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Sample records for adaptive sliding observer

  1. Robust observer-based adaptive fuzzy sliding mode controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oveisi, Atta; Nestorović, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a new observer-based adaptive fuzzy integral sliding mode controller is proposed based on the Lyapunov stability theorem. The plant is subjected to a square-integrable disturbance and is assumed to have mismatch uncertainties both in state- and input-matrices. Based on the classical sliding mode controller, the equivalent control effort is obtained to satisfy the sufficient requirement of sliding mode controller and then the control law is modified to guarantee the reachability of the system trajectory to the sliding manifold. In order to relax the norm-bounded constrains on the control law and solve the chattering problem of sliding mode controller, a fuzzy logic inference mechanism is combined with the controller. An adaptive law is then introduced to tune the parameters of the fuzzy system on-line. Finally, for evaluating the controller and the robust performance of the closed-loop system, the proposed regulator is implemented on a real-time mechanical vibrating system.

  2. Sliding mode disturbance observer-based adaptive integral backstepping control of a piezoelectric nano-manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yangming; Yan, Peng

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates a systematic modeling and control methodology for a multi-axis PZT (piezoelectric transducer) actuated servo stage supporting nano-manipulations. A sliding mode disturbance observer-based adaptive integral backstepping control method with an estimated inverse model compensation scheme is proposed to achieve ultra high precision tracking in the presence of the hysteresis nonlinearities, model uncertainties, and external disturbances. By introducing a time rate of the input signal, an enhanced rate-dependent Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is developed to describe the hysteresis behaviors, and its inverse is also constructed to mitigate their adverse effects. In particular, the corresponding inverse compensation error is analyzed and its boundedness is proven. Subsequently, the sliding mode disturbance observer-based adaptive integral backstepping controller is designed to guarantee the convergence of the tracking error, where the sliding mode disturbance observer can track the total disturbances in a finite time, while the integral action is incorporated into the adaptive backstepping design to improve the steady-state control accuracy. Finally, real time implementations of the proposed algorithm are applied on the PZT actuated servo system, where excellent tracking performance with tracking precision error around 6‰ for circular contour tracking is achieved in the experimental results.

  3. Extended observer based on adaptive second order sliding mode control for a fixed wing UAV.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Herman; Salas-Peña, Oscar S; León-Morales, Jesús de

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the design of attitude and airspeed controllers for a fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicle. An adaptive second order sliding mode control is proposed for improving performance under different operating conditions and is robust in presence of external disturbances. Moreover, this control does not require the knowledge of disturbance bounds and avoids overestimation of the control gains. Furthermore, in order to implement this controller, an extended observer is designed to estimate unmeasurable states as well as external disturbances. Additionally, sufficient conditions are given to guarantee the closed-loop stability of the observer based control. Finally, using a full 6 degree of freedom model, simulation results are obtained where the performance of the proposed method is compared against active disturbance rejection based on sliding mode control.

  4. Distributed Adaptive Fuzzy Control for Nonlinear Multiagent Systems Via Sliding Mode Observers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qikun; Shi, Peng; Shi, Yan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the problem of distributed adaptive fuzzy control is investigated for high-order uncertain nonlinear multiagent systems on directed graph with a fixed topology. It is assumed that only the outputs of each follower and its neighbors are available in the design of its distributed controllers. Equivalent output injection sliding mode observers are proposed for each follower to estimate the states of itself and its neighbors, and an observer-based distributed adaptive controller is designed for each follower to guarantee that it asymptotically synchronizes to a leader with tracking errors being semi-globally uniform ultimate bounded, in which fuzzy logic systems are utilized to approximate unknown functions. Based on algebraic graph theory and Lyapunov function approach, using Filippov-framework, the closed-loop system stability analysis is conducted. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and potential of the developed design techniques.

  5. A novel approach for state of charge estimation based on adaptive switching gain sliding mode observer in electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaopeng; Shen, Weixiang; Cao, Zhenwei; Kapoor, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach for battery state of charge (SOC) estimation in electric vehicles (EVs) based on an adaptive switching gain sliding mode observer (ASGSMO) has been presented. To design the ASGSMO for the SOC estimation, the state equations based on a battery equivalent circuit model (BECM) are derived to represent dynamic behaviours of a battery. Comparing with a conventional sliding mode observer, the ASGSMO has a capability of minimising chattering levels in the SOC estimation by using the self-adjusted switching gain while maintaining the characteristics of being able to compensate modelling errors caused by the parameter variations of the BECM. Lyapunov stability theory is adopted to prove the error convergence of the ASGSMO for the SOC estimation. The lithium-polymer battery (LiPB) is utilised to conduct experiments for determining the parameters of the BECM and verifying the effectiveness of the proposed ASGSMO in various discharge current profiles including EV driving conditions in both city and suburban.

  6. Interpolating sliding mode observer for a ball and beam system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luai Hammadih, Mohammad; Hosani, Khalifa Al; Boiko, Igor

    2016-09-01

    A principle of interpolating sliding mode observer is introduced in this paper. The observer incorporates multiple linear observers through interpolation of multiple estimates, which is treated as a type of adaptation. The principle is then applied to the ball and beam system for observation of the slope of the beam from the measurement of the ball position. The linearised model of the ball and beam system using multiple linearisation points is developed. The observer dynamics implemented in Matlab/Simulink Real Time Workshop environment. Experiments conducted on the ball and beam experimental setup demonstrate excellent performance of the designed novel interpolating (adaptive) observer.

  7. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  8. Adaptive sliding mode control for a class of chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Zalam, B.

    2015-03-01

    Chaos control here means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, an Adaptive Sliding Mode Controller (ASMC) is presented based on Lyapunov stability theory. The well known Chua's circuit is chosen to be our case study in this paper. The study shows the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive sliding mode controller.

  9. Adaptive sliding mode control for a class of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Zalam, B.

    2015-03-30

    Chaos control here means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, an Adaptive Sliding Mode Controller (ASMC) is presented based on Lyapunov stability theory. The well known Chua's circuit is chosen to be our case study in this paper. The study shows the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive sliding mode controller.

  10. Adaptive robust controller based on integral sliding mode concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleb, M.; Plestan, F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes, for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems, an adaptive controller based on adaptive second-order sliding mode control and integral sliding mode control concepts. The adaptation strategy solves the problem of gain tuning and has the advantage of chattering reduction. Moreover, limited information about perturbation and uncertainties has to be known. The control is composed of two parts: an adaptive one whose objective is to reject the perturbation and system uncertainties, whereas the second one is chosen such as the nominal part of the system is stabilised in zero. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, an application on an academic example is shown with simulation results.

  11. An adaptive sliding mode control technology for weld seam tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Hu, Youmin; Wu, Bo; Zhou, Kaibo; Ge, Mingfeng

    2015-03-01

    A novel adaptive sliding mode control algorithm is derived to deal with seam tracking control problem of welding robotic manipulator, during the process of large-scale structure component welding. The proposed algorithm does not require the precise dynamic model, and is more practical. Its robustness is verified by the Lyapunov stability theory. The analytical results show that the proposed algorithm enables better high-precision tracking performance with chattering-free than traditional sliding mode control algorithm under various disturbances.

  12. Nanolubrication of sliding components in adaptive optics used in microprojectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Lee, Hyungoo; Chaparala, Satish C.; Bhatia, Vikram

    2010-10-01

    Integrated microprojectors are being developed to project a large image on any surface chosen by the users. For a laser-based microprojector, a piezo-electric based adaptive optics unit is adopted in the green laser architecture. The operation of this unit depends on stick-slip motion between the sliding components. Nanolubrication of adaptive optics sliding components is needed to reduce wear and for smooth operation. In this study, a methodology to measure lubricant thickness distribution with a nanoscale resolution is developed. Friction, adhesion, and wear mechanisms of lubricant on the sliding components are studied. Effect of actual composite components, scan direction, scale effect, temperature, and humidity to correlate AFM data with the microscale device performance is studied.

  13. Adaptive backstepping slide mode control of pneumatic position servo system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haipeng; Fan, Juntao

    2016-09-01

    With the price decreasing of the pneumatic proportional valve and the high performance micro controller, the simple structure and high tracking performance pneumatic servo system demonstrates more application potential in many fields. However, most existing control methods with high tracking performance need to know the model information and to use pressure sensor. This limits the application of the pneumatic servo system. An adaptive backstepping slide mode control method is proposed for pneumatic position servo system. The proposed method designs adaptive slide mode controller using backstepping design technique. The controller parameter adaptive law is derived from Lyapunov analysis to guarantee the stability of the system. A theorem is testified to show that the state of closed-loop system is uniformly bounded, and the closed-loop system is stable. The advantages of the proposed method include that system dynamic model parameters are not required for the controller design, uncertain parameters bounds are not need, and the bulk and expensive pressure sensor is not needed as well. Experimental results show that the designed controller can achieve better tracking performance, as compared with some existing methods.

  14. A novel adaptive sliding mode control with application to MEMS gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Fei, Juntao; Batur, Celal

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive sliding mode controller for MEMS gyroscope; an adaptive tracking controller with a proportional and integral sliding surface is proposed. The adaptive sliding mode control algorithm can estimate the angular velocity and the damping and stiffness coefficients in real time. A proportional and integral sliding surface, instead of a conventional sliding surface is adopted. An adaptive sliding mode controller that incorporates both matched and unmatched uncertainties and disturbances is derived and the stability of the closed-loop system is established. The numerical simulation is presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. It is shown that the proposed adaptive sliding mode control scheme offers several advantages such as the consistent estimation of gyroscope parameters including angular velocity and large robustness to parameter variations and external disturbances.

  15. Adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode control for microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incremona, Gian Paolo; Cucuzzella, Michele; Ferrara, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the design of adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode (ASSOSM) control laws for grid-connected microgrids. Due to the presence of the inverter, of unpredicted load changes, of switching among different renewable energy sources, and of electrical parameters variations, the microgrid model is usually affected by uncertain terms which are bounded, but with unknown upper bounds. To theoretically frame the control problem, the class of second-order systems in Brunovsky canonical form, characterised by the presence of matched uncertain terms with unknown bounds, is first considered. Four adaptive strategies are designed, analysed and compared to select the most effective ones to be applied to the microgrid case study. In the first two strategies, the control amplitude is continuously adjusted, so as to arrive at dominating the effect of the uncertainty on the controlled system. When a suitable control amplitude is attained, the origin of the state space of the auxiliary system becomes attractive. In the other two strategies, a suitable blend between two components, one mainly working during the reaching phase, the other being the predominant one in a vicinity of the sliding manifold, is generated, so as to reduce the control amplitude in steady state. The microgrid system in a grid-connected operation mode, controlled via the selected ASSOSM control strategies, exhibits appreciable stability properties, as proved theoretically and shown in simulation.

  16. Darkfield adapter for whole slide imaging: adapting a darkfield internal reflection illumination system to extend WSI applications.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yoshihiro; Higgins, Christopher; Yamamoto, Yasuhito; Nyhus, Julie; Bernard, Amy; Dong, Hong-Wei; Karten, Harvey J; Schilling, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for whole slide darkfield imaging. Whole Slide Imaging (WSI), also sometimes called virtual slide or virtual microscopy technology, produces images that simultaneously provide high resolution and a wide field of observation that can encompass the entire section, extending far beyond any single field of view. For example, a brain slice can be imaged so that both overall morphology and individual neuronal detail can be seen. We extended the capabilities of traditional whole slide systems and developed a prototype system for darkfield internal reflection illumination (DIRI). Our darkfield system uses an ultra-thin light-emitting diode (LED) light source to illuminate slide specimens from the edge of the slide. We used a new type of side illumination, a variation on the internal reflection method, to illuminate the specimen and create a darkfield image. This system has four main advantages over traditional darkfield: (1) no oil condenser is required for high resolution imaging (2) there is less scatter from dust and dirt on the slide specimen (3) there is less halo, providing a more natural darkfield contrast image, and (4) the motorized system produces darkfield, brightfield and fluorescence images. The WSI method sometimes allows us to image using fewer stains. For instance, diaminobenzidine (DAB) and fluorescent staining are helpful tools for observing protein localization and volume in tissues. However, these methods usually require counter-staining in order to visualize tissue structure, limiting the accuracy of localization of labeled cells within the complex multiple regions of typical neurohistological preparations. Darkfield imaging works on the basis of light scattering from refractive index mismatches in the sample. It is a label-free method of producing contrast in a sample. We propose that adapting darkfield imaging to WSI is very useful, particularly when researchers require additional structural information without the use of

  17. Anomaly Detection in Test Equipment via Sliding Mode Observers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.; Drakunov, Sergey V.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear observers were originally developed based on the ideas of variable structure control, and for the purpose of detecting disturbances in complex systems. In this anomaly detection application, these observers were designed for estimating the distributed state of fluid flow in a pipe described by a class of advection equations. The observer algorithm uses collected data in a piping system to estimate the distributed system state (pressure and velocity along a pipe containing liquid gas propellant flow) using only boundary measurements. These estimates are then used to further estimate and localize possible anomalies such as leaks or foreign objects, and instrumentation metering problems such as incorrect flow meter orifice plate size. The observer algorithm has the following parts: a mathematical model of the fluid flow, observer control algorithm, and an anomaly identification algorithm. The main functional operation of the algorithm is in creating the sliding mode in the observer system implemented as software. Once the sliding mode starts in the system, the equivalent value of the discontinuous function in sliding mode can be obtained by filtering out the high-frequency chattering component. In control theory, "observers" are dynamic algorithms for the online estimation of the current state of a dynamic system by measurements of an output of the system. Classical linear observers can provide optimal estimates of a system state in case of uncertainty modeled by white noise. For nonlinear cases, the theory of nonlinear observers has been developed and its success is mainly due to the sliding mode approach. Using the mathematical theory of variable structure systems with sliding modes, the observer algorithm is designed in such a way that it steers the output of the model to the output of the system obtained via a variety of sensors, in spite of possible mismatches between the assumed model and actual system. The unique properties of sliding mode control

  18. Adaptive Actor-Critic Design-Based Integral Sliding-Mode Control for Partially Unknown Nonlinear Systems With Input Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Fan, Quan-Yong; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of integral sliding-mode control for a class of nonlinear systems with input disturbances and unknown nonlinear terms through the adaptive actor-critic (AC) control method. The main objective is to design a sliding-mode control methodology based on the adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) method, so that the closed-loop system with time-varying disturbances is stable and the nearly optimal performance of the sliding-mode dynamics can be guaranteed. In the first step, a neural network (NN)-based observer and a disturbance observer are designed to approximate the unknown nonlinear terms and estimate the input disturbances, respectively. Based on the NN approximations and disturbance estimations, the discontinuous part of the sliding-mode control is constructed to eliminate the effect of the disturbances and attain the expected equivalent sliding-mode dynamics. Then, the ADP method with AC structure is presented to learn the optimal control for the sliding-mode dynamics online. Reconstructed tuning laws are developed to guarantee the stability of the sliding-mode dynamics and the convergence of the weights of critic and actor NNs. Finally, the simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Tensor Product Model Transformation Based Adaptive Integral-Sliding Mode Controller: Equivalent Control Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoliang; Li, Hongxing

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes new methodologies for the design of adaptive integral-sliding mode control. A tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode control law with respect to uncertainties and perturbations is studied, while upper bounds on the perturbations and uncertainties are assumed to be unknown. The advantage of proposed controllers consists in having a dynamical adaptive control gain to establish a sliding mode right at the beginning of the process. Gain dynamics ensure a reasonable adaptive gain with respect to the uncertainties. Finally, efficacy of the proposed controller is verified by simulations on an uncertain nonlinear system model. PMID:24453897

  20. Tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode controller: equivalent control method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoliang; Sun, Kaibiao; Li, Hongxing

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes new methodologies for the design of adaptive integral-sliding mode control. A tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode control law with respect to uncertainties and perturbations is studied, while upper bounds on the perturbations and uncertainties are assumed to be unknown. The advantage of proposed controllers consists in having a dynamical adaptive control gain to establish a sliding mode right at the beginning of the process. Gain dynamics ensure a reasonable adaptive gain with respect to the uncertainties. Finally, efficacy of the proposed controller is verified by simulations on an uncertain nonlinear system model.

  1. Adaptive uniform finite-/fixed-time convergent second-order sliding-mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basin, Michael; Bharath Panathula, Chandrasekhara; Shtessel, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an adaptive gain algorithm for second-order sliding-mode control (2-SMC), specifically a super-twisting (STW)-like controller, with uniform finite/fixed convergence time, that is robust to perturbations with unknown bounds. It is shown that a second-order sliding mode is established as exact finite-time convergence to the origin if the adaptive gain does not have the ability to get reduced and converge to a small vicinity of the origin if the adaptation algorithm does not overestimate the control gain. The estimate of fixed convergence time of the studied adaptive STW-like controller is derived based on the Lyapunov analysis. The efficacy of the proposed adaptive algorithm is illustrated in a tutorial example, where the adaptive STW-like controller with uniform finite/fixed convergence time is compared to the adaptive STW controller with non-uniform finite convergence time.

  2. Adaptive sliding mode control of tethered satellite deployment with input limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Sun, Guanghui

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive sliding mode tension control method for the deployment of tethered satellite, where the input tension limitation is taken into account. The underactuated governing equations of the tethered satellites system are firstly derived based on Lagrangian mechanics theory. Considering the fact that the tether can only resist axial stretching, the tension input is modelled as input limitation. New adaptive sliding mode laws are addressed to guarantee the stability of the tethered satellite deployment with input disturbance, meanwhile to eliminate the effect of the limitation features of the tension input. Compared with the classic control strategy, the newly proposed adaptive sliding mode control law can deploy the satellite with smaller overshoot of the in-plane angle and implement the tension control reasonably and effectively in engineering practice. The numerical results validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  3. Bifurcations, chaos and adaptive backstepping sliding mode control of a power system with excitation limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Fuhong; Wang, Yaoda; Peng, Guangya; Wang, Enrong; Auth, Jane A.

    2016-08-01

    The bifurcation and Lyapunov exponent for a single-machine-infinite bus system with excitation model are carried out by varying the mechanical power, generator damping factor and the exciter gain, from which periodic motions, chaos and the divergence of system are observed respectively. From given parameters and different initial conditions, the coexisting motions are developed in power system. The dynamic behaviors in power system may switch freely between the coexisting motions, which will bring huge security menace to protection operation. Especially, the angle divergences due to the break of stable chaotic oscillation are found which causes the instability of power system. Finally, a new adaptive backstepping sliding mode controller is designed which aims to eliminate the angle divergences and make the power system run in stable orbits. Numerical simulations are illustrated to verify the effectivity of the proposed method.

  4. Adaptive braking by Ase1 prevents overlapping microtubules from sliding completely apart.

    PubMed

    Braun, Marcus; Lansky, Zdenek; Fink, Gero; Ruhnow, Felix; Diez, Stefan; Janson, Marcel E

    2011-09-04

    Short regions of overlap between ends of antiparallel microtubules are central elements within bipolar microtubule arrays. Although their formation requires motors, recent in vitro studies demonstrated that stable overlaps cannot be generated by molecular motors alone. Motors either slide microtubules along each other until complete separation or, in the presence of opposing motors, generate oscillatory movements. Here, we show that Ase1, a member of the conserved MAP65/PRC1 family of microtubule-bundling proteins, enables the formation of stable antiparallel overlaps through adaptive braking of Kinesin-14-driven microtubule-microtubule sliding. As overlapping microtubules start to slide apart, Ase1 molecules become compacted in the shrinking overlap and the sliding velocity gradually decreases in a dose-dependent manner. Compaction is driven by moving microtubule ends that act as barriers to Ase1 diffusion. Quantitative modelling showed that the molecular off-rate of Ase1 is sufficiently low to enable persistent overlap stabilization over tens of minutes. The finding of adaptive braking demonstrates that sliding can be slowed down locally to stabilize overlaps at the centre of bipolar arrays, whereas sliding proceeds elsewhere to enable network self-organization.

  5. An Adaptive Supervisory Sliding Fuzzy Cerebellar Model Articulation Controller for Sensorless Vector-Controlled Induction Motor Drive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shun-Yuan; Tseng, Chwan-Lu; Lin, Shou-Chuang; Chiu, Chun-Jung; Chou, Jen-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of an adaptive supervisory sliding fuzzy cerebellar model articulation controller (FCMAC) in the speed sensorless vector control of an induction motor (IM) drive system. The proposed adaptive supervisory sliding FCMAC comprised a supervisory controller, integral sliding surface, and an adaptive FCMAC. The integral sliding surface was employed to eliminate steady-state errors and enhance the responsiveness of the system. The adaptive FCMAC incorporated an FCMAC with a compensating controller to perform a desired control action. The proposed controller was derived using the Lyapunov approach, which guarantees learning-error convergence. The implementation of three intelligent control schemes—the adaptive supervisory sliding FCMAC, adaptive sliding FCMAC, and adaptive sliding CMAC—were experimentally investigated under various conditions in a realistic sensorless vector-controlled IM drive system. The root mean square error (RMSE) was used as a performance index to evaluate the experimental results of each control scheme. The analysis results indicated that the proposed adaptive supervisory sliding FCMAC substantially improved the system performance compared with the other control schemes. PMID:25815450

  6. Adaptive sliding mode control design for a class of uncertain singularly perturbed nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuo-Jung

    2014-02-01

    This paper addresses adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) of uncertain singularly perturbed nonlinear (USPN) systems with guaranteed H∞ control performance. First, we use Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model to construct the USPN systems. Then, the sliding surface can be determined via linear matrix inequality (LMI) design procedure. Second, we propose neural network (NN)-based ASMC design to stabilise the USPN systems. The proposed methods are based on the Lyapunov stability theorem. The adaptive law can reduce the effect of uncertainty. The proposed NN-based ASMC will stabilise the USPN systems for all ɛ ∈ (0, ɛ*]. Simulation result reveals that the proposed NN-based ASMC scheme has better convergence time compared with the fuzzy control scheme (Li, T.-H.S., & Lin, K.J. (2004). Stabilization of singularly perturbed fuzzy systems, IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy Systems, 12, 579-595.).

  7. Disturbance observer based sliding mode control of active suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Vaijayanti S.; Mohan, B.; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel scheme to reduce the acceleration of the sprung mass, used in combination with sliding mode control, is proposed. The proposed scheme estimates the effects of the uncertain, nonlinear spring and damper, load variation and the unknown road disturbance. The controller needs the states of sprung mass only, obviating the need to measure the states of the unsprung mass. The ultimate boundedness of the overall suspension system is proved. The efficacy of the method is verified through simulations for three different types of road profiles and load variation and the scheme is validated on an experimental setup. The results are compared with passive suspension system.

  8. An Application of Chaotic Chua's System for Secure Chaotic Communication Based on Sliding Mode observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemih, K.; Halimi, M.; Ghanes, M.; Zhang, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we study the design and implementation of analog secure communication systems via synchronized chaotic Chua's circuit with sliding mode observer. For this, we adopt an approach based on an inclusion of the message in the transmitter and in the receiver; we use a sliding mode observer with un-known input in order to recover the information. Finally, an analog electronic circuit with Multisim software is designed to physically realize the complete system (transmitter-receiver).

  9. Reducing False Negative Reads in RFID Data Streams Using an Adaptive Sliding-Window Approach

    PubMed Central

    Massawe, Libe Valentine; Kinyua, Johnson D. M.; Vermaak, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Unreliability of the data streams generated by RFID readers is among the primary factors which limit the widespread adoption of the RFID technology. RFID data cleaning is, therefore, an essential task in the RFID middleware systems in order to reduce reading errors, and to allow these data streams to be used to make a correct interpretation and analysis of the physical world they are representing. In this paper we propose an adaptive sliding-window based approach called WSTD which is capable of efficiently coping with both environmental variation and tag dynamics. Our experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach. PMID:22666027

  10. Adaptive localization of focus point regions via random patch probabilistic density from whole-slide, Ki-67-stained brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Yazan M; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Norul Huda; MdZin, Reena Rahayu; Omar, Khairuddin

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of whole-slide tissue for digital pathology images has been clinically approved to provide a second opinion to pathologists. Localization of focus points from Ki-67-stained histopathology whole-slide tissue microscopic images is considered the first step in the process of proliferation rate estimation. Pathologists use eye pooling or eagle-view techniques to localize the highly stained cell-concentrated regions from the whole slide under microscope, which is called focus-point regions. This procedure leads to a high variety of interpersonal observations and time consuming, tedious work and causes inaccurate findings. The localization of focus-point regions can be addressed as a clustering problem. This paper aims to automate the localization of focus-point regions from whole-slide images using the random patch probabilistic density method. Unlike other clustering methods, random patch probabilistic density method can adaptively localize focus-point regions without predetermining the number of clusters. The proposed method was compared with the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering methods. Our proposed method achieves a good performance, when the results were evaluated by three expert pathologists. The proposed method achieves an average false-positive rate of 0.84% for the focus-point region localization error. Moreover, regarding RPPD used to localize tissue from whole-slide images, 228 whole-slide images have been tested; 97.3% localization accuracy was achieved.

  11. Adaptive Localization of Focus Point Regions via Random Patch Probabilistic Density from Whole-Slide, Ki-67-Stained Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Yazan M.; MdZin, Reena Rahayu

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of whole-slide tissue for digital pathology images has been clinically approved to provide a second opinion to pathologists. Localization of focus points from Ki-67-stained histopathology whole-slide tissue microscopic images is considered the first step in the process of proliferation rate estimation. Pathologists use eye pooling or eagle-view techniques to localize the highly stained cell-concentrated regions from the whole slide under microscope, which is called focus-point regions. This procedure leads to a high variety of interpersonal observations and time consuming, tedious work and causes inaccurate findings. The localization of focus-point regions can be addressed as a clustering problem. This paper aims to automate the localization of focus-point regions from whole-slide images using the random patch probabilistic density method. Unlike other clustering methods, random patch probabilistic density method can adaptively localize focus-point regions without predetermining the number of clusters. The proposed method was compared with the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering methods. Our proposed method achieves a good performance, when the results were evaluated by three expert pathologists. The proposed method achieves an average false-positive rate of 0.84% for the focus-point region localization error. Moreover, regarding RPPD used to localize tissue from whole-slide images, 228 whole-slide images have been tested; 97.3% localization accuracy was achieved. PMID:25793010

  12. Robust dynamic sliding-mode control using adaptive RENN for magnetic levitation system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Faa-Jeng; Chen, Syuan-Yi; Shyu, Kuo-Kai

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, a robust dynamic sliding mode control system (RDSMC) using a recurrent Elman neural network (RENN) is proposed to control the position of a levitated object of a magnetic levitation system considering the uncertainties. First, a dynamic model of the magnetic levitation system is derived. Then, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-type sliding-mode control system (SMC) is adopted for tracking of the reference trajectories. Moreover, a new PID-type dynamic sliding-mode control system (DSMC) is proposed to reduce the chattering phenomenon. However, due to the hardware being limited and the uncertainty bound being unknown of the switching function for the DSMC, an RDSMC is proposed to improve the control performance and further increase the robustness of the magnetic levitation system. In the RDSMC, an RENN estimator is used to estimate an unknown nonlinear function of lumped uncertainty online and replace the switching function in the hitting control of the DSMC directly. The adaptive learning algorithms that trained the parameters of the RENN online are derived using Lyapunov stability theorem. Furthermore, a robust compensator is proposed to confront the uncertainties including approximation error, optimal parameter vectors, and higher order terms in Taylor series. Finally, some experimental results of tracking the various periodic trajectories demonstrate the validity of the proposed RDSMC for practical applications.

  13. Unknown Input and Sensor Fault Estimation Using Sliding-Mode Observers

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Hui, Stefen; Zak, Stanislaw

    2011-06-29

    Sliding-mode observers are used to construct unknown input estimators. Then, these unknown input estimators are combined with sensor fault estimation schemes into one architecture that employs two sliding-mode observers for simultaneously estimating the plant’s actuator faults (part of the unknown input) and detecting sensor faults. Closed form expressions are presented for the estimates of unknown inputs and sensor faults. A benchmark example of a controlled inverted pendulum system from the literature is utilized in the simulation study. The study shows that the observers analyzed in this paper generate good estimates of the unknown input and sensor faults signals in noisy environments for nonlinear plants.

  14. Robust adaptive synchronization of Rossler and Chen chaotic systems via slide technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Shi, Songjiao

    2003-05-01

    This Letter considers the robust adaptive synchronization problem of Rossler and Chen chaotic systems with different time-varying unknown parameters. When system's unknown parameters vary in bound intervals and the bounds of intervals are unknown, a robust adaptive controller is designed. In order to increase the robustness of the closed loop systems, the key idea is that a sliding mode type of controller is employed. Besides, instead of the estimate values of systems' unknown parameters being taken as updating object, a new updating object is introduced in constructing controller. The proposed controller can make the states of Rossler and Chen chaotic systems globally asymptotically robustly synchronized. Simulation results are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Speed tracking and synchronization of multiple motors using ring coupling control and adaptive sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Li, Le-Bao; Sun, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Sheng-Zhou; Yang, Qing-Quan

    2015-09-01

    A new control approach for speed tracking and synchronization of multiple motors is developed, by incorporating an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) technique into a ring coupling synchronization control structure. This control approach can stabilize speed tracking of each motor and synchronize its motion with other motors' motion so that speed tracking errors and synchronization errors converge to zero. Moreover, an adaptive law is exploited to estimate the unknown bound of uncertainty, which is obtained in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem to minimize the control effort and attenuate chattering. Performance comparisons with parallel control, relative coupling control and conventional PI control are investigated on a four-motor synchronization control system. Extensive simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  16. An adaptive sliding mode backstepping control for the mobile manipulator with nonholonomic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Naijian; Song, Fangzhen; Li, Guoping; Sun, Xuan; Ai, Changsheng

    2013-10-01

    To solve disturbances, nonlinearity, nonholonomic constraints and dynamic coupling between the platform and its mounted robot manipulator, an adaptive sliding mode controller based on the backstepping method applied to the robust trajectory tracking of the wheeled mobile manipulator is described in this article. The control algorithm rests on adopting the backstepping method to improve the global ultimate asymptotic stability and applying the sliding mode control to obtain high response and invariability to uncertainties. According to the Lyapunov stability criterion, the wheeled mobile manipulator is divided into several stabilizing subsystems, and an adaptive law is designed to estimate the general nondeterminacy, which make the controller be capable to drive the trajectory tracking error of the mobile manipulator to converge to zero even in the presence of perturbations and mathematical model errors. We compare our controller with the robust neural network based algorithm in nonholonomic constraints and uncertainties, and simulation results prove the effectivity and feasibility of the proposed method in the trajectory tracking of the wheeled mobile manipulator.

  17. Adaptive stochastic resonance method for impact signal detection based on sliding window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jimeng; Chen, Xuefeng; He, Zhengjia

    2013-04-01

    Aiming at solving the existing sharp problems in impact signal detection by using stochastic resonance (SR) in the fault diagnosis of rotating machinery, such as the measurement index selection of SR and the detection of impact signal with different impact amplitudes, the present study proposes an adaptive SR method for impact signal detection based on sliding window by analyzing the SR characteristics of impact signal. This method can not only achieve the optimal selection of system parameters by means of weighted kurtosis index constructed through using kurtosis index and correlation coefficient, but also achieve the detection of weak impact signal through the algorithm of data segmentation based on sliding window, even though the differences between different impact amplitudes are great. The algorithm flow of adaptive SR method is given and effectiveness of the method has been verified by the contrastive results between the proposed method and the traditional SR method of simulation experiments. Finally, the proposed method has been applied to a gearbox fault diagnosis in a hot strip finishing mill in which two local faults located on the pinion are obtained successfully. Therefore, it can be concluded that the proposed method is of great practical value in engineering.

  18. Cytopathology whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials: A software pilot

    PubMed Central

    Van Es, Simone L.; Pryor, Wendy M.; Belinson, Zack; Salisbury, Elizabeth L.; Velan, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The constant growth in the body of knowledge in medicine requires pathologists and pathology trainees to engage in continuing education. Providing them with equitable access to efficient and effective forms of education in pathology (especially in remote and rural settings) is important, but challenging. Methods: We developed three pilot cytopathology virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials (VMATs) to explore a novel adaptive E-learning platform (AeLP) which can incorporate whole slide images for pathology education. We collected user feedback to further develop this educational material and to subsequently deploy randomized trials in both pathology specialist trainee and also medical student cohorts. Cytopathology whole slide images were first acquired then novel VMATs teaching cytopathology were created using the AeLP, an intelligent tutoring system developed by Smart Sparrow. The pilot was run for Australian pathologists and trainees through the education section of Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia website over a period of 9 months. Feedback on the usability, impact on learning and any technical issues was obtained using 5-point Likert scale items and open-ended feedback in online questionnaires. Results: A total of 181 pathologists and pathology trainees anonymously attempted the three adaptive tutorials, a smaller proportion of whom went on to provide feedback at the end of each tutorial. VMATs were perceived as effective and efficient E-learning tools for pathology education. User feedback was positive. There were no significant technical issues. Conclusion: During this pilot, the user feedback on the educational content and interface and the lack of technical issues were helpful. Large scale trials of similar online cytopathology adaptive tutorials were planned for the future. PMID:26605119

  19. Disturbance observer based sliding mode control of nonlinear mismatched uncertain systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginoya, Divyesh; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new design of multiple-surface sliding mode control for a class of nonlinear uncertain systems with mismatched uncertainties and disturbances. In the method of multiple-surface sliding mode control, it is required to compensate for the derivatives of the virtual inputs which gives rise to the so-called problem of 'explosion of terms'. In this paper a disturbance observer based multiple-surface sliding mode control is proposed to estimate the uncertainties as well as the derivative of the virtual inputs to overcome this problem. The practical stability of the overall system is proved. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy is illustrated via simulation of a benchmark problem and comparison with other control strategies. The proposed scheme is validated by implementing it on a serial flexible joint manipulator in the laboratory.

  20. Efficiency and adaptability of the benthic methane filter at Quepos Slide cold seeps, offshore Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeb, P.; Krause, S.; Linke, P.; Hensen, C.; Dale, A. W.; Nuzzo, M.; Treude, T.

    2014-11-01

    Large amounts of methane are delivered by fluids through the erosive forearc of the convergent margin offshore Costa Rica and lead to the formation of cold seeps at the sediment surface. Besides mud extrusion, numerous cold seeps are created by landslides induced by seamount subduction or fluid migration along major faults. Most of the dissolved methane reaching the seafloor at cold seeps is oxidized within the benthic microbial methane filter by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Measurements of AOM and sulfate reduction as well as numerical modeling of porewater profiles revealed a highly active and efficient benthic methane filter at Quepos Slide site; a landslide on the continental slope between the Nicoya and Osa Peninsula. Integrated areal rates of AOM ranged from 12.9 ± 6.0 to 45.2 ± 11.5 mmol m-2 d-1, with only 1 to 2.5% of the upward methane flux being released into the water column. Additionally, two parallel sediment cores from Quepos Slide were used for in vitro experiments in a recently developed Sediment-F low-Through (SLOT) system to simulate an increased fluid and methane flux from the bottom of the sediment core. The benthic methane filter revealed a high adaptability whereby the methane oxidation efficiency responded to the increased fluid flow within 150-170 days. To our knowledge, this study provides the first estimation of the natural biogeochemical response of seep sediments to changes in fluid flow.

  1. FAT-based adaptive sliding control for flexible arms: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haung, An-Chyau; Liao, Kuo-Kai

    2006-11-01

    An adaptive sliding controller is proposed in this paper for flexible arms containing time-varying uncertainties with unknown bounds based on function approximation technique (FAT). The uncertainties are firstly represented by finite linear combinations of orthonormal basis with some unknown constant weighting vectors. Output error dynamics can thus be derived as a stable first-order filter driven by parameter error vectors. Appropriate update laws for the weighting vectors are selected using the Lyapunov method so that asymptotic convergence of the output error can be proved as long as a sufficient number of basis functions are used. Effects of the approximation error on system performance are also investigated in this paper. Both computer simulation and experimental results confirm the feasibility of the proposed control strategy.

  2. Stabilization and synchronization for a mechanical system via adaptive sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhankui; Sun, Kaibiao; Ling, Shuai

    2017-03-06

    In this paper, we investigate the synchronization problem of chaotic centrifugal flywheel governor with parameters uncertainty and lumped disturbances. A slave centrifugal flywheel governor system is considered as an underactuated following-system which a control input is designed to follow a master centrifugal flywheel governor system. To tackle lumped disturbances and uncertainty parameters, a novel synchronization control law is developed by employing sliding mode control strategy and Nussbaum gain technique. Adaptation updating algorithms are derived in the sense of Lyapunov stability analysis such that the lumped disturbances can be suppressed and the adverse effect caused by uncertainty parameters can be compensated. In addition, the synchronization tracking-errors are proven to converge to a small neighborhood of the origin. Finally, simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  3. Decentralized adaptive sliding mode control for beam synchronization of tethered InSAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinxiu; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Baolin

    2016-10-01

    Beam synchronization problem of tethered interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is addressed in this paper. Two antennas of the system are carried by separate satellites connected through a tether to obtain a preferable baseline. A Total Zero Doppler Steering (TZDS) is implemented to mother-satellite to cancel the residual Doppler. Subsequently attitude reference trajectories for the two satellites are generated to achieve the beam synchronization and TZDS. Thereafter, a decentralized adaptive sliding mode control law is proposed to track these reference trajectories in the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances. Finally, the stability of closed-loop system is proved by the corollary of Barbalat's Lemma. Simulation results show the proposed control law is effective to achieve beam synchronization of the system.

  4. Motion of a DNA Sliding Clamp Observed by Single Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, Ted A.; Kwon, Youngeun; Johnson, Aaron; Hollars, Christopher W.; O'Donnell, Mike; Camarero, Julio A.; Barsky, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and slide along DNA to allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. These clamps contain many positively charged residues that could curtail the sliding due to attractive interactions with the negatively charged DNA. By single-molecule spectroscopy we have observed a fluorescently labeled sliding clamp (polymerase III β subunit or β clamp) loaded onto freely diffusing, single-stranded M13 circular DNA annealed with fluorescently labeled DNA oligomers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for the β clamp diffusing along DNA is on the order of 10–14 m2/s, at least 3 orders of magnitude less than that for diffusion through water alone. We also find evidence that the β clamp remains at the 3′ end in the presence of Escherichia coli single-stranded-binding protein. These results may imply that the clamp not only acts to hold the polymerase on the DNA but also prevents excessive drifting along the DNA. PMID:18556658

  5. Mean deviation coupling synchronous control for multiple motors via second-order adaptive sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Li, Lebao; Sun, Lingling; Zhang, Shengzhou

    2016-05-01

    A new mean deviation coupling synchronization control strategy is developed for multiple motor control systems, which can guarantee the synchronization performance of multiple motor control systems and reduce complexity of the control structure with the increasing number of motors. The mean deviation coupling synchronization control architecture combining second-order adaptive sliding mode control (SOASMC) approach is proposed, which can improve synchronization control precision of multiple motor control systems and make speed tracking errors, mean speed errors of each motor and speed synchronization errors converge to zero rapidly. The proposed control scheme is robustness to parameter variations and random external disturbances and can alleviate the chattering phenomena. Moreover, an adaptive law is employed to estimate the unknown bound of uncertainty, which is obtained in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem to minimize the control effort. Performance comparisons with master-slave control, relative coupling control, ring coupling control, conventional PI control and SMC are investigated on a four-motor synchronization control system. Extensive comparative results are given to shown the good performance of the proposed control scheme.

  6. 6-DOF robust adaptive terminal sliding mode control for spacecraft formation flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianying; Sun, Zhaowei

    2012-04-01

    This paper addresses the tracking control problem of the leader-follower spacecraft formation, by which we mean that the relative motion between the leader and the follower is required to track a desired time-varying trajectory given in advance. Using dual number, the six-degree-of-freedom motion of the follower spacecraft relative to the leader spacecraft is modeled, where the coupling effect between the translational motion and the rotational one is accounted. A robust adaptive terminal sliding mode control law, including the adaptive algorithms, is proposed to ensure the finite time convergence of the relative motion tracking errors despite the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances, based on which a modified controller is furthermore developed to solve the dual-equilibrium problem caused by dual quaternion representation. In addition, to alleviate the chattering, hyperbolic tangent function is adopted to substitute for the sign function. And by theoretical analysis, it is proved that the tracking error in such case will converge to a neighborhood of the origin in finite time. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the validity of the proposed approaches.

  7. Current Sensor Fault Diagnosis Based on a Sliding Mode Observer for PMSM Driven Systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; Huang, Yi-Shan; Zhao, Kai-Hui

    2015-05-11

    This paper proposes a current sensor fault detection method based on a sliding mode observer for the torque closed-loop control system of interior permanent magnet synchronous motors. First, a sliding mode observer based on the extended flux linkage is built to simplify the motor model, which effectively eliminates the phenomenon of salient poles and the dependence on the direct axis inductance parameter, and can also be used for real-time calculation of feedback torque. Then a sliding mode current observer is constructed in αβ coordinates to generate the fault residuals of the phase current sensors. The method can accurately identify abrupt gain faults and slow-variation offset faults in real time in faulty sensors, and the generated residuals of the designed fault detection system are not affected by the unknown input, the structure of the observer, and the theoretical derivation and the stability proof process are concise and simple. The RT-LAB real-time simulation is used to build a simulation model of the hardware in the loop. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Current Sensor Fault Diagnosis Based on a Sliding Mode Observer for PMSM Driven Systems

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; Huang, Yi-Shan; Zhao, Kai-Hui

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a current sensor fault detection method based on a sliding mode observer for the torque closed-loop control system of interior permanent magnet synchronous motors. First, a sliding mode observer based on the extended flux linkage is built to simplify the motor model, which effectively eliminates the phenomenon of salient poles and the dependence on the direct axis inductance parameter, and can also be used for real-time calculation of feedback torque. Then a sliding mode current observer is constructed in αβ coordinates to generate the fault residuals of the phase current sensors. The method can accurately identify abrupt gain faults and slow-variation offset faults in real time in faulty sensors, and the generated residuals of the designed fault detection system are not affected by the unknown input, the structure of the observer, and the theoretical derivation and the stability proof process are concise and simple. The RT-LAB real-time simulation is used to build a simulation model of the hardware in the loop. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25970258

  9. Sensorless sliding mode observer for a five-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor drive.

    PubMed

    Hosseyni, Anissa; Trabelsi, Ramzi; Mimouni, Med Faouzi; Iqbal, Atif; Alammari, Rashid

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the sensorless vector controlled five-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) drive based on a sliding mode observer (SMO). The observer is designed considering the back electromotive force (EMF) of five-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor. The SMO structure and design are illustrated. Stability of the proposed observer is demonstrated using Lyapunov stability criteria. The proposed strategy is asymptotically stable in the context of Lyapunov theory. Simulated results on a five-phase PMSM drive are displayed to validate the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  10. Smooth sliding mode control with a disturbance observer for a virtual axis parallel mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Daogen; Wang, Zhenhua; Wang, Zhenqi; Zhang, Xiaotong

    2013-10-01

    The control charactics of the virtual axis parallel mechanism is nonlinear and strong coupling as well as uncertainty. To achieve the goal of decoupling and inhibition of various uncertaities, this paper proposes the algorithm of smooth sliding mode control with a disturbance observer.In order to decline the inherent trembling of the sliding mode control, the paper uses the nonlinear power function such as fal(s,α , δ) in the approaching law decision. Also it uses the PVT interpolation strategy in the joint-space trajectory planning to ensure the stability of the mechanism movement, which is based on the mechnical kinematics models. Simulation of the trajectory tracing shows that the algorithm can improve the robust performance of the parameter perturbation and certain interferance, which achives the aim of the accurate steady-state performance and the good dynamic tracing performance.

  11. Sensorless control of ship propulsion interior permanent magnet synchronous motor based on a new sliding mode observer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yan-Cheng; Wang, Ning; Liu, Si-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a sensorless speed control strategy for ship propulsion interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) based on a new sliding-mode observer (SMO). In the SMO the low-pass filter and the method of arc-tangent calculation of extended electromotive force (EMF) or phase-locked loop (PLL) technique are not used. The calculation of the rotor speed is deduced from the Lyapunov function stability analysis. In order to reduce system chattering, sigmoid functions with switching gains being adaptively updated by fuzzy logic systems are innovatively incorporated into the SMO. Finally, simulation results for a 4.088 MW ship propulsion IPMSM and experimental results from a 7.5 kW IPMSM drive are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed SMO method.

  12. Adaptive Hierarchical Sliding Mode Control with Input Saturation for Attitude Regulation of Multi-satellite Tethered System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Sun, Guanghui

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive hierarchical sliding mode control for the attitude regulation of the multi-satellite inline tethered system, where the input saturation is taken into account. The governing equations for the attitude dynamics of the three-satellite inline tethered system are derived firstly by utilizing Lagrangian mechanics theory. Considering the fact that the attitude of the central satellite can be adjusted by using the simple exponential stabilization scheme, the decoupling of the central satellite and the terminal ones is presented, and in addition, the new adaptive sliding mode control law is applied to stabilize the attitude dynamics of the two terminal satellites based on the synchronization and partial contraction theory. In the adaptive hierarchical sliding mode control design, the input is modeled as saturated input due to the fact that the flywheel torque is bounded, and meanwhile, an adaptive update rate is introduced to eliminate the effect of the saturated input and the external perturbation. The proposed control scheme can be applied on the two-satellite system to achieve fixed-point rotation. Numerical results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Tracking Control of a 2-DOF Arm Actuated by Pneumatic Muscle Actuators Using Adaptive Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming-Kun; Wu, Jui-Chi

    Pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) have the highest power/weight ratio and power/volume ratio of any actuator. Therefore, they can be used not only in the rehabilitation engineering, but also as an actuator in robots, including industrial robots and therapy robots. It is difficult to achieve excellent tracking performance using classical control methods because the compressibility of gas and the nonlinear elasticity of bladder container causes parameter variations. An adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control is developed in this study. The fuzzy sliding surface can be used to reduce fuzzy rule numbers, and the adaptive control law is used to modify fuzzy rules on-line. A model matching technique is then adopted to adjust scaling factors. The experimental results show that this control strategy can attain excellent tracking performance.

  14. Robust In-Flight Sensor Fault Diagnostics for Aircraft Engine Based on Sliding Mode Observers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaodong; Huang, Jinquan; Lu, Feng

    2017-04-11

    For a sensor fault diagnostic system of aircraft engines, the health performance degradation is an inevitable interference that cannot be neglected. To address this issue, this paper investigates an integrated on-line sensor fault diagnostic scheme for a commercial aircraft engine based on a sliding mode observer (SMO). In this approach, one sliding mode observer is designed for engine health performance tracking, and another for sensor fault reconstruction. Both observers are employed in in-flight applications. The results of the former SMO are analyzed for post-flight updating the baseline model of the latter. This idea is practical and feasible since the updating process does not require the algorithm to be regulated or redesigned, so that ground-based intervention is avoided, and the update process is implemented in an economical and efficient way. With this setup, the robustness of the proposed scheme to the health degradation is much enhanced and the latter SMO is able to fulfill sensor fault reconstruction over the course of the engine life. The proposed sensor fault diagnostic system is applied to a nonlinear simulation of a commercial aircraft engine, and its effectiveness is evaluated in several fault scenarios.

  15. State of charge estimation of lithium-ion batteries using fractional order sliding mode observer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qishui; Zhong, Fuli; Cheng, Jun; Li, Hui; Zhong, Shouming

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a state of charge (SOC) estimation method based on fractional order sliding mode observer (SMO) for lithium-ion batteries. A fractional order RC equivalent circuit model (FORCECM) is firstly constructed to describe the charging and discharging dynamic characteristics of the battery. Then, based on the differential equations of the FORCECM, fractional order SMOs for SOC, polarization voltage and terminal voltage estimation are designed. After that, convergence of the proposed observers is analyzed by Lyapunov's stability theory method. The framework of the designed observer system is simple and easy to implement. The SMOs can overcome the uncertainties of parameters, modeling and measurement errors, and present good robustness. Simulation results show that the presented estimation method is effective, and the designed observers have good performance.

  16. Sliding mode based trajectory linearization control for hypersonic reentry vehicle via extended disturbance observer.

    PubMed

    Xingling, Shao; Honglun, Wang

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel hybrid control framework by combing observer-based sliding mode control (SMC) with trajectory linearization control (TLC) for hypersonic reentry vehicle (HRV) attitude tracking problem. First, fewer control consumption is achieved using nonlinear tracking differentiator (TD) in the attitude loop. Second, a novel SMC that employs extended disturbance observer (EDO) to counteract the effect of uncertainties using a new sliding surface which includes the estimation error is integrated to address the tracking error stabilization issues in the attitude and angular rate loop, respectively. In addition, new results associated with EDO are examined in terms of dynamic response and noise-tolerant performance, as well as estimation accuracy. The key feature of the proposed compound control approach is that chattering free tracking performance with high accuracy can be ensured for HRV in the presence of multiple uncertainties under control constraints. Based on finite time convergence stability theory, the stability of the resulting closed-loop system is well established. Also, comparisons and extensive simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the control strategy.

  17. A reduced-order nonlinear sliding mode observer for vehicle slip angle and tyre forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuhang; Ji, Yunfeng; Guo, Konghui

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a reduced-order sliding mode observer (RO-SMO) is developed for vehicle state estimation. Several improvements are achieved in this paper. First, the reference model accuracy is improved by considering vehicle load transfers and using a precise nonlinear tyre model 'UniTire'. Second, without the reference model accuracy degraded, the computing burden of the state observer is decreased by a reduced-order approach. Third, nonlinear system damping is integrated into the SMO to speed convergence and reduce chattering. The proposed RO-SMO is evaluated through simulation and experiments based on an in-wheel motor electric vehicle. The results show that the proposed observer accurately predicts the vehicle states.

  18. Flexible Modes Control Using Sliding Mode Observers: Application to Ares I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri B.; Hall, Charles E.; Baev, Simon; Orr, Jeb S.

    2010-01-01

    The launch vehicle dynamics affected by bending and sloshing modes are considered. Attitude measurement data that are corrupted by flexible modes could yield instability of the vehicle dynamics. Flexible body and sloshing modes are reconstructed by sliding mode observers. The resultant estimates are used to remove the undesirable dynamics from the measurements, and the direct effects of sloshing and bending modes on the launch vehicle are compensated by means of a controller that is designed without taking the bending and sloshing modes into account. A linearized mathematical model of Ares I launch vehicle was derived based on FRACTAL, a linear model developed by NASA/MSFC. The compensated vehicle dynamics with a simple PID controller were studied for the launch vehicle model that included two bending modes, two slosh modes and actuator dynamics. A simulation study demonstrated stable and accurate performance of the flight control system with the augmented simple PID controller without the use of traditional linear bending filters.

  19. A novel discrete adaptive sliding-mode-like control method for ionic polymer-metal composite manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyong; Hao, Lina; Chen, Wenlin; Li, Zhi; Liu, Liqun

    2013-09-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC), also called artificial muscle, is an EAP material which can generate a relatively large deformation with a low driving voltage (generally less than 5 V). Like other EAP materials, IPMC possesses strong nonlinear properties, which can be described as a hybrid of back-relaxation (BR) and hysteresis characteristics, which also vary with water content, environmental temperature and even the usage consumption. Nowadays, many control approaches have been developed to tune the IPMC actuators, among which adaptive methods show a particular striking performance. To deal with IPMCs’ nonlinear problem, this paper represents a robust discrete adaptive inverse (AI) control approach, which employs an on-line identification technique based on the BR operator and Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) hysteresis operator hybrid model estimation method. Here the newly formed control approach is called discrete adaptive sliding-mode-like control (DASMLC) due to the similarity of its design method to that of a sliding mode controller. The weighted least mean squares (WLMS) identification method was employed to estimate the hybrid IPMC model because of its advantage of insensitivity to environmental noise. Experiments with the DASMLC approach and a conventional PID controller were carried out to compare and demonstrate the proposed controller’s better performance.

  20. Adaptive dual-layer super-twisting control and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Christopher; Shtessel, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a super-twisting-like structure with adaptive gains is proposed. The structure is parameterised by two scalar gains, both of which adapt, and by an additional time-varying term. The magnitudes of the adaptive terms are allowed to both increase and decrease as appropriate so that they are as small as possible, in the sense that they do not unnecessarily over-bound the uncertainty, and yet are large enough to sustain a sliding motion. In the paper, a new time varying gain is incorporated into the traditional super-twisting architecture. The proposed adaption law has a dual-layer structure which is formally analyzed using Lyapunov techniques. The additional term has the effect of simplifying the stability analysis whilst guaranteeing the second-order sliding mode properties of the traditional super-twisting scheme.

  1. Design and experimental evaluation of a robust position controller for an electrohydrostatic actuator using adaptive antiwindup sliding mode scheme.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Min; Park, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jong Shik

    2013-01-01

    A robust control scheme is proposed for the position control of the electrohydrostatic actuator (EHA) when considering hardware saturation, load disturbance, and lumped system uncertainties and nonlinearities. To reduce overshoot due to a saturation of electric motor and to realize robustness against load disturbance and lumped system uncertainties such as varying parameters and modeling error, this paper proposes an adaptive antiwindup PID sliding mode scheme as a robust position controller for the EHA system. An optimal PID controller and an optimal anti-windup PID controller are also designed to compare control performance. An EHA prototype is developed, carrying out system modeling and parameter identification in designing the position controller. The simply identified linear model serves as the basis for the design of the position controllers, while the robustness of the control systems is compared by experiments. The adaptive anti-windup PID sliding mode controller has been found to have the desired performance and become robust against hardware saturation, load disturbance, and lumped system uncertainties and nonlinearities.

  2. Design and Experimental Evaluation of a Robust Position Controller for an Electrohydrostatic Actuator Using Adaptive Antiwindup Sliding Mode Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Min; Park, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jong Shik

    2013-01-01

    A robust control scheme is proposed for the position control of the electrohydrostatic actuator (EHA) when considering hardware saturation, load disturbance, and lumped system uncertainties and nonlinearities. To reduce overshoot due to a saturation of electric motor and to realize robustness against load disturbance and lumped system uncertainties such as varying parameters and modeling error, this paper proposes an adaptive antiwindup PID sliding mode scheme as a robust position controller for the EHA system. An optimal PID controller and an optimal anti-windup PID controller are also designed to compare control performance. An EHA prototype is developed, carrying out system modeling and parameter identification in designing the position controller. The simply identified linear model serves as the basis for the design of the position controllers, while the robustness of the control systems is compared by experiments. The adaptive anti-windup PID sliding mode controller has been found to have the desired performance and become robust against hardware saturation, load disturbance, and lumped system uncertainties and nonlinearities. PMID:23983640

  3. Adhesion and sliding response of a biologically inspired fibrillar surface: experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Yao, H; Rocca, G Della; Guduru, P R; Gao, H

    2008-07-06

    Inspired by the adhesion mechanisms of several animal species such as geckos, beetles and flies, several efforts in designing and fabricating surface engineering strategies have been made recently to mimic the adhesive and frictional behaviour of biological foot pads. An important feature of such biological adhesion systems is the ability to switch between strong attachment and easy detachment, which is crucial for animal locomotion. Recent investigations have suggested that such a 'switching' mechanism can be achieved by the elastic anisotropy of the attachment pad, which renders the magnitude of the detachment force to be direction dependent. This suggestion is supported by the observations that the fibres of the foot pads in geckos and insects are oriented at an angle to the base and that geckos curl their toes backwards (digital hyperextension) while detaching from a surface. One of the promising bio-inspired architectures developed recently is a film-terminated fibrillar PDMS surface; this structure was demonstrated to result in superior detachment force and energy dissipation compared with a bulk PDMS surface. In this investigation, the film-terminated fibrillar architecture is modified by tilting the fibres to make the surface vertically more compliant and elastically anisotropic. The directional detachment and the sliding resistance between the tilted fibrillar surfaces and a spherical glass lens are measured: both show significant directional anisotropy. It is argued that the anisotropy introduced by the tilted fibres and the deformation-induced change in the compliance of the fibre layer are responsible for the observed anisotropy in the detachment force.

  4. State observer-based sliding mode control for semi-active hydro-pneumatic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sizhong; Zhao, Yuzhuang; Liu, Gang; Yang, Lin

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an improved virtual reference model for semi-active suspension to coordinate the vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. The reference model combines the virtues of sky-hook with ground-hook control logic, and the hybrid coefficient is tuned according to the longitudinal and lateral acceleration so as to improve the vehicle stability especially in high-speed condition. Suspension state observer based on unscented Kalman filter is designed. A sliding mode controller (SMC) is developed to track the states of the reference model. The stability of the SMC strategy is proven by means of Lyapunov function taking into account the nonlinear damper characteristics and sprung mass variation of the vehicle. Finally, the performance of the controller is demonstrated under three typical working conditions: the random road excitation, speed bump road and sharp acceleration and braking. The simulation results indicated that, compared with the traditional passive suspension, the proposed control algorithm can offer a better coordination between vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. This approach provides a viable alternative to costlier active suspension control systems for commercial vehicles.

  5. Efficiency and adaptability of the benthic methane filter at Quepos Slide cold seeps, offshore of Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeb, P.; Krause, S.; Linke, P.; Hensen, C.; Dale, A. W.; Nuzzo, M.; Treude, T.

    2015-11-01

    Large amounts of methane are delivered by fluids through the erosive forearc of the convergent margin offshore of Costa Rica and lead to the formation of cold seeps at the sediment surface. Besides mud extrusion, numerous cold seeps are created by landslides induced by seamount subduction or fluid migration along major faults. Most of the dissolved methane migrating through the sediments of cold seeps is oxidized within the benthic microbial methane filter by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Measurements of AOM and sulfate reduction as well as numerical modeling of porewater profiles revealed a highly active and efficient benthic methane filter at the Quepos Slide site, a landslide on the continental slope between the Nicoya and Osa Peninsula. Integrated areal rates of AOM ranged from 12.9 ± 6.0 to 45.2 ± 11.5 mmol m-2 d-1, with only 1 to 2.5 % of the upward methane flux being released into the water column. Additionally, two parallel sediment cores from Quepos Slide were used for in vitro experiments in a recently developed sediment-flow-through (SLOT) system to simulate an increased fluid and methane flux from the bottom of the sediment core. The benthic methane filter revealed a high adaptability whereby the methane oxidation efficiency responded to the increased fluid flow within ca. 170 d. To our knowledge, this study provides the first estimation of the natural biogeochemical response of seep sediments to changes in fluid flow.

  6. Observer performance using virtual pathology slides: impact of LCD color reproduction accuracy.

    PubMed

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Silverstein, Louis D; Hashmi, Syed F; Graham, Anna R; Weinstein, Ronald S; Roehrig, Hans

    2012-12-01

    The use of color LCDs in medical imaging is growing as more clinical specialties use digital images as a resource in diagnosis and treatment decisions. Telemedicine applications such as telepathology, teledermatology, and teleophthalmology rely heavily on color images. However, standard methods for calibrating, characterizing, and profiling color displays do not exist, resulting in inconsistent presentation. To address this, we developed a calibration, characterization, and profiling protocol for color-critical medical imaging applications. Physical characterization of displays calibrated with and without the protocol revealed high color reproduction accuracy with the protocol. The present study assessed the impact of this protocol on observer performance. A set of 250 breast biopsy virtual slide regions of interest (half malignant, half benign) were shown to six pathologists, once using the calibration protocol and once using the same display in its "native" off-the-shelf uncalibrated state. Diagnostic accuracy and time to render a decision were measured. In terms of ROC performance, Az (area under the curve) calibrated = 0.8570 and Az uncalibrated = 0.8488. No statistically significant difference (p = 0.4112) was observed. In terms of interpretation speed, mean calibrated = 4.895 s; mean uncalibrated = 6.304 s which is statistically significant (p = 0.0460). Early results suggest a slight advantage diagnostically for a properly calibrated and color-managed display and a significant potential advantage in terms of improved workflow. Future work should be conducted using different types of color images that may be more dependent on accurate color rendering and a wider range of LCDs with varying characteristics.

  7. Influence of LCD color reproduction accuracy on observer performance using virtual pathology slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Silverstein, Louis D.; Hashmi, Syed F.; Graham, Anna R.; Weinstein, Ronald S.; Roehrig, Hans

    2012-02-01

    The use of color LCDs in medical imaging is growing as more clinical specialties use digital images as a resource in diagnosis and treatment decisions. Telemedicine applications such as telepathology, teledermatology and teleophthalmology rely heavily on color images. However, standard methods for calibrating, characterizing and profiling color displays do not exist, resulting in inconsistent presentation. To address this, we developed a calibration, characterization and profiling protocol for color-critical medical imaging applications. Physical characterization of displays calibrated with and without the protocol revealed high color reproduction accuracy with the protocol. The present study assessed the impact of this protocol on observer performance. A set of 250 breast biopsy virtual slide regions of interest (half malignant, half benign) were shown to 6 pathologists, once using the calibration protocol and once using the same display in its "native" off-the-shelf uncalibrated state. Diagnostic accuracy and time to render a decision were measured. In terms of ROC performance, Az (area under the curve) calibrated = 0.8640; uncalibrated = 0.8558. No statistically significant difference (p = 0.2719) was observed. In terms of interpretation speed, mean calibrated = 4.895 sec, mean uncalibrated = 6.304 sec which is statistically significant (p = 0.0460). Early results suggest a slight advantage diagnostically for a properly calibrated and color-managed display and a significant potential advantage in terms of improved workflow. Future work should be conducted using different types of color images that may be more dependent on accurate color rendering and a wider range of LCDs with varying characteristics.

  8. An experimental comparison of proportional-integral, sliding mode, and robust adaptive control for piezo-actuated nanopositioning stages.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guo-Ying; Zhu, Li-Min

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the proportional-integral (PI) control, sliding mode control (SMC), and robust adaptive control (RAC) for applications to piezo-actuated nanopositioning stages without the inverse hysteresis construction. For a fair comparison, the control parameters of the SMC and RAC are selected on the basis of the well-tuned parameters of the PI controller under same desired trajectories and sampling frequencies. The comparative results show that the RAC improves the tracking performance by 17 and 37 times than the PI controller in terms of the maximum tracking error e(m) and the root mean tracking error e(rms), respectively, while the RAC improves the tracking performance by 7 and 9 times than the SMC in terms of e(m) and e(rms), respectively.

  9. Vision-based stabilization of nonholonomic mobile robots by integrating sliding-mode control and adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhengcai; Yin, Longjie; Fu, Yili

    2013-01-01

    Vision-based pose stabilization of nonholonomic mobile robots has received extensive attention. At present, most of the solutions of the problem do not take the robot dynamics into account in the controller design, so that these controllers are difficult to realize satisfactory control in practical application. Besides, many of the approaches suffer from the initial speed and torque jump which are not practical in the real world. Considering the kinematics and dynamics, a two-stage visual controller for solving the stabilization problem of a mobile robot is presented, applying the integration of adaptive control, sliding-mode control, and neural dynamics. In the first stage, an adaptive kinematic stabilization controller utilized to generate the command of velocity is developed based on Lyapunov theory. In the second stage, adopting the sliding-mode control approach, a dynamic controller with a variable speed function used to reduce the chattering is designed, which is utilized to generate the command of torque to make the actual velocity of the mobile robot asymptotically reach the desired velocity. Furthermore, to handle the speed and torque jump problems, the neural dynamics model is integrated into the above mentioned controllers. The stability of the proposed control system is analyzed by using Lyapunov theory. Finally, the simulation of the control law is implemented in perturbed case, and the results show that the control scheme can solve the stabilization problem effectively. The proposed control law can solve the speed and torque jump problems, overcome external disturbances, and provide a new solution for the vision-based stabilization of the mobile robot.

  10. Ensemble transform sensitivity method for adaptive observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Xie, Yuanfu; Wang, Hongli; Chen, Dehui; Toth, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    The Ensemble Transform (ET) method has been shown to be useful in providing guidance for adaptive observation deployment. It predicts forecast error variance reduction for each possible deployment using its corresponding transformation matrix in an ensemble subspace. In this paper, a new ET-based sensitivity (ETS) method, which calculates the gradient of forecast error variance reduction in terms of analysis error variance reduction, is proposed to specify regions for possible adaptive observations. ETS is a first order approximation of the ET; it requires just one calculation of a transformation matrix, increasing computational efficiency (60%-80% reduction in computational cost). An explicit mathematical formulation of the ETS gradient is derived and described. Both the ET and ETS methods are applied to the Hurricane Irene (2011) case and a heavy rainfall case for comparison. The numerical results imply that the sensitive areas estimated by the ETS and ET are similar. However, ETS is much more efficient, particularly when the resolution is higher and the number of ensemble members is larger.

  11. Design of an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control for uncertain discrete-time nonlinear systems based on noisy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Toshio

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the design of an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control (AFSMC) for uncertain discrete-time nonlinear dynamic systems. The dynamic systems are described by a discrete-time state equation with nonlinear uncertainties, and the uncertainties include the modelling errors and the external disturbances to be unknown but nonlinear with the bounded properties. The states are measured by the restriction of measurement sensors and the contamination with independent measurement noises. The nonlinear uncertainties are approximated by using the fuzzy IF-THEN rules based on the universal approximation theorem, and the approximation error is compensated by adding an adaptive complementary term to the proposed AFSMC. The fuzzy inference approach based on the extended single input rule modules is proposed to reduce the number of the fuzzy IF-THEN rules. The estimates for the un-measurable states and the adjustable parameters are obtained by using the weighted least squares estimator and its simplified one. It is proved that under some conditions the estimation errors will remain in the vicinity of zero as time increases, and the states are ultimately bounded subject to the proposed AFSMC. The effectiveness of the proposed method is indicated through the simulation experiment of a simple numerical system.

  12. A new fractional-order sliding mode controller via a nonlinear disturbance observer for a class of dynamical systems with mismatched disturbances.

    PubMed

    Pashaei, Shabnam; Badamchizadeh, Mohammadali

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the stabilization and disturbance rejection for a class of fractional-order nonlinear dynamical systems with mismatched disturbances. To fulfill this purpose a new fractional-order sliding mode control (FOSMC) based on a nonlinear disturbance observer is proposed. In order to design the suitable fractional-order sliding mode controller, a proper switching surface is introduced. Afterward, by using the sliding mode theory and Lyapunov stability theory, a robust fractional-order control law via a nonlinear disturbance observer is proposed to assure the existence of the sliding motion in finite time. The proposed fractional-order sliding mode controller exposes better control performance, ensures fast and robust stability of the closed-loop system, eliminates the disturbances and diminishes the chattering problem. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed fractional-order controller is depicted via numerical simulation results of practical example and is compared with some other controllers.

  13. Synchronization analysis and control of three eccentric rotors in a vibrating system using adaptive sliding mode control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxi; Zhang, Xueliang; Chen, Xiaozhe; Wen, Bangchun; Wang, Bo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, self- and controlled synchronizations of three eccentric rotors (ERs) in line driven by induction motors rotating in the same direction in a vibrating system are investigated. The vibrating system is a typical underactuated mechanical-electromagnetic coupling system. The analysis and control of the vibrating system convert to the synchronization motion problem of three ERs. Firstly, the self-synchronization motion of three ERs is analyzed according to self-synchronization theory. The criterions of synchronization and stability of self-synchronous state are obtained by using a modified average perturbation method. The significant synchronization motion of three ERs with zero phase differences cannot be implemented according to self-synchronization theory through analysis and simulations. To implement the synchronization motion of three ERs with zero phase differences, an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) algorithm based on a modified master-slave control strategy is employed to design the controllers. The stability of the controllers is verified by using Lyapunov theorem. The performances of the controlled synchronization system are presented by simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of controllers. Finally, the effects of reference speed and non-zero phase differences on the controlled system are discussed to show the strong robustness of the proposed controllers. Additionally, the dynamic responses of the vibrating system in different synchronous states are analyzed.

  14. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Control of a Spherical Rolling Robot Using Sliding-Mode-Control-Theory-Based Online Learning Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kayacan, Erkan; Kayacan, Erdal; Ramon, Herman; Saeys, Wouter

    2013-02-01

    As a model is only an abstraction of the real system, unmodeled dynamics, parameter variations, and disturbances can result in poor performance of a conventional controller based on this model. In such cases, a conventional controller cannot remain well tuned. This paper presents the control of a spherical rolling robot by using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller in combination with a sliding-mode control (SMC)-theory-based learning algorithm. The proposed control structure consists of a neuro-fuzzy network and a conventional controller which is used to guarantee the asymptotic stability of the system in a compact space. The parameter updating rules of the neuro-fuzzy system using SMC theory are derived, and the stability of the learning is proven using a Lyapunov function. The simulation results show that the control scheme with the proposed SMC-theory-based learning algorithm is able to not only eliminate the steady-state error but also improve the transient response performance of the spherical rolling robot without knowing its dynamic equations.

  15. Direct observation of bulk second-harmonic generation inside a glass slide with tightly focused optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianghui; Fardad, Shima; Das, Susobhan; Salandrino, Alessandro; Hui, Rongqing

    2016-04-01

    Bulk second-harmonic generation (SHG) inside glass slides is directly detected unambiguously without interference from surface contributions. This is enabled by tightly focused and highly localized ultrashort laser pulses. The theoretical calculations based on vector diffraction theory and the phenomenological model of SHG inside centrosymmetric materials agree well with the measured far-field SHG radiation patterns for different polarization states of the fundamental beam. The results indicate that the observed bulk SHG is predominantly related to the bulk parameter δ' and originates from the three-dimensional field gradient in the focal region.

  16. Observations of grain-boundary sliding and surface topography in an 8090 Al alloy after uniaxial and biaxial superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.R.; Huang, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The surface topography of an 8090 aluminum alloy was studied after uniaxial or biaxial superplastic deformation, with particular reference to grain-boundary sliding (GBS) offsets, grain rotation angles, formation of striated bands (SBs) or fibers, cavity distribution, and cavity formation mechanisms. Additionally, the contribution of GBS or grain separation to the overall strain was evaluated. Striated bands were observed and are thought to be the newly exposed faces of the grains inclined to the specimen`s surface. They were formed by sliding of grains upward and downward relative to the specimen surface. Grooves and crests inside SBs were formed from the relative motion of grain-boundary defects. Fibers were observed and are thought to be the further development of the SBs resulting from the formation of elongated cavities and grain separation. More cavitation was found in equibiaxially strained regions than in other regions subjected to approximately equivalent levels of strain. About 50 pct of the total strain was contributed to GBS in the uniaxial tensile-loaded specimens, as compared to about 30 pct in the biaxial-strained specimens. The effects of grain separation, grain rotation, and secondary GBS may be the reasons for the reduction of the observed strain contribution from GBS in biaxially strained specimens.

  17. The adaptive observer. [liapunov synthesis, single-input single-output, and reduced observers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The simple generation of state from available measurements, for use in systems for which the criteria defining the acceptable state behavior mandates a control that is dependent upon unavailable measurement is described as an adaptive means for determining the state of a linear time invariant differential system having unknown parameters. A single input output adaptive observer and the reduced adaptive observer is developed. The basic ideas for both the adaptive observer and the nonadaptive observer are examined. A survey of the Liapunov synthesis technique is taken, and the technique is applied to adaptive algorithm for the adaptive observer.

  18. Emplacement mechanisms of the South Kona slide complex, Hawaii Island: Sampling and observations by remotely operated vehicle Kaiko

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yokose, H.; Lipman, P.W.

    2004-01-01

    Emplacement of a giant submarine slide complex, offshore of South Kona, Hawaii Island, was investigated in 2001 by visual observation and in-situ sampling on the bench scarp and a megablock, during two dives utilizing the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Kaiko and its mother ship R/V Kairei. Topography of the bench scarp and megablocks were defined in 3-D perspective, using high-resolution digital bathymetric data acquired during the cruise. Compositions of 34 rock samples provide constraints on the landslide source regions and emplacement mechanisms. The bench scarp consists mainly of highly fractured, vesiculated, and oxidized a-a lavas that slumped from the subaerial flank of ancestral Mauna Loa. The megablock contains three units: block facies, matrix facies, and draped sediment. The block facies contains hyaloclastite interbedded with massive lava, which slid from the shallow submarine flank of ancestral Mauna Loa, as indicated by glassy groundmass of the hyaloclastite, low oxidation state, and low sulfur content. The matrix facies, which directly overlies the block facies and is similar to a lahar deposit, is thought to have been deposited from the water column immediately after the South Kona slide event. The draped sediment is a thin high-density turbidite layer that may be a distal facies of the Alika-2 debris-avalanche deposit; its composition overlaps with rocks from subaerial Mauna Loa. The deposits generated by the South Kona slide vary from debris avalanche deposit to turbidite. Spatial distribution of the deposits is consistent with deposits related to large landslides adjacent to other Hawaiian volcanoes and the Canary Islands. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  19. GLACIER SLIDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The theory of the sliding of glaciers presented in earlier papers has been generalized (1) by taking into account the resistance to sliding offered...bed at the downstream side of an obstacle. The sliding velocities and controlling obstacle sizes which are found from the generalized theory are...magnitude smaller in thickness than the height of the controlling obstacles can cause an appreciable increase in the sliding velocity. The generalized

  20. Robust Sensor Faults Reconstruction for a Class of Uncertain Linear Systems Using a Sliding Mode Observer: An LMI Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, Boulaabi; Faycal, Ben Hmida; Moncef, Gossa; Anis, Sellami

    2009-03-05

    This paper presents a design method of a Sliding Mode Observer (SMO) for robust sensor faults reconstruction of systems with matched uncertainty. This class of uncertainty requires a known upper bound. The basic idea is to use the H{sub {infinity}} concept to design the observer, which minimizes the effect of the uncertainty on the reconstruction of the sensor faults. Specifically, we applied the equivalent output error injection concept from previous work in Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) scheme. Then, these two problems of design and reconstruction can be expressed and numerically formulate via Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs) optimization. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the validity and the applicability of the proposed approach.

  1. Online fault detection of permanent magnet demagnetization for IPMSMs by nonsingular fast terminal-sliding-mode observer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai-Hui; Chen, Te-Fang; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Gang

    2014-12-05

    To prevent irreversible demagnetization of a permanent magnet (PM) for interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSMs) by flux-weakening control, a robust PM flux-linkage nonsingular fast terminal-sliding-mode observer (NFTSMO) is proposed to detect demagnetization faults. First, the IPMSM mathematical model of demagnetization is presented. Second, the construction of the NFTSMO to estimate PM demagnetization faults in IPMSM is described, and a proof of observer stability is given. The fault decision criteria and fault-processing method are also presented. Finally, the proposed scheme was simulated using MATLAB/Simulink and implemented on the RT-LAB platform. A number of robustness tests have been carried out. The scheme shows good performance in spite of speed fluctuations, torque ripples and the uncertainties of stator resistance.

  2. Online Fault Detection of Permanent Magnet Demagnetization for IPMSMs by Nonsingular Fast Terminal-Sliding-Mode Observer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai-Hui; Chen, Te-Fang; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    To prevent irreversible demagnetization of a permanent magnet (PM) for interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSMs) by flux-weakening control, a robust PM flux-linkage nonsingular fast terminal-sliding-mode observer (NFTSMO) is proposed to detect demagnetization faults. First, the IPMSM mathematical model of demagnetization is presented. Second, the construction of the NFTSMO to estimate PM demagnetization faults in IPMSM is described, and a proof of observer stability is given. The fault decision criteria and fault-processing method are also presented. Finally, the proposed scheme was simulated using MATLAB/Simulink and implemented on the RT-LAB platform. A number of robustness tests have been carried out. The scheme shows good performance in spite of speed fluctuations, torque ripples and the uncertainties of stator resistance. PMID:25490582

  3. Robust Sensor Faults Reconstruction for a Class of Uncertain Linear Systems Using a Sliding Mode Observer: An LMI Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskander, Boulaabi; Anis, Sellami; Fayçal, Ben Hmida; Moncef, Gossa

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a design method of a Sliding Mode Observer (SMO) for robust sensor faults reconstruction of systems with matched uncertainty. This class of uncertainty requires a known upper bound. The basic idea is to use the H∞ concept to design the observer, which minimizes the effect of the uncertainty on the reconstruction of the sensor faults. Specifically, we applied the equivalent output error injection concept from previous work in Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) scheme. Then, these two problems of design and reconstruction can be expressed and numerically formulate via Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs) optimization. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the validity and the applicability of the proposed approach.

  4. Tracking with asymptotic sliding mode and adaptive input delay effect compensation of nonlinearly perturbed delayed systems applied to traffic feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkin, Boris; Haddad, Jack; Shtessel, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    Asymptotical sliding mode-model reference adaptive control design for a class of systems with parametric uncertainty, unknown nonlinear perturbation and external disturbance, and with known input and state delays is proposed. To overcome the difficulty to directly predict the plant state under uncertainties, a control design is based on a developed decomposition procedure, where a 'generalised error' in conjunction with auxiliary linear dynamic blocks with adjustable gains is introduced and the sliding variable is formed on the basis of this error. The effect of such a decomposition is to pull the input delay out of first step of the design procedure. As a result, similarly to the classical Smith predictor, the adaptive control architecture based only on the lumped-delays, i.e. without conventional in such cases difficult-implemented distributed-delay blocks. Two new adaptive control schemes are proposed. A linearisation-based control design is constructed for feedback control of an urban traffic region model with uncertain dynamics. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed adaptive control method.

  5. Decentralized Sliding Mode Observer Based Dual Closed-Loop Fault Tolerant Control for Reconfigurable Manipulator against Actuator Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Yuanchun

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers a decentralized fault tolerant control (DFTC) scheme for reconfigurable manipulators. With the appearance of norm-bounded failure, a dual closed-loop trajectory tracking control algorithm is proposed on the basis of the Lyapunov stability theory. Characterized by the modularization property, the actuator failure is estimated by the proposed decentralized sliding mode observer (DSMO). Moreover, the actuator failure can be treated in view of the local joint information, so its control performance degradation is independent of other normal joints. In addition, the presented DFTC scheme is significantly simplified in terms of the structure of the controller due to its dual closed-loop architecture, and its feasibility is highly reflected in the control of reconfigurable manipulators. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed DFTC scheme is demonstrated using simulations. PMID:26181826

  6. Sliding Rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: First Observation of Rocks in Motion

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Ray, Jib; Jackson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved >60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, “windowpane” ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of ∼4–5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2–5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice. PMID:25162535

  7. Sliding rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: first observation of rocks in motion.

    PubMed

    Norris, Richard D; Norris, James M; Lorenz, Ralph D; Ray, Jib; Jackson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved > 60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, "windowpane" ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of -4-5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2-5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice.

  8. An adaptive tracking observer for failure-detection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidar, M.

    1982-01-01

    The design problem of adaptive observers applied to linear, constant and variable parameters, multi-input, multi-output systems, is considered. It is shown that, in order to keep the observer's (or Kalman filter) false-alarm rate (FAR) under a certain specified value, it is necessary to have an acceptable proper matching between the observer (or KF) model and the system parameters. An adaptive observer algorithm is introduced in order to maintain desired system-observer model matching, despite initial mismatching and/or system parameter variations. Only a properly designed adaptive observer is able to detect abrupt changes in the system (actuator, sensor failures, etc.) with adequate reliability and FAR. Conditions for convergence for the adaptive process were obtained, leading to a simple adaptive law (algorithm) with the possibility of an a priori choice of fixed adaptive gains. Simulation results show good tracking performance with small observer output errors and accurate and fast parameter identification, in both deterministic and stochastic cases.

  9. The influence of normal stress and sliding velocity on the frictional behaviour of calcite at room temperature: insights from laboratory experiments and microstructural observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, B. M.; Collettini, C.; Viti, C.; Cavallo, A.

    2016-04-01

    The presence of calcite in and near faults, as the dominant material, cement, or vein fill, indicates that the mechanical behaviour of carbonate-dominated material likely plays an important role in shallow- and mid-crustal faulting. To better understand the behaviour of calcite, under loading conditions relevant to earthquake nucleation, we sheared powdered gouge of Carrara Marble, >98 per cent CaCO3, at constant normal stresses between 1 and 100 MPa under water-saturated conditions at room temperature. We performed slide-hold-slide tests, 1-3000 s, to measure the amount of static frictional strengthening and creep relaxation, and velocity-stepping tests, 0.1-1000 μm s-1, to evaluate frictional stability. We observe that the rates of frictional strengthening and creep relaxation decrease with increasing normal stress and diverge as shear velocity is increased from 1 to 3000 μm s-1 during slide-hold-slide experiments. We also observe complex frictional stability behaviour that depends on both normal stress and shearing velocity. At normal stresses less than 20 MPa, we observe predominantly velocity-neutral friction behaviour. Above 20 MPa, we observe strong velocity-strengthening frictional behaviour at low velocities, which then evolves towards velocity-weakening friction behaviour at high velocities. Microstructural analyses of recovered samples highlight a variety of deformation mechanisms including grain size reduction and localization, folding of calcite grains and fluid-assisted diffusion mass transfer processes promoting the development of calcite nanograins in the highly deformed portions of the experimental fault. Our combined analyses indicate that calcite fault gouge transitions from brittle to semi-brittle behaviour at high normal stress and slow sliding velocities. This transition has important implications for earthquake nucleation and propagation on faults in carbonate-dominated lithologies.

  10. The Surface of Titan from Adaptive Optics Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, S. G.; Macintosh, B.; Max, C.; Roe, H.; de Pater, I.; Young, E. F.; McKay, C. P.

    Saturn's largest moon Titan is the only satellite in the solar system with a substantial atmosphere. Photolysis of methane creates a hydrocarbon haze in Titan's atmosphere that is opaque to visible light. The new adaptive optics system on the 10-meter W.M. Keck Telescope enables us to observe Titan with a resolution of 0.04 arcseconds, or 20 resolution elements across the disk. By observing at near-infrared wavelengths that are methane band windows we can see through Titan's hydrocarbon haze to the surface beneath. Recent adaptive optics images of Titan both in broadband (J, H, and K) filters and in narrowband filters that selectively probe Titan's surface and atmosphere allow us to determine surface albedo and properties of the hydrocarbon haze layer. Future observations will include high-resolution spectroscopy coupled with adaptive optics to obtain spectra of individual surface features.

  11. Adaptive sliding mode back-stepping pitch angle control of a variable-displacement pump controlled pitch system for wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiu-xing; Lin, Yong-gang; Li, Wei; Liu, Hong-wei; Gu, Ya-jing

    2015-09-01

    A variable-displacement pump controlled pitch system is proposed to mitigate generator power and flap-wise load fluctuations for wind turbines. The pitch system mainly consists of a variable-displacement hydraulic pump, a fixed-displacement hydraulic motor and a gear set. The hydraulic motor can be accurately regulated by controlling the pump displacement and fluid flows to change the pitch angle through the gear set. The detailed mathematical representation and dynamic characteristics of the proposed pitch system are thoroughly analyzed. An adaptive sliding mode pump displacement controller and a back-stepping stroke piston controller are designed for the proposed pitch system such that the resulting pitch angle tracks its desired value regardless of external disturbances and uncertainties. The effectiveness and control efficiency of the proposed pitch system and controllers have been verified by using realistic dataset of a 750 kW research wind turbine.

  12. An Adaptive Buddy Check for Observational Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, Dick P.; Rukhovets, Leonid; Todling, Ricardo; DaSilva, Arlindo M.; Larson, Jay W.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An adaptive buddy check algorithm is presented that adjusts tolerances for outlier observations based on the variability of surrounding data. The algorithm derives from a statistical hypothesis test combined with maximum-likelihood covariance estimation. Its stability is shown to depend on the initial identification of outliers by a simple background check. The adaptive feature ensures that the final quality control decisions are not very sensitive to prescribed statistics of first-guess and observation errors, nor on other approximations introduced into the algorithm. The implementation of the algorithm in a global atmospheric data assimilation is described. Its performance is contrasted with that of a non-adaptive buddy check, for the surface analysis of an extreme storm that took place in Europe on 27 December 1999. The adaptive algorithm allowed the inclusion of many important observations that differed greatly from the first guess and that would have been excluded on the basis of prescribed statistics. The analysis of the storm development was much improved as a result of these additional observations.

  13. Neptune and Titan Observed with Keck Telescope Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Macintosh, B.A.; Gibbard, S.; Gavel, D.T.; Roe, H.; De Pater, I.; Ghez, A.M.; Acton, S.; Wizinowich, P.L.; Lai, O.

    2000-05-05

    The authors report on observations taken during engineering science validation time using the new adaptive optics system at the 10-m Keck II Telescope. They observe Neptune and Titan at near-infrared wavelengths. These objects are ideal for adaptive optics imaging because they are bright and small, yet have many diffraction-limited resolution elements across their disks. In addition Neptune and Titan have prominent physical features, some of which change markedly with time. They have observed infrared-bright storms on Neptune, and very low-albedo surface regions on Titan, Saturn's largest moon, Spatial resolution on Neptune and Titan was 0.05-0.06 and 0.04-0.05 arc sec, respectively.

  14. Neptune and Titan observed with Keck Telescope adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Claire E.; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Gibbard, Seran; Gavel, Donald T.; Roe, Henry; de Pater, Imke; Ghez, Andrea M.; Acton, Scott; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Lai, Olivier

    2000-07-01

    We report on observations taken during engineering science validation time using the new adaptive optics system at the 10-m Keck II Telescope. We observed Neptune and Titan at near- infrared wavelengths. These objects are ideal for adaptive optics imaging because they are bright and small, yet have many diffraction-limited resolution elements across their disks. In addition Neptune and Titan have prominent physical features, some of which change markedly with time. We have observed infrared-bright 'storms' on Neptune, and very low- albedo surface regions on Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Spatial resolution on Neptune and Titan was 0.05 - 0.06 and 0.04 - 0.05 arc sec, respectively.

  15. Adaptive Observatories for Observing Moving Marine Organisms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellingham, J. G.; Scholin, C.; Zhang, Y.; Godin, M. A.; Hobson, B.; Frolov, S.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to characterize the response of small marine organisms to each other, and to their environment, is a demanding observational challenge. Small organisms live in a water reference frame, while existing cable or mooring-based observatories operate in an Earth reference frame. Thus repeated observations from a fixed system observe different populations as currents sweep organisms by the sensors. In contrast, mobile systems are typically optimized for spatial coverage rather than repeated observations of the same water volume. Lagrangian drifters track water mass, but are unable to find or reposition themselves relative to ocean features. We are developing a system capable of finding, following and observing discrete populations of marine organisms over time, leveraging a decade and a half investment in the Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network (AOSN) program. AOSN undertook the development of platforms to enable multi-platform coordinated measurement of ocean properties in the late 1990s, leading to the development of a variety of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and associated technologies, notably several glider systems, now in common use. Efforts by a number of research groups have focused on methods to employ these networked systems to observe and predict dynamic physical ocean phenomena. For example, periodic large scale field programs in Monterey Bay have progressively integrated these systems with data systems, predictive models, and web-based collaborative portals. We are adapting these approaches to follow and observe the dynamics of marine organisms. Compared to physical processes, the temporal and spatial variability of small marine organisms, particularly micro-organisms, is typical greater. Consequently, while multi-platform observations of physical processes can be coordinated via intermittent communications links from shore, biological observations require a higher degree of adaptability of the observation system in situ. This talk will

  16. Decentralized adaptive robust control based on sliding mode and nonlinear compensator for the control of ankle movement using functional electrical stimulation of agonist-antagonist muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobravi, Hamid-Reza; Erfanian, Abbas

    2009-08-01

    A decentralized control methodology is designed for the control of ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion in paraplegic subjects with electrical stimulation of tibialis anterior and calf muscles. Each muscle joint is considered as a subsystem and individual controllers are designed for each subsystem. Each controller operates solely on its associated subsystem, with no exchange of information between the subsystems. The interactions between the subsystems are taken as external disturbances for each isolated subsystem. In order to achieve robustness with respect to external disturbances, unmodeled dynamics, model uncertainty and time-varying properties of muscle-joint dynamics, a robust control framework is proposed which is based on the synergistic combination of an adaptive nonlinear compensator with a sliding mode control and is referred to as an adaptive robust control. Extensive simulations and experiments on healthy and paraplegic subjects were performed to demonstrate the robustness against the time-varying properties of muscle-joint dynamics, day-to-day variations, subject-to-subject variations, fast convergence, stability and tracking accuracy of the proposed method. The results indicate that the decentralized robust control provides excellent tracking control for different reference trajectories and can generate control signals to compensate the muscle fatigue and reject the external disturbance. Moreover, the controller is able to automatically regulate the interaction between agonist and antagonist muscles under different conditions of operating without any preprogrammed antagonist activities.

  17. Observations to support adaptation: Principles, scales and decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    As has been long noted, a comprehensive, coordinated observing system is the backbone of any Earth information system. Demands are increasingly placed on earth observation and prediction systems and attendant services to address the needs of economically and environmentally vulnerable sectors and investments, including energy, water, human health, transportation, agriculture, fisheries, tourism, biodiversity, and national security. Climate services include building capacity to interpret information and recognize standards and limitations of data in the promotion of social and economic development in a changing climate. This includes improving the understanding of climate in the context of a variety of temporal and spatial scales (including the influence of decadal scale forcings and land surface feedbacks on seasonal forecast reliability). Climate data and information are central for developing decision options that are sensitive to climate-related uncertainties and the design of flexible adaptation pathways. Ideally monitoring should be action oriented to support climate risk assessment and adaptation including informing robust decision making to multiple risks over the long term. Based on the experience of global observations programs and empirical research we outline- Challenges in developing effective monitoring and climate information systems to support adaptation. The types of observations of critical importance needed for sector planning to enhance food, water and energy security, and to improve early warning for disaster risk reduction Observations needed for ecosystem-based adaptation including the identification of thresholds, maintenance of biological diversity and land degradation The benefits and limits of linking regional model output to local observations including analogs and verification for adaptation planning To support these goals a robust systems of integrated observations are needed to characterize the uncertainty surrounding emergent risks

  18. Observer-based higher order sliding mode control of power factor in three-phase AC/DC converter for hybrid electric vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianxing; Laghrouche, Salah; Wack, Maxime

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a full-bridge boost power converter topology is studied for power factor control, using output higher order sliding mode control. The AC/DC converters are used for charging the battery and super-capacitor in hybrid electric vehicles from the utility. The proposed control forces the input currents to track the desired values, which can control the output voltage while keeping the power factor close to one. Super-twisting sliding mode observer is employed to estimate the input currents and load resistance only from the measurement of output voltage. Lyapunov analysis shows the asymptotic convergence of the closed-loop system to zero. Multi-rate simulation illustrates the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed controller in the presence of measurement noise.

  19. Some Tests For Adaptative Observations In Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quélo, D.; Michelangeli, P.-A.; Sportisse, B.

    Air pollution forecast requires the coupling of models with data through data assimi- lation. A key question is related to the choice of observations (apart from technical require- ments). One wants to choose in a judicious way the species to observe, in which loca- tions and at which moments. The appropriate strategies are related to the techniques of "targeting" and "adaptative observations". We will investigate these techniques on a simplified model. The first part reports the influence of the slow-fast behaviour of atmospheric chem- istry. The second part presents the use of singular vectors and second-order adjoint techniques in order to determine the "optimal" choice of observations. This project is led in the framework of the INRIA Cooperative Research Action CO- MODE (COupling MOdels and Data in Environment).

  20. Cloud Structures on Neptune Observed with Keck Telescope Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, C. E.; Macintosh, B. A.; Gibbard, S. G.; Gavel, D. T.; Roe, H. G.; de Pater, I.; Ghez, A. M.; Acton, D. S.; Lai, O.; Stomski, P.; Wizinowich, P. L.

    2003-01-01

    We report on observations obtained with the adaptive optics system at the 10 m Keck II Telescope during engineering validation and early science observing time for the adaptive optics system. We observed Neptune at near-infrared wavelengths. Angular resolution was 0.05"-0.06", corresponding to a spatial scale of approximately 1000 km at Neptune. We discuss the latitudinal structure of circumferential cloud bands and of compact infrared-bright features seen in the southern hemisphere, as well as their variation with wavelength. We determine the values of I/F (proportional to the ratio of reflected intensity to incident solar flux) in the J and H infrared-wavelength bands, including narrowband filters where there is strong methane absorption. We use the I/F values inside and outside of methane bands to estimate the altitude of clouds responsible for the brightest compact features in the infrared. Our data show that, on two of our four observing dates, the brightest region on Neptune contained highly reflective haze layers located below the tropopause but not deeper than a few bars.

  1. Natural frequency identification of smart washer by using adaptive observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Okugawa, Masayuki

    2014-04-01

    Bolted joints are used in many machines/structures and some of them have been loosened during long time use, and unluckily these bolt loosening may cause a great accident of machines/structures system. These bolted joint, especially in important places, are main object of maintenance inspection. Maintenance inspection with human- involvement is desired to be improved owing to time-consuming, labor-intensive and high-cost. By remote and full automation monitoring of the bolt loosening, constantly monitoring of bolted joint is achieved. In order to detect loosening of bolted joints without human-involvement, applying a structural health monitoring technique and smart structures/materials concept is the key objective. In this study, a new method of bolt loosening detection by adopting a smart washer has been proposed, and the basic detection principle was discussed with numerical analysis about frequency equation of the system, was confirmed experimentally. The smart washer used in this study is in cantilever type with piezoelectric material, which adds the washer the self-sensing and actuation function. The principle used to detect the loosening of the bolts is a method of a bolt loosening detection noted that the natural frequency of a smart washer system is decreasing by the change of the bolt tightening axial tension. The feature of this proposed method is achieving to identify the natural frequency at current condition on demand by adopting the self-sensing and actuation function and system identification algorithm for varying the natural frequency depending the bolt tightening axial tension. A novel bolt loosening detection method by adopting adaptive observer is proposed in this paper. The numerical simulations are performed to verify the possibility of the adaptive observer-based loosening detection. Improvement of the detection accuracy for a bolt loosening is confirmed by adopting initial parameter and variable adaptive gain by numerical simulation.

  2. Sensor Web Dynamic Measurement Techniques and Adaptive Observing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talabac, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Sensor Web observing systems may have the potential to significantly improve our ability to monitor, understand, and predict the evolution of rapidly evolving, transient, or variable environmental features and events. This improvement will come about by integrating novel data collection techniques, new or improved instruments, emerging communications technologies and protocols, sensor mark-up languages, and interoperable planning and scheduling systems. In contrast to today's observing systems, "event-driven" sensor webs will synthesize real- or near-real time measurements and information from other platforms and then react by reconfiguring the platforms and instruments to invoke new measurement modes and adaptive observation strategies. Similarly, "model-driven" sensor webs will utilize environmental prediction models to initiate targeted sensor measurements or to use a new observing strategy. The sensor web concept contrasts with today's data collection techniques and observing system operations concepts where independent measurements are made by remote sensing and in situ platforms that do not share, and therefore cannot act upon, potentially useful complementary sensor measurement data and platform state information. This presentation describes NASA's view of event-driven and model-driven Sensor Webs and highlights several research and development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  3. Adaptive optics observations of the core of Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, C. E.; Whysong, D.; Antonucci, R.; Canalizo, G.; Macintosh, B. A.; Stockton, A.

    2001-12-01

    We report on near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of the core of Cygnus A, using adaptive optics systems at the Lick and Keck Observatories. In our images, a V-shaped ionization cone structure is seen to the south-east of the nucleus, as in previous HST NICMOS observations. To the north-west of the nucleus are two diffuse emission regions. We have obtained K-band spectra of these regions and of the nucleus. Paschen alpha spectra show emission near the nucleus with FWHM 1000 km/s. The diffuse emission regions to the north-west and south-east have narrower linewidths. We interpret these data in terms of models for the core of Cygnus A. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48, and was supported in part by the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by the University of California at Santa Cruz under cooperative agreement No. AST - 9876783.

  4. Full-order sliding mode control of uncertain chaos in a permanent magnet synchronous motor based on a fuzzy extended state observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang; Nan, Yu-Rong; Zheng, Heng-Huo; Ren, Xue-Mei

    2015-11-01

    A full-order sliding mode control based on a fuzzy extended state observer is proposed to control the uncertain chaos in the permanent magnet synchronous motor. Through a simple coordinate transformation, the chaotic PMSM model is transformed into the Brunovsky canonical form, which is more suitable for the controller design. Based on the fuzzy control theory, a fuzzy extended state observer is developed to estimate the unknown states and uncertainties, and the restriction that all the system states should be completely measurable is avoided. Thereafter, a full-order sliding mode controller is designed to ensure the convergence of all system states without any chattering problem. Comparative simulations show the effectiveness and superior performance of the proposed control method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61403343 and 61433003), the Scientific Research Foundation of Education Department of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. Y201329260), and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang University of Technology, China (Grant No. 1301103053408).

  5. Soar adaptive optics observations of the globular cluster NGC 6496

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Luciano; Kunder, Andrea; Tokovinin, Andrei E-mail: lfraga@lna.br

    2013-06-01

    We present high-quality BVRI photometric data in the field of globular cluster NGC 6496 obtained with the SOAR Telescope Adaptive Module (SAM). Our observations were collected as part of the ongoing SAM commissioning. The distance modulus and cluster color excess as found from the red clump are (m – M) {sub V} = 15.71 ± 0.02 mag and E(V – I) = 0.28 ± 0.02 mag. An age of 10.5 ± 0.5 Gyr is determined from the difference in magnitude between the red clump and the subgiant branch. These parameters are in excellent agreement with the values derived from isochrone fitting. From the color-magnitude diagram we find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = –0.65 dex and hence support a disk classification for NGC 6496. The complete BVRI data set for NGC 6469 is made available in the electronic edition of the Journal.

  6. Adaptive tuning functions arise from visual observation of past movement

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Ian S.; Franklin, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Visual observation of movement plays a key role in action. For example, tennis players have little time to react to the ball, but still need to prepare the appropriate stroke. Therefore, it might be useful to use visual information about the ball trajectory to recall a specific motor memory. Past visual observation of movement (as well as passive and active arm movement) affects the learning and recall of motor memories. Moreover, when passive or active, these past contextual movements exhibit generalization (or tuning) across movement directions. Here we extend this work, examining whether visual motion also exhibits similar generalization across movement directions and whether such generalization functions can explain patterns of interference. Both the adaptation movement and contextual movement exhibited generalization beyond the training direction, with the visual contextual motion exhibiting much broader tuning. A second experiment demonstrated that this pattern was consistent with the results of an interference experiment where opposing force fields were associated with two separate visual movements. Overall, our study shows that visual contextual motion exhibits much broader (and shallower) tuning functions than previously seen for either passive or active movements, demonstrating that the tuning characteristics of past motion are highly dependent on their sensory modality. PMID:27341163

  7. SOAR Adaptive Optics Observations of the Globular Cluster NGC 6496

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Luciano; Kunder, Andrea; Tokovinin, Andrei

    2013-06-01

    We present high-quality BVRI photometric data in the field of globular cluster NGC 6496 obtained with the SOAR Telescope Adaptive Module (SAM). Our observations were collected as part of the ongoing SAM commissioning. The distance modulus and cluster color excess as found from the red clump are (m - M) V = 15.71 ± 0.02 mag and E(V - I) = 0.28 ± 0.02 mag. An age of 10.5 ± 0.5 Gyr is determined from the difference in magnitude between the red clump and the subgiant branch. These parameters are in excellent agreement with the values derived from isochrone fitting. From the color-magnitude diagram we find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.65 dex and hence support a disk classification for NGC 6496. The complete BVRI data set for NGC 6469 is made available in the electronic edition of the Journal. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  8. Multivariable robust adaptive sliding mode control of an industrial boiler-turbine in the presence of modeling imprecisions and external disturbances: A comparison with type-I servo controller.

    PubMed

    Ghabraei, Soheil; Moradi, Hamed; Vossoughi, Gholamreza

    2015-09-01

    To guarantee the safety and efficient performance of the power plant, a robust controller for the boiler-turbine unit is needed. In this paper, a robust adaptive sliding mode controller (RASMC) is proposed to control a nonlinear multi-input multi-output (MIMO) model of industrial boiler-turbine unit, in the presence of unknown bounded uncertainties and external disturbances. To overcome the coupled nonlinearities and investigate the zero dynamics, input-output linearization is performed, and then the new decoupled inputs are derived. To tackle the uncertainties and external disturbances, appropriate adaption laws are introduced. For constructing the RASMC, suitable sliding surface is considered. To guarantee the sliding motion occurrence, appropriate control laws are constructed. Then the robustness and stability of the proposed RASMC is proved via Lyapunov stability theory. To compare the performance of the purposed RASMC with traditional control schemes, a type-I servo controller is designed. To evaluate the performance of the proposed control schemes, simulation studies on nonlinear MIMO dynamic system in the presence of high frequency bounded uncertainties and external disturbances are conducted and compared. Comparison of the results reveals the superiority of proposed RASMC over the traditional control schemes. RAMSC acts efficiently in disturbance rejection and keeping the system behavior in desirable tracking objectives, without the existence of unstable quasi-periodic solutions.

  9. Guideline adaptation and implementation planning: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adaptation of high-quality practice guidelines for local use has been advanced as an efficient means to improve acceptability and applicability of evidence-informed care. In a pan-Canadian study, we examined how cancer care groups adapted pre-existing guidelines to their unique context and began implementation planning. Methods Using a mixed-methods, case-study design, five cases were purposefully sampled from self-identified groups and followed as they used a structured method and resources for guideline adaptation. Cases received the ADAPTE Collaboration toolkit, facilitation, methodological and logistical support, resources and assistance as required. Documentary and primary data collection methods captured individual case experience, including monthly summaries of meeting and field notes, email/telephone correspondence, and project records. Site visits, process audits, interviews, and a final evaluation forum with all cases contributed to a comprehensive account of participant experience. Results Study cases took 12 to >24 months to complete guideline adaptation. Although participants appreciated the structure, most found the ADAPTE method complex and lacking practical aspects. They needed assistance establishing individual guideline mandate and infrastructure, articulating health questions, executing search strategies, appraising evidence, and achieving consensus. Facilitation was described as a multi-faceted process, a team effort, and an essential ingredient for guideline adaptation. While front-line care providers implicitly identified implementation issues during adaptation, they identified a need to add an explicit implementation planning component. Conclusions Guideline adaptation is a positive initial step toward evidence-informed care, but adaptation (vs. ‘de novo’ development) did not meet expectations for reducing time or resource commitments. Undertaking adaptation is as much about the process (engagement and capacity building) as it

  10. Keck Adaptive Optics Observations of TW Hydrae Association Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, B.; Max, C.; Zuckerman, B.; Becklin, E. E.; Kaisler, D.; Lowrance, P.; Weinberger, A.; Christou, J.; Schneider, G.; Acton, S.

    Adaptive optics (AO) on 8-10 m telescopes is an enormously powerful tool for studying young nearby stars. It is especially useful for searching for companions. Using AO on the 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope we have measured the position of the brown dwarf companion to TWA5 and resolved the primary into an 0.055 arcsecond double. Over the next several years follow-up astrometry should permit an accurate determination of the masses of these young stars. We have also re-observed the candidate extrasolar planet TWA6B, but measurements of its motion relative to TWA6A are inconclusive. We are carrying out a search for new planetary or brown dwarf companions to TWA stars and, if current giant planet models are correct, are currently capable of detecting a 1 Jupiter-mass companion at ~1 arcsecond and a 5 Jupiter-mass companion at ~0.5 arcsecon around a typical TWA member.

  11. Photoevaporating stellar envelopes observed with Rayleigh beacon adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, P. R.; Fugate, R. Q.; Christou, J. C.; Ellerbroek, B. L.; Higgins, C. H.; Spinhirne, J. M.; Cleis, R. A.; Moroney, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    We present H-alpha and I-band images of a approximately 1 min diameter field centered on theta(sup 1) C Ori made with a unique adaptive optics system that uses either starlight or Rayleigh-backscattered laser light to correct for atmospheric wavefront distortion. Approximately one-half of the stars in this region are positionally associated with knots of ionized gas, which are interpreted as photoevaporating envelopes of low-mass stars. The acronyms 'partially ionized globule' (PIGs), external ionized (accretion) disks in the environs of radiation sources (EIDERs), or protoplanetary disks (ProPlyDs) all refer to these same knots. The H-alpha fluxes of the PIGs are proportional to their 2 cm radio continumm flux densities, and for nearly all the ionized knots, the 2 cm brightness temperatures are consistent with theta(sup 1) C Ori as the primary source of ionization. The comet-like morphology of the bright nebulosities is modeled as the result of an equilibrium between photoionization, recombination, and shadowing. The radii of the ionized 'head' of the cometary PIGs grow with distance from theta(sup 1) C Ori; the radii range from approximately less than or equal to 0.05 sec to approximately 0.25 sec. We interpret the size-distance relationship as evidence that the envelopes all have the same density profile and mass-loss rate within a factor of 2. Faint, arcuate wisps are observed 1 sec to 2 sec distance from some of the cometary nebulosities; these are modeled as bow shocks caused by the wind from theta(sup 1) C Ori. The positions of the stars associated with the PIGs in the observational H-R diagram indicate they are pre-main-sequence stars with masses less than approximately 3 solar mass, with approximately 1 solar mass being typical. Their medium I-K color is 2.9.

  12. The Validation of a Classroom Observation Instrument Based on the Construct of Teacher Adaptive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughland, Tony; Vlies, Penny

    2016-01-01

    Teacher adaptability is a key disposition for teachers that has been linked to outcomes of interests to schools. The aim of this study was to examine how the broader disposition of teacher adaptability might be observable as classroom-based adaptive practices using an argument-based approach to validation. The findings from the initial phase of…

  13. An adaptive observer for single-input single-output linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, R. L.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that the full order adaptive observer for single input, single output, observable, continuous, stable, linear differential systems in the absence of a deterministic or random disturbance vector guarantees the vanishing of observation error, regardless of the size of the constant or slowly varying parameter ignorance. The observer parameters are directly changed in a Liapunov adaptive way so as to eventually yield the unknown full order Luenberger observer. The observer poles throughout may be placed freely in the stable region and no derivatives are required in the adaptive law.

  14. Apparatus Would Stain Microscope Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breeding, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed apparatus meters specific amounts of fluid out of containers at specific times to stain microscope slides. Intended specifically for semiautomated staining of microbiological and hematological samples in microgravity, leakproof apparatus used in other environments in which technicians have little time to allocate to staining procedures and/or exposure to toxic staining agents or to micro-organisms to be stained hazardous. Apparatus adapted to perform almost any staining procedure and accommodates multiple staining reagents, useful for small or remote clinical laboratories.

  15. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  16. Probing the functions of contextual modulation by adapting images rather than observers

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Countless visual aftereffects have illustrated how visual sensitivity and perception can be biased by adaptation to the recent temporal context. This contextual modulation has been proposed to serve a variety of functions, but the actual benefits of adaptation remain uncertain. We describe an approach we have recently developed for exploring these benefits by adapting images instead of observers, to simulate how images should appear under theoretically optimal states of adaptation. This allows the long-term consequences of adaptation to be evaluated in ways that are difficult to probe by adapting observers, and provides a common framework for understanding how visual coding changes when the environment or the observer changes, or for evaluating how the effects of temporal context depend on different models of visual coding or the adaptation processes. The approach is illustrated for the specific case of adaptation to color, for which the initial neural coding and adaptation processes are relatively well understood, but can in principle be applied to examine the consequences of adaptation for any stimulus dimension. A simple calibration that adjusts each neuron’s sensitivity according to the stimulus level it is exposed to is sufficient to normalize visual coding and generate a host of benefits, from increased efficiency to perceptual constancy to enhanced discrimination. This temporal normalization may also provide an important precursor for the effective operation of contextual mechanisms operating across space or feature dimensions. To the extent that the effects of adaptation can be predicted, images from new environments could be “pre-adapted” to match them to the observer, eliminating the need for observers to adapt. PMID:25281412

  17. A reduced adaptive observer for multivariable systems. [using reduced dynamic ordering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, R. L.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    An adaptive observer for multivariable systems is presented for which the dynamic order of the observer is reduced, subject to mild restrictions. The observer structure depends directly upon the multivariable structure of the system rather than a transformation to a single-output system. The number of adaptive gains is at most the sum of the order of the system and the number of input parameters being adapted. Moreover, for the relatively frequent specific cases for which the number of required adaptive gains is less than the sum of system order and input parameters, the number of these gains is easily determined by inspection of the system structure. This adaptive observer possesses all the properties ascribed to the single-input single-output adpative observer. Like the other adaptive observers some restriction is required of the allowable system command input to guarantee convergence of the adaptive algorithm, but the restriction is more lenient than that required by the full-order multivariable observer. This reduced observer is not restricted to cycle systems.

  18. Phase and speed synchronization control of four eccentric rotors driven by induction motors in a linear vibratory feeder with unknown time-varying load torques using adaptive sliding mode control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxi; Zhang, Xueliang; Chen, Xiaozhe; Wen, Bangchun; Wang, Bo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, phase and speed synchronization control of four eccentric rotors (ERs) driven by induction motors in a linear vibratory feeder with unknown time-varying load torques is studied. Firstly, the electromechanical coupling model of the linear vibratory feeder is established by associating induction motor's model with the dynamic model of the system, which is a typical under actuated model. According to the characteristics of the linear vibratory feeder, the complex control problem of the under actuated electromechanical coupling model converts to phase and speed synchronization control of four ERs. In order to keep the four ERs operating synchronously with zero phase differences, phase and speed synchronization controllers are designed by employing adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) algorithm via a modified master-slave structure. The stability of the controllers is proved by Lyapunov stability theorem. The proposed controllers are verified by simulation via Matlab/Simulink program and compared with the conventional sliding mode control (SMC) algorithm. The results show the proposed controllers can reject the time-varying load torques effectively and four ERs can operate synchronously with zero phase differences. Moreover, the control performance is better than the conventional SMC algorithm and the chattering phenomenon is attenuated. Furthermore, the effects of reference speed and parametric perturbations are discussed to show the strong robustness of the proposed controllers. Finally, experiments on a simple vibratory test bench are operated by using the proposed controllers and without control, respectively, to validate the effectiveness of the proposed controllers further.

  19. Adapting a Planetary Science Observational Facility for Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, P.; DFN Team

    2016-09-01

    The Desert Fireball Network (DFN) is designed to track meteoroids entering the atmosphere, determine pre-entry orbits (their origin in the solar system), and pinpoint fall positions for recovery by field teams. Fireball observatories are sited at remote dark-sky sites across Australia - logistics for power, sensor platforms, and data connection are in place. Each observatory is a fully autonomous unit, taking 36MP all-sky images (with fisheye lenses) throughout the night, capable of operating for 12 months in a harsh environment, and storing all imagery collected over that period. They are intelligent imaging systems, using neural network algorithms to recognize and report fireball events. An automated data reduction pipeline delivers orbital data and meteorite fall positions. Currently the DFN stands at 50 observing stations covering 2.5 million km2. A sub-set of the existing stations will be upgraded with a parallel camera package using 50mm prime lenses. Paired stations will allow triangulation. The high resolution array would deliver a Gpixel tiled image of the visible sky every 10 sec, at 20 arcsec resolution, with a limiting magnitude of 13 in a 10 sec snapshot. There are benefits in transient astronomy (optical flashes associated with gamma-ray bursts; flares from sources that generate ultra-high energy cosmic rays), and space situational awareness. The hardware upgrade would extend the resolution of the DFN into the V=11-12 magnitude range for objects in LEO, allowing us to observe significant activity during the terminator period. The result would be a wide field array, capable of triangulation, with a 3500km baseline enabling a larger terminator observing window.

  20. Designing Good Slides. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Disease Control (DHEW/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    This guide is designed to help those who want to illustrate material in a formal presentation using 35mm double-frame slides, and it is also useful as a guide for teaching students how to work with slides. The guide provides a step-by-step procedure for each format. For instance, those who want to design a slide with copy only would go through a…

  1. Neural network-based adaptive controller design of robotic manipulators with an observer.

    PubMed

    Sun, F; Sun, Z; Woo, P Y

    2001-01-01

    A neural network (NN)-based adaptive controller with an observer is proposed for the trajectory tracking of robotic manipulators with unknown dynamics nonlinearities. It is assumed that the robotic manipulator has only joint angle position measurements. A linear observer is used to estimate the robot joint angle velocity, while NNs are employed to further improve the control performance of the controlled system through approximating the modified robot dynamics function. The adaptive controller for robots with an observer can guarantee the uniform ultimate bounds of the tracking errors and the observer errors as well as the bounds of the NN weights. For performance comparisons, the conventional adaptive algorithm with an observer using linearity in parameters of the robot dynamics is also developed in the same control framework as the NN approach for online approximating unknown nonlinearities of the robot dynamics. Main theoretical results for designing such an observer-based adaptive controller with the NN approach using multilayer NNs with sigmoidal activation functions, as well as with the conventional adaptive approach using linearity in parameters of the robot dynamics are given. The performance comparisons between the NN approach and the conventional adaptation approach with an observer is carried out to show the advantages of the proposed control approaches through simulation studies.

  2. Application of Sliding Mode Methods to the Design of Reconfigurable Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Scott R.

    2002-01-01

    Observer-based sliding mode control is investigated for application to aircraft reconfigurable flight control. A comprehensive overview of reconfigurable flight control is given, including, a review of the current state-of-the-art within the subdisciplines of fault detection, parameter identification, adaptive control schemes, and dynamic control allocation. Of the adaptive control methods reviewed, sliding mode control (SMC) appears very promising due its property of invariance to matched uncertainty. An overview of sliding mode control is given and its remarkable properties are demonstrated by example. Sliding mode methods, however, are difficult to implement because unmodeled parasitic dynamics cause immediate and severe instability. This presents a challenge for all practical applications with limited bandwidth actuators. One method to deal with parasitic dynamics is the use of an asymptotic observer in the feedback path. Observer-based SMC is investigated, and a method for selecting observer gains is offered. An additional method for shaping the feedback loop using a filter is also developed. It is shown that this SMC prefilter is equivalent to a form of model reference hedging. A complete design procedure is given which takes advantage of the sliding mode boundary layer to recast the SMC as a linear control law. Frequency domain loop shaping is then used to design the sliding manifold. Finally, three aircraft applications are demonstrated. An F-18/HARV is used to demonstrate a SISO pitch rate tracking controller. It is also used to demonstrate a MIMO lateral-directional roll rate tracking controller. The last application is a full linear six degree-of-freedom advanced tailless fighter model. The observer-based SMC is seen to provide excellent tracking with superior robustness to parameter changes and actuator failures.

  3. Application of sliding mode methods to the design of reconfigurable flight control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Scott Russell

    Observer-based sliding mode control is investigated for application to aircraft reconfigurable flight control. A comprehensive overview of reconfigurable flight control is given, including a review of the current state-of-the-art within the subdisciplines of fault detection, parameter identification, adaptive control schemes, and dynamic control allocation. Of the adaptive control methods reviewed, sliding mode control (SMC) appears very promising due its property of invariance to matched uncertainty. An overview of sliding mode control is given and its remarkable properties are demonstrated by example. Sliding mode methods, however, are difficult to implement because unmodeled parasitic dynamics cause immediate and severe instability. This presents a challenge for all practical applications with limited bandwidth actuators. One method to deal with parasitic dynamics is the use of an asymptotic observer in the feedback path. Observer-based SMC is investigated, and a method for selecting observer gains is offered. An additional method for shaping the feedback loop using a filter is also developed. It is shown that this SMC prefilter is equivalent to a form of model reference hedging. A complete design procedure is given which takes advantage of the sliding mode boundary layer to recast the SMC as a linear control law. Frequency domain loop shaping is then used to design the sliding manifold. Finally, three aircraft applications are demonstrated. An F-18/HARV is used to demonstrate a SISO pitch rate tracking controller. It is also used to demonstrate a MIMO lateral-directional roll rate tracking controller. The last application is a full linear six degree-of-freedom advanced tailless fighter model. The observer-based SMC is seen to provide excellent tracking with superior robustness to parameter changes and actuator failures.

  4. Direct Adaptive Neural Control for a Class of Uncertain Nonaffine Nonlinear Systems Based on Disturbance Observer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mou; Ge, Shuzhi Sam

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, the direct adaptive neural control is proposed for a class of uncertain nonaffine nonlinear systems with unknown nonsymmetric input saturation. Based on the implicit function theorem and mean value theorem, both state feedback and output feedback direct adaptive controls are developed using neural networks (NNs) and a disturbance observer. A compounded disturbance is defined to take into account of the effect of the unknown external disturbance, the unknown nonsymmetric input saturation, and the approximation error of NN. Then, a disturbance observer is developed to estimate the unknown compounded disturbance, and it is established that the estimate error converges to a compact set if appropriate observer design parameters are chosen. Both state feedback and output feedback direct adaptive controls can guarantee semiglobal uniform boundedness of the closed-loop system signals as rigorously proved by Lyapunov analysis. Numerical simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed direct adaptive neural control techniques.

  5. Herbaceous Ornamental Plants. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Still, Steven

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with commercially important herbaceous ornamental plants. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 338 slides illustrating 150 different plants. Generally, two slides are used to illustrate each plant: one slide shows…

  6. Mailing microscope slides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many insects feed agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants and cause millions of dollars of damage annually. Identification for some of these require the preparation of a microscope slide for examination. There are times when a microscope slide may need to be sent away to a speci...

  7. Partial Adaptation of Obtained and Observed Value Signals Preserves Information about Gains and Losses

    PubMed Central

    Baddeley, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N.; Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Given that the range of rewarding and punishing outcomes of actions is large but neural coding capacity is limited, efficient processing of outcomes by the brain is necessary. One mechanism to increase efficiency is to rescale neural output to the range of outcomes expected in the current context, and process only experienced deviations from this expectation. However, this mechanism comes at the cost of not being able to discriminate between unexpectedly low losses when times are bad versus unexpectedly high gains when times are good. Thus, too much adaptation would result in disregarding information about the nature and absolute magnitude of outcomes, preventing learning about the longer-term value structure of the environment. Here we investigate the degree of adaptation in outcome coding brain regions in humans, for directly experienced outcomes and observed outcomes. We scanned participants while they performed a social learning task in gain and loss blocks. Multivariate pattern analysis showed two distinct networks of brain regions adapt to the most likely outcomes within a block. Frontostriatal areas adapted to directly experienced outcomes, whereas lateral frontal and temporoparietal regions adapted to observed social outcomes. Critically, in both cases, adaptation was incomplete and information about whether the outcomes arose in a gain block or a loss block was retained. Univariate analysis confirmed incomplete adaptive coding in these regions but also detected nonadapting outcome signals. Thus, although neural areas rescale their responses to outcomes for efficient coding, they adapt incompletely and keep track of the longer-term incentives available in the environment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Optimal value-based choice requires that the brain precisely and efficiently represents positive and negative outcomes. One way to increase efficiency is to adapt responding to the most likely outcomes in a given context. However, too strong adaptation would result

  8. Comparing and contrasting observed adaptations in three deltas: the Ganges-Meghna-Brahmaputra, Mahanadi and Volta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, R. J.; Suckall, N.; Mensah, A.; Mondal, S.; Dey, S.; Hazra, S.

    2015-12-01

    In low and middle-income countries, many deltaic communities directly depend on the natural environment for income and well-being. Current environmental concerns that threaten deltaic communities, such as increasing salinity, sedimentation, erosion and subsidence are likely to be exacerbated by climate change and variability, for example sea-level rise, increased storminess and rising temperatures. Such changes, along with other social and environmental stressors, mean that communities must adapt. This paper outlines findings of a systematic review of the peer-reviewed and grey literature that examines observed adaptations in three deltas of differing sizes in various geographical contexts: the Ganges-Meghna-Brahmaputra in India and Bangladesh, the Mahanadi in India, and the Volta in Ghana. It compares and contrasts various elements of observed adaptations, including who is driving the adaptation, the beneficiaries, barriers to participation and evidence for maladaptation. The predominant drivers of adaptation vary from government (at state level in India and national level in Bangladesh) and NGOs (in Ghana). Autonomous adaptations are not widely reported in the literature from any of the deltas. In all three deltas there is a focus on supporting adaptation in farming rather than fishing; despite the fact that fisheries contribute to local food security as well as national economies. Lack of access to financial, natural, physical and human capital are common barriers to adaptation in all three deltas. Additionally the Indian literature in particular highlights the lack of coordination between different government departments, coupled with an excessively top-down (state-driven) approach to adaptation. Maladaptation is most commonly reported in the literature from Bangladesh, for example, loss of employment of inland fishermen in embanked areas. The paper concludes by highlighting some of the implications of these findings for adaptation policy in deltas.

  9. Filter accuracy for the Lorenz 96 model: Fixed versus adaptive observation operators

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, Andrew M.; Shukla, Abhishek; Sanz-Alonso, Daniel; Law, K. J. H.

    2016-02-23

    In the context of filtering chaotic dynamical systems it is well-known that partial observations, if sufficiently informative, can be used to control the inherent uncertainty due to chaos. The purpose of this paper is to investigate, both theoretically and numerically, conditions on the observations of chaotic systems under which they can be accurately filtered. In particular, we highlight the advantage of adaptive observation operators over fixed ones. The Lorenz ’96 model is used to exemplify our findings. Here, we consider discrete-time and continuous-time observations in our theoretical developments. We prove that, for fixed observation operator, the 3DVAR filter can recover the system state within a neighbourhood determined by the size of the observational noise. It is required that a sufficiently large proportion of the state vector is observed, and an explicit form for such sufficient fixed observation operator is given. Numerical experiments, where the data is incorporated by use of the 3DVAR and extended Kalman filters, suggest that less informative fixed operators than given by our theory can still lead to accurate signal reconstruction. Adaptive observation operators are then studied numerically; we show that, for carefully chosen adaptive observation operators, the proportion of the state vector that needs to be observed is drastically smaller than with a fixed observation operator. Indeed, we show that the number of state coordinates that need to be observed may even be significantly smaller than the total number of positive Lyapunov exponents of the underlying system.

  10. Grain boundary sliding in wires with bamboo structure

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Petersen, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    Grain boundary sliding during the torsional creep deformation of austenitic stainless steel wires (Fe-15 wt % Cr-15 wt % Ni) with bamboo structures has been investigated. At 1100/sup 0/K, the sliding rate du/dt is approximately proportional to tau/sup 2.5/ where tau is the applied shear stress. Although Reading and Smith's (Phil. Mag. A, 51, 71 (1985)) model of lattice-dislocation grain boundary sliding has shortcomings, it predicts the observed sliding rates quite well. At sufficiently small grain sizes and low stresses, the observed nonlinear grain boundary sliding may inhibit diffusional creep.

  11. Texturing in metals as a result of sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with copper, nickel, iron and cobalt sliding on themselves in air and argon. The resulting wear surfaces were examined by X-ray analysis to determine if surface texturing had occurred as a result of sliding. Results of the investigation indicate that, for the face-centered-cubic metals copper and nickel, a (111) texture develops with the (111) planes tilted 10 deg in the direction of sliding. The body-centered-cubic metal iron exhibited a (110) texture with the (111) direction oriented in the direction of sliding. It also exhibited a 10 deg tilt in the direction of sliding. The environment influenced the results in that the degree of texture observed in argon was less than that seen in air for iron. No texturing was observed for the close-packed-hexagonal metal cobalt. Recrystallization was observed with copper as a result of sliding.

  12. Texturing in metals as a result of sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with copper, nickel, iron, and cobalt sliding on themselves in air and argon. The resulting wear surfaces were examined with X-ray analysis to determine if surface texturing had occurred as a result of sliding. Results of the investigation indicate that, for the face-centered-cubic metals copper and nickel, a (111) texture develops with the (111) planes tilted 10 deg in the direction of sliding. The body-centered-cubic metal iron exhibited a (110) texture with the (100) direction oriented in the direction of sliding. It also exhibited a 10 deg tilt in the direction of sliding. The environment influenced the results in that the degree of texture observed in argon was less than that seen in air for iron. No texturing was observed for the close-packed-hexagonal metal cobalt. Recrystallization was observed with copper as a result of sliding.

  13. Design for slides.

    PubMed

    Johns, M

    1995-09-01

    The basic principles of design for projection slides are discussed, with particular reference to the impact of the personal computer and commercial presentation software on the material that is destined to end up on the screen at meetings and in seminar rooms. While modern software can be a boon to the presenter, allowing simple creation of slides, it can also encourage some of the worst excesses. The keynote of the design of slides for educational purposes should be simplicity, and ways of achieving simple but effective results are described.

  14. Prototype Slide Stainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The prototype slide staining system capable of performing both one-component Wright's staining of blood smears and eight-step Gram staining of heat fixed slides of microorganisms is described. Attention was given to liquid containment, waste handling, absence of contamination from previous staining, and stability of the staining reagents. The unit is self-contained, capable of independent operation under one- or zero-g conditions, and compatible with Skylab A.

  15. An Airship Slide Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E R; Pickering, S F

    1924-01-01

    This report prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, describes an airship slide rule developed by the Gas-Chemistry Section of the Bureau of Standards, at the request of the Bureau of Engineering of the Navy Department. It is intended primarily to give rapid solutions of a few problems of frequent occurrence in airship navigation, but it can be used to advantage in solving a great variety of problems, involving volumes, lifting powers, temperatures, pressures, altitudes and the purity of the balloon gas. The rule is graduated to read directly in the units actually used in making observations, constants and conversion factors being taken care of by the length and location of the scales. It is thought that with this rule practically any problem likely to arise in this class of work can be readily solved after the user has become familiar with the operation of the rule; and that the solution will, in most cases, be as accurate as the data warrant.

  16. Selected Landscape Plants. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Kevin

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with commercially important woody ornamental landscape plants. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 253 slides illustrating 92 different plants. Several slides are used to illustrate each plant: besides a view of…

  17. Fundamentals of the Slide Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, Susan Zee

    This paper is an introduction to the fundamentals of the art (including architecture) slide library, with some emphasis on basic procedures of the science slide library. Information in this paper is particularly relevant to the college, university, and museum slide library. Topics addressed include: (1) history of the slide library; (2) duties of…

  18. Ornamental Landscape Grasses. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Still, Steven M.; Adams, Denise W.

    This slide script to accompany the slide series, Ornamental Landscape Grasses, contains photographs of the 167 slides and accompanying narrative text intended for use in the study and identification of commercially important ornamental grasses and grasslike plants. Narrative text is provided for slides of 62 different perennial and annual species…

  19. Filter accuracy for the Lorenz 96 model: Fixed versus adaptive observation operators

    DOE PAGES

    Stuart, Andrew M.; Shukla, Abhishek; Sanz-Alonso, Daniel; ...

    2016-02-23

    In the context of filtering chaotic dynamical systems it is well-known that partial observations, if sufficiently informative, can be used to control the inherent uncertainty due to chaos. The purpose of this paper is to investigate, both theoretically and numerically, conditions on the observations of chaotic systems under which they can be accurately filtered. In particular, we highlight the advantage of adaptive observation operators over fixed ones. The Lorenz ’96 model is used to exemplify our findings. Here, we consider discrete-time and continuous-time observations in our theoretical developments. We prove that, for fixed observation operator, the 3DVAR filter can recovermore » the system state within a neighbourhood determined by the size of the observational noise. It is required that a sufficiently large proportion of the state vector is observed, and an explicit form for such sufficient fixed observation operator is given. Numerical experiments, where the data is incorporated by use of the 3DVAR and extended Kalman filters, suggest that less informative fixed operators than given by our theory can still lead to accurate signal reconstruction. Adaptive observation operators are then studied numerically; we show that, for carefully chosen adaptive observation operators, the proportion of the state vector that needs to be observed is drastically smaller than with a fixed observation operator. Indeed, we show that the number of state coordinates that need to be observed may even be significantly smaller than the total number of positive Lyapunov exponents of the underlying system.« less

  20. Multiscale parameterization with adaptive regularization for improved assimilation of nonlocal observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Oliver, Dean S.

    2012-04-01

    Dynamic data for parameter estimation in groundwater hydrology are often strongly sensitive to averages of porosity and permeability over extended regions, but only weakly sensitive to the properties of individual gridblocks. Consequently, updates of gridblock parameters from the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) will be subject to substantial error due to spurious correlations when the size of the ensemble is small. It has been shown that adaptive localization methods can reduce the magnitude of spurious correlations and regularize updates from the EnKF. In this paper we show that when data are sensitive to an average of parameters over extended regions, adaptive localization methods may eliminate true, but weak, correlations. For this type of data, there appears to be a relationship between the spatial scale of the model variables and the sensitivity of observations to the variables. By introducing a multiscale expansion with adaptive localization, we are able to increase the sensitivity to variables corresponding to large spatial scales and more accurately compute their magnitudes, while eliminating updates to variables corresponding to small spatial scales with weak correlations. Three examples with distinct features are used to compare the new method of combining adaptive localization with wavelet parameterization to the case of no localization and adaptive localization with standard gridblock parameterization. We show that the Kalman gain estimated using the wavelet parameterization with adaptive localization is less biased and has smaller root-mean-square error for the problems in which spatial averaging is important and the Kalman gain has large-scale features.

  1. Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation--Checklist: Development and Factor Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koth, Christine W.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Leaf, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    Two studies examined the validity and factor structure of the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation-Checklist, an instrument used to evaluate school-based programs. The checklist is a cost-effective alternative to the original interview format, and the factor structure is consistent across gender, race, age, and time of administration.…

  2. Five Methods to Score the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation Checklist and to Examine Group Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ze; Rohrer, David; Chuang, Chi-ching; Fujiki, Mayo; Herman, Keith; Reinke, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    This study compared 5 scoring methods in terms of their statistical assumptions. They were then used to score the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation Checklist, a measure consisting of 3 subscales and 21 Likert-type items. The 5 methods used were (a) sum/average scores of items, (b) latent factor scores with continuous indicators, (c)…

  3. Adaptive data assimilation including the effect of spatial variations in observation error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehlich, Rod

    2006-04-01

    An optimal adaptive data assimilation algorithm is derived using the maximum likelihood method based on a conditional Gaussian probability density function for the first-guess and direct observations of the state variables but including local estimates of the observation and first-guess error statistics. An interpolation of the first-guess field to the observation coordinates is not required under the assumption of locally homogeneous statistics for the random atmosphere. However, the definition of observation error requires a definition of model 'truth' which is defined as a spatial average of the continuous random atmospheric variables. Then the total observation error consists of two independent components: an instrument error and an observation sampling error defined by the spatial average of the observation and the statistics of the local turbulence. Estimates of the observation sampling error statistics are determined from an ensemble of background or first-guess fields or from the analysis of the raw data from instrumented aircraft, Doppler lidars, or radar profilers. The spatial variations of the sampling error are referenced to the local turbulence conditions at each analysis coordinate and therefore each observation can have a different observation error for each nearby analysis coordinate. The extension of the adaptive assimilation concept to include the spatial variations in observation error for statistical interpolation, 3D-Var, 4D-Var, extended Kalman filtering, and ensemble Kalman filtering is also presented for the traditional meaning of observation error, i.e. each observation is assigned a single error. The conditional analysis error is derived for a single observation at the analysis coordinate and multiple observations around the analysis point. Example calculations of the conditional analysis error are presented for a few simple set of observation and measurement geometries to demonstrate the impact of the spatially variable observation errors

  4. Strapping rowers to their sliding seat improves performance during the start of single-scull rowing.

    PubMed

    van Soest, A J Knoek; de Koning, H; Hofmijster, M J

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of strapping rowers to their sliding seat on performance during 75 m on-water starting trials was investigated. Well-trained rowers performed 75 m maximum-effort starts using an instrumented single scull equipped with a redesigned sliding seat system, both under normal conditions and while strapped to the sliding seat. Strapping rowers to their sliding seat resulted in a 0.45 s lead after 75 m, corresponding to an increase in average boat velocity of about 2.5%. Corresponding effect sizes were large. No significant changes were observed in general stroke cycle characteristics. No indications of additional boat heaving and pitching under strapped conditions were found. The increase in boat velocity is estimated to correspond to an increase in average mechanical power output during the start of on-water rowing between 5% and 10%, which is substantial but smaller than the 12% increase found in a previous study on ergometer starting. We conclude that, after a very short period of adaptation to the strapped condition, single-scull starting performance is substantially improved when the rower is strapped to the sliding seat.

  5. Clear widens the field for observations of the Sun with multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Dirk; Gorceix, Nicolas; Goode, Philip R.; Marino, Jose; Rimmele, Thomas; Berkefeld, Thomas; Wöger, Friedrich; Zhang, Xianyu; Rigaut, François; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    The multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) pathfinder Clear on the New Solar Telescope in Big Bear Lake has provided the first-ever MCAO-corrected observations of the Sun that show a clearly and visibly widened corrected field of view compared to quasi-simultaneous observations with classical adaptive optics (CAO) correction. Clear simultaneously uses three deformable mirrors, each conjugated to a different altitude, to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. While the MCAO correction was most effective over an angle that is approximately three times wider than the angle that was corrected by CAO, the full 53'' field of view did benefit from MCAO correction. We further demonstrate that ground-layer-only correction is attractive for solar observations as a complementary flavor of adaptive optics for observational programs that require homogenous seeing improvement over a wide field rather than diffraction-limited resolution. We show illustrative images of solar granulation and of a sunspot obtained on different days in July 2016, and present a brief quantitative analysis of the generalized Fried parameters of the images. The movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  7. Slowing the Summer Slide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lorna

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that summer slide--the loss of learning over the summer break--is a huge contributor to the achievement gap between low-income students and their higher-income peers. In fact, some researchers have concluded that two-thirds of the 9th-grade reading achievement gap can be explained by unequal access to summer learning opportunities…

  8. Black and White Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Jackie

    1979-01-01

    Outlines procedures for using some photographic techniques to start a black and white slide collection. Instructions are given for: (1) necessary equipment and materials; (2) photographing images such as photos, charts or drawings; (3) developing the film; and (4) setting up the filing system. Photographs and drawings illustrate the process. (AMH)

  9. Ecological Change, Sliding Baselines and the Importance of Historical Data: Lessons from Combing Observational and Quantitative Data on a Temperate Reef Over 70 Years

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Giulia; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Parravicini, Valeriano; Rovere, Alessio; Peirano, Andrea; Montefalcone, Monica; Massa, Francesco; Morri, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of environmental change on ecosystems requires the identification of baselines that may act as reference conditions. However, the continuous change of these references challenges our ability to define the true natural status of ecosystems. The so-called sliding baseline syndrome can be overcome through the analysis of quantitative time series, which are, however, extremely rare. Here we show how combining historical quantitative data with descriptive ‘naturalistic’ information arranged in a chronological chain allows highlighting long-term trends and can be used to inform present conservation schemes. We analysed the long-term change of a coralligenous reef, a marine habitat endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. The coralligenous assemblages of Mesco Reef (Ligurian Sea, NW Mediterranean) have been studied, although discontinuously, since 1937 thus making available both detailed descriptive information and scanty quantitative data: while the former was useful to understand the natural history of the ecosystem, the analysis of the latter was of paramount importance to provide a formal measure of change over time. Epibenthic assemblages remained comparatively stable until the 1990s, when species replacement, invasion by alien algae, and biotic homogenisation occurred within few years, leading to a new and completely different ecosystem state. The shift experienced by the coralligenous assemblages of Mesco Reef was probably induced by a combination of seawater warming and local human pressures, the latter mainly resulting in increased water turbidity; in turn, cumulative stress may have favoured the establishment of alien species. This study showed that the combined analysis of quantitative and descriptive historical data represent a precious knowledge to understand ecosystem trends over time and provide help to identify baselines for ecological management. PMID:25714413

  10. Hybrid neural network fraction integral terminal sliding mode control of an Inchworm robot manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mehran; Ghanbari, Ahmad; Ettefagh, Mir Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes a control scheme based on the fraction integral terminal sliding mode control and adaptive neural network. It deals with the system model uncertainties and the disturbances to improve the control performance of the Inchworm robot manipulator. A fraction integral terminal sliding mode control applies to the Inchworm robot manipulator to obtain the initial stability. Also, an adaptive neural network is designed to approximate the system uncertainties and unknown disturbances to reduce chattering phenomena. The weight matrix of the proposed adaptive neural network can be updated online, according to the current state error information. The stability of the proposed control method is proved by Lyapunov theory. The performance of the adaptive neural network fraction integral terminal sliding mode control is compared with three other conventional controllers such as sliding mode control, integral terminal sliding mode control and fraction integral terminal sliding mode control. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  11. Numerical Modelling of Tsunami Generated by Deformable Submarine Slides: Parameterisation of Slide Dynamics for Coupling to Tsunami Propagation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. C.; Collins, G. S.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Mouradian, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical modelling informs risk assessment of tsunami generated by submarine slides; however, for large-scale slides modelling can be complex and computationally challenging. Many previous numerical studies have approximated slides as rigid blocks that moved according to prescribed motion. However, wave characteristics are strongly dependent on the motion of the slide and previous work has recommended that more accurate representation of slide dynamics is needed. We have used the finite-element, adaptive-mesh CFD model Fluidity, to perform multi-material simulations of deformable submarine slide-generated waves at real world scales for a 2D scenario in the Gulf of Mexico. Our high-resolution approach represents slide dynamics with good accuracy, compared to other numerical simulations of this scenario, but precludes tracking of wave propagation over large distances. To enable efficient modelling of further propagation of the waves, we investigate an approach to extract information about the slide evolution from our multi-material simulations in order to drive a single-layer wave propagation model, also using Fluidity, which is much less computationally expensive. The extracted submarine slide geometry and position as a function of time are parameterised using simple polynomial functions. The polynomial functions are used to inform a prescribed velocity boundary condition in a single-layer simulation, mimicking the effect the submarine slide motion has on the water column. The approach is verified by successful comparison of wave generation in the single-layer model with that recorded in the multi-material, multi-layer simulations. We then extend this approach to 3D for further validation of this methodology (using the Gulf of Mexico scenario proposed by Horrillo et al., 2013) and to consider the effect of lateral spreading. This methodology is then used to simulate a series of hypothetical submarine slide events in the Arctic Ocean (based on evidence of historic

  12. Adaptive nonlinear observer for state and unknown parameter estimation in noisy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Krishna; Valibeygi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive observer for Lipschitz nonlinear systems and dissipative nonlinear systems in the presence of disturbances and sensor noise. The observer is based on an H∞ observer that can estimate both the system states and unknown parameters by minimising a cost function consisting of the sum of the square integrals of the estimation errors in the states and unknown parameters. The paper presents necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of the observer, and the equations for determining observer gains are formulated as linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) that can be solved offline using commercially available LMI solvers. The observer design has also been extended to the case of time-varying unknown parameters. The use of the observer is demonstrated through illustrative examples and the performance is compared with extended Kalman filtering. Compared to previous results on nonlinear observers, the proposed observer is more computationally efficient, and guarantees state and parameter estimation for two very broad classes of nonlinear systems (Lipschitz and dissipative nonlinear systems) in the presence of input disturbances and sensor noise. In addition, the proposed observer does not require online computation of the observer gain.

  13. Adaptive super-twisting observer for estimation of random road excitation profile in automotive suspension systems.

    PubMed

    Rath, J J; Veluvolu, K C; Defoort, M

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of road excitation profile is important for evaluation of vehicle stability and vehicle suspension performance for autonomous vehicle control systems. In this work, the nonlinear dynamics of the active automotive system that is excited by the unknown road excitation profile are considered for modeling. To address the issue of estimation of road profile, we develop an adaptive supertwisting observer for state and unknown road profile estimation. Under Lipschitz conditions for the nonlinear functions, the convergence of the estimation error is proven. Simulation results with Ford Fiesta MK2 demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer for state and unknown input estimation for nonlinear active suspension system.

  14. Study on Chaotic Fault Tolerant Synchronization Control Based on Adaptive Observer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongming; Huang, Xinyu; Ren, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Aiming at the abrupt faults of the chaotic system, an adaptive observer is proposed to trace the states of the master system. The sufficient conditions for synchronization of such chaotic systems are also derived. Then the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are illustrated via numerical simulations of chaotic Chen system. Finally, the proposed synchronization schemes are applied to secure communication system successfully. The experimental results demonstrate that the employed observer can manage real-time fault diagnosis and parameter identification as well as states tracing of the master system, and so the synchronization of master system and slave system is achieved. PMID:24959615

  15. Adaptive Super-Twisting Observer for Estimation of Random Road Excitation Profile in Automotive Suspension Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rath, J. J.; Veluvolu, K. C.; Defoort, M.

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of road excitation profile is important for evaluation of vehicle stability and vehicle suspension performance for autonomous vehicle control systems. In this work, the nonlinear dynamics of the active automotive system that is excited by the unknown road excitation profile are considered for modeling. To address the issue of estimation of road profile, we develop an adaptive supertwisting observer for state and unknown road profile estimation. Under Lipschitz conditions for the nonlinear functions, the convergence of the estimation error is proven. Simulation results with Ford Fiesta MK2 demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer for state and unknown input estimation for nonlinear active suspension system. PMID:24683321

  16. On Performability Theory and the Inverse Sliding Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    motion of a homogeneous circular ring or disk sliding on a plane under the action of Coulomb friction in [11]. They make some interesting observations...Algorithmic Foundations of Robotics (WAFR) 1994 Preprints, San Francisco, California. [4] S. Goyal, A. Ruina , and J. Papadopoulos. Planar Sliding With Dry... Ruina , and J. Papadopoulos. Planar Sliding With Dry Friction 2: Dynamics of Motion. Cornell University Department of Computer Science Tech Report, TR

  17. Preparing Slide Presentations on Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elberfeld, John K.

    1982-01-01

    Suggest use of well-organized slide presentation as effective way to introduce computers to large audiences and discusses how to get started--state objective, analyze audience, outline presentation, prepare slides--and equipment needed to obtain slides from television screens, miniature components, and book illustrations. References and sources…

  18. Disturbance observer based active and adaptive synchronization of energy resource chaotic system.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Meng; Li, Donghai; Zuo, Min; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, synchronization of a three-dimensional energy resource chaotic system is considered. For the sake of achieving the synchronization between the drive and response systems, two different nonlinear control approaches, i.e. active control with known parameters and adaptive control with unknown parameters, have been designed. In order to guarantee the transient performance, finite-time boundedness (FTB) and finite-time stability (FTS) are introduced in the design of active control and adaptive control, respectively. Simultaneously, in view of the existence of disturbances, a new disturbance observer is proposed to estimate the disturbance. The conditions of the asymptotic stability for the closed-loop system are obtained. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the proposed approaches.

  19. Sliding Luttinger liquid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Kane, C. L.; Lubensky, T. C.

    2001-07-01

    We study systems of coupled spin-gapped and gapless Luttinger liquids. First, we establish the existence of a sliding Luttinger liquid phase for a system of weakly coupled parallel quantum wires, with and without disorder. It is shown that the coupling can stabilize a Luttinger liquid phase in the presence of disorder. We then extend our analysis to a system of crossed Luttinger liquids and establish the stability of a non-Fermi-liquid state: the crossed sliding Luttinger liquid phase. In this phase the system exhibits a finite-temperature, long-wavelength, isotropic electric conductivity that diverges as a power law in temperature T as T-->0. This two-dimensional system has many properties of a true isotropic Luttinger liquid, though at zero temperature it becomes anisotropic. An extension of this model to a three-dimensional stack exhibits a much higher in-plane conductivity than the conductivity in a perpendicular direction.

  20. Using slides to test for changes in crown defoliation assessment methods. Part I: Visual assessment of slides.

    PubMed

    Dobbertin, Matthias; Hug, Christian; Mizoue, Nobuya

    2004-11-01

    In this study we used photographs of tree crowns to test whether the assessment methods for tree defoliation in Switzerland have changed over time. We randomly selected 24 series of slides of Norway spruce with field assessments made between 1986 and 1995. The slides were randomly arranged and assessed by three experts without prior knowledge of the year when the slide was taken or the tree number. Defoliation was assessed using the Swiss reference photo guide. Although the correlations between the field assessments and slide assessments were high (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient ranged between 0.79 and 0.83), we found significant differences between field and slide assessments (4.3 to 9% underprediction by the slide assessors) and between the slide assessments. However, no significant trends in field assessment methods could be detected. When the mean differences between field and slide assessments were subtracted, in some years, field assessors consistently underpredicted (1990, 1992) or overpredicted defoliation (1987, 1991). Defoliation tended to be overpredicted in slides taken against the light, and underpredicted for trees with more than 25% crown overlap. We conclude that slide series can be used to detect changes in assessment methods. However, potential observer bias calls for more objective methods of assessment.

  1. Improve earthquake hypocenter using adaptive simulated annealing inversion in regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal observation

    SciTech Connect

    Ry, Rexha Verdhora; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Observation of earthquakes is routinely used widely in tectonic activity observation, and also in local scale such as volcano tectonic and geothermal activity observation. It is necessary for determining the location of precise hypocenter which the process involves finding a hypocenter location that has minimum error between the observed and the calculated travel times. When solving this nonlinear inverse problem, simulated annealing inversion method can be applied to such global optimization problems, which the convergence of its solution is independent of the initial model. In this study, we developed own program codeby applying adaptive simulated annealing inversion in Matlab environment. We applied this method to determine earthquake hypocenter using several data cases which are regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal field. The travel times were calculated using ray tracing shooting method. We then compared its results with the results using Geiger’s method to analyze its reliability. Our results show hypocenter location has smaller RMS error compared to the Geiger’s result that can be statistically associated with better solution. The hypocenter of earthquakes also well correlated with geological structure in the study area. Werecommend using adaptive simulated annealing inversion to relocate hypocenter location in purpose to get precise and accurate earthquake location.

  2. Improve earthquake hypocenter using adaptive simulated annealing inversion in regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ry, Rexha Verdhora; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-01

    Observation of earthquakes is routinely used widely in tectonic activity observation, and also in local scale such as volcano tectonic and geothermal activity observation. It is necessary for determining the location of precise hypocenter which the process involves finding a hypocenter location that has minimum error between the observed and the calculated travel times. When solving this nonlinear inverse problem, simulated annealing inversion method can be applied to such global optimization problems, which the convergence of its solution is independent of the initial model. In this study, we developed own program codeby applying adaptive simulated annealing inversion in Matlab environment. We applied this method to determine earthquake hypocenter using several data cases which are regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal field. The travel times were calculated using ray tracing shooting method. We then compared its results with the results using Geiger's method to analyze its reliability. Our results show hypocenter location has smaller RMS error compared to the Geiger's result that can be statistically associated with better solution. The hypocenter of earthquakes also well correlated with geological structure in the study area. Werecommend using adaptive simulated annealing inversion to relocate hypocenter location in purpose to get precise and accurate earthquake location.

  3. A global logrank test for adaptive treatment strategies based on observational studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Valenstein, Marcia; Pfeiffer, Paul; Ganoczy, Dara

    2014-02-28

    In studying adaptive treatment strategies, a natural question that is of paramount interest is whether there is any significant difference among all possible treatment strategies. When the outcome variable of interest is time-to-event, we propose an inverse probability weighted logrank test for testing the equivalence of a fixed set of pre-specified adaptive treatment strategies based on data from an observational study. The weights take into account both the possible selection bias in an observational study and the fact that the same subject may be consistent with more than one treatment strategy. The asymptotic distribution of the weighted logrank statistic under the null hypothesis is obtained. We show that, in an observational study where the treatment selection probabilities need to be estimated, the estimation of these probabilities does not have an effect on the asymptotic distribution of the weighted logrank statistic, as long as the estimation of the parameters in the models for these probabilities is n-consistent. Finite sample performance of the test is assessed via a simulation study. We also show in the simulation that the test can be pretty robust to misspecification of the models for the probabilities of treatment selection. The method is applied to analyze data on antidepressant adherence time from an observational database maintained at the Department of Veterans Affairs' Serious Mental Illness Treatment Research and Evaluation Center.

  4. Reducing slide sheet injury.

    PubMed

    Varcin-Coad, Lynn

    2008-12-01

    Slide sheets are often stated to be the cause of hand and forearm injuries. While there are many other possible reasons injuries to nursing staff, carer and client occur, the most important linking factors relating to musculoskeletal disorders and manual handling of people is the ongoing inappropriateness or lack of suitably designed and equipped work areas. As physiotherapist Lynn Varcin-Coad writes, staff are bearing the brunt of inefficiencies of design and lack of high order risk control.

  5. Influence of normal loads and sliding velocities on friction properties of engineering plastics sliding against rough counterfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Chowdhury, M. A.; Rahaman, M. L.; Oumer, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Friction properties of plastic materials are very important under dry sliding contact conditions for bearing applications. In the present research, friction properties of engineering plastics such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and nylon are investigated under dry sliding contact conditions. In the experiments, PTFE and nylon slide against different rough counterfaces such as mild steel and stainless steel 316 (SS 316). Frictional tests are carried out at low loads 5, 7.5 and 10 N, low sliding velocities 0.5, 0.75 and 1 m/s and relative humidity 70%. The obtained results reveal that friction coefficient of PTFE increases with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities within the observed range. On the other hand, frictional values of nylon decrease with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities. It is observed that in general, these polymers show higher frictional values when sliding against SS 316 rather than mild steel. During running-in process, friction coefficient of PTFE and nylon steadily increases with the increase in rubbing time and after certain duration of rubbing, it remains at steady level. At identical operating conditions, the frictional values are significantly different depending on normal load, sliding velocity and material pair. It is also observed that in general, the influence of normal load on the friction properties of PTFE and nylon is greater than that of sliding velocity.

  6. Slide system for machine tools

    DOEpatents

    Douglass, Spivey S.; Green, Walter L.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a machine tool which permits the machining of nonaxisymmetric surfaces on a workpiece while rotating the workpiece about a central axis of rotation. The machine tool comprises a conventional two-slide system (X-Y) with one of these slides being provided with a relatively short travel high-speed auxiliary slide which carries the material-removing tool. The auxiliary slide is synchronized with the spindle speed and the position of the other two slides and provides a high-speed reciprocating motion required for the displacement of the cutting tool for generating a nonaxisymmetric surface at a selected location on the workpiece.

  7. Slide system for machine tools

    DOEpatents

    Douglass, S.S.; Green, W.L.

    1980-06-12

    The present invention relates to a machine tool which permits the machining of nonaxisymmetric surfaces on a workpiece while rotating the workpiece about a central axis of rotation. The machine tool comprises a conventional two-slide system (X-Y) with one of these slides being provided with a relatively short travel high-speed auxiliary slide which carries the material-removing tool. The auxiliary slide is synchronized with the spindle speed and the position of the other two slides and provides a high-speed reciprocating motion required for the displacement of the cutting tool for generating a nonaxisymmetric surface at a selected location on the workpiece.

  8. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  9. Binary stars observed with adaptive optics at the starfire optical range

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, Jack D.

    2014-03-01

    In reviewing observations taken of binary stars used as calibration objects for non-astronomical purposes with adaptive optics on the 3.5 m Starfire Optical Range telescope over the past 2 years, one-fifth of them were found to be off-orbit. In order to understand such a high number of discrepant position angles and separations, all previous observations in the Washington Double Star Catalog for these rogue binaries were obtained from the Naval Observatory. Adding our observations to these yields new orbits for all, resolving the discrepancies. We have detected both components of γ Gem for the first time, and we have shown that 7 Cam is an optical pair, not physically bound.

  10. Flexible Description and Adaptive Processing of Earth Observation Data through the BigEarth Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgan, Dorian; Bacu, Victor; Stefanut, Teodor; Nandra, Cosmin; Mihon, Danut

    2016-04-01

    The Earth Observation data repositories extending periodically by several terabytes become a critical issue for organizations. The management of the storage capacity of such big datasets, accessing policy, data protection, searching, and complex processing require high costs that impose efficient solutions to balance the cost and value of data. Data can create value only when it is used, and the data protection has to be oriented toward allowing innovation that sometimes depends on creative people, which achieve unexpected valuable results through a flexible and adaptive manner. The users need to describe and experiment themselves different complex algorithms through analytics in order to valorize data. The analytics uses descriptive and predictive models to gain valuable knowledge and information from data analysis. Possible solutions for advanced processing of big Earth Observation data are given by the HPC platforms such as cloud. With platforms becoming more complex and heterogeneous, the developing of applications is even harder and the efficient mapping of these applications to a suitable and optimum platform, working on huge distributed data repositories, is challenging and complex as well, even by using specialized software services. From the user point of view, an optimum environment gives acceptable execution times, offers a high level of usability by hiding the complexity of computing infrastructure, and supports an open accessibility and control to application entities and functionality. The BigEarth platform [1] supports the entire flow of flexible description of processing by basic operators and adaptive execution over cloud infrastructure [2]. The basic modules of the pipeline such as the KEOPS [3] set of basic operators, the WorDeL language [4], the Planner for sequential and parallel processing, and the Executor through virtual machines, are detailed as the main components of the BigEarth platform [5]. The presentation exemplifies the development

  11. Adaptive Optics Observations of Titan from the W.M. Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, S. G.; Macintosh, B.; Max, C. E.; Roe, H.; de Pater, I.; Young, E. F.; McKay, C. P.

    2000-10-01

    Saturn's largest moon Titan is the only satellite in the solar system with a substantial atmosphere. Photolysis of methane creates a hydrocarbon haze in Titan's atmosphere that is opaque to visible light. The new adaptive optics system on the 10-meter W.M. Keck Telescope enables us to observe Titan with a resolution of 0.04 arcseconds, or 20 resolution elements across the disk. By observing at near-infrared wavelengths that are methane band windows, we can see through Titan's hydrocarbon haze to the surface beneath. We will report on adaptive optics images of Titan taken in 1999, including broadband engineering images taken in February, August, and September, and broadband K and narrowband J and H band images taken in October. The narrowband filters have been chosen to selectively probe Titan's surface or atmosphere. Using this data combined with atmospheric modeling, we are able to determine surface Titan's surface albedo and properties of its hydrocarbon haze layer. This research was supported in part by the STC Program of the National Science Foundation under Agreement No. AST-9876783, and in part under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Univ. of Calif. under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  12. All-in-one 3D printed microscopy chamber for multidimensional imaging, the UniverSlide.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, Kevin; Andrique, Laetitia; Feyeux, Maxime; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Nassoy, Pierre; Recher, Gaëlle

    2017-02-10

    While live 3D high resolution microscopy techniques are developing rapidly, their use for biological applications is partially hampered by practical difficulties such as the lack of a versatile sample chamber. Here, we propose the design of a multi-usage observation chamber adapted for live 3D bio-imaging. We show the usefulness and practicality of this chamber, which we named the UniverSlide, for live imaging of two case examples, namely multicellular systems encapsulated in sub-millimeter hydrogel shells and zebrafish larvae. We also demonstrate its versatility and compatibility with all microscopy devices by using upright or inverted microscope configurations after loading the UniverSlide with fixed or living samples. Further, the device is applicable for medium/high throughput screening and automatized multi-position image acquisition, providing a constraint-free but stable and parallelized immobilization of the samples. The frame of the UniverSlide is fabricated using a stereolithography 3D printer, has the size of a microscopy slide, is autoclavable and sealed with a removable lid, which makes it suitable for use in a controlled culture environment. We describe in details how to build this chamber and we provide all the files necessary to print the different pieces in the lab.

  13. All-in-one 3D printed microscopy chamber for multidimensional imaging, the UniverSlide

    PubMed Central

    Alessandri, Kevin; Andrique, Laetitia; Feyeux, Maxime; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Nassoy, Pierre; Recher, Gaëlle

    2017-01-01

    While live 3D high resolution microscopy techniques are developing rapidly, their use for biological applications is partially hampered by practical difficulties such as the lack of a versatile sample chamber. Here, we propose the design of a multi-usage observation chamber adapted for live 3D bio-imaging. We show the usefulness and practicality of this chamber, which we named the UniverSlide, for live imaging of two case examples, namely multicellular systems encapsulated in sub-millimeter hydrogel shells and zebrafish larvae. We also demonstrate its versatility and compatibility with all microscopy devices by using upright or inverted microscope configurations after loading the UniverSlide with fixed or living samples. Further, the device is applicable for medium/high throughput screening and automatized multi-position image acquisition, providing a constraint-free but stable and parallelized immobilization of the samples. The frame of the UniverSlide is fabricated using a stereolithography 3D printer, has the size of a microscopy slide, is autoclavable and sealed with a removable lid, which makes it suitable for use in a controlled culture environment. We describe in details how to build this chamber and we provide all the files necessary to print the different pieces in the lab. PMID:28186188

  14. All-in-one 3D printed microscopy chamber for multidimensional imaging, the UniverSlide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandri, Kevin; Andrique, Laetitia; Feyeux, Maxime; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Nassoy, Pierre; Recher, Gaëlle

    2017-02-01

    While live 3D high resolution microscopy techniques are developing rapidly, their use for biological applications is partially hampered by practical difficulties such as the lack of a versatile sample chamber. Here, we propose the design of a multi-usage observation chamber adapted for live 3D bio-imaging. We show the usefulness and practicality of this chamber, which we named the UniverSlide, for live imaging of two case examples, namely multicellular systems encapsulated in sub-millimeter hydrogel shells and zebrafish larvae. We also demonstrate its versatility and compatibility with all microscopy devices by using upright or inverted microscope configurations after loading the UniverSlide with fixed or living samples. Further, the device is applicable for medium/high throughput screening and automatized multi-position image acquisition, providing a constraint-free but stable and parallelized immobilization of the samples. The frame of the UniverSlide is fabricated using a stereolithography 3D printer, has the size of a microscopy slide, is autoclavable and sealed with a removable lid, which makes it suitable for use in a controlled culture environment. We describe in details how to build this chamber and we provide all the files necessary to print the different pieces in the lab.

  15. Gravity Slides With Magnetic Braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrick, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    Slides with magnetic braking enable safe emergency descent from tall buildings, fire-truck ladders, towers, and like. According to concept, slide includes sled that moves along stationary aluminum track tilted against top of building. Sled holds set of permanent magnets at preset small distance from surface of track. Passenger stands on, sits on, or strapped to platform on sled. Release device at top of slide holds sled in place until passenger prepared for descent.

  16. New analytical expressions of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect adapted to different observation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué, G.; Montalto, M.; Boisse, I.; Oshagh, M.; Santos, N. C.

    2013-02-01

    The Rossiter-McLaughlin (hereafter RM) effect is a key tool for measuring the projected spin-orbit angle between stellar spin axes and orbits of transiting planets. However, the measured radial velocity (RV) anomalies produced by this effect are not intrinsic and depend on both instrumental resolution and data reduction routines. Using inappropriate formulas to model the RM effect introduces biases, at least in the projected velocity Vsini⋆ compared to the spectroscopic value. Currently, only the iodine cell technique has been modeled, which corresponds to observations done by, e.g., the HIRES spectrograph of the Keck telescope. In this paper, we provide a simple expression of the RM effect specially designed to model observations done by the Gaussian fit of a cross-correlation function (CCF) as in the routines performed by the HARPS team. We derived a new analytical formulation of the RV anomaly associated to the iodine cell technique. For both formulas, we modeled the subplanet mean velocity vp and dispersion βp accurately taking the rotational broadening on the subplanet profile into account. We compare our formulas adapted to the CCF technique with simulated data generated with the numerical software SOAP-T and find good agreement up to Vsini⋆ ≲ 20 km s-1. In contrast, the analytical models simulating the two different observation techniques can disagree by about 10σ in Vsini⋆ for large spin-orbit misalignments. It is thus important to apply the adapted model when fitting data. A public code implementing the expressions derived in this paper is available at http://www.astro.up.pt/resources/arome. A copy of the code is also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/550/A53

  17. Subaru Telescope adaptive optics observations of gravitationally lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Cristian E.; Oguri, Masamune; Minowa, Yosuke; Iye, Masanori; Inada, Naohisa; Oya, Shin; Kayo, Issha; Hayano, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Ito, Meguru; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Terada, Hiroshi; Takami, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of an imaging observation campaign conducted with the Subaru Telescope adaptive optics system (IRCS+AO188) on 28 gravitationally lensed quasars and candidates (23 doubles, 1 quad, 1 possible triple, and 3 candidates) from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search. We develop a novel modelling technique that fits analytical and hybrid point spread functions (PSFs), while simultaneously measuring the relative astrometry, photometry, as well as the lens galaxy morphology. We account for systematics by simulating the observed systems using separately observed PSF stars. The measured relative astrometry is comparable with that typically achieved with the Hubble Space Telescope, even after marginalizing over the PSF uncertainty. We model for the first time the quasar host galaxies in five systems, without a priori knowledge of the PSF, and show that their luminosities follow the known correlation with the mass of the supermassive black hole. For each system, we obtain mass models far more accurate than those previously published from low-resolution data, and we show that in our sample of lensing galaxies the observed light profile is more elliptical than the mass, for ellipticity ≳0.25. We also identify eight doubles for which the sources of external and internal shear are more reliably separated, and should therefore be prioritized in monitoring campaigns aimed at measuring time delays in order to infer the Hubble constant.

  18. Section 608 Rule Presentation Slides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document presents slides informing the public about updates to the Section 608 concerning appliance disposal, refrigerant reclamation, technician certification, refrigerant sales restriction, recordkeeping, and repairing refrigerant leaks.

  19. Adaptive intermittent control: A computational model explaining motor intermittency observed in human behavior.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yutaka; Tanaka, Masato; Inoue, Yasuyuki

    2015-07-01

    It is a fundamental question how our brain performs a given motor task in a real-time fashion with the slow sensorimotor system. Computational theory proposed an influential idea of feed-forward control, but it has mainly treated the case that the movement is ballistic (such as reaching) because the motor commands should be calculated in advance of movement execution. As a possible mechanism for operating feed-forward control in continuous motor tasks (such as target tracking), we propose a control model called "adaptive intermittent control" or "segmented control," that brain adaptively divides the continuous time axis into discrete segments and executes feed-forward control in each segment. The idea of intermittent control has been proposed in the fields of control theory, biological modeling and nonlinear dynamical system. Compared with these previous models, the key of the proposed model is that the system speculatively determines the segmentation based on the future prediction and its uncertainty. The result of computer simulation showed that the proposed model realized faithful visuo-manual tracking with realistic sensorimotor delays and with less computational costs (i.e., with fewer number of segments). Furthermore, it replicated "motor intermittency", that is, intermittent discontinuities commonly observed in human movement trajectories. We discuss that the temporally segmented control is an inevitable strategy for brain which has to achieve a given task with small computational (or cognitive) cost, using a slow control system in an uncertain variable environment, and the motor intermittency is the side-effect of this strategy.

  20. A disturbance observer-based adaptive control approach for flexure beam nano manipulators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangming; Yan, Peng; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic modeling and control methodology for a two-dimensional flexure beam-based servo stage supporting micro/nano manipulations. Compared with conventional mechatronic systems, such systems have major control challenges including cross-axis coupling, dynamical uncertainties, as well as input saturations, which may have adverse effects on system performance unless effectively eliminated. A novel disturbance observer-based adaptive backstepping-like control approach is developed for high precision servo manipulation purposes, which effectively accommodates model uncertainties and coupling dynamics. An auxiliary system is also introduced, on top of the proposed control scheme, to compensate the input saturations. The proposed control architecture is deployed on a customized-designed nano manipulating system featured with a flexure beam structure and voice coil actuators (VCA). Real time experiments on various manipulating tasks, such as trajectory/contour tracking, demonstrate precision errors of less than 1%.

  1. Analysis and Synthesis of Memory-Based Fuzzy Sliding Mode Controllers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Lin, Yujuan; Feng, Gang

    2015-12-01

    This paper addresses the sliding mode control problem for a class of Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with matched uncertainties. Different from the conventional memoryless sliding surface, a memory-based sliding surface is proposed which consists of not only the current state but also the delayed state. Both robust and adaptive fuzzy sliding mode controllers are designed based on the proposed memory-based sliding surface. It is shown that the sliding surface can be reached and the closed-loop control system is asymptotically stable. Furthermore, to reduce the chattering, some continuous sliding mode controllers are also presented. Finally, the ball and beam system is used to illustrate the advantages and effectiveness of the proposed approaches. It can be seen that, with the proposed control approaches, not only can the stability be guaranteed, but also its transient performance can be improved significantly.

  2. Sliding valve pump

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, C.L.

    1980-09-09

    A sliding valve pump for oil wells which includes a working barrel having a plurality of apertures located in spaced relationship in the wall thereof and a pair of travelling valves fitted within the working barrel and carried by a plunger rod, the valves also having a plurality of apertures or ports for periodic registration with the ports in the working barrel wall to facilitate pumping of fluid from an oil reservoir or pool to the surface. The pump is designed to pull the oil-gas mixture from the reservoir pool into the lower section of the working barrel on the downward stroke, and to subsequently pump the collected oil through the barrel and tubing upwardly toward the surface on the upward stroke.

  3. Static and dynamic friction in sliding colloidal monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2012-01-01

    In a pioneer experiment, Bohlein et al. realized the controlled sliding of two-dimensional colloidal crystals over laser-generated periodic or quasi-periodic potentials. Here we present realistic simulations and arguments that besides reproducing the main experimentally observed features give a first theoretical demonstration of the potential impact of colloid sliding in nanotribology. The free motion of solitons and antisolitons in the sliding of hard incommensurate crystals is contrasted with the soliton–antisoliton pair nucleation at the large static friction threshold Fs when the two lattices are commensurate and pinned. The frictional work directly extracted from particles’ velocities can be analyzed as a function of classic tribological parameters, including speed, spacing, and amplitude of the periodic potential (representing, respectively, the mismatch of the sliding interface and the corrugation, or “load”). These and other features suggestive of further experiments and insights promote colloid sliding to a unique friction study instrument. PMID:23019582

  4. Digital slide reproduction using densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaro, Peter R.; Gschwind, Rudolf; Rosenthaler, Lukas; Laurenson, Pip

    2002-06-01

    Many contemporary art collections contain important art installations where artists have used 35 mm slides as the primary medium. The number of ours these works are on show makes it necessary to regularly change the slides due to light fading. With funding from the Henry Moore Foundation. The conservation department at Tate initiated a project to examine ways in which digital technology could be used to aid the conservation of these works. The aim of the project was to place the original slides in cold storage and explored the possibility of using digital technology to make duplicate sets for display in the gallery. The reproductions needed to be of very high quality both in terms of resolution and color management. This paper discusses the use of densitometry to calibrate both device dependent and device independent systems for digitally reproducing 35 mm slides using a scanner and a film recorder and the effect of metamery when using slide films which employ different dyes.

  5. Ceramic wear in indentation and sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved with single-crystal ceramic materials in indentation and in sliding contacts. Experiments simulating interfacial events have been conducted with hemispherical, conical and pyramidal indenters (riders). With spherical riders, under either abrasive or adhesive conditions, two types of fracture pits have been observed. First, spherical-shaped fracture pits and wear particles are found as a result of either indenting or sliding. These are shown to be due to a spherical-shaped fracture along the circular or spherical stress trajectories. Second, polyhedral fracture pits and debris, produced by anisotropic fracture, and also found both during indenting and sliding. These are primarily controlled by surface and subsurface cracking along cleavage planes. Several quantitative results have also been obtained from this work. For example, using a pyramidal diamond, crack length of Mn-Zn ferrite in the indentation process grows linearly with increasing normal load. Moreover, the critical load to fracture both in indentation and sliding is essentially isotropic and is found to be directly proportional to the indenter radius.

  6. The Core of NGC 6240 from Keck Adaptive Optics and HST NICMOS Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C E; Canalizo, G; Macintosh, B A; Raschke, L; Whysong, D; Antonucci, R; Schneider, G

    2004-11-19

    We present results of near infrared imaging of the disk-galaxy-merger NGC 6240 using adaptive optics on the Keck II Telescope and reprocessed archival data from NICMOS on the Hubble Space Telescope. Both the North and South nuclei of NGC 6240 are clearly elongated, with considerable sub-structure within each nucleus. In K' band there are at least two point-sources within the North nucleus; we tentatively identify the south-western point-source within the North nucleus as the position of one of the two AGNs. Within the South nucleus, the northern subnucleus is more highly reddened. Based upon the nuclear separation measured at 5 GHz, we suggest that the AGN in the South nucleus is still enshrouded in dust at K' band, and is located slightly to the north of the brightest point in K' band. Within the South nucleus there is strong H{sub 2} 1-0 S(1) line emission from the northern sub-nucleus, contrary to the conclusions of previous seeing-limited observations. Narrowband H{sub 2} emission-line images show that a streamer or ribbon of excited molecular hydrogen connects the North and South nuclei. We suggest that this linear feature corresponds to a bridge of gas connecting the two nuclei, as seen in computer simulations of mergers. Many any point-like regions are seen around the two nuclei. These are most prominent at 1.1 microns with NICMOS, and in K'-band with Keck adaptive optics. We suggest that these point-sources represent young star clusters formed in the course of the merger.

  7. The Core of NGC 6240 from Keck Adaptive Optics and HST NICMOS Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C E; Canalizo, G; Macintosh, B A; Raschke, L; Whysong, D; Antonucci, R; Schneider, G

    2004-06-28

    We present results of near infrared imaging of the disk-galaxy-merger NGC 6240 using adaptive optics on the Keck II Telescope and reprocessed archival data from NICMOS on the Hubble Space Telescope. Both the North and South nuclei of NGC 6240 are clearly elongated, with considerable sub-structure within each nucleus. In K' band there are at least two point-sources within the North nucleus; we tentatively identify the south-western point-source within the North nucleus as the position of one of the two AGNs. Within the South nucleus, the northern subnucleus is more highly reddened. Based upon the nuclear separation measured at 5 GHz, we suggest that the AGN in the South nucleus is still enshrouded in dust at K' band, and is located slightly to the north of the brightest point in K' band. Within the South nucleus there is strong H{sub 2} 1-0 S(1) line emission from the northern sub-nucleus, contrary to the conclusions of previous seeing-limited observations. Narrowband H{sub 2} emission-line images show that a streamer or ribbon of excited molecular hydrogen connects the North and South nuclei. We suggest that this linear feature corresponds to a bridge of gas connecting the two nuclei, as seen in computer simulations of mergers. Many point-like regions are seen around the two nuclei. These are most prominent at 1.1 microns with NICMOS, and in K'-band with Keck adaptive optics. We suggest that these point-sources represent star clusters formed in the course of the merger.

  8. Maximum-Likelihood Adaptive Filter for Partially Observed Boolean Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imani, Mahdi; Braga-Neto, Ulisses M.

    2017-01-01

    Partially-observed Boolean dynamical systems (POBDS) are a general class of nonlinear models with application in estimation and control of Boolean processes based on noisy and incomplete measurements. The optimal minimum mean square error (MMSE) algorithms for POBDS state estimation, namely, the Boolean Kalman filter (BKF) and Boolean Kalman smoother (BKS), are intractable in the case of large systems, due to computational and memory requirements. To address this, we propose approximate MMSE filtering and smoothing algorithms based on the auxiliary particle filter (APF) method from sequential Monte-Carlo theory. These algorithms are used jointly with maximum-likelihood (ML) methods for simultaneous state and parameter estimation in POBDS models. In the presence of continuous parameters, ML estimation is performed using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm; we develop for this purpose a special smoother which reduces the computational complexity of the EM algorithm. The resulting particle-based adaptive filter is applied to a POBDS model of Boolean gene regulatory networks observed through noisy RNA-Seq time series data, and performance is assessed through a series of numerical experiments using the well-known cell cycle gene regulatory model.

  9. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off

  10. Line copy presentation slides with Kodalith.

    PubMed

    Kraushar, M F; Bailey, B A

    1978-08-01

    Line copy presentation slides with white letters on a blue background can be produced with a two-step process. The slides are more permanent than diazo slides, and the process is faster and less expensive.

  11. Design of sliding mode control for a class of uncertain switched systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yonghui; Jia, Tinggang; Niu, Yugang; Zou, Yuanyuan

    2015-04-01

    This paper considers the problem of sliding mode control for a class of uncertain switched systems with parameter uncertainties and external disturbances. A key feature of the controlled system is that each subsystem is not required to share the same input channel, which was usually assumed in some existing works. By means of a weighted sum of the input matrix, a common sliding surface is designed in this work. It is shown that the reachability of the sliding surface can be ensured by the present sliding mode controller. Moreover, the sliding motion on the specified sliding surface is asymptotically stable under the proposed switching signal dependent on the state and time. Additionally, the above results are further extended to the case that the system states are unavailable. Both the sliding surface and sliding mode controller are designed by utilising state-observer. Finally, numerical simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the present method.

  12. Translation, cultural adaptation and content re-validation of the observational teamwork assessment for surgery tool.

    PubMed

    Amaya Arias, Ana Carolina; Barajas, Rocío; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier H; Wheelock, Ana; Gaitán Duarte, Hernando; Hull, Louise; Sevdalis, Nick

    2014-12-01

    Background. Poor teamwork and nontechnical skill performance are increasingly recognized as important contributing factors to errors and adverse events in the operating room. Assessment of these safety critical skills is important to facilitate improvement, however there are no tools available to assess these safety skills in Latin America. This study aimed to translate, culturally adapt and content validate the Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS) tool for use in Latin America. Methods. A multi-phase, multi-method study was conducted: Phase 1: translation and back-translation; Phase 2: content validity assessed via expert consensus; Phase 3: inter-rater reliability assessed via real-time observation in 98 general surgical procedures using OTAS-S. Results. The first change in OTAS-S, was to distinguish between the surgical nurses and scrub technicians (both OR team members are captured in the nursing sub-team in the original OTAS). OTAS-S consists of 168 exemplar behaviors: 60/114 identical to the exemplars listed in the original OTAS tool, 48/114 original exemplars underwent minor modifications, 13 were duplicated (to account for the additional sub-team distinguished in OTAS-S), 6 original exemplars were removed, and 47 new exemplar behaviors were added. Inter-observer agreement was substantial (KW = 0.602; IC: 0.581-0.620). The calculated KW by phase, behaviors and teams were between 0.534 and 0.678. Conclusions. The study provides a content validated teamwork assessment tool for use within Colombian operating rooms and potentially Latin-American. OTAS-S can be used to assess the quality of teamwork in ORs, facilitate structured debriefing and thus improve patient safety and reduce team-related errors.

  13. Evaluation of 2 whole-slide imaging applications in dermatopathology.

    PubMed

    Velez, Nicole; Jukic, Drazen; Ho, Jonhan

    2008-09-01

    Digitization of glass slides holds great promise for increasing workflow efficiency, but current applications have not gained widespread acceptance. Applications to date have not taken into consideration pathologists' workflow patterns, and as a result many find navigation cumbersome and interpretation more challenging when compared to glass slides. We observed 3 dermatopathologists evaluate a set of cases using 2 digital applications, one of which used a novel navigation method developed in-house. We then compared their approach to the digital slides with the gold standard traditional microscopy with glass slides. Common diagnoses were identified in 3 categories: inflammatory, nonmelanocytic, and melanocytic lesions. Forty-five cases were selected representing these diagnoses. Digital slides were captured on a commercially available scanner. Sign-out was performed with a commercial viewer as well as with the in-house application. Sessions were captured on video and reviewed. Time to examine each slide, time spent at each magnification, and diagnostic concordance were measured. Average time spent per slide was least with the microscope (23 seconds) as compared with the in-house (34 seconds) or the vendor application (38 seconds). This difference was most significant in the least complex cases. Pathologists reported difficulty interpreting mitotic figures, neutrophil lobules, and eosinophil granules by digital slides. These results suggest that current applications for viewing digital slides do not yet provide a more efficient means of evaluating dermatopathology cases and reinforce the need for improvement in both the capture process and the presentation of digital slides, with particular attention paid to the interface and navigation.

  14. CNOP-based sensitive areas identification for tropical cyclone adaptive observations with PCAGA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin-Lin; Yuan, Shi-Jin; Mu, Bin; Zhou, Fei-Fan

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) was investigated to identify sensitive areas for tropical cyclone adaptive observations with principal component analysis based genetic algorithm (PCAGA) method and two tropical cyclones, Fitow (2013) and Matmo (2014), were studied with a 120 km resolution using the fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). To verify the effectiveness of PCAGA method, CNOPs were also calculated by an adjoint-based method as a benchmark for comparison on patterns, energies, and vertical distributions of temperatures. Comparing with the benchmark, the CNOPs obtained from PCAGA had similar patterns for Fitow and a little different for Matmo; the vertically integrated energies were located closer to the verification areas and the initial tropical cyclones. Experimental results also presented that the CNOPs of PCAGA had a more positive impact on the forecast improvement, which gained from the reductions of the CNOPs in the whole domain containing sensitive areas. Furthermore, the PCAGA program was executed 40 times for each case and all the averages of benefits were larger than the benchmark. This also proved the validity and stability of the PCAGA method. All results showed that the PCAGA method could approximately solve CNOP of complicated models without computing adjoint models, and obtain more benefits of reducing the CNOPs in the whole domain.

  15. RADIO GALAXY 3C 230 OBSERVED WITH GEMINI LASER ADAPTIVE-OPTICS INTEGRAL-FIELD SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbring, Eric

    2011-11-15

    The Altair laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility combined with the near-infrared integral-field spectrometer on Gemini North have been employed to study the morphology and kinematics of 3C 230 at z = 1.5, the first such observations of a high-redshift radio galaxy. These suggest a bi-polar outflow spanning 0.''9 ({approx}16 kpc projected distance for a standard {Lambda} CDM cosmology) reaching a mean relative velocity of 235 km s{sup -1} in redshifted H{alpha} +[N II] and [S II] emission. Structure is resolved to 0.''1 (0.8 kpc), which is well correlated with optical images from the Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Array radio maps obtained at similar spatial resolution. Line diagnostics suggest that over the 10{sup 7} yr to 10{sup 8} yr duration of its active galactic nucleus activity, gas has been ejected into bright turbulent lobes at rates comparable to star formation, although constituting perhaps only 1% of the baryonic mass in the galaxy.

  16. Assessment of cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance using an adaptive observer--experimental and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Andersson, K; Manchester, I R; Andersson, N; Shiriaev, A; Malm, J; Eklund, A

    2007-11-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) patients have a disturbance in the dynamics of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system. The outflow conductance, C, of the CSF system has been suggested to be prognostic for positive outcome after treatment with a CSF shunt. All current methods for estimation of C have drawbacks; these include lack of information on the accuracy and relatively long investigation times. Thus, there is a need for improved methods. To accomplish this, the theoretical framework for a new adaptive observer (OBS) was developed which provides real-time estimation of C. The aim of this study was to evaluate the OBS method and to compare it with the constant pressure infusion (CPI) method. The OBS method was applied to data from infusion investigations performed with the CPI method. These consisted of repeated measurements on an experimental set-up and 30 patients with suspected INPH. There was no significant difference in C between the CPI and the OBS method for the experimental set-up. For the patients there was a significant difference, -0.84+/-1.25 microl (s kPa)(-1), mean +/- SD (paired sample t-test, p<0.05). However, such a difference is within clinically acceptable limits. This encourages further development of this new real-time approach for estimation of the outflow conductance.

  17. Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune's Tropospheric Cloud Layer with the Lick Observatory Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Henry G.; Gavel, Donald; Max, Claire; de Pater, Imke; Gibbard, Seran; Macintosh, Bruce; Baines, Kevin H.

    2001-09-01

    We provide one of the first constraints on the combined infrared single-scattering albedo and opacity of Neptune's upper tropospheric cloud layer. For the observations, we used the adaptive optics system on the Lick Observatory's 3 m Shane Telescope (Mount Hamilton, California). The cloud layer is thought to be composed of H2S and extend up to 3.5-4.5 bars. Previously, the single-scattering albedo was measured in the range 0.2-0.94 μm and found to be extremely high (>0.8), but decreasing with increasing wavelength. Assuming an optically thick cloud, we find the best-fit single-scattering albedo of a 3.5 bar layer to be 0.23+0.07-0.08 at 1.27 μm and 0.18+0.03-0.04 at 1.56 μm. Uncertainties in the column density of haze above the cloud layer, and from deconvolution to remove contaminating light scattered by the point-spread function from infrared-bright features, indicate that the cloud could be even darker, but it is unlikely to be brighter than we report. The cloud particles could be brighter than we report if the total near-infrared opacity of the cloud is very low or the cloud's scattering phase function is significantly more forward-scattering at 1.2-1.6 μm than at 0.75 μm.

  18. Using Copernicus earth observation services to monitor climate change impacts and adaptations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Daniel; Zebisch, Marc; Sonnenschein, Ruth; Schönthaler, Konstanze; von Andrian-Werburg, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In the last years, earth observation made a big leap towards an operational monitoring of the state of environment. Remote sensing provides for instance information on the dynamics, trends and anomalies of snow and glaciers, vegetation, soil moisture or water temperature. In particular, the European Copernicus initiative offers new opportunities through new satellites with a higher temporal and spatial resolution, operational services for environmental monitoring and an open data access policy. With the Copernicus climate change service and the ESA climate change initiative, specific earth observation programs are in place to address the impacts of climate change. However, such products and services are until now rarely picked up in the field of policy or decision making oriented climate impact or climate risk assessments. In this talk, we will present results of a study, which focus on the question, if and how remote sensing approaches could be integrated into operational monitoring activities of climate impacts and response measures on a national and subnational scale. We assessed all existing and planned Copernicus services regarding their relevance for climate impact monitoring by comparing them against the indication fields from an indicator system for climate impact and response monitoring in Germany, which has lately been developed in the framework of the German national adaptation strategy. For several climate impact or response indicators, an immediate integration of remote sensing data could be identified and been recommended. For these cases, we will show practical examples on the benefit of remote sensing data. For other indication fields, promising approaches were found, which need further development. We argue that remote sensing is a very valuable complement to the existing indicator schemes by contributing with spatial explicit, timely information but not always easy to integrate with classical approaches, which are oriented towards consistent long

  19. Finite-time control of DC-DC buck converters via integral terminal sliding modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chian-Song; Shen, Chih-Teng

    2012-05-01

    This article presents novel terminal sliding modes for finite-time output tracking control of DC-DC buck converters. Instead of using traditional singular terminal sliding mode, two integral terminal sliding modes are introduced for robust output voltage tracking of uncertain buck converters. Different from traditional sliding mode control (SMC), the proposed controller assures finite convergence time for the tracking error and integral tracking error. Furthermore, the singular problem in traditional terminal SMC is removed from this article. When considering worse modelling, adaptive integral terminal SMC is derived to guarantee finite-time convergence under more relaxed stability conditions. In addition, several experiments show better start-up performance and robustness.

  20. Coating for hot sliding seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.

    1979-01-01

    Heat resistant paint is effective surface coating for sliding seals that must operate at elevated temperatures. Economical paint is easy to apply, offers minimal friction, and improves reliability of seals.

  1. Static and dynamic friction in sliding colloidal monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-03-01

    In a recent experimental breakthrough, the controlled sliding of 2D colloidal crystals over perfectly regular, laser generated periodic or quasi-periodic `corrugation` potentials has been realized in Bechinger's group. Based on realistic MD simulations which reproduce the main experimentally observed features, we explore the potential impact of colloid monolayer sliding in nanotribology. The free motion of edge-spawned kinks and antikinks in smooth incommensurate sliding is contrasted with the kink-antikink pair nucleation at the large static friction threshold in the commensurate case. The Aubry pinning/depinning transition is also demonstrated, e.g., as a function of the corrugation amplitude. Simulated sliding data allow the extraction of frictional work directly from particles coordinates and velocities as a function of classic friction parameters, primarily speed, and corrugation strength. Analogies with sliding charge-density waves, driven Josephson systems, sliding of rare gas islands, and other novel features suggest further experiments and insights, which promote colloid sliding to a novel friction study instrument. Research partly sponsored by Sinergia Project CRSII2 136287/1.

  2. Arctic Climate and Water Change: Model and Observation Relevance for Assessment and Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bring, Arvid; Destouni, Georgia

    2014-05-01

    The Arctic is subject to growing economic and political interest. Meanwhile, its climate and water systems are in rapid transformation. In this paper, we review and extend a set of studies on climate model results, hydro-climatic change, and hydrological monitoring systems. Results indicate that general circulation model (GCM) projections of drainage basin temperature and precipitation have improved between two model generations. However, some inaccuracies remain for precipitation projections. When considering geographical priorities for monitoring or adaptation efforts, our results indicate that future projections by GCMs and recent observations diverge regarding the basins where temperature and precipitation changes currently are the most pronounced and where they will be so in the future. Regarding late twentieth-century discharge changes in major Arctic rivers, data generally show excess of water relative to precipitation changes. This indicates a possible contribution to sea-level rise of river water that was previously stored in permafrost or groundwater. The river contribution to the increasing Arctic Ocean freshwater inflow is similar in magnitude to the separate contribution from glaciers, which underlines the importance of considering all possible sources of freshwater when assessing sea-level change. We further investigate monitoring systems and find a lack of harmonized water chemistry data, which limits the ability to understand the origin and transport of nutrients, carbon and sediment to the sea. To provide adequate information for research and policy, Arctic hydrological and hydrochemical monitoring needs to be extended, better integrated and made more accessible. Further water-focused data and modeling efforts are required to resolve the source of excess discharge in Arctic rivers. Finally, improvements in climate model parameterizations are needed, in particular for precipitation projections.

  3. Modification, translation and adaptation of questionnaires: should copyright laws be observed?

    PubMed

    Juniper, Elizabeth F

    2009-06-01

    This commentary is intended to start a discussion about whether people should be allowed to modify, translate, adapt or sell copyrighted questionnaires without the permission of the developer (copyright-holder).

  4. Behavioral and neural correlates of visuomotor adaptation observed through a brain-computer interface in primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Chase, Steven M; Kass, Robert E; Schwartz, Andrew B

    2012-07-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) provide a defined link between neural activity and devices, allowing a detailed study of the neural adaptive responses generating behavioral output. We trained monkeys to perform two-dimensional center-out movements of a computer cursor using a BCI. We then applied a perturbation by randomly selecting a subset of the recorded units and rotating their directional contributions to cursor movement by a consistent angle. Globally, this perturbation mimics a visuomotor transformation, and in the first part of this article we characterize the psychophysical indications of motor adaptation and compare them with known results from adaptation of natural reaching movements. Locally, however, only a subset of the neurons in the population actually contributes to error, allowing us to probe for signatures of neural adaptation that might be specific to the subset of neurons we perturbed. One compensation strategy would be to selectively adapt the subset of cells responsible for the error. An alternate strategy would be to globally adapt the entire population to correct the error. Using a recently developed mathematical technique that allows us to differentiate these two mechanisms, we found evidence of both strategies in the neural responses. The dominant strategy we observed was global, accounting for ∼86% of the total error reduction. The remaining 14% came from local changes in the tuning functions of the perturbed units. Interestingly, these local changes were specific to the details of the applied rotation: in particular, changes in the depth of tuning were only observed when the percentage of perturbed cells was small. These results imply that there may be constraints on the network's adaptive capabilities, at least for perturbations lasting only a few hundreds of trials.

  5. Automated detection of diagnostically relevant regions in H&E stained digital pathology slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlmann, Claus; Patel, Amar; Johnson, Jeffrey; Ni, Jie; Chekkoury, Andrei; Khurd, Parmeshwar; Kamen, Ali; Grady, Leo; Krupinski, Elizabeth; Graham, Anna; Weinstein, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    We present a computationally efficient method for analyzing H&E stained digital pathology slides with the objective of discriminating diagnostically relevant vs. irrelevant regions. Such technology is useful for several applications: (1) It can speed up computer aided diagnosis (CAD) for histopathology based cancer detection and grading by an order of magnitude through a triage-like preprocessing and pruning. (2) It can improve the response time for an interactive digital pathology workstation (which is usually dealing with several GByte digital pathology slides), e.g., through controlling adaptive compression or prioritization algorithms. (3) It can support the detection and grading workflow for expert pathologists in a semi-automated diagnosis, hereby increasing throughput and accuracy. At the core of the presented method is the statistical characterization of tissue components that are indicative for the pathologist's decision about malignancy vs. benignity, such as, nuclei, tubules, cytoplasm, etc. In order to allow for effective yet computationally efficient processing, we propose visual descriptors that capture the distribution of color intensities observed for nuclei and cytoplasm. Discrimination between statistics of relevant vs. irrelevant regions is learned from annotated data, and inference is performed via linear classification. We validate the proposed method both qualitatively and quantitatively. Experiments show a cross validation error rate of 1.4%. We further show that the proposed method can prune ~90% of the area of pathological slides while maintaining 100% of all relevant information, which allows for a speedup of a factor of 10 for CAD systems.

  6. The sliding-helix voltage sensor

    PubMed Central

    Peyser, Alexander; Nonner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The voltage sensor (VS) domain of voltage-gated ion channels underlies electrical excitability of living cells. We simulate a mesoscale model of the VS domain to determine the functional consequences of some of its physical elements. Our mesoscale model is based on VS charges, linear dielectrics and whole-body motion, applied to an S4 ‘sliding helix’. The electrostatics under voltage-clamped boundary conditions are solved consistently using a boundary element method. Based on electrostatic configurational energy, statistical-mechanical expectations of the experimentally observable relation between displaced charge and membrane voltage are predicted. Consequences of the model are investigated for variations of: S4 configuration (α- and 310-helical), countercharge alignment with S4 charges, protein polarizability, geometry of the gating canal, screening of S4 charges by the baths, and fixed charges located at the bath interfaces. The sliding helix VS domain has an inherent electrostatic stability in the explored parameter space: countercharges present in the region of weak dielectric always retain an equivalent S4 charge in that region but allow sliding movements displacing 3 to 4 e0. That movement is sensitive to small energy variations (< 2kT) along the path dependent on a number of electrostatic parameters tested in our simulations. These simulations show how the slope of the relation between displaced charge and voltage could be tuned in a channel. PMID:22907204

  7. A novel glass slide filing system for pathology slides.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Steve; Kartono, Francisca; Shitabata, Paul K

    2007-07-01

    The availability of a collection of microscope glass slides for review is essential in the study and practice of pathology. A common problem facing many pathologists is the lack of a well-organized filing system. We present a novel system that would be easily accessible, informative, protective, and portable.

  8. Adaptive nonlinear control for autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, William S.

    We present the background and motivation for ground vehicle autonomy, and focus on uses for space-exploration. Using a simple design example of an autonomous ground vehicle we derive the equations of motion. After providing the mathematical background for nonlinear systems and control we present two common methods for exactly linearizing nonlinear systems, feedback linearization and backstepping. We use these in combination with three adaptive control methods: model reference adaptive control, adaptive sliding mode control, and extremum-seeking model reference adaptive control. We show the performances of each combination through several simulation results. We then consider disturbances in the system, and design nonlinear disturbance observers for both single-input-single-output and multi-input-multi-output systems. Finally, we show the performance of these observers with simulation results.

  9. Adaptive Optics at the Big Bear Solar Observatory: Instrument Description and First Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Carsten; Tritschler, Alexandra; Rimmele, Thomas R.; Richards, Kit; Hegwer, Steve L.; Wöger, Friedrich

    2007-02-01

    In 2004 January, the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) was equipped with a high-order adaptive optics (AO) system built in collaboration with the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak. The hardware is almost identical to the AO system operated at the NSO Dunn Solar Tower (DST), incorporating a 97 actuator deformable mirror, a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor with 76 subapertures, and an off-the-shelf digital signal processor system. However, the BBSO optical design is quite different. It had to be adapted to the 65 cm vacuum reflector and the downstream postfocus instrumentation. In this paper, we describe the optical design, demonstrate the AO performance, and use image restoration techniques to illustrate the image quality that can be achieved with the new AO system.

  10. Active sliding between cytoplasmic microtubules.

    PubMed

    Koonce, M P; Tong, J; Euteneuer, U; Schliwa, M

    Microtubules are versatile cellular polymers that play a role in cell shape determination and mediate various motile processes such as ciliary and flagellar bending, chromosome movements and organelle transport. That a sliding microtubule mechanism can generate force has been demonstrated in highly ordered structures such as axonemes, and microtubule-based force generation almost certainly contributes to the function of mitotic and meiotic spindles. Most cytoplasmic microtubule arrays, however, do not exhibit the structural regularity of axonemes and some spindles, and often appear disorganized. Yet many cellular activities (such as shape changes during morphogenesis, axonal extension and spindle assembly) involve highly coordinated microtubule behaviour and possibly require force generated by an intermicrotubule sliding mechanism, or perhaps use sliding to move microtubules rapidly into a protrusion for stabilization. Here we show that active sliding between cytoplasmic microtubules can occur in microtubule bundles of the amoeba Reticulomyxa. A force-producing mechanism of this sort could be used by this organism to facilitate the extension of cell processes and to generate the dynamic movements of the cytoplasmic network.

  11. Heavy duty complete extension slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, José Ignacio; Vázquez, Javier

    2001-09-01

    The selection from available commercial market of a set of slides to be used in an habitable pressurised module in space, to draw a 660 mm box out of a rack, up to a completely extracted position in a safely supported configuration, seems in principle not to be a complicated task. That was the first approach taken in the design process of the telescopic guides of the Crew Work Bench (CWB) included in the Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL), part of "ESA Microgravity Facilities for Columbus" within the Columbus Orbital Facility (COF) of the International Space Station (ISS). Nevertheless, common space compatible requirements such as materials, specific environmental loads, available envelope, total weight, etc., can make the selection of telescopic slides from commercial market unfeasible. A specific development to design space compatible telescopic slides for the CWB was undertaken. A set of heavy duty space compatible telescopic slides were designed, manufactured and tested. They should be operative in both, 1-g environment and in orbit, and additionally should withstand an inadvertent astronaut kick or bump of 556 N in any direction.

  12. Herbaceous Ornamental Plants. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Still, Steven

    This document, which is one in a series of curriculum materials that has been developed for use in Ohio agricultural education programs, contains 338 black-and-white photographs of a set of color slides and an accompanying script that, together, are intended as an aid in the study and identification of 150 different commercially important…

  13. Linear Motor With Air Slide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Fenn, Ralph C.

    1993-01-01

    Improved linear actuator comprises air slide and linear electric motor. Unit exhibits low friction, low backlash, and more nearly even acceleration. Used in machinery in which positions, velocities, and accelerations must be carefully controlled and/or vibrations must be suppressed.

  14. Designing for Damage: Robust Flight Control Design using Sliding Mode Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, T. K.; Wells, S. R.; Hess, Ronald A.; Bacon, Barton (Technical Monitor); Davidson, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A brief review of sliding model control is undertaken, with particular emphasis upon the effects of neglected parasitic dynamics. Sliding model control design is interpreted in the frequency domain. The inclusion of asymptotic observers and control 'hedging' is shown to reduce the effects of neglected parasitic dynamics. An investigation into the application of observer-based sliding mode control to the robust longitudinal control of a highly unstable is described. The sliding mode controller is shown to exhibit stability and performance robustness superior to that of a classical loop-shaped design when significant changes in vehicle and actuator dynamics are employed to model airframe damage.

  15. Sliding mode control of a simulated MEMS gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Batur, C; Sreeramreddy, T; Khasawneh, Q

    2006-01-01

    The microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are penetrating more and more into measurement and control problems because of their small size, low cost, and low power consumption. The vibrating gyroscope is one of those MEMS devices that will have a significant impact on the stability control systems in transportation industry. This paper studies the design and control of a vibrating gyroscope. The device has been constructed in a Pro-E environment and its model has been simulated in the finite-element domain in order to approximate its dynamic characteristics with a lumped model. A model reference adaptive feedback controller and the sliding mode controller have been considered to guarantee the stability of the device. It is shown that the sliding mode controller of the vibrating proof mass results in a better estimate of the unknown angular velocity than that of the model reference adaptive feedback controller.

  16. NOTE: Titan's Atmosphere in Late Southern Spring Observed with Adaptive Optics on the W. M. Keck II 10-Meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Henry G.; de Pater, Imke; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Gibbard, Seran G.; Max, Claire E.; McKay, Chris P.

    2002-05-01

    Using adaptive optics on the W. M. Keck II telescope, we imaged Titan several times during 1999 to 2001 in narrowband near-infrared filters selected to probe Titan's stratosphere and upper troposphere. We observed a bright feature around the south pole, possibly a collar of haze or clouds. Further, we find that solar phase angle explains most of the observed east-west brightness asymmetry of Titan's atmosphere, although the data do not preclude the presence of a "morning fog" effect at small solar phase angle.

  17. Adaptive Optics Observations of Arcturus using the Mount Wilson 100 Inch Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Nils H.; ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Mason, Brian D.

    1999-05-01

    Upon inspection of the multiple-star results in the Hipparcos catalog, the flag for entry number 69673 particularly stands out; it is Arcturus, for which no companion has been reported previously. The Hipparcos companion is reported to be at a separation of 0.255"+/-0.039" with a magnitude difference in a broadband filter (peaked near 460 nm) of 3.33+/-0.31. We present recent results using the natural guide star adaptive optics system on the Mount Wilson 100 inch telescope showing Arcturus to be a single star.

  18. Neural adaptive observer-based sensor and actuator fault detection in nonlinear systems: Application in UAV.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Alireza; Aboutalebi, Payam; Yen, Kang K; Sargolzaei, Arman

    2017-03-01

    A new online detection strategy is developed to detect faults in sensors and actuators of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems. In this design, the weighting parameters of the Neural Network (NN) are updated by using the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). Online adaptation of these weighting parameters helps to detect abrupt, intermittent, and incipient faults accurately. We apply the proposed fault detection system to a nonlinear dynamic model of the WVU YF-22 unmanned aircraft for its evaluation. The simulation results show that the new method has better performance in comparison with conventional recurrent neural network-based fault detection strategies.

  19. Frequency-Shaped Sliding Mode Control for Rudder Roll Damping System of Robotic Boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xinping; Yu, Zhenyu; Nonami, Kenzo

    In this paper, a robotic boat model of combined yaw and roll rate is obtained by a system identification approach. The identified system is designed with frequency-shaped sliding mode control. The control scheme is composed of a sliding mode observer and a sliding mode controller. The stability and reachability of the switching function are proved by Lyapunov theory. Computer simulations and experiment carried out at INAGE offshore show that successful course keeping and roll reduction results are achieved.

  20. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the `explosion of complexity' of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  1. Survey of the Use of Slide/Tape Presentations for Orientation and Instruction Purposes in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry

    Eighty-eight academic libraries were surveyed to determine what kinds of slide/tape library instruction materials are available for purchase or loan. The conclusions reached were: (1) there are less than a dozen libraries that have produced presentations of sufficient quality and adaptability to be widely used; and (2) the slide/tape format…

  2. Rate-weakening friction characterizes both slow sliding and catastrophic failure of landslides

    PubMed Central

    Handwerger, Alexander L.; Rempel, Alan W.; Skarbek, Rob M.; Roering, Joshua J.; Hilley, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Catastrophic landslides cause billions of dollars in damages and claim thousands of lives annually, whereas slow-moving landslides with negligible inertia dominate sediment transport on many weathered hillslopes. Surprisingly, both failure modes are displayed by nearby landslides (and individual landslides in different years) subjected to almost identical environmental conditions. Such observations have motivated the search for mechanisms that can cause slow-moving landslides to transition via runaway acceleration to catastrophic failure. A similarly diverse range of sliding behavior, including earthquakes and slow-slip events, occurs along tectonic faults. Our understanding of these phenomena has benefitted from mechanical treatments that rely upon key ingredients that are notably absent from previous landslide descriptions. Here, we describe landslide motion using a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that incorporates a nonlocal stress balance to account for the elastic response to gradients in slip. Our idealized, one-dimensional model reproduces both the displacement patterns observed in slow-moving landslides and the acceleration toward failure exhibited by catastrophic events. Catastrophic failure occurs only when the slip surface is characterized by rate-weakening friction and its lateral dimensions exceed a critical nucleation length h* that is shorter for higher effective stresses. However, landslides that are extensive enough to fall within this regime can nevertheless slide slowly for months or years before catastrophic failure. Our results suggest that the diversity of slip behavior observed during landslides can be described with a single model adapted from standard fault mechanics treatments. PMID:27573836

  3. Rate-weakening friction characterizes both slow sliding and catastrophic failure of landslides.

    PubMed

    Handwerger, Alexander L; Rempel, Alan W; Skarbek, Rob M; Roering, Joshua J; Hilley, George E

    2016-09-13

    Catastrophic landslides cause billions of dollars in damages and claim thousands of lives annually, whereas slow-moving landslides with negligible inertia dominate sediment transport on many weathered hillslopes. Surprisingly, both failure modes are displayed by nearby landslides (and individual landslides in different years) subjected to almost identical environmental conditions. Such observations have motivated the search for mechanisms that can cause slow-moving landslides to transition via runaway acceleration to catastrophic failure. A similarly diverse range of sliding behavior, including earthquakes and slow-slip events, occurs along tectonic faults. Our understanding of these phenomena has benefitted from mechanical treatments that rely upon key ingredients that are notably absent from previous landslide descriptions. Here, we describe landslide motion using a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that incorporates a nonlocal stress balance to account for the elastic response to gradients in slip. Our idealized, one-dimensional model reproduces both the displacement patterns observed in slow-moving landslides and the acceleration toward failure exhibited by catastrophic events. Catastrophic failure occurs only when the slip surface is characterized by rate-weakening friction and its lateral dimensions exceed a critical nucleation length [Formula: see text] that is shorter for higher effective stresses. However, landslides that are extensive enough to fall within this regime can nevertheless slide slowly for months or years before catastrophic failure. Our results suggest that the diversity of slip behavior observed during landslides can be described with a single model adapted from standard fault mechanics treatments.

  4. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the behavioral pain scale and the critical-care pain observational tools in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, Nai-Huan; Yang, Yen; Lee, Ming Shinn; Dalal, Koustuv; Smith, Graeme D

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the cultural adaptation and testing of the behavioral pain scale (BPS) and the critical-care pain observation tools (CPOT) for pain assessment in Taiwan. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, including forward translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of experts, adjustments, and then piloting of the prefinal versions of the BPS and the CPOT. A content validity index was used to assess content validities of the BPS and the CPOT, with 0.80 preset as the level that would be regarded as acceptable. The principal investigator then made adjustments when the content validity index was <0.80. The pilot test was performed with a sample of ten purposively selected patients by 2 medical staff from a medical care center in Taiwan. The BPS and the CPOT are adequate instruments for the assessment of pain levels in patients who cannot communicate due to sedation and ventilation treatments. PMID:27695360

  5. Approved Practices in Dairy Reproduction. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roediger, Roger D.; Barr, Harry L.

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with approved practices in dairy reproduction. Included in the guide are narrations for use with 200 slides dealing with the following topics: the importance of good reproduction, the male and female roles in reproduction, selection of…

  6. Linear Classification of Dairy Cattle. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipiorski, James; Spike, Peter

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with principles of the linear classification of dairy cattle. Included in the guide are narrations for use with 63 slides, which illustrate the following areas that are considered in the linear classification system: stature, strength,…

  7. Techniques for Generating Instructional Slides. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Edgar A.; And Others

    Common in briefing presentations and in individualized instruction is the use of slides that present materials prepared on a typewriter (questions, instructions, outlines). To increase the efficiency and effectiveness of producing these kind of slides a procedure was developed to facilitate: (1) formatting copy to be used for slides; (2) using…

  8. Diseases of Landscape Ornamentals. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Charles C.; Sydnor, T. Davis

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with recognizing and controlling diseases found on ornamental landscape plants. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 80 slides illustrating various foliar diseases (anthracnose, black spot, hawthorn leaf blight,…

  9. On-Line Retrieval of Clinical Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgrom, Linda

    The Physical Diagnosis Slide Bank, a collaborative project of the Universities of Washington, California at San Diego, and Arizona, utilizes an online interactive computer program to access a collection of over 2000 teaching clinical slides. Searchable data elements for each slide in the bank include subject descriptors (MeSH); accession number;…

  10. Adaptive optics observations of NGC 6240 at the Keck and Lick Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, C. E.; Whysong, D.; Macintosh, B. A.; Antonucci, R.; Roe, H.

    2000-12-01

    NGC 6240 is a luminous IRAS galaxy, and contains a nuclear starburst that is about 10 million years old. NGC 6240 consists of two merging disk galaxies. It is a LINER, and may host one or two active galactic nuclei. Previous studies have detected high-velocity ionized gas flowing outward in a "superwind," as well as strong molecular hydrogen and [FeII] emission. Here we report on near-IR adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy of NGC 6240 at the Keck and Lick Observatories. The twin nuclei are clearly resolved in both images and spectra. We report on the spatial distribution and velocity structure of the molecular hydrogen emission, and its implications for potential excitation mechanisms and physical conditions in the emitting gas. This research was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, under Contract W-7405-ENG-48.

  11. Routes to failure in rotating MEMS devices experiencing sliding friction

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.; LaVigne, G.; Rodgers, M.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Waters, J.P.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1997-08-01

    Gear systems rotating on hubs have been operated to failure using Sandia`s microengine as the actuation device. Conventional failure modes such as fatigue induced fracture did not occur, indicating that the devices are mechanically extremely robust. The generic route to failure observed for all rotating devices involves sticking of structures that are in sliding contact. This sticking evidently results from microscopic changes in the sliding surfaces during operation. The rate at which these changes occur is accelerated by excessive applied forces, which originate from non-optimized designs or inappropriate drive voltages. Precursors to failure are observed, enabling further understanding of the microscopic changes that occur in the sliding surfaces that ultimately lead to failure.

  12. Sliding Mode Control (SMC) of Robot Manipulator via Intelligent Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Neha; Ohri, Jyoti

    2016-06-01

    Inspite of so much research, key technical problem, naming chattering of conventional, simple and robust SMC is still a challenge to the researchers and hence limits its practical application. However, newly developed soft computing based techniques can provide solution. In order to have advantages of conventional and heuristic soft computing based control techniques, in this paper various commonly used intelligent techniques, neural network, fuzzy logic and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) have been combined with sliding mode controller (SMC). For validation, proposed hybrid control schemes have been implemented for tracking a predefined trajectory by robotic manipulator, incorporating structured and unstructured uncertainties in the system. After reviewing numerous papers, all the commonly occurring uncertainties like continuous disturbance, uniform random white noise, static friction like coulomb friction and viscous friction, dynamic friction like Dhal friction and LuGre friction have been inserted in the system. Various performance indices like norm of tracking error, chattering in control input, norm of input torque, disturbance rejection, chattering rejection have been used. Comparative results show that with almost eliminated chattering the intelligent SMC controllers are found to be more efficient over simple SMC. It has also been observed from results that ANFIS based controller has the best tracking performance with the reduced burden on the system. No paper in the literature has found to have all these structured and unstructured uncertainties together for motion control of robotic manipulator.

  13. Sliding Mode Control (SMC) of Robot Manipulator via Intelligent Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Neha; Ohri, Jyoti

    2017-02-01

    Inspite of so much research, key technical problem, naming chattering of conventional, simple and robust SMC is still a challenge to the researchers and hence limits its practical application. However, newly developed soft computing based techniques can provide solution. In order to have advantages of conventional and heuristic soft computing based control techniques, in this paper various commonly used intelligent techniques, neural network, fuzzy logic and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) have been combined with sliding mode controller (SMC). For validation, proposed hybrid control schemes have been implemented for tracking a predefined trajectory by robotic manipulator, incorporating structured and unstructured uncertainties in the system. After reviewing numerous papers, all the commonly occurring uncertainties like continuous disturbance, uniform random white noise, static friction like coulomb friction and viscous friction, dynamic friction like Dhal friction and LuGre friction have been inserted in the system. Various performance indices like norm of tracking error, chattering in control input, norm of input torque, disturbance rejection, chattering rejection have been used. Comparative results show that with almost eliminated chattering the intelligent SMC controllers are found to be more efficient over simple SMC. It has also been observed from results that ANFIS based controller has the best tracking performance with the reduced burden on the system. No paper in the literature has found to have all these structured and unstructured uncertainties together for motion control of robotic manipulator.

  14. Rise of the Machines: Automated Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics Observations of Thousands of Objects with Robo-AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Dekany, R.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Das, H.; Punnadi, S.; Chordia, P.

    2013-01-01

    Robo-AO is the first fully automated laser guide star adaptive optics instrument. Robo-AO has completed thousands of automated AO observations at the visible diffraction limit for several scientific programs during its first semester of science observations. These programs include: the Ultimate Binarity Survey to examine stellar binarity properties across the main sequence and beyond; a survey of 1,000 Kepler objects of interest; the multiplicity of solar type stars; and several programs for high precision astrometric observations. A new infrared camera is under development for Robo-AO, and a clone of the system is in the planning stages. This presentation will discuss the Robo-AO instrument capabilities, summarize the science programs undertaken, and discuss the future of Robo-AO.

  15. Automated single-slide staining device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A simple apparatus and method is disclosed for making individual single Gram stains on bacteria inoculated slides to assist in classifying bacteria in the laboratory as Gram-positive or Gram-negative. The apparatus involves positioning a single inoculated slide in a stationary position and thereafter automatically and sequentially flooding the slide with increments of a primary stain, a mordant, a decolorizer, a counterstain and a wash solution in a sequential manner without the individual lab technician touching the slide and with minimum danger of contamination thereof from other slides.

  16. Pressure vessel sliding support unit and system using the sliding support unit

    DOEpatents

    Breach, Michael R.; Keck, David J.; Deaver, Gerald A.

    2013-01-15

    Provided is a sliding support and a system using the sliding support unit. The sliding support unit may include a fulcrum capture configured to attach to a support flange, a fulcrum support configured to attach to the fulcrum capture, and a baseplate block configured to support the fulcrum support. The system using the sliding support unit may include a pressure vessel, a pedestal bracket, and a plurality of sliding support units.

  17. The impact of aircraft digital weather data in an adaptive observation strategy to improve the ensemble prediction of hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensman, Edward Leroy

    Modern meteorological data assimilation techniques and ensemble weather prediction methods involve the minimization of error variance. Both of these techniques are used here to assess the impact of assimilating digital aircraft weather data, in an adaptive observation strategy, to improve hurricane forecasting. Many operational and research centers utilize ensemble prediction systems to improve their weather forecasts. This study utilizes a Monte Carlo technique to randomly generate a series of 50 separate perturbed model states. These ``random'' perturbations are scaled to the typical error values observed daily in meteorology. From the family of 50 ensemble members a field of sea level pressure variance, at the 48-hour forecast point, is calculated using deviations of the 50 members from the control (unperturbed state). The bull's eye of maximum error variance is then backward correlated to various meteorological fields such as temperature, wind and humidity at the 24-hour point of the forecast. The areas of highest correlation represent model sensitivity to random error growth and thus targets for intensive observations. In August and September of 1998, a team of scientists participated in a NASA-sponsored field campaign termed the Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3). The purpose was to conduct an intensive study of Atlantic hurricanes. The CAMEX-3 data were utilized in this research to assess the impact of targeted observations on subsequent forecasts. Specifically, a series of experiments were conducted utilizing: all of the CAMEX-3 data, a portion just over the model-sensitive target areas, and from a random selection of data throughout the near-storm environment. These data were assimilated using both a multivariate optimal interpolation technique and a 4-dimensional variational assimilation method. Results from these experiments showed that these data, once assimilated into the model's initial state, improved subsequent hurricane forecasts

  18. Shape control of distributed parameter reflectors using sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Fukashi; Washington, Gregory N.; Utkin, Vadim

    2001-08-01

    Sliding mode control has become one of the most powerful control methods for variable structure systems, a set of continuous systems with an appropriate switching logic. Its robustness properties and order reduction capability have made sliding mode control one of the most efficient tools for relatively higher order nonlinear plants operating under uncertain conditions. Piezo-electric materials possess the property of creating a charge when subjected to a mechanical strain, and of generating a strain when subjected to an electric field. Piezo-electric actuators are known to have a hysteresis due to the thermal motion and Coulomb interaction of Weiss domains. Because of the thermal effect the hysteresis of piezo-electric actuators is reproducible only with some uncertainty in experiments. The robustness of sliding mode control under uncertain conditions has an advantage in handling the hysteresis of piezo-electric actuators. In this research sliding mode control is used to control the shape of one- and two-dimensionally curved adaptive reflectors with piezo-electric actuators. Four discrete linear actuators for the one-dimensionally curved reflector and eight actuators for the two-dimensionally curved reflector are assumed.

  19. Slide crown lengthening procedure using wide surface incisions and cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Szymaitis, Dennis W

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the slide crown lengthening procedure (SCLP), which incorporates surgical design features to overcome present crown lengthening procedure (CLP) shortcomings. The result is a 75% decrease in required surgery on adjacent teeth and a corresponding 75% reduction in surgical time. Other advantages include a reduction in surgical morbidity, improvement in terminal esthetics, and fewer teeth subject to papillae removal and apically repositioned gingiva. The 20 to 30 degree incision forming the slide is the pivotal feature; it allows effortless flap positioning. This incision angle enables wide surface incisions to adhere flaps together by producing stronger fibrin clots, decreasing tissue retraction angles, and reforming disrupted fibrin clots as incision sides slide while maintaining contact. This enhanced fibrin clot eliminates the need for sutures. The slide produced by the 20 to 30 degree incision functions for crown lengthening on all sites (facial, lingual, or palatal). This versatile surgical design introduces a new healing dimension that adapts to and provides benefits for other dental surgeries, such as gingival grafts, endodontic surgery, implants, and extractions.

  20. Circumnuclear Star Clusters in the Galaxy Merger NGC 6240, Observed with Keck Adaptive Optics and HST

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L K; Max, C E; Schneider, G

    2007-02-12

    We discuss images of the central {approx} 10 kpc (in projection) of the galaxy merger NGC 6240 at H and K{prime} bands, taken with the NIRC2 narrow camera on Keck II using natural guide star adaptive optics. We detect 28 star clusters in the NIRC2 images, of which only 7 can be seen in the similar-spatial-resolution, archival WFPC2 Planetary Camera data at either B or I bands. Combining the NIRC2 narrow camera pointings with wider NICMOS NIC2 images taken with the F110W, F160W, and F222M filters, we identify a total of 32 clusters that are detected in at least one of these 5 infrared ({lambda}{sub c} > 1 {micro}m) bandpasses. By comparing to instantaneous burst, stellar population synthesis models (Bruzual & Charlot 2003), we estimate that most of the clusters are consistent with being {approx} 15 Myr old and have photometric masses ranging from 7 x 10{sup 5} M{sub {circle_dot}} to 4 x 10{sup 7}M{sub {circle_dot}}. The total contribution to the star formation rate (SFR) from these clusters is approximately 10M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1}, or {approx} 10% of the total SFR in the nuclear region. We use these newly discovered clusters to estimate the extinction toward NGC 6240's double nuclei, and find values of A{sub v} as high as 14 magnitudes along some sightlines, with an average extinction of A{sub v} {approx} 7 mag toward sightlines within {approx} 3-inches of the double nuclei.

  1. Preliminary observations on specific adaptations of exophilic ixodid ticks to forests or open country habitats.

    PubMed

    Uspensky, Igor

    2002-01-01

    Some features of three-host exophilic ticks important for their survival differ at the generic level in relation to the types of their habitat. Ixodes and Haemaphysalis are typical forest genera. Hyalomma is an open country genus, whereas Dermacentor and Rhipicephalus, having some features of forest ticks, are closer to the ticks of open country. Forest ticks encounter rather stable and favorable temperature, humidity and illumination conditions as compared with open country ticks. A few differences determining every-day survival, hostseeking. and reproduction of ticks are considered. (1) Tolerance to desiccation is very low in forest ticks and much greater in ticks of open country. (2) Lack of eyes in forest ticks (having, however, epithelial photoreceptor cells) and formation of eyes as special morphological structures in ticks of open country. (3) Capability of mating and insemination of unfed specimens both on and off hosts in forest ticks (Ixodes) and insemination of partially engorged females only on hosts by fed males in open country ticks. (4) Reciprocal sexual dimorphism where in forest ticks females have a larger body than males and in open country ticks this correlation is opposite. (5) Linear dependence between female weight and number of eggs laid is established in forest ticks after the female weight becomes higher than 50% of mean engorgement weight whereas in open country ticks linear dependence begins to reveal itself much earlier. (6) In forest ticks the compensatory growth occurs only during adult feeding whereas in open country ticks such a growth occurs both during nymphal and adult feeding. The adaptive nature of the above differences and their evolutionary trends have been hypothesized.

  2. Results of Instrument Observations and Adaptive Prediction of Thermoabrasion of Banks of the Vilyui Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Velikin, S. A.; Sobol', I. S.; Sobol', S. V.; Khokhlov, D. N.

    2013-11-15

    Quantitative data derived from observations of reformation of the thermoabrasive banks of the Viliyui Reservoir in Yakutia during the service period from 1972 through 2011, and results of analytical prediction of bank formations over the next 20 years for purposes of monitoring the ecological safety of this water body are presented.

  3. Jupiter System Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senske, Dave; Kwok, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed mission for the Jupiter System Observer. The presentation also includes overviews of the mission timeline, science goals, and spacecraftspecifications for the satellite.

  4. Surface layer structure of AISI 1020 steel at different stages of dry sliding under electric current of high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleutdinov, K. A.; Rubtsov, V. Ye; Fadin, V. V.; Aleutdinova, M. I.

    2016-02-01

    Wear intensity of the sliding electric contact steel 1020/steel 1045 depending on sliding time is presented at the contact current density higher than 100 A/cm2 without lubricant. It is shown that wear intensity of 1020 steel decreases at increasing of sliding time. Wear intensity is stabilized after some sliding time. This time (burn-in time) decreases at reduction of current density. Structural changes are realized in surface layer. Signs of liquid phase are observed on sliding surface. This liquid isn't a result of melting. It is established using Auger spectrometry that the contact layer contains up to 50 at.% of oxygen.

  5. Sliding viscoelastic drops on slippery surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Clarke, A.; Rothstein, J. P.; Poole, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the sliding of drops of constant-viscosity dilute elastic liquids (Boger fluids) on various surfaces caused by sudden surface inclination. For smooth or roughened hydrophilic surfaces, such as glass or acrylic, there is essentially no difference between these elastic liquids and a Newtonian comparator fluid (with identical shear viscosity, surface tension, and static contact angle). In contrast for embossed polytetrafluoroethylene superhydrophobic surfaces, profound differences are observed: the elastic drops slide at a significantly reduced rate and complex branch-like patterns are left on the surface by the drop's wake including, on various scales, beads-on-a-string like phenomena. Microscopy images indicate that the strong viscoelastic effect is caused by stretching filaments of fluid from isolated islands, residing at pinning sites on the surface pillars, of the order ˜30 μm in size. On this scale, the local strain rates are sufficient to extend the polymer chains, locally increasing the extensional viscosity of the solution, retarding the drop and leaving behind striking branch-like structures on much larger scales.

  6. Atomic-Scale Sliding Friction on Graphene in Water.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Pimentel, Carlos; Pedraz, Patricia; Luo, Feng; Serena, Pedro A; Pina, Carlos M; Gnecco, Enrico; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-04-26

    The sliding of a sharp nanotip on graphene completely immersed in water is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) and atomic force microscopy. MD simulations predict that the atomic-scale stick-slip is almost identical to that found in ultrahigh vacuum. Furthermore, they show that water plays a purely stochastic role in sliding (solid-to-solid) friction. These observations are substantiated by friction measurements on graphene grown on Cu and Ni, where, oppositely of the operation in air, lattice resolution is readily achieved. Our results promote friction force microscopy in water as a robust alternative to ultra-high-vacuum measurements.

  7. Occurrence of spherical ceramic debris in indentation and sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Indenting experiments were conducted with the silicon carbide (0001) surface in contact with a spherical diamond indenter in air. Sliding friction experiments were also conducted with silicon carbide in contact with iron and iron-based binary alloys at room temperature and 800 C. Fracture pits with a spherical particle and spherical wear debris were observed as a result of indenting and sliding. Spherical debris may be produced by a mechanism that involves a spherical-shaped fracture along the circular or spherical stress trajectories under the inelastic deformation zone.

  8. Adaptation of the Aerospace Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrograph for Observation of Rocket Launches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-15

    8 5. Simplified scale drawing of cine- sextant mount with NIRIS spectrograph ............................. 8 6. The NIRIS spectrograph installed on...the Photo-Sonics cine sextant tracking mount as it is being towed to its observing site at Vandenberg Air Force Base ................................. 9...and Figures 5 and 6 show the placement of the experimental equipment on the cine- sextant tracking mount. 90 FOV ’"...Telescope Neutral Density Filter

  9. Sliding mode controller for a photovoltaic pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElOugli, A.; Miqoi, S.; Boutouba, M.; Tidhaf, B.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a sliding mode control scheme (SMC) for maximum power point tracking controller for a photovoltaic pumping system, is proposed. The main goal is to maximize the flow rate for a water pump, by forcing the photovoltaic system to operate in its MPP, to obtain the maximum power that a PV system can deliver.And this, through the intermediary of a sliding mode controller to track and control the MPP by overcoming the power oscillation around the operating point, which appears in most implemented MPPT techniques. The sliding mode control approach is recognized as one of the efficient and powerful tools for nonlinear systems under uncertainty conditions.The proposed controller with photovoltaic pumping system is designed and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. In addition, to evaluate its performances, a classical MPPT algorithm using perturb and observe (P&O) has been used for the same system to compare to our controller. Simulation results are shown.

  10. An analytical model of dynamic sliding friction during impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic sliding friction was studied based on the angular velocity of a golf ball during an oblique impact. This study used the analytical model proposed for the dynamic sliding friction on lubricated and non-lubricated inclines. The contact area A and sliding velocity u of the ball during impact were used to describe the dynamic friction force Fd = λAu, where λ is a parameter related to the wear of the contact area. A comparison with experimental results revealed that the model agreed well with the observed changes in the angular velocity during impact, and λAu is qualitatively equivalent to the empirical relationship, μN + μη‧dA/dt, given by the product between the frictional coefficient μ and the contact force N, and the additional term related to factor η‧ for the surface condition and the time derivative of A.

  11. An analytical model of dynamic sliding friction during impact

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic sliding friction was studied based on the angular velocity of a golf ball during an oblique impact. This study used the analytical model proposed for the dynamic sliding friction on lubricated and non-lubricated inclines. The contact area A and sliding velocity u of the ball during impact were used to describe the dynamic friction force Fd = λAu, where λ is a parameter related to the wear of the contact area. A comparison with experimental results revealed that the model agreed well with the observed changes in the angular velocity during impact, and λAu is qualitatively equivalent to the empirical relationship, μN + μη′dA/dt, given by the product between the frictional coefficient μ and the contact force N, and the additional term related to factor η′ for the surface condition and the time derivative of A. PMID:28054668

  12. An Evaluation of a Biological Slide-Tutorial Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Gordon L.

    Described is an auto-tutorial slide program for zoology students. A self-paced system was devised for observing the subject matter covered in the twelve study units of a zoology course. The post-testing evaluation revealed that students with lower grade point averages achieved scores comparable with students of higher grade point averages.…

  13. Understanding Learning Style by Eye Tracking in Slide Video Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Jianxia; Nishihara, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    More and more videos are now being used in e-learning context. For improving learning effect, to understand how students view the online video is important. In this research, we investigate how students deploy their attention when they learn through interactive slide video in the aim of better understanding observers' learning style. Felder and…

  14. Reinforcement learning for partially observable dynamic processes: adaptive dynamic programming using measured output data.

    PubMed

    Lewis, F L; Vamvoudakis, Kyriakos G

    2011-02-01

    Approximate dynamic programming (ADP) is a class of reinforcement learning methods that have shown their importance in a variety of applications, including feedback control of dynamical systems. ADP generally requires full information about the system internal states, which is usually not available in practical situations. In this paper, we show how to implement ADP methods using only measured input/output data from the system. Linear dynamical systems with deterministic behavior are considered herein, which are systems of great interest in the control system community. In control system theory, these types of methods are referred to as output feedback (OPFB). The stochastic equivalent of the systems dealt with in this paper is a class of partially observable Markov decision processes. We develop both policy iteration and value iteration algorithms that converge to an optimal controller that requires only OPFB. It is shown that, similar to Q -learning, the new methods have the important advantage that knowledge of the system dynamics is not needed for the implementation of these learning algorithms or for the OPFB control. Only the order of the system, as well as an upper bound on its "observability index," must be known. The learned OPFB controller is in the form of a polynomial autoregressive moving-average controller that has equivalent performance with the optimal state variable feedback gain.

  15. Adaptive observation in the South China Sea using CNOP approach based on a 3-D ocean circulation model and its adjoint model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yineng; Peng, Shiqiu; Liu, Duanling

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of adaptive (or targeted) observation on improving the midrange (30 days) forecast skill of ocean state of the South China Sea (SCS). A region associated with the South China Sea Western Boundary Current (SCSWBC) is chosen as the "target" of the adaptive observation. The Conditional Nonlinear Optimal Perturbation (CNOP) approach is applied to a three-dimensional ocean model and its adjoint model for determining the sensitive region. Results show that the initial errors in the sensitive region determined by the CNOP approach have significant impacts on the forecast of ocean state in the target region; thus, reducing these initial errors through adaptive observation can lead to a better 30 day prediction of ocean state in the target region. Our results suggest that implementing adaptive observation is an effective and cost-saving way to improve an ocean model's forecast skill over the SCS.

  16. High-vacuum adhesion and friction properties of sliding contact-mode micromachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-07-01

    The evolution of adhesion and friction in contact-mode micromachines operated in high vacuum was studied by tracking changes in the adhesive pressure, interfacial shear strength, and static coefficient of friction with accumulating sliding cycles. Low adhesion and high static friction observed during the initial stage of sliding were followed by monotonically intensifying adhesion and decreasing friction until reaching an equilibrium stage at steady-state sliding. This trend revealed the existence of two friction regimes in which asperity deformation and adhesion were the dominant friction mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations indicated that sliding resulted in physical and chemical surface changes. The evolution of the adhesion and friction properties with sliding cycles is attributed to the increase of both the real contact area and the work of adhesion due to nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of contaminant adsorbents, respectively.

  17. Kinesin-1 heavy chain mediates microtubule sliding to drive changes in cell shape.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Amber L; Kim, Hwajin; Srinivasan, Divya; Lakonishok, Margot; Larson, Adam G; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2010-07-06

    Microtubules are typically observed to buckle and loop during interphase in cultured cells by an unknown mechanism. We show that lateral microtubule movement and looping is a result of microtubules sliding against one another in interphase Drosophila S2 cells. RNAi of the kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC), but not dynein or the kinesin-1 light chain, eliminates these movements. KHC-dependent microtubule sliding powers the formation of cellular processes filled with parallel microtubule bundles. The growth of these cellular processes is independent of the actin cytoskeleton. We further observe cytoplasmic microtubule sliding in Xenopus and Ptk2 cells, and show that antibody inhibition of KHC in mammalian cells prevents sliding. We therefore propose that, in addition to its well established role in organelle transport, an important universal function of kinesin-1 is to mediate cytoplasmic microtubule-microtubule sliding. This provides the cell with a dedicated mechanism to transport long and short microtubule filaments and drive changes in cell shape.

  18. Tape-recorded Lectures With Slide Synchronization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhue, D.

    1969-01-01

    Describes "Taped Explanation Slide Synchronization" programs used for individual study or group showing in college zoology. Discusses preparation of programs, class organization, equipment, and costs. (EB)

  19. Cavity growth on a sliding grain boundary

    SciTech Connect

    I-Wei Chen

    1983-11-01

    Cavity growth on a sliding grain boundary to which a normal stress is applied is found to be faster than that on a stationary grain boundary. The morphology of the cavity contains an asymmetric crack-like tip which prompts surface diffusion locally when the sliding is dominant, and the growth rate becomes proportional to the third power of the normal stress independent of the sliding rate. Since the sliding rates of all grain boundaries are statistically comparable, only the normal stress dependence remains important. The conditions which favor the present mechanism are examined and shown to be in good agreement with the experimental evidence in creep cavitation.

  20. High speed sliding of axonemal microtubules produced by outer arm dynein.

    PubMed

    Seetharam, Raviraja N; Satir, Peter

    2005-02-01

    To study dynein arm activity at high temporal resolution, axonemal sliding was measured field by field for wild type and dynein arm mutants of Tetrahymena thermophila. For wt SB255 cells, when the rate of data acquisition was 60 fps, about 5x greater than previously published observations, sliding was observed to be discontinuous with very high velocity sliding (average 196 microm/sec) for a few msec (1 or 2 fields) followed by a pause of several fields. The sliding velocities measured were an order of magnitude greater than rates previously measured by video analysis. However, when the data were analyzed at 12 fps for the same axonemes, consistent with previous observations, sliding was linear as the axonemes extended several times their original length with an average velocity of approximately 10 microm/sec. The pauses or stops occurred at approximately 200 and 300% of the initial length, suggesting that dynein arms on one axonemal doublet were initially active to the limit of extension, and then the arms on the next doublet became activated. In contrast, in a mutant where OADs are missing, sliding observed at 60 fps was continuous and slow (5 microm/sec), as opposed to the discontinuous high-velocity sliding of SB255 and of the mutant at the permissive temperature where OADs are present. High-velocity step-wise sliding was also present in axonemes from an inner arm dynein mutant (KO6). These results indicate that the high-speed discontinuous pattern of sliding is produced by the mechanochemical activity of outer arm dynein. The rate of sliding is consistent with a low duty ratio of the outer arm dynein and with the operation of each arm along a doublet once per beat.

  1. Extended-state-observer-based adaptive control for synchronisation of multi-agent systems with unknown nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongjiu; You, Xiu; Liu, Zhixin; Sun, Fuchun

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the problem of synchronisation to a desired trajectory for non-linear multi-agent systems. By introducing extended state observer approach, decentralised adaptive controllers are designed for distributed systems which have non-identical unknown non-linear dynamics. The non-identical unknown non-linear dynamics allows for a tracked command dynamics which is also non-linear and unknown. State variables of agents can be obtained only in the case where leader agent and the network communication topology for multi-agent systems is strongly connected digraph network structures. A Lyapunov-function-based approach is given to show that the tracking error is ultimately bounded. Some simulation results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed techniques in this paper.

  2. Design and adaptation of ocean observing systems at coastal scales, the role of data assimilation in the optimization of measures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandini, Carlo; Taddei, Stefano; Fattorini, Maria; Doronzo, Bartolomeo; Lapucci, Chiara; Ortolani, Alberto; Poulain, Pierre Marie

    2015-04-01

    The design and the implementation of observation systems, in the current view, are not limited to the capability to observe some phenomena of particular interest in a given sea area, but must ensure maximum benefits to the analysis/prediction systems that are based on numerical models. The design of these experimental systems takes great advantage from the use of synthetic data, whose characteristics are as close as possible to the observed data (e.g. in-situ), in terms of spatial and temporal variability, particularly when the power spectrum of the observed signal is close to that reproduced by a numerical model. This method, usually referred to as OSSE (Observing System Simulation Experiment), is a preferred way to test numerical data for assimilation into models as if they were real data, with the advantage of defining different datasets for data assimilation at almost no cost. This applies both to the design of fixed networks (such as buoys or coastal radars), and to the improvement of the performance of mobile platforms, such as autonomous marine vehicles, floats or mobile radars, through the optimization of parameters for vehicle guidance, coverage, trajectories or localization of sampling points, according to the adaptive observation concept. In this work we present the results of some experimental activities recently undertaken in the coastal area between the Ligurian and Northern Tyrrhenian seas, that have shown a great vulnerability in recent years, due to a number of marine accidents and environmental issues. In this cross-border area an observation and forecasting system is being installed as part of the SICOMAR project (PO maritime Italy-France), in order to provide real time data at high spatial and time resolution, and to design interoperable, expandable and flexible observing platforms, that can be quickly adapted to the needs of local problems (e.g. accidents at sea). The starting SICOMAR network includes HF coastal radars, FerryBoxes onboard ships

  3. New methods for state estimation and adaptive observation of environmental flow systems leveraging coordinated swarms of sensor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewley, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Accurate long-term forecasts of the path and intensity of hurricanes are imperative to protect property and save lives. Accurate estimations and forecasts of the spread of large-scale contaminant plumes, such as those from Deepwater Horizon, Fukushima, and recent volcanic eruptions in Iceland, are essential for assessing environment impact, coordinating remediation efforts, and in certain cases moving folks out of harm's way. The challenges in estimating and forecasting such systems include: (a) environmental flow modeling, (b) high-performance real-time computing, (c) assimilating measured data into numerical simulations, and (d) acquiring in-situ data, beyond what can be measured from satellites, that is maximally relevant for reducing forecast uncertainty. This talk will focus on new techniques for addressing (c) and (d), namely, data assimilation and adaptive observation, in both hurricanes and large-scale environmental plumes. In particular, we will present a new technique for the energy-efficient coordination of swarms of sensor-laden balloons for persistent, in-situ, distributed, real-time measurement of developing hurricanes, leveraging buoyancy control only (coupled with the predictable and strongly stratified flowfield within the hurricane). Animations of these results are available at http://flowcontrol.ucsd.edu/3dhurricane.mp4 and http://flowcontrol.ucsd.edu/katrina.mp4. We also will survey our unique hybridization of the venerable Ensemble Kalman and Variational approaches to large-scale data assimilation in environmental flow systems, and how essentially the dual of this hybrid approach may be used to solve the adaptive observation problem in a uniquely effective and rigorous fashion.

  4. On the mechanism of floating and sliding of liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Musin, Albina; Barkay, Zahava

    2009-03-09

    The mechanisms of floating and sliding of liquid marbles are studied. Liquid marbles containing CaCl(2) and marbles containing NaOH water solutions float on water containing Na(2)CO(3) and an alcoholic solution of phenolphthalein with no chemical reaction. Sliding of liquid marbles, consisting of NaOH water solutions, on polymer substrates coated with phenolphthalein is studied as well. No chemical reaction is observed. These observations supply direct experimental evidence for the suggestion that interfaces are separated by an air layer when marbles roll on solid substrates. It is concluded that a liquid marble rests on hydrophobic particles coating the liquid. In contrast, drops containing an NaOH water solution sliding on superhydrophobic surfaces coated with phenolphthalein leave a colored trace. The mechanism of low-friction sliding of drops deposited on superhydrophobic surfaces and liquid marbles turns out to be quite different: there is no direct contact between liquid and solid in the case of marbles' motion.

  5. Depth Estimation Using a Sliding Camera.

    PubMed

    Ge, Kailin; Hu, Han; Feng, Jianjiang; Zhou, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Image-based 3D reconstruction technology is widely used in different fields. The conventional algorithms are mainly based on stereo matching between two or more fixed cameras, and high accuracy can only be achieved using a large camera array, which is very expensive and inconvenient in many applications. Another popular choice is utilizing structure-from-motion methods for arbitrarily placed camera(s). However, due to too many degrees of freedom, its computational cost is heavy and its accuracy is rather limited. In this paper, we propose a novel depth estimation algorithm using a sliding camera system. By analyzing the geometric properties of the camera system, we design a camera pose initialization algorithm that can work satisfyingly with only a small number of feature points and is robust to noise. For pixels corresponding to different depths, an adaptive iterative algorithm is proposed to choose optimal frames for stereo matching, which can take advantage of continuously pose-changing imaging and save the time consumption amazingly too. The proposed algorithm can also be easily extended to handle less constrained situations (such as using a camera mounted on a moving robot or vehicle). Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world data have illustrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  6. Simulation and Research of Control-System for PMSM Based on Sliding Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baofeng, Lv; Guoxiang, Zhang

    In this paper, permanent magnet synchronous motor rotor flux oriented control strategy is studied, for the key issues of vector control is to observe the rotor flux, the control system is given based on sliding mode observer, and the sliding mode rotor flux observer is designed, with MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation, the results of simulation show that the system with wide speed range, has a good dynamic and static performance.

  7. Seismic isolation of nuclear power plants using sliding isolation bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manish

    Nuclear power plants (NPP) are designed for earthquake shaking with very long return periods. Seismic isolation is a viable strategy to protect NPPs from extreme earthquake shaking because it filters a significant fraction of earthquake input energy. This study addresses the seismic isolation of NPPs using sliding bearings, with a focus on the single concave Friction Pendulum(TM) (FP) bearing. Friction at the sliding surface of an FP bearing changes continuously during an earthquake as a function of sliding velocity, axial pressure and temperature at the sliding surface. The temperature at the sliding surface, in turn, is a function of the histories of coefficient of friction, sliding velocity and axial pressure, and the travel path of the slider. A simple model to describe the complex interdependence of the coefficient of friction, axial pressure, sliding velocity and temperature at the sliding surface is proposed, and then verified and validated. Seismic hazard for a seismically isolated nuclear power plant is defined in the United States using a uniform hazard response spectrum (UHRS) at mean annual frequencies of exceedance (MAFE) of 10-4 and 10 -5. A key design parameter is the clearance to the hard stop (CHS), which is influenced substantially by the definition of the seismic hazard. Four alternate representations of seismic hazard are studied, which incorporate different variabilities and uncertainties. Response-history analyses performed on single FP-bearing isolation systems using ground motions consistent with the four representations at the two shaking levels indicate that the CHS is influenced primarily by whether the observed difference between the two horizontal components of ground motions in a given set is accounted for. The UHRS at the MAFE of 10-4 is increased by a design factor (≥ 1) for conventional (fixed base) nuclear structure to achieve a target annual frequency of unacceptable performance. Risk oriented calculations are performed for

  8. eSlide suite: an open source software system for whole slide imaging.

    PubMed

    Della Mea, V; Bortolotti, N; Beltrami, C A

    2009-08-01

    This short report briefly describes the principles underlying the telepathology technique known as whole slide imaging, and the design and implementation of a system for acquisition and visualisation of digital slides. The developed system, including an acquisition module and a visualisation module, is available as an open source on the Internet, together with sample acquired slides.

  9. Sliding Over a Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosatti, Erio; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Santoro, Giuseppe E.

    2011-03-01

    The frictional response experienced by a stick-slip slider when a phase transition occurs in the underlying solid substrate is a potentially exciting, poorly explored problem. We show, based on 2-dimensional simulations modeling the sliding of a nanotip, that indeed friction may be heavily affected by a continuous structural transition. First, friction turns nonmonotonic as temperature crosses the transition, peaking at the critical temperature Tc where fluctuations are strongest. Second, below Tc friction depends upon order parameter directions, and is much larger for those where the frictional slip can cause a local flip. This may open a route towards control of atomic scale friction by switching the order parameter direction by an external field or strain, with possible application to e.g., displacive ferroelectrics such as BaTi O3 , as well as ferro- and antiferro-distortive materials. Supported by project ESF FANAS/AFRI sponsored by the Italian Research Council (CNR).

  10. On sliding of a puck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, V. A.

    2013-09-01

    Aleksandr Yul'evich Ishlinsky liked to consider a problem with some "special thrill" at the end of the Seminar meeting of the Chair of Applied Mathematics at the Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics at M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University. For example, in 1978 he asked the author of this paper to describe the process of sliding of a rotating hockey puck on ice. Somewhat later, on such a seminar, the author made his report and demonstrated the experimental results, which was approved by Aleksandr Yul'evich. But the small paper on this topic, delivered to the journal "Vestnik Moskovskogo Universiteta," was published only in 1981 [1] thanks to the support of Valentin Vitalievich Rumyantsev. The author thanks the Editorial Board of this journal for the possibility of discussing one of "Ishlinsky's problems" once again.

  11. Peeling, sliding, pulling and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, John; Peng, Gunnar

    2015-11-01

    The peeling of an elastic sheet away from thin layer of viscous fluid is a simply-stated and generic problem, that involves complex interactions between the flow and elastic deformation on a range of length scales. Consider an analogue of capillary spreading, where a blister of injected viscous fluid spreads due to tension in the overlying elastic sheet. Here the tension is coupled to the deformation of the sheet, and thus varies in time and space. A key question is whether or not viscous shear stresses ahead of the blister are sufficient to prevent the sheet sliding inwards and relieving the tension. Our asymptotic analysis reveals a dichotomy between fast and slow spreading, and between two-dimensional and axisymmetric spreading. In combination with bending stresses and gravity, which may dominate parts of the flow but not others, there is a plethora of dynamical regimes.

  12. Peeling, sliding, pulling and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, John; Peng, Gunnar

    2016-11-01

    The peeling of an elastic sheet away from thin layer of viscous fluid is a simply-stated and generic problem, that involves complex interactions between the flow and elastic deformation on a range of length scales. Consider an analogue of capillary spreading, where a blister of injected viscous fluid spreads due to tension in the overlying elastic sheet. Here the tension is coupled to the deformation of the sheet, and thus varies in time and space. A key question is whether or not viscous shear stresses ahead of the blister are sufficient to prevent the sheet sliding inwards and relieving the tension. Our asymptotic analysis reveals a dichotomy between fast and slow spreading, and between two-dimensional and axisymmetric spreading. In combination with bending stresses and gravity, which may dominate parts of the flow but not others, there is a plethora of dynamical regimes.

  13. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  14. Effects of a sliding plate on morphology of the epiphyseal plate in goat distal femur.

    PubMed

    Lin, Da-sheng; Lian, Ke-jian; Hong, Jia-yuan; Ding, Zhen-qi; Zhai, Wen-liang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of a sliding plate on the morphology of the epiphyseal plate in goat distal femur. Eighteen premature female goats were divided randomly into sliding plate, regular plate and control groups. Radiographic analysis and histological staining were performed to evaluate the development of epiphyseal plate at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery. In the sliding plate group, the plate extended accordingly as the epiphyseal plate grows, and the epiphyseal morphology was kept essential normal. However, the phenomenon of the epiphyseal growth retardation and premature closure were very common in the regular plate group. In addition, the sliding plate group exhibited more normal histologic features and Safranin O staining compared to the regular plate group. Our results suggest that the sliding plate can provide reliable internal fixation of epiphyseal fracture without inhibiting epiphyseal growth.

  15. Effects of a Sliding Plate on Morphology of the Epiphyseal Plate in Goat Distal Femur

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Da-sheng; LIAN, Ke-jian; HONG, Jia-yuan; DING, Zhen-qi; ZHAI, Wen-liang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of a sliding plate on the morphology of the epiphyseal plate in goat distal femur. Eighteen premature female goats were divided randomly into sliding plate, regular plate and control groups. Radiographic analysis and histological staining were performed to evaluate the development of epiphyseal plate at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery. In the sliding plate group, the plate extended accordingly as the epiphyseal plate grows, and the epiphyseal morphology was kept essential normal. However, the phenomenon of the epiphyseal growth retardation and premature closure were very common in the regular plate group. In addition, the sliding plate group exhibited more normal histologic features and Safranin O staining compared to the regular plate group. Our results suggest that the sliding plate can provide reliable internal fixation of epiphyseal fracture without inhibiting epiphyseal growth. PMID:22359485

  16. Modeling the Sliding/Falling Ladder Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, William P.; Fox, James B.

    2003-01-01

    Recently we were presented with an interesting twist to the sliding ladder problem viewed in the related rates section of most calculus textbooks. Our problem concerning a sliding ladder that eventually hits the ground. At first, those attempting this problem fell into the calculus trap using only related rates. Previous work for this problem…

  17. Getting Clever with the Sliding Ladder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De, Subhranil

    2014-01-01

    The familiar system involving a uniform ladder sliding against a vertical wall and a horizontal floor is considered again. The floor is taken to be smooth and the wall to be possibly rough--a situation where no matter how large the static friction coefficient between the ladder and the wall, the ladder cannot lean at rest and must slide down.…

  18. New slide test for infectious mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, R. J. L.

    1967-01-01

    The rapid and simple slide test for infectious mononucleosis designed by Hoff and Bauer (1965) is designed and compared with a modified sheep-cell slide screening test (Maloney and Malzone, 1949) and the differentenial absorption technique (Davidson, 1937). The claim of Hoff and Bauer that their test is more `specific' is substantiated. Brief clinical histories illustrate the argument. PMID:5628856

  19. The Cancer Digital Slide Archive - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. David Gutman and Dr. Lee Cooper developed The Cancer Digital Slide Archive (CDSA), a web platform for accessing pathology slide images of TCGA samples. Find out how they did it and how to use the CDSA website in this Case Study.

  20. Sliding indirect hernia containing both ovaries.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Carol L

    2005-09-01

    Although sliding indirect inguinal hernias containing the ipsilateral ovary and fallopian tube are not uncommon in infant girls, sliding hernias containing both ovaries are rare. This report describes a large indirect inguinal hernia in a 1-year-old infant girl that contained the left uterine fundus, left bladder ear, as well as both ovaries and fallopian tubes.

  1. [Heritage Education Lesson Plans and Slide Presentations].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Buren, Maurie

    Field tested in 27 schools and in grades four through twelve, this teaching unit stresses heritage education through the study of southern U.S. architectural styles for homes from the pioneer log structures to the 1950s ranch home. Each of the four lessons in this unit focuses around a slide presentation of 20 slides designed to fit into one…

  2. An LPV Adaptive Observer for Updating a Map Applied to an MAF Sensor in a Diesel Engine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Changhui

    2015-10-23

    In this paper, a new method for mass air flow (MAF) sensor error compensation and an online updating error map (or lookup table) due to installation and aging in a diesel engine is developed. Since the MAF sensor error is dependent on the engine operating point, the error model is represented as a two-dimensional (2D) map with two inputs, fuel mass injection quantity and engine speed. Meanwhile, the 2D map representing the MAF sensor error is described as a piecewise bilinear interpolation model, which can be written as a dot product between the regression vector and parameter vector using a membership function. With the combination of the 2D map regression model and the diesel engine air path system, an LPV adaptive observer with low computational load is designed to estimate states and parameters jointly. The convergence of the proposed algorithm is proven under the conditions of persistent excitation and given inequalities. The observer is validated against the simulation data from engine software enDYNA provided by Tesis. The results demonstrate that the operating point-dependent error of the MAF sensor can be approximated acceptably by the 2D map from the proposed method.

  3. An LPV Adaptive Observer for Updating a Map Applied to an MAF Sensor in a Diesel Engine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Changhui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for mass air flow (MAF) sensor error compensation and an online updating error map (or lookup table) due to installation and aging in a diesel engine is developed. Since the MAF sensor error is dependent on the engine operating point, the error model is represented as a two-dimensional (2D) map with two inputs, fuel mass injection quantity and engine speed. Meanwhile, the 2D map representing the MAF sensor error is described as a piecewise bilinear interpolation model, which can be written as a dot product between the regression vector and parameter vector using a membership function. With the combination of the 2D map regression model and the diesel engine air path system, an LPV adaptive observer with low computational load is designed to estimate states and parameters jointly. The convergence of the proposed algorithm is proven under the conditions of persistent excitation and given inequalities. The observer is validated against the simulation data from engine software enDYNA provided by Tesis. The results demonstrate that the operating point-dependent error of the MAF sensor can be approximated acceptably by the 2D map from the proposed method. PMID:26512675

  4. A mechanism of stick-slip fault sliding without friction rate dependence and supersonic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, Iuliia; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Stick-slip sliding is often observed at various scales and in particular in fault sliding and the accompanied seismic events. Stick-slip is conventionally associated with rate-dependent friction, in particular the intermittent change between static and kinetic friction. However the accumulation of elastic energy in the sliding plates on both sides of the fault can produce oscillations in the velocity of sliding even if the friction coefficient is constant. This manifests itself in terms of oscillations in the sliding velocity somewhat resembling the stick-slip movement. Furthermore, over long faults the sliding exhibits wave-like propagation. We present a model that shows that the zones of non-zero sliding velocities propagate along the fault with the velocity of p-wave. The mechanism of such fast wave propagation is the normal (tensile/compressive) stresses in the neighbouring elements (normal stresses on the planes normal to the fault surface). The strains associated with these stresses are controlled by the Young's modulus rather than shear modulus resulting in the p-wave velocity of propagation of the sliding zone. This manifests itself as a supersonic (with respect to the s-waves) propagation of an apparent shear rupture.

  5. Probing the sliding interactions between bundled actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andy; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2011-03-01

    Assemblies of filamentous biopolymers are hierarchical materials in which the properties of the overall assemblage are determined by structure and interactions between constituent particles at all hierarchical levels. For example, the overall bending rigidity of a two bundled filaments greatly depends on the bending rigidity of, and the adhesion strength between individual filaments. However, another property of importance is the ability for the filaments to slide freely against one another. Everyday experience indicates that it is much easier to bend a stack of papers in which individual sheets freely slide past each other than the same stack of papers in which all the sheets are irreversibly glued together. Similarly, in filamentous structures the ability for local re-arrangement is of the utmost importance in determining the properties of the structures observed. In order to study this phenomenon we create bundles of biopolymers by inducing attractive interactions between actin filaments via the depletion mechanism. We find that bundles of actin filaments to do not slide freely across one another. In order to characterize these sliding interactions, we perform active experiments using laser tweezers to pull one filament across the other at constant velocity.

  6. Flow speed within the Antarctic ice sheet and its controls inferred from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthern, Robert J.; Hindmarsh, Richard C. A.; Williams, C. Rosie

    2015-07-01

    Accurate dynamical models of the Antarctic ice sheet with carefully specified initial conditions and well-calibrated rheological parameters are needed to forecast global sea level. By adapting an inverse method previously used in electric impedance tomography, we infer present-day flow speeds within the ice sheet. This inversion uses satellite observations of surface velocity, snow accumulation rate, and rate of change of surface elevation to estimate the basal drag coefficient and an ice stiffness parameter that influences viscosity. We represent interior ice motion using a vertically integrated approximation to incompressible Stokes flow. This model represents vertical shearing within the ice and membrane stresses caused by horizontal stretching and shearing. Combining observations and model, we recover marked geographical variations in the basal drag coefficient. Relative changes in basal shear stress are smaller. No simple sliding law adequately represents basal shear stress as a function of sliding speed. Low basal shear stress predominates in central East Antarctica, where thick insulating ice allows liquid water at the base to lubricate sliding. Higher shear stress occurs in coastal East Antarctica, where a frozen bed is more likely. Examining Thwaites glacier in more detail shows that the slowest sliding often coincides with elevated basal topography. Differences between our results and a similar adjoint-based inversion suggest that inversion or regularization methods can influence recovered parameters for slow sliding and finer scales; on broader scales we recover a similar pattern of low basal drag underneath major ice streams and extensive regions in East Antarctica that move by basal sliding.

  7. A Sliding Mode Control with Optimized Sliding Surface for Aircraft Pitch Axis Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangchul; Kim, Kwangjin; Kim, Youdan

    A sliding mode controller with an optimized sliding surface is proposed for an aircraft control system. The quadratic type of performance index for minimizing the angle of attack and the angular rate of the aircraft in the longitudinal motion is used to design the sliding surface. For optimization of the sliding surface, a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation is formulated and it is solved through a numerical algorithm using a Generalized HJB (GHJB) equation and the Galerkin spectral method. The solution of this equation denotes a nonlinear sliding surface, on which the trajectory of the system approximately satisfies the optimality condition. Numerical simulation is performed for a nonlinear aircraft model with an optimized sliding surface and a simple linear sliding surface. The simulation result demonstrates that the proposed controller can be effectively applied to the longitudinal maneuver of an aircraft.

  8. An updated nuclear criticality slide rule

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, C.M.; Broadhead, B.L.

    1998-04-01

    This Volume 2 contains the functional version of the updated nuclear criticality slide rule (more accurately, sliding graphs) that is referenced in An Updated Nuclear Criticality Slide Rule: Technical Basis, NUREG/CR-6504, Vol. 1 (ORNL/TM-13322/V1). This functional slide rule provides a readily usable {open_quotes}in-hand{close_quotes} method for estimating pertinent nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete. Graphs from historic documents are provided as references for estimating critical parameters of various fissile material systems. Conversion factors for various English and metric units are provided for quick reference.

  9. Whole slide imaging for educational purposes.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Szymas, Janusz; Yagi, Yukako; Wilbur, David

    2012-01-01

    Digitized slides produced by whole slide image scanners can be easily shared over a network or by transferring image files to optical or other data storage devices. Navigation of digitized slides is interactive and intended to simulate viewing glass slides with a microscope (virtual microscopy). Image viewing software permits users to edit, annotate, analyze, and easily share whole slide images (WSI). As a result, WSI have begun to replace the traditional light microscope, offering a myriad of opportunities for education. This article focuses on current applications of WSI in education and proficiency testing. WSI has been successfully explored for graduate education (medical, dental, and veterinary schools), training of pathology residents, as an educational tool in allied pathology schools (e.g., cytotechnology), for virtual tracking and tutoring, tele-education (tele-conferencing), e-learning, virtual workshops, at tumor boards, with interactive publications, and on examinations. WSI supports flexible and cost-effective distant learning and augments problem-oriented teaching, competency evaluation, and proficiency testing. WSI viewed on touchscreen displays and with tablet technology are especially beneficial for education. Further investigation is necessary to develop superior WSI applications that better support education and to design viewing stations with ergonomic tools that improve the WSI-human interface and navigation of virtual slides. Studies to determine the impact of training pathologists without exposure to actual glass slides are also needed.

  10. Superlubric-pinned transition in sliding incommensurate colloidal monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelli, Davide; Vanossi, Andrea; Invernizzi, Michele; Paronuzzi, Stella; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystalline colloidal monolayers sliding over a laser-induced optical lattice providing the periodic "corrugation" potential recently emerged as a new tool for the study of friction between ideal crystal surfaces. Here, we focus in particular on static friction, the minimal sliding force necessary to depin one lattice from the other. If the colloid and the optical lattices are mutually commensurate, the colloid sliding is always pinned by static friction; however, when they are incommensurate, the presence or absence of pinning can be expected to depend upon the system parameters, like in one-dimensional (1D) systems. If a 2D analogy to the mathematically established Aubry transition of one-dimensional systems were to hold, an increasing periodic corrugation strength U0 should turn an initially free-sliding, superlubric colloid into a pinned state, where the static friction force goes from zero to finite through a well-defined dynamical phase transition. We address this problem by the simulated sliding of a realistic model 2D colloidal lattice, confirming the existence of a clear and sharp superlubric-pinned transition for increasing corrugation strength. Unlike the 1D Aubry transition, which is continuous, the 2D transition exhibits a definite first-order character, with a jump of static friction. With no change of symmetry, the transition entails a structural character, with a sudden increase of the colloid-colloid interaction energy, accompanied by a compensating downward jump of the colloid-corrugation energy. The transition value for the corrugation amplitude U0 depends upon the misalignment angle θ between the optical and the colloidal lattices, superlubricity surviving until larger corrugations for angles away from the energetically favored orientation, which is itself generally slightly misaligned, as shown in recent work. The observability of the superlubric-pinned colloid transition is proposed and discussed.

  11. KECK ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS OF THE PROTOSTELLAR DISK AROUND RADIO SOURCE I IN THE ORION KLEINMANN-LOW NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sitarski, Breann N.; Morris, Mark R.; Becklin, E. E.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Lu, Jessica R.; Duchene, Gaspard; Stolte, Andrea; Zinnecker, Hans

    2013-06-20

    We have made the first detection of a near-infrared counterpart associated with the disk around Radio Source ''I'', a massive protostar in the Kleinmann-Low nebula in Orion, using imaging with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. The infrared emission is evident in images acquired using L' (3.8 {mu}m) and Ms (4.7 {mu}m) filters and is not detectable at K' (2.1 {mu}m). The observed morphology strongly suggests that we are seeing some combination of scattered and thermal light emanating from the disk. The disk is also manifest in the L'/Ms flux ratio image. We interpret the near-infrared emission as the illuminated surface of a nearly edge-on disk, oriented so that only the northern face is visible; the opposite surface remains hidden by the disk. We do not see infrared radiation associated directly with the star proposed to be associated with Source ''I''. The data also suggest that there is a cavity above and below the disk that is oriented perpendicular to the disk and is sculpted by the known, strong outflow from the inner disk of Source I. We compare our data to models of a protostar with a surrounding disk, envelope, and wind-blown cavity in order to elucidate the nature of the disk around Radio Source I.

  12. Facies characteristics, morphology and depositional models of clay-slide deposits in terraced fjord valleys, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Louise; Eilertsen, Raymond S.; Solberg, Inger-Lise; Sveian, Harald; Rokoengen, Kåre

    2007-12-01

    Many bedrock-confined fjord valleys along the Norwegian coast contain thick accumulations of fine-grained sediments that were deposited during and after the last deglaciation. The deposits gradually emerged above sea level due to glacioisostatic uplift, and fjord marine sedimentation was gradually followed by shallow marine and fluvial processes. During emergence terraces and river-cut slopes were formed in the valleys. Subsequent leaching of salt ions from the pore water in the marine deposits by groundwater has led to the development of quick clay. The deposits are subject to river erosion and destructive landslides involving quick clay. Most slides are of prehistoric age. Others are known from modern observations as well as from historic records. Landforms such as distinct slide scars or the hummocky terrain of slide deposits may be strongly modified by secondary processes. In addition, deposits from the most liquid part of quick clay slides may have planar surfaces. Clay-slide deposits on a fluvial or deltaic terrace, therefore, are not always easily recognized from morphology, and only exposures may reveal their internal structures and allow them to be distinguished from overbank flood sediments. Detailed sedimentological work shows that slide deposits in such setting consist of distinct facies containing reworked marine sediments. We propose three facies successions of clay-slide deposits that form a continuum. The dominant components of these succession types are: slightly deformed blocks of laminated clay and silt (A), highly deformed clay and silt with gravel clasts (B) and massive to stratified clay and silt with scattered clasts (C). We suggest that in many cases a basal muddy diamicton is a characteristic, and possibly diagnostic feature. Processes and depositional models are interpreted from the different succession types. The results may be relevant for identifying clay-slide deposits elsewhere and may be useful during general mapping of fjord marine

  13. The Use of a Computer-Controlled Random Access Slide Projector for Rapid Information Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Mark T.

    A 35mm random access slide projector operated in conjunction with a computer terminal was adapted to meet the need for a more rapid and complex graphic display mechanism than is currently available with teletypewriter terminals. The model projector can be operated manually to provide for a maintenance checkout of the electromechanical system.…

  14. The role of grain boundary sliding on creep deformation characteristics of discontinuous reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1994-10-01

    In this study, the grain boundary sliding behavior in discontinuous reinforced composites is investigated numerically. Results indicate that the stress enhancement factor for the composite is much larger than the one observed for the matrix material. In the composite, the increase in the strain rates as a result of grain boundary sliding occurs in a wider stress range in comparison to the matrix. It is shown that the experimentally observed large scale triple point grain boundary cavitation in the composites could occur as a result of large grain rotations resulting from grain boundary sliding and evolution of triaxial stress state. Also, the observed larger creep exponent values or stress dependent creep exponent values for the composites may not be explained solely by the mechanism of grain boundary sliding.

  15. Rate-weakening friction characterizes both slow sliding and catastrophic failure of landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handwerger, Alexander L.; Rempel, Alan W.; Skarbek, Rob M.; Roering, Joshua J.; Hilley, George E.

    2016-09-01

    Catastrophic landslides cause billions of dollars in damages and claim thousands of lives annually, whereas slow-moving landslides with negligible inertia dominate sediment transport on many weathered hillslopes. Surprisingly, both failure modes are displayed by nearby landslides (and individual landslides in different years) subjected to almost identical environmental conditions. Such observations have motivated the search for mechanisms that can cause slow-moving landslides to transition via runaway acceleration to catastrophic failure. A similarly diverse range of sliding behavior, including earthquakes and slow-slip events, occurs along tectonic faults. Our understanding of these phenomena has benefitted from mechanical treatments that rely upon key ingredients that are notably absent from previous landslide descriptions. Here, we describe landslide motion using a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that incorporates a nonlocal stress balance to account for the elastic response to gradients in slip. Our idealized, one-dimensional model reproduces both the displacement patterns observed in slow-moving landslides and the acceleration toward failure exhibited by catastrophic events. Catastrophic failure occurs only when the slip surface is characterized by rate-weakening friction and its lateral dimensions exceed a critical nucleation length h*h* that is shorter for higher effective stresses. However, landslides that are extensive enough to fall within this regime can nevertheless slide slowly for months or years before catastrophic failure. Our results suggest that the diversity of slip behavior observed during landslides can be described with a single model adapted from standard fault mechanics treatments.

  16. Near-infrared polarimetric adaptive optics observations of NGC 1068: a torus created by a hydromagnetic outflow wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C.; Jones, T. J.; Nikutta, R.; McMaster, L.; Mason, R. E.; Elvis, M.; Shenoy, D.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Ramírez, E.; González Martín, O.; Hönig, S. F.; Levenson, N. A.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Perlman, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present J' and K' imaging linear polarimetric adaptive optics observations of NGC 1068 using MMT-Pol on the 6.5-m MMT. These observations allow us to study the torus from a magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) framework. In a 0.5 arcsec (30 pc) aperture at K', we find that polarization arising from the passage of radiation from the inner edge of the torus through magnetically aligned dust grains in the clumps is the dominant polarization mechanism, with an intrinsic polarization of 7.0 ± 2.2 per cent. This result yields a torus magnetic field strength in the range of 4-82 mG through paramagnetic alignment, and 139^{+11}_{-20} mG through the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The measured position angle (P.A.) of polarization at K' is found to be similar to the P.A. of the obscuring dusty component at few parsec scales using infrared interferometric techniques. We show that the constant component of the magnetic field is responsible for the alignment of the dust grains, and aligned with the torus axis on to the plane of the sky. Adopting this magnetic field configuration and the physical conditions of the clumps in the MHD outflow wind model, we estimate a mass outflow rate ≤0.17 M⊙ yr-1 at 0.4 pc from the central engine for those clumps showing near-infrared dichroism. The models used were able to create the torus in a time-scale of ≥105 yr with a rotational velocity of ≤1228 km s-1 at 0.4 pc. We conclude that the evolution, morphology and kinematics of the torus in NGC 1068 can be explained within a MHD framework.

  17. A STELLAR DYNAMICAL MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE BLACK HOLE IN NGC 3998 FROM KECK ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Jonelle L.; Van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Barth, Aaron J.; Sarzi, Marc

    2012-07-01

    We present a new stellar dynamical mass measurement of the black hole in the nearby, S0 galaxy NGC 3998. By combining laser guide star adaptive optics observations obtained with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph on the Keck II telescope with long-slit spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Keck I telescope, we map out the stellar kinematics on both small spatial scales, well within the black hole sphere of influence, and large scales. We find that the galaxy is rapidly rotating and exhibits a sharp central peak in the velocity dispersion. Using the kinematics and the stellar luminosity density derived from imaging observations, we construct three-integral, orbit-based, triaxial stellar dynamical models. We find the black hole has a mass of M{sub BH} = (8.1{sup +2.0}{sub -1.9}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, with an I-band stellar mass-to-light ratio of M/L = 5.0{sup +0.3}{sub -0.4} M{sub Sun }/L{sub Sun} (3{sigma} uncertainties), and that the intrinsic shape of the galaxy is very round, but oblate. With the work presented here, NGC 3998 is now one of a very small number of galaxies for which both stellar and gas dynamical modeling have been used to measure the mass of the black hole. The stellar dynamical mass is nearly a factor of four larger than the previous gas dynamical black hole mass measurement. Given that this cross-check has so far only been attempted on a few galaxies with mixed results, carrying out similar studies in other objects is essential for quantifying the magnitude and distribution of the cosmic scatter in the black hole mass-host galaxy relations.

  18. Evaluation of immunohistochemical staining using whole-slide imaging for HER2 scoring of breast cancer in comparison with real glass slides.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuzuru; Iijima, Tatsuo; Noguchi, Masayuki

    2012-09-01

    Whole-slide imaging (WSI) has been used for education and histological image preservation, and several studies have also reported its validity for practical pathological diagnosis. However, such studies employed materials stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE), and very few attempts have been made to use immunohistochemically stained materials for diagnostic purposes. In the present study, we investigated the availability of WSI diagnosis for immunohistochemically stained materials in place of routine glass slides. Thirty pathologists participated in a trial of HER2 expression diagnosis using WSI and compared the results with those obtained by light microscopy. The validity of WSI diagnosis (interobserver agreement) was rated as 'substantial' in comparison with glass slide diagnosis (κ-value = 0.719). There was a tendency for observers to assign higher scores with WSI than with glass slides, probably because WSI requires slides to be scanned into a computer and observed via a monitor. Although we were able to demonstrate the potential utility of WSI for diagnosing immunostained materials, it must be borne in mind that there are some differences in visualization between WSI and glass slides.

  19. Time variability of Io's volcanic activity from near-IR adaptive optics observations on 100 nights in 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, Katherine; de Pater, Imke

    2016-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is a dynamic target, exhibiting extreme and time-variable volcanic activity powered by tidal forcing from Jupiter. We have conducted a campaign of high-cadence observations of Io with the goal of characterizing its volcanic activity. Between Aug 2013 and the end of 2015, we imaged Io on 100 nights in the near-infrared with adaptive optics on the Keck and Gemini N telescopes, which resolve emission from individual volcanic hot spots. During our program, we made over 400 detections of 48 distinct hot spots, some of which were detected 30+ times. We use these observations to derive a timeline of global volcanic activity on Io, which exhibits wide variability from month to month. The timelines of thermal activity at individual volcanic centers have geophysical implications, and will permit future characterization by others. We evaluate hot spot detection limits and give a simple parameterization of the minimum detectable intensity as a function of emission angle, which can be applied to other analyses. We detected three outburst eruptions in August 2013, but no other outburst-scale events were observed in the subsequent ∼90 observations. Either the cluster of events in August 2013 was a rare occurrence, or there is a mechanism causing large events to occur closely-spaced in time. We also detected large eruptions (though not of outburst scale) within days of one another at Kurdalagon Patera and Sethlaus/Gabija Paterae in 2015. As was also seen in the Galileo dataset, the hot spots we detected can be separated into two categories based on their thermal emission: those that are persistently active for 1 year or more at moderate intensity, and those that are only briefly active, are time-variable, and often reach large intensities. A small number of hot spots in the latter category appear and subside in a matter of days, reaching particularly high intensities; although these are not bright enough to qualify as outbursts, their thermal signatures follow

  20. The Earth surface slide movement at Soledad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, A.

    1986-11-01

    The Earth surface slide movement at Soledad is a mountain-slide type of movement. Estimations of the thickness of the layer which is moving range between 10 and 100 m. There is no proof that the movement is water induced, but it could be influenced by the water household. The slope of the slide area is H: D = 1: 2. The height difference in the moving area studied, according to this paper, is 1 km. The actual rate of movement is about 12 cm/yr.

  1. Railway bridge monitoring during construction and sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaudi, Daniele; Casanova, Nicoletta; Kronenberg, Pascal; Vurpillot, Samuel

    1997-05-01

    The Moesa railway bridge is a composite steel concrete bridge on three spans of 30 m each. The 50 cm thick concrete deck is supported on the lower flanges of two continuous, 2.7 m high I-beams. The bridge has been constructed alongside an old metallic bridge. After demolishing this one, the new bridge has been slid for 5 m by 4 hydraulic jacks and positioned on the refurbished piles of the old bridge. About 30 fiber optic, low-coherence sensors were imbedded in the concrete deck to monitor its deformations during concrete setting and shrinkage, as well as during the bridge sliding phase. In the days following concrete pour it was possible to follow its thermal expansion due to the exothermic setting reaction and the following thermal and during shrinkage. The deformations induced by the additional load produced by the successive concreting phases were also observed. During the bridge push, which extended over six hours, the embedded and surface mounted sensors allowed the monitoring of the curvature variations in the horizontal plane due to the slightly uneven progression of the jacks. Excessive curvature and the resulting cracking of concrete could be ruled out by these measurements. It was also possible to observe the bridge elongation under the heating action of the sun.

  2. Terminal sliding mode tracking control for a class of SISO uncertain nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mou; Wu, Qing-Xian; Cui, Rong-Xin

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the terminal sliding mode tracking control is proposed for the uncertain single-input and single-output (SISO) nonlinear system with unknown external disturbance. For the unmeasured disturbance of nonlinear systems, terminal sliding mode disturbance observer is presented. The developed disturbance observer can guarantee the disturbance approximation error to converge to zero in the finite time. Based on the output of designed disturbance observer, the terminal sliding mode tracking control is presented for uncertain SISO nonlinear systems. Subsequently, terminal sliding mode tracking control is developed using disturbance observer technique for the uncertain SISO nonlinear system with control singularity and unknown non-symmetric input saturation. The effects of the control singularity and unknown input saturation are combined with the external disturbance which is approximated using the disturbance observer. Under the proposed terminal sliding mode tracking control techniques, the finite time convergence of all closed-loop signals are guaranteed via Lyapunov analysis. Numerical simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed terminal sliding mode tracking control.

  3. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Helfrich addresses two perspectives from which to think about observation in the classroom: that of the teacher observing her classroom, her group, and its needs, and that of the outside observer coming into the classroom. Offering advice from her own experience, she encourages and defends both. Do not be afraid of the disruption of outside…

  4. Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    Joosten begins his article by telling us that love and knowledge together are the foundation for our work with children. This combination is at the heart of our observation. With this as the foundation, he goes on to offer practical advice to aid our practice of observation. He offers a "List of Objects of Observation" to help guide our…

  5. Physiological Observations and Omics to Develop Personalized Sensormotor Adaptability Countermeasures Using Bed Rest and Space Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.; Feiveson, A.; Oddsson, L.; Zanello, S.; Oman, C. M.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H. S.; Reschke, M.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during the initial exposure to microgravity and during the re-adapation phase following a return to an earth-gravitational environment. These alterations may disrupt the ability to perform mission critical functional tasks requiring ambulation, manual control and gaze stability. Interestingly, astronauts who return from space flight show substantial differences in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which individual astronauts would be affected would improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. For such an approach to succeed, we must develop predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability that will allow us to foresee, before actual space flight, which crewmembers are likely to experience the greatest challenges to their adaptive capacities. The goals of this project are to identify and characterize this set of predictive measures that include: 1) behavioral tests to assess sensory bias and adaptability quantified using both strategic and plastic-adaptive responses; 2) imaging to determine individual brain morphological and functional features using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging, resting state functional connectivity MRI, and sensorimotor adaptation task-related functional brain activation; 3) genotype markers for genetic polymorphisms in Catechol-O-Methyl Transferase, Dopamine Receptor D2, Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and genetic polymorphism of alpha2-adrenergic receptor that play a role in the neural pathways underlying sensorimotor adaptation. We anticipate these predictive measures will be significantly correlated with individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability after long-duration space flight and an analog bed rest environment. We will be conducting a retrospective study leveraging data already collected from relevant

  6. Quasistatic manipulation with compliance and sliding

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, I. ); Cutkosky, M.R. )

    1992-02-01

    The authors propose a method for modeling dextrous manipulation with sliding fingers. The approach combines compliance and friction limit surfaces. The method is useful for describing how a grasp will behave in the presence of external forces (e.g., when and how the fingertips will slide) and for planning how to control the fingers so that the grasped object will follow a desired trajectory. The sliding trajectories are characterized by a transient and steady-state solution. The underlying theory is first discussed and illustrated with several single-finger examples. Experimental results are also presented. The analysis is then extended to grasps with multiple sliding and nonsliding fingers. The multifinger analysis is illustrated with an example of manipulating a card with two soft-contact fingers.

  7. Automated single-slide staining system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, S. M.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus developed to Gram-stain single slides automatically is flexible enough to accommodate other types of staining procedures. Method frees operator and eliminates necessity for subjective evaluations as to length of staining or decolorizing time.

  8. Spatial distribution of Io's volcanic activity from near-IR adaptive optics observations on 100 nights in 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, Katherine; de Pater, Imke

    2016-12-01

    The extreme and time-variable volcanic activity on Jupiter's moon Io is the result of periodic tidal forcing. The spatial distribution of Io's surface heat flux provides an important constraint on models for tidal heat dissipation, yielding information on interior properties and on the depth at which the tidal heat is primarily dissipated. We analyze the spatial distribution of 48 hot spots based on more than 400 total hot spot detections in adaptive optics images taken on 100 nights in 2013-2015 (data presented in de Kleer and de Pater [2016] Time variability of Io's volcanic activity from near-IR adaptive optics 13 observations on 100 nights in 2013-2015). We present full surface maps of Io at multiple near-infrared wavelengths for three epochs during this time period, and show that the longitudinal distribution of hot spots has not changed significantly since the Galileo mission. We find that hot spots that are persistently active at moderate intensities tend to occur at different latitudes/longitudes than those that exhibit sudden brightening events characterized by high peak intensities and subsequent decay phases. While persistent hot spots are located primarily between ± 30°N, hot spots exhibiting bright eruption events occur primarily between 40° and 65° in both the northern and southern hemispheres. In addition, while persistent hot spots occur preferentially on the leading hemisphere, all bright eruptions were detected on the trailing hemisphere, despite the comparable longitudinal coverage of our observations to both hemispheres. A subset of the bright hot spots which are not intense enough to qualify as outburst eruptions resemble outbursts in terms of temporal evolution and spatial distribution, and may be outbursts whose peak emission went unobserved, or else scaled-down versions of the same phenomenon. A statistical analysis finds that large eruptions are more spatially clustered and occur at higher latitudes than 95% of simulated datasets that

  9. Projector slides - preparation, construction and use.

    PubMed

    Galer, I A

    1976-12-01

    Projector slides are used widely as visual aids in lectures and meetings. However, they are often difficult to read and to interpret, and can bring about more confusion than illumination to an audience. A framework is offered for the non-specialist in graphic design, within which the preparation, construction and presentation of projector slides may be placed in a systematic fashion. Summary recommendations are also given.

  10. Preparing Scientific Papers, Posters, and Slides.

    PubMed

    Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Maeno, Misato

    2016-01-01

    Publications and presentations are important in academic medicine. The ability to present information in a standard fashion is critically important. Papers, posters, and slides must be prepared appropriately to maximize their chance of being accepted. The first step is to use word processing software correctly. English language usage must conform to standard scientific English usage. Abbreviations should be avoided as much as possible. Numerical data must be presented with the appropriate number of significant figures. The first step in preparing a paper is to decide the target journal. Papers should always be written in 12 point Times New Roman font, while slides and posters should be in Arial or Helvetica. The Results section must contain actual data with appropriate statistical analysis. Take great care to prepare figures and tables according to the journal's instructions. Posters must be prepared to allow easy reading at a distance of 2m. Use a white background and dark letters. The majority of the area of your poster should be Results, and there is no need to include the abstract or references on a poster. Slide presentations should be limited to about one slide for each minute of the talk. Avoid the use of animations and excessive use of color. Do not use abbreviations on slides. Following these simple guidelines will meet the requirements of most journals and allow your audience to appreciate the data on your posters and slides.

  11. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  12. Tribology of the lubricant quantized sliding state.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Capozza, Rosario; Vanossi, Andrea; Santoro, Giuseppe E; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2009-11-07

    In the framework of Langevin dynamics, we demonstrate clear evidence of the peculiar quantized sliding state, previously found in a simple one-dimensional boundary lubricated model [A. Vanossi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 056101 (2006)], for a substantially less idealized two-dimensional description of a confined multilayer solid lubricant under shear. This dynamical state, marked by a nontrivial "quantized" ratio of the averaged lubricant center-of-mass velocity to the externally imposed sliding speed, is recovered, and shown to be robust against the effects of thermal fluctuations, quenched disorder in the confining substrates, and over a wide range of loading forces. The lubricant softness, setting the width of the propagating solitonic structures, is found to play a major role in promoting in-registry commensurate regions beneficial to this quantized sliding. By evaluating the force instantaneously exerted on the top plate, we find that this quantized sliding represents a dynamical "pinned" state, characterized by significantly low values of the kinetic friction. While the quantized sliding occurs due to solitons being driven gently, the transition to ordinary unpinned sliding regimes can involve lubricant melting due to large shear-induced Joule heating, for example at large speed.

  13. Positive Quantitative Relationship between EMT and Contact-Initiated Sliding on Fiber-like Tracks.

    PubMed

    Milano, Daniel F; Natividad, Robert J; Saito, Yasuhiro; Luo, Catherine Y; Muthuswamy, Senthil K; Asthagiri, Anand R

    2016-10-04

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex process by which cells acquire invasive properties that enable escape from the primary tumor. Complete EMT, however, is not required for metastasis: circulating tumor cells exhibit hybrid epithelial-mesenchymal states, and genetic perturbations promoting partial EMT induce metastasis in vivo. An open question is whether and to what extent intermediate stages of EMT promote invasiveness. Here, we investigate this question, building on recent observation of a new invasive property. Migrating cancer cell lines and cells transduced with prometastatic genes slide around other cells on spatially confined, fiberlike micropatterns. We show here that low-dosage/short-duration exposure to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) induces partial EMT and enables sliding on narrower (26 μm) micropatterns than untreated counterparts (41 μm). High-dosage/long-duration exposure induces more complete EMT, including disrupted cell-cell contacts and reduced E-cadherin expression, and promotes sliding on the narrowest (15 μm) micropatterns. These results identify a direct and quantitative relationship between EMT and cell sliding and show that EMT-associated invasive sliding is progressive, with cells that undergo partial EMT exhibiting intermediate sliding behavior and cells that transition more completely through EMT displaying maximal sliding. Our findings suggest a model in which fiber maturation and EMT work synergistically to promote invasiveness during cancer progression.

  14. Modeling the Physics of Sliding Objects on Rotating Space Elevators and Other Non-relativistic Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovic, Leonardo; Knudsen, Steven

    2017-01-01

    We consider general problem of modeling the dynamics of objects sliding on moving strings. We introduce a powerful computational algorithm that can be used to investigate the dynamics of objects sliding along non-relativistic strings. We use the algorithm to numerically explore fundamental physics of sliding climbers on a unique class of dynamical systems, Rotating Space Elevators (RSE). Objects sliding along RSE strings do not require internal engines or propulsion to be transported from the Earth's surface into outer space. By extensive numerical simulations, we find that sliding climbers may display interesting non-linear dynamics exhibiting both quasi-periodic and chaotic states of motion. While our main interest in this study is in the climber dynamics on RSEs, our results for the dynamics of sliding object are of more general interest. In particular, we designed tools capable of dealing with strongly nonlinear phenomena involving moving strings of any kind, such as the chaotic dynamics of sliding climbers observed in our simulations.

  15. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E. K.

    2015-05-06

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  16. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  17. The trochanter slide osteotomy approach for resurfacing hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pitto, Rocco P

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the safety and efficacy of the greater trochanter slide osteotomy approach for resurfacing hip arthroplasty. Fifty consecutive hips (47 patients) with degenerative joint disease were enrolled in the study. Serial clinical and radiological assessments were performed after the index operation. At 1-year follow-up, the clinical outcome and patient satisfaction were rated excellent or good in all hips. The radiological assessment showed signs of satisfactory implant alignment. Periprosthetic fractures and non-unions of the greater trochanter were not observed. The greater trochanter slide osteotomy approach for resurfacing hip arthroplasty is a safe procedure and provides optimal exposure of the acetabulum and proximal femur, maintaining the soft-tissue integrity of the hip joint. Blood supply of the proximal femur is not violated using this approach.

  18. Plastic strain arrangement in copper single crystals in sliding

    SciTech Connect

    Chumaevskii, Andrey V. Lychagin, Dmitry V.; Tarasov, Sergei Yu.

    2014-11-14

    Deformation of tribologically loaded contact zone is one of the wear mechanisms in spite of the fact that no mass loss may occur during this process. Generation of optimal crystallographic orientations of the grains in a polycrystalline materials (texturing) may cause hardening and reducing the deformation wear. To reveal the orientation dependence of an individual gain and simplify the task we use copper single crystals with the orientations of the compression axis along [111] and [110]. The plastic deformation was investigated by means of optical, scanning electron microscopy and EBSD techniques. It was established that at least four different zones were generated in the course of sliding test, such as non-deformed base metal, plastic deformation layer sliding, crystalline lattice reorientation layer and subsurface grain structure layer. The maximum plastic strain penetration depth was observed on [110]-single crystals. The minimum stability of [111]-crystals with respect to rotation deformation mode as well as activation of shear in the sliding contact plane provide for rotation deformation localization below the worn surface. The high-rate accumulation of misorientations and less strain penetration depth was observed on [111]-crystals as compared to those of [110]-oriented ones.

  19. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  20. The Louisiana Slide Library; A Humanities Program. Bulletin 1755.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Council for Music and Performing Arts, New Orleans.

    The Louisiana Slide Library is an extensive collection of slides, lectures, and tapes designed for use in the arts, the humanities, social and ethnic studies, languages, home economics, careers, crafts, and special education. This bibliography lists these slide sets and indicates the grade level intended for each set and the number of slides in…

  1. Horizontal sliding of kilometre-scale hot spring area during the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Ishibashi, Jun'ichiro; Ishitsuka, Kazuya; Kamata, Ryuichi

    2017-02-20

    We report horizontal sliding of the kilometre-scale geologic block under the Aso hot springs (Uchinomaki area) caused by vibrations from the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (Mw 7.0). Direct borehole observations demonstrate the sliding along the horizontal geological formation at ~50 m depth, which is where the shallowest hydrothermal reservoir developed. Owing to >1 m northwest movement of the geologic block, as shown by differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR), extensional open fissures were generated at the southeastern edge of the horizontal sliding block, and compressional deformation and spontaneous fluid emission from wells were observed at the northwestern edge of the block. The temporal and spatial variation of the hot spring supply during the earthquake can be explained by the horizontal sliding and borehole failures. Because there was no strain accumulation around the hot spring area prior to the earthquake and gravitational instability could be ignored, the horizontal sliding along the low-frictional formation was likely caused by seismic forces from the remote earthquake. The insights derived from our field-scale observations may assist further research into geologic block sliding in horizontal geological formations.

  2. Horizontal sliding of kilometre-scale hot spring area during the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Ishibashi, Jun’ichiro; Ishitsuka, Kazuya; Kamata, Ryuichi

    2017-01-01

    We report horizontal sliding of the kilometre-scale geologic block under the Aso hot springs (Uchinomaki area) caused by vibrations from the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (Mw 7.0). Direct borehole observations demonstrate the sliding along the horizontal geological formation at ~50 m depth, which is where the shallowest hydrothermal reservoir developed. Owing to >1 m northwest movement of the geologic block, as shown by differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR), extensional open fissures were generated at the southeastern edge of the horizontal sliding block, and compressional deformation and spontaneous fluid emission from wells were observed at the northwestern edge of the block. The temporal and spatial variation of the hot spring supply during the earthquake can be explained by the horizontal sliding and borehole failures. Because there was no strain accumulation around the hot spring area prior to the earthquake and gravitational instability could be ignored, the horizontal sliding along the low-frictional formation was likely caused by seismic forces from the remote earthquake. The insights derived from our field-scale observations may assist further research into geologic block sliding in horizontal geological formations. PMID:28218298

  3. Horizontal sliding of kilometre-scale hot spring area during the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Ishibashi, Jun’Ichiro; Ishitsuka, Kazuya; Kamata, Ryuichi

    2017-02-01

    We report horizontal sliding of the kilometre-scale geologic block under the Aso hot springs (Uchinomaki area) caused by vibrations from the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (Mw 7.0). Direct borehole observations demonstrate the sliding along the horizontal geological formation at ~50 m depth, which is where the shallowest hydrothermal reservoir developed. Owing to >1 m northwest movement of the geologic block, as shown by differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR), extensional open fissures were generated at the southeastern edge of the horizontal sliding block, and compressional deformation and spontaneous fluid emission from wells were observed at the northwestern edge of the block. The temporal and spatial variation of the hot spring supply during the earthquake can be explained by the horizontal sliding and borehole failures. Because there was no strain accumulation around the hot spring area prior to the earthquake and gravitational instability could be ignored, the horizontal sliding along the low-frictional formation was likely caused by seismic forces from the remote earthquake. The insights derived from our field-scale observations may assist further research into geologic block sliding in horizontal geological formations.

  4. Identification of mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum smear slide using automatic scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulaningtyas, Riries; Suksmono, Andriyan B.; Mengko, Tati L. R.; Saptawati, Putri

    2015-04-01

    Sputum smear observation has an important role in tuberculosis (TB) disease diagnosis, because it needs accurate identification to avoid high errors diagnosis. In development countries, sputum smear slide observation is commonly done with conventional light microscope from Ziehl-Neelsen stained tissue and it doesn't need high cost to maintain the microscope. The clinicians do manual screening process for sputum smear slide which is time consuming and needs highly training to detect the presence of TB bacilli (mycobacterium tuberculosis) accurately, especially for negative slide and slide with less number of TB bacilli. For helping the clinicians, we propose automatic scanning microscope with automatic identification of TB bacilli. The designed system modified the field movement of light microscope with stepper motor which was controlled by microcontroller. Every sputum smear field was captured by camera. After that some image processing techniques were done for the sputum smear images. The color threshold was used for background subtraction with hue canal in HSV color space. Sobel edge detection algorithm was used for TB bacilli image segmentation. We used feature extraction based on shape for bacilli analyzing and then neural network classified TB bacilli or not. The results indicated identification of TB bacilli that we have done worked well and detected TB bacilli accurately in sputum smear slide with normal staining, but not worked well in over staining and less staining tissue slide. However, overall the designed system can help the clinicians in sputum smear observation becomes more easily.

  5. Elastically accommodated grain-boundary sliding: New insights from experiment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Ian; Faul, Ulrich H.; Skelton, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Substantial progress is reported towards a reconciliation of experimental observations of high-temperature viscoelastic behaviour of fine-grained materials with the micromechanical theory of grain-boundary sliding. The classic Raj-Ashby theory of grain boundary sliding has recently been revisited - confirming the presence of the following features: (i) at a characteristic period τe much less than the Maxwell relaxation time τd, a dissipation peak of amplitude ∼10-2 and associated shear modulus relaxation resulting from elastically accommodated sliding on grain boundaries of relatively low viscosity; (ii) at intermediate periods, a broad regime of diffusionally-assisted grain-boundary sliding within which the dissipation varies with period as Q-1∼Toα with α ∼ 1/3, sliding being limited by stress concentrations at grain corners, that are progressively eroded with increasing period and diffusion distance; and (iii) for periods longer than the Maxwell relaxation time τd, diffusionally accommodated grain-boundary sliding with Q-1 ∼ To. For periods To ≫ τe, laboratory dissipation data may be adequately described as a function of a single master variable, namely the normalised period To/τd. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the lower levels of dissipation measured at shorter periods deviate from such a master curve - consistent with the existence of the two characteristic timescales, τe and τd, for grain-boundary sliding, with distinct grain-size sensitivities. New forced-oscillation data at moderate temperatures (short normalised periods) provide tentative evidence of the dissipation peak of elastically accommodated sliding. Complementary torsional microcreep data indicate that, at seismic periods of 1-1000 s, much of the non-elastic strain is recoverable - consistent with substantial contributions from elastically accommodated and diffusionally assisted grain-boundary sliding.

  6. Decoupling control based on terminal sliding mode and wavelet network for the speed and tension system of reversible cold strip rolling mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yiming; Liu, Le; Li, Jianxiong; Xu, Yanze

    2015-08-01

    To weaken the nonlinear coupling influences among the variables in the speed and tension system of reversible cold strip rolling mill, a novel dynamic decoupling control strategy is proposed based on nonsingular fast terminal sliding mode (NFTSM) and wavelet neural network (WNN). First, nonlinear disturbance observers are developed to counteract the mismatched uncertainties, and then input/output dynamic decoupling and linearisation for the speed and tension nonlinear coupling system are realised by utilising the inverse system theory. Second, nonsingular fast terminal sliding mode controller (NFTSMC) for each pseudo linear subsystem is presented based on backstepping and two-power reaching law, so as to improve the global convergence speed and robust stability of the system. Third, adaptive WNNs are used to approximate the uncertain items of the system, so as to improve the control precision of the speed and tension of reversible cold strip rolling mill. Theoretical analyses show that the NFTSMs satisfy reachability condition, the system error variables can converge to equilibrium point in finite time, and the resulting closed-loop system is globally asymptotically stable. Finally, simulation research is carried out on the speed and tension system of a 1422 mm reversible cold strip rolling mill by using the actual data, and results show the superiority of the proposed control strategy in comparison with the strategies of cascade PI, linear sliding mode control and internal model control.

  7. Regulation of Blood Glucose Concentration in Type 1 Diabetics Using Single Order Sliding Mode Control Combined with Fuzzy On-line Tunable Gain, a Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Dinani, Soudabeh Taghian; Zekri, Maryam; Kamali, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is considered as a global affecting disease with an increasing contribution to both mortality rate and cost damage in the society. Therefore, tight control of blood glucose levels has gained significant attention over the decades. This paper proposes a method for blood glucose level regulation in type 1 diabetics. The control strategy is based on combining the fuzzy logic theory and single order sliding mode control (SOSMC) to improve the properties of sliding mode control method and to alleviate its drawbacks. The aim of the proposed controller that is called SOSMC combined with fuzzy on-line tunable gain is to tune the gain of the controller adaptively. This merit causes a less amount of control effort, which is the rate of insulin delivered to the patient body. As a result, this method can decline the risk of hypoglycemia, a lethal phenomenon in regulating blood glucose level in diabetics caused by a low blood glucose level. Moreover, it attenuates the chattering observed in SOSMC significantly. It is worth noting that in this approach, a mathematical model called minimal model is applied instead of the intravenously infused insulin–blood glucose dynamics. The simulation results demonstrate a good performance of the proposed controller in meal disturbance rejection and robustness against parameter changes. In addition, this method is compared to fuzzy high-order sliding mode control (FHOSMC) and the superiority of the new method compared to FHOSMC is shown in the results. PMID:26284169

  8. Droplets sliding down inclined planes: unexpected dynamics on elastomer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourlier-Fargette, Aurelie; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Neukirch, Sebastien

    2016-11-01

    Droplet dynamics on an angled surface results from a competition between the weight of the droplet, capillary forces, and viscous dissipation inside the drop. The motion of droplets on stiff surfaces has been investigated for a long time, both experimentally and theoretically, while recent studies have shown the interesting physics underlying the sliding of droplets on soft surfaces. We focus on the dynamics of water-glycerol mixture droplets sliding down vertical plates of silicone elastomers, highlighting an unexpected behavior: the droplet dynamics on such a surface includes two regimes with different constant speeds. These results contrast with those found in the literature for droplets sliding on materials such as treated glass. We investigate the universality of this behavior on various elastomers, and study in detail the two regimes and the sharp transition observed between them. Different candidates can be responsible for the sudden speed change: bistability, chemical interaction with the substrate, softness of the material, etc. Our experiments to clarify the role of each of them reveal an unexpected link between microscopic phenomena at the scale of the polymer matrix and the macroscopic dynamics of a droplet.

  9. Sliding Mode Control Applied to Reconfigurable Flight Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Wells, S. R.; Bacon, Barton (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sliding mode control is applied to the design of a flight control system capable of operating with limited bandwidth actuators and in the presence of significant damage to the airframe and/or control effector actuators. Although inherently robust, sliding mode control algorithms have been hampered by their sensitivity to the effects of parasitic unmodeled dynamics, such as those associated with actuators and structural modes. It is known that asymptotic observers can alleviate this sensitivity while still allowing the system to exhibit significant robustness. This approach is demonstrated. The selection of the sliding manifold as well as the interpretation of the linear design that results after introduction of a boundary layer is accomplished in the frequency domain. The design technique is exercised on a pitch-axis controller for a simple short-period model of the High Angle of Attack F-18 vehicle via computer simulation. Stability and performance is compared to that of a system incorporating a controller designed by classical loop-shaping techniques.

  10. Fatigue resistant carbon coatings for rolling/sliding contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harpal; Ramirez, Giovanni; Eryilmaz, Osman; Greco, Aaron; Doll, Gary; Erdemir, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The growing demands for renewable energy production have recently resulted in a significant increase in wind plant installation. Field data from these plants show that wind turbines suffer from costly repair, maintenance and high failure rates. Often times the reliability issues are linked with tribological components used in wind turbine drivetrains. The primary failure modes in bearings and gears are associated with micropitting, wear, brinelling, scuffing, smearing and macropitting all of which occur at or near the surface. Accordingly, a variety of surface engineering approaches are currently being considered to alter the near surface properties of such bearings and gears to prevent these tribological failures. In the present work, we have evaluated the tribological performance of compliant highly hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating developed at Argonne National Laboratory, under mixed rolling/sliding contact conditions for wind turbine drivetrain components. The coating was deposited on AISI 52100 steel specimens using a magnetron sputter deposition system. The experiments were performed on a PCS Micro-Pitting-Rig (MPR) with four material pairs at 1.79 GPa contact stress, 40% slide to roll ratio and in polyalphaolefin (PAO4) basestock oil (to ensure extreme boundary conditions). The post-test analysis was performed using optical microscopy, surface profilometry, and Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained show a potential for these coatings in sliding/rolling contact applications as no failures were observed with coated specimens even after 100 million cycles compared to uncoated pair in which they failed after 32 million cycles, under the given test conditions.

  11. Theory of sliding-mode triboelectric nanogenerators.

    PubMed

    Niu, Simiao; Liu, Ying; Wang, Sihong; Lin, Long; Zhou, Yu Sheng; Hu, Youfan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-11-20

    The triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is a powerful approach toward new energy technology, especially for portable electronics. A theoretical model for the sliding-mode TENG is presented in this work. The finite element method was utilized to characterize the distributions of electric potential, electric field, and charges on the metal electrodes of the TENG. Based on the FEM calculation, the semi-analytical results from the interpolation method and the analytical V-Q-x relationship are built to study the sliding-mode TENG. The analytical V-Q-x equation is validated through comparison with the semi-analytical results. Furthermore, based on the analytical V-Q-x equation, dynamic output performance of sliding-mode TENG is calculated with arbitrary load resistance, and good agreement with experimental data is achieved. The theory presented here is a milestone work for in-depth understanding of the working mechanism of the sliding-mode TENG, and provides a theoretical basis for further enhancement of the sliding-mode TENG for both energy scavenging and self-powered sensor applications.

  12. Resistance to Sliding on Atomic Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominik, C.; Tielens, A.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The structure and stability of agglomerates of micron-sized particles is determined by the mechanical properties of the individual contacts between the constituent particles. In this paper we study the possibility of aggregate rearrangements by sliding. Since the contacts between (sub)micron particles are only a few hundred atoms in diameter, processes on atomic levels will play the dominating roll. We study a theoretical model of sliding friction for surfaces that are either flat or contain steps in their grids. The results show that sliding over flat surfaces may produce a large range of friction coefficients, including zero if the adhesive forces are small compared to the binding forces inside a body. However, both grid alignment and steps in the surface will lead to high values for friction. These processes combined virtually eliminate the possibility of sliding in a collision of two (sub)micron sized particles at velocities low enough for sticking to occur. On the other hand we show that in collisions between aggregates sliding may be an important factor for energy dissipation and compaction.

  13. Slide-Ring Materials Using Cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kohzo

    2017-01-01

    We have recently synthesized slide-ring materials using cyclodextrin by cross-linking polyrotaxanes, a typical supramolecule. The slide-ring materials have polymer chains with bulky end groups topologically interlocked by figure-of-eight shaped junctions. This indicates that the cross-links can pass through the polymer chains similar to pulleys to relax the tension of the backbone polymer chains. The slide-ring materials also differ from conventional polymers in that the entropy of rings affects the elasticity. As a result, the slide-ring materials show quite small Young's modulus not proportional to the cross-linking density. This concept can be applied to a wide variety of polymeric materials as well as gels. In particular, the slide-ring materials show remarkable scratch-proof properties for coating materials for automobiles, cell phones, mobile computers, and so on. Further current applications include vibration-proof insulation materials for sound speakers, highly abrasive polishing media, dielectric actuators, and so on.

  14. NEMD simulations for ductile metal sliding

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James E; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J; Holian, Brad L

    2011-01-31

    We have studied the sliding behavior for a 19 M Al(110)/Al(110) defective crystal at 15 GPa as a function of relative sliding velocity. The general features are qualitatively similar to smaller scale (1.4 M) atom simulations for Al(111)/Al(110) nondefective single crystal sliding. The critical velocity, v{sub c}, is approximately the same for the defective crystal as the size scaled v{sub c}. The lower velocity tangential force is depressed relative to the perfect crystal. The critical temperature, T*, is depressed relative to the perfect crystal. These conclusions are consistent with a lower value for f{sub c} for the defective crystal. The detailed features of structural transformation and the high velocity regime remain to be mapped.

  15. Develop and Manufacture an airlock sliding tray

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Cindy M.

    2014-02-26

    Objective: The goal of this project is to continue to develop an airlock sliding tray and then partner with an industrial manufacturing company for production. The sliding tray will be easily installed into and removed from most glovebox airlocks in a few minutes. Technical Approach: A prototype of a sliding tray has been developed and tested in the LANL cold lab and 35 trays are presently being built for the plutonium facility (PF-4). The current, recently approved design works for a 14-inch diameter round airlock and has a tray length of approximately 20 inches. The grant will take the already tested and approved round technology and design for the square airlock. These two designs will be suitable for the majority of the existing airlocks in the multitude of DOE facilities. Partnering with an external manufacturer will allow for production of the airlock trays at a much lower cost and increase the availability of the product for all DOE sites. Project duration is estimated to be 12-13 months. Benefits: The purpose of the airlock sliding trays is fourfold: 1) Mitigate risk of rotator cuff injuries, 2) Improve ALARA, 3) Reduce risk of glovebox glove breaches and glove punctures, and 4) Improve worker comfort. I have had the opportunity to visit many other DOE facilities including Savannah, Y-12, ORNL, Sandia, and Livermore for assistance with ergonomic problems and/or injuries. All of these sites would benefit from the airlock sliding tray and I can assume all other DOE facilities with gloveboxes built prior to 1985 could also use the sliding trays.

  16. An observation support system with an adaptive ontology-driven user interface for the modeling of complex behaviors during surgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Neumuth, T; Kaschek, B; Neumuth, D; Ceschia, M; Meixensberger, J; Strauss, G; Burgert, O

    2010-11-01

    The field of surgical interventions emphasizes knowledge and experience; explicit and detailed models of surgical processes are hard to obtain by observation or measurement. However, in medical engineering and related developments, such models are highly valuable. Surgical process modeling deals with the generation of complex process descriptions by observation. This places high demands on the observers, who have to use a sizable terminology to denominate surgical actions, instruments, and patient anatomies, and to describe processes unambiguously. Here, we present a novel method, employing an ontology-based user interface that adapts to the actual situation and describe the principles of the system. A validation study showed that this method enables observers with little recording experience to reach a recording accuracy of >90%. Furthermore, this method can be used for live and video observation. We conclude that the method of ontology-supported recording for complex behaviors can be advantageously employed when surgical processes are modeled.

  17. Friction and Wear Behavior of Silicon Under Conditions of Sliding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimpalli, Chandrasekhar Venkata

    Silicon is gaining importance as a material in micromechanical applications such as micromotors and microactuators. Friction and wear can affect the performance of these devices and hence it is important to study the friction and wear behavior of silicon. The deformation behavior of n-type silicon is fundamentally different from p-type. On deformation, n -type silicon may convert to p-type, but p-type silicon does not convert to n-type on deformation. This is related to the effect of dislocations interacting with the electrical charge carriers. Friction and wear behavior of n and p-type silicon was studied under conditions of sliding wear. Sliding was selected because the stress system associated with sliding introduces large plastic strains at the surface. The friction and wear behavior of n and p-type silicon is expected to be different due to the differences in their deformation behavior. Also, the n to p transition may show up in the friction and wear behavior. The samples were tested in air and in vacuum. Diamond was used as the slider. The wear tracks showed evidence of plastic flow. The morphology of this material was similar to that seen in more ductile materials. The coefficient of friction was also high. Other researchers have reported that DC Silicon transforms to a more ductile phase when sufficient pressure is applied. When shear stresses are present, as in sliding wear, the pressure for phase transformation has been reported to be about 8 GPa. The maximum pressure under the slider in the present set of experiments was estimated to be 8.2 GPa. Therefore, it is possible that transformed material extruded during sliding to produce the flow-like features observed at the wear track. The work involved in this phase transformation, as well as the work in deforming DC Silicon and/or the ductile product phase would contribute to the frictional energy. The debris from the air tests was DC silicon (as determined by XRD and TEM). No significant differences were

  18. Glacier Basal Sliding in Two-Dimensions Quantified from Correlation of High-Resolution Satellite Imagery: A Case Study on Kennicott Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, W. H., Jr.; Anderson, R. S.; Allen, J.; Rajaram, H.; Anderson, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    observed spatiotemporal pattern of sliding.

  19. Sliding Window Generalized Kernel Affine Projection Algorithm Using Projection Mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavakis, Konstantinos; Theodoridis, Sergios

    2008-12-01

    Very recently, a solution to the kernel-based online classification problem has been given by the adaptive projected subgradient method (APSM). The developed algorithm can be considered as a generalization of a kernel affine projection algorithm (APA) and the kernel normalized least mean squares (NLMS). Furthermore, sparsification of the resulting kernel series expansion was achieved by imposing a closed ball (convex set) constraint on the norm of the classifiers. This paper presents another sparsification method for the APSM approach to the online classification task by generating a sequence of linear subspaces in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). To cope with the inherent memory limitations of online systems and to embed tracking capabilities to the design, an upper bound on the dimension of the linear subspaces is imposed. The underlying principle of the design is the notion of projection mappings. Classification is performed by metric projection mappings, sparsification is achieved by orthogonal projections, while the online system's memory requirements and tracking are attained by oblique projections. The resulting sparsification scheme shows strong similarities with the classical sliding window adaptive schemes. The proposed design is validated by the adaptive equalization problem of a nonlinear communication channel, and is compared with classical and recent stochastic gradient descent techniques, as well as with the APSM's solution where sparsification is performed by a closed ball constraint on the norm of the classifiers.

  20. Impact Driver With Integral Sliding Hammer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Bilby J.

    1987-01-01

    Tool combines impact driver with sliding dead-blow hammer. Used for any purpose for which ordinary impact driver used; tightening fasteners or driving starter holes for drill. Tool protects user from accidental injury and surrounding equipment from damage that might occur from ordinary arm-wielded hammer. Especially useful in underwater work.

  1. Simulation of sliding of liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alen, Saif Khan; Farhat, Nazia; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of sliding behavior of liquid droplets on flat and periodic microgrooved surfaces with a range of groove geometry are conducted. A numerical model is developed which is capable of predicting the critical sliding angle of the drop by comparing the advancing and the receding angles obtained from numerical and experimental findings. The effect of microgroove topography, droplet size and inclination angle on the droplet sliding characteristics is analysed. Using an open-source platform (Surface Evolver), a 3D drop-shape model is developed to numerically determine the drop stability and contact angle hysteresis on tilted surfaces. In this numerical model, the three phase contact line of the drop is obtained by numerically calculating the vertex force and local contact angle at each vertex of the base contour. Several numerical models are developed based on various assumptions of base contour shape (circular or elliptical) and implementation of gravitational force to the droplet. Droplet shapes and critical sliding angles, obtained from these numerical models, are compared with those of experimental results and are found to be in very good agreement.

  2. Enhancing Creative Thinking through Designing Electronic Slides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokaram, Al-Ali Khaled; Al-Shabatat, Ahmad Mohammad; Fong, Fook Soon; Abdallah, Andaleeb Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    During the shifting of teaching and learning methods using computer technologies, much emphasis was paid on the knowledge content more than the thinking skills. Thus, this study investigated the effects of a computer application, namely, designing electronic slides on the development of creative thinking skills of a sample of undergraduate…

  3. Particle Sliding on a Rough Incline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    We study a particle sliding on a rough inclined plane as an example of a mechanical problem with nonholonomic constraint. The particle is launched in an arbitrary direction so that its motion has both a horizontal and a "vertical" (i.e., up- and downhill) direction. The friction force acts along the instantaneous velocity, so that the horizontal…

  4. Observation of cone and rod photoreceptors in normal subjects and patients using a new generation adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Merino, David; Duncan, Jacque L.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the capability of a new generation adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) to resolve cones and rods in normal subjects, and confirm our findings by comparing cone and rod spacing with published histology measurements. Cone and rod spacing measurements are also performed on AOSLO images from two different diseased eyes, one affected by achromatopsia and the other by acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). The potential of AOSLO technology in the study of these and other retinal diseases is illustrated. PMID:21833357

  5. Percolation, sliding, localization and relaxation in topologically closed circuits

    PubMed Central

    Hurowitz, Daniel; Cohen, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Considering a random walk in a random environment in a topologically closed circuit, we explore the implications of the percolation and sliding transitions for its relaxation modes. A complementary question regarding the “delocalization” of eigenstates of non-hermitian Hamiltonians has been addressed by Hatano, Nelson, and followers. But we show that for a conservative stochastic process the implied spectral properties are dramatically different. In particular we determine the threshold for under-damped relaxation, and observe “complexity saturation” as the bias is increased. PMID:26961586

  6. Percolation, sliding, localization and relaxation in topologically closed circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurowitz, Daniel; Cohen, Doron

    2016-03-01

    Considering a random walk in a random environment in a topologically closed circuit, we explore the implications of the percolation and sliding transitions for its relaxation modes. A complementary question regarding the “delocalization” of eigenstates of non-hermitian Hamiltonians has been addressed by Hatano, Nelson, and followers. But we show that for a conservative stochastic process the implied spectral properties are dramatically different. In particular we determine the threshold for under-damped relaxation, and observe “complexity saturation” as the bias is increased.

  7. How to Prepare Clay-Lift and Sandwich Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barman, Charles R.

    1984-01-01

    Describes two techniques for making 35 millimeter slides without using photographic film. One method uses clear adhesive contact paper and the other uses transparency film. Both techniques are inexpensive and require only a few minutes of preparation per slide. (JM)

  8. Solenoid valve design minimizes vibration and sliding wear problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillon, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Two-way cryogenic solenoid valve resists damage from vibration and metallic interfacial sliding. The new system features a flat-faced armature guided by a flexure disk which eliminates sliding surfaces and is less subject to contamination and wear.

  9. The significance of phytoplankton photo-adaptation and benthic pelagic coupling to primary production in the South China Sea: Observations and numerical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kon-Kee; Chen, Ying-Jie; Tseng, Chun-Mao; Lin, I.-I.; Liu, Hong-Bin; Snidvongs, Anond

    2007-07-01

    The primary production in the South China Sea (SCS) has been assessed by a coupled physical-biogeochemical model with a simple NPZD ecosystem [Liu et al., 2002. Monsoon-forced chlorophyll distribution and primary production in the SCS: observations and a numerical study. Deep-Sea Research I 49(8), 1387-1412]. In recent years there have been an increasing number of observations in the SCS that may be used to check the validity of the previous approach. The coupled model of the SCS mentioned above employs a photo-adaptation scheme for the phytoplankton growth and uses the simplest bottom boundary condition of an inert benthic layer. These adopted schemes are checked against observations at the South-East Asian Time-series Study (SEATS) Station in the northern SCS and in the Gulf of Thailand. Numerical experiments with or without photo-adaptation or active benthic processes are carried out in this study. Additional experiments are performed with different parameters used for these processes. The observations at the SEATS Station provide direct evidence for the variable chlorophyll-to-nitrogen ratio in phytoplankton as required by photo-adaptation. It is concluded that a photo-adaptation scheme is critical to the phytoplankton growth, especially for the development of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM). Without photo-adaptation, the average value of the vertically integrated primary production (IPP) over the whole SCS domain would be 35% lower. It is noted that, the modeled SCM occurs at depths shallower than observations due to physical as well as biological processes employed by the model. Increasing the upper limit of the chlorophyll-to-nitrogen ratio, as suggested by observations, enhances chlorophyll level in the lower part of the euphotic zone and raises primary productivity in areas with rich nutrient supply. The observed values of the IPP in the Gulf of Thailand clearly demonstrate the importance of the benthic-pelagic coupling to the nutrient cycle

  10. Vulnerability and adaptation of urban dwellers in slope failure threats--a preliminary observation for the Klang Valley Region.

    PubMed

    Thanapackiam, P; Salleh, Khairulmaini Osman; Ghaffar, Fauza Ab

    2012-04-01

    This paper discusses the outcome of a research that examines the relationships between vulnerability and adaptation of urban dwellers to the slope failure threat in the Klang Valley Region. Intense urban landuse expansions in the Klang Valley Region have increased urban dwellers vulnerability to slope failures in recent years. The Klang Valley Region was chosen as the study area due to the increasing intensities and frequencies of slope failures threat. This paper examines urban dwellers vulnerability based on their (1) population and demographics characteristics, (2) the state of physical structures of dwellings and (3) the situation of the immediate environment threatened by slope failures. The locations of slope failure incidents were identified, mapped and examined followed with a detailed field study to identified areas. The results identified significant relationships between vulnerability indicators and slope failures in the Klang Valley Region. The findings of the study are envisaged to give valuable insights on addressing the threat of slope failures in the Klang Valley Region.

  11. ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS OF B0128+437: A LOW-MASS, HIGH-REDSHIFT GRAVITATIONAL LENS

    SciTech Connect

    Lagattuta, David J.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Auger, Matthew W.

    2010-06-20

    We use high-resolution adaptive optics (AO) imaging on the Keck II telescope to study the gravitational lens B0128+437 in unprecedented detail, allowing us to resolve individual lensed quasar components and, for the first time, detect and measure properties of the lensing galaxy. B0128+437 is a small-separation lens with known flux-ratio and astrometric anomalies. We discuss possible causes for these anomalies, including the presence of substructure in the lensing galaxy, propagation effects due to dust and a turbulent interstellar medium, and gravitational microlensing. This work demonstrates that AO will be an essential tool for studying the many new small-separation lenses expected from future surveys.

  12. Tribological characteristics of metallic glass in sliding contact: Experimental investigations and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xi-Yong

    The unlubricated sliding characteristics of zirconium-based bulk metallic glass disks have been examined in vacuum and in air using sliders made from the same material or from a hard bearing steel (52100). The pin-on-disk test system allowed collection of debris, monitoring of the friction force and, using a Kelvin probe, in situ detection of changes in the structure and chemical composition of the disk surface. Friction coefficient and wear rate of metallic glass were found to vary with normal load, sliding velocity and test environment. Post-test characterization included microhardness testing, X-ray diffraction, SEM and EDS. Examination of worn surfaces, cross-sections and debris confirmed the importance of plastic deformation, material transfer and environmental interactions. When devitrified material was tested, sliding processes caused the near-surface material to re-amorphize. Results from sliding of bulk metallic glass specimens were compared with those from related experiments involving crystalline metals and alloys. Although bulk metallic glasses are reported to have only limited ductility in tensile tests, the friction coefficients and worn surfaces of these materials are typical of ductile materials. Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were used to simulate the sliding of a 2D 2-component amorphous system interacting via Lennard-Jones potentials. The friction coefficient showed a transient before reaching an average steady state value. The steady state friction coefficient was observed to decrease with an increasing sliding velocity. Mixing was observed at the sliding interface. The mixed layer grew at a rate that scaled with the square root of time. A density decrease was recorded in the region adjacent to the sliding interface. This spatially corresponded to the softer layer detected experimentally near the worn surface in a Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni 10.0Be22.5 bulk metallic glass alloy after sliding. Subsurface displacement profiles produced in these

  13. 7 CFR 3201.73 - Slide way lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Slide way lubricants. 3201.73 Section 3201.73... Designated Items § 3201.73 Slide way lubricants. (a) Definition. Products used to provide lubrication and... this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased slide way lubricants. By...

  14. 7 CFR 3201.73 - Slide way lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Slide way lubricants. 3201.73 Section 3201.73... Designated Items § 3201.73 Slide way lubricants. (a) Definition. Products used to provide lubrication and... this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased slide way lubricants. By...

  15. 7 CFR 3201.73 - Slide way lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Slide way lubricants. 3201.73 Section 3201.73... Designated Items § 3201.73 Slide way lubricants. (a) Definition. Products used to provide lubrication and... this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased slide way lubricants. By...

  16. 21 CFR 864.3800 - Automated slide stainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated slide stainer. 864.3800 Section 864.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Automated slide stainer. (a) Identification. An automated slide stainer is a device used to stain...

  17. 21 CFR 864.3800 - Automated slide stainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated slide stainer. 864.3800 Section 864.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Automated slide stainer. (a) Identification. An automated slide stainer is a device used to stain...

  18. 21 CFR 864.3800 - Automated slide stainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated slide stainer. 864.3800 Section 864.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Automated slide stainer. (a) Identification. An automated slide stainer is a device used to stain...

  19. 21 CFR 864.3800 - Automated slide stainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated slide stainer. 864.3800 Section 864.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Automated slide stainer. (a) Identification. An automated slide stainer is a device used to stain...

  20. 21 CFR 864.3800 - Automated slide stainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated slide stainer. 864.3800 Section 864.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Automated slide stainer. (a) Identification. An automated slide stainer is a device used to stain...

  1. Shear-induced lamellar ordering and interfacial sliding in amorphous carbon films: A superlow friction regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian-Bao; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Xu, Liang; Wang, Lin-Feng; Wang, Hui

    2011-10-01

    A shear-induced phase transition from disorder to lamellar ordering in amorphous carbon films are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Formation of well-separated graphene-like interfacial layers is observed with large interlayer distances, diminishing and ultimately vanishing interlayer bonds, which provides a near-frictionless sliding plane. The steady-state velocity accommodation mode after the running-in stage is interfacial sliding between the graphene-like layers, which explains the experimentally observed graphitization and formation of carbon-rich transfer layers. A superlow friction or superlubricity regime with friction coefficient of approximately 0.01 originates from the extremely large repulsive and low shear interactions across the sliding interface.

  2. Mechanism of sand slide - cold lahar induced by extreme rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Masumi; Dok, Atitkagna

    2014-05-01

    Along with the increasing frequencies of extreme rainfall events in almost every where on the earth, shallow slide - debris flow, i.e. cold lahars running long distance often occurs and claims downslope residents lives. In the midnight of 15 October 2013, Typhoon Wilpha attacked the Izu-Oshima, a active volcanic Island and the extreme rainfall of more than 800 mm / 24 hours was recorded. This downpour of more than 80 mm/hr lasted 4 hours at its peak and caused a number of cold lahars. The initial stage of those lahars was shallow slides of surface black volcanic ash deposits, containing mostly fine sands. The thickness was only 50 cm - 1 m. In the reconnaissance investigation, author found that the sliding surface was the boundary of two separate volcanic ash layers between the black and yellow colored and apparently showing contrast of permeability and hardness. Permeability contrast may have contributed to generation of excess pore pressure on the border and trigger the slide. Then, the unconsolidated, unpacked mass was easily fluidized and transformed into mud flows, that which volcanologists call cold lahars. Seismometers installed for monitoring the active volcano's activities, succeeded to detect many tremors events. Many are spikes but 5 larger and longer events were extracted. They lasted 2 -3 minutes and if we assume that this tremors reflects the runout movement, then we can calculate the mean velocity of the lahars. Estimated velocity was 45 - 60 km/h, which is much higher than the average speed 30 - 40 km/h of debris flows observed in Japan. Flume tests of volcanic ash flows by the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute showed the wet volcanic ash can run at higher speed than other materials. The two tremor records were compare d with the local residents witnessed and confirmed by newspaper reported that the reach of the lahar was observed at the exact time when tremor ends. We took the black volcanic ash and conducted ring shear tests to

  3. An analysis of grain boundary sliding and grain boundary cavitation in discontinuously reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1996-05-01

    In this study, the creep cavitation and rupture characteristics of polycrystalline matrix material and discontinuously reinforced composites are investigated including grain boundary sliding behavior, reinforcement aspect ratio and interfacial behavior between the reinforcement and surrounding matrix grains. Free sliding of the grain boundaries, a continuous nucleation of the grain boundary cavities, their diffusional growth and coalescence to form grain boundary facet cracks are fully accounted for in the analyses. The results indicate that, with sliding grain boundaries, the stress enhancement factor for the composites is much higher than the one observed for the matrix material and its value increases with increasing reinforcement aspect ratio, reduction in the matrix grain size and sliding interfacial behavior between the reinforcement and the matrix. For the composites, the influence of grain boundary sliding on the creep life is reduced by the stress concentration effect that is seen at the end of the reinforcements. In contrast with the behavior of polycrystalline matrix material in composites after the formation of the first facet crack, resulting from the coalescence of the cavities, a significant time is required for the formation of the other grain boundary facet cracks across the ligament to cause final rupture. The results also show that experimentally observed higher creep exponents or stress dependent creep exponent values in discontinuously reinforced composites can occur as a result of creep damage evolution behavior.

  4. Kinesin-1 heavy chain mediates microtubule sliding to drive changes in cell shape

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Amber L.; Kim, Hwajin; Srinivasan, Divya; Lakonishok, Margot; Larson, Adam G.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2010-01-01

    Microtubules are typically observed to buckle and loop during interphase in cultured cells by an unknown mechanism. We show that lateral microtubule movement and looping is a result of microtubules sliding against one another in interphase Drosophila S2 cells. RNAi of the kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC), but not dynein or the kinesin-1 light chain, eliminates these movements. KHC-dependent microtubule sliding powers the formation of cellular processes filled with parallel microtubule bundles. The growth of these cellular processes is independent of the actin cytoskeleton. We further observe cytoplasmic microtubule sliding in Xenopus and Ptk2 cells, and show that antibody inhibition of KHC in mammalian cells prevents sliding. We therefore propose that, in addition to its well established role in organelle transport, an important universal function of kinesin-1 is to mediate cytoplasmic microtubule–microtubule sliding. This provides the cell with a dedicated mechanism to transport long and short microtubule filaments and drive changes in cell shape. PMID:20566873

  5. "Discoveries in Planetary Sciences": Slide Sets Highlighting New Advances for Astronomy Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, D. A.; Schneider, N. M.; Beyer, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary science is a field that evolves rapidly, motivated by spacecraft mission results. Exciting new mission results are generally communicated rather quickly to the public in the form of press releases and news stories, but it can take several years for new advances to work their way into college textbooks. Yet it is important for students to have exposure to these new advances for a number of reasons. In some cases, new work renders older textbook knowledge incorrect or incomplete. In some cases, new discoveries make it possible to emphasize older textbook knowledge in a new way. In all cases, new advances provide exciting and accessible examples of the scientific process in action. To bridge the gap between textbooks and new advances in planetary sciences we have developed content on new discoveries for use by undergraduate instructors. Called 'Discoveries in Planetary Sciences', each new discovery is summarized in a 3-slide PowerPoint presentation. The first slide describes the discovery, the second slide discusses the underlying planetary science concepts, and the third presents the big picture implications of the discovery. A fourth slide includes links to associated press releases, images, and primary sources. This effort is generously sponsored by the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, and the slide sets are available at http://dps.aas.org/education/dpsdisc/. Sixteen slide sets have been released so far covering topics spanning all sub-disciplines of planetary science. Results from the following spacecraft missions have been highlighted: MESSENGER, the Spirit and Opportunity rovers, Cassini, LCROSS, EPOXI, Chandrayan, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Express, and Venus Express. Additionally, new results from Earth-orbiting and ground-based observing platforms and programs such as Hubble, Keck, IRTF, the Catalina Sky Survey, HARPS, MEarth, Spitzer, and amateur astronomers have been highlighted. 4-5 new slide sets are

  6. Sliding sleeves of XRCC4-XLF bridge DNA and connect fragments of broken DNA.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Ineke; Sitters, Gerrit; Candelli, Andrea; Heerema, Stephanie J; Heller, Iddo; de Melo, Abinadabe J; Zhang, Hongshan; Normanno, Davide; Modesti, Mauro; Peterman, Erwin J G; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2016-07-28

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the primary pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. Such breaks are formed, for example, during gene-segment rearrangements in the adaptive immune system or by cancer therapeutic agents. Although the core components of the NHEJ machinery are known, it has remained difficult to assess the specific roles of these components and the dynamics of bringing and holding the fragments of broken DNA together. The structurally similar XRCC4 and XLF proteins are proposed to assemble as highly dynamic filaments at (or near) DSBs. Here we show, using dual- and quadruple-trap optical tweezers combined with fluorescence microscopy, how human XRCC4, XLF and XRCC4-XLF complexes interact with DNA in real time. We find that XLF stimulates the binding of XRCC4 to DNA, forming heteromeric complexes that diffuse swiftly along the DNA. Moreover, we find that XRCC4-XLF complexes robustly bridge two independent DNA molecules and that these bridges are able to slide along the DNA. These observations suggest that XRCC4-XLF complexes form mobile sleeve-like structures around DNA that can reconnect the broken ends very rapidly and hold them together. Understanding the dynamics and regulation of this mechanism will lead to clarification of how NHEJ proteins are involved in generating chromosomal translocations.

  7. Controlling chaos based on a novel intelligent integral terminal sliding mode control in a rod-type plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, Khari; Zahra, Rahmani; Behrooz, Rezaie

    2016-05-01

    An integral terminal sliding mode controller is proposed in order to control chaos in a rod-type plasma torch system. In this method, a new sliding surface is defined based on a combination of the conventional sliding surface in terminal sliding mode control and a nonlinear function of the integral of the system states. It is assumed that the dynamics of a chaotic system are unknown and also the system is exposed to disturbance and unstructured uncertainty. To achieve a chattering-free and high-speed response for such an unknown system, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system is utilized in the next step to approximate the unknown part of the nonlinear dynamics. Then, the proposed integral terminal sliding mode controller stabilizes the approximated system based on Lyapunov’s stability theory. In addition, a Bee algorithm is used to select the coefficients of integral terminal sliding mode controller to improve the performance of the proposed method. Simulation results demonstrate the improvement in the response speed, chattering rejection, transient response, and robustness against uncertainties.

  8. fMRI Adaptation between Action Observation and Action Execution Reveals Cortical Areas with Mirror Neuron Properties in Human BA 44/45

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Stephan; Schillinger, Frieder L.; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Schultz, Johannes; Uludag, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Mirror neurons (MNs) are considered to be the supporting neural mechanism for action understanding. MNs have been identified in monkey’s area F5. The identification of MNs in the human homolog of monkeys’ area F5 Broadmann Area 44/45 (BA 44/45) has been proven methodologically difficult. Cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) adaptation studies supporting the existence of MNs restricted their analysis to a priori candidate regions, whereas studies that failed to find evidence used non-object-directed (NDA) actions. We tackled these limitations by using object-directed actions (ODAs) differing only in terms of their object directedness in combination with a cross-modal adaptation paradigm and a whole-brain analysis. Additionally, we tested voxels’ blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response patterns for several properties previously reported as typical MN response properties. Our results revealed 52 voxels in left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG; particularly BA 44/45), which respond to both motor and visual stimulation and exhibit cross-modal adaptation between the execution and observation of the same action. These results demonstrate that part of human IFG, specifically BA 44/45, has BOLD response characteristics very similar to monkey’s area F5. PMID:26973496

  9. Vesicocutaneous fistula after sliding hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Varun; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sureka, Sanjoy

    2016-01-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias are usually direct inguinal hernias containing various abdominal viscera. The incidence of bladder forming a part of an inguinal hernia, called as “scrotal cystocele,” is 1–4%. The risk of bladder injury is as high as 12% when repairing this type of hernia. This case report emphasizes this aspect in a 65-year-old man who presented with urinary leak through the scrotal wound following right inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26941501

  10. Ultra High Pressure (UHP) Technology (BRIEFING SLIDES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-25

    AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2008-4600 POSTPRINT ULTRA HIGH PRESSURE ( UHP ) TECHNOLOGY (BRIEFING SLIDES) Patrick D. Sullivan Air Force Research...Since the discovery of the unprecedented effectiveness of 1500 psi Ultra High Pressure ( UHP ) technology in September of 2002 , AFRL scientists and... engineers have sought to increase Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting (ARFF) performance by moving to higher flow rates to obtain greater throw distance and

  11. Managing and Querying Whole Slide Images

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fusheng; Oh, Tae W.; Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution pathology images provide rich information about the morphological and functional characteristics of biological systems, and are transforming the field of pathology into a new era. To facilitate the use of digital pathology imaging for biomedical research and clinical diagnosis, it is essential to manage and query both whole slide images (WSI) and analytical results generated from images, such as annotations made by humans and computed features and classifications made by computer algorithms. There are unique requirements on modeling, managing and querying whole slide images, including compatibility with standards, scalability, support of image queries at multiple granularities, and support of integrated queries between images and derived results from the images. In this paper, we present our work on developing the Pathology Image Database System (PIDB), which is a standard oriented image database to support retrieval of images, tiles, regions and analytical results, image visualization and experiment management through a unified interface and architecture. The system is deployed for managing and querying whole slide images for In Silico brain tumor studies at Emory University. PIDB is generic and open source, and can be easily used to support other biomedical research projects. It has the potential to be integrated into a Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) with powerful query capabilities to support pathology imaging. PMID:22844574

  12. Managing and querying whole slide images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fusheng; Oh, Tae W.; Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel

    2012-02-01

    High-resolution pathology images provide rich information about the morphological and functional characteristics of biological systems, and are transforming the field of pathology into a new era. To facilitate the use of digital pathology imaging for biomedical research and clinical diagnosis, it is essential to manage and query both whole slide images (WSI) and analytical results generated from images, such as annotations made by humans and computed features and classifications made by computer algorithms. There are unique requirements on modeling, managing and querying whole slide images, including compatibility with standards, scalability, support of image queries at multiple granularities, and support of integrated queries between images and derived results from the images. In this paper, we present our work on developing the Pathology Image Database System (PIDB), which is a standard oriented image database to support retrieval of images, tiles, regions and analytical results, image visualization and experiment management through a unified interface and architecture. The system is deployed for managing and querying whole slide images for In Silico brain tumor studies at Emory University. PIDB is generic and open source, and can be easily used to support other biomedical research projects. It has the potential to be integrated into a Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) with powerful query capabilities to support pathology imaging.

  13. Elastically Accommodated Grain-Boundary Sliding: New Insights from Experiment and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, I.; Skelton, R.; Faul, U.; Morris, S.

    2012-12-01

    According to the classic Raj-Ashby theory of grain-boundary sliding, elastic behaviour breaks down at sufficiently high temperatures and appropriate timescales of shear stress application - by sliding on boundaries of relatively low viscosity, accommodated, in the first instance by elastic distortion of the neighbouring grains. The distribution of normal stress across the slipped boundary is responsible for such elastic deformation, and provides the restoring force for recoverable (anelastic) behaviour. Only at higher temperatures and longer time scales, is it possible for appreciable diffusion to erode this distribution of boundary normal stress and progressively allow the additional permanent strains of diffusionally accommodated sliding. Separate characteristic timescales for elastically and diffusionally accommodated sliding, with distinctive dependencies on temperature and grain size, are difficult to reconcile with control of the full spectrum of viscoelastic behaviour by a single master variable, as has been widely advocated. However, in experimental studies of pure polycrystalline materials, the strain-energy dissipation peak predicted for elastically accommodated sliding has proved to be elusive. In a recent attempt to reconcile the results of forced-oscillation experiments with the predictions of the theory of grain-boundary sliding (Lee, Morris & Wilkening, Proc. R. Soc. A, 2011), a dissipation plateau at moderate temperatures for fine-grained polycrystalline olivine has been tentatively attributed to elastically accommodated sliding (Jackson & Faul, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 2010). Here we will examine two further lines of evidence concerning the nature of the transition between elastic and viscoelastic behaviour in polycrystalline olivine: (i) a re-assessment of torsional microcreep data that constrain the recoverable fraction of the non-elastic strain; and (ii) closer scrutiny of the mildly non-elastic behaviour observed at moderate temperatures

  14. The use of digital 'virtual slides' in the quality assessment of haematological morphology: results of a pilot exercise involving UK NEQAS(H) participants.

    PubMed

    Burthem, J; Brereton, M; Ardern, J; Hickman, L; Seal, L; Serrant, A; Hutchinson, C V; Wells, E; McTaggart, P; De la Salle, B; Parker-Williams, J; Hyde, K

    2005-07-01

    We report the results of a pilot study assessing the use of digital 'virtual slides' in haematological quality assessment. Conducted together with the UK National External Quality Assessment Scheme for General Haematology, the study involved 166 separate participants, using the format of a typical assessment exercise. The results revealed substantial concordance of observations made using digital slides with those reported in previous glass slide surveys that used identical cases. Participant feedback strongly supported the use of electronic slides in teaching and assessment roles. Our results suggest roles for this new electronic resource in external quality assessment (EQA), education and continuing professional development.

  15. Observation of dynamic wavelength shifts of a four-beam laser diode and study of its adaptability to optical heads.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, M; Kime, K

    1995-04-01

    Dynamic wavelength shifts for a four-beam laser diode were observed with a streak camera system. The wavelength shift does not exceed 2 nm for pulsed laser beam operation at a bottom power of 5 mW and a peak power of 40 mW. For a 5-mW continuous operation laser beam, the induced wavelength shift in the presence of another laser beam under the above pulse condition does not exceed 1 nm. The observed wavelength shifts are small enough for practical use, and this four-beam laser diode can be successfully applied to multibeam optical heads for parallel data processing.

  16. Computer generated slides: a need to curb our enthusiasm.

    PubMed

    Dalal, M D; Daver, B M

    1996-12-01

    The popular use of computer generated slides for presentations during plastic surgery scientific meetings has opened a fresh chapter in audiovisual techniques. Although the profusion of colours seen during presentations is a visual treat, the information imparted by these slides leaves much to be desired and raises the question of whether such attractive and apparently professionally made slides are visual aids during such presentations. Presentation slides are displayed for a very short time (10-15 seconds) as compared to slides displayed during a lecture and therefore these presentation slides should have the ability to impart their information very quickly. We conducted a study wherein 36 slides, each having a different colour combination, were displayed to a class of third year medical students who were asked to judge the efficacy of each slide. The attractiveness, clarity and recall of each slide was graded by every student and, with the information obtained, the most effective format and colour combinations to be used while making slides for presentations were established. We conclude that the best format for slides is a plain dark coloured background (blue, purple or green) and a separate, contrasting plain dark coloured title text background (red, green or purple), with white letters for the text and yellow letters for the title.

  17. Slide-specific models for segmentation of differently stained digital histopathology whole slide images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieu, Nicolas; Pauly, Olivier; Zimmermann, Johannes; Binnig, Gerd; Schmidt, Günter

    2016-03-01

    The automatic analysis of whole slide images (WSIs) of stained histopathology tissue sections plays a crucial role in the discovery of predictive biomarkers in the field on immuno-oncology by enabling the quantification of the phenotypic information contained in the tissue sections. The automatic detection of cells and nuclei, while being one of the major steps of such analysis, remains a difficult problem because of the low visual differentiation of high pleomorphic and densely cluttered objects and of the diversity of tissue appearance between slides. The key idea of this work is to take advantage of well-differentiated objects in each slide to learn about the appearance of the tissue and in particular about the appearance of low-differentiated objects. We detect well-differentiated objects on a automatically selected set of representative regions, learn slide-specific visual context models, and finally use the resulting posterior maps to perform the final detection steps on the whole slide. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated against manual annotations on a set of differently stained images.

  18. In-situ physical properties of submarine slides along the Lesser Antilles Arc derived from rock physics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbach, M. J.; Manga, M.; Adachi, T.; Breitkreuz, C. F.; Lafuerza, S.; Le Friant, A.; Morgan, S.; Ishizuka, O.; Jutzeler, M.; Slagle, A. L.; Talling, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    that Poisson's ratio typically drops sharply at the base of slides. We hypothesize that the basal boundaries of submarine slides consist of stronger, dewatered material overlain by weaker, less-compacted sediment. The analysis implies significant variability in sediment strength and permeability with depth in deep-water basins where slide debris accumulates. At IODP sites 1398 and 1399 in the Grenada Basin we observe high Poisson's ratios and anomalously high porosity in sediments older than 100ky. Our analysis suggests the permeability of some shallowly buried (<200 m below sea-level) slide debris exceeds 10^-17 m^2 at these sites; this in-part explains why elevated pressures exist in the basin. The analysis implies near-lithostatic pressure at some locations beneath the Grenada basin and perhaps in other similar settings where distal mass wasting acts as the dominant sediment source.

  19. Adaptation of an Electrochemistry-based Li-Ion Battery Model to Account for Deterioration Observed Under Randomized Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-02

    with electrolyte in which the ions can migrate. For Li-ion, a common chemistry is a pos- itive electrode consisting of lithium cobalt oxide (LixCoO2) and...electrically isolated by a micro- porous polymer separator film that is permeable to Li ions. The electrolyte enables lithium ions (Li+) to diffuse...among other factors. Some relevant physical aging mechanisms observed in batteries are: 1. Solid - electrolyte interface (SEI) layer growth: The neg

  20. The Influence of Interfacial Roughness on Fiber Sliding in Oxide Composites with La-Monazite Interphases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. B.; Hay, R. S.; Marshall, D. B.; Morgan, P. E. D.; Sayir, A.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor); Farmer, Serene C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Room temperature debonding and sliding of La-Monazite coated fibers is assessed using a composite with a polycrystalline alumina matrix and fibers of several different single crystal (mullite, sapphire) and directionally solidified eutectic (Al2O3/Y3Al5O12 and Al2O3/Y-ZrO2) compositions. These fibers provide a range of residual stresses and interfacial roughnesses. Sliding occurred over a debond crack at the fiber-coating interface when the sliding displacement and surface roughness were relatively small. At large sliding displacements with relatively rough interfaces, the monazite coatings were deformed extensively by fracture, dislocations and occasional twinning, whereas the fibers were undamaged. Dense, fine-grained (10 nm) microstructures suggestive of dynamic recrystallization were also observed in the coatings. Frictional heating during sliding is assessed. The possibility of low temperature recrystallization is discussed in the light of the known resistance of monazite to radiation damage. The ability of La-Monazite to undergo plastic deformation relatively easily at low temperatures may be enabling for its use as a composite interface.

  1. Fluid pressure responses for a Devil's Slide-like system: problem formulation and simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Matthew A.; Loague, Keith; Voss, Clifford I.

    2015-01-01

    This study employs a hydrogeologic simulation approach to investigate subsurface fluid pressures for a landslide-prone section of the central California, USA, coast known as Devil's Slide. Understanding the relative changes in subsurface fluid pressures is important for systems, such as Devil's Slide, where slope creep can be interrupted by episodic slip events. Surface mapping, exploratory core, tunnel excavation records, and dip meter data were leveraged to conceptualize the parameter space for three-dimensional (3D) Devil's Slide-like simulations. Field observations (i.e. seepage meter, water retention, and infiltration experiments; well records; and piezometric data) and groundwater flow simulation (i.e. one-dimensional vertical, transient, and variably saturated) were used to design the boundary conditions for 3D Devil's Slide-like problems. Twenty-four simulations of steady-state saturated subsurface flow were conducted in a concept-development mode. Recharge, heterogeneity, and anisotropy are shown to increase fluid pressures for failure-prone locations by up to 18.1, 4.5, and 1.8% respectively. Previous estimates of slope stability, driven by simple water balances, are significantly improved upon with the fluid pressures reported here. The results, for a Devil's Slide-like system, provide a foundation for future investigations

  2. Referenceless image quality evaluation for whole slide imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Noriaki; Bautista, Pinky A.; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Ohyama, Nagaaki; Yagi, Yukako

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The image quality in whole slide imaging (WSI) is one of the most important issues for the practical use of WSI scanners. In this paper, we proposed an image quality evaluation method for scanned slide images in which no reference image is required. Methods: While most of the conventional methods for no-reference evaluation only deal with one image degradation at a time, the proposed method is capable of assessing both blur and noise by using an evaluation index which is calculated using the sharpness and noise information of the images in a given training data set by linear regression analysis. The linear regression coefficients can be determined in two ways depending on the purpose of the evaluation. For objective quality evaluation, the coefficients are determined using a reference image with mean square error as the objective value in the analysis. On the other hand, for subjective quality evaluation, the subjective scores given by human observers are used as the objective values in the analysis. The predictive linear regression models for the objective and subjective image quality evaluations, which were constructed using training images, were then used on test data wherein the calculated objective values are construed as the evaluation indices. Results: The results of our experiments confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed image quality evaluation method in both objective and subjective image quality measurements. Finally, we demonstrated the application of the proposed evaluation method to the WSI image quality assessment and automatic rescanning in the WSI scanner. PMID:22530177

  3. Probing the sliding interactions between bundled actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andy; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-02-01

    Assemblies of filamentous biopolymers are hierarchical materials in which the properties of the overall assemblage are determined by structure and interactions between constituent particles at all hierarchical levels. For example, the overall bending rigidity of a two bundled filaments greatly depends on the bending rigidity of, and the adhesion strength between individual filaments. However, another property of importance is the ability for the filaments to slide freely against one another. Everyday experience indicates that it is much easier to bend a stack of papers in which individual sheets freely slide past each other than the same stack of papers in which all the sheets are irreversibly glued together. Similarly, in filamentous structures the ability for local re-arrangement is of the utmost importance in determining the properties of the structures observed. We have developed a method to directly measure the frictional interactions between a pair of aligned filaments in a well-defined and controllable configuration. This enables us to systematically investigate the role of adhesion strength, filament orientation, length, and surface structure.

  4. Role of vacancies and solute atoms on grain boundary sliding

    SciTech Connect

    Vetrano, J.S.; Henager, C.H. Jr.; Simonen, E.P.

    2000-07-01

    It is necessary for grain boundary dislocations to slide and climb during the grain boundary sliding process that dominates fine-grained superplastic deformation. The process of climb requires either an influx of vacancies to the grain boundary plane or a local generation of vacancies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of grain boundaries in superplastically deformed Al-Mg-Mn alloys quenched under load from the deformation temperature have revealed the presence of nano-scale cavities resulting from a localized supersaturation of vacancies at the grain boundary. Compositional measurements along interfaces have also shown an effect of solute atoms on the local structure. This is shown to result from a coupling of vacancy and solute atom flows during deformation and quenching. Calculations of the localized vacancy concentration indicate that the supersaturation along the grain boundary can be as much as a factor of ten. The effects of the local supersaturation and solute atom movement on deformation rates and cavity nucleation and growth is discussed.

  5. Role of Vacancies and Solute Atoms on Grain Boundary Sliding

    SciTech Connect

    Vetrano, John S.; Henager, Charles H.; Simonen, Edward P.

    2000-10-30

    It is necessary for grain boundary dislocations to slide and climb during the grain boundary sliding process that dominates fine-grained superplastic deformation. The process of climb requires either an influx of vacancies to the grain boundary plane or a local generation of vacancies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of grain boundaries in superplastically deformed Al-Mg-Mn alloys quenched under load from the deformation temperature have revealed the presence of nano-scale cavities resulting from a localized supersaturation of vacancies at the grain boundary. Compositional measurements along interfaces have also shown an effect of solute atoms on the local structure. This is shown to result from a coupling of vacancy and solute atom flows during deformation and quenching. Calculations of the localized vacancy concentration indicate that the supersaturation along the grain boundary can be as much as a factor of five. The effects of the local supersaturation and solute atom movement on deformation rates and cavity nucleation and growth will be discussed.

  6. A comparative study of input devices for digital slide navigation.

    PubMed

    Molin, Jesper; Lundström, Claes; Fjeld, Morten

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes work presented at the Nordic Symposium on Digital Pathology 2014, Linköping, Sweden. Quick and seamless integration between input devices and the navigation of digital slides remains a key barrier for many pathologists to "go digital." To better understand this integration, three different input device implementations were compared in terms of time to diagnose, perceived workload and users' preferences. Six pathologists reviewed in total nine cases with a computer mouse, a 6 degrees-of-freedom (6DOF) navigator and a touchpad. The participants perceived significantly less workload (P < 0.05) with the computer mouse and the 6DOF navigator, than with the touchpad, while no effect of the input device used on the time to diagnose was observed. Five out of six pathologists preferred the 6DOF navigator, while the touchpad was the least preferred device. While digital slide navigation is often designed to mimic microscope interaction, the results of this study demonstrate that in order to minimize workload there is reason to let the digital interaction move beyond the familiar microscope tradition.

  7. Multicell actuator based on a sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, O.; Barbot, J.-P.; Hilairet, M.

    2008-08-01

    This paper deals with reliability of motor drive systems. It focuses on the switching power converter which is the weakest drive part. It investigates a new architecture which provides intrinsic redundancy. The method used in this fault switch detection and diagnosis is based on a sliding mode observer. The original aspect of this new approach is that the observer influences the control algorithm in order to rule out or accept the possibility of the device failure. This leads to the right decision which induces the rebuilding of the converter topology. This fault tolerant control strategy assures continuous operation even though one switch failure occurs. This article has been submitted as part of “IET Colloquium on Reliability in Electromagnetic Systems”, 24 and 25 May 2007, Paris

  8. RTTOV-gb - Adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is the single most important under-sampled part of the atmosphere. According to the WMO Statement Of Guidance For Global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), temperature and humidity profiles (in cloudy areas) are among the four critical atmospheric variables not adequately measured in the PBL. Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) provide temperature and humidity profiles in both clear- and cloudy-sky conditions with high temporal resolution and low-to-moderate vertical resolution, with information mostly residing in the PBL. Ground-based MWR offer to bridge this observational gap by providing continuous temperature and humidity information in the PBL. The MWR data assimilation into NWP models may be particularly important in nowcasting and severe weather initiation. The assimilation of thermodynamic profiles retrieved from MWR data has been recently experimented, but a way to possibly increase the impact is to directly assimilate measured radiances instead of retrieved profiles. The assimilation of observed radiances in a variational scheme requires the following tools: (i) a fast radiative transfer (RT) model to compute the simulated radiances at MWR channels from the NWP model fields (ii) the partial derivatives (Jacobians) of the fast radiative transfer model with respect to control variables to optimize the distances of the atmospheric state from both the first guess and the observations. Such a RT model is available from the EUMETSAT NWPSAF (Numerical Weather Prediction Satellite Application Facility) and well accepted in the NWP community: RTTOV. This model was developed for nadir-viewing passive visible, infrared, and microwave satellite radiometers, spectrometers and interferometers. It has been modified to handle ground-based microwave radiometer observations. This version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, provides the tools needed to exploit ground-based upward looking MWR brightness temperatures into NWP variational data

  9. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber–glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons’ law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements. PMID:27291939

  10. Finite-Time Attitude Tracking Control for Spacecraft Using Terminal Sliding Mode and Chebyshev Neural Network.

    PubMed

    An-Min Zou; Kumar, K D; Zeng-Guang Hou; Xi Liu

    2011-08-01

    A finite-time attitude tracking control scheme is proposed for spacecraft using terminal sliding mode and Chebyshev neural network (NN) (CNN). The four-parameter representations (quaternion) are used to describe the spacecraft attitude for global representation without singularities. The attitude state (i.e., attitude and velocity) error dynamics is transformed to a double integrator dynamics with a constraint on the spacecraft attitude. With consideration of this constraint, a novel terminal sliding manifold is proposed for the spacecraft. In order to guarantee that the output of the NN used in the controller is bounded by the corresponding bound of the approximated unknown function, a switch function is applied to generate a switching between the adaptive NN control and the robust controller. Meanwhile, a CNN, whose basis functions are implemented using only desired signals, is introduced to approximate the desired nonlinear function and bounded external disturbances online, and the robust term based on the hyperbolic tangent function is applied to counteract NN approximation errors in the adaptive neural control scheme. Most importantly, the finite-time stability in both the reaching phase and the sliding phase can be guaranteed by a Lyapunov-based approach. Finally, numerical simulations on the attitude tracking control of spacecraft in the presence of an unknown mass moment of inertia matrix, bounded external disturbances, and control input constraints are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed controller.

  11. ANDES TOOLS: Promotional slides for Industrial Clients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-03

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 10 August 2015 – 3 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ANDES TOOLS: Promotional slides for Industrial ...Clients 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9300-13-C-2014 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Tim Holmes, D.Sc. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK... Industrial Clients PA Case Number: #15479; Clearance Date: 9/3/2015 14. ABSTRACT Briefing Charts/Viewgraphs 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/A 16. SECURITY

  12. Collective sliding states for colloidal molecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    We study the driving of colloidal molecular crystals over periodic substrates such as those created with optical traps. The n-merization that occurs in the colloidal molecular crystal states produces a remarkably rich variety of distinct dynamical behaviors, including polarization effects within the pinned phase and the formation of both ordered and disordered sliding phases. Using computer simulations, we map the dynamic phase diagrams as a function of substrate strength for dimers and trimers on a triangular substrate, and correlate features on the phase diagram with transport signatures.

  13. Bi-directional planar slide mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.

    2003-11-04

    A bi-directional slide mechanism. A pair of master and slave disks engages opposite sides of the platform. Rotational drivers are connected to master disks so the disks rotate eccentrically about their respective axes of rotation. Opposing slave disks are connected to master disks on opposite sides of the platform by a circuitous mechanical linkage, or are electronically synchronized together using stepper motors, to effect coordinated motion. The synchronized eccentric motion of the pairs of master/slave disks compels smooth linear motion of the platform forwards and backwards without backlash. The apparatus can be incorporated in a MEMS device.

  14. "The living picture": on the circulation of microscope-slide knowledge in 1903.

    PubMed

    Gaycken, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Microscope slides allowed preparations to circulate among scientific and educational contexts. An extension of the circulation of microscope slides was how they became part of lantern exhibition culture. This article considers an early example of the adoption of microscope lantern show conventions by another medium, the cinema. E Martin Duncan, who was employed by Charles Urban to produce a series of popular-science films beginning in 1903, brought his experience with microphotography to bear on the challenge of adapting cinema to the purpose of public instruction. Duncan's first series of films, entitled "The Unseen World," demonstrated both profound links to the display tradition of the lantern lecture as well as the transformation of that tradition by the cinema's representational possibilities.

  15. Presentation video retrieval using automatically recovered slide and spoken text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Video is becoming a prevalent medium for e-learning. Lecture videos contain text information in both the presentation slides and lecturer's speech. This paper examines the relative utility of automatically recovered text from these sources for lecture video retrieval. To extract the visual information, we automatically detect slides within the videos and apply optical character recognition to obtain their text. Automatic speech recognition is used similarly to extract spoken text from the recorded audio. We perform controlled experiments with manually created ground truth for both the slide and spoken text from more than 60 hours of lecture video. We compare the automatically extracted slide and spoken text in terms of accuracy relative to ground truth, overlap with one another, and utility for video retrieval. Results reveal that automatically recovered slide text and spoken text contain different content with varying error profiles. Experiments demonstrate that automatically extracted slide text enables higher precision video retrieval than automatically recovered spoken text.

  16. Markov state modeling of sliding friction.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, F; Landes, François P; Laio, A; Prestipino, S; Tosatti, E

    2016-11-01

    Markov state modeling (MSM) has recently emerged as one of the key techniques for the discovery of collective variables and the analysis of rare events in molecular simulations. In particular in biochemistry this approach is successfully exploited to find the metastable states of complex systems and their evolution in thermal equilibrium, including rare events, such as a protein undergoing folding. The physics of sliding friction and its atomistic simulations under external forces constitute a nonequilibrium field where relevant variables are in principle unknown and where a proper theory describing violent and rare events such as stick slip is still lacking. Here we show that MSM can be extended to the study of nonequilibrium phenomena and in particular friction. The approach is benchmarked on the Frenkel-Kontorova model, used here as a test system whose properties are well established. We demonstrate that the method allows the least prejudiced identification of a minimal basis of natural microscopic variables necessary for the description of the forced dynamics of sliding, through their probabilistic evolution. The steps necessary for the application to realistic frictional systems are highlighted.

  17. Markov state modeling of sliding friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, F.; Landes, François P.; Laio, A.; Prestipino, S.; Tosatti, E.

    2016-11-01

    Markov state modeling (MSM) has recently emerged as one of the key techniques for the discovery of collective variables and the analysis of rare events in molecular simulations. In particular in biochemistry this approach is successfully exploited to find the metastable states of complex systems and their evolution in thermal equilibrium, including rare events, such as a protein undergoing folding. The physics of sliding friction and its atomistic simulations under external forces constitute a nonequilibrium field where relevant variables are in principle unknown and where a proper theory describing violent and rare events such as stick slip is still lacking. Here we show that MSM can be extended to the study of nonequilibrium phenomena and in particular friction. The approach is benchmarked on the Frenkel-Kontorova model, used here as a test system whose properties are well established. We demonstrate that the method allows the least prejudiced identification of a minimal basis of natural microscopic variables necessary for the description of the forced dynamics of sliding, through their probabilistic evolution. The steps necessary for the application to realistic frictional systems are highlighted.

  18. A frictional sliding algorithm for liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Roger A.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a new frictional sliding algorithm for liquid menisci in contact with solid substrates. In contrast to solid-solid contact, the liquid-solid contact behavior is governed by the contact line, where a contact angle forms and undergoes hysteresis. The new algorithm admits arbitrary meniscus shapes and arbitrary substrate roughness, heterogeneity and compliance. It is discussed and analyzed in the context of droplet contact, but it also applies to liquid films and solids with surface tension. The droplet is modeled as a stabilized membrane enclosing an incompressible medium. The contact formulation is considered rate-independent such that hydrostatic conditions apply. Three distinct contact algorithms are needed to describe the cases of frictionless surface contact, frictionless line contact and frictional line contact. For the latter, a predictor-corrector algorithm is proposed in order to enforce the contact conditions at the contact line and thus distinguish between the cases of advancing, pinning and receding. The algorithms are discretized within a monolithic finite element formulation. Several numerical examples are presented to illustrate the numerical and physical behavior of sliding droplets.

  19. Whole-slide imaging: routine pathologic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Toby C; Swapp, Ryan E; Kaplan, Keith J

    2012-05-01

    Digital pathology systems offer pathologists an alternate, emerging mechanism to manage and interpret information. They offer increasingly fast and scalable hardware platforms for slide scanning and software that facilitates remote viewing, slide conferencing, archiving, and image analysis. Deployed initially and validated largely within the research and biopharmaceutical industries, WSI is increasingly being implemented for direct patient care. Improvements in image quality, scan times, and imageviewing browsers will hopefully allow pathologists to more seamlessly convert to digital pathology, much like our radiology colleagues have done before us. However, WSI creates both opportunities and challenges. Although niche applications of WSI technology for clinical, educational, and research purposes are clearly successful, it is evident that several areas still require attention and careful consideration before more widespread clinical adoption of WSI takes place. These include regulatory issues, development of standards of practice and validation guidelines, workflow modifications, as well as defining situations where WSI technology will really improve practice in a cost-effective way. Current progress on these and other issues, along with improving technology, will no doubt pave the way for increased adoption over the next decade, allowing the pathology community as a whole to harness the true potential of WSI for patient care. The digital decade will likely redefine how pathology is practiced and the role of the pathologist.

  20. A Crossed Sliding Luttinger Liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Kane, C. L.; Lubensky, T. C.

    2001-03-01

    It was recently demonstrated [1] that a stack of weakly coupled 2D planar XY-models can exhibit a sliding phase characterized by correlations that die off as a power-law with distance within a plane and exponentially with distance in the perpendicular direction. In this talk we investigate how these ideas can be extended to two-dimensional arrays of coupled quantam wires. In particular, we will focus on a crossed array of wires and demonstrate the existence of the so-called "crossed sliding Luttinger liquid" phase [2]. This phase is characterized by power-law correlations, and a two-dimensional isotropic in-plane conductivity that diverges as a power-law in temperature T as T goes to 0. It thus represents a nearly isotropic non-Fermi liquid state in two dimensions. 1. C.S. O'Hern, T.C. Lubensky, and J.Toner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2745 (1999). 2. Ranjan Mukhopadhyay, C.L. Kane, and T.C. Lubensky, condmat/0007039.

  1. Robust partial integrated guidance and control for missiles via extended state observer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Ran, Maopeng; Dong, Chaoyang

    2016-11-01

    A novel extended state observer (ESO) based control is proposed for a class of nonlinear systems subject to multiple uncertainties, and then applied to partial integrated guidance and control (PIGC) design for a missile. The proposed control strategy incorporates both an ESO and an adaptive sliding mode control law. The multiple uncertainties are treated as an extended state of the plant, and then estimate them using the ESO and compensate for them in the control action, in real time. Based on the output of the ESO, the resulting adaptive sliding mode control law is inherently continuous and differentiable. Strict proof is given to show that the estimation error of the ESO can be arbitrarily small in a finite time. In addition, the adaptive sliding mode control law can achieve finite time convergence to a neighborhood of the origin, and the accurate expression of the convergent region is given. Finally, simulations are conducted on the planar missile-target engagement geometry. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy in enhanced interception performance and improved robustness against multiple uncertainties are demonstrated.

  2. Effect of slide track shape on the wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene in a pin-on-disk wear simulation of total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa; Calonius, Olof; Keränen, Jaakko

    2004-05-15

    Prosthetic joints appear to show a strong relationship between the type of relative motion and wear, requiring careful consideration in the design of wear simulators. This relationship was studied with a 12-station pin-on-disk device, specifically adapted for the wear simulation of prosthetic hip joints. Each station had a unique motion, characterized by the so-called slide track, the track of the pin on the disk. The slide track shapes included 10 ellipses, their aspect ratio (AR) varying from 1.1 to 11.0, and a circle and a straight line as extreme cases. Hence for the first time in hip wear simulation, the motion was systematically varied over a wide range. Conventional UHMWPE pins were tested against polished CoCr disks in diluted calf serum three times for 3 million cycles. Below the AR value of 5.5, the polyethylene wear factor and wear mechanisms agreed with clinical observations. Above this value, the wear factor decreased to unrealistically low values, and the wear surface topography differed from that of retrieved acetabular cups. The wear particles, however, were similar to those isolated from periprosthetic tissues, irrespective of the AR value. In conclusion, it is recommended that the AR value be kept well below the critical point of 5.5.

  3. Zooming in: high resolution 3D reconstruction of differently stained histological whole slide images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Johannes; Berger, Judith; Müller, Benedikt; Breuhahn, Kai; Grabe, Niels; Heldmann, Stefan; Homeyer, André; Lahrmann, Bernd; Laue, Hendrik; Olesch, Janine; Schwier, Michael; Sedlaczek, Oliver; Warth, Arne

    2014-03-01

    Much insight into metabolic interactions, tissue growth, and tissue organization can be gained by analyzing differently stained histological serial sections. One opportunity unavailable to classic histology is three-dimensional (3D) examination and computer aided analysis of tissue samples. In this case, registration is needed to reestablish spatial correspondence between adjacent slides that is lost during the sectioning process. Furthermore, the sectioning introduces various distortions like cuts, folding, tearing, and local deformations to the tissue, which need to be corrected in order to exploit the additional information arising from the analysis of neighboring slide images. In this paper we present a novel image registration based method for reconstructing a 3D tissue block implementing a zooming strategy around a user-defined point of interest. We efficiently align consecutive slides at increasingly fine resolution up to cell level. We use a two-step approach, where after a macroscopic, coarse alignment of the slides as preprocessing, a nonlinear, elastic registration is performed to correct local, non-uniform deformations. Being driven by the optimization of the normalized gradient field (NGF) distance measure, our method is suitable for differently stained and thus multi-modal slides. We applied our method to ultra thin serial sections (2 μm) of a human lung tumor. In total 170 slides, stained alternately with four different stains, have been registered. Thorough visual inspection of virtual cuts through the reconstructed block perpendicular to the cutting plane shows accurate alignment of vessels and other tissue structures. This observation is confirmed by a quantitative analysis. Using nonlinear image registration, our method is able to correct locally varying deformations in tissue structures and exceeds the limitations of globally linear transformations.

  4. [Esophageal manometry in patients with sliding hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Mata, M; Ixtepan, L; Peña Ancira, F; de Ramírez, A F; Villalobos, J J; Campuzano, M

    1979-01-01

    This presents the method to be followed for the valuation of the gastro-esophagic function in patients with sliding hiatal hernia, twenty-one patients with this diagnosis were studied through X-Rays. Besides gastric and esophagic endoscopy, a complete clinical examinations was made to compare the information obtained from the studies, with the direct measurement of the contractions of the esophagus and the lower sphincter through conventional manometric methods. The relationship between the simptoms and the clinical procedures done in the patients were observed as was the usefulness of esophagic manometry to detect not only the direct pressure of the gastro-esophagic sphincter, but also to determine the concurrent motor changes that can occur in patients which show hiatal hernia. The benefit of this studies to decide the therapeutic handling, specially surgical, is discussed.

  5. Forced convection in the wakes of sliding bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, O'Reilly; Donnelly, B.; Persoons, T.; Nolan, K.; Murray, D. B.

    2016-09-01

    Both vapour and gas bubbles are known to significantly increase heat transfer rates between a heated surface and the surrounding fluid, even with no phase change. However, the complex wake structures means that the surface cooling is not fully understood. The current study uses high speed infra-red thermography to measure the surface temperature and convective heat flux enhancement associated with an air bubble sliding under an inclined surface, with a particular focus on the wake. Enhancement levels of 6 times natural convection levels are observed, along with cooling patterns consistent with a possible hairpin vortex structure interacting with the thermal boundary layer. Local regions of suppressed convective heat transfer highlight the complexity of the bubble wake in two-phase applications.

  6. Towards slide enhancement with the titanium-molybdenum wire?

    PubMed

    Thiry, Pol; Barthélémi, Stéphane

    2010-12-01

    This study aims to improve the tribological properties of titanium-molybdenum wire. Following an analysis of the wire/bracket/ligation friction parameters and an overview of the technological research into means of reducing such friction,we set up several types of surface treatment in the laboratory by physical deposition in the vapor phase and using cold plasma technology. The specimens obtained underwent two types of tribological tests and were then subjected to traction and bending tests in order to determine the variations in their mechanical properties induced by the different types of treatment. For purposes of comparison, all the tests were conducted on untreated wire, TMA® Low-friction® wire and stainless steel wire and with two types of elastomeric ties. We were able to demonstrate some remarkable slide performances obtained using cold plasma nitriding while preserving the mechanical properties. A significant difference was observed relative to the other surface treatments.

  7. Second order sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    PubMed

    Zheng, En-Hui; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Luo, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    A method based on second order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed to design controllers for a small quadrotor UAV. For the switching sliding manifold design, the selection of the coefficients of the switching sliding manifold is in general a sophisticated issue because the coefficients are nonlinear. In this work, in order to perform the position and attitude tracking control of the quadrotor perfectly, the dynamical model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. For the former, a sliding manifold is defined by combining the position and velocity tracking errors of one state variable, i.e., the sliding manifold has two coefficients. For the latter, a sliding manifold is constructed via a linear combination of position and velocity tracking errors of two state variables, i.e., the sliding manifold has four coefficients. In order to further obtain the nonlinear coefficients of the sliding manifold, Hurwitz stability analysis is used to the solving process. In addition, the flight controllers are derived by using Lyapunov theory, which guarantees that all system state trajectories reach and stay on the sliding surfaces. Extensive simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  8. Underwater Sliding Properties: Effect of Slider Shape and Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirveslahti, A.; Mielonen, K.; Ikonen, K.; Cui, W.; Suvanto, M.; Pakkanen, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    A dynamic test method for the measurement of the underwater sliding properties of model boats has been developed. Surface-modified model boats were examined to assess how the surface wettability properties affect sliding. Along with the surface properties, the influence of the boat shape was considered. We studied various coatings in the contact angle range of 3-162∘ with two model boat shapes. The hydrophobicity of the surfaces influenced the sliding speed of the model boat depending on the boat shape. The method is applicable to study sliding properties of model boats with different surfaces in variable flow conditions.

  9. Slide less pathology”: Fairy tale or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Indu, M; Rathy, R; Binu, MP

    2016-01-01

    Pathology practice is significantly advanced in various frontiers. Therefore, “slide less digital” pathology will not be a mere imagination in near future. Digitalization of histopathological slides (whole slide imaging [WSI]) is possible with the help of whole slide scanner. The WSI has a positive impact not only in routine practice but also in research field, medical education and bioindustry. Even if digital pathology has definitive advantages, its widespread use is not yet possible. As it is an upcoming technology in our field, this article is aimed to discussessential aspects of WSI. PMID:27601824

  10. Observer performance for adaptive, image-based denoising and filtered back projection compared to scanner-based iterative reconstruction for lower dose CT enterography

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Joel G.; Hara, Amy K.; Fidler, Jeff L.; Silva, Alvin C.; Barlow, John M.; Carter, Rickey E.; Bartley, Adam; Shiung, Maria; Holmes, David R.; Weber, Nicolas K.; Bruining, David H.; Yu, Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare observer performance for detection of intestinal inflammation for low-dose CT enterography (LD-CTE) using scanner-based iterative reconstruction (IR) vs. vendor-independent, adaptive image-based noise reduction (ANLM) or filtered back projection (FBP). Methods Sixty-two LD-CTE exams were performed. LD-CTE images were reconstructed using IR, ANLM, and FBP. Three readers, blinded to image type, marked intestinal inflammation directly on patient images using a specialized workstation over three sessions, interpreting one image type/patient/session. Reference standard was created by a gastroenterologist and radiologist, who reviewed all available data including dismissal Gastroenterology records, and who marked all inflamed bowel segments on the same workstation. Reader and reference localizations were then compared. Non-inferiority was tested using Jackknife free-response ROC (JAFROC) figures of merit (FOM) for ANLM and FBP compared to IR. Patient-level analyses for the presence or absence of inflammation were also conducted. Results There were 46 inflamed bowel segments in 24/62 patients (CTDIvol interquartile range 6.9–10.1 mGy). JAFROC FOM for ANLM and FBP were 0.84 (95% CI 0.75–0.92) and 0.84 (95% CI 0.75–0.92), and were statistically non-inferior to IR (FOM 0.84; 95% CI 0.76–0.93). Patient-level pooled confidence intervals for sensitivity widely overlapped, as did specificities. Image quality was rated as better with IR and AMLM compared to FBP (p < 0.0001), with no difference in reading times (p = 0.89). Conclusions Vendor-independent adaptive image-based noise reduction and FBP provided observer performance that was non-inferior to scanner-based IR methods. Adaptive image-based noise reduction maintained or improved upon image quality ratings compared to FBP when performing CTE at lower dose levels. PMID:25725794

  11. The decline of mountain permafrost and the occurrence of recent large debris slides in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saemundsson, Thorsteinn; Kristinn Helgason, Jon; Petursson, Halldor

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade several, somewhat unusual, debris slides have occurred in Iceland. Most of these slides occurred in the Tröllaskagi peninsula in central north Iceland as well as in the eastern part of the island, and their starting zones are all located above 750-800 m. In most of them large blocks of frozen sediments have been observed in the slide material. The temperature rise which has been observed in Iceland during the last decades has lead to discussions about the present permafrost condition in Iceland and the possible decline of mountain permafrost. Recent studies at the Orravatnsrústir palsa site, in the highlands north of the Hofsjökull icecap give clear indications of decreasing of the permafrost during the last decade or so (Saemundsson et al. 2012). In 2011 and 2012 two large debris slides occurred in northern Iceland. In 2011 a huge slide fell from the Torfufell Mountain in the Eyjafjörður area and in 2012 another one fell from the Móafellshyrna Mountain in the Fljót area. In both these cases the slides originated at about 750-800 m a.s.l. and large chunks of frozen sediments transported down the mountain sides. The Torfufell debris slide fell on the 14th of October 2011, after exceptionally warm summer and unusually rainy fall. The slide originated along a 200 m long fissure at 800 m.a.s.l in a NW facing slope. Big blocks of frozen sediments located within the landslide debris material were traced back to crown of the landslide. The, Móafellshyrna debris slide fell on the 20th of September 2012, occurred after an unusually warm and dry summer with record amount of sunshine hours, followed by month of intense precipitation and earthquake activity in N-Iceland. The slide originated in a 200 m wide cirque at 750 m height in the NW slope of the mountain where a frozen solid debris cone slid or crept off a 100 m high rock face into a steep water saturated talus slope. The frozen sediments at 750 m height give clear indication of mountain

  12. Unwinding forward and sliding back: an intermittent unwinding mode of the BLM helicase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Qin, Wei; Li, Jing-Hua; Lu, Ying; Lu, Ke-Yu; Nong, Da-Guan; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xu, Chun-Hua; Xi, Xu-Guang; Li, Ming

    2015-04-20

    There are lines of evidence that the Bloom syndrome helicase, BLM, catalyzes regression of stalled replication forks and disrupts displacement loops (D-loops) formed during homologous recombination (HR). Here we constructed a forked DNA with a 3' single-stranded gap and a 5' double-stranded handle to partly mimic a stalled DNA fork and used magnetic tweezers to study BLM-catalyzed unwinding of the forked DNA. We have directly observed that the BLM helicase may slide on the opposite strand for some distance after duplex unwinding at different forces. For DNA construct with a long hairpin, progressive unwinding of the hairpin is frequently interrupted by strand switching and backward sliding of the enzyme. Quantitative study of the uninterrupted unwinding length (time) has revealed a two-state-transition mechanism for strand-switching during the unwinding process. Mutational studies revealed that the RQC domain plays an important role in stabilizing the helicase/DNA interaction during both DNA unwinding and backward sliding of BLM. Especially, Lys1125 in the RQC domain, a highly conserved amino acid among RecQ helicases, may be involved in the backward sliding activity. We have also directly observed the in vitro pathway that BLM disrupts the mimic stalled replication fork. These results may shed new light on the mechanisms for BLM in DNA repair and homologous recombination.

  13. Unwinding forward and sliding back: an intermittent unwinding mode of the BLM helicase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuang; Qin, Wei; Li, Jing-Hua; Lu, Ying; Lu, Ke-Yu; Nong, Da-Guan; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xu, Chun-Hua; Xi, Xu-Guang; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    There are lines of evidence that the Bloom syndrome helicase, BLM, catalyzes regression of stalled replication forks and disrupts displacement loops (D-loops) formed during homologous recombination (HR). Here we constructed a forked DNA with a 3′ single-stranded gap and a 5′ double-stranded handle to partly mimic a stalled DNA fork and used magnetic tweezers to study BLM-catalyzed unwinding of the forked DNA. We have directly observed that the BLM helicase may slide on the opposite strand for some distance after duplex unwinding at different forces. For DNA construct with a long hairpin, progressive unwinding of the hairpin is frequently interrupted by strand switching and backward sliding of the enzyme. Quantitative study of the uninterrupted unwinding length (time) has revealed a two-state-transition mechanism for strand-switching during the unwinding process. Mutational studies revealed that the RQC domain plays an important role in stabilizing the helicase/DNA interaction during both DNA unwinding and backward sliding of BLM. Especially, Lys1125 in the RQC domain, a highly conserved amino acid among RecQ helicases, may be involved in the backward sliding activity. We have also directly observed the in vitro pathway that BLM disrupts the mimic stalled replication fork. These results may shed new light on the mechanisms for BLM in DNA repair and homologous recombination. PMID:25765643

  14. Historical roots of centrosome research: discovery of Boveri's microscope slides in Würzburg

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Boveri's visionary monograph ‘Ueber die Natur der Centrosomen’ (On the nature of centrosomes) in 1900 was founded primarily on microscopic observations of cleaving eggs of sea urchins and the roundworm parasite Ascaris. As Boveri wrote in the introductory paragraph, his interests were less about morphological aspects of centrosomes, but rather aimed at an understanding of their physiological role during cell division. The remarkable transition from observations of tiny dot-like structures in fixed and sectioned material to a unified theory of centrosome function (which in essence still holds true today) cannot be fully appreciated without examining Boveri's starting material, the histological specimens. It was generally assumed that the microscope slides were lost during the bombing of the Zoological Institute in Würzburg at the end of WWII. Here, I describe the discovery of a number of Boveri's original microscope slides with serial sections of early sea urchin and Ascaris embryos, stained by Heidenhain's iron haematoxylin method. Some slides bear handwritten notes and sketches by Boveri. Evidence is presented that the newly discovered slides are part of the original material used by Boveri for his seminal centrosome monograph. PMID:25047623

  15. Maximum limit to the number of myosin II motors participating in processive sliding of actin

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Khushboo; Puliyakodan, Mohammed Shabeel; Pandey, Vikas; Nath, Sunil; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analysed processive sliding and breakage of actin filaments at various heavy meromyosin (HMM) densities and ATP concentrations in IVMA. We observed that with addition of ATP solution, the actin filaments fragmented stochastically; we then determined mean length and velocity of surviving actin filaments post breakage. Average filament length decreased with increase in HMM density at constant ATP, and increased with increase in ATP concentration at constant HMM density. Using density of HMM molecules and length of actin, we estimated the number of HMM molecules per actin filament (N) that participate in processive sliding of actin. N is solely a function of ATP concentration: 88 ± 24 and 54 ± 22 HMM molecules (mean ± S.D.) at 2 mM and 0.1 mM ATP respectively. Processive sliding of actin filament was observed only when N lay within a minimum lower limit (Nmin) and a maximum upper limit (Nmax) to the number of HMM molecules. When N < Nmin the actin filament diffused away from the surface and processivity was lost and when N > Nmax the filament underwent breakage eventually and could not sustain processive sliding. We postulate this maximum upper limit arises due to increased number of strongly bound myosin heads. PMID:27554800

  16. Utility of whole slide imaging and virtual microscopy in prostate pathology.

    PubMed

    Camparo, Philippe; Egevad, Lars; Algaba, Ferran; Berney, Daniel M; Boccon-Gibod, Liliane; Compérat, Eva; Evans, Andrew J; Grobholz, Rainer; Kristiansen, Glen; Langner, Cord; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Montironi, Rodolfo; Oliveira, Pedro; Vainer, Ben; Varma, Murali

    2012-04-01

    Whole slide imaging (WSI) has been used in conjunction with virtual microscopy (VM) for training or proficiency testing purposes, multicentre research, remote frozen section diagnosis and to seek specialist second opinion in a number of organ systems. The feasibility of using WSI/VM for routine surgical pathology reporting has also been explored. In this review, we discuss the utility and limitations of WSI/VM technology in the histological assessment of specimens from the prostate. Features of WSI/VM that are particularly well suited to assessment of prostate pathology include the ability to examine images at different magnifications as well as to view histology and immunohistochemistry side-by-side on the screen. Use of WSI/VM would also solve the difficulty in obtaining multiple identical copies of small lesions in prostate biopsies for teaching and proficiency testing. It would also permit annotation of the virtual slides, and has been used in a study of inter-observer variation of Gleason grading to facilitate precise identification of the foci on which grading decisions had been based. However, the large number of sections examined from each set of prostate biopsies would greatly increase time required for scanning as well as the size of the digital file, and would also be an issue if digital archiving of prostate biopsies is contemplated. Z-scanning of glass slides, a process that increases scanning time and file size would be required to permit focusing a virtual slide up and down to assess subtle nuclear features such as nucleolar prominence. The common use of large blocks to process prostatectomy specimens would also be an issue, as few currently available scanners can scan such blocks. A major component of proficiency testing of prostate biopsy assessment involves screening of the cores to detect small atypical foci. However, screening virtual slides of wavy fragmented prostate cores using a computer mouse aided by an overview image is very different

  17. Significance of grain sliding mechanisms for ductile deformation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, A.; Bourcier, M.; Gaye, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.; Ludwig, W.

    2013-12-01

    Ductile shear zones at depth present polyphase and heterogeneous rocks and multi-scale strain localization patterns. Most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (dislocation creep), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding and solution mass transfer). Because their chronology of appearance and interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology seems illusory. We have therefore characterized over a decade the rheology of synthetic lower crustal materials with different compositions and fluid contents, and for various microstructures. Non-Newtonian flow clearly related to dominant dislocation creep. Conversely, Newtonian behavior involved grain sliding mechanisms, but crystal plasticity could be identified as well. In order to clarify the respective roles of these mechanisms we underwent a multi-scale investigation of the ductile deformation of rock analog synthetic halite with controlled microstructures. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X ray computed tomography, allowing for digital image correlation (DIC) techniques and retrieval of full strain field. Crystal plasticity dominated, as evidenced by physical slip lines and DIC computed slip bands. Crystal orientation mapping allowed to identify strongly active easy glide {110} <110> systems. But, all other slip systems were observed as well, and especially near interfaces, where their activity is necessary to accommodate for the plastic strain incompatibilities between neighboring grains. We also evidenced grain boundary sliding (GBS), which clearly occurred as a secondary, but necessary, accommodation mechanism. The DIC technique allowed the quantification of the relative contribution of each mechanism. The amount of GBS clearly increased with decreasing grain size. Finite element (FE) modeling

  18. Screening and dotting virtual slides: A new challenge for cytotechnologists.

    PubMed

    Khalbuss, Walid E; Cuda, Jackie; Cucoranu, Ioan C

    2013-01-01

    Digital images are increasingly being used in cytopathology. Whole-slide imaging (WSI) is a digital imaging modality that uses computerized technology to scan and convert entire cytology glass slides into digital images that can be viewed on a digital display using the image viewer software. Digital image acquisition of cytology glass slides has improved significantly over the years due to the use of liquid-based preparations and advances in WSI scanning technology such as automatic multipoint pre-scan focus technology or z-stack scanning technology. Screening cytotechnologists are responsible for every cell that is present on an imaged slide. One of the challenges users have to overcome is to establish a technique to review systematically the entire imaged slide and to dot selected abnormal or significant findings. The scope of this article is to review the current user interface technology available for virtual slide navigation when screening digital slides in cytology. WSI scanner vendors provide tools, built into the image viewer software that allow for a more systematic navigation of the virtual slides, such as auto-panning, keyboard-controlled slide navigation and track map. Annotation tools can improve communication between the screener and the final reviewer or can be used for education. The tracking functionality allows recording of the WSI navigation process and provides a mechanism for confirmation of slide coverage by the screening cytotechnologist as well as a useful tool for quality assurance. As the WSI technology matures, additional features and tools to support navigation of a cytology virtual slide are anticipated.

  19. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  20. Sliding through a superlight granular medium.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Vázquez, F; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2009-12-01

    We explore the penetration dynamics of an intruder in a granular medium composed of expanded polystyrene spherical particles. Three features distinguish our experiment from others studied so far in granular physics: (a) the impact is horizontal, decoupling the effects of gravity and the drag force; (b) the density of the intruder rho(i) is up to 350 times larger than the density of the granular medium rho(m); and (c) the way the intruder moves through the material, sliding at the bottom of the column with small friction. Under these conditions we find that the final penetration D scales with (rho(i)/rho(m)) and the drag force Fd and D saturate with the height of the granular bed.

  1. Sliding Mode Control of Steerable Needles

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, D. Caleb; Das, Jadav; Gilbert, Hunter B.; Swaney, Philip J.; Miga, Michael I.; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Webster, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Steerable needles can potentially increase the accuracy of needle-based diagnosis and therapy delivery, provided they can be adequately controlled based on medical image information. We propose a novel sliding mode control law that can be used to deliver the tip of a flexible asymmetric-tipped needle to a desired point, or to track a desired trajectory within tissue. The proposed control strategy requires no a priori knowledge of model parameters, has bounded input speeds, and requires little computational resources. We show that if the standard nonholonomic model for tip-steered needles holds, then the control law will converge to desired targets in a reachable workspace, within a tolerance that can be defined by the control parameters. Experimental results validate the control law for target points and trajectory following in phantom tissue and ex vivo liver. Experiments with targets that move during insertion illustrate robustness to disturbances caused by tissue deformation. PMID:25400527

  2. Sliding Mode Control of Steerable Needles.

    PubMed

    Rucker, D Caleb; Das, Jadav; Gilbert, Hunter B; Swaney, Philip J; Miga, Michael I; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Webster, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Steerable needles can potentially increase the accuracy of needle-based diagnosis and therapy delivery, provided they can be adequately controlled based on medical image information. We propose a novel sliding mode control law that can be used to deliver the tip of a flexible asymmetric-tipped needle to a desired point, or to track a desired trajectory within tissue. The proposed control strategy requires no a priori knowledge of model parameters, has bounded input speeds, and requires little computational resources. We show that if the standard nonholonomic model for tip-steered needles holds, then the control law will converge to desired targets in a reachable workspace, within a tolerance that can be defined by the control parameters. Experimental results validate the control law for target points and trajectory following in phantom tissue and ex vivo liver. Experiments with targets that move during insertion illustrate robustness to disturbances caused by tissue deformation.

  3. LGS adaptive optics system with long-pulsed sodium laser on Lijiang 1.8 meter telescope 2014-2016 observation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Min; Jiang, Changchun; Wei, Ling; Zheng, Wenjia; Li, Wenru; Ma, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Luchun; Jin, Kai; Bo, Yong; Zuo, Junwei; Wang, Pengyuan; Cheng, Feng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Donghong; Deng, Jijiang; Gao, Yang; Shen, Yu; Bian, Qi; Yao, Ji; Huang, Jiang; Dong, Ruoxi; Deng, Keran; Peng, Qinjun; Rao, Changhui; Xu, Zuyan; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-07-01

    During 2014-2016, the Laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics (AO) system observation campaign has been carried out on Lijiang 1.8 meter telescope. During the campaign, two generation LGS AO systems have been developed and installed. In 2014, a long-pulsed solid Sodium prototype laser with 20W@400Hz, a beam transfer optical (BTO) system, and a laser launch telescope (LLT) with 300mm diameter were mounted onto the telescope and moved with telescope azimuth journal. At the same time, a 37-elements compact LGS AO system had been mounted on the Bent-Cassegrain focus and got its first light on observing HIP43963 (mV= 8.18mv) and reached Sr=0.27 in J Band after LGS AO compensation. In 2016, the solid Sodium laser has been upgrade to stable 32W@800Hz while D2a plus D2b repumping is used to increase the photon return, and a totally new LGS AO system with 164-elements Deformable Mirror, Linux Real Time Controller, inner closed loop Tip/tilt mirror, Multiple-PMT tracking detector is established and installed on the telescope. And the throughput for the BTO/LLT is improved nearly 20%. The campaign process, the performance of the two LGS AO systems especially the latter one, the characteristics of the BTO/LLT system and the result are present in this paper.

  4. ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS OF 3 {mu}m WATER ICE IN SILHOUETTE DISKS IN THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER AND M43

    SciTech Connect

    Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Minowa, Yosuke; Hayano, Yutaka; Oya, Shin; Hattori, Masayuki; Takami, Hideki; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Watanabe, Makoto; Saito, Yoshihiko; Ito, Meguru; Iye, Masanori

    2012-12-01

    We present the near-infrared images and spectra of four silhouette disks in the Orion Nebula Cluster (M42) and M43 using the Subaru Adaptive Optics system. While d053-717 and d141-1952 show no water ice feature at 3.1 {mu}m, a moderately deep ({tau}{sub ice} {approx} 0.7) water ice absorption is detected toward d132-1832 and d216-0939. Taking into account the water ice so far detected in the silhouette disks, the critical inclination angle to produce a water ice absorption feature is confirmed to be 65 Degree-Sign -75 Degree-Sign . As for d216-0939, the crystallized water ice profile is exactly the same as in the previous observations taken 3.63 years ago. If the water ice material is located at 30 AU, then the observations suggest it is uniform at a scale of about 3.5 AU.

  5. AFRD WAREHOUSE, WEST SIDE DETAIL OF ALTERED SLIDING DOORS, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AFRD WAREHOUSE, WEST SIDE DETAIL OF ALTERED SLIDING DOORS, FACING EAST. WEATHER COVER OVER RAIL IS ORIGINAL. SHEET METAL SIDING HAS BEEN INSERTED BETWEEN TWO HALVES OF SLIDING DOORS. - Minidoka Relocation Center Warehouse, 111 South Fir Street, Shoshone, Lincoln County, ID

  6. Lecture Handouts of Projected Slides in a Medical Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Dominick; Quirt, Ian

    1991-01-01

    In a third-year medical school hematology course, handouts reproducing all or most of the 35mm slides used during the lecture are given at the beginning of class. The slides are reproduced on the left, with room for note-taking on the right. Despite some disadvantages, the method is seen as helpful. (Author/MSE)

  7. A Transformational Approach to Slip-Slide Factoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steckroth, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    In this "Delving Deeper" article, the author introduces the slip-slide method for solving Algebra 1 mathematics problems. This article compares the traditional method approach of trial and error to the slip-slide method of factoring. Tools that used to be taken for granted now make it possible to investigate relationships visually,…

  8. Analysis of tensioned membrane structures considering cable sliding.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang-yong

    2003-01-01

    In routine design of tensioned membrane structures, the membrane is generally modeled using space membrane elements and the cables by space cable elements, with no sliding allowed between the membrane and the cables. On the other hand, large deflections are expected and sliding between the membrane and the cables is inevitable. In the present paper, the general finite element code ABAQUS was employed to investigate the influence of cable sliding on membrane surface on the structural behavior. Three analysis models were devised to fulfill this purpose: (1) The membrane element shares nodes with the cable element; (2) The cable can slide on the membrane surface freely (without friction) and (3) The cable can slide on the membrane surface, but with friction between the cable and the membrane. The sliding problem is modeled using a surface-based contact algorithm. The results from three analysis models are compared, showing that cable sliding has only little influence on the structure shape and on the stress distributions in the membrane. The main influence of cable sliding may be its effect on the dynamic behavior of tensioned membrane structures.

  9. Qualification test unit slide stainer (Beckman P/N 673753)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernier, P. S.

    1972-01-01

    Specifications for a slide stainer unit for the Skylab program are presented. The qualification test slide stainer was designed to be a self-contained system capable of performing an eight-step Gram stain of microorganisms and a Wright's stain of blood smears.

  10. A Simple Measurement of the Sliding Friction Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Luigi M.; Defrancesco, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple computer-aided experiment for investigating Coulomb's law of sliding friction in a classroom. It provides a way of testing the possible dependence of the friction coefficient on various parameters, such as types of materials, normal force, apparent area of contact and sliding velocity.

  11. Determining the Ecosystem Services Important for Urban Landscapes-Slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation consists of introductory slides on ecosystem services in urban landscapes and then a discussion of two case studies concerning the provision of water quality in urban landscapes. The introductory slides will explore the range of ecosystem services provided by u...

  12. 8. Photocopy of original USRS glass plate slide (from original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of original USRS glass plate slide (from original slide on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, Colorado) Photographer unknown, ca. 1908 The diversion weir of the Okanogan National Irrigation Project - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  13. 45 CFR 98.42 - Sliding fee scales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.42 Sliding fee scales... provides for cost sharing by families that receive CCDF child care services. (b) A sliding fee...

  14. 45 CFR 98.42 - Sliding fee scales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.42 Sliding fee scales... provides for cost sharing by families that receive CCDF child care services. (b) A sliding fee...

  15. 45 CFR 98.42 - Sliding fee scales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.42 Sliding fee scales... provides for cost sharing by families that receive CCDF child care services. (b) A sliding fee...

  16. 45 CFR 98.42 - Sliding fee scales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.42 Sliding fee scales... provides for cost sharing by families that receive CCDF child care services. (b) A sliding fee...

  17. 45 CFR 98.42 - Sliding fee scales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.42 Sliding fee scales... provides for cost sharing by families that receive CCDF child care services. (b) A sliding fee...

  18. Computer Slide Shows: A Trap for Bad Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemm, W. R.

    2007-01-01

    Slide shows presented with software such as PowerPoint or WordPerfect Presentations can trap instructors into bad teaching practices. Research on memory suggests that slide-show instruction can actually be less effective than traditional lecturing when the teacher uses a blackboard or overhead projector. The author proposes a model of classroom…

  19. Robust spatiotemporal matching of electronic slides to presentation videos.

    PubMed

    Fan, Quanfu; Barnard, Kobus; Amir, Arnon; Efrat, Alon

    2011-08-01

    We describe a robust and efficient method for automatically matching and time-aligning electronic slides to videos of corresponding presentations. Matching electronic slides to videos provides new methods for indexing, searching, and browsing videos in distance-learning applications. However, robust automatic matching is challenging due to varied frame composition, slide distortion, camera movement, low-quality video capture, and arbitrary slides sequence. Our fully automatic approach combines image-based matching of slide to video frames with a temporal model for slide changes and camera events. To address these challenges, we begin by extracting scale-invariant feature-transformation (SIFT) keypoints from both slides and video frames, and matching them subject to a consistent projective transformation (homography) by using random sample consensus (RANSAC). We use the initial set of matches to construct a background model and a binary classifier for separating video frames showing slides from those without. We then introduce a new matching scheme for exploiting less distinctive SIFT keypoints that enables us to tackle more difficult images. Finally, we improve upon the matching based on visual information by using estimated matching probabilities as part of a hidden Markov model (HMM) that integrates temporal information and detected camera operations. Detailed quantitative experiments characterize each part of our approach and demonstrate an average accuracy of over 95% in 13 presentation videos.

  20. Computer Control of a Random Access Slide Projector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip G.

    1982-01-01

    A description of a simple interface to enable the interconnection of a random access slide projector and a microcomputer is provided, as well as summaries of the role of slide images as a means of implementing graphic communication and the new activity in graphics as an area of information processing. The microcomputer interface is then detailed,…

  1. Design Your Organization's Own Slide-Tape Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilden, Scott W.

    1975-01-01

    Slide-tape shows offer a relatively inexpensive, easy-to-assemble means of informing a wide variety of groups interested in education. This article outlines a seven-step procedure to produce a coherent, professional-looking slide-tape presentation. (DS)

  2. The Easy Way to Create Computer Slide Shows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1995-01-01

    Discusses techniques for creating computer slide shows. Topics include memory; format; color use; HyperCard and CD-ROM; font styles and sizes; graphs and graphics; the slide show option; special effects; and tips for effective presentation. (Author/AEF)

  3. Optimizing Student Learning: Examining the Use of Presentation Slides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Judy; Corrigan, Hope; Hofacker, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory overload and split attention result in reduced learning when instructors read slides with bullet points and complex graphs during a lecture. Conversely, slides containing relevant visual elements, when accompanied by instructor narration, use both the visual and verbal channels of a student's working memory, thus improving the chances of…

  4. PPP Sliding Window Algorithm and Its Application in Deformation Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiwei; Zhang, Rui; Yao, Yibin; Liu, Yanyan; Hu, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the double-difference relative positioning method, the precise point positioning (PPP) algorithm can avoid the selection of a static reference station and directly measure the three-dimensional position changes at the observation site and exhibit superiority in a variety of deformation monitoring applications. However, because of the influence of various observing errors, the accuracy of PPP is generally at the cm-dm level, which cannot meet the requirements needed for high precision deformation monitoring. For most of the monitoring applications, the observation stations maintain stationary, which can be provided as a priori constraint information. In this paper, a new PPP algorithm based on a sliding window was proposed to improve the positioning accuracy. Firstly, data from IGS tracking station was processed using both traditional and new PPP algorithm; the results showed that the new algorithm can effectively improve positioning accuracy, especially for the elevation direction. Then, an earthquake simulation platform was used to simulate an earthquake event; the results illustrated that the new algorithm can effectively detect the vibrations change of a reference station during an earthquake. At last, the observed Wenchuan earthquake experimental results showed that the new algorithm was feasible to monitor the real earthquakes and provide early-warning alerts. PMID:27241172

  5. PPP Sliding Window Algorithm and Its Application in Deformation Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiwei; Zhang, Rui; Yao, Yibin; Liu, Yanyan; Hu, Yuming

    2016-05-31

    Compared with the double-difference relative positioning method, the precise point positioning (PPP) algorithm can avoid the selection of a static reference station and directly measure the three-dimensional position changes at the observation site and exhibit superiority in a variety of deformation monitoring applications. However, because of the influence of various observing errors, the accuracy of PPP is generally at the cm-dm level, which cannot meet the requirements needed for high precision deformation monitoring. For most of the monitoring applications, the observation stations maintain stationary, which can be provided as a priori constraint information. In this paper, a new PPP algorithm based on a sliding window was proposed to improve the positioning accuracy. Firstly, data from IGS tracking station was processed using both traditional and new PPP algorithm; the results showed that the new algorithm can effectively improve positioning accuracy, especially for the elevation direction. Then, an earthquake simulation platform was used to simulate an earthquake event; the results illustrated that the new algorithm can effectively detect the vibrations change of a reference station during an earthquake. At last, the observed Wenchuan earthquake experimental results showed that the new algorithm was feasible to monitor the real earthquakes and provide early-warning alerts.

  6. Effects of induced vibration modes on droplet sliding phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, Jose Eduardo; Alvarado, Jorge; Yao, Chun-Wei; Dropwise Condensation Collaboration; Engineered Surfaces Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation has been undertaken to understand the effects of induced vibration modes on droplet sliding phenomena. A mathematical model has been postulated which is capable of estimating accurately droplet sliding angles when using hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The model, which takes into account equilibrium contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and droplet volume, has been validated using experimental data. The model has been modified to be able to estimate droplet sliding angle when different modes of vibrations are imposed on the surfaces. Experimental results to date reveal that when resonance modes of vibrations are imposed, the droplet sliding angles decrease considerably. The results also indicate that the modified model can be used effectively to relate imposed resonance frequencies to the critical sliding angle of droplets. LSAMP sponsored NSF Fellowship.

  7. Teaching Veterinary Histopathology: A Comparison of Microscopy and Digital Slides.

    PubMed

    Brown, Peter J; Fews, Debra; Bell, Nick J

    2016-01-01

    Virtual microscopy using digitized slides has become more widespread in teaching in recent years. There have been no direct comparisons of the use of virtual microscopy and the use of microscopes and glass slides. Third-year veterinary students from two different schools completed a simple objective test, covering aspects of histology and histopathology, before and after a practical class covering relevant material presented as either glass slides viewed with a microscope or as digital slides. There was an overall improvement in performance by students at both veterinary schools using both practical formats. Neither format was consistently better than the other, and neither school consistently outperformed the other. In a comparison of student appraisal of use of digital slides and microscopes, the digital technology was identified as having many advantages.

  8. World petroleum assessment 2000; compiled PowerPoint slides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahlbrandt, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    The slides in this compilation have been produced for a number of presentations on the World Petroleum Assessment 20000. Many of the figures are taken directly form the publication "U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000" - Description and Results: USGS Digital Data Series DDS-60, 2000. Some of the slides are modifications of figures from DDS-60, some are new descriptive slides, and a few are new slides. Several of the slides appear to be duplicates, but in fact are slight modifications for format or content from the same image. Forty-one people participated in this effort as part of the World Energy Assessment Team. The full list of contributors is given ion DDS-60. 

  9. An industry perspective: An update on the adoption of whole slide imaging

    PubMed Central

    Montalto, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript is an adaptation of the closing keynote presentation of the Digital Pathology Association Pathology Visions Conference 2015 in Boston, MA, USA. In this presentation, analogies are drawn between the adoption of whole slide imaging (WSI) and other mainstream digital technologies, including digital music and books. In doing so, it is revealed that the adoption of seemingly similar digital technologies does not follow the same adoption profiles and that understanding the unique aspects of value for each customer segment is critical. Finally, a call to action is given to academia and industry to study the value that WSI brings to the global healthcare community. PMID:27141323

  10. Sliding-Mode Control Applied for Robust Control of a Highly Unstable Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, Travis Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    An investigation into the application of an observer based sliding mode controller for robust control of a highly unstable aircraft and methods of compensating for actuator dynamics is performed. After a brief overview of some reconfigurable controllers, sliding mode control (SMC) is selected because of its invariance properties and lack of need for parameter identification. SMC is reviewed and issues with parasitic dynamics, which cause system instability, are addressed. Utilizing sliding manifold boundary layers, the nonlinear control is converted to a linear control and sliding manifold design is performed in the frequency domain. An additional feedback form of model reference hedging is employed which is similar to a prefilter and has large benefits to system performance. The effects of inclusion of actuator dynamics into the designed plant is heavily investigated. Multiple Simulink models of the full longitudinal dynamics and wing deflection modes of the forward swept aero elastic vehicle (FSAV) are constructed. Additionally a linear state space models to analyze effects from various system parameters. The FSAV has a pole at +7 rad/sec and is non-minimum phase. The use of 'model actuators' in the feedback path, and varying there design, is heavily investigated for the resulting effects on plant robustness and tolerance to actuator failure. The use of redundant actuators is also explored and improved robustness is shown. All models are simulated with severe failure and excellent tracking, and task dependent handling qualities, and low pilot induced oscillation tendency is shown.

  11. Impact of Atomic Corrugation on Sliding Friction as Probed by QCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Tonya; Lee, Sang; Krim, Jacqueline

    2004-03-01

    At the atomic scale, friction is believed to originate primarily via sliding induced excitation of phonons. [1] Theoretical predictions of the magnitude of phononic dissipation have been related to the atomic corrugation of the adsorbate/substrate potential. [2] Braun and colleagues [3] measured a corrugation of 1.9 meV for xenon on a copper(111) surface using helium atom scattering. Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM), we have measured the sliding friction of Xe/Cu(111) adsorbed at 77 K. The QCM probe of sliding friction is the sliptime, which measures the slippage of the adsorbate atop the oscillating surface of the QCM. For monolayer coverages, we observed a sliptime of 10 ns for Xe/Cu(111). We also discuss theoretical predictions for the impact of atomic corrugation on sliding friction. [1] Fundamentals of Friction; Macroscopic and Microscopic Processes, ed. I.L. Singer and H.M. Pollock, Kluwer, Dordrecht (1992). [2] M. Cieplak, E.D. Smith, and M.O. Robbins, Science 265 (1994) 1209. [3] J. Braun et al., PRL 80 (1998) 125.

  12. The empirical evaluation and examination of breechface markings on ten consecutively manufactured pistol slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sascha

    Previously published research and case studies exist pertaining to consecutively manufactured tool marks and the individuality of those markings on tools. This study seeked to assess the Association of Firearm and Tool Mark Examiners (AFTE) Theory of Identification and provide additional research into the investigation of characteristics potentially viewed on the breechfaces of pistol slides. The researcher obtained ten consecutively manufactured Ruger LCP .380 Auto slides for examination. The tool marks exhibited on the breechfaces were macroscopically examined, evaluated in terms of potential for the transfer of subclass characteristics, and examined for the presence of individual characteristics. This research indicated whether breechface markings were accorded to their respective slide or if misidentification by examiners was possible. The first phase of this study was in further validating the AFTE Theory of Identification through generation of a test for AFTE members. This test required examiners to distinguish between subclass and individual characteristics, identify cartridge cases to their respective slide, and determine whether there was potential for misidentification of breechface markings due to subclass carryover. The second phase observed the differences and similarities of examiner ability and IBISRTM BRASSTRAX-3D(TM) ability to identify cartridge cases. This study might also function as a test for firearm and tool mark examiners to utilize in their laboratories as a training exercise related to consecutively manufactured breechfaces. The research findings might also facilitate the development of error rates pertaining to this study.

  13. Chromosomal Replication Dynamics and Interaction with the β Sliding Clamp Determine Orientation of Bacterial Transposable Elements

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Manuel J.; Díaz-Maldonado, Héctor; González-Tortuero, Enrique; López de Saro, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) are small transposable elements widespread in bacterial genomes, where they play an essential role in chromosome evolution by stimulating recombination and genetic flow. Despite their ubiquity, it is unclear how ISs interact with the host. Here, we report a survey of the orientation patterns of ISs in bacterial chromosomes with the objective of gaining insight into the interplay between ISs and host chromosomal functions. We find that a significant fraction of IS families present a consistent and family-specific orientation bias with respect to chromosomal DNA replication, especially in Firmicutes. Additionally, we find that the transposases of up to nine different IS families with different transposition pathways interact with the β sliding clamp, an essential replication factor, suggesting that this is a widespread mechanism of interaction with the host. Although we find evidence that the interaction with the β sliding clamp is common to all bacterial phyla, it also could explain the observed strong orientation bias found in Firmicutes, because in this group β is asymmetrically distributed during synthesis of the leading or lagging strands. Besides the interaction with the β sliding clamp, other asymmetries also play a role in the biased orientation of some IS families. The utilization of the highly conserved replication sliding clamps suggests a mechanism for host regulation of IS proliferation and also a universal platform for IS dispersal and transmission within bacterial populations and among phylogenetically distant species. PMID:24614824

  14. DPS Discovery Slide Sets for the Introductory Astronomy Instructor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Jackson, Brian; Buxner, Sanlyn; Horst, Sarah; Brain, David; Schneider, Nicholas M.

    2016-10-01

    The DPS actively supports the E/PO needs of the society's membership, including those at the front of the college classroom. The DPS Discovery Slide Sets are an opportunity for instructors to put the latest planetary science into their lectures and for scientists to get their exciting results to college students.In an effort to keep the astronomy classroom apprised of the fast moving field of planetary science, the Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) has developed "DPS Discoveries", which are 3-slide presentations that can be incorporated into college lectures. The slide sets are targeted at the Introductory Astronomy undergraduate level. Each slide set consists of three slides which cover a description of the discovery, a discussion of the underlying science, and a presentation of the big picture implications of the discovery, with a fourth slide that includes links to associated press releases, images, and primary sources. Topics span all subdisciplines of planetary science, and 26 sets are available in Farsi and Spanish. We intend for these slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors include new developments (not yet in their textbooks) into the broader context of the course. If you need supplemental material for your classroom, please checkout the archived collection: http://dps.aas.org/education/dpsdiscMore slide sets are now in development and will be available soon! In the meantime, we seek input, feedback, and help from the DPS membership to add fresh slide sets to the series and to connect the college classroom to YOUR science. It's easy to get involved - we'll provide a content template, tips and tricks for a great slide set, and pedagogy reviews. Talk to a coauthor to find out how you can disseminate your science or get involved in E/PO with your contributions.

  15. Energy Partitioning during Frictional Sliding at Coseismic Slip Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, T.; Mizoguchi, K.

    2008-12-01

    Determination of the energy partitioning during an earthquake is key to understanding the physics of earthquakes (e.g., Kanamori and Rivera, 2006). Observations made on natural faults that have experienced earthquakes suggest that part of the energy dissipates into a volume of rock surrounding the fault though grain crushing processes, forming fault gouge (e.g., Wilson et al., 2005). Thus we performed high-velocity wear experiments using a rotary-shear apparatus, in order to estimate the partitioning of the frictional work into heat and surface energy during frictional sliding at nearly coseismic slip rates. In particular, we attempted to test whether the ratio of the energy partitioning varies as a function of slip rate. The ratio of dissipated energy as heat to the total frictional work was estimated from the difference between measured temperature around the sliding surfaces and calculated temperature by 2D-FEM on the assumption that all frictional work converts into heat. The surface energy was estimated based on the particle size distribution of the wear materials, which was determined by FE-SEM image analysis. The particles size ranged between 0.03 and 10 μm in average diameter. In the experiments, hollow cylindrical specimens of gabbro were slid at slip rates of 0.004 to 0.3 m/s and normal stresses of 0.2 to 5.6 MPa under unconfined and dry conditions. Rock powder (gouge) was continuously produced by abrasive wear of initially bare fault surfaces during sliding. Because the sliding surfaces were not confined in the experiments, the gouge was extruded from the fault surfaces, resulting in shortening of axial length of specimen. In this study, we defined the dimensionless wear rate, given by that an axial shortening rate of the specimen was divided by slip rate. Then, we examined how the wear rate and temperature changed as a function of the rate of frictional work per a unit fault area, Ef, determined by shear stress multiplied by slip rate. Hereafter, Q and

  16. Simultaneous Modeling of Transient Creep and Grain Boundary Sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. F.; Sundberg, M.

    2009-12-01

    Grain boundary sliding (GBS) has been identified as an important contributor to the plastic deformation of polycrystalline solids. This phenomenon, whether accommodated by grain boundary diffusion or dislocation slip, has implications for rheological behavior and microstructural evolution during creep. Because GBS is not an independent deformation mechanism, but rather acts in kinetic series with some other (typically) rate-limiting process, direct investigation of the precise sliding mechanism(s) is difficult during conventional large-strain creep testing. Direct observations of grain boundary sliding can be obtained, however, by: (1) observing the mechanical response of a polycrystalline solid to an oscillating load as a function of frequency using the internal friction technique, and (2) studying the short duration transient response of a polycrystalline solid to a step-function change in stress. To this end, we have conducted an experimental study of low-frequency (10-2.2510-0.5 Hz), the attenuation spectra reveal the onset of an apparent Debye peak in the attenuation spectra, likely due to elastically-accommodated GBS (GBS being rate-limiting). Previous experimental studies have demonstrated that the Andrade viscoelastic model can accurately predict both the transient creep response and

  17. Humboldt slide - A large shear-dominated retrogressive slope failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Prior, D.B.; Field, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Humboldt Slide is a large, complex slide zone located on the northern California continental margin. Its three-dimensional architecture has been imaged by a combination of multibeam bathymetry, Huntec Deep-Tow seismic profiling, and sidescan sonar. The slide is interpreted to be Late Pleistocene to early Holocene in age and was caused by a combination of factors. The area of the slide is a local depocenter with high accumulation rates of organic-rich sediment; there has been local steepening of slopes by tectonic uplifts; and the entire area is one of high seismicity. Overall, the failure occurred by retrogressive, shear-dominated, minimum movement apparently as a sequence of events. Failure initially occurred by subsidence extension at the middle of the feature, followed by upslope retrogressive failure and downslope compression, and finally by translational sliding at the top of the slide. Degassing, as evidenced by abundant pockmarks, may have inhibited downslope translation. The slide may still be active, as suggested by offsets in Holocene hemipelagic sediment draped over some of the shear surfaces. Crown cracks occur above the present head of the failure and may represent the next generation of failure.

  18. Estimation of lung lobar sliding using image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelon, Ryan; Cao, Kunlin; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan

    2012-03-01

    MOTIVATION: The lobes of the lungs slide relative to each other during breathing. Quantifying lobar sliding can aid in better understanding lung function, better modeling of lung dynamics, and a better understanding of the limits of image registration performance near fissures. We have developed a method to estimate lobar sliding in the lung from image registration of CT scans. METHODS: Six human lungs were analyzed using CT scans spanning functional residual capacity (FRC) to total lung capacity (TLC). The lung lobes were segmented and registered on a lobe-by-lobe basis. The displacement fields from the independent lobe registrations were then combined into a single image. This technique allows for displacement discontinuity at lobar boundaries. The displacement field was then analyzed as a continuum by forming finite elements from the voxel grid of the FRC image. Elements at a discontinuity will appear to have undergone significantly elevated 'shear stretch' compared to those within the parenchyma. Shear stretch is shown to be a good measure of sliding magnitude in this context. RESULTS: The sliding map clearly delineated the fissures of the lung. The fissure between the right upper and right lower lobes showed the greatest sliding in all subjects while the fissure between the right upper and right middle lobe showed the least sliding.

  19. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  20. Terrain analysis of the racetrack basin and the sliding rocks of Death Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messina, P.; Stoffer, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Racetrack Playa's unusual surface features known as sliding rocks have been the subject of an ongoing debate and several mapping projects for half a century, although the causative mechanism remains unresolved. Clasts ranging in volume from large pebbles to medium boulders have, unwitnessed, maneuvered around the nearly flat dry lake over considerable distances. The controversy has persisted partly because eyewitness accounts of the phenomenon continue to be lacking, and the earlier mapping missions were limited in method and geographic range. In July 1996, we generated the first complete map of all observed sliding rock trails by submeter differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) mapping technology. The resulting map shows 162 sliding rocks and associated trails to an accuracy of approximately 30 cm. Although anemometer data are not available in the Racetrack wilderness, wind is clearly a catalyst for sliding rock activity; an inferred wind rose was constructed from DGPS trail segment data. When the entire trail network is examined in plan, some patterns emerge, although other (perhaps expected relations) remain elusive: terrain analysis of the surrounding topography demonstrates that the length and morphology of trails are more closely related to where rocks rested at the onset of motion than to any physical attribute of the rocks themselves. Follow-up surveys in May 1998, May 1999, August 1999, and November 1999 revealed little modification of the July, 1996 sliding rock configuration. Only four rocks were repositioned during the El Nino winter of 1997-1998, suggesting that activity may not be restricted to winter storms. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Classical and higher-order sliding mode attitude control for launch vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, James Edward, Jr.

    In determining flight controls for launch vehicle systems, several things must be taken into account. Launch vehicle systems can be expendable or reusable, carry crew or cargo, etc. Each of these launch vehicles maneuvers through a wide range of flight conditions and different mission profiles. Crewed vehicles must adhere to human rating requirements which limit the angular rates. Reusable launch vehicle systems must take into account actuator saturation during entry. Wind disturbances and plant uncertainties are major perturbations to the nominal state of any launch vehicle. An ideal controller is one that is robust enough to handle these uncertainties and external disturbances with limited control authority. One major challenge that exists in the design of these vehicles is the updating of old autopilot technology to new robust designs while also taking into account the different type of launch vehicle system employed. Sliding mode control algorithms that are inherently robust to external disturbances and plant uncertainties are very good candidates for improving the robustness and accuracy of the flight control systems. This dissertation focuses on systematically studying and developing a 'toolbox' of classical and higher-order sliding mode attitude control algorithms for different types of launch vehicle systems operating in uncertain conditions, including model uncertainties, actuator malfunctions, and external perturbations such as wind gusts. The developed toolbox comprises of time-varying sliding variables, classical and higher-order sliding mode attitude control algorithms, and observer techniques that yield novel sliding mode attitude control architectures. The proposed control toolbox allows achieving even higher standards of performance, reliability, safety, operability, and cost for launch vehicles over the current state of the art. Case studies include controlling the X-33 and SLV-X Launch Vehicles studied under NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI

  2. Sliding-cavity fluid contactors in low-gravity fluids, materials, and biotechnology research.

    PubMed

    Todd, Paul; Vellinger, John C; Sengupta, Shramik; Sportiello, Michael G; Greenberg, Alan R; Krantz, William B

    2002-10-01

    The well-known method of sliding-cavity fluid contactors used by Gosting for diffusion measurements and by Tiselius in electrophoresis has found considerable use in low-gravity research. To date, sliding-cavity contactors have been used in liquid diffusion experiments, interfacial transport experiments, biomolecular crystal growth, biphasic extraction, multistage extraction, microencapsulation, seed germination, invertebrate development, and thin-film casting. Sliding-cavity technology has several advantages for spaceflight: it is simple, it accommodates small samples, samples can be fully enclosed, phases can be combined, multiple samples can be processed at high sample density, real-time observations can be made, and mixed and diffused samples can be compared. An analysis of the transport phenomena that govern the sliding-cavity method is offered. During sliding of one liquid over another flow rates between 0.001 and 0.1m/sec are developed, giving Reynolds numbers in the range 0.1-100. Assuming no slip at liquid-solid boundaries shear rates are of the order 1sec(-1). The measured consequence is the transfer of 2-5% of the content of a cavity to the opposite cavity. In the absence of gravity, buoyancy-driven transport is assumed absent. Transport processes are limited to (1) molecular diffusion, in which reactants diffuse toward one another at rates that depend on their diffusion coefficient and concentration gradient (Fick's second law), (2) solutocapillary (Marangoni) flow driven by surface-tension gradients, (3) capillary flow (drop spreading) at liquid-solid three-phase lines leading to immiscible phase demixing, and (4) vapor-phase diffusive mass transfer in evaporative processes. Quantitative treatment of these phenomena has been accomplished over the past few years in low-gravity research in space and on aircraft.

  3. Validation of whole slide imaging for frozen section diagnosis in surgical pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas W.; Slaw, Renee J.; McKenney, Jesse K.; Patil, Deepa T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Whole slide imaging (WSI) using high-resolution scanners is gaining acceptance as a platform for consultation as well as for frozen section (FS) evaluation in surgical pathology. We report results of an intra-observer concordance study comparing evaluation of WSI of scanned FS microscope slides with the original interpretation of the same microscope slides after an average lag time of approximately 1-year. Methods: A total of 70 FS cases (148 microscope slides) originally interpreted by 2 pathologists were scanned at ×20 using Aperio CS2 scanner (Leica Biosystems, San Diego, CA, USA). Reports were redacted such that the study pathologists reviewed images using eSlide Manager Healthcare Network application (Leica Biosystems) accompanied by the same clinical information available at the time of original FS evaluation. Discrepancies between the original FS diagnosis and WSI diagnosis were categorized as major (impacted patient care) or minor (no impact on patient care). Results: Lymph nodes, margins for head and neck cancer resections, and arthroplasty specimens to exclude infection, were the most common FS specimens. The average wash-out interval was 380 days (range: 303–466 days). There was one major discrepancy (1.4% of 70 cases) where the original FS was interpreted as severe squamous dysplasia, and the WSI FS diagnosis was mild dysplasia. There were two minor discrepancies; one where the original FS was called focal moderate squamous dysplasia and WSI FS diagnosis was negative for dysplasia. The second case was an endometrial adenocarcinoma that was originally interpreted as Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Grade I, while the WSI FS diagnosis was FIGO Grade II. Conclusions: These findings validate and support the use of WSI to provide interpretation of FS in our network of affiliated hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers. PMID:26430537

  4. A simple method to evaluate the reliability of OWAS observations.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, I; Engels, J A; van der Gulden, J W

    1998-08-01

    Slides showing nurses in different working postures were used to determine the reliability of OWAS observations. Each slide could be looked at for 3 seconds, while a new slide was shown every 30 seconds to resemble the normal practice of observation. Two observers twice scored a series of slides, some of them being identical at both viewings. To reduce effects of recall there was a time interval of 4 weeks or more between the two viewings and the slides were in a different order the second time. Different series were used to evaluate inter- and intra-observer reliability. The OWAS scores of corresponding slides were compared. In almost all comparisons percentages of agreement over 85% and kappa's over 0.6 were found, which is considered as good agreement. The procedure described seems to be a useful and simple technique to determine such reliability.

  5. MIMO Sliding Mode Control for a Tailless Fighter Aircraft, An Alternative to Reconfigurable Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, S. R.; Hess, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    A frequency-domain procedure for the design of sliding mode controllers for multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems is presented. The methodology accommodates the effects of parasitic dynamics such as those introduced by unmodeled actuators through the introduction of multiple asymptotic observers and model reference hedging. The design procedure includes a frequency domain approach to specify the sliding manifold, the observer eigenvalues, and the hedge model. The procedure is applied to the development of a flight control system for a linear model of the Innovative Control Effector (ICE) fighter aircraft. The stability and performance robustness of the resulting design is demonstrated through the introduction of significant degradation in the control effector actuators and variation in vehicle dynamics.

  6. Initial rotor position estimation and sliding preventing for elevators with surface-mounted PMSMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Shen, Anwen; Tang, Qipeng; Xu, Jinbang

    2016-03-01

    Improved methods of initial rotor position estimation and sliding prevention are presented in this paper for elevators with surface-mounted permanent magnet synchronous machines (SPMSMs). In contrast to most of the existing literature, in this paper, estimation errors caused by stator resistance and dead time are analysed in detail. The improved estimation method can reduce the errors greatly without dead-time compensations and knowledge of motor parameters. Besides, an observer-based feedforward compensation of load torque is introduced to elevator applications to prevent sliding during the starting process. Since the torque observer is widely used in other motor applications, we focus on the impact caused by the change in inertia. Finally, a series of experiments are performed on a testing system with two 13.4 kW SPMSMs and drivers to illustrate the effectiveness and improvement of the method.

  7. Recent slope mobilizations in the Storegga Slide area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, C.; Crutchley, G.; Karstens, J.; Dumke, I.; Duennbier, K.

    2012-12-01

    With ~3500 km3 of mobilized material the Storegga Slide off mid-Norway is one of the largest known sub-marine slope failures. It occurred approximately 8150 years ago and there is strong evidence suggesting that the slide caused a large tsunami that propagated through the North Atlantic and affected the coasts of Norway, Iceland and the U.K. In the Nyegga area along the northern side wall of the slide numerous shallow faults exist. These faults detach within the top 100 m below the sea floor at various stratigraphic levels below, at, and above the main slide plain of the Storegga Slide. Previous studies proposed that these faults are evidence for partial slope movements during the Storegga Slide event indicating that the adjacent slopes were deformed due to the stress variations caused by the Storegga Slide. New high-resolution Parasound data that we have collected in May 2012 onboard RV Meteor show offsets of reflectors that are buried less than 3 m below the sea floor. Assuming that the sedimentation rates derived from a near-by Marion Dufresne sediment core, can be extrapolated to the study area, these reflector offsets suggest that the faults are younger than the Storegga Slide. Given a several million year-long history of repeated slope failures in the area it is important to obtain more precise dates for the activity of the faults in order to assess if these faults can be used as an indicator for future slope failures in the area or if they are the result of small-scale adjustments of the head wall topography in the wake of the Storegga Slide.

  8. Introducing Slide Sets for the Introductory Astronomy Instructor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Schneider, Nicholas; Brain, David; Schultz, Gregory; Buxner, Sanlyn; Smith, Denise

    2014-11-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) community and Forums work together to bring the cutting-edge discoveries of NASA Astrophysics and Planetary Science missions to the introductory astronomy college classroom. These mission- and grant-based E/PO programs are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present two new opportunities for college instructors to bring the latest NASA discoveries in Space Science into their classrooms.In an effort to keep the astronomy classroom apprised of the fast moving field of planetary science, the Division of Planetary Sciences (DPS) has developed “DPS Discoveries”, which are short, topical presentations that can be incorporated into college lectures. The slide sets are targeted at the Introductory Astronomy undergraduate level. Each slide set consists of three slides that cover a description of the discovery, a discussion of the underlying science, and a presentation of the big picture implications of the discovery, with a fourth slide that includes links to associated press releases, images, and primary sources. Topics span all subdisciplines of planetary science, and sets are available in Farsi and Spanish. The NASA SMD Planetary Science Forum has recently partnered with the DPS to continue producing the Discovery slides and connect them to NASA mission science. http://dps.aas.org/education/dpsdisc Similarly, the NASA SMD Astrophysics Forum is coordinating the development of a series of slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors incorporate new discoveries in their classrooms. The “Astro 101 slide sets” are presentations 5-7 slides in length on a new development or discovery from a NASA Astrophysics mission relevant to topics in introductory astronomy courses. We intend for these slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors include new developments (not yet in their textbooks) into the

  9. Geomorphology, stability and mobility of the Currituck slide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locat, J.; Lee, H.; ten Brink, U.S.; Twichell, D.; Geist, E.; Sansoucy, M.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 100,000??years, the U.S. Atlantic continental margin has experienced various types of mass movements some of which are believed to have taken place at times of low sea level. At one of these times of low sea level a significant trigger caused a major submarine mass movement off the coast of Virginia: the Currituck slide which is believed to have taken place between 24 and 50??ka ago. This slide removed a total volume of about 165??km3 from this section of the continental slope. The departure zone still shows a very clean surface that dips at 4?? and is only covered by a thin veneer of postglacial sediment. Multibeam bathymetric and seismic survey data suggest that this slide took place along three failures surfaces. The morphology of the source area suggests that the sediments were already at least normally consolidated at the time of failure. The slide debris covers an area as much as 55??km wide that extends 180??km from the estimated toe of the original slope. The back analysis of slide initiation indicates that very high pore pressure, a strong earthquake, or both had to be generated to trigger slides on such a low failure plane angle. The shape of the failure plane, the fact that the surface is almost clear of any debris, and the mobility analysis, all support the argument that the slides took place nearly simultaneously. Potential causes for the generation of high pore pressures could be seepage forces from coastal aquifers, delta construction and related pore pressure generation due to the local sediment loading, gas hydrates, and earthquakes. This slide, and its origin, is a spectacular example of the potential threat that submarine mass movements can pose to the US Atlantic coast and underline the need to further assess the potential for the generation of such large slides, like the Grand Banks 1927 landslide of similar volume. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Comparing whole slide digital images versus traditional glass slides in the detection of common microscopic features seen in dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Nikki S.; Markow, Michael; Prieto-Granada, Carlos; Gaudi, Sudeep; Turner, Leslie; Rodriguez-Waitkus, Paul; Messina, Jane L.; Jukic, Drazen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The quality and limitations of digital slides are not fully known. We aimed to estimate intrapathologist discrepancy in detecting specific microscopic features on glass slides and digital slides created by scanning at ×20. Methods: Hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid–Schiff glass slides were digitized using the Mirax Scan (Carl Zeiss Inc., Germany). Six pathologists assessed 50–71 digital slides. We recorded objective magnification, total time, and detection of the following: Mast cells; eosinophils; plasma cells; pigmented macrophages; melanin in the epidermis; fungal bodies; neutrophils; civatte bodies; parakeratosis; and sebocytes. This process was repeated using the corresponding glass slides after 3 weeks. The diagnosis was not required. Results: The mean time to assess digital slides was 176.77 s and 137.61 s for glass slides (P < 0.001, 99% confidence interval [CI]). The mean objective magnification used to detect features using digital slides was 18.28 and 14.07 for glass slides (P < 0.001, 99.99% CI). Parakeratosis, civatte bodies, pigmented macrophages, melanin in the epidermis, mast cells, eosinophils, plasma cells, and neutrophils, were identified at lower objectives on glass slides (P = 0.023–0.001, 95% CI). Average intraobserver concordance ranged from κ = 0.30 to κ = 0.78. Features with poor to fair average concordance were: Melanin in the epidermis (κ = 0.15–0.58); plasma cells (κ = 0.15–0.49); and neutrophils (κ = 0.12–0.48). Features with moderate average intrapathologist concordance were: parakeratosis (κ = 0.21–0.61); civatte bodies (κ = 0.21–0.71); pigment-laden macrophages (κ = 0.34–0.66); mast cells (κ = 0.29–0.78); and eosinophils (κ = 0.31–0.79). The average intrapathologist concordance was good for sebocytes (κ = 0.51–1.00) and fungal bodies (κ = 0.47–0.76). Conclusions: Telepathology using digital slides scanned at ×20 is sufficient for detection of histopathologic features routinely

  11. Effect of sliding locus on subsurface crack formation in ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene knee component.

    PubMed

    Todo, S; Tomita, N; Kitakura, T; Yamano, Y

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sliding locus on fatigue destruction of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in order to design a durable total knee arthroplasty (TKA) articulation. Two-dimensional sliding fatigue testing was performed under two simplified patterns of articulating interface sliding locus. Scanning acoustic tomography (SAT) was used for observation of subsurface cracks in UHMWPE specimens. A high rate of subsurface crack formation was observed when the movement was reciprocated on two different loci, in contrast with that on a single linear locus. This finding suggests that crack formation or propagation in UHMWPE components is accelerated not only by the compressive stress but also by complicated articulating movement locus.

  12. Decentralized finite-time attitude synchronization for multiple rigid spacecraft via a novel disturbance observer.

    PubMed

    Zong, Qun; Shao, Shikai

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates decentralized finite-time attitude synchronization for a group of rigid spacecraft by using quaternion with the consideration of environmental disturbances, inertia uncertainties and actuator saturation. Nonsingular terminal sliding mode (TSM) is used for controller design. Firstly, a theorem is proven that there always exists a kind of TSM that converges faster than fast terminal sliding mode (FTSM) for quaternion-descripted attitude control system. Controller with this kind of TSM has faster convergence and reduced computation than FTSM controller. Then, combining with an adaptive parameter estimation strategy, a novel terminal sliding mode disturbance observer is proposed. The proposed disturbance observer needs no upper bound information of the lumped uncertainties or their derivatives. On the basis of undirected topology and the disturbance observer, decentralized attitude synchronization control laws are designed and all attitude errors are ensured to converge to small regions in finite time. As for actuator saturation problem, an auxiliary variable is introduced and accommodated by the disturbance observer. Finally, simulation results are given and the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is testified.

  13. Sliding mode control for chaotic systems based on LMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Han, Zheng-zhi; Xie, Qi-yue; Zhang, Wei

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates the chaos control problem for a general class of chaotic systems. A feedback controller is established to guarantee asymptotical stability of the chaotic systems based on the sliding mode control theory. A new reaching law is introduced to solve the chattering problem that is produced by traditional sliding mode control. A dynamic compensator is designed to improve the performance of the closed-loop system in sliding mode, and its parameter is obtained from a linear matrix inequality (LMI). Simulation results for the well known Chua's circuit and Lorenz chaotic system are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  14. Robust sliding mode control applied to double Inverted pendulum system

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjoub, Sonia; Derbel, Nabil; Mnif, Faical

    2009-03-05

    A three hierarchical sliding mode control is presented for a class of an underactuated system which can overcome the mismatched perturbations. The considered underactuated system is a double inverted pendulum (DIP), can be modeled by three subsystems. Such structure allows the construction of several designs of hierarchies for the controller. For all hierarchical designs, the asymptotic stability of every layer sliding mode surface and the sliding mode surface of subsystems are proved theoretically by Barbalat's lemma. Simulation results show the validity of these methods.

  15. A relationship between slide quality and image quality in whole slide imaging (WSI).

    PubMed

    Yagi, Yukako; Gilbertson, John R

    2008-07-15

    This study examined the effect of tissue section thickness and consistency--parameters outside the direct control of the imaging devices themselves--on WSI capture speed and image quality. Preliminary data indicates that thinner, more consistent tissue sectioning (such as those produced by automated tissue sectioning robots) results in significantly faster WSI capture times and better image quality. A variety of tissue types (including human breast, mouse embryo, mouse brain, etc.) were sectioned using an (AS-200) Automated Tissue Sectioning System (Kurabo Industries, Osaka Japan) at thicknesses from 2 - 9 microm (at one microm intervals) and stained with H&E by a standard method. The resulting slides were imaged with 5 different WSI devices (ScanScope CS, Aperio, CA; iScan, BioImagene, CA; DX40, DMetrix, AZ; NanoZoomer, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Japan; Mirax Scan, Carl Zeiss Inc., Germany) with sampling periods of 0.43 - 0.69 microm/pixel. Slides with different tissue thicknesses were compared for image quality, appropriate number of focus points, and overall scanning speed. Thinner sections (i.e. 3 microm sections versus 7 microm) required significantly fewer focus points and had significantly lower (10-15%) capture times. Improvement was seen with all devices and tissues tested. Furthermore, a panel of experienced pathologist judged image quality to be significantly better (for example, with better apparent resolution of nucleoli) with the thinner sections. Automated tissue sectioning is a very new technology; however, the AS-200 seems to be able to produce thinner, more consistent, flatter sections than manual methods at reasonably high throughput. The resulting tissue sections seem to be easier for a WSI system's focusing systems to deal with (compared to manually cut slides). Teaming an automated tissue-sectioning device with a WSI device shows promise in producing faster WSI throughput with better image quality.

  16. Enhanced fluorescence cell imaging with metal-coated slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moal, Eric; Fort, Emmanuel; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Janin, Anne; Murata, Hideyuki; Cordelières, Fabrice P.

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has witnessed momentous advances in fluorescence microscopy. The introduction of novel fluorescent markers, together with the development of original microscopy techniques, made it possible to study biomolecular interactions in living cells and to examine the structure and function of living tissues. The emergence of these innovative techniques had a remarkable impact on all the life sciences. However, many biological and medical applications involve the detection of minute quantities of biomolecules, and are limited by the signal weakness in common observation conditions. Here, we show that silver and gold-coated microscope slides can be used as mirror substrates to efficiently improve detection sensitivity when fluorescence microscopy is applied to micrometer-thick biological samples. We report a fourfold enhancement of the fluorescence signal and a noticeable strengthening of the image contrast, when mirror substrates are used with standard air microscope objectives. We demonstrate that metal-coated substrates provide the means to get sensitivity-enhanced fluorescence detection with dry optics, while keeping a wide field observation and a large depth of field. This is a crucial advantage for automated and high-throughput applications to cell and tissue diagnostic analysis.

  17. Development and Validation of a Histological Method to Measure Microvessel Density in Whole-Slide Images of Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Croons, Valerie; Waumans, Yannick; Sluydts, Ellen; De Schepper, Stefanie; Andries, Luc; Waelput, Wim; Fransen, Erik; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Kockx, Mark M.; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Despite all efforts made to develop predictive biomarkers for antiangiogenic therapies, no unambiguous markers have been identified so far. This is due to among others the lack of standardized tests. This study presents an improved microvessel density quantification method in tumor tissue based on stereological principles and using whole-slide images. Vessels in tissue sections of different cancer types were stained for CD31 by an automated and validated immunohistochemical staining method. The stained slides were digitized with a digital slide scanner. Systematic, uniform, random sampling of the regions of interest on the whole-slide images was performed semi-automatically with the previously published applications AutoTag and AutoSnap. Subsequently, an unbiased counting grid was combined with the images generated with these scripts. Up to six independent observers counted microvessels in up to four cancer types: colorectal carcinoma, glioblastoma multiforme, ovarian carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. At first, inter-observer variability was found to be unacceptable. However, after a series of consensus training sessions and interim statistical analysis, counting rules were modified and inter-observer concordance improved considerably. Every CD31-positive object was counted, with exclusion of suspected CD31-positive monocytes, macrophages and tumor cells. Furthermore, if interconnected, stained objects were considered a single vessel. Ten regions of interest were sufficient for accurate microvessel density measurements. Intra-observer and inter-observer variability were low (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.7) if the observers were adequately trained. PMID:27583442

  18. Sliding Wear Behavior of TiC-Reinforced Cu-4 wt.% Ni Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pushkar; Gautam, R. K.; Tyagi, Rajnesh; Kumar, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    The present investigation explores the effect of TiC content on the sliding wear properties of Cu-4 wt.% Ni matrix composites. Cu-4 wt.% Ni - x wt.% TiC ( x = 0, 2, 4 and 8 wt.%) metal matrix composites were developed by powder metallurgy route. Their friction and wear was studied under dry sliding at different loads of 5, 7.5 and 10 N and constant sliding speed of 2 m/s using a pin-on-disk machine. The metallographic observations showed an almost uniform distribution of TiC particles in the matrix. Hardness of the composites increased with increasing TiC content (up to 4 wt.%). Friction and wear results of TiC-reinforced composites show better wear resistance than unreinforced matrix alloy. However, the optimum wear resistance was observed for 4 wt.% TiC-reinforced composites. Worn surfaces of specimens indicated the abrasion as the primary mechanism of wear in all the materials investigated in the study. The observed behavior has been explained on the basis of (1) the hardness which results in a decrease in real area of contact in composites containing TiC particles and (2) the formation of a transfer layer of wear debris on the surface of the composites which protects underlying substrate by inhibiting metal-metal contact.

  19. The binarity of Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with Adaptive Optics and spectroscopy. A study of the triple system TY CrA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corporon, Patrice

    1998-03-01

    Multiplicity is a major issue in stellar astrophysics. Firstly, any stellar formation theory must explain the large abundance of multiple systems among Main Sequence and young low-mass T Tauri stars. Secondly, binary studies allow the direct determination of physical parameters. In the case of Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars, the binarity status is not well known; furthermore, direct mass determination are required to test stellar evolution models for these young intermediate mass objects. The first part of the thesis presents the results of a systematic search for HAeBe binaries in both hemispheres. Two complementary techniques were used to cover a large range of orbital period P: high angular resolution imaging with Adaptive Optics (AO) (binary separation ρ between 0.12'' and few arcseconds, i.e. P ≅ many years), and high resolution visible spectroscopy to study short orbital period (P ≅few hours to few months). Among the 68 HAeBe stars observed with ADONIS--ESO and PUEO--CFH AO instruments, 30 binaries (18 discovered) have been detected. 42 HAeBe stars have been surveyed with the CES--ESO and 'ELODIE, AURéLIE--OHP spectrographs. Radial velocity variations were found in 7 targets (4 are new spectroscopic binaries, 3 d. < P < 166 d.). In addition, the 7Li 6 708 Å absorption line (absent feature in simple HAeBe stars spectra) indicates the presence of a cooler companion in 6 HAeBe spectrum binaries, 4 of which are new detections. The observed visual binary frequency for HAeBe stars is of the order of 50%. For short period spectroscopic binaries (P < 100 days), the observed frequency is about 10%. Considering observational bias effects, these estimates are regarded as lower limits for the true HAeBe binary frequency. Based on our multi-color AO images, spectral types of twenty-two visual companions have been determined. A trend is found such that companions of Ae stars are low-mass T Tauri stars (spectral type K--M), while companions of Be stars are intermediate

  20. Needs assessment for adapting TB directly observed treatment intervention programme in Limpopo Province, South Africa: A community-based participatory research approach

    PubMed Central

    Khoza, Lunic B.; Van den Borne, Hubertus B.; Lebese, Rachel T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Limpopo Province is one of the hardest hit by tuberculosis and human immune virus infections in the country. The province has been implementing a directly observed treatment strategy since 1996. However, the cure rate was 64% in 2015 and remains far from the set target by the World Health Organization of 85%. Poor health-care seeking and adherence behaviours were identified as major risk behaviours. Aim To apply a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach in identifying barriers and facilitators to health-care seeking and adherence to treatment, and to determine strategies and messages in order to inform the design of an adapted intervention programme. Setting This study was conducted in three districts in the Limpopo Province, Capricorn, Mopani and Sekhukhune districts. Methods The community participatory research approach was applied. Purposive sampling was used to sample participants. Focus group discussions were used to collect data. Participatory analysis was used comparing findings within and across all the participants. Results A total of 161 participated in the study. Participants included coordinators, professional nurses, supporters and patients. Major modifiable behavioural-related barriers were lack of knowledge about tuberculosis, misinformation and misperceptions cultural beliefs, stigma and refusal of treatment support. Environment-related barriers were attitudes of health workers, lack of support by family and community, lack of food and use of alcohol and drugs. Strategies and messages included persuasive and motivational messages to promote healthy behaviour. Conclusion Joint programmatic collaboration between the community and academic researchers is really needed for interventions to address the needs of the community. PMID:27542290

  1. Cross-talk between protein kinase A and mitogen-activated protein kinases signalling in the adaptive changes observed during morphine withdrawal in the heart.

    PubMed

    Almela, P; Atucha, N M; Milanés, M V; Laorden, M L

    2009-09-01

    Our previous studies have shown that morphine withdrawal induced an increase in the expression of protein kinase (PK) A and mitogen-activated extracellular kinase (MAPK) pathways in the heart during morphine withdrawal. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction between PKA and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways mediating the cardiac adaptive changes observed after naloxone administration to morphine-dependent rats. Dependence on morphine was induced by a 7-day subcutaneous implantation of morphine pellets. Morphine withdrawal was precipitated on day 8 by an injection of naloxone (2 mg/kg). ERK1/2 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation was determined by quantitative blot immunolabeling using phosphorylation state-specific antibodies. Naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal activates ERK1/2 and phosphorylates TH at Ser31 in the right and left ventricle, with an increase in the mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate. When N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), a PKA inhibitor, was infused, concomitantly with morphine, it diminished the expression of ERK1/2. In contrast, the infusion of calphostin C (a PKC inhibitor) did not modify the morphine withdrawal-induced activation of ERK1/2. The ability of morphine withdrawal to activate ERK that phosphorylates TH at Ser31 was reduced by HA-1004. The present findings demonstrate that the enhancement of ERK1/2 expression and the phosphorylation state of TH at Ser31 during morphine withdrawal are dependent on PKA and suggest cross-talk between PKA and ERK1/2 transduction pathway mediating morphine withdrawal-induced activation (phosphorylation) of TH.

  2. Affective responses of high and low body satisfied men to viewing physique slides.

    PubMed

    Hausenblas, Heather A; Janelle, Christopher M; Gardner, Rebecca Ellis; Hagan, Amy L

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute affective responses of high and low body satisfied (BS) men who viewed physique slides of the male ideal (model-slides), physique slides of themselves (self-slides), and nonphysique slides (control-slides). During three laboratory visits the participants viewed the slides from one of the three conditions, and they completed pre-, in-, and post-task affective measures. It was found that the: (a) high BS group reported less mood disturbance than the low BS group; (b) participants reported an increase in depression, anger, and body dissatisfaction after viewing the self-slides; (c) participants indicated a decrease in body dissatisfaction after viewing the model-slides; and (d) viewing the control-slides did not result in affective changes. Findings suggest that viewing physique slides results in increased mood disturbance, regardless of BS level.

  3. Piecewise-diffeomorphic image registration: application to the motion estimation between 3D CT lung images with sliding conditions.

    PubMed

    Risser, Laurent; Vialard, François-Xavier; Baluwala, Habib Y; Schnabel, Julia A

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for modelling sliding conditions when registering 3D images in a piecewise-diffeomorphic framework. More specifically, our main contribution is the development of a mathematical formalism to perform Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping registration with sliding conditions. We also show how to adapt this formalism to the LogDemons diffeomorphic registration framework. We finally show how to apply this strategy to estimate the respiratory motion between 3D CT pulmonary images. Quantitative tests are performed on 2D and 3D synthetic images, as well as on real 3D lung images from the MICCAI EMPIRE10 challenge. Results show that our strategy estimates accurate mappings of entire 3D thoracic image volumes that exhibit a sliding motion, as opposed to conventional registration methods which are not capable of capturing discontinuous deformations at the thoracic cage boundary. They also show that although the deformations are not smooth across the location of sliding conditions, they are almost always invertible in the whole image domain. This would be helpful for radiotherapy planning and delivery.

  4. 11. COULTERVILLE ROAD AT ROCK SLIDE AREA WITH HWY 140 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. COULTERVILLE ROAD AT ROCK SLIDE AREA WITH HWY 140 AT REAR. LOOKING NNE. GIS: N-37 43 04.7 / W-119 43 00.3 - Coulterville Road, Between Foresta & All-Weather Highway, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  5. Sliding mode control application in ABWR plant pressure regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhengyu; Edwards, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    A sliding mode controller is designed for an ABWR nuclear power plant turbine throttle pressure regulation. To avoid chattering problem, which is common to conventional sliding mode controllers, and estimation of uncertainties and disturbances, the recursive-form sliding mode control algorithm is developed. To apply the sliding mode control technique, the original plant's 11.-order dynamics model is first transformed to a canonical form differential equation of a relative order of 2 for turbine throttle pressure's dynamics. Simulation results show that the design objectives are achieved and the resulting controller is superior to the existing PI controller in many aspects, including settling time, overshoot/undershoot in response to setpoint step input and fluctuation amplitude in the presence of external disturbances. (authors)

  6. Directional sliding of histone octamers caused by DNA bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng-Ye; Li, Wei; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xie, Ping

    2006-03-01

    Chromatin-remodeling complexes such as SWI/SNF and RSC of yeast can perturb the structure of nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner. Experimental results prove that this chromatin remodeling process involves DNA bending. We simulate the effect of DNA bending, caused by chromatin-remodeling complexes, on directional sliding of histone octamers by Brownian dynamics simulation. The simulation results show that, after a DNA loop being generated at the side of a nucleosome, the histone octamer slides towards this DNA loop until the loop disappears. The DNA loop size is an important factor affecting the process of directional sliding of the histone octamer. A model for directional sliding of histone octamers induced by chromatin-remodeling complexes is suggested. (This research was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China, and the Innovation Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.) (Email: pywang@aphy.iphy.ac.cn)

  7. 9. Bronze slide expansion plate at Pier 3, on right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Bronze slide expansion plate at Pier 3, on right, fixed end left. - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Hot Metal Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  8. QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SLIDE-BASED SYSTEMS: INSTABLITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: All slide-based fluorescence cytometry detections systems basically include an excitation light source, intermediate optics, and a detection device (CCD or PMT). Occasionally, this equipment becomes unstable, generating unreliable and inferior data. Methods: A num...

  9. AFRD WAREHOUSE, SOUTH SIDE DETAIL, SLIDING DOORS. FACING NORTH. COMPARE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AFRD WAREHOUSE, SOUTH SIDE DETAIL, SLIDING DOORS. FACING NORTH. COMPARE WITH FIGURES 4 AND 5 IN NARRATIVE REPORT, WHICH SHOW DIAGONAL BRACES BELOW GLAZED SECTION OF DOORS. - Minidoka Relocation Center Warehouse, 111 South Fir Street, Shoshone, Lincoln County, ID

  10. DETAIL OF WEST END SLIDING DOOR AND EAVE VENTS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF WEST END SLIDING DOOR AND EAVE VENTS ON THE SOUTH SIDE - Hickam Field, Practice Bomb Loading Shed, Bomb Storage Road near the intersection of Moffet and Kamakahi Streets, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Digitization of photographic slides: simple, effective, fast, and inexpensive method.

    PubMed

    Camarena, Lázaro Cárdenas; Guerrero, María Teresa

    2002-03-01

    The technological evolution has changed multiple areas of plastic surgery, including photography. The photograph is one of the instruments used most by the plastic surgeon, and it cannot be eliminated by technological changes. The principal change in photography is that images can be scanned through digital cameras instead of slides. Despite the multiple advantages that digital photography represents, many surgeons are resisting the change. One of the main reasons for this resistance is the large quantity of photographic slides that need to be digitized to be used at scientific conferences as well as in publications. The methods and existing techniques for digitizing slides are costly and time-consuming, and there is risk for loss of definition and image brightness. The authors present a simple, effective, fast, and inexpensive method for digitizing slides. This method has been validated by various plastic surgeons and is effective for use in multimedia presentations and for paper printouts with publication quality.

  12. BASEMENT, A view looking southwest toward the three panel, sliding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking southwest toward the three panel, sliding glass door of walk-in hood and dial guage - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  13. 6. Main cabin, northwest "wing" with plank door and sliding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Main cabin, northwest "wing" with plank door and sliding screen door; view to east. - M.T. & Jennie H. Deaton Property, Big Springs Summer Home Area, Lot 2, Block N, Island Park, Fremont County, ID

  14. Sliding Mode Thermal Control System for Space Station Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson Mark E.; Shtessel, Yuri B.

    1998-01-01

    The decoupled control of the nonlinear, multiinput-multioutput, and highly coupled space station furnace facility (SSFF) thermal control system is addressed. Sliding mode control theory, a subset of variable-structure control theory, is employed to increase the performance, robustness, and reliability of the SSFF's currently designed control system. This paper presents the nonlinear thermal control system description and develops the sliding mode controllers that cause the interconnected subsystems to operate in their local sliding modes, resulting in control system invariance to plant uncertainties and external and interaction disturbances. The desired decoupled flow-rate tracking is achieved by optimization of the local linear sliding mode equations. The controllers are implemented digitally and extensive simulation results are presented to show the flow-rate tracking robustness and invariance to plant uncertainties, nonlinearities, external disturbances, and variations of the system pressure supplied to the controlled subsystems.

  15. 21. INTERIOR OF SOUTHEAST REAR BEDROOM SHOWING ALUMINUMFRAME SLIDING GLASS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. INTERIOR OF SOUTHEAST REAR BEDROOM SHOWING ALUMINUM-FRAME SLIDING GLASS WINDOWS. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  16. 19. INTERIOR OF NORTHEAST REAR BEDROOM SHOWING ALUMINUMFRAME SLIDING GLASS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR OF NORTHEAST REAR BEDROOM SHOWING ALUMINUM-FRAME SLIDING GLASS WINDOWS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  17. An Inexpensive, Easy to Build Slide-Tape Programmer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukas, Terrence

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the construction and use of a slide/tape programer that is simple to build and use, costs a fraction of the cheapest commercial models, and can be used with any tape recorder/player. (Author)

  18. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON SOUTH SIDE OF SOUTH WING. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  19. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON SOUTH SIDE OF SOUTH WING, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  20. Hierarchical Fuzzy Feature Similarity Combination for Presentation Slide Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushki, A.; Ajmal, M.; Plataniotis, K. N.

    2009-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel XML-based system for retrieval of presentation slides to address the growing data mining needs in presentation archives for educational and scholarly settings. In particular, contextual information, such as structural and formatting features, is extracted from the open format XML representation of presentation slides. In response to a textual user query, each extracted feature is used to compute a fuzzy relevance score for each slide in the database. The fuzzy scores from the various features are then combined through a hierarchical scheme to generate a single relevance score per slide. Various fusion operators and their properties are examined with respect to their effect on retrieval performance. Experimental results indicate a significant increase in retrieval performance measured in terms of precision-recall. The improvements are attributed to both the incorporation of the contextual features and the hierarchical feature combination scheme.