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Sample records for adaptive smoothed particle

  1. Chi-squared smoothed adaptive particle-filtering based prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Christopher P.; Orchard, Marcos E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel form of selecting the likelihood function of the standard sequential importance sampling/re-sampling particle filter (SIR-PF) with a combination of sliding window smoothing and chi-square statistic weighting, so as to: (a) increase the rate of convergence of a flexible state model with artificial evolution for online parameter learning (b) improve the performance of a particle-filter based prognosis algorithm. This is applied and tested with real data from oil total base number (TBN) measurements from three haul trucks. The oil data has high measurement uncertainty and an unknown phenomenological state model. Performance of the proposed algorithm is benchmarked against the standard form of SIR-PF estimation which utilises the Normal (Gaussian) likelihood function. Both implementations utilise the same particle filter based prognosis algorithm so as to provide a common comparison. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to further explore the effects of the combination of sliding window smoothing and chi-square statistic weighting to the SIR-PF.

  2. A DAFT DL_POLY distributed memory adaptation of the Smoothed Particle Mesh Ewald method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, I. J.; Todorov, I. T.; Smith, W.

    2006-09-01

    The Smoothed Particle Mesh Ewald method [U. Essmann, L. Perera, M.L. Berkowtz, T. Darden, H. Lee, L.G. Pedersen, J. Chem. Phys. 103 (1995) 8577] for calculating long ranged forces in molecular simulation has been adapted for the parallel molecular dynamics code DL_POLY_3 [I.T. Todorov, W. Smith, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. London 362 (2004) 1835], making use of a novel 3D Fast Fourier Transform (DAFT) [I.J. Bush, The Daresbury Advanced Fourier transform, Daresbury Laboratory, 1999] that perfectly matches the Domain Decomposition (DD) parallelisation strategy [W. Smith, Comput. Phys. Comm. 62 (1991) 229; M.R.S. Pinches, D. Tildesley, W. Smith, Mol. Sim. 6 (1991) 51; D. Rapaport, Comput. Phys. Comm. 62 (1991) 217] of the DL_POLY_3 code. In this article we describe software adaptations undertaken to import this functionality and provide a review of its performance.

  3. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  4. Equalizing resolution in smoothed-particle hydrodynamics calculations using self-adaptive sinc kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, Domingo; Cabezón, Rubén M.; Escartín, José A.; Ebinger, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Context. The smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique is a numerical method for solving gas-dynamical problems. It has been applied to simulate the evolution of a wide variety of astrophysical systems. The method has a second-order accuracy, with a resolution that is usually much higher in the compressed regions than in the diluted zones of the fluid. Aims: We propose and check a method to balance and equalize the resolution of SPH between high- and low-density regions. This method relies on the versatility of a family of interpolators called sinc kernels, which allows increasing the interpolation quality by varying only a single parameter (the exponent of the sinc function). Methods: The proposed method was checked and validated through a number of numerical tests, from standard one-dimensional Riemann problems in shock tubes, to multidimensional simulations of explosions, hydrodynamic instabilities, and the collapse of a Sun-like polytrope. Results: The analysis of the hydrodynamical simulations suggests that the scheme devised to equalize the accuracy improves the treatment of the post-shock regions and, in general, of the rarefacted zones of fluids while causing no harm to the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. The method is robust and easy to implement with a low computational overload. It conserves mass, energy, and momentum and reduces to the standard SPH scheme in regions of the fluid that have smooth density gradients.

  5. Astrophysical smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, Stephan

    2009-04-01

    The paper presents a detailed review of the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with particular focus on its astrophysical applications. We start by introducing the basic ideas and concepts and thereby outline all ingredients that are necessary for a practical implementation of the method in a working SPH code. Much of SPH's success relies on its excellent conservation properties and therefore the numerical conservation of physical invariants receives much attention throughout this review. The self-consistent derivation of the SPH equations from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid is the common theme of the remainder of the text. We derive a modern, Newtonian SPH formulation from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid. It accounts for changes of the local resolution lengths which result in corrective, so-called "grad-h-terms". We extend this strategy to special relativity for which we derive the corresponding grad-h equation set. The variational approach is further applied to a general-relativistic fluid evolving in a fixed, curved background space-time. Particular care is taken to explicitly derive all relevant equations in a coherent way.

  6. Nonequilibrium Flows with Smooth Particle Applied Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon

    Smooth particle methods are relatively new methods for simulating solid and fluid flows though they have a 20-year history of solving complex hydrodynamic problems in astrophysics, such as colliding planets and stars, for which correct answers are unknown. The results presented in this thesis evaluate the adaptability or fitness of the method for typical hydrocode production problems. For finite hydrodynamic systems, boundary conditions are important. A reflective boundary condition with image particles is a good way to prevent a density anomaly at the boundary and to keep the fluxes continuous there. Boundary values of temperature and velocity can be separately controlled. The gradient algorithm, based on differentiating the smooth particle expressions for (urho) and (Trho), does not show numerical instabilities for the stress tensor and heat flux vector quantities which require second derivatives in space when Fourier's heat -flow law and Newton's viscous force law are used. Smooth particle methods show an interesting parallel linking them to molecular dynamics. For the inviscid Euler equation, with an isentropic ideal gas equation of state, the smooth particle algorithm generates trajectories isomorphic to those generated by molecular dynamics. The shear moduli were evaluated based on molecular dynamics calculations for the three weighting functions, B spline, Lucy, and Cusp functions. The accuracy and applicability of the methods were estimated by comparing a set of smooth particle Rayleigh -Benard problems, all in the laminar regime, to corresponding highly-accurate grid-based numerical solutions of continuum equations. Both transient and stationary smooth particle solutions reproduce the grid-based data with velocity errors on the order of 5%. The smooth particle method still provides robust solutions at high Rayleigh number where grid-based methods fails. Considerably fewer smooth particles are required than atoms in a corresponding molecular dynamics

  7. Temperature structure of the intracluster medium from smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and adaptive-mesh refinement simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rasia, Elena; Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke; Avestruz, Camille; Borgani, Stefano; Dolag, Klaus; Granato, Gian Luigi; Murante, Giuseppe; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Nelson, Kaylea

    2014-08-20

    Analyses of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters suggest that X-ray masses can be underestimated by 10%-30%. The largest bias originates from both violation of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) and an additional temperature bias caused by inhomogeneities in the X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM). To elucidate this large dispersion among theoretical predictions, we evaluate the degree of temperature structures in cluster sets simulated either with smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) or adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) codes. We find that the SPH simulations produce larger temperature variations connected to the persistence of both substructures and their stripped cold gas. This difference is more evident in nonradiative simulations, whereas it is reduced in the presence of radiative cooling. We also find that the temperature variation in radiative cluster simulations is generally in agreement with that observed in the central regions of clusters. Around R {sub 500} the temperature inhomogeneities of the SPH simulations can generate twice the typical HE mass bias of the AMR sample. We emphasize that a detailed understanding of the physical processes responsible for the complex thermal structure in ICM requires improved resolution and high-sensitivity observations in order to extend the analysis to higher temperature systems and larger cluster-centric radii.

  8. Nonequilibrium flows with smooth particle applied mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kum, Oyeon

    1995-07-01

    Smooth particle methods are relatively new methods for simulating solid and fluid flows through they have a 20-year history of solving complex hydrodynamic problems in astrophysics, such as colliding planets and stars, for which correct answers are unknown. The results presented in this thesis evaluate the adaptability or fitness of the method for typical hydrocode production problems. For finite hydrodynamic systems, boundary conditions are important. A reflective boundary condition with image particles is a good way to prevent a density anomaly at the boundary and to keep the fluxes continuous there. Boundary values of temperature and velocity can be separately controlled. The gradient algorithm, based on differentiating the smooth particle expression for (uρ) and (Tρ), does not show numerical instabilities for the stress tensor and heat flux vector quantities which require second derivatives in space when Fourier`s heat-flow law and Newton`s viscous force law are used. Smooth particle methods show an interesting parallel linking to them to molecular dynamics. For the inviscid Euler equation, with an isentropic ideal gas equation of state, the smooth particle algorithm generates trajectories isomorphic to those generated by molecular dynamics. The shear moduli were evaluated based on molecular dynamics calculations for the three weighting functions, B spline, Lucy, and Cusp functions. The accuracy and applicability of the methods were estimated by comparing a set of smooth particle Rayleigh-Benard problems, all in the laminar regime, to corresponding highly-accurate grid-based numerical solutions of continuum equations. Both transient and stationary smooth particle solutions reproduce the grid-based data with velocity errors on the order of 5%. The smooth particle method still provides robust solutions at high Rayleigh number where grid-based methods fails.

  9. Progress in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Dilts, G.A.; Mandell, D.A.; Crotzer, L.A.; Knapp, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless, Lagrangian numerical method for hydrodynamics calculations where calculational elements are fuzzy particles which move according to the hydrodynamic equations of motion. Each particle carries local values of density, temperature, pressure and other hydrodynamic parameters. A major advantage of SPH is that it is meshless, thus large deformation calculations can be easily done with no connectivity complications. Interface positions are known and there are no problems with advecting quantities through a mesh that typical Eulerian codes have. These underlying SPH features make fracture physics easy and natural and in fact, much of the applications work revolves around simulating fracture. Debris particles from impacts can be easily transported across large voids with SPH. While SPH has considerable promise, there are some problems inherent in the technique that have so far limited its usefulness. The most serious problem is the well known instability in tension leading to particle clumping and numerical fracture. Another problem is that the SPH interpolation is only correct when particles are uniformly spaced a half particle apart leading to incorrect strain rates, accelerations and other quantities for general particle distributions. SPH calculations are also sensitive to particle locations. The standard artificial viscosity treatment in SPH leads to spurious viscosity in shear flows. This paper will demonstrate solutions for these problems that they and others have been developing. The most promising is to replace the SPH interpolant with the moving least squares (MLS) interpolant invented by Lancaster and Salkauskas in 1981. SPH and MLS are closely related with MLS being essentially SPH with corrected particle volumes. When formulated correctly, JLS is conservative, stable in both compression and tension, does not have the SPH boundary problems and is not sensitive to particle placement. The other approach to

  10. Numerical Convergence In Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qirong; Hernquist, Lars; Li, Yuexing

    2015-02-01

    We study the convergence properties of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using numerical tests and simple analytic considerations. Our analysis shows that formal numerical convergence is possible in SPH only in the joint limit N → ∞, h → 0, and Nnb → ∞, where N is the total number of particles, h is the smoothing length, and Nnb is the number of neighbor particles within the smoothing volume used to compute smoothed estimates. Previous work has generally assumed that the conditions N → ∞ and h → 0 are sufficient to achieve convergence, while holding Nnb fixed. We demonstrate that if Nnb is held fixed as the resolution is increased, there will be a residual source of error that does not vanish as N → ∞ and h → 0. Formal numerical convergence in SPH is possible only if Nnb is increased systematically as the resolution is improved. Using analytic arguments, we derive an optimal compromise scaling for Nnb by requiring that this source of error balance that present in the smoothing procedure. For typical choices of the smoothing kernel, we find Nnb vpropN 0.5. This means that if SPH is to be used as a numerically convergent method, the required computational cost does not scale with particle number as O(N), but rather as O(N 1 + δ), where δ ≈ 0.5, with a weak dependence on the form of the smoothing kernel.

  11. NUMERICAL CONVERGENCE IN SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Qirong; Li, Yuexing; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-02-10

    We study the convergence properties of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using numerical tests and simple analytic considerations. Our analysis shows that formal numerical convergence is possible in SPH only in the joint limit N → ∞, h → 0, and N{sub nb} → ∞, where N is the total number of particles, h is the smoothing length, and N{sub nb} is the number of neighbor particles within the smoothing volume used to compute smoothed estimates. Previous work has generally assumed that the conditions N → ∞ and h → 0 are sufficient to achieve convergence, while holding N{sub nb} fixed. We demonstrate that if N{sub nb} is held fixed as the resolution is increased, there will be a residual source of error that does not vanish as N → ∞ and h → 0. Formal numerical convergence in SPH is possible only if N{sub nb} is increased systematically as the resolution is improved. Using analytic arguments, we derive an optimal compromise scaling for N{sub nb} by requiring that this source of error balance that present in the smoothing procedure. For typical choices of the smoothing kernel, we find N{sub nb} ∝N {sup 0.5}. This means that if SPH is to be used as a numerically convergent method, the required computational cost does not scale with particle number as O(N), but rather as O(N {sup 1} {sup +} {sup δ}), where δ ≈ 0.5, with a weak dependence on the form of the smoothing kernel.

  12. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a new computational technique uniquely suited to computation of hypervelocity impact phenomena. This paper reviews the characteristics, philosophy, and a bit of the derivation of the method. As illustrations of the technique, several test case computations and several application computations are shown.

  13. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1992-09-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a new computational technique uniquely suited to computation of hypervelocity impact phenomena. This paper reviews the characteristics, philosophy, and a bit of the derivation of the method. As illustrations of the technique, several test case computations and several application computations are shown.

  14. SPHGR: Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert

    2015-02-01

    SPHGR (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction) is a python based open-source framework for analyzing smoothed-particle hydrodynamic simulations. Its basic form can run a baryonic group finder to identify galaxies and a halo finder to identify dark matter halos; it can also assign said galaxies to their respective halos, calculate halo & galaxy global properties, and iterate through previous time steps to identify the most-massive progenitors of each halo and galaxy. Data about each individual halo and galaxy is collated and easy to access. SPHGR supports a wide range of simulations types including N-body, full cosmological volumes, and zoom-in runs. Support for multiple SPH code outputs is provided by pyGadgetReader (ascl:1411.001), mainly Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and TIPSY (ascl:1111.015).

  15. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics with GRAPE-1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umemura, Masayuki; Fukushige, Toshiyuki; Makino, Junichiro; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Sugimoto, Daiichiro; Turner, Edwin L.; Loeb, Abraham

    1993-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) scheme using GRAPE-1A, a special-purpose processor used for gravitational N-body simulations. The GRAPE-1A calculates the gravitational force exerted on a particle from all other particles in a system, while simultaneously making a list of the nearest neighbors of the particle. It is found that GRAPE-1A accelerates SPH calculations by direct summation by about two orders of magnitudes for a ten thousand-particle simulation. The effective speed is 80 Mflops, which is about 30 percent of the peak speed of GRAPE-1A. Also, in order to investigate the accuracy of GRAPE-SPH, some test simulations were executed. We found that the force and position errors are smaller than those due to representing a fluid by a finite number of particles. The total energy and momentum were conserved within 0.2-0.4 percent and 2-5 x 10 exp -5, respectively, in simulations with several thousand particles. We conclude that GRAPE-SPH is quite effective and sufficiently accurate for self-gravitating hydrodynamics.

  16. Workshop on advances in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Miller, W.A.

    1993-12-31

    This proceedings contains viewgraphs presented at the 1993 workshop held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Discussed topics include: negative stress, reactive flow calculations, interface problems, boundaries and interfaces, energy conservation in viscous flows, linked penetration calculations, stability and consistency of the SPH method, instabilities, wall heating and conservative smoothing, tensors, tidal disruption of stars, breaking the 10,000,000 particle limit, modelling relativistic collapse, SPH without H, relativistic KSPH avoidance of velocity based kernels, tidal compression and disruption of stars near a supermassive rotation black hole, and finally relativistic SPH viscosity and energy.

  17. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  18. A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics approach for poroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorno, Maria; Steeb, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the SHynergie project we look to investigate hydraulic fracturing and crack evolving in poroelastic media. We model biphasic media assuming incompressible solid grain and incompressible pore liquid. Modeling evolving fractures and fracture networks in elastic and poroelastic media by mesh-based numerical approaches, like X-FEM, is especially in 3-dim a challenging task. Therefore, we propose a meshless particle method for fractured media based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) approach. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method highly suitable for the simulation of large deformations including free surfaces and/or interfaces. Within the SPH method, the computational domain is discretized with particles, avoiding the computational expenses of meshing. Our SPH solution is implemented in a parallel computational framework, which allows to simulate large domains more representative of the scale of our study cases. Our implementation is carefully validated against classical mesh-based approaches and compared with classical solutions for consolidation problems. Furthermore, we discuss fracture initiation and propagation in poroelastic rocks at the reservoir scale.

  19. Computational brittle fracture using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPBM. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPBM. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we have simulated a number of experiments. We discuss three of these simulations in this paper. The first experiment consists of a brittle steel sphere impacting a plate. The experimental sphere fragment patterns are compared to the calculations. The second experiment is a steel flyer plate in which the recovered steel target crack patterns are compared to the calculated crack patterns. We also briefly describe a simulation of a tungsten rod impacting a heavily confined alumina target, which has been recently reported on in detail.

  20. An analysis of smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.W.; Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Mello, F.J.; Hicks, D.L.

    1994-03-01

    SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. In the present study, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine its applicability in the field of solid dynamics. An important result of the work is a rigorous von Neumann stability analysis which provides a simple criterion for the stability or instability of the method in terms of the stress state and the second derivative of the kernel function. Instability, which typically occurs only for solids in tension, results not from the numerical time integration algorithm, but because the SPH algorithm creates an effective stress with a negative modulus. The analysis provides insight into possible methods for removing the instability. Also, SPH has been coupled into the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO, and a weighted residual derivation of the SPH equations has been obtained.

  1. An implicit Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic code

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Charles E.

    2000-05-01

    An implicit version of the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) code SPHINX has been written and is working. In conjunction with the SPHINX code the new implicit code models fluids and solids under a wide range of conditions. SPH codes are Lagrangian, meshless and use particles to model the fluids and solids. The implicit code makes use of the Krylov iterative techniques for solving large linear-systems and a Newton-Raphson method for non-linear corrections. It uses numerical derivatives to construct the Jacobian matrix. It uses sparse techniques to save on memory storage and to reduce the amount of computation. It is believed that this is the first implicit SPH code to use Newton-Krylov techniques, and is also the first implicit SPH code to model solids. A description of SPH and the techniques used in the implicit code are presented. Then, the results of a number of tests cases are discussed, which include a shock tube problem, a Rayleigh-Taylor problem, a breaking dam problem, and a single jet of gas problem. The results are shown to be in very good agreement with analytic solutions, experimental results, and the explicit SPHINX code. In the case of the single jet of gas case it has been demonstrated that the implicit code can do a problem in much shorter time than the explicit code. The problem was, however, very unphysical, but it does demonstrate the potential of the implicit code. It is a first step toward a useful implicit SPH code.

  2. An investigation of particles suspension using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazouki, Arman; Negrut, Dan

    2013-11-01

    This contribution outlines a method for the direct numerical simulation of rigid body suspensions in a Lagrangian-Lagrangian framework using extended Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (XSPH) method. The dynamics of the arbitrarily shaped rigid bodies is fully resolved via Boundary Condition Enforcing (BCE) markers and updated according to the general Newton-Euler equations of motion. The simulation tool, refered to herien as Chrono::Fluid, relies on a parallel implementation that runs on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards. The simulation results obtained for transient Poiseuille flow, migration of cylinder and sphere in Poiseuille flow, and distribution of particles at different cross sections of the laminar flow of dilute suspension were respectively within 0.1%, 1%, and 5% confidence interval of analytical and experimental results reported in the literature. It was shown that at low Reynolds number, Re = O(1), the radial migration (a) behaves non-monotonically as the particles relative distance (distance over diameter) increases from zero to two; and (b) decreases as the particle skewness and size increases. The scaling of Chrono::Fluid was demonstrated in conjunction with a suspension dynamics analysis in which the number of ellipsoids went up to 3e4. Financial support was provided in part by National Science Foundation grant NSF CMMI-084044.

  3. Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    1993-08-01

    Gingold, Lucy, and Monaghan invented a grid-free version of continuum mechanics ``smoothed-particle hydrodynamics,`` in 1977. It is a likely contributor to ``hybrid`` simulations combining atomistic and continuum simulations. We describe applications of this particle-based continuum technique from the closely-related standpoint of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. We compare chaotic Lyapunov spectra for atomistic solids and fluids with those which characterize a two-dimensional smoothed-particle fluid system.

  4. Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, W. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    1993-08-01

    Gingold, Lucy, and Monaghan invented a grid-free version of continuum mechanics 'smoothed-particle hydrodynamics,' in 1977. It is a likely contributor to 'hybrid' simulations combining atomistic and continuum simulations. We describe applications of this particle-based continuum technique from the closely-related standpoint of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. We compare chaotic Lyapunov spectra for atomistic solids and fluids with those which characterize a two-dimensional smoothed-particle fluid system.

  5. Image segmentation on adaptive edge-preserving smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kun; Wang, Dan; Zheng, Xiuqing

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, typical active contour models are widely applied in image segmentation. However, they perform badly on real images with inhomogeneous subregions. In order to overcome the drawback, this paper proposes an edge-preserving smoothing image segmentation algorithm. At first, this paper analyzes the edge-preserving smoothing conditions for image segmentation and constructs an edge-preserving smoothing model inspired by total variation. The proposed model has the ability to smooth inhomogeneous subregions and preserve edges. Then, a kind of clustering algorithm, which reasonably trades off edge-preserving and subregion-smoothing according to the local information, is employed to learn the edge-preserving parameter adaptively. At last, according to the confidence level of segmentation subregions, this paper constructs a smoothing convergence condition to avoid oversmoothing. Experiments indicate that the proposed algorithm has superior performance in precision, recall, and F-measure compared with other segmentation algorithms, and it is insensitive to noise and inhomogeneous-regions.

  6. Cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations: the entropy equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2002-07-01

    We discuss differences in simulation results that arise between the use of either the thermal energy or the entropy as an independent variable in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In this context, we derive a new version of SPH that, when appropriate, manifestly conserves both energy and entropy if smoothing lengths are allowed to adapt freely to the local mass resolution. To test various formulations of SPH, we consider point-like energy injection, as in certain models of supernova feedback, and find that powerful explosions are well represented by SPH even when the energy is deposited into a single particle, provided that the entropy equation is integrated. If the thermal energy is instead used as an independent variable, unphysical solutions can be obtained for this problem. We also examine the radiative cooling of gas spheres that collapse and virialize in isolation, and of haloes that form in cosmological simulations of structure formation. When applied to these problems, the thermal energy version of SPH leads to substantial overcooling in haloes that are resolved with up to a few thousand particles, while the entropy formulation is biased only moderately low for these haloes under the same circumstances. For objects resolved with much larger particle numbers, the two approaches yield consistent results. We trace the origin of the differences to systematic resolution effects in the outer parts of cooling flows. When the thermal energy equation is integrated and the resolution is low, the compressional heating of the gas in the inflow region is underestimated, violating entropy conservation and improperly accelerating cooling. The cumulative effect of this overcooling can be significant. In cosmological simulations of moderate size, we find that the fraction of baryons which cool and condense can be reduced by up to a factor ~2 if the entropy equation is employed rather than the thermal energy equation, partly explaining discrepancies with semi

  7. Consistent scaling of thermal fluctuations in smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Ellero, Marco; Español, Pep

    2009-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as a model of fluid particles suffers from the problem that it has no physical scale associated with the particles. Therefore, a DPD simulation requires an ambiguous fine-tuning of the model parameters with the physical parameters. A corrected version of DPD that does not suffer from this problem is smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)]. SDPD is, in fact, a version of the well-known smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, albeit with the proper inclusion of thermal fluctuations. Here, we show that SDPD produces the proper scaling of the fluctuations as the resolution of the simulation is varied. This is investigated in two problems: the Brownian motion of a spherical colloidal particle and a polymer molecule in suspension.

  8. Consistent scaling of thermal fluctuations in smoothed dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Ellero, Marco; Español, Pep

    2009-01-21

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as a model of fluid particles suffers from the problem that it has no physical scale associated with the particles. Therefore, a DPD simulation requires an ambiguous fine-tuning of the model parameters with the physical parameters. A corrected version of DPD that does not suffer from this problem is smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Espanol and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)]. SDPD is, in fact, a version of the well-known smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, albeit with the proper inclusion of thermal fluctuations. Here, we show that SDPD produces the proper scaling of the fluctuations as the resolution of the simulation is varied. This is investigated in two problems: the Brownian motion of a spherical colloidal particle and a polymer molecule in suspension.

  9. Modeling Water Waves with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Robert A. Dalrymple Dept of Civil Engineering The Johns Hopkins University 3400 North Charles Street Baltimore, MD 21218 hone: (410) 516...TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) The Johns Hopkins University,Dept of Civil Engineering,3400 North...Computational Physics, 229, 3652-3663. Monaghan , J.J. and Kajtar, J.B., 2009, SPH Particle Boundary Forces for Arbitrary Boundaries, Computer Physics

  10. Likelihood Methods for Adaptive Filtering and Smoothing. Technical Report #455.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Ronald W.

    The dynamic linear model or Kalman filtering model provides a useful methodology for predicting the past, present, and future states of a dynamic system, such as an object in motion or an economic or social indicator that is changing systematically with time. Recursive likelihood methods for adaptive Kalman filtering and smoothing are developed.…

  11. An adaptive filter for smoothing noisy radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.; Stiles, J. A.; Shanmugam, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.; Smith, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    A spatial domain adaptive Wiener filter for smoothing radar images corrupted by multiplicative noise is presented. The filter is optimum in a minimum mean squared error sense, computationally efficient, and preserves edges in the image better than other filters. The proposed algorithm can also be used for processing optical images with illumination variations that have a multiplicative effect.

  12. A Numerical Analysis of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    dx at ’ atI- /L:{(x,t)uh(x,t)[•o - 1008 dld = -J O(x,O)uh(x,O)dx - or0 t(Jx,t)uh(xt)dtdx = -L (x,O)uh(x,O)dx - J 00 t(X,t)uh(xt)dxdt. (5.13) O0 O0...approach h3 ). Second, the 6-20 higher order kernels have more elaborate shapes than standard kernels. But unless enough particles are used to take advantage...and use the normalization of W to obtain f ’(uo) = nf ’(u) W(Uo - u, h) du f’(x + u,) W(-x, h) dx = W(-z,h) [f’(uo) + x f"(uo) + - dx 7-18 = f’(uo) j W

  13. A switch to reduce resistivity in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricco, Terrence S.; Price, Daniel J.

    2013-12-01

    Artificial resistivity is included in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamic simulations to capture shocks and discontinuities in the magnetic field. Here, we present a new method for adapting the strength of the applied resistivity so that shocks are captured but the dissipation of the magnetic field away from shocks is minimized. Our scheme utilizes the gradient of the magnetic field as a shock indicator, setting αB = h | ∇ B | / | B |, such that resistivity is switched on only where strong discontinuities are present. The advantage to this approach is that the resistivity parameter does not depend on the absolute field strength. The new switch is benchmarked on a series of shocktube tests demonstrating its ability to capture shocks correctly. It is compared against a previous switch proposed by Price & Monaghan, showing that it leads to lower dissipation of the field, and in particular, that it succeeds at capturing shocks in the regime where the Alfvén speed is much less than the sound speed (i.e. when the magnetic field is very weak). It is also simpler. We also demonstrate that our recent constrained divergence cleaning algorithm has no difficulty with shocktube tests, in contrast to other implementations.

  14. Launch Environment Water Flow Simulations Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Berg, Jared J.; Harris, Michael F.; Crespo, Alejandro C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the water flow from the rainbird nozzle system used in the sound suppression system during pad abort and nominal launch. The simulations help determine if water from rainbird nozzles will impinge on the rocket nozzles and other sensitive ground support elements.

  15. Water Flow Simulation using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Berg, Jared; Harris, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of water flow from the rainbird nozzles has been accomplished using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The advantage of using SPH is that no meshing is required, thus the grid quality is no longer an issue and accuracy can be improved.

  16. Smoothed Profile Method to Simulate Colloidal Particles in Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Nakayama, Yasuya; Kim, Kang

    A new direct numerical simulation scheme, called "Smoothed Profile (SP) method," is presented. The SP method, as a direct numerical simulation of particulate flow, provides a way to couple continuum fluid dynamics with rigid-body dynamics through smoothed profile of colloidal particle. Our formulation includes extensions to colloids in multicomponent solvents such as charged colloids in electrolyte solutions. This method enables us to compute the time evolutions of colloidal particles, ions, and host fluids simultaneously by solving Newton, advection-diffusion, and Navier-Stokes equations so that the electro-hydrodynamic couplings can be fully taken into account. The electrophoretic mobilities of charged spherical particles are calculated in several situations. The comparisons with approximation theories show quantitative agreements for dilute dispersions without any empirical parameters.

  17. Rapid Structured Volume Grid Smoothing and Adaption Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    A rapid, structured volume grid smoothing and adaption technique, based on signal processing methods, was developed and applied to the Shuttle Orbiter at hypervelocity flight conditions in support of the Columbia Accident Investigation. Because of the fast pace of the investigation, computational aerothermodynamicists, applying hypersonic viscous flow solving computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes, refined and enhanced a grid for an undamaged baseline vehicle to assess a variety of damage scenarios. Of the many methods available to modify a structured grid, most are time-consuming and require significant user interaction. By casting the grid data into different coordinate systems, specifically two computational coordinates with arclength as the third coordinate, signal processing methods are used for filtering the data [Taubin, CG v/29 1995]. Using a reverse transformation, the processed data are used to smooth the Cartesian coordinates of the structured grids. By coupling the signal processing method with existing grid operations within the Volume Grid Manipulator tool, problems related to grid smoothing are solved efficiently and with minimal user interaction. Examples of these smoothing operations are illustrated for reductions in grid stretching and volume grid adaptation. In each of these examples, other techniques existed at the time of the Columbia accident, but the incorporation of signal processing techniques reduced the time to perform the corrections by nearly 60%. This reduction in time to perform the corrections therefore enabled the assessment of approximately twice the number of damage scenarios than previously possible during the allocated investigation time.

  18. Rapid Structured Volume Grid Smoothing and Adaption Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, structured volume grid smoothing and adaption technique, based on signal processing methods, was developed and applied to the Shuttle Orbiter at hypervelocity flight conditions in support of the Columbia Accident Investigation. Because of the fast pace of the investigation, computational aerothermodynamicists, applying hypersonic viscous flow solving computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes, refined and enhanced a grid for an undamaged baseline vehicle to assess a variety of damage scenarios. Of the many methods available to modify a structured grid, most are time-consuming and require significant user interaction. By casting the grid data into different coordinate systems, specifically two computational coordinates with arclength as the third coordinate, signal processing methods are used for filtering the data [Taubin, CG v/29 1995]. Using a reverse transformation, the processed data are used to smooth the Cartesian coordinates of the structured grids. By coupling the signal processing method with existing grid operations within the Volume Grid Manipulator tool, problems related to grid smoothing are solved efficiently and with minimal user interaction. Examples of these smoothing operations are illustrated for reduction in grid stretching and volume grid adaptation. In each of these examples, other techniques existed at the time of the Columbia accident, but the incorporation of signal processing techniques reduced the time to perform the corrections by nearly 60%. This reduction in time to perform the corrections therefore enabled the assessment of approximately twice the number of damage scenarios than previously possible during the allocated investigation time.

  19. A method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics using spheroidal kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulbright, Michael S.; Benz, Willy; Davies, Melvyn B.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) designed to model systems dominated by deformation along a preferential axis. These systems cause severe problems for SPH codes using spherical kernels, which are best suited for modeling systems which retain rough spherical symmetry. Our method allows the smoothing length in the direction of the deformation to evolve independently of the smoothing length in the perpendicular plane, resulting in a kernel with a spheroidal shape. As a result the spatial resolution in the direction of deformation is significantly improved. As a test case we present the one-dimensional homologous collapse of a zero-temperature, uniform-density cloud, which serves to demonstrate the advantages of spheroidal kernels. We also present new results on the problem of the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

  20. Liquid drops and surface tension with smoothed particle applied mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, S.; Posch, H. A.

    2000-10-01

    Smoothed particle applied mechanics (SPAM), also referred to as smoothed particle hydrodynamics, is a Lagrangian particle method for the simulation of continuous flows. Here we apply it to the formation of a liquid drop, surrounded by its vapor, for a van der Waals (vdW) fluid in two dimensions. The cohesive pressure of the vdW equation of state gives rise to an attractive, central force between the particles with an interaction range which is assumed to exceed the interaction range of all the other smoothed forces in the SPAM equations of motion. With this assumption, stable drops are formed, and the vdW phase diagram is well reproduced by the simulations. Below the critical temperature, the surface tension for equilibrated drops may be computed from the pressure excess in their centers. It agrees very well with the surface tension independently determined from the vibrational frequency of weakly excited drops. We also study strongly deformed drops performing large-amplitude oscillations, which are reminiscent of the oscillations of a large ball of water under microgravity conditions. In an appendix we comment on the limitations of SPAM by studying the violation of angular momentum conservation, which is a consequence of noncentral forces contributed by the full Newtonian viscous stress tensor.

  1. General Relativistic Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code developments: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Joshua; Silberman, Zachary; Rizzo, Monica

    2017-01-01

    We report on our progress in developing a new general relativistic Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code, which will be appropriate for studying the properties of accretion disks around black holes as well as compact object binary mergers and their ejecta. We will discuss in turn the relativistic formalisms being used to handle the evolution, our techniques for dealing with conservative and primitive variables, as well as those used to ensure proper conservation of various physical quantities. Code tests and performance metrics will be discussed, as will the prospects for including smoothed particle hydrodynamics codes within other numerical relativity codebases, particularly the publicly available Einstein Toolkit. We acknowledge support from NSF award ACI-1550436 and an internal RIT D-RIG grant.

  2. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics method from a large eddy simulation perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mascio, A.; Antuono, M.; Colagrossi, A.; Marrone, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, often used for the modelling of the Navier-Stokes equations by a meshless Lagrangian approach, is revisited from the point of view of Large Eddy Simulation (LES). To this aim, the LES filtering procedure is recast in a Lagrangian framework by defining a filter that moves with the positions of the fluid particles at the filtered velocity. It is shown that the SPH smoothing procedure can be reinterpreted as a sort of LES Lagrangian filtering, and that, besides the terms coming from the LES convolution, additional contributions (never accounted for in the SPH literature) appear in the equations when formulated in a filtered fashion. Appropriate closure formulas are derived for the additional terms and a preliminary numerical test is provided to show the main features of the proposed LES-SPH model.

  3. Smoothed Particle Inference Analysis of SNR RCW 103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Dwarkadas, Vikram

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of applying a novel analysis method, Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI), to an XMM-Newton observation of SNR RCW 103. SPI is a Bayesian modeling process that fits a population of gas blobs ("smoothed particles") such that their superposed emission reproduces the observed spatial and spectral distribution of photons. Emission-weighted distributions of plasma properties, such as abundances and temperatures, are then extracted from the properties of the individual blobs. This technique has important advantages over analysis techniques which implicitly assume that remnants are two-dimensional objects in which each line of sight encompasses a single plasma. By contrast, SPI allows superposition of as many blobs of plasma as are needed to match the spectrum observed in each direction, without the need to bin the data spatially. This RCW 103 analysis is part of a pilot study for the larger SPIES (Smoothed Particle Inference Exploration of SNRs) project, in which SPI will be applied to a sample of 12 bright SNRs.

  4. Numerical simulations of glass impacts using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, we have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. We have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, we did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  5. Light diffraction by a particle on an optically smooth surface.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B R

    1997-01-01

    The differential cross section for radiation scattered by a particle that is large compared to the wavelength, and resting on an optically smooth surface, is characterized by an intense, narrow peak in the direction of the reflected beam. This peak is shown to be due mainly to Fraunhofer diffraction by the overlapping projections of the particle and its image on a plane perpendicular to the reflected beam. Results calculated with this simple diffraction theory are compared with accurate results calculated by the multipole expansion method. Simple analytic formulas are derived that characterize the width and height of the central diffraction peak.

  6. An immersed boundary method for smoothed particle hydrodynamics of self-propelled swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieber, S. E.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2008-10-01

    We present a novel particle method, combining remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics with Immersed Boundary and Level Set techniques for the simulation of flows past complex deforming geometries. The present method retains the Lagrangian adaptivity of particle methods and relies on the remeshing of particle locations in order to ensure the accuracy of the method. In fact this remeshing step enables the introduction of Immersed Boundary Techniques used in grid based methods. The method is applied to simulations of flows of isothermal and compressible fluids past steady and unsteady solid boundaries that are described using a particle Level Set formulation. The method is validated with two and three-dimensional benchmark problems of flows past cylinders and spheres and it is shown to be well suited to simulations of large scale simulations using tens of millions of particles, on flow-structure interaction problems as they pertain to self-propelled anguilliform swimmers.

  7. Adaptive Acceleration of Visually Evoked Smooth Eye Movements in Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The optokinetic response (OKR) consists of smooth eye movements following global motion of the visual surround, which suppress image slip on the retina for visual acuity. The effective performance of the OKR is limited to rather slow and low-frequency visual stimuli, although it can be adaptably improved by cerebellum-dependent mechanisms. To better understand circuit mechanisms constraining OKR performance, we monitored how distinct kinematic features of the OKR change over the course of OKR adaptation, and found that eye acceleration at stimulus onset primarily limited OKR performance but could be dramatically potentiated by visual experience. Eye acceleration in the temporal-to-nasal direction depended more on the ipsilateral floccular complex of the cerebellum than did that in the nasal-to-temporal direction. Gaze-holding following the OKR was also modified in parallel with eye-acceleration potentiation. Optogenetic manipulation revealed that synchronous excitation and inhibition of floccular complex Purkinje cells could effectively accelerate eye movements in the nasotemporal and temporonasal directions, respectively. These results collectively delineate multiple motor pathways subserving distinct aspects of the OKR in mice and constrain hypotheses regarding cellular mechanisms of the cerebellum-dependent tuning of movement acceleration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although visually evoked smooth eye movements, known as the optokinetic response (OKR), have been studied in various species for decades, circuit mechanisms of oculomotor control and adaptation remain elusive. In the present study, we assessed kinematics of the mouse OKR through the course of adaptation training. Our analyses revealed that eye acceleration at visual-stimulus onset primarily limited working velocity and frequency range of the OKR, yet could be dramatically potentiated during OKR adaptation. Potentiation of eye acceleration exhibited different properties between the nasotemporal and

  8. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-02-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales.

  9. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2015-05-21

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we develop a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena of associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture of the void probability and solvation free energy of apolar particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for a understanding emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  10. Pattern recognition issues on anisotropic smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira Marinho, Eraldo

    2014-03-01

    This is a preliminary theoretical discussion on the computational requirements of the state of the art smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) from the optics of pattern recognition and artificial intelligence. It is pointed out in the present paper that, when including anisotropy detection to improve resolution on shock layer, SPH is a very peculiar case of unsupervised machine learning. On the other hand, the free particle nature of SPH opens an opportunity for artificial intelligence to study particles as agents acting in a collaborative framework in which the timed outcomes of a fluid simulation forms a large knowledge base, which might be very attractive in computational astrophysics phenomenological problems like self-propagating star formation.

  11. Visual enhancement of unmixed multispectral imagery using adaptive smoothing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, G.P.; Rahman, Z.-U.; Schowengerdt, R.A.; Reichenbach, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Adaptive smoothing (AS) has been previously proposed as a method to smooth uniform regions of an image, retain contrast edges, and enhance edge boundaries. The method is an implementation of the anisotropic diffusion process which results in a gray scale image. This paper discusses modifications to the AS method for application to multi-band data which results in a color segmented image. The process was used to visually enhance the three most distinct abundance fraction images produced by the Lagrange constraint neural network learning-based unmixing of Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus multispectral sensor data. A mutual information-based method was applied to select the three most distinct fraction images for subsequent visualization as a red, green, and blue composite. A reported image restoration technique (partial restoration) was applied to the multispectral data to reduce unmixing error, although evaluation of the performance of this technique was beyond the scope of this paper. The modified smoothing process resulted in a color segmented image with homogeneous regions separated by sharpened, coregistered multiband edges. There was improved class separation with the segmented image, which has importance to subsequent operations involving data classification.

  12. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for polymer molecules in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinov, Sergey; Ellero, Marco; Hu, Xiangyu; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2008-06-01

    We present a model for a polymer molecule in solution based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [Español and Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)]. This method is a thermodynamically consistent version of smoothed particle hydrodynamics able to discretize the Navier-Stokes equations and, at the same time, to incorporate thermal fluctuations according to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Within the framework of the method developed for mesoscopic multiphase flows by Hu and Adams [J. Comput. Phys. 213, 844 (2006)], we introduce additional finitely extendable nonlinear elastic interactions between particles that represent the beads of a polymer chain. In order to assess the accuracy of the technique, we analyze the static and dynamic conformational properties of the modeled polymer molecule in solution. Extensive tests of the method for the two-dimensional (2D) case are performed, showing good agreement with the analytical theory. Finally, the effect of confinement on the conformational properties of the polymer molecule is investigated by considering a 2D microchannel with gap H varying between 1 and 10μm , of the same order as the polymer gyration radius. Several SDPD simulations are performed for different chain lengths corresponding to N=20-100 beads, giving a universal behavior of the gyration radius RG and polymer stretch X as functions of the channel gap when normalized properly.

  13. Numerical solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mocz, Philip; Succi, Sauro

    2015-05-01

    We formulate a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics numerical method, traditionally used for the Euler equations for fluid dynamics in the context of astrophysical simulations, to solve the nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the Madelung formulation. The probability density of the wave function is discretized into moving particles, whose properties are smoothed by a kernel function. The traditional fluid pressure is replaced by a quantum pressure tensor, for which a robust discretization is found. We demonstrate our numerical method on a variety of numerical test problems involving the simple harmonic oscillator, soliton-soliton collision, Bose-Einstein condensates, collapsing singularities, and dark matter halos governed by the Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson equation. Our method is conservative, applicable to unbounded domains, and is automatically adaptive in its resolution, making it well suited to study problems with collapsing solutions.

  14. Numerical solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocz, Philip; Succi, Sauro

    2015-05-01

    We formulate a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics numerical method, traditionally used for the Euler equations for fluid dynamics in the context of astrophysical simulations, to solve the nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the Madelung formulation. The probability density of the wave function is discretized into moving particles, whose properties are smoothed by a kernel function. The traditional fluid pressure is replaced by a quantum pressure tensor, for which a robust discretization is found. We demonstrate our numerical method on a variety of numerical test problems involving the simple harmonic oscillator, soliton-soliton collision, Bose-Einstein condensates, collapsing singularities, and dark matter halos governed by the Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson equation. Our method is conservative, applicable to unbounded domains, and is automatically adaptive in its resolution, making it well suited to study problems with collapsing solutions.

  15. Modeling electrokinetic flows by consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Parks, Michael L.

    2017-04-01

    We present a consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (I2SPH) discretization of Navier-Stokes, Poisson-Boltzmann, and advection-diffusion equations subject to Dirichlet or Robin boundary conditions. It is applied to model various two and three dimensional electrokinetic flows in simple or complex geometries. The accuracy and convergence of the consistent I2SPH are examined via comparison with analytical solutions, grid-based numerical solutions, or empirical models. The new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in microfluidics and complex fluids with charged objects, such as colloids and biomolecules, in arbitrary complex geometries.

  16. Modeling electrokinetic flows by consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wenxiao; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; ...

    2017-01-03

    In this paper, we present a consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (I2SPH) discretization of Navier–Stokes, Poisson–Boltzmann, and advection–diffusion equations subject to Dirichlet or Robin boundary conditions. It is applied to model various two and three dimensional electrokinetic flows in simple or complex geometries. The accuracy and convergence of the consistent I2SPH are examined via comparison with analytical solutions, grid-based numerical solutions, or empirical models. Lastly, the new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in microfluidics and complex fluids with charged objects, such as colloids and biomolecules, in arbitrary complex geometries.

  17. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Kathrin Fedosov, Dmitry A. Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-15

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  18. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kathrin; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier-Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor-Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  19. Tensor classification of structure in smoothed particle hydrodynamics density fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, Duncan; Bonnell, Ian; Lucas, William; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    As hydrodynamic simulations increase in scale and resolution, identifying structures with non-trivial geometries or regions of general interest becomes increasingly challenging. There is a growing need for algorithms that identify a variety of different features in a simulation without requiring a `by eye' search. We present tensor classification as such a technique for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). These methods have already been used to great effect in N-Body cosmological simulations, which require smoothing defined as an input free parameter. We show that tensor classification successfully identifies a wide range of structures in SPH density fields using its native smoothing, removing a free parameter from the analysis and preventing the need for tessellation of the density field, as required by some classification algorithms. As examples, we show that tensor classification using the tidal tensor and the velocity shear tensor successfully identifies filaments, shells and sheet structures in giant molecular cloud simulations, as well as spiral arms in discs. The relationship between structures identified using different tensors illustrates how different forces compete and co-operate to produce the observed density field. We therefore advocate the use of multiple tensors to classify structure in SPH simulations, to shed light on the interplay of multiple physical processes.

  20. CRKSPH - A Conservative Reproducing Kernel Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontiere, Nicholas; Raskin, Cody D.; Owen, J. Michael

    2017-03-01

    We present a formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) that utilizes a first-order consistent reproducing kernel, a smoothing function that exactly interpolates linear fields with particle tracers. Previous formulations using reproducing kernel (RK) interpolation have had difficulties maintaining conservation of momentum due to the fact the RK kernels are not, in general, spatially symmetric. Here, we utilize a reformulation of the fluid equations such that mass, linear momentum, and energy are all rigorously conserved without any assumption about kernel symmetries, while additionally maintaining approximate angular momentum conservation. Our approach starts from a rigorously consistent interpolation theory, where we derive the evolution equations to enforce the appropriate conservation properties, at the sacrifice of full consistency in the momentum equation. Additionally, by exploiting the increased accuracy of the RK method's gradient, we formulate a simple limiter for the artificial viscosity that reduces the excess diffusion normally incurred by the ordinary SPH artificial viscosity. Collectively, we call our suite of modifications to the traditional SPH scheme Conservative Reproducing Kernel SPH, or CRKSPH. CRKSPH retains many benefits of traditional SPH methods (such as preserving Galilean invariance and manifest conservation of mass, momentum, and energy) while improving on many of the shortcomings of SPH, particularly the overly aggressive artificial viscosity and zeroth-order inaccuracy. We compare CRKSPH to two different modern SPH formulations (pressure based SPH and compatibly differenced SPH), demonstrating the advantages of our new formulation when modeling fluid mixing, strong shock, and adiabatic phenomena.

  1. SPHRAY: A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Ray Tracer for Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Pelupessy, Inti

    2011-03-01

    SPHRAY, a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) ray tracer, is designed to solve the 3D, time dependent, radiative transfer (RT) equations for arbitrary density fields. The SPH nature of SPHRAY makes the incorporation of separate hydrodynamics and gravity solvers very natural. SPHRAY relies on a Monte Carlo (MC) ray tracing scheme that does not interpolate the SPH particles onto a grid but instead integrates directly through the SPH kernels. Given initial conditions and a description of the sources of ionizing radiation, the code will calculate the non-equilibrium ionization state (HI, HII, HeI, HeII, HeIII, e) and temperature (internal energy/entropy) of each SPH particle. The sources of radiation can include point like objects, diffuse recombination radiation, and a background field from outside the computational volume. The MC ray tracing implementation allows for the quick introduction of new physics and is parallelization friendly. A quick Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) test taken from computer graphics applications allows for the acceleration of the raytracing component. We present the algorithms used in SPHRAY and verify the code by performing all the test problems detailed in the recent Radiative Transfer Comparison Project of Iliev et. al. The Fortran 90 source code for SPHRAY and example SPH density fields are made available online.

  2. Integral approximations to classical diffusion and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Qiang; Lehoucq, R. B.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2014-12-31

    The contribution of the paper is the approximation of a classical diffusion operator by an integral equation with a volume constraint. A particular focus is on classical diffusion problems associated with Neumann boundary conditions. By exploiting this approximation, we can also approximate other quantities such as the flux out of a domain. Our analysis of the model equation on the continuum level is closely related to the recent work on nonlocal diffusion and peridynamic mechanics. In particular, we elucidate the role of a volumetric constraint as an approximation to a classical Neumann boundary condition in the presence of physical boundary. The volume-constrained integral equation then provides the basis for accurate and robust discretization methods. As a result, an immediate application is to the understanding and improvement of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method.

  3. Simulations of dolphin kick swimming using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Raymond C Z; Cleary, Paul W; Mason, Bruce R

    2012-06-01

    In competitive human swimming the submerged dolphin kick stroke (underwater undulatory swimming) is utilized after dives and turns. The optimal dolphin kick has a balance between minimizing drag and maximizing thrust while also minimizing the physical exertion required of the swimmer. In this study laser scans of athletes are used to provide realistic swimmer geometries in a single anatomical pose. These are rigged and animated to closely match side-on video footage. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) fluid simulations are performed to evaluate variants of this swimming stroke technique. This computational approach provides full temporal and spatial information about the flow moving around the deforming swimmer model. The effects of changes in ankle flexibility and stroke frequency are investigated through a parametric study. The results suggest that the net streamwise force on the swimmer is relatively insensitive to ankle flexibility but is strongly dependent on kick frequency.

  4. Integral approximations to classical diffusion and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Qiang; Lehoucq, R. B.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2014-12-31

    The contribution of the paper is the approximation of a classical diffusion operator by an integral equation with a volume constraint. A particular focus is on classical diffusion problems associated with Neumann boundary conditions. By exploiting this approximation, we can also approximate other quantities such as the flux out of a domain. Our analysis of the model equation on the continuum level is closely related to the recent work on nonlocal diffusion and peridynamic mechanics. In particular, we elucidate the role of a volumetric constraint as an approximation to a classical Neumann boundary condition in the presence of physical boundary.more » The volume-constrained integral equation then provides the basis for accurate and robust discretization methods. As a result, an immediate application is to the understanding and improvement of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method.« less

  5. Integral approximations to classical diffusion and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2015-04-01

    The contribution of the paper is the approximation of a classical diffusion operator by an integral equation with a volume constraint. A particular focus is on classical diffusion problems associated with Neumann boundary conditions. By exploiting this approximation, we can also approximate other quantities such as the flux out of a domain. Our analysis of the model equation on the continuum level is closely related to the recent work on nonlocal diffusion and peridynamic mechanics. In particular, we elucidate the role of a volumetric constraint as an approximation to a classical Neumann boundary condition in the presence of physical boundary. The volume-constrained integral equation then provides the basis for accurate and robust discretization methods. An immediate application is to the understanding and improvement of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method.

  6. Flow and Transport in Smooth and Rough Unsaturated Wide Aperture Fractures with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, J.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Geyer, T.

    2014-12-01

    Unsaturated flow in fractured porous media exhibits highly complex flow dynamics and a wide range of intermittent flow processes. Especially in wide aperture fractures, flow processes may be dominated by gravitational instead of capillary forces leading to a deviation from the classical volume effective approaches (Richard's equation, Van Genuchten type relationships). The existence of various flow modes such as droplets, rivulets, turbulent and adsorbed films is well known, however, their spatial and temporal distribution within fracture networks is still an open question partially due to the lack of appropriate modeling tools. With our work we want to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying flow and transport dynamics in unsaturated fractured media in order to support the development of more refined upscaled methods, applicable on catchment scales. We present pore- and fracture-scale flow simulations obtained with a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The model allows to simulate free-surface flow dynamics including the effect of surface tension for a wide range of wetting conditions. Several empirical and semi-analytical solutions are used to verify the model. We show that our results satisfy the empirical scaling laws for droplet velocity and critical contact angle. Due to the efficient generation of surface tension via particle-particle interaction forces the dynamic wetting of surfaces as well as the velocity enhancement of droplets on saturated surfaces can readily be obtained. Furthermore, we study the effect of surface roughness on droplet velocities. Lastly, we present flow and transport simulations in the presence of an adjacent porous matrix in order to investigate its influence on the fracture surface flow dynamics and transport across the matrix-fracture interface.

  7. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Petsev, Nikolai D; Leal, L Gary; Shell, M Scott

    2015-01-28

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  8. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2015-01-28

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  9. Multiscale modeling of particle in suspension with smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin; Litvinov, Sergey; Qian, Rui; Ellero, Marco; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2012-01-01

    We apply smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [Español and Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] to model solid particles in suspension. SDPD is a thermodynamically consistent version of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and can be interpreted as a multiscale particle framework linking the macroscopic SPH to the mesoscopic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. Rigid structures of arbitrary shape embedded in the fluid are modeled by frozen particles on which artificial velocities are assigned in order to satisfy exactly the no-slip boundary condition on the solid-liquid interface. The dynamics of the rigid structures is decoupled from the solvent by solving extra equations for the rigid body translational/angular velocities derived from the total drag/torque exerted by the surrounding liquid. The correct scaling of the SDPD thermal fluctuations with the fluid-particle size allows us to describe the behavior of the particle suspension on spatial scales ranging continuously from the diffusion-dominated regime typical of sub-micron-sized objects towards the non-Brownian regime characterizing macro-continuum flow conditions. Extensive tests of the method are performed for the case of two/three dimensional bulk particle-system both in Brownian/ non-Brownian environment showing numerical convergence and excellent agreement with analytical theories. Finally, to illustrate the ability of the model to couple with external boundary geometries, the effect of confinement on the diffusional properties of a single sphere within a micro-channel is considered, and the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the wall-separation distance is evaluated and compared with available analytical results.

  10. Dusty gas with one fluid in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laibe, Guillaume; Price, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    In a companion paper we have shown how the equations describing gas and dust as two fluids coupled by a drag term can be re-formulated to describe the system as a single-fluid mixture. Here, we present a numerical implementation of the one-fluid dusty gas algorithm using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The algorithm preserves the conservation properties of the SPH formalism. In particular, the total gas and dust mass, momentum, angular momentum and energy are all exactly conserved. Shock viscosity and conductivity terms are generalized to handle the two-phase mixture accordingly. The algorithm is benchmarked against a comprehensive suit of problems: DUSTYBOX, DUSTYWAVE, DUSTYSHOCK and DUSTYOSCILL, each of them addressing different properties of the method. We compare the performance of the one-fluid algorithm to the standard two-fluid approach. The one-fluid algorithm is found to solve both of the fundamental limitations of the two-fluid algorithm: it is no longer possible to concentrate dust below the resolution of the gas (they have the same resolution by definition), and the spatial resolution criterion h < csts, required in two-fluid codes to avoid over-damping of kinetic energy, is unnecessary. Implicit time-stepping is straightforward. As a result, the algorithm is up to ten billion times more efficient for 3D simulations of small grains. Additional benefits include the use of half as many particles, a single kernel and fewer SPH interpolations. The only limitation is that it does not capture multi-streaming of dust in the limit of zero coupling, suggesting that in this case a hybrid approach may be required.

  11. The small-scale turbulent dynamo in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricco, T. S.; Price, D. J.; Federrath, C.

    2016-05-01

    Supersonic turbulence is believed to be at the heart of star formation. We have performed smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of the small- scale dynamo amplification of magnetic fields in supersonic turbulence. The calculations use isothermal gas driven at rms velocity of Mach 10 so that conditions are representative of starforming molecular clouds in the Milky Way. The growth of magnetic energy is followed for 10 orders in magnitude until it reaches saturation, a few percent of the kinetic energy. The results of our dynamo calculations are compared with results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and their qualitative behaviour. The simulations utilise the latest algorithmic developments we have developed, in particular, a new divergence cleaning approach to maintain the solenoidal constraint on the magnetic field and a method to reduce the numerical dissipation of the magnetic shock capturing scheme. We demonstrate that our divergence cleaning method may be used to achieve ∇ • B = 0 to machine precision, albeit at significant computational expense.

  12. Simulating Magnetized Laboratory Plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2009-01-01

    The creation of plasmas in the laboratory continues to generate excitement in the physics community. Despite the best efforts of the intrepid plasma diagnostics community, the dynamics of these plasmas remains a difficult challenge to both the theorist and the experimentalist. This dissertation describes the simulation of strongly magnetized laboratory plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a method born of astrophysics but gaining broad support in the engineering community. We describe the mathematical formulation that best characterizes a strongly magnetized plasma under our circumstances of interest, and we review the SPH method and its application to astrophysical plasmas based on research by Phillips [1], Buerve [2], and Price and Monaghan [3]. Some modifications and extensions to this method are necessary to simulate terrestrial plasmas, such as a treatment of magnetic diffusion based on work by Brookshaw [4] and by Atluri [5]; we describe these changes as we turn our attention toward laboratory experiments. Test problems that verify the method are provided throughout the discussion. Finally, we apply our method to the compression of a magnetized plasma performed by the Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment (CTIX) [6] and show that the experimental results support our computed predictions.

  13. Comparison of Particle Flow Code and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Modelling of Landslide Run outs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preh, A.; Poisel, R.; Hungr, O.

    2009-04-01

    In most continuum mechanics methods modelling the run out of landslides the moving mass is divided into a number of elements, the velocities of which can be established by numerical integration of Newtońs second law (Lagrangian solution). The methods are based on fluid mechanics modelling the movements of an equivalent fluid. In 2004, McDougall and Hungr presented a three-dimensional numerical model for rapid landslides, e.g. debris flows and rock avalanches, called DAN3D.The method is based on the previous work of Hungr (1995) and is using an integrated two-dimensional Lagrangian solution and meshless Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) principle to maintain continuity. DAN3D has an open rheological kernel, allowing the use of frictional (with constant porepressure ratio) and Voellmy rheologies and gives the possibility to change material rheology along the path. Discontinuum (granular) mechanics methods model the run out mass as an assembly of particles moving down a surface. Each particle is followed exactly as it moves and interacts with the surface and with its neighbours. Every particle is checked on contacts with every other particle in every time step using a special cell-logic for contact detection in order to reduce the computational effort. The Discrete Element code PFC3D was adapted in order to make possible discontinuum mechanics models of run outs. Punta Thurwieser Rock Avalanche and Frank Slide were modelled by DAN as well as by PFC3D. The simulations showed correspondingly that the parameters necessary to get results coinciding with observations in nature are completely different. The maximum velocity distributions due to DAN3D reveal that areas of different maximum flow velocity are next to each other in Punta Thurwieser run out whereas the distribution of maximum flow velocity shows almost constant maximum flow velocity over the width of the run out regarding Frank Slide. Some 30 percent of total kinetic energy is rotational kinetic energy in

  14. Explicit 3D continuum fracture modeling with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.

    1993-01-01

    Impact phenomena shaped our solar system. As usual for most solar system processes, the scales are far different than we can address directly in the laboratory. Impact velocities are often much higher than we can achieve, sizes are often vastly larger, and most impacts take place in an environment where the only gravitational force is the mutual pull of the impactors. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique has been applied in the past to the simulations of giant impacts. In these simulations, the colliding objects were so massive (at least a sizeable fraction of the Earth's mass) that material strength was negligible compared to gravity. This assumption can no longer be made when the bodies are much smaller. To this end, we have developed a 3D SPH code that includes a strength model to which we have added a von Mises yielding relation for stresses beyond the Hugoniot Elastic Limit. At the lower stresses associated with brittle failure, we use a rate-dependent strength based on the nucleation of incipient flaws whose number density is given by a Weibull distribution. Following Grady and Kipp and Melosh et al., we introduce a state variable D ('damage'), 0 less than D less than 1, which expresses the local reduction in strength due to crack growth under tensile loading. Unfortunately for the hydrodynamics, Grady and Kipp's model predicts which fragments are the most probable ones and not the ones that are really formed. This means, for example, that if a given laboratory experiment is modeled, the fragment distribution obtained from the Grady-Kipp theory would be equivalent to a ensemble average over many realizations of the experiment. On the other hand, the hydrodynamics itself is explicit and evolves not an ensemble average but very specific fragments. Hence, there is a clear incompatibility with the deterministic nature of the hydrodynamics equations and the statistical approach of the Grady-Kipp dynamical fracture model. We remedy these shortcomings

  15. Conjugate Adaptation of Smooth Pursuit during Monocular Viewing in Strabismic Monkeys with Exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Seiji; Das, Vallabh E.; Mustari, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Humans and monkeys are able to adapt their smooth pursuit output when challenged with consistent errors in foveal/parafoveal image motion during tracking. Visual motion information from the retina is known to be necessary for guiding smooth pursuit adaptation. The purpose of this study is to determine whether retinal motion signals delivered to one eye during smooth pursuit produce adaptation in the fellow eye. We tested smooth pursuit adaptation during monocular viewing in strabismic monkeys with exotropia. Methods To induce smooth pursuit adaptation experimentally, we used a step-ramp tracking with two different velocities (adaptation paradigm), where the target begins moving at one speed (25°/s) for first 100 ms and then changes to a lower speed (5°/s) for the remainder of the trial. Typically, 100 to 200 trials were used to adapt the smooth pursuit response. Control trials employing single speed step-ramp target motion (ramp speed = 25°/s) were used before and after adaptation paradigm to estimate adaptation. Results The magnitude of adaptation as calculated by percentage change was not significantly different (P = 0.53) for the viewing (mean, 40.3% ± 5.9%) and the nonviewing (mean, 39.7% ± 6.2%) eyes during monocular viewing conditions, even in cases with large angle (18°–20°) strabismus. Conclusions Our results indicate that animals with strabismus retain the ability to produce conjugate adaptation of smooth pursuit. Therefore, we suggest that a single central representation of retinal motion information in the viewing eye drives adaptation for both eyes equally. PMID:22410567

  16. Steady flow of smooth, inelastic particles on a bumpy inclined plane: hard and soft particle simulations.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anurag; Khakhar, D V

    2010-04-01

    We study smooth, slightly inelastic particles flowing under gravity on a bumpy inclined plane using event-driven and discrete-element simulations. Shallow layers (ten particle diameters) are used to enable simulation using the event-driven method within reasonable computational times. Steady flows are obtained in a narrow range of angles (13 degrees-14.5 degrees); lower angles result in stopping of the flow and higher angles in continuous acceleration. The flow is relatively dense with the solid volume fraction, nu approximately 0.5 , and significant layering of particles is observed. We derive expressions for the stress, heat flux, and dissipation for the hard and soft particle models from first principles. The computed mean velocity, temperature, stress, dissipation, and heat flux profiles of hard particles are compared to soft particle results for different values of stiffness constant (k). The value of stiffness constant for which results for hard and soft particles are identical is found to be k>or=2x10(6) mg/d, where m is the mass of a particle, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and d is the particle diameter. We compare the simulation results to constitutive relations obtained from the kinetic theory of Jenkins and Richman [J. T. Jenkins and M. W. Richman, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 87, 355 (1985)] for pressure, dissipation, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. We find that all the quantities are very well predicted by kinetic theory for volume fractions nu<0.5. At higher densities, obtained for thicker layers (H=15d and H=20d), the kinetic theory does not give accurate prediction. Deviations of the kinetic theory predictions from simulation results are relatively small for dissipation and heat flux and most significant deviations are observed for shear viscosity and pressure. The results indicate the range of applicability of soft particle simulations and kinetic theory for dense flows.

  17. Modeling rainfall-runoff processes using smoothed particle hydrodynamics with mass-varied particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsang-Jung; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Kao-Hua

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a novel treatment of adopting mass-varied particles in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is proposed to solve the shallow water equations (SWEs) and model the rainfall-runoff process. Since SWEs have depth-averaged or cross-section-averaged features, there is no sufficient dimension to add rainfall particles. Thus, SPH-SWE methods have focused on modeling discharge flows in open channels or floodplains without rainfall. With the proposed treatment, the application of SPH-SWEs can be extended to rainfall-runoff processes in watersheds. First, the numerical procedures associated with using mass-varied particles in SPH-SWEs are introduced and derived. Then, numerical validations are conducted for three benchmark problems, including uniform rainfall over a 1D flat sloping channel, nonuniform rain falling over a 1D three-slope channel with different rainfall durations, and uniform rainfall over a 2D plot with complex topography. The simulated results indicate that the proposed treatment can avoid the necessity of a source term function of mass variation, and no additional particles are needed for the increase of mass. Rainfall-runoff processes can be well captured in the presence of hydraulic jumps, dry/wet bed flows, and supercritical/subcritical/transcritical flows. The proposed treatment using mass-varied particles was proven robust and reliable for modeling rainfall-runoff processes. It can provide a new alternative for investigating practical hydrological problems.

  18. AN ADAPTIVE PARTICLE-MESH GRAVITY SOLVER FOR ENZO

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-11-01

    We describe and implement an adaptive particle-mesh algorithm to solve the Poisson equation for grid-based hydrodynamics codes with nested grids. The algorithm is implemented and extensively tested within the astrophysical code Enzo against the multigrid solver available by default. We find that while both algorithms show similar accuracy for smooth mass distributions, the adaptive particle-mesh algorithm is more accurate for the case of point masses, and is generally less noisy. We also demonstrate that the two-body problem can be solved accurately in a configuration with nested grids. In addition, we discuss the effect of subcycling, and demonstrate that evolving all the levels with the same timestep yields even greater precision.

  19. Investigating the global collapse of filaments using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2015-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of cold, uniform density, self-gravitating filaments, to investigate their longitudinal collapse time-scales; these time-scales are important because they determine the time available for a filament to fragment into cores. A filament is initially characterized by its line-mass, μO, its radius, RO (or equivalently its density ρ O= μ O/π RO^2), and its aspect ratio, AO (≡ZO/RO, where ZO is its half-length). The gas is only allowed to contract longitudinally, i.e. parallel to the symmetry axis of the filament (the z-axis). Pon et al. (2012) have considered the global dynamics of such filaments analytically. They conclude that short filaments (AO ≲ 5) collapse along the z-axis more-or-less homologously, on a time-scale tHOM ˜ 0.44 AO (GρO)-1/2; in contrast, longer filaments (AO ≳ 5) undergo end-dominated collapse, i.e. two dense clumps form at the ends of the filament and converge on the centre sweeping up mass as they go, on a time-scale t_{END} ˜ 0.98 AO^{1/2} (Gρ O)^{-1/2}. Our simulations do not corroborate these predictions. First, for all AO ≳ 2, the collapse time satisfies a single equation t_{COL}˜ (0.49+0.26AO)(Gρ O)^{-1/2}, which for large AO is much longer than the Pon et al. prediction. Secondly, for all AO ≳ 2, the collapse is end-dominated. Thirdly, before being swept up, the gas immediately ahead of an end-clump is actually accelerated outwards by the gravitational attraction of the approaching clump, resulting in a significant ram pressure. For high aspect ratio filaments, the end-clumps approach an asymptotic inward speed, due to the fact that they are doing work both accelerating and compressing the gas they sweep up. Pon et al. appear to have neglected the outward acceleration and its consequences.

  20. Contractile reactions of guinea pig airway smooth muscles in the presence of stannum oxide nanosized particles.

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Zaytseva, T N; Nosarev, A V; Agev, B G; Dyakova, E Yu; Ogorodova, L M; Magaeva, A A; Terecova, O G; Itin, V I

    2012-05-01

    Contractile reactions of the guinea pig airway smooth muscles in the presence of stannum dioxide nanosized particles were studied. Contractile reactions to cholinergic and histaminergic stimulation were potentiated by inhalations of nanoparticle aerosol and by exposure of isolated smooth muscle segments to nanoparticle suspension.

  1. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  2. Fermionic full counting statistics with smooth boundaries: From discrete particles to bosonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitri A.; Levkivskyi, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the problem of full counting statistics of particles on a segment of a one-dimensional gas of free fermions. Using a combination of analytical and numerical methods, we study the crossover between the counting of discrete particles and of the continuous particle density as a function of smoothing in the counting procedure. In the discrete-particle limit, the result is given by the Fisher-Hartwig expansion for Toeplitz determinants, while in the continuous limit we recover the bosonization results. This example of full counting statistics with smoothing is also related to orthogonality catastrophe, Fermi-edge singularity and non-equilibrium bosonization.

  3. Smoothed aggregation adaptive spectral element-based algebraic multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-20

    SAAMGE provides parallel methods for building multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for elliptic equations with highly heterogeneous coefficients. Additionally, hierarchy adaptation is implemented allowing solving multiple problems with close coefficients without rebuilding the hierarchy.

  4. An adaptive segment method for smoothing lidar signal based on noise estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuzhao; Luo, Pingping

    2014-10-01

    An adaptive segmentation smoothing method (ASSM) is introduced in the paper to smooth the signal and suppress the noise. In the ASSM, the noise is defined as the 3σ of the background signal. An integer number N is defined for finding the changing positions in the signal curve. If the difference of adjacent two points is greater than 3Nσ, the position is recorded as an end point of the smoothing segment. All the end points detected as above are recorded and the curves between them will be smoothed separately. In the traditional method, the end points of the smoothing windows in the signals are fixed. The ASSM creates changing end points in different signals and the smoothing windows could be set adaptively. The windows are always set as the half of the segmentations and then the average smoothing method will be applied in the segmentations. The Iterative process is required for reducing the end-point aberration effect in the average smoothing method and two or three times are enough. In ASSM, the signals are smoothed in the spacial area nor frequent area, that means the frequent disturbance will be avoided. A lidar echo was simulated in the experimental work. The echo was supposed to be created by a space-born lidar (e.g. CALIOP). And white Gaussian noise was added to the echo to act as the random noise resulted from environment and the detector. The novel method, ASSM, was applied to the noisy echo to filter the noise. In the test, N was set to 3 and the Iteration time is two. The results show that, the signal could be smoothed adaptively by the ASSM, but the N and the Iteration time might be optimized when the ASSM is applied in a different lidar.

  5. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic model for viscoelastic fluids with thermal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Ellero, Marco; Español, Pep

    2009-05-01

    We present a fluid-particle model for a polymer solution in nonisothermal situations. The state of the fluid particles is characterized by the thermodynamic variables and a configuration tensor that describes the underlying molecular orientation of the polymer molecules. The specification of very simple physical mechanisms inspired by the dynamics of single polymer molecules allows one, with the help of the general equation for nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) formalism, to derive the equations of motion for a set of fluid particles carrying polymer molecules in suspension. In the simplest case of Hookean dumbbells we recover a fluid-particle version of the Oldroyd-B model in which thermal fluctuations are included consistently. Generalization to more complex viscoelastic models, such as finitely extensible nonlinear elastic Peterlin (FENE-P) model, with the proper introduction of thermal fluctuations is straightforward.

  6. Molelcular dynamics, smooth particle applied mechanics and Clausius` inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.

    1996-03-01

    Recent developments in molecular dynamics furnish new interconnections among three classical fields: particle mechanics, continuum mechanics, and thermodynamics. The resulting links clarify the importance of Lyapunov instability to irreversibility.

  7. ADVANCING THE ION BEAM THIN FILM PLANARIZATION PROCESS FOR THE SMOOTHING OF SUBSTRATE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkarimi, P B; Spiller, E; Baker, S L; Robinson, J C; Stearns, D G; Liddle, J A; Salmassi, F; Liang, T; Stivers, A R

    2004-10-19

    For a number of technologies small substrate contaminants are undesirable, and for one technology in particular, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), they can be a very serious issue. We have demonstrated that the Ion Beam Thin Film Planarization Process, a coating process designed to planarize substrate asperities, can be extended to smooth {approx}70 nm and {approx}80 nm diameter particles on EUVL reticle substrates to a height of {approx}0.5 nm, which will render them noncritical in an EUVL printing process. We demonstrate this smoothing process using controlled nanoscale substrate particles and lines fabricated with an e-beam lithography process. The above smoothing process was also modified to yield an excellent reflectance/wavelength uniformity and a good EUV reflectivity for the multilayer, which is required for EUVL reticles. Cross-sectional TEM on a smoothed substrate line defect shows excellent agreement with results obtained from our multilayer growth model.

  8. Neumann and Robin boundary conditions for heat conduction modeling using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili Sikarudi, M. A.; Nikseresht, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics is a robust Lagrangian particle method which is widely used in various applications, from astrophysics to hydrodynamics and heat conduction. It has intrinsic capabilities for simulating large deformation, composites, multiphysics events, and multiphase fluid flows. It is vital to use reliable boundary conditions when boundary value problems like heat conduction or Poisson equation for incompressible flows are solved. Since smoothed particle hydrodynamics is not a boundary fitted grids method, implementation of boundary conditions can be problematic. Many methods have been proposed for enhancing the accuracy of implementation of boundary conditions. In the present study a new approach for facilitating the implementation of Robin and Neumann boundary conditions is proposed and proven to give accurate results. Also there is no need to use complicated preprocessing as in virtual particle method. The new method is compared to an equivalent one dimensional moving least square scheme and it is shown that the present method is less sensitive to particle disorder.

  9. Adaptive quantization-parameter clip scheme for smooth quality in H.264/AVC.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sudeng; Wang, Hanli; Kwong, Sam

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the issues over the smooth quality and the smooth bit rate during rate control (RC) in H.264/AVC. An adaptive quantization-parameter (Q(p)) clip scheme is proposed to optimize the quality smoothness while keeping the bit-rate fluctuation at an acceptable level. First, the frame complexity variation is studied by defining a complexity ratio between two nearby frames. Second, the range of the generated bits is analyzed to prevent the encoder buffer from overflow and underflow. Third, based on the safe range of the generated bits, an optimal Q(p) clip range is developed to reduce the quality fluctuation. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed Q(p) clip scheme can achieve excellent performance in quality smoothness and buffer regulation.

  10. Smooth muscle adaptation and recovery of contractility after massive small bowel resection in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Wen, Jie; Cai, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that massive small bowel resection (mSBR) compromises the normal intestinal processes of digestion and absorption, and requires an adaptive response to regain full function and reinstate coordinated contractile activity of the circular smooth muscle. This study was designed to investigate spontaneous contractile activity of circular smooth muscle using the mSBR rat model and to determine the functional role of M(2) and M(3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in this process. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent an 80% proximal SBR or sham operation. Markers of adaptation, including villus and microvillus height, were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy. Contractility was measured by attaching the distal ileum strips to strain gauge transducers and exposing the tissue to varying doses of the cholinergic agonist carbachol. Protein expressions of M(2)- and M(3)-mAChR in intestinal smooth muscle (ISM) were detected by Western blot. Following mSBR, the ISM showed perturbed spontaneous rhythmic contraction, irregular amplitude and slow frequency by muscle strip test. However, by two weeks after mSBR, the contractile function of circular smooth muscle was found to have returned to normal levels. Protein expression of M(2)-mAChR was down-regulated following mSBR but up-regulated during the adaptive process when contractile activity of circular smooth muscle was regained. These results indicate that smooth muscle contractility was spontaneously restored in rats following mSBR, and involved the acetylcholine receptors M(2) and M(3). Thus, the disrupted contractile response of smooth muscle in short bowel syndrome may be corrected by therapeutic intervention to restore the expressions of M(2)- and M(3)-mAChR to pre-mSBR levels.

  11. Deformation of Soft Tissue and Force Feedback Using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Ruiyi; Li, Yunhua; Song, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    We study the deformation and haptic feedback of soft tissue in virtual surgery based on a liver model by using a force feedback device named PHANTOM OMNI developed by SensAble Company in USA. Although a significant amount of research efforts have been dedicated to simulating the behaviors of soft tissue and implementing force feedback, it is still a challenging problem. This paper introduces a kind of meshfree method for deformation simulation of soft tissue and force computation based on viscoelastic mechanical model and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). Firstly, viscoelastic model can present the mechanical characteristics of soft tissue which greatly promotes the realism. Secondly, SPH has features of meshless technique and self-adaption, which supply higher precision than methods based on meshes for force feedback computation. Finally, a SPH method based on dynamic interaction area is proposed to improve the real time performance of simulation. The results reveal that SPH methodology is suitable for simulating soft tissue deformation and force feedback calculation, and SPH based on dynamic local interaction area has a higher computational efficiency significantly compared with usual SPH. Our algorithm has a bright prospect in the area of virtual surgery. PMID:26417380

  12. Deformation of Soft Tissue and Force Feedback Using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Ruiyi; Li, Yunhua; Song, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    We study the deformation and haptic feedback of soft tissue in virtual surgery based on a liver model by using a force feedback device named PHANTOM OMNI developed by SensAble Company in USA. Although a significant amount of research efforts have been dedicated to simulating the behaviors of soft tissue and implementing force feedback, it is still a challenging problem. This paper introduces a kind of meshfree method for deformation simulation of soft tissue and force computation based on viscoelastic mechanical model and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). Firstly, viscoelastic model can present the mechanical characteristics of soft tissue which greatly promotes the realism. Secondly, SPH has features of meshless technique and self-adaption, which supply higher precision than methods based on meshes for force feedback computation. Finally, a SPH method based on dynamic interaction area is proposed to improve the real time performance of simulation. The results reveal that SPH methodology is suitable for simulating soft tissue deformation and force feedback calculation, and SPH based on dynamic local interaction area has a higher computational efficiency significantly compared with usual SPH. Our algorithm has a bright prospect in the area of virtual surgery.

  13. Smooth particle hydrodynamics: theory and application to the origin of the moon

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, W.

    1986-01-01

    The origin of the moon is modeled by the so-called smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method (Lucy, 1977, Monaghan 1985) which substitutes to the fluid a finite set of extended particles, the hydrodynamics equations reduce to the equation of motion of individual particles. These equations of motion differ only from the standard gravitational N-body problem insofar that pressure gradients and viscosity terms have to be added to the gradient of the potential to derive the forces between the particles. The numerical tools developed for ''classical'' N-body problems can therefore be readily applied to solve 3 dimensional hydroynamical problems. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Remeshed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of the mechanical behavior of human organs.

    PubMed

    Hieber, Simone E; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-01-01

    In computer aided surgery the accurate simulation of the mechanical behavior of human organs is essential for the development of surgical simulators. In this paper we introduce particle based simulations of two different human organ materials modeled as linear viscoelastic solids. The constitutive equations for the material behavior are discretized using a particle approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method while the body surface is tracked using level sets. A key aspect of this approach is its flexibility which allows the simulation of complex time varying topologies with large deformations. The accuracy of the original formulation is significantly enhanced by using a particle reinitialization technique resulting in remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (rSPH). The mechanical parameters of the systems used in the simulations are derived from experimental measurements on human cadaver organs. We compare the mechanical behavior of liver- and kidney-like materials based on the dynamic simulations of a tensile test case. Moreover, we present a particle based reconstruction of the liver topology and its strain distribution under a small local load. Finally, we demonstrate a unified formulation of fluid structure interaction based on particle methods.

  15. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (T(s)≈0.96) is close to the theoretically derived value of T(s)=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  16. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (Ts≈0.96 ) is close to the theoretically derived value of Ts=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  17. On the dynamics of nonlinear, unsteady landslide flow within the smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvostova, O.; Averbukh, E.

    2012-04-01

    In the present study the idea of landslide modeling by particle method is described. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics was invented in 1977 by Leon Lucy and independently by Bob Gingold and Joe Monaghan [1]. It was used for astrophysics phenomena's simulation. Later it was adapted for hydrodynamics, gas dynamics and solid body problems. Landslides can be caused by the influence of different factors. Landslides occur when the angle of inclination of the slope of the slope or if the slope is burdened with loose material. A landslide flow is a thin homogeneous layer of nearly incompressible fluid. It is considered that at the initial moment shifted part of a ground mass is splitting and turning into liquid of several layers which then is streaming down along the slope. The landslide flow motion is described with the Navie-Stocks set of equations: D→u-= - 1\\upsidedownBigTriangle P + μ \\upsidedownBigTriangle →u + g Dt ρ (1) D-ρ = 0, Dt (2) where u is velocity vector, t is time, ρ is a flow density, P is a pressure, μ is a viscosity coefficient, g is gravity. Continuum discretization by finite number of lagrangian particles is the main idea of SPH [2,3]. Particles moves with the flow and arbitrary connectivity is allowed. Therefore, SPH does not need a grid to calculate spatial derivatives. For any field A(r), involved in equation (1), e.g. pressure, density, viscosity etc., we consider an approximation with a finite function: A(r) = ∫ω A (r')W (r- r',h)dr' (3) where A is a desired field, r is a radius-vector, W is an interpolating kernel. The free boundary condition problem is discussed. Finding the particles on a free surface is described. Also the surface tension force defining is shown. Described method is implemented and mathematical modeling of landslide flows motion along slope is simulated. Different types of slopes are considered: with constant and variable steepness, long and wide. Wave-breaking effects near the wall are shown. Findings are analyzed

  18. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model (PF-SPH) and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the accuracy of the model under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, to demonstrate the capabilities and robustness of the model we use it to simulate flow of three fluids in a porous material.

  19. A Novel Method for Modeling Neumann and Robin Boundary Conditions in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Amon, Cristina

    2010-08-26

    In this paper we present an improved method for handling Neumann or Robin boundary conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The Neumann and Robin boundary conditions are common to many physical problems (such as heat/mass transfer), and can prove challenging to model in volumetric modeling techniques such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). A new SPH method for diffusion type equations subject to Neumann or Robin boundary conditions is proposed. The new method is based on the continuum surface force model [1] and allows an efficient implementation of the Neumann and Robin boundary conditions in the SPH method for geometrically complex boundaries. The paper discusses the details of the method and the criteria needed to apply the model. The model is used to simulate diffusion and surface reactions and its accuracy is demonstrated through test cases for boundary conditions describing different surface reactions.

  20. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) model and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the model's accuracy under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, we use the Pf-SPH model to simulate three phase flow in a porous medium.

  1. High-order Eulerian incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics with transition to Lagrangian free-surface motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, S. J.; Stansby, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    The incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) method is derived in Eulerian form with high-order smoothing kernels to provide increased accuracy for a range of steady and transient internal flows. Periodic transient flows, in particular, demonstrate high-order convergence and accuracies approaching, for example, spectral mesh-based methods. The improved accuracies are achieved through new high-order Gaussian kernels applied over regular particle distributions with time stepping formally up to 2nd order for transient flows. The Eulerian approach can be easily extended to model free surface flows by merging from Eulerian to Lagrangian regions in an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) fashion, and a demonstration with periodic wave propagation is presented. In the long term, it is envisaged that the method will greatly increase the accuracy and efficiency of SPH methods, while retaining the flexibility of SPH in modelling free surface and multiphase flows.

  2. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics and its applications for multiphase flow and reactive transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Trask, Nathaniel; Pan, K.; Jones, Bruce D.; Pan, Wenxiao; Williams, John R.

    2016-03-11

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a Lagrangian method based on a meshless discretization of partial differential equations. In this review, we present SPH discretization of the Navier-Stokes and Advection-Diffusion-Reaction equations, implementation of various boundary conditions, and time integration of the SPH equations, and we discuss applications of the SPH method for modeling pore-scale multiphase flows and reactive transport in porous and fractured media.

  3. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for phase separating fluid mixtures. II. Diffusion in a binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Thieulot, Cedric; Janssen, L P B M; Español, Pep

    2005-07-01

    A previously formulated smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for a phase separating mixture is tested for the case when viscous processes are negligible and only mass and energy diffusive processes take place. We restrict ourselves to the case of a binary mixture that can exhibit liquid-liquid phase separation. The thermodynamic consistency of the model is assessed and the potential of the model to study complex pattern formation in the presence of various thermal boundaries is illustrated.

  4. Discrete-element modelling and smoothed particle hydrodynamics: potential in the environmental sciences.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Paul W; Prakash, Mahesh

    2004-09-15

    Particle-based simulation methods, such as the discrete-element method and smoothed particle hydrodynamics, have specific advantages in modelling complex three-dimensional (3D) environmental fluid and particulate flows. The theory of both these methods and their relative advantages compared with traditional methods will be discussed. Examples of 3D flows on realistic topography illustrate the environmental application of these methods. These include the flooding of a river valley as a result of a dam collapse, coastal inundation by a tsunami, volcanic lava flow and landslides. Issues related to validation and quality data availability are also discussed.

  5. MODELING OF FRICTION STIR WELDING (FSW) PROCESS USING SMOOTH PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS (SPH)

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Grant, Glenn J.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2006-06-14

    We present a novel modeling approach to simulate FSW process that may have significant advantages over current traditional finite element or finite difference based methods. The proposed model is based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, a fully Lagrangian particle method that can simulate the dynamics of interfaces, large material deformations, void formations and material's strain and temperature history without employing complex tracking schemes. Two- and three-dimensional simulations for different tool designs are presented. Preliminary numerical results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  6. A strategy to couple the material point method (MPM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) computational techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Samuel J.; Jones, Bruce; Williams, John R.

    2016-12-01

    A strategy is introduced to allow coupling of the material point method (MPM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) for numerical simulations. This new strategy partitions the domain into SPH and MPM regions, particles carry all state variables and as such no special treatment is required for the transition between regions. The aim of this work is to derive and validate the coupling methodology between MPM and SPH. Such coupling allows for general boundary conditions to be used in an SPH simulation without further augmentation. Additionally, as SPH is a purely particle method, and MPM is a combination of particles and a mesh. This coupling also permits a smooth transition from particle methods to mesh methods, where further coupling to mesh methods could in future provide an effective farfield boundary treatment for the SPH method. The coupling technique is introduced and described alongside a number of simulations in 1D and 2D to validate and contextualize the potential of using these two methods in a single simulation. The strategy shown here is capable of fully coupling the two methods without any complicated algorithms to transform information from one method to another.

  7. A Fast Variational Method for the Construction of Resolution Adaptive C-Smooth Molecular Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L; Xu, Guoliang; Zhang, Qin

    2009-05-01

    We present a variational approach to smooth molecular (proteins, nucleic acids) surface constructions, starting from atomic coordinates, as available from the protein and nucleic-acid data banks. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations traditionally used in understanding protein and nucleic-acid folding processes, are based on molecular force fields, and require smooth models of these molecular surfaces. To accelerate MD simulations, a popular methodology is to employ coarse grained molecular models, which represent clusters of atoms with similar physical properties by psuedo- atoms, resulting in coarser resolution molecular surfaces. We consider generation of these mixed-resolution or adaptive molecular surfaces. Our approach starts from deriving a general form second order geometric partial differential equation in the level-set formulation, by minimizing a first order energy functional which additionally includes a regularization term to minimize the occurrence of chemically infeasible molecular surface pockets or tunnel-like artifacts. To achieve even higher computational efficiency, a fast cubic B-spline C(2) interpolation algorithm is also utilized. A narrow band, tri-cubic B-spline level-set method is then used to provide C(2) smooth and resolution adaptive molecular surfaces.

  8. Simulation of Helical Flow Hydrodynamics in Meanders and Advection-Turbulent Diffusion Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusti, T. P.; Hertanti, D. R.; Bahsan, E.; Soeryantono, H.

    2013-12-01

    Particle-based numerical methods, such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), may be able to simulate some hydrodynamic and morphodynamic behaviors better than grid-based numerical methods. This study simulates hydrodynamics in meanders and advection and turbulent diffusion in straight river channels using Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic. The simulators generate three-dimensional data for hydrodynamics and one-dimensional data for advection-turbulent diffusion. Fluid at rest, sloshing, and helical flow are simulated in the river meanders. Spill loading and step loading are done to simulate concentration patterns associated with advection-turbulent diffusion. Results indicate that helical flow is formed due to disturbance in morphology and particle velocity in the stream and the number of particles does not have a significant effect on the pattern of advection-turbulent diffusion concentration.

  9. A Nonlinear Framework of Delayed Particle Smoothing Method for Vehicle Localization under Non-Gaussian Environment

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhu; Havyarimana, Vincent; Li, Tong; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel nonlinear framework of smoothing method, non-Gaussian delayed particle smoother (nGDPS), is proposed, which enables vehicle state estimation (VSE) with high accuracy taking into account the non-Gaussianity of the measurement and process noises. Within the proposed method, the multivariate Student’s t-distribution is adopted in order to compute the probability distribution function (PDF) related to the process and measurement noises, which are assumed to be non-Gaussian distributed. A computation approach based on Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is designed to cope with the mean and the covariance matrix of the proposal non-Gaussian distribution. A delayed Gibbs sampling algorithm, which incorporates smoothing of the sampled trajectories over a fixed-delay, is proposed to deal with the sample degeneracy of particles. The performance is investigated based on the real-world data, which is collected by low-cost on-board vehicle sensors. The comparison study based on the real-world experiments and the statistical analysis demonstrates that the proposed nGDPS has significant improvement on the vehicle state accuracy and outperforms the existing filtering and smoothing methods. PMID:27187405

  10. Simulation of unsaturated flow in complex fractures using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Meakin, Paul

    2005-08-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) models were used to simulate unsaturated flow in fractures with complex geometries. SPH is a fully Lagrangian particle-based method that allows the dynamics of interfaces separating fluids to be modeled without employing complex front tracking schemes. In SPH simulations, the fluid density field is represented by a superposition of weighting functions centered on particles which represent the fluids. The pressure is related to the fluid density through an equation of state, and the particles move in response to the pressure gradient. SPH does not require the construction of grids that would otherwise introduce numerical dispersion. The model can be used to simulate complex free-surface flow phenomenon such as invasion of wetting and nonwetting fluids into three-dimensional fractures. These processes are a severe challenge for grid-based methods. Surface tension was simulated by using a van der Waals equation of state and a combination of short-range repulsive and longer-range attractive interactions between fluid particles. The wetting behavior was simulated using similar interactions between mobile fluid particles and stationary boundary particles. The fracture geometry was generated from self-affine fractal surfaces. The fractal model was based on a large body of experimental work, which indicates that fracture surfaces have a self-affine fractal geometry characterized by a material independent (quasi universal) Hurst exponent of about 0.75.

  11. A novel method for modeling of complex wall geometries in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitzlmayr, Andreas; Koscher, Gerold; Khinast, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has become increasingly important during recent decades. Its meshless nature, inherent representation of convective transport and ability to simulate free surface flows make SPH particularly promising with regard to simulations of industrial mixing devices for high-viscous fluids, which often have complex rotating geometries and partially filled regions (e.g., twin-screw extruders). However, incorporating the required geometries remains a challenge in SPH since the most obvious and most common ways to model solid walls are based on particles (i.e., boundary particles and ghost particles), which leads to complications with arbitrarily-curved wall surfaces. To overcome this problem, we developed a systematic method for determining an adequate interaction between SPH particles and a continuous wall surface based on the underlying SPH equations. We tested our new approach by using the open-source particle simulator "LIGGGHTS" and comparing the velocity profiles to analytical solutions and SPH simulations with boundary particles. Finally, we followed the evolution of a tracer in a twin-cam mixer during the rotation, which was experimentally and numerically studied by several other authors, and ascertained good agreement with our results. This supports the validity of our newly-developed wall interaction method, which constitutes a step forward in SPH simulations of complex geometries.

  12. Entropy increase in confined free expansions via molecular dynamics and smooth-particle applied mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Posch, H. A.

    1999-02-01

    The eventual entropy increase of an ideal gas undergoing free expansion, ΔS=k ln(Vfin/V0), requires a ``coarse-grained'' hydrodynamic description because Gibbs' fine-grained entropy is unchanged in such a process. Smooth particle applied mechanics (SPAM) is well suited to the simulation and study of such problems because the particles in SPAM simulations can be of any size, from microscopic to macroscopic. SPAM furnishes a natural interpolation, or bridge, linking microscopic molecular dynamics to macroscopic continuum mechanics. We analyze particle-based simulations of ideal-gas free expansions from both the microscopic and the macroscopic points of view, comparing several dynamical estimates for the time development of the system entropy. Most of the entropy increase occurs rapidly, within a single sound traversal time. A local comoving version of turbulent hydrodynamics provides the most useful viewpoint for describing flows of this kind.

  13. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for phase separating fluid mixtures. I. General equations.

    PubMed

    Thieulot, Cedric; Janssen, L P B M; Español, Pep

    2005-07-01

    We present a thermodynamically consistent discrete fluid particle model for the simulation of a recently proposed set of hydrodynamic equations for a phase separating van der Waals fluid mixture [P. Español and C.A.P. Thieulot, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9109 (2003)]. The discrete model is formulated by following a discretization procedure given by the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method within the thermodynamically consistent general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) framework. Each fluid particle carries information on the mass, momentum, energy, and the mass fraction of the different components. The discrete model allows one to simulate nonisothermal dynamic evolution of phase separating fluids with surface tension effects while respecting the first and second laws of thermodynamics exactly.

  14. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for phase separating fluid mixtures. I. General equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric; Janssen, L. P. B. M.; Español, Pep

    2005-07-01

    We present a thermodynamically consistent discrete fluid particle model for the simulation of a recently proposed set of hydrodynamic equations for a phase separating van der Waals fluid mixture [P. Español and C.A.P. Thieulot, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9109 (2003)]. The discrete model is formulated by following a discretization procedure given by the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method within the thermodynamically consistent general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) framework. Each fluid particle carries information on the mass, momentum, energy, and the mass fraction of the different components. The discrete model allows one to simulate nonisothermal dynamic evolution of phase separating fluids with surface tension effects while respecting the first and second laws of thermodynamics exactly.

  15. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, P; Park, C Y; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Tsuda, A; Sager, T M; Molina, R M; Donaghey, T C; Alencar, A M; Kasahara, D I; Ericsson, T; Millet, E J; Swenson, J; Tschumperlin, D J; Butler, J P; Brain, J D; Fredberg, J J; Gehr, P; Zhou, E H

    2010-06-06

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40-100 nm and less than 44 microm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 microm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 microM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases.

  16. Evaluation of shear stress accumulation on blood components in normal and dysfunctional bileaflet mechanical heart valves using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, S; Maleki, H; Hassan, I; Kadem, L

    2012-10-11

    Evaluating shear induced hemodynamic complications is one of the major concerns in design of the mechanical heart valves (MHVs). The monitoring of these events relies on both numerical simulations and experimental measurements. Currently, numerical approaches are mainly based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. A more straightforward evaluation can be based on the Lagrangian analysis of the whole blood. As a consequence, Lagrangian meshfree methods are more adapted to such evaluation. In this study, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a fully meshfree particle method originated to simulate compressible astrophysical flows, is applied to study the flow through a normal and a dysfunctional bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). The SPH results are compared with the reference data. The accumulation of shear stress patterns on blood components illustrates the important role played by non-physiological flow patterns and mainly vortical structures in this issue. The statistical distribution of particles with respect to shear stress loading history provides important information regarding the relative number of blood components that can be damaged. This can be used as a measure of the response of blood components to the presence of the valve implant or any implantable medical device. This work presents the first attempt to simulate pulsatile flow through BMHVs using SPH method.

  17. An adaptive kernel smoothing method for classifying Austrosimulium tillyardianum (Diptera: Simuliidae) larval instars.

    PubMed

    Cen, Guanjun; Yu, Yonghao; Zeng, Xianru; Long, Xiuzhen; Wei, Dewei; Gao, Xuyuan; Zeng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    In insects, the frequency distribution of the measurements of sclerotized body parts is generally used to classify larval instars and is characterized by a multimodal overlap between instar stages. Nonparametric methods with fixed bandwidths, such as histograms, have significant limitations when used to fit this type of distribution, making it difficult to identify divisions between instars. Fixed bandwidths have also been chosen somewhat subjectively in the past, which is another problem. In this study, we describe an adaptive kernel smoothing method to differentiate instars based on discontinuities in the growth rates of sclerotized insect body parts. From Brooks' rule, we derived a new standard for assessing the quality of instar classification and a bandwidth selector that more accurately reflects the distributed character of specific variables. We used this method to classify the larvae of Austrosimulium tillyardianum (Diptera: Simuliidae) based on five different measurements. Based on head capsule width and head capsule length, the larvae were separated into nine instars. Based on head capsule postoccipital width and mandible length, the larvae were separated into 8 instars and 10 instars, respectively. No reasonable solution was found for antennal segment 3 length. Separation of the larvae into nine instars using head capsule width or head capsule length was most robust and agreed with Crosby's growth rule. By strengthening the distributed character of the separation variable through the use of variable bandwidths, the adaptive kernel smoothing method could identify divisions between instars more effectively and accurately than previous methods.

  18. An Adaptive Kernel Smoothing Method for Classifying Austrosimulium tillyardianum (Diptera: Simuliidae) Larval Instars

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Guanjun; Zeng, Xianru; Long, Xiuzhen; Wei, Dewei; Gao, Xuyuan; Zeng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    In insects, the frequency distribution of the measurements of sclerotized body parts is generally used to classify larval instars and is characterized by a multimodal overlap between instar stages. Nonparametric methods with fixed bandwidths, such as histograms, have significant limitations when used to fit this type of distribution, making it difficult to identify divisions between instars. Fixed bandwidths have also been chosen somewhat subjectively in the past, which is another problem. In this study, we describe an adaptive kernel smoothing method to differentiate instars based on discontinuities in the growth rates of sclerotized insect body parts. From Brooks’ rule, we derived a new standard for assessing the quality of instar classification and a bandwidth selector that more accurately reflects the distributed character of specific variables. We used this method to classify the larvae of Austrosimulium tillyardianum (Diptera: Simuliidae) based on five different measurements. Based on head capsule width and head capsule length, the larvae were separated into nine instars. Based on head capsule postoccipital width and mandible length, the larvae were separated into 8 instars and 10 instars, respectively. No reasonable solution was found for antennal segment 3 length. Separation of the larvae into nine instars using head capsule width or head capsule length was most robust and agreed with Crosby’s growth rule. By strengthening the distributed character of the separation variable through the use of variable bandwidths, the adaptive kernel smoothing method could identify divisions between instars more effectively and accurately than previous methods. PMID:26546689

  19. Modelling airway smooth muscle passive length adaptation via thick filament length distributions

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Graham M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new model of airway smooth muscle (ASM), which surrounds and constricts every airway in the lung and thus plays a central role in the airway constriction associated with asthma. This new model of ASM is based on an extension of sliding filament/crossbridge theory, which explicitly incorporates the length distribution of thick sliding filaments to account for a phenomenon known as dynamic passive length adaptation; the model exhibits good agreement with experimental data for ASM force–length behaviour across multiple scales. Principally these are (nonlinear) force–length loops at short timescales (seconds), parabolic force–length curves at medium timescales (minutes) and length adaptation at longer timescales. This represents a significant improvement on the widely-used cross-bridge models which work so well in or near the isometric regime, and may have significant implications for studies which rely on crossbridge or other dynamic airway smooth muscle models, and thus both airway and lung dynamics. PMID:23721681

  20. Supernova Feedback in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations of Dwarf Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, Gregory S.; Quinn, T.; Dalcanton, J.; Wadsley, J.; Gogarten, S.

    2007-12-01

    I will describe simulations that represent the evolution of galaxies using N-body smoothed particle hydrodynamic. The simulations present a novel recipe for star formation and the consequent supernova feedback. The recipes are employed in a number of isolated galaxies with different masses. The supernova feedback is effective at delaying star formation in low mass galaxies. The feedback also drives winds from low mass galaxies. In these winds, we find that stars can form and populate a stellar halo surrounding dwarf galaxies that compares well with the observed stellar halos surrounding Local Group Dwarfs.

  1. Mesh-free modeling of liquid crystals using modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yakutovich, M V; Care, C M; Newton, C J P; Cleaver, D J

    2010-10-01

    We present a generalization of the modified smooth particle hydrodynamics simulation technique capable of simulating static and dynamic liquid crystalline behavior. This generalization is then implemented in the context of the Qian-Sheng description of nematodynamics. To test the method, we first use it to simulate switching in both a Fréedericksz setup and a chiral hybrid aligned nematic cell. In both cases, the results obtained give excellent agreement with previously published results. We then apply the technique in a three-dimensional simulation of the switching dynamics of the post aligned bistable nematic device.

  2. DualSPHysics: Open-source parallel CFD solver based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, A. J. C.; Domínguez, J. M.; Rogers, B. D.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.; Longshaw, S.; Canelas, R.; Vacondio, R.; Barreiro, A.; García-Feal, O.

    2015-02-01

    DualSPHysics is a hardware accelerated Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code developed to solve free-surface flow problems. DualSPHysics is an open-source code developed and released under the terms of GNU General Public License (GPLv3). Along with the source code, a complete documentation that makes easy the compilation and execution of the source files is also distributed. The code has been shown to be efficient and reliable. The parallel power computing of Graphics Computing Units (GPUs) is used to accelerate DualSPHysics by up to two orders of magnitude compared to the performance of the serial version.

  3. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, Deepak S; Trabia, Mohamed; O'Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S

    2014-01-23

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  4. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  5. An automatic locally-adaptive method to estimate heavily-tailed breakthrough curves from particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, Daniele; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Particle tracking methods to simulate solute transport deal with the issue of having to reconstruct smooth concentrations from a limited number of particles. This is an error-prone process that typically leads to large fluctuations in the determined late-time behavior of breakthrough curves (BTCs). Kernel density estimators (KDE) can be used to automatically reconstruct smooth BTCs from a small number of particles. The kernel approach incorporates the uncertainty associated with subsampling a large population by equipping each particle with a probability density function. Two broad classes of KDE methods can be distinguished depending on the parametrization of this function: global and adaptive methods. This paper shows that each method is likely to estimate a specific portion of the BTCs. Although global methods offer a valid approach to estimate early-time behavior and peak of BTCs, they exhibit important fluctuations at the tails where fewer particles exist. In contrast, locally adaptive methods improve tail estimation while oversmoothing both early-time and peak concentrations. Therefore a new method is proposed combining the strength of both KDE approaches. The proposed approach is universal and only needs one parameter (α) which slightly depends on the shape of the BTCs. Results show that, for the tested cases, heavily-tailed BTCs are properly reconstructed with α ≈ 0.5 .

  6. Prediction of material strength and fracture of glass using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1994-08-01

    The design of many military devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics, that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in truck and jeep windshields and in helicopters; and rock and concrete that are used in underground bunkers. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass, and data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, the authors did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  7. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-08-05

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a novel multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semi-analytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models the dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface.

  8. Simulation of drop movement over an inclined surface using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Das, Arup K; Das, Prasanta K

    2009-10-06

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to numerically simulate the movement of drops down an inclined plane. Diffuse interfaces have been assumed for tracking the motion of the contact line. The asymmetric shape of the three-dimensional drop and the variation of contact angle along its periphery can be calculated using the simulation. During the motion of a liquid drop down an inclined plane, an internal circulation of liquid particles is observed due to gravitational pull which causes periodic change in the drop shape. The critical angle of inclination required for the inception of drop motion is also evaluated for different fluids as a function of drop volume. The numerical predictions exhibit a good agreement with the published experimental results.

  9. Smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics modeling of dissipation mechanisms in gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Colagrossi, Andrea; Souto-Iglesias, Antonio; Antuono, Matteo; Marrone, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    The smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been used to study the evolution of free-surface Newtonian viscous flows specifically focusing on dissipation mechanisms in gravity waves. The numerical results have been compared with an analytical solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations for Reynolds numbers in the range 50-5000. We found that a correct choice of the number of neighboring particles is of fundamental importance in order to obtain convergence towards the analytical solution. This number has to increase with higher Reynolds numbers in order to prevent the onset of spurious vorticity inside the bulk of the fluid, leading to an unphysical overdamping of the wave amplitude. This generation of spurious vorticity strongly depends on the specific kernel function used in the SPH model.

  10. Smooth- and rough-wall boundary layer structure from high spatial range particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, D. T.; Morrill-Winter, C.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.; Schultz, M. P.; Klewicki, J. C.

    2016-10-01

    Two particle image velocimetry arrangements are used to make true spatial comparisons between smooth- and rough-wall boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers across a very wide range of streamwise scales. Together, the arrangements resolve scales ranging from motions on the order of the Kolmogorov microscale to those longer than twice the boundary layer thickness. The rough-wall experiments were obtained above a continuous sandpaper sheet, identical to that used by Squire et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 795, 210 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.196], and cover a range of friction and equivalent sand-grain roughness Reynolds numbers (12 000 ≲δ+≲ 18000, 62 ≲ks+≲104 ). The smooth-wall experiments comprise new and previously published data spanning 6500 ≲δ+≲17 000 . Flow statistics from all experiments show similar Reynolds number trends and behaviors to recent, well-resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements above the same rough surface. Comparisons, at matched δ+, between smooth- and rough-wall two-point correlation maps and two-point magnitude-squared coherence maps demonstrate that spatially the outer region of the boundary layer is the same between the two flows. This is apparently true even at wall-normal locations where the total (inner-normalized) energy differs between the smooth and rough wall. Generally, the present results provide strong support for Townsend's [The Structure of Turbulent Shear Flow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1956), Vol. 1] wall-similarity hypothesis in high Reynolds number fully rough boundary layer flows.

  11. Differential evolution for many-particle adaptive quantum metrology.

    PubMed

    Lovett, Neil B; Crosnier, Cécile; Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Sanders, Barry C

    2013-05-31

    We devise powerful algorithms based on differential evolution for adaptive many-particle quantum metrology. Our new approach delivers adaptive quantum metrology policies for feedback control that are orders-of-magnitude more efficient and surpass the few-dozen-particle limitation arising in methods based on particle-swarm optimization. We apply our method to the binary-decision-tree model for quantum-enhanced phase estimation as well as to a new problem: a decision tree for adaptive estimation of the unknown bias of a quantum coin in a quantum walk and show how this latter case can be realized experimentally.

  12. A smooth particle-mesh Ewald algorithm for Stokes suspension simulations: The sedimentation of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintillan, David; Darve, Eric; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2005-03-01

    Large-scale simulations of non-Brownian rigid fibers sedimenting under gravity at zero Reynolds number have been performed using a fast algorithm. The mathematical formulation follows the previous simulations by Butler and Shaqfeh ["Dynamic simulations of the inhomogeneous sedimentation of rigid fibres," J. Fluid Mech. 468, 205 (2002)]. The motion of the fibers is described using slender-body theory, and the line distribution of point forces along their lengths is approximated by a Legendre polynomial in which only the total force, torque, and particle stresslet are retained. Periodic boundary conditions are used to simulate an infinite suspension, and both far-field hydrodynamic interactions and short-range lubrication forces are considered in all simulations. The calculation of the hydrodynamic interactions, which is typically the bottleneck for large systems with periodic boundary conditions, is accelerated using a smooth particle-mesh Ewald (SPME) algorithm previously used in molecular dynamics simulations. In SPME the slowly decaying Green's function is split into two fast-converging sums: the first involves the distribution of point forces and accounts for the singular short-range part of the interactions, while the second is expressed in terms of the Fourier transform of the force distribution and accounts for the smooth and long-range part. Because of its smoothness, the second sum can be computed efficiently on an underlying grid using the fast Fourier transform algorithm, resulting in a significant speed-up of the calculations. Systems of up to 512 fibers were simulated on a single-processor workstation, providing a different insight into the formation, structure, and dynamics of the inhomogeneities that occur in sedimenting fiber suspensions.

  13. Adaptive smoothing of valleys in DEMs using TIN interpolation from ridgeline elevations: An application to morphotectonic aspect analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Gyozo

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a smoothing method that eliminates valleys of various Strahler-order drainage lines from a digital elevation model (DEM), thus enabling the recovery of local and regional trends in a terrain. A novel method for automated extraction of high-density channel network is developed to identify ridgelines defined as the watershed boundaries of channel segments. A DEM using TIN interpolation is calculated based on elevations of digitally extracted ridgelines. This removes first-order watersheds from the DEM. Higher levels of DEM smoothing can be achieved by the application of the method to ridgelines of higher-order channels. The advantage of the proposed smoothing method over traditional smoothing methods of moving kernel, trend and spectral methods is that it does not require pre-definition of smoothing parameters, such as kernel or trend parameters, and thus it follows topography in an adaptive way. Another advantage is that smoothing is controlled by the physical-hydrological properties of the terrain, as opposed to mathematical filters. Level of smoothing depends on ridgeline geometry and density, and the applied user-defined channel order. The method requires digital extraction of a high-density channel and ridgeline network. The advantage of the smoothing method over traditional methods is demonstrated through a case study of the Kali Basin test site in Hungary. The smoothing method is used in this study for aspect generalisation for morphotectonic investigations in a small watershed.

  14. Development of stress boundary conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) for the modeling of solids deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet-Grellier, Thomas; Pramanik, Ranjan; Pan, Kai; Albaiz, Abdulaziz; Jones, Bruce D.; Williams, John R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper develops a method for imposing stress boundary conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) with and without the need for dummy particles. SPH has been used for simulating phenomena in a number of fields, such as astrophysics and fluid mechanics. More recently, the method has gained traction as a technique for simulation of deformation and fracture in solids, where the meshless property of SPH can be leveraged to represent arbitrary crack paths. Despite this interest, application of boundary conditions within the SPH framework is typically limited to imposed velocity or displacement using fictitious dummy particles to compensate for the lack of particles beyond the boundary interface. While this is enough for a large variety of problems, especially in the case of fluid flow, for problems in solid mechanics there is a clear need to impose stresses upon boundaries. In addition to this, the use of dummy particles to impose a boundary condition is not always suitable or even feasibly, especially for those problems which include internal boundaries. In order to overcome these difficulties, this paper first presents an improved method for applying stress boundary conditions in SPH with dummy particles. This is then followed by a proposal of a formulation which does not require dummy particles. These techniques are then validated against analytical solutions to two common problems in rock mechanics, the Brazilian test and the penny-shaped crack problem both in 2D and 3D. This study highlights the fact that SPH offers a good level of accuracy to solve these problems and that results are reliable. This validation work serves as a foundation for addressing more complex problems involving plasticity and fracture propagation.

  15. A variational multi-symplectic particle-in-cell algorithm with smoothing functions for the Vlasov-Maxwell system

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi

    2013-10-15

    Smoothing functions are commonly used to reduce numerical noise arising from coarse sampling of particles in particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations. When applying smoothing functions to symplectic algorithms, the conservation of symplectic structure should be guaranteed to preserve good conservation properties. In this paper, we show how to construct a variational multi-symplectic PIC algorithm with smoothing functions for the Vlasov-Maxwell system. The conservation of the multi-symplectic structure and the reduction of numerical noise make this algorithm specifically suitable for simulating long-term dynamics of plasmas, such as those in the steady-state operation or long-pulse discharge of a super-conducting tokamak. The algorithm has been implemented in a 6D large scale PIC code. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the good conservation properties of the multi-symplectic algorithm and the reduction of the noise due to the application of smoothing function.

  16. Multi-resolution flow simulations by smoothed particle hydrodynamics via domain decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-09-01

    We present a methodology to concurrently couple particle-based methods via a domain decomposition (DD) technique for simulating viscous flows. In particular, we select two resolutions of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method as demonstration. Within the DD framework, a simulation domain is decomposed into two (or more) overlapping sub-domains, each of which has an individual particle scale determined by the local flow physics. Consistency of the two sub-domains is achieved in the overlap region by matching the two independent simulations based on Lagrangian interpolation of state variables and fluxes. The domain decomposition based SPH method (DD-SPH) employs different spatial and temporal resolutions, and hence, each sub-domain has its own smoothing length and time step. As a consequence, particle refinement and de-refinement are performed asynchronously according to individual time advancement of each sub-domain. The proposed strategy avoids SPH force interactions between different resolutions on purpose, so that coupling, in principle, can go beyond SPH-SPH, and may allow SPH to be coupled with other mesoscopic or microscopic particle methods. The DD-SPH method is validated first for a transient Couette flow, where simulation results based on proper coupling of spatial-temporal scales agree well with analytical solutions. In particular, we find that the size of the overlap region should be at least rc,1 + 2rc,2, where rc,1 and rc,2 are cut off radii in the two sub-domains with rc,1 ≤rc,2. Subsequently, a perturbation wave is considered traveling either parallel or perpendicular to the hybrid interface. Compressibility is significant if transient behavior at short sonic-time-scale is relevant, while the fluid can be treated as quasi-incompressible at sufficiently long time scale. To this end, we propose a coupling of density fields from the two sub-domains. Finally, a steady Wannier flow is simulated, where a rotating cylinder is placed next to a

  17. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Stochastic Model for Flow and Transport in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Meakin, Paul

    2008-11-03

    A meso-scale stochastic Lagrangian particle model was developed and used to simulate conservative and reactive transport in porous media. In the stochastic model, the fluid flow in a porous continuum is governed by a combination of a Langevin equation and continuity equation. Pore-scale velocity fluctuations, the source of hydrodynamic dispersion, are represented by the white noise. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method was used to solve the governing equations. Changes in the properties of the fluid particles (e.g., the solute concentration) are governed by the advection-diffusion equation. The separate treatment of advective and diffusive mixing in the stochastic transport model is more realistic than the classical advection-dispersion theory, which uses a single effective diffusion coefficient (the dispersion coefficient) to describe both types of mixing leading to over-prediction of mixing induced effective reaction rates. The stochastic model predicts much lower reaction product concentrations in mixing induced reactions. In addition, the dispersion theory predicts more stable fronts (with a higher effective fractal dimension) than the stochastic model during the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities.

  18. Entropy increase in confined free expansions via molecular dynamics and smooth-particle applied mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.

    1999-02-01

    The eventual entropy increase of an ideal gas undergoing free expansion, {Delta}S=k&hthinsp;ln(V{sub fin}/V{sub 0}), requires a {open_quotes}coarse-grained{close_quotes} hydrodynamic description because Gibbs{close_quote} fine-grained entropy is unchanged in such a process. Smooth particle applied mechanics (SPAM) is well suited to the simulation and study of such problems because the particles in SPAM simulations can be of any size, from microscopic to macroscopic. SPAM furnishes a natural interpolation, or bridge, linking microscopic molecular dynamics to macroscopic continuum mechanics. We analyze particle-based simulations of ideal-gas free expansions from both the microscopic and the macroscopic points of view, comparing several dynamical estimates for the time development of the system entropy. Most of the entropy increase occurs rapidly, within a single sound traversal time. A local comoving version of turbulent hydrodynamics provides the most useful viewpoint for describing flows of this kind. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. GPUs, a new tool of acceleration in CFD: efficiency and reliability on smoothed particle hydrodynamics methods.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Alejandro C; Dominguez, Jose M; Barreiro, Anxo; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Rogers, Benedict D

    2011-01-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a numerical method commonly used in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to simulate complex free-surface flows. Simulations with this mesh-free particle method far exceed the capacity of a single processor. In this paper, as part of a dual-functioning code for either central processing units (CPUs) or Graphics Processor Units (GPUs), a parallelisation using GPUs is presented. The GPU parallelisation technique uses the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) of nVidia devices. Simulations with more than one million particles on a single GPU card exhibit speedups of up to two orders of magnitude over using a single-core CPU. It is demonstrated that the code achieves different speedups with different CUDA-enabled GPUs. The numerical behaviour of the SPH code is validated with a standard benchmark test case of dam break flow impacting on an obstacle where good agreement with the experimental results is observed. Both the achieved speed-ups and the quantitative agreement with experiments suggest that CUDA-based GPU programming can be used in SPH methods with efficiency and reliability.

  20. Consistent Temperature Coupling with Thermal Fluctuations of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics and Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C.; Hiermaier, Stefan; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy) thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain – internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity – are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance. PMID:23300586

  1. GPUs, a New Tool of Acceleration in CFD: Efficiency and Reliability on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Methods

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Alejandro C.; Dominguez, Jose M.; Barreiro, Anxo; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Rogers, Benedict D.

    2011-01-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a numerical method commonly used in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to simulate complex free-surface flows. Simulations with this mesh-free particle method far exceed the capacity of a single processor. In this paper, as part of a dual-functioning code for either central processing units (CPUs) or Graphics Processor Units (GPUs), a parallelisation using GPUs is presented. The GPU parallelisation technique uses the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) of nVidia devices. Simulations with more than one million particles on a single GPU card exhibit speedups of up to two orders of magnitude over using a single-core CPU. It is demonstrated that the code achieves different speedups with different CUDA-enabled GPUs. The numerical behaviour of the SPH code is validated with a standard benchmark test case of dam break flow impacting on an obstacle where good agreement with the experimental results is observed. Both the achieved speed-ups and the quantitative agreement with experiments suggest that CUDA-based GPU programming can be used in SPH methods with efficiency and reliability. PMID:21695185

  2. Simulation of a ceramic impact experiment using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-08-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPHINX. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPHINX, and we discuss how the model differs from others. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we simulate an experiment in which a tungsten rod strikes a target of heavily confined ceramic. Simulations in 3D at relatively coarse resolution yield poor results. However, 2D plane-strain approximations to the test produce crack patterns that are strikingly similar to the data, although the fracture model needs further refinement to match some of the finer details. We conclude with an outline of plans for continuing research and development.

  3. Scattering and bound states of spinless particles in a mixed vector-scalar smooth step potential

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.G.; Castro, A.S. de

    2009-11-15

    Scattering and bound states for a spinless particle in the background of a kink-like smooth step potential, added with a scalar uniform background, are considered with a general mixing of vector and scalar Lorentz structures. The problem is mapped into the Schroedinger-like equation with an effective Rosen-Morse potential. It is shown that the scalar uniform background present subtle and trick effects for the scattering states and reveals itself a high-handed element for formation of bound states. In that process, it is shown that the problem of solving a differential equation for the eigenenergies is transmuted into the simpler and more efficient problem of solving an irrational algebraic equation.

  4. Investigation of pressure variations over stepped spillways using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Sarhang M.; Muhammed, Jowhar R.; Karunarathna, Harshinie U.; Reeve, Dominic E.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper the smoothed particle hydrodynamics, (SPH), technique is used to investigate the pressure distribution on steps located in the non-aerated flow region of a stepped spillway for different discharges typical of skimming flow conditions. The open source code 2D SPHysics has been employed after being validated against the laboratory model studies of flow over broad crested weirs and flow over stepped spillways. The numerical results, in terms of the water surface and velocity profiles at different sections, are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results. The code is then applied to determine the pressure distribution on the vertical and horizontal step faces. Also, the aspects of the pressure pattern are described and the positions/magnitudes of the maximum and minimum pressure values are presented.

  5. Smooth-particle applied mechanics: Conservation of angular momentum with tensile stability and velocity averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.; Merritt, Elizabeth C.

    2004-01-01

    Smooth-particle applied mechanics (SPAM) provides several approaches to approximate solutions of the continuum equations for both fluids and solids. Though many of the usual formulations conserve mass, (linear) momentum, and energy, the angular momentum is typically not conserved by SPAM. A second difficulty with the usual formulations is that tensile stress states often exhibit an exponentially fast high-frequency short-wavelength instability, “tensile instability.” We discuss these twin defects of SPAM and illustrate them for a rotating elastic body. We formulate ways to conserve angular momentum while at the same time delaying the symptoms of tensile instability for many sound-traversal times. These ideas should prove useful in more general situations.

  6. Coupled incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for continuum-based modelling sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahar, Gourabananda; Dhar, Anirban

    2017-04-01

    A coupled solenoidal Incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) model is presented for simulation of sediment displacement in erodible bed. The coupled framework consists of two separate incompressible modules: (a) granular module, (b) fluid module. The granular module considers a friction based rheology model to calculate deviatoric stress components from pressure. The module is validated for Bagnold flow profile and two standardized test cases of sediment avalanching. The fluid module resolves fluid flow inside and outside porous domain. An interaction force pair containing fluid pressure, viscous term and drag force acts as a bridge between two different flow modules. The coupled model is validated against three dambreak flow cases with different initial conditions of movable bed. The simulated results are in good agreement with experimental data. A demonstrative case considering effect of granular column failure under full/partial submergence highlights the capability of the coupled model for application in generalized scenario.

  7. Simulating hypervelocity impact effects on structures using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code MAGI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libersky, Larry; Allahdadi, Firooz A.; Carney, Theodore C.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of interaction occurring between space debris and orbiting structures is of great interest to the planning and survivability of space assets. Computer simulation of the impact events using hydrodynamic codes can provide some understanding of the processes but the problems involved with this fundamental approach are formidable. First, any realistic simulation is necessarily three-dimensional, e.g., the impact and breakup of a satellite. Second, the thickness of important components such as satellite skins or bumper shields are small with respect to the dimension of the structure as a whole, presenting severe zoning problems for codes. Thirdly, the debris cloud produced by the primary impact will yield many secondary impacts which will contribute to the damage and possible breakup of the structure. The problem was approached by choosing a relatively new computational technique that has virtues peculiar to space impacts. The method is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

  8. Three-Dimensional Simulation of Tsunami Run Up Around Conical Island Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buruchenko, Sergey K.

    2016-10-01

    The large-scale laboratory experiments were performed in a 30 m-wide, 25 m-long, and 60 cm-deep wave basin. Waves were realistically created in the tank by a horizontal wave generator with 60 different paddles each 46 cm-wide and moving independently. These experiments provided run-up observations for validating numerical models and supplemented comparisons with analytical results. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a popular meshfree, Lagrangian method with attractive features in modelling fluid dynamics. The SPH method is capable of dealing with problems with free surface, deformable boundary, moving interface, wave propagation and solid simulation. A weakly incompressible fluid flow SPH model was employed in this paper to investigate the run-up heights of nearshore tsunamis in the vicinity of a circular island. The predicted numerical results have been verified by comparing to available laboratory measurements. A good agreement has been observed.

  9. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics pore-scale simulations of unstable immiscible flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Dunusinghe Mudiyanselage Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Oostrom, Martinus; Palmer, Bruce J.; Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted a series of high-resolution numerical experiments using the Pair-Wise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) multiphase flow model. First, we derived analytical expressions relating parameters in the PF-SPH model to the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we used the model to study viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement of immiscible fluids in porous media for a wide range of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios. We demonstrated that the steady state saturation profiles and the boundaries of viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement regions compare favorably with micromodel laboratory experimental results. For displacing fluid with low viscosity, we observed that the displacement pattern changes from viscous fingering to stable displacement with increasing injection rate. When a high viscosity fluid is injected, transition behavior from capillary fingering to stable displacement occurred as the flow rate was increased. These observation also agree with the results of the micromodel laboratory experiments.

  10. Survey of shock-wave structures of smooth-particle granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, D. A.; Mazzoleni, A. P.; Faw, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    We show the effects of simulated supersonic granular flow made up of smooth particles passing over two prototypical bodies: a wedge and a disk. We describe a way of computationally identifying shock wave locations in granular flows and tabulate the shock wave locations for flow over wedges and disks. We quantify the shock structure in terms of oblique shock angle for wedge impediments and shock standoff distance for disk impediments. We vary granular flow parameters including upstream volume fraction, average upstream velocity, granular temperature, and the collision coefficient of restitution. Both wedges and disks have been used in the aerospace community as prototypical impediments to flowing air in order to investigate the fundamentally different shock structures emanating from sharp and blunt bodies, and we present these results in order to increase the understanding of the fundamental behavior of supersonic granular flow.

  11. Hemodynamic Influence on Smooth Muscle Cell Kinetics and Phenotype During Early Vein Graft Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Benjamin; Destephens, Anthony; Dumeny, Leanne; Hu, Qiongyao; He, Yong; O'Malley, Kerri; Jiang, Zhihua; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger; Berceli, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Pathologic vascular adaptation following local injury is the primary driver for accelerated intimal hyperplasia and an occlusive phenotype. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation within the wall, and migration into the developing intima, is a major component of this remodeling response. The primary objective in the current study was to investigate the effect of the local biomechanical forces on early vein graft adaptation, specifically focusing on the spatial and temporal response of SMC proliferation and conversion from a contractile to synthetic architecture. Taking advantage of the differential adaptation that occurs during exposure to divergent flow environments, vein grafts were implanted in rabbits to create two distinct flow environments and harvested at times ranging from 2 h to 28 days. Using an algorithm for the virtual reconstruction of unfixed, histologic specimens, immunohistochemical tracking of DNA synthesis, and high-throughput transcriptional analysis, the spatial and temporal changes in graft morphology, cell proliferation, and SMC phenotype were catalogued. Notable findings include a burst of cell proliferation at 7 days post-implantation, which was significantly augmented by exposure to a reduced flow environment. Compared to the adjacent media, proliferation rates were 3-fold greater in the intima, and a specific spatial distribution of these proliferating cells was identified, with a major peak in the sub-endothelial region and a second peak centering on the internal elastic lamina. Genomic markers of a contractile SMC phenotype were reduced as early as 2 h post-implantation and reached a nadir at 7 days. Network analysis of upstream regulatory pathways identified GATA6 and KLF5 as important transcription factors that regulate this shift in SMC phenotype.

  12. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  13. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  14. A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method for domains with arbitrary-geometry solid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Potami, Raffaele; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method with dynamic virtual particle allocation (SDPD-DV) for modeling and simulation of mesoscopic fluids in wall-bounded domains is presented. The physical domain in SDPD-DV may contain external and internal solid boundaries of arbitrary geometries, periodic inlets and outlets, and the fluid region. The SDPD-DV method is realized with fluid particles, boundary particles, and dynamically allocated virtual particles. The internal or external solid boundaries of the domain can be of arbitrary geometry and are discretized with a surface grid. These boundaries are represented by boundary particles with assigned properties. The fluid domain is discretized with fluid particles of constant mass and variable volume. Conservative and dissipative force models due to virtual particles exerted on a fluid particle in the proximity of a solid boundary supplement the original SDPD formulation. The dynamic virtual particle allocation approach provides the density and the forces due to virtual particles. The integration of the SDPD equations is accomplished with a velocity-Verlet algorithm for the momentum and a Runge-Kutta for the entropy equation. The velocity integrator is supplemented by a bounce-forward algorithm in cases where the virtual particle force model is not able to prevent particle penetration. For the incompressible isothermal systems considered in this work, the pressure of a fluid particle is obtained by an artificial compressibility formulation for liquids and the ideal gas law for gases. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained by an implementation of the generalized Einstein and the Green-Kubo relations. Field properties are obtained by sampling SDPD-DV outputs on a post-processing grid that allows harnessing the particle information on desired spatiotemporal scales. The SDPD-DV method is verified and validated with simulations in bounded and periodic domains that cover the hydrodynamic and mesoscopic regimes for

  15. Adaptive fuzzy control with smooth inverse for nonlinear systems preceded by non-symmetric dead-zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingjian; Wang, Shaoping

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the adaptive output feedback control problem of a class of nonlinear systems preceded by non-symmetric dead-zone is considered. To cope with the possible control signal chattering phenomenon which is caused by non-smooth dead-zone inverse, a new smooth inverse is proposed for non-symmetric dead-zone compensation. For the systematic design procedure of the adaptive fuzzy control algorithm, we combine the backstepping technique and small-gain approach. The Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy logic systems are used to approximate unknown system nonlinearities. The closed-loop stability is studied by using small gain theorem and the closed-loop system is proved to be semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results indicate that, compared to the algorithm with the non-smooth inverse, the proposed control strategy can achieve better tracking performance and the chattering phenomenon can be avoided effectively.

  16. An alternative smooth particle hydrodynamics formulation to simulate chemotaxis in porous media.

    PubMed

    Avesani, Diego; Dumbser, Michael; Chiogna, Gabriele; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-08-27

    Chemotaxis, the microorganisms autonomous motility along or against the concentration gradients of a chemical species, is an important, yet often neglected factor controlling the transport of bacteria through saturated porous media. For example, chemotactic bacteria could enhance bioremediation by directing their own motion to residual contaminants trapped in low hydraulic conductive zones of contaminated aquifers. The aim of the present work is to develop an accurate numerical scheme to model chemotaxis in saturated porous media and other advective dominating flow systems. We propose to model chemotaxis by using a new class of meshless Lagrangian particle methods we recently developed for applications in fluid mechanics. The method is based on the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) formulation of (Ben Moussa et al., Int Ser Numer Math, 13(1):29-62, 2006), combined with a new Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) reconstruction technique on moving point clouds in multiple space dimensions. The purpose of this new numerical scheme is to fully exploit the advantages of SPH among traditional mesh-based and mesh-free schemes and to overcome drawbacks related to the use of standard SPH for modeling chemotaxis in porous media. First, we test the new scheme against analytical reference solutions. Then, under the assumption of complete mixing at the Darcy scale, we perform two-dimensional conservative solute transport simulations under steady-state flow conditions, to show the capability of the proposed new scheme to model chemotaxis.

  17. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics: Applications to migration of radionuclides in confined aqueous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayoral-Villa, Estela; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Carlos E.; Klapp, Jaime; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Di G. Sigalotti, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    A smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model is presented for simulating the decay chain transport of radionuclides in confined aqueous solutions. The SPH formulation is based on the open-source parallel code DualSPHysics extended to solve the advective-diffusion equation for the evolution of the concentration field coupled to the fluid-dynamic equations, including the effects of radioactive decay of the tracer contaminants. The performance of the method is demonstrated for environmental engineering problems dealing with the transport of contaminants in still and flowing water. The results from a series of benchmark test calculations are described in two- and three-space dimensions, where the advection, diffusion, and radioactive decay modes are tested separately and in combined form. The accuracy of the present SPH transport model is shown by direct comparison with the analytical solutions and results from other SPH approaches. For a given problem, convergence of the SPH solution is seen to increase with decreasing particle size and spacing.

  18. Large scale water entry simulation with smoothed particle hydrodynamics on single- and multi-GPU systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhe; Xu, Fei; Takahashi, Akiyuki; Sun, Yu

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a Weakly Compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (WCSPH) framework is presented utilizing the parallel architecture of single- and multi-GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) platforms. The program is developed for water entry simulations where an efficient potential based contact force is introduced to tackle the interaction between fluid and solid particles. The single-GPU SPH scheme is implemented with a series of optimization to achieve high performance. To go beyond the memory limitation of single GPU, the scheme is further extended to multi-GPU platform basing on an improved 3D domain decomposition and inter-node data communication strategy. A typical benchmark test of wedge entry is investigated in varied dimensions and scales to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the program. The results of 2D and 3D benchmark tests manifest great consistency with the experiment and better accuracy than other numerical models. The performance of the single-GPU code is assessed by comparing with serial and parallel CPU codes. The improvement of the domain decomposition strategy is verified, and a study on the scalability and efficiency of the multi-GPU code is carried out as well by simulating tests with varied scales in different amount of GPUs. Lastly, the single- and multi-GPU codes are further compared with existing state-of-the-art SPH parallel frameworks for a comprehensive assessment.

  19. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics: Applications to migration of radionuclides in confined aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Mayoral-Villa, Estela; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Klapp, Jaime; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G

    2016-04-01

    A smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model is presented for simulating the decay chain transport of radionuclides in confined aqueous solutions. The SPH formulation is based on the open-source parallel code DualSPHysics extended to solve the advective-diffusion equation for the evolution of the concentration field coupled to the fluid-dynamic equations, including the effects of radioactive decay of the tracer contaminants. The performance of the method is demonstrated for environmental engineering problems dealing with the transport of contaminants in still and flowing water. The results from a series of benchmark test calculations are described in two- and three-space dimensions, where the advection, diffusion, and radioactive decay modes are tested separately and in combined form. The accuracy of the present SPH transport model is shown by direct comparison with the analytical solutions and results from other SPH approaches. For a given problem, convergence of the SPH solution is seen to increase with decreasing particle size and spacing.

  20. Flight test results from a supercritical mission adaptive wing with smooth variable camber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke; Webb, Lannie D.; Friend, Edward L.; Lokos, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The mission adaptive wing (MAW) consisted of leading- and trailing-edge variable-camber surfaces that could be deflected in flight to provide a near-ideal wing camber shape for any flight condition. These surfaces featured smooth, flexible upper surfaces and fully enclosed lower surfaces, distinguishing them from conventional flaps that have discontinuous surfaces and exposed or semiexposed mechanisms. Camber shape was controlled by either a manual or automatic flight control system. The wing and aircraft were extensively instrumented to evaluate the local flow characteristics and the total aircraft performance. This paper discusses the interrelationships between the wing pressure, buffet, boundary-layer and flight deflection measurement system analyses and describes the flight maneuvers used to obtain the data. The results are for a wing sweep of 26 deg, a Mach number of 0.85, leading and trailing-edge cambers (delta(sub LE/TE)) of 0/2 and 5/10, and angles of attack from 3.0 deg to 14.0 deg. For the well-behaved flow of the delta(sub LE/TE) = 0/2 camber, a typical cruise camber shape, the local and global data are in good agreement with respect to the flow properties of the wing. For the delta(sub LE/TE) = 5/10 camber, a maneuvering camber shape, the local and global data have similar trends and conclusions, but not the clear-cut agreement observed for cruise camber.

  1. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Amy C.; Knaub, Leslie A.; McClatchey, P. Mason; Connon, Chelsea A.; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W.; Geary, Kate E.; Walker, Lori A.; Klemm, Dwight J.; Reusch, Jane E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM). At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p < 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide increased with high glucose in Wistar SMCs (p < 0.05) with no change in the GK beyond elevated baseline concentrations. Baseline comparisons show persistent metabolic perturbations in a diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27034743

  2. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Keller, Amy C; Knaub, Leslie A; McClatchey, P Mason; Connon, Chelsea A; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W; Geary, Kate E; Walker, Lori A; Klemm, Dwight J; Reusch, Jane E B

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM). At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p < 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide increased with high glucose in Wistar SMCs (p < 0.05) with no change in the GK beyond elevated baseline concentrations. Baseline comparisons show persistent metabolic perturbations in a diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets.

  3. Adaptive smoothing based on Gaussian processes regression increases the sensitivity and specificity of fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Strappini, Francesca; Gilboa, Elad; Pitzalis, Sabrina; Kay, Kendrick; McAvoy, Mark; Nehorai, Arye; Snyder, Abraham Z

    2017-03-01

    Temporal and spatial filtering of fMRI data is often used to improve statistical power. However, conventional methods, such as smoothing with fixed-width Gaussian filters, remove fine-scale structure in the data, necessitating a tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity. Specifically, smoothing may increase sensitivity (reduce noise and increase statistical power) but at the cost loss of specificity in that fine-scale structure in neural activity patterns is lost. Here, we propose an alternative smoothing method based on Gaussian processes (GP) regression for single subjects fMRI experiments. This method adapts the level of smoothing on a voxel by voxel basis according to the characteristics of the local neural activity patterns. GP-based fMRI analysis has been heretofore impractical owing to computational demands. Here, we demonstrate a new implementation of GP that makes it possible to handle the massive data dimensionality of the typical fMRI experiment. We demonstrate how GP can be used as a drop-in replacement to conventional preprocessing steps for temporal and spatial smoothing in a standard fMRI pipeline. We present simulated and experimental results that show the increased sensitivity and specificity compared to conventional smoothing strategies. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1438-1459, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Application of Reinforcement Learning Algorithms for the Adaptive Computation of the Smoothing Parameter for Probabilistic Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Kusy, Maciej; Zajdel, Roman

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose new methods for the choice and adaptation of the smoothing parameter of the probabilistic neural network (PNN). These methods are based on three reinforcement learning algorithms: Q(0)-learning, Q(λ)-learning, and stateless Q-learning. We regard three types of PNN classifiers: the model that uses single smoothing parameter for the whole network, the model that utilizes single smoothing parameter for each data attribute, and the model that possesses the matrix of smoothing parameters different for each data variable and data class. Reinforcement learning is applied as the method of finding such a value of the smoothing parameter, which ensures the maximization of the prediction ability. PNN models with smoothing parameters computed according to the proposed algorithms are tested on eight databases by calculating the test error with the use of the cross validation procedure. The results are compared with state-of-the-art methods for PNN training published in the literature up to date and, additionally, with PNN whose sigma is determined by means of the conjugate gradient approach. The results demonstrate that the proposed approaches can be used as alternative PNN training procedures.

  5. A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2012-02-08

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH is a fully Lagrangian particle method. It is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper SPH is used to study ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from the SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is further verified by simulating the plane shear flow of two immiscible fluids and the propagation of a highly viscous blob of fluid along a horizontal surface. In the experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous newtonian fluid. For consistency, in the described SPH model the ice is also modeled as a viscous newtonian fluid. Typically, ice sheets are modeled as a non-Newtonian fluid, accounting for the changes in the mechanical properties of ice. Implementation of a non-Newtonian rheology in the SPH model is the subject of our ongoing research.

  6. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Monaghan, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper, SPH is used to study 3D ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios, similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is verif;ed by simulating Poiseuille flow, plane shear flow with free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. In the laboratory experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous Newtonian fluid. In the present work, however, the ice is modeled as both viscous Newtonian fluid and non-Newtonian fluid, such that the effect of non-Newtonian rheology on the dynamics of grounding line was examined. The non-Newtonian constitutive relation is prescribed to be Glen’s law for the creep of polycrystalline ice. A V-shaped bedrock ramp is further introduced to model the real geometry of bedrock slope.

  7. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations is found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study formation of the so-called "giant fluctuations" of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lies on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field are in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity, the power spectra decay as the power -4 of the wavenumber-except for small wavenumbers that diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations, resulting in much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wavenumber. Finally, the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlaying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  8. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations is found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study formation of the so-called “giant fluctuations” of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lies on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field are in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity, the power spectra decay as the power −4 of the wavenumber—except for small wavenumbers that diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations, resulting in much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wavenumber. Finally, the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlaying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  9. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully-coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations are found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for the coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study the formation of the so-called giant fluctuations of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lays on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field is in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity the the power spectra decays as the power -4 of the wave number except for small wave numbers which diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations resulting in the much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wave number. Finally the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  10. Smooth terminating bands in {sup 112}Te: Particle-hole induced collectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E. S.; Evans, A. O.; Boston, A. J.; Chantler, H. J.; Nolan, P. J.; Semple, A. T.; Starosta, K.; Chiara, C. J.; Fossan, D. B.; Lane, G. J.; Sears, J. M.; Vaman, C.; Devlin, M.; LaFosse, D. R.; Sarantites, D. G.; Fletcher, A. M.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Smith, J. F.; Afanasjev, A. V.

    2007-01-15

    The Gammasphere spectrometer, in conjunction with the Microball charged-particle array, was used to investigate high-spin states in {sup 112}Te via {sup 58}Ni({sup 58}Ni, 4p{gamma}) reactions at 240 and 250 MeV. Several smooth terminating bands were established, and lifetime measurements were performed for the strongest one using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Results obtained in the spin range 18-32({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) yield a transition quadrupole moment of 4.0{+-}0.5eb, which corresponds to a quadrupole deformation epsilon{sub 2}=0.26{+-}0.03; this value is significantly larger than the ground-state deformation of tellurium isotopes. It was also possible to extract a transition quadrupole moment for the yrast band in {sup 114}Xe, produced via the 58Ni (58Ni, 2p{gamma}) reaction. A value of 3.0{+-}0.5eb was found in the spin range 16-24({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), which corresponds to a quadrupole deformation epsilon{sub 2}=0.19{+-}0.03. Cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations are used to interpret the results.

  11. Geometrical on-the-fly shock detection in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A. M.; Dolag, K.; Donnert, J. M. F.

    2016-05-01

    We present an on-the-fly geometrical approach for shock detection and Mach number calculation in simulations employing smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We utilize pressure gradients to select shock candidates and define up- and downstream positions. We obtain hydrodynamical states in the up- and downstream regimes with a series of normal and inverted kernel weightings parallel and perpendicular to the shock normals. Our on-the-fly geometrical Mach detector incorporates well within the SPH formalism and has low computational cost. We implement our Mach detector into the simulation code GADGET and alongside many SPH improvements. We test our shock finder in a sequence of shock tube tests with successively increasing Mach numbers exceeding by far the typical values inside galaxy clusters. For all shocks, we resolve the shocks well and the correct Mach numbers are assigned. An application to a strong magnetized shock tube gives stable results in full magnetohydrodynamic setups. We simulate a merger of two idealized galaxy clusters and study the shock front. Shock structures within the merging clusters as well as the cluster shock are well captured by our algorithm and assigned correct Mach numbers.

  12. Computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for shared-memory parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, Daisuke; Furuichi, Mikito; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2015-09-01

    The computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation is investigated for three types of current shared-memory parallel computer devices: many integrated core (MIC) processors, graphics processing units (GPUs), and multi-core CPUs. We are especially interested in efficient shared-memory allocation methods for each chipset, because the efficient data access patterns differ between compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming for GPUs and OpenMP programming for MIC processors and multi-core CPUs. We first introduce several parallel implementation techniques for the SPH code, and then examine these on our target computer architectures to determine the most effective algorithms for each processor unit. In addition, we evaluate the effective computing performance and power efficiency of the SPH simulation on each architecture, as these are critical metrics for overall performance in a multi-device environment. In our benchmark test, the GPU is found to produce the best arithmetic performance as a standalone device unit, and gives the most efficient power consumption. The multi-core CPU obtains the most effective computing performance. The computational speed of the MIC processor on Xeon Phi approached that of two Xeon CPUs. This indicates that using MICs is an attractive choice for existing SPH codes on multi-core CPUs parallelized by OpenMP, as it gains computational acceleration without the need for significant changes to the source code.

  13. A smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model collisions between solid, self-gravitating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, C.; Riecker, S.; Maindl, T. I.; Speith, R.; Scherrer, S.; Kley, W.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) lead to a major increase in the performance of the computation of astrophysical simulations. Owing to the different nature of GPU architecture compared to traditional central processing units (CPUs) such as x86 architecture, existing numerical codes cannot be easily migrated to run on GPU. Here, we present a new implementation of the numerical method smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using CUDA and the first astrophysical application of the new code: the collision between Ceres-sized objects. Aims: The new code allows for a tremendous increase in speed of astrophysical simulations with SPH and self-gravity at low costs for new hardware. Methods: We have implemented the SPH equations to model gas, liquids and elastic, and plastic solid bodies and added a fragmentation model for brittle materials. Self-gravity may be optionally included in the simulations and is treated by the use of a Barnes-Hut tree. Results: We find an impressive performance gain using NVIDIA consumer devices compared to our existing OpenMP code. The new code is freely available to the community upon request. If you are interested in our CUDA SPH code miluphCUDA, please write an email to Christoph Schäfer. miluphCUDA is the CUDA port of miluph. miluph is pronounced [maßl2v]. We do not support the use of the code for military purposes.

  14. Modelling large floating bodies in urban area flash-floods via a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, Raffaele; Sole, Aurelia; Mirauda, Domenica; Adamowski, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Large debris, including vehicles parked along floodplains, can cause severe damage and significant loss of life during urban area flash-floods. In this study, the authors validated and applied the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model, developed in Amicarelli et al. (2015), which reproduces in 3D the dynamics of rigid bodies driven by free surface flows, to the design of flood mitigation measures. To validate the model, the authors compared the model's predictions to the results of an experimental setup, involving a dam breach that strikes two fixed obstacles and three transportable floating bodies. Given the accuracy of the results, in terms of water depth over time and the time history of the bodies' movements, the SPH model explored in this study was used to analyse the mitigation efficiency of a proposed structural intervention - the use of small barriers (groynes) to prevent the transport of floating bodies. Different groynes configurations were examined to identify the most appropriate design and layout for urban area flash-flood damage mitigation. The authors found that groynes positioned upstream and downstream of each floating body can be effective as a risk mitigation measure for damage resulting from their movement.

  15. Numerical modeling of debris flow runout for a case in southwestern China with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Anika; Cuomo, Sabatino; Wang, Xueliang; Zhang, Luqing

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows and landslide dams are a major natural hazard causing high socioeconomic risk in inhabited mountainous areas. This is also true for vast parts of southwestern China, which are highly prone to slope failures due to several factors, such as a humid climate with high precipitation in the summer months, geological predisposing factors with highly weathered sedimentary rocks and a high seismicity. Not only do the landslides and flooding related to landslide dams threaten residents, buildings and transportation structures, but also do flooding conditions endanger power supply, which relies in this region partly on hydropower. In order to assess the potential of landslides to block rivers, it is crucial to understand which factors influence possible run-out distances and how they can be quantified. In the study we are presenting a numerical modeling analysis for a particular case of a complex landslide in Ningnan county, southwestern China, which transformed into a debris flow and blocked the river and the major road leading through the valley after heavy rainfall. For this purpose a quasi-3D Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model was implemented that can account for geotechnical slope parameters, run-out distance, velocities and deposition heights. A digital terrain model and the geometry information of the landslide were used as input data in order to estimate the relevant geotechnical parameters by back-analysis. The results of the analysis can be used for the prediction of run-out distances for future events at this site and other similar sites.

  16. Thermomechanically coupled conduction mode laser welding simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haoyue; Eberhard, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Process simulations of conduction mode laser welding are performed using the meshless Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The solid phase is modeled based on the governing equations in thermoelasticity. For the liquid phase, surface tension effects are taken into account to simulate the melt flow in the weld pool, including the Marangoni force caused by a temperature-dependent surface tension gradient. A non-isothermal solid-liquid phase transition with the release or absorption of additional energy known as the latent heat of fusion is considered. The major heat transfer through conduction is modeled, whereas heat convection and radiation are neglected. The energy input from the laser beam is modeled as a Gaussian heat source acting on the initial material surface. The developed model is implemented in Pasimodo. Numerical results obtained with the model are presented for laser spot welding and seam welding of aluminum and iron. The change of process parameters like welding speed and laser power, and their effects on weld dimensions are investigated. Furthermore, simulations may be useful to obtain the threshold for deep penetration welding and to assess the overall welding quality. A scalability and performance analysis of the implemented SPH algorithm in Pasimodo is run in a shared memory environment. The analysis reveals the potential of large welding simulations on multi-core machines.

  17. A two-dimensional Segmented Boundary Algorithm for complex moving solid boundaries in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasanizade, Sh.; Sousa, J. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    A Segmented Boundary Algorithm (SBA) is proposed to deal with complex boundaries and moving bodies in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Boundaries are formed in this algorithm with chains of lines obtained from the decomposition of two-dimensional objects, based on simple line geometry. Various two-dimensional, viscous fluid flow cases have been studied here using a truly incompressible SPH method with the aim of assessing the capabilities of the SBA. Firstly, the flow over a stationary circular cylinder in a plane channel was analyzed at steady and unsteady regimes, for a single value of blockage ratio. Subsequently, the flow produced by a moving circular cylinder with a prescribed acceleration inside a plane channel was investigated as well. Next, the simulation of the flow generated by the impulsive start of a flat plate, again inside a plane channel, has been carried out. This was followed by the study of confined sedimentation of an elliptic body subjected to gravity, for various density ratios. The set of test cases was completed with the simulation of periodic flow around a sunflower-shaped object. Extensive comparisons of the results obtained here with published data have demonstrated the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms, namely in cases involving complex geometries and moving bodies.

  18. Adaptation of a cubic smoothing spline algortihm for multi-channel data stitching at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C; Adcock, A; Azevedo, S; Liebman, J; Bond, E

    2010-12-28

    Some diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), including the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic, require multiple channels of data to achieve the required dynamic range. These channels need to be stitched together into a single time series, and they may have non-uniform and redundant time samples. We chose to apply the popular cubic smoothing spline technique to our stitching problem because we needed a general non-parametric method. We adapted one of the algorithms in the literature, by Hutchinson and deHoog, to our needs. The modified algorithm and the resulting code perform a cubic smoothing spline fit to multiple data channels with redundant time samples and missing data points. The data channels can have different, time-varying, zero-mean white noise characteristics. The method we employ automatically determines an optimal smoothing level by minimizing the Generalized Cross Validation (GCV) score. In order to automatically validate the smoothing level selection, the Weighted Sum-Squared Residual (WSSR) and zero-mean tests are performed on the residuals. Further, confidence intervals, both analytical and Monte Carlo, are also calculated. In this paper, we describe the derivation of our cubic smoothing spline algorithm. We outline the algorithm and test it with simulated and experimental data.

  19. Adaptation of a cubic smoothing spline algorithm for multi-channel data stitching at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Charles G., Jr.; Adcock, Aaron B.; Azevedo, Stephen G.; Liebman, Judith A.; Bond, Essex J.

    2011-03-01

    Some diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), including the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic, require multiple channels of data to achieve the required dynamic range. These channels need to be stitched together into a single time series, and they may have non-uniform and redundant time samples. We chose to apply the popular cubic smoothing spline technique to our stitching problem because we needed a general non-parametric method. We adapted one of the algorithms in the literature, by Hutchinson and deHoog, to our needs. The modified algorithm and the resulting code perform a cubic smoothing spline fit to multiple data channels with redundant time samples and missing data points. The data channels can have different, timevarying, zero-mean white noise characteristics. The method we employ automatically determines an optimal smoothing level by minimizing the Generalized Cross Validation (GCV) score. In order to automatically validate the smoothing level selection, the Weighted Sum-Squared Residual (WSSR) and zero-mean tests are performed on the residuals. Further, confidence intervals, both analytical and Monte Carlo, are also calculated. In this paper, we describe the derivation of our cubic smoothing spline algorithm. We outline the algorithm and test it with simulated and experimental data.

  20. Fluid-Structure Interaction Study of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Dynamics Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wenbin; Li, Kewei; Sun, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Computational modeling of heart valve dynamics incorporating both fluid dynamics and valve structural responses has been challenging. In this study, we developed a novel fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). A previously developed nonlinear finite element (FE) model of transcatheter aortic valves (TAV) was utilized to couple with SPH to simulate valve leaflet dynamics throughout the entire cardiac cycle. Comparative simulations were performed to investigate the impact of using FE-only models vs. FSI models, as well as an isotropic vs. an anisotropic leaflet material model in TAV simulations. From the results, substantial differences in leaflet kinematics between FE-only and FSI models were observed, and the FSI model could capture the realistic leaflet dynamic deformation due to its more accurate spatial and temporal loading conditions imposed on the leaflets. The stress and the strain distributions were similar between the FE and FSI simulations. However, the peak stresses were different due to the water hammer effect induced by the fluid inertia in the FSI model during the closing phase, which led to 13-28% lower peak stresses in the FE-only model compared to that of the FSI model. The simulation results also indicated that tissue anisotropy had a minor impact on hemodynamics of the valve. However, a lower tissue stiffness in the radial direction of the leaflets could reduce the leaflet peak stress caused by the water hammer effect. It is hoped that the developed FSI models can serve as an effective tool to better assess valve dynamics and optimize next generation TAV designs.

  1. Insights from inside the spinodal: Bridging thermalization time scales with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütz, Martin; Nielaba, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We report the influence of the strength of heat bath coupling on the demixing behavior in spinodal decomposing one component liquid-vapor systems. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with a van der Waals equation of state is used for the simulation. A thermostat for SPH is introduced that is based on the Berendsen thermostat. It controls the strength of heat bath coupling and allows for quenches with exponential temperature decay at a certain thermalization time scale. The present method allows us to bridge several orders of magnitude in the thermalization time scale. The early stage is highly affected by the choice of time scale. A transition from exponential growth to a 1 /2 ordinary power law scaling in the characteristic lengths is observed. At high initial temperatures the growth is logarithmic. The comparison with pure thermal simulations reveals latent heat to raise the mean system temperature. Large thermalization time scales and thermal conductivity are figured out to affect a stagnation of heating, which is explained with convective processes. Furthermore, large thermalization time scales are responsible for a stagnation of growth of domains, which is temporally embedded between early and late stage of phase separation. Therefore, it is considered as an intermediate stage. We present an aspect concerning this stage, namely that choosing larger thermalization time scales increases the duration. Moreover, it is observed that diffuse interfaces are formed during this stage, provided that the stage is apparent. We show that the differences in the evolution between pure thermal simulations and simulations with an instantaneously scaled mean temperature can be explained by the thermalization process, since a variation of the time scale allows for the bridging between these cases of limit.

  2. Spherical tensor multipolar electrostatics and smooth particle mesh Ewald summation: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, François; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-07-01

    The point-charge approximation, typically used by classical molecular mechanics force-fields, can be overcome by a multipolar expansion. For decades multipole moments were only used in the context of the rigid body approximation but recently it has become possible to combine multipolar electrostatics with molecular flexibility. The program DL_MULTI, which is derived from DL_POLY_2, includes efficient multipolar Ewald functionality up to the hexadecapole moment but the code is restricted to rigid bodies. The incorporation of flexibility into DL_MULTI would cause too large an impact on its architecture whereas the package DL_POLY_4 offers a more attractive and sustainable route to handle multipolar electrostatics. This package inherently handles molecular flexibility, which warrants sufficiently transferable atoms or atoms that are "knowledgeable" about their chemical environment (as made possible by quantum chemical topology and machine learning). DL_MULTI uses the spherical multipole formalism, which is mathematically more involved than the Cartesian one but which is more compact. DL_POLY_4 uses the computationally efficient method of smooth particle mesh Ewald (SPME) summation, which has also been parallellized by others. Therefore, combining the strengths of DL_POLY_4 and DL_MULTI poses the challenge of merging SPME with multipolar electrostatics by spherical multipole. In an effort to recast as clearly as possible the principles behind DL_MULTI, its key equations have been reformulated by the more streamlined route involving the algebra of complex numbers, and some of these equations' peculiarities clarified. This article explores theoretically the repercussions of the merging of SPME with spherical multipole electrostatics (as implemented in DL_MULTI). Difficulties in design and implementation of possible future code are discussed.

  3. Star formation rate and metallicity of damped Lyman α absorbers in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, K.; Springel, V.; Hernquist, L.

    2004-02-01

    We study the distribution of the star formation rate (SFR) and metallicity of damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) in the redshift range z= 0-4.5 using cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the Λ cold dark matter model. Our simulations include standard radiative cooling and heating with a uniform ultraviolet background, star formation, supernova (SN) feedback, as well as a phenomenological model for feedback by galactic winds. The latter allows us to examine, in particular, the effect of galactic outflows on the distribution of the SFR and metallicity of DLAs. We employ a `conservative entropy' formulation of SPH which alleviates numerical overcooling effects that affected earlier simulations. In addition, we utilize a series of simulations of varying box-size and particle number to investigate the impact of numerical resolution on our results. We find that there is a positive correlation between the projected stellar mass density and the neutral hydrogen column density (NHI) of DLAs for high NHI systems, and that there is a good correspondence in the spatial distribution of stars and DLAs in the simulations. The evolution of typical star-to-gas mass ratios in DLAs can be characterized by an increase from approximately 2 at z= 4.5 to 3 at z= 3, to 10 at z= 1 and finally to 20 at z= 0. We also find that the projected SFR density in DLAs follows the Kennicutt law well at all redshifts, and the simulated values are consistent with the recent observational estimates of this quantity by Wolfe, Prochaska & Gawiser. The rate of evolution in the mean metallicity of simulated DLAs as a function of redshift is mild, and is consistent with the rate estimated from observations. The predicted metallicity of DLAs is generally subsolar in our simulations, and there is a significant scatter in the distribution of DLA metallicity for a given NHI. However, we find that the median metallicity of simulated DLAs is close to that of Lyman-break galaxies, and is

  4. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Modeling of Gravity Currents on a Dry Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E.; Grimaldi, S.; Bui, H.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity currents flowing over porous media occur in many environmental processes and industrial applications, such as irrigation, benthic boundary layers, and oil spills. The coupling of the flow over the porous surface and the infiltration of the fluid in the porous media is complex and difficult to model. Of particular interest is the prediction of the position of the runoff front and the depth of the infiltration front. We present here a model for the flow of a finite volume of a highly viscous Newtonian fluid over a dry, homogenous porous medium. The Navier-Stokes equations describing the runoff flow are coupled to the Volume Averaged Navier-Stokes equations for the infiltration flow. The numerical solution of these equations is challenging because of the presence of two free surfaces (runoff and infiltration waves), the lack of fixed boundary conditions at the runoff front, and the difficulties in defining appropriate conditions at the surface of the porous medium. The first two challenges were addressed by using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, which is a Lagrangian, mesh-free particle method particularly suitable for modelling free surface flows. Two different approaches were used to model the flow conditions at the surface of the porous medium. The Two Domain Approach (TDA) assumes that runoff and infiltration flows occur in two separate homogenous domains; here, we assume the continuity of velocity and stresses at the interface of the two domains. The One Domain Approach (ODA) models runoff and infiltration flows as occurring through a medium whose hydraulic properties vary continuously in space. The transition from the hydraulic properties of the atmosphere and the porous medium occur in a layer near the surface of the porous medium. Expressions listed in literature were used to compute the thickness of this transition layer and the spatial variation of porosity and permeability within it. Our results showed that ODA led to slower velocities of the runoff

  5. Hydrodynamics in adaptive resolution particle simulations: Multiparticle collision dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, Uliana; Winkler, Roland G.; Sutmann, Godehard

    2016-06-01

    A new adaptive resolution technique for particle-based multi-level simulations of fluids is presented. In the approach, the representation of fluid and solvent particles is changed on the fly between an atomistic and a coarse-grained description. The present approach is based on a hybrid coupling of the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method and molecular dynamics (MD), thereby coupling stochastic and deterministic particle-based methods. Hydrodynamics is examined by calculating velocity and current correlation functions for various mixed and coupled systems. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic properties of the mixed fluid are conserved by a suitable coupling of the two particle methods, and that the simulation results agree well with theoretical expectations.

  6. Smooth particle hydrodynamics method for modeling cavitation-induced fracture of a fluid under shock-wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, M. N.; Kedrinskii, V. K.

    2013-11-01

    It is demonstrated that the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics can be used to study the flow structure in a cavitating medium with a high concentration of the gas phase and to describe the process of inversion of the two-phase state of this medium: transition from a cavitating fluid to a system consisting of a gas and particles. A numerical analysis of the dynamics of the state of a hemispherical droplet under shock-wave loading shows that focusing of the shock wave reflected from the free surface of the droplet leads to the formation of a dense, but rapidly expanding cavitation cluster at the droplet center. By the time t = 500 µs, the bubbles at the cluster center not only coalesce and form a foam-type structure, but also transform to a gas-particle system, thus, forming an almost free rapidly expanding zone. The mechanism of this process defined previously as an internal "cavitation explosion" of the droplet is validated by means of mathematical modeling of the problem by the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method. The deformation of the cavitating droplet is finalized by its decomposition into individual fragments and particles.

  7. Classical to path-integral adaptive resolution in molecular simulation: towards a smooth quantum-classical coupling.

    PubMed

    Poma, A B; Delle Site, L

    2010-06-25

    Simulations that couple different molecular models in an adaptive way by changing resolution on the fly allow us to identify the relevant degrees of freedom of a system. This, in turn, leads to a detailed understanding of the essential physics which characterizes a system. While the delicate process of transition from one model to another is well understood for the adaptivity between classical molecular models the same cannot be said for the quantum-classical adaptivity. The main reason for this is the difficulty in describing a continuous transition between two different kinds of physical principles: probabilistic for the quantum and deterministic for the classical. Here we report the basic principles of an algorithm that allows for a continuous and smooth transition by employing the path integral description of atoms.

  8. Gas cooling in semi-analytic models and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations: are results consistent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saro, A.; De Lucia, G.; Borgani, S.; Dolag, K.

    2010-08-01

    We present a detailed comparison between the galaxy populations within a massive cluster, as predicted by hydrodynamical smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations and by a semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation. Both models include gas cooling and a simple prescription of star formation, which consists in transforming instantaneously any cold gas available into stars, while neglecting any source of energy feedback. This simplified comparison is thus not meant to be compared with observational data, but is aimed at understanding the level of agreement, at the stripped-down level considered, between two techniques that are widely used to model galaxy formation in a cosmological framework and which present complementary advantages and disadvantages. We find that, in general, galaxy populations from SAMs and SPH have similar statistical properties, in agreement with previous studies. However, when comparing galaxies on an object-by-object basis, we find a number of interesting differences: (i) the star formation histories of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from SAM and SPH models differ significantly, with the SPH BCG exhibiting a lower level of star formation activity at low redshift, and a more intense and shorter initial burst of star formation with respect to its SAM counterpart; (ii) while all stars associated with the BCG were formed in its progenitors in the SAM used here, this holds true only for half of the final BCG stellar mass in the SPH simulation, the remaining half being contributed by tidal stripping of stars from the diffuse stellar component associated with galaxies accreted on the cluster halo; (iii) SPH satellites can lose up to 90 per cent of their stellar mass at the time of accretion, due to tidal stripping, a process not included in the SAM used in this paper; (iv) in the SPH simulation, significant cooling occurs on the most massive satellite galaxies and this lasts for up to 1 Gyr after accretion. This physical process is

  9. Model Adaptation for Prognostics in a Particle Filtering Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2011-01-01

    One of the key motivating factors for using particle filters for prognostics is the ability to include model parameters as part of the state vector to be estimated. This performs model adaptation in conjunction with state tracking, and thus, produces a tuned model that can used for long term predictions. This feature of particle filters works in most part due to the fact that they are not subject to the "curse of dimensionality", i.e. the exponential growth of computational complexity with state dimension. However, in practice, this property holds for "well-designed" particle filters only as dimensionality increases. This paper explores the notion of wellness of design in the context of predicting remaining useful life for individual discharge cycles of Li-ion batteries. Prognostic metrics are used to analyze the tradeoff between different model designs and prediction performance. Results demonstrate how sensitivity analysis may be used to arrive at a well-designed prognostic model that can take advantage of the model adaptation properties of a particle filter.

  10. Length oscillation mimicking periodic individual deep inspirations during tidal breathing attenuates force recovery and adaptation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Raqeeb, Abdul; Solomon, Dennis; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2010-11-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) is able to generate maximal force under static conditions, and this isometric force can be maintained over a large length range due to length adaptation. The increased force at short muscle length could lead to excessive narrowing of the airways. Prolonged exposure of ASM to submaximal stimuli also increases the muscle's ability to generate force in a process called force adaptation. To date, the effects of length and force adaptation have only been demonstrated under static conditions. In the mechanically dynamic environment of the lung, ASM is constantly subjected to periodic stretches by the parenchyma due to tidal breathing and deep inspiration. It is not known whether force recovery due to muscle adaptation to a static environment could occur in a dynamic environment. In this study the effect of length oscillation mimicking tidal breathing and deep inspiration was examined. Force recovery after a length change was attenuated in the presence of length oscillation, except at very short lengths. Force adaptation was abolished by length oscillation. We conclude that in a healthy lung (with intact airway-parenchymal tethering) where airways are not allowed to narrow excessively, large stretches (associated with deep inspiration) may prevent the ability of the muscle to generate maximal force that would occur under static conditions irrespective of changes in mean length; mechanical perturbation on ASM due to tidal breathing and deep inspiration, therefore, is the first line of defense against excessive bronchoconstriction that may result from static length and force adaptation.

  11. Adaptive Beam Smoothing with Plasma-Pinholes for Laser-Entrance-Hole Transmission Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Ruggles, Lawrence E.; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathn E.; Speas, C. Shane; Porter, John L.

    2014-10-01

    The concept of Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) requires the deposition of laser energy into a fuel-filled cylinder that is exposed to a magnetic field. To improve process, it is essential to optimize transmission through the foil covered laser entrance hole (LEH), which involves minimizing laser-plasma-instabilities (LPI). Laser beam smoothing is the most common approach to minimize LPI. It typically involves a Random-Phase-Plate (RPP) and smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). This approach can still cause LPI issues due to intensity ``hot-spots'' on a ps-time scale, and it inconveniently fixes the usable spot size. Changing laser spot sizes requires multiple dedicated RPPs. To study ideal spot sizes on a MagLIF LEH, the RPP/SSD approach gets cost prohibitive. As alternative, we use sacrificial thin foils (500 nm or less) at the laser focus, which instantly turn into a plasma-pinhole, acting as spatial filter. The smoothed laser spot size grows linearly with distance from best focus. We present experimental data for smoothing performance and resulting LEH transmission. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. DOE's Nat'l Nucl. Sec. Admin. under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. A Parallel Implementation of a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Method on Graphics Hardware Using the Compute Unified Device Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Wong Unhong; Wong Honcheng; Tang Zesheng

    2010-05-21

    The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), which is a class of meshfree particle methods (MPMs), has a wide range of applications from micro-scale to macro-scale as well as from discrete systems to continuum systems. Graphics hardware, originally designed for computer graphics, now provide unprecedented computational power for scientific computation. Particle system needs a huge amount of computations in physical simulation. In this paper, an efficient parallel implementation of a SPH method on graphics hardware using the Compute Unified Device Architecture is developed for fluid simulation. Comparing to the corresponding CPU implementation, our experimental results show that the new approach allows significant speedups of fluid simulation through handling huge amount of computations in parallel on graphics hardware.

  13. A crystal plasticity smooth-particle hydrodynamics approach and its application to equal-channel angular pressing simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Anxin; Hartmaier, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    A crystal plasticity (CP) modelling approach based on smooth-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been developed to study severe plastic deformation of crystalline materials. The method has been implemented and validated by comparing the stress distribution and stress evolution of several SPH and FEM simulations for an anisotropic elastic material. The findings show that the SPH method produces an efficient and numerically robust solution for solid-mechanics boundary value problems. Furthermore, the approach has been extended to incorporate a CP model and employed to simulate FCC polycrystals under the equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) condition. It was found that the polycrystal contains four distinct regions with different deformation mechanisms. For the case that friction between deformable particles and boundary particles was neglected, more than one half of the grains suffered severe plastic deformation. The CP-SPH developed here thus is demonstrated to be a powerful tool to study grain refinement under severe plastic deformation.

  14. Distributed Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimizer in Dynamic Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E

    2007-01-01

    In the real world, we have to frequently deal with searching and tracking an optimal solution in a dynamical and noisy environment. This demands that the algorithm not only find the optimal solution but also track the trajectory of the changing solution. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is a population-based stochastic optimization technique, which can find an optimal, or near optimal, solution to a numerical and qualitative problem. In PSO algorithm, the problem solution emerges from the interactions between many simple individual agents called particles, which make PSO an inherently distributed algorithm. However, the traditional PSO algorithm lacks the ability to track the optimal solution in a dynamic and noisy environment. In this paper, we present a distributed adaptive PSO (DAPSO) algorithm that can be used for tracking a non-stationary optimal solution in a dynamically changing and noisy environment.

  15. Influence of confinement by smooth and rough walls on particle dynamics in dense hard-sphere suspensions.

    PubMed

    Eral, H B; van den Ende, D; Mugele, F; Duits, M H G

    2009-12-01

    We used video microscopy and particle tracking to study the dynamics of confined hard-sphere suspensions. Our fluids consisted of 1.1-microm-diameter silica spheres suspended at volume fractions of 0.33-0.42 in water-dimethyl sulfoxide. Suspensions were confined in a quasiparallel geometry between two glass surfaces: a millimeter-sized rough sphere and a smooth flat wall. First, as the separation distance (H) is decreased from 18 to 1 particle diameter, a transition takes place from a subdiffusive behavior (as in bulk) at large H, to completely caged particle dynamics at small H. These changes are accompanied by a strong decrease in the amplitude of the mean-square displacement (MSD) in the horizontal plane parallel to the confining surfaces. In contrast, the global volume fraction essentially remains constant when H is decreased. Second, measuring the MSD as a function of distance from the confining walls, we found that the MSD is not spatially uniform but smaller close to the walls. This effect is the strongest near the smooth wall where layering takes place. Although confinement also induces local variations in volume fraction, the spatial variations in MSD can be attributed only partially to this effect. The changes in MSD are predominantly a direct effect of the confining surfaces. Hence, both the wall roughness and the separation distance (H) influence the dynamics in confined geometries.

  16. A fast and explicit algorithm for simulating the dynamics of small dust grains with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel J.; Laibe, Guillaume

    2015-07-01

    We describe a simple method for simulating the dynamics of small grains in a dusty gas, relevant to micron-sized grains in the interstellar medium and grains of centimetre size and smaller in protoplanetary discs. The method involves solving one extra diffusion equation for the dust fraction in addition to the usual equations of hydrodynamics. This `diffusion approximation for dust' is valid when the dust stopping time is smaller than the computational timestep. We present a numerical implementation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics that is conservative, accurate and fast. It does not require any implicit timestepping and can be straightforwardly ported into existing 3D codes.

  17. Local Adaptive Calibration of the GLASS Surface Incident Shortwave Radiation Product Using Smoothing Spline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liang, S.; Wang, G.

    2015-12-01

    Incident solar radiation (ISR) over the Earth's surface plays an important role in determining the Earth's climate and environment. Generally, can be obtained from direct measurements, remotely sensed data, or reanalysis and general circulation models (GCMs) data. Each type of product has advantages and limitations: the surface direct measurements provide accurate but sparse spatial coverage, whereas other global products may have large uncertainties. Ground measurements have been normally used for validation and occasionally calibration, but transforming their "true values" spatially to improve the satellite products is still a new and challenging topic. In this study, an improved thin-plate smoothing spline approach is presented to locally "calibrate" the Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS) ISR product using the reconstructed ISR data from surface meteorological measurements. The influences of surface elevation on ISR estimation was also considered in the proposed method. The point-based surface reconstructed ISR was used as the response variable, and the GLASS ISR product and the surface elevation data at the corresponding locations as explanatory variables to train the thin plate spline model. We evaluated the performance of the approach using the cross-validation method at both daily and monthly time scales over China. We also evaluated estimated ISR based on the thin-plate spline method using independent ground measurements at 10 sites from the Coordinated Enhanced Observation Network (CEON). These validation results indicated that the thin plate smoothing spline method can be effectively used for calibrating satellite derived ISR products using ground measurements to achieve better accuracy.

  18. Adaptive Parametric Spectral Estimation with Kalman Smoothing for Online Early Seizure Detection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun S.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Cash, Sydney S.; Truccolo, Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Tracking spectral changes in neural signals, such as local field potentials (LFPs) and scalp or intracranial electroencephalograms (EEG, iEEG), is an important problem in early detection and prediction of seizures. Most approaches have focused on either parametric or nonparametric spectral estimation methods based on moving time windows. Here, we explore an adaptive (time-varying) parametric ARMA approach for tracking spectral changes in neural signals based on the fixed-interval Kalman smoother. We apply the method to seizure detection based on spectral features of intracortical LFPs recorded from a person with pharmacologically intractable focal epilepsy. We also devise and test an approach for real-time tracking of spectra based on the adaptive parametric method with the fixed-interval Kalman smoother. The order of ARMA models is determined via the AIC computed in moving time windows. We quantitatively demonstrate the advantages of using the adaptive parametric estimation method in seizure detection over nonparametric alternatives based exclusively on moving time windows. Overall, the adaptive parametric approach significantly improves the statistical separability of interictal and ictal epochs. PMID:24663686

  19. A 'Good' muscle in a 'Bad' environment: the importance of airway smooth muscle force adaptation to airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Ynuk; Chapman, David G; Paré, Peter D; King, Gregory G; Salome, Cheryl M

    2011-12-15

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, with a consequent increase in spasmogens, and exaggerated airway narrowing in response to stimuli, termed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The nature of any relationship between inflammation and AHR is less clear. Recent ex vivo data has suggested a novel mechanism by which inflammation may lead to AHR, in which increased basal ASM-tone, due to the presence of spasmogens in the airways, may "strengthen" the ASM and ultimately lead to exaggerated airway narrowing. This phenomenon was termed "force adaptation" [Bossé, Y., Chin, L.Y., Paré, P.D., Seow, C.Y., 2009. Adaptation of airway smooth muscle to basal tone: relevance to airway hyperresponsiveness. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 40, 13-18]. However, it is unknown whether the magnitude of the effect of force adaptation ex vivo could contribute to exaggerated airway narrowing in vivo. Our aim was to utilize a computational model of ASM shortening in order to quantify the potential effect of force adaptation on airway narrowing when all other mechanical factors were kept constant. The shortening in the model is dictated by a balance between physiological loads and ASM force-generating capacity at different lengths. The results suggest that the magnitude of the effect of force adaptation on ASM shortening would lead to substantially more airway narrowing during bronchial challenge at any given airway generation. We speculate that the increased basal ASM-tone in asthma, due to the presence of inflammation-derived spasmogens, produces an increase in the force-generating capacity of ASM, predisposing to AHR during subsequent challenge.

  20. Adaptive smoothing of high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging data by generalized cross-validation improves Q-ball orientation distribution function reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Metwalli, Nader S; Hu, Xiaoping P; Carew, John D

    2010-09-01

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is a high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI) technique for reconstructing the orientation distribution function (ODF). Some form of smoothing or regularization is typically required in the ODF reconstruction from low signal-to-noise ratio HARDI data. The amount of smoothing or regularization is usually set a priori at the discretion of the investigator. In this article, we apply an adaptive and objective means of smoothing the raw HARDI data using the smoothing splines on the sphere method with generalized cross-validation (GCV) to estimate the diffusivity profile in each voxel. Subsequently, we reconstruct the ODF, from the smoothed data, based on the Funk-Radon transform (FRT) used in QBI. The spline method was applied to both simulated data and in vivo human brain data. Simulated data show that the smoothing splines on the sphere method with GCV smoothing reduces the mean squared error in estimates of the ODF as compared with the standard analytical QBI approach. The human data demonstrate the utility of the method for estimating smooth ODFs.

  1. Smoothed Biasing Forces Yield Unbiased Free Energies with the Extended-System Adaptive Biasing Force Method.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Adrien; Lelièvre, Tony; Stoltz, Gabriel; Hénin, Jérôme

    2016-12-27

    We report a theoretical description and numerical tests of the extended-system adaptive biasing force method (eABF), together with an unbiased estimator of the free energy surface from eABF dynamics. Whereas the original ABF approach uses its running estimate of the free energy gradient as the adaptive biasing force, eABF is built on the idea that the exact free energy gradient is not necessary for efficient exploration, and that it is still possible to recover the exact free energy separately with an appropriate estimator. eABF does not directly bias the collective coordinates of interest, but rather fictitious variables that are harmonically coupled to them; therefore is does not require second derivative estimates, making it easily applicable to a wider range of problems than ABF. Furthermore, the extended variables present a smoother, coarse-grain-like sampling problem on a mollified free energy surface, leading to faster exploration and convergence. We also introduce CZAR, a simple, unbiased free energy estimator from eABF trajectories. eABF/CZAR converges to the physical free energy surface faster than standard ABF for a wide range of parameters.

  2. Effect of lobe pumping on human albumin: development of a lobe pump simulator using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gomme, Peter T; Prakash, Mahesh; Hunt, Ben; Stokes, Nick; Cleary, Paul; Tatford, Owen C; Bertolini, Joseph

    2006-02-01

    Using SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics), the motion of a lobe pump under load was simulated in order to predict the level of shear stress experienced by a protein solution. By varying the gap size between the lobes and pump housing, variations in pump efficiency and shear stress were determined. The simulations indicated that pump shear was dependent on gap size, with shear stress levels (0-40 Pa) correlating with those estimated in previous albumin-pumping studies. As gap size increased, the number of fluid particles experiencing low shear (<10 Pa) increased, whereas those experiencing high shear (>20 Pa) showed a decreasing trend. The pump efficiency, however, decreased with gap size, requiring more lobe revolutions to pass a unit volume. Taken together, these observations indicate that lobe pumps operated with increased gaps between the rotors and the housing result in larger number of particles within the fluid experiencing shear stresses. Moreover, the simulations indicate that it is best to use larger lobe pumps operated at high efficiency to transfer protein-containing solutions.

  3. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-05-07

    Background: The calculation of diffusion-controlled ligand binding rates is important for understanding enzyme mechanisms as well as designing enzyme inhibitors. Methods: We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) BC, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new BC treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with “imperfect” reaction rates. Results: The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and thenmore » applied to the calculation of ligand binding to a mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Conclusions: Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.« less

  4. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael D.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to an acetylcholinesterase monomer. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) boundary condition, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new boundary condition treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with "imperfect" reaction rates. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  5. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-05-07

    Background: The calculation of diffusion-controlled ligand binding rates is important for understanding enzyme mechanisms as well as designing enzyme inhibitors. Methods: We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) BC, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new BC treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with “imperfect” reaction rates. Results: The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to a mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Conclusions: Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  6. Object tracking with adaptive HOG detector and adaptive Rao-Blackwellised particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Stefano; Paleari, Marco; Ariano, Paolo; Bona, Basilio

    2012-01-01

    Scenarios for a manned mission to the Moon or Mars call for astronaut teams to be accompanied by semiautonomous robots. A prerequisite for human-robot interaction is the capability of successfully tracking humans and objects in the environment. In this paper we present a system for real-time visual object tracking in 2D images for mobile robotic systems. The proposed algorithm is able to specialize to individual objects and to adapt to substantial changes in illumination and object appearance during tracking. The algorithm is composed by two main blocks: a detector based on Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) descriptors and linear Support Vector Machines (SVM), and a tracker which is implemented by an adaptive Rao-Blackwellised particle filter (RBPF). The SVM is re-trained online on new samples taken from previous predicted positions. We use the effective sample size to decide when the classifier needs to be re-trained. Position hypotheses for the tracked object are the result of a clustering procedure applied on the set of particles. The algorithm has been tested on challenging video sequences presenting strong changes in object appearance, illumination, and occlusion. Experimental tests show that the presented method is able to achieve near real-time performances with a precision of about 7 pixels on standard video sequences of dimensions 320 × 240.

  7. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics method applied to pulsatile flow inside a rigid two-dimensional model of left heart cavity.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, S; Kadem, L; Rogers, B D; Hassan, I

    2012-11-01

    This paper aims to extend the application of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a meshfree particle method, to simulate flow inside a model of the heart's left ventricle (LV). This work is considered the first attempt to simulate flow inside a heart cavity using a meshfree particle method. Simulating this kind of flow, characterized by high pulsatility and moderate Reynolds number using SPH is challenging. As a consequence, validation of the computational code using benchmark cases is required prior to simulating the flow inside a model of the LV. In this work, this is accomplished by simulating an unsteady oscillating flow (pressure amplitude: A = 2500 N ∕ m(3) and Womersley number: W(o)  = 16) and the steady lid-driven cavity flow (Re = 3200, 5000). The results are compared against analytical solutions and reference data to assess convergence. Then, both benchmark cases are combined and a pulsatile jet in a cavity is simulated and the results are compared with the finite volume method. Here, an approach to deal with inflow and outflow boundary conditions is introduced. Finally, pulsatile inlet flow in a rigid model of the LV is simulated. The results demonstrate the ability of SPH to model complex cardiovascular flows and to track the history of fluid properties. Some interesting features of SPH are also demonstrated in this study, including the relation between particle resolution and sound speed to control compressibility effects and also order of convergence in SPH simulations, which is consistently demonstrated to be between first-order and second-order at the moderate Reynolds numbers investigated.

  8. Smooth particle hydrodynamics: importance of correction terms in adaptive resolution algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimi, J.-M.; Serna, A.; Pastor, C.; Bernabeu, G.

    2003-11-01

    We describe TREEASPH, a new code to evolve self-gravitating fluids, both with and without a collisionless component. In TREEASPH, gravitational forces are computed from a hierarchical tree algorithm (TREEcode), while hydrodynamic properties are computed by using a SPH method that includes the ∇h correction terms appearing when the spatial resolution h(t,r) is not a constant. Another important feature, which considerably increases the code efficiency on sequential and vectorial computers, is that time-stepping is performed from a PEC scheme (Predict-Evaluate-Correct) modified to allow for individual timesteps. Some authors have previously noted that the ∇h correction terms are needed to avoid the introduction on simulations of a non-physical entropy. By using TREEASPH we show here that, in cosmological simulations, this non-physical entropy has a negative sign. As a consequence, when the ∇h terms are neglected, the density peaks associated to shock fronts are overestimated. This in turn results in an overestimated efficiency of star-formation processes.

  9. Measuring Ejecta from Inspiralling Binary Neutron Stars using Smoothed-particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Monica; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Faber, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational waves, detectable perturbations in spacetime, can arise from astrophysical systems such as inspiralling binary neutron stars, the remnants of the core collapse of massive stars. In the inspiral process, neutron stars, composed of highly dense nuclear matter, are torn apart by each others gravity and eject matter. Using both gravitational waves and direct observations of ejected matter, we may gain valuable new information about the composition of neutron stars. Using several previously studied test cases, we seek to determine how the amount of ejected matter depends on the physical parameters of these systems. To do this, we use a particle-based hydrodynamics code which can accurately simulate binary neutron star systems with variable equation of state, spin, mass ratio, and eccentricity, and includes the lowest-order effects from gravitational wave emission. I would like to thank RIT's College of Science as well as the Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation for support and funding.

  10. Some New Algorithms for Boundary Value Problems in Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-06

    LABORATORIES HSS, INC ATTN: A D THORNBROUGH ATTN: D HANSEN ATTN: R BACKSTROM ATTN: D DAHLGREN INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES ATTN: T P WRIGHT ATTN: E BAUER...UNCLASS I FlED Za ;;:( .,~l Tv C • .l.SS•F’C.l- 7.0111 Au T ~ORI TY l )15"~18UT ON ’ .l.JAILA31L"" OF ’lE~Q;>r N/ A s ince Unclass ified fo r r elease...on) SONE NEW ALGORITHHS FOR BOUND.\\RY VALUE PROBLEHS I N SNOOTH PARTICLE HYDiWDYNANI CS 11 ~~’ISONAL Av " ;..OR(S) Campbe ll, Phil N. t )a rvoe

  11. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12

    material flows through a still mesh. This is not typically done in an ALE3D analysis, especially if Lagrange elements exist. Deforming Lagrange elements would certainly tangle with a Eulerian mesh eventually. The best method in this case is to have an advecting mesh positioned as some relaxed version of the pre and post Lagrange step; this gives the best opportunity of modeling a high energy event with a combination of Lagrange and ALE elements. Dyne3D is another explicit dynamic analysis code, ParaDyn being the parallel version. ParaDyn is used for predicting the transient response of three dimensional structures using Lagrangian solid mechanics. Large deformation and mesh tangling is often resolved through the use of an element deletion scheme. This is useful to accommodate component failure, but if it is done purely as a means to preserve a useful mesh it can lead to problems because it does not maintain continuity of the material bulk response. Whatever medium exists between structural components is typically not modeled in ParaDyn. Instead, a structure either has a known loading profile applied or given initial conditions. The many included contact algorithms can calculate the loading response of materials if and when they collide. A recent implementation of an SPH module in which failed or deleted material nodes are converted to independent particles is currently being utilized for a variety of spall related problems and high velocity impact scenarios. Figure 4 shows an example of a projectile, given an initial velocity, and how it fails the first plate which generates SPH particles which then interact with and damage the second plate.

  12. Benchmark tests and spin adaptation for the particle-particle random phase approximation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; van Aggelen, Helen; Steinmann, Stephan N; Peng, Degao; Yang, Weitao

    2013-11-07

    The particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) provides an approximation to the correlation energy in density functional theory via the adiabatic connection [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)]. It has virtually no delocalization error nor static correlation error for single-bond systems. However, with its formal O(N(6)) scaling, the pp-RPA is computationally expensive. In this paper, we implement a spin-separated and spin-adapted pp-RPA algorithm, which reduces the computational cost by a substantial factor. We then perform benchmark tests on the G2/97 enthalpies of formation database, DBH24 reaction barrier database, and four test sets for non-bonded interactions (HB6/04, CT7/04, DI6/04, and WI9/04). For the G2/97 database, the pp-RPA gives a significantly smaller mean absolute error (8.3 kcal/mol) than the direct particle-hole RPA (ph-RPA) (22.7 kcal/mol). Furthermore, the error in the pp-RPA is nearly constant with the number of atoms in a molecule, while the error in the ph-RPA increases. For chemical reactions involving typical organic closed-shell molecules, pp- and ph-RPA both give accurate reaction energies. Similarly, both RPAs perform well for reaction barriers and nonbonded interactions. These results suggest that the pp-RPA gives reliable energies in chemical applications. The adiabatic connection formalism based on pairing matrix fluctuation is therefore expected to lead to widely applicable and accurate density functionals.

  13. Right Ventricular Enlargement and Renal Function Are Associated With Smooth Introduction of Adaptive Servo-Ventilation Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Iwasaku, Toshihiro; Okuhara, Yoshitaka; Eguchi, Akiyo; Ando, Tomotaka; Naito, Yoshiro; Masuyama, Tohru; Hirotani, Shinichi

    2017-04-06

    Although adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) therapy has beneficial effects on chronic heart failure (CHF), a relatively large number of CHF patients cannot undergo ASV therapy due to general discomfort from the mask and/or positive airway pressure. The present study aimed to clarify baseline patient characteristics which are associated with the smooth introduction of ASV treatment in stable CHF inpatients.Thirty-two consecutive heart failure (HF) inpatients were enrolled (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 45%, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) > 10 mL/minute/1.73m(2), and apnea-hypopnea index < 30/hour). After the patients were clinically stabilized on optimal therapy, they underwent portable polysomnography and echocardiography, and then received ASV therapy. The patients were divided into two groups: a smooth introduction group (n = 18) and non-smooth introduction group (n = 14). Smooth introduction of ASV treatment was defined as ASV usage for 4 hours and more on the first night. Univariate analysis showed that the smooth introduction group differed significantly from the non-smooth introduction group in age, hemoglobin level, eGFR, HF origin, LVEF, right ventricular (RV) diastolic dimension (RVDd), RV dp/dt, and RV fractional shortening. Multivariate analyses revealed that RVDd, eGFR, and LVEF were independently associated with smooth introduction. In addition, RVDd and eGFR seemed to be better diagnostic parameters for longer usage for ASV therapy according to the analysis of receiver operating characteristics curves.RV enlargement, eGFR, and LVEF are associated with the smooth introduction of ASV therapy in CHF inpatients.

  14. Improved adhesion, growth and maturation of vascular smooth muscle cells on polyethylene grafted with bioactive molecules and carbon particles.

    PubMed

    Parizek, Martin; Kasalkova, Nikola; Bacakova, Lucie; Slepicka, Petr; Lisa, Vera; Blazkova, Martina; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2009-11-20

    High-density polyethylene (PE) foils were modified by an Ar(+) plasma discharge and subsequent grafting with biomolecules, namely glycine (Gly), polyethylene glycol (PEG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), colloidal carbon particles (C) or BSA and C (BSA + C). As revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), the surface chemical structure and surface morphology of PE changed dramatically after plasma treatment. The contact angle decreased for the samples treated by plasma, mainly in relation to the formation of oxygen structures during plasma irradiation. A further decrease in the contact angle was obvious after glycine and PEG grafting. The increase in oxygen concentration after glycine and PEG grafting proved that the two molecules were chemically linked to the plasma-activated surface. Plasma treatment led to ablation of the PE surface layer, thus the surface morphology was changed and the surface roughness was increased. The materials were then seeded with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) derived from rat aorta and incubated in a DMEM medium with fetal bovine serum. Generally, the cells adhered and grew better on modified rather than on unmodified PE samples. Immunofluorescence showed that focal adhesion plaques containing talin, vinculin and paxillin were most apparent in cells on PE grafted with PEG or BSA + C, and the fibres containing alpha-actin, beta-actin or SM1 and SM2 myosins were thicker, more numerous and more brightly stained in the cells on all modified PE samples than on pristine PE. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed increased concentrations of focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin and also a cytoskeletal protein beta-actin in cells on PE modified with BSA + C. A contractile protein alpha-actin was increased in cells on PE grafted with PEG or Gly. These results showed that PE activated with plasma and subsequently grafted with bioactive molecules and colloidal C

  15. Improved Adhesion, Growth and Maturation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells on Polyethylene Grafted with Bioactive Molecules and Carbon Particles

    PubMed Central

    Parizek, Martin; Kasalkova, Nikola; Bacakova, Lucie; Slepicka, Petr; Lisa, Vera; Blazkova, Martina; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2009-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (PE) foils were modified by an Ar+ plasma discharge and subsequent grafting with biomolecules, namely glycine (Gly), polyethylene glycol (PEG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), colloidal carbon particles (C) or BSA and C (BSA + C). As revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), the surface chemical structure and surface morphology of PE changed dramatically after plasma treatment. The contact angle decreased for the samples treated by plasma, mainly in relation to the formation of oxygen structures during plasma irradiation. A further decrease in the contact angle was obvious after glycine and PEG grafting. The increase in oxygen concentration after glycine and PEG grafting proved that the two molecules were chemically linked to the plasma-activated surface. Plasma treatment led to ablation of the PE surface layer, thus the surface morphology was changed and the surface roughness was increased. The materials were then seeded with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) derived from rat aorta and incubated in a DMEM medium with fetal bovine serum. Generally, the cells adhered and grew better on modified rather than on unmodified PE samples. Immunofluorescence showed that focal adhesion plaques containing talin, vinculin and paxillin were most apparent in cells on PE grafted with PEG or BSA + C, and the fibres containing α-actin, β-actin or SM1 and SM2 myosins were thicker, more numerous and more brightly stained in the cells on all modified PE samples than on pristine PE. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed increased concentrations of focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin and also a cytoskeletal protein β-actin in cells on PE modified with BSA + C. A contractile protein α-actin was increased in cells on PE grafted with PEG or Gly. These results showed that PE activated with plasma and subsequently grafted with bioactive molecules and colloidal C particles

  16. A comparison of finite element analysis to smooth particle hydrodynamics for application to projectile impact on cementitious material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordendale, Nikolas A.; Heard, William F.; Sherburn, Jesse A.; Basu, Prodyot K.

    2016-03-01

    The response of structural components of high-strength cementitious (HSC) materials to projectile impact is characterized by high-rate fragmentation resulting from strong compressive shock waves coupled with reflected tensile waves. Accurate modeling of armor panels of such brittle materials under high-velocity projectile impact is a complex problem requiring meticulous experimental characterization of material properties. In a recent paper by the authors, an approach to handle such problems based on a modified Advanced Fundamental Concrete (AFC) constitutive model was developed. In the HSC panels considered in this study, an analogous approach is applied, and the predictions are verified with ballistic impact test data. Traditional Lagrangian finite element analysis (FEA) of these problems tends to introduce errors and suffers from convergence issues resulting from large deformations at free surfaces. Also, FEA cannot properly account for the issues of secondary impact of spalled fragments when multiple armor panels are used. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is considered to be an attractive alternative to resolve these and other issues. However, SPH-based quantitative results have been found to be less accurate than the FEA-based ones when the deformations are not sufficiently large. This paper primarily focuses on a comparison of FEA and SPH models to predict high-velocity projectile impact on single and stacked HSC panels. Results are compared to recent ballistic experiments performed as a part of this research, and conclusions are drawn based on the findings.

  17. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Continuous Boundary Force method for Navier-Stokes equations subject to Robin boundary condition

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Bao, Jie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-02-15

    Robin boundary condition for the Navier-Stokes equations is used to model slip conditions at the fluid-solid boundaries. A novel Continuous Boundary Force (CBF) method is proposed for solving the Navier-Stokes equations subject to Robin boundary condition. In the CBF method, the Robin boundary condition at boundary is replaced by the homogeneous Neumann boundary condition at the boundary and a volumetric force term added to the momentum conservation equation. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method is used to solve the resulting Navier-Stokes equations. We present solutions for two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in domains bounded by flat and curved boundaries subject to various forms of the Robin boundary condition. The numerical accuracy and convergence are examined through comparison of the SPH-CBF results with the solutions of finite difference or finite element method. Taken the no-slip boundary condition as a special case of slip boundary condition, we demonstrate that the SPH-CBF method describes accurately both no-slip and slip conditions.

  18. Adaptive multifocus image fusion using block compressed sensing with smoothed projected Landweber integration in the wavelet domain.

    PubMed

    V S, Unni; Mishra, Deepak; Subrahmanyam, G R K S

    2016-12-01

    The need for image fusion in current image processing systems is increasing mainly due to the increased number and variety of image acquisition techniques. Image fusion is the process of combining substantial information from several sensors using mathematical techniques in order to create a single composite image that will be more comprehensive and thus more useful for a human operator or other computer vision tasks. This paper presents a new approach to multifocus image fusion based on sparse signal representation. Block-based compressive sensing integrated with a projection-driven compressive sensing (CS) recovery that encourages sparsity in the wavelet domain is used as a method to get the focused image from a set of out-of-focus images. Compression is achieved during the image acquisition process using a block compressive sensing method. An adaptive thresholding technique within the smoothed projected Landweber recovery process reconstructs high-resolution focused images from low-dimensional CS measurements of out-of-focus images. Discrete wavelet transform and dual-tree complex wavelet transform are used as the sparsifying basis for the proposed fusion. The main finding lies in the fact that sparsification enables a better selection of the fusion coefficients and hence better fusion. A Laplacian mixture model fit is done in the wavelet domain and estimation of the probability density function (pdf) parameters by expectation maximization leads us to the proper selection of the coefficients of the fused image. Using the proposed method compared with the fusion scheme without employing the projected Landweber (PL) scheme and the other existing CS-based fusion approaches, it is observed that with fewer samples itself, the proposed method outperforms other approaches.

  19. An adaptive non-local means filter for denoising live-cell images and improving particle detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Parton, Richard; Ball, Graeme; Qiu, Zhen; Greenaway, Alan H; Davis, Ilan; Lu, Weiping

    2010-12-01

    Fluorescence imaging of dynamical processes in live cells often results in a low signal-to-noise ratio. We present a novel feature-preserving non-local means approach to denoise such images to improve feature recovery and particle detection. The commonly used non-local means filter is not optimal for noisy biological images containing small features of interest because image noise prevents accurate determination of the correct coefficients for averaging, leading to over-smoothing and other artifacts. Our adaptive method addresses this problem by constructing a particle feature probability image, which is based on Haar-like feature extraction. The particle probability image is then used to improve the estimation of the correct coefficients for averaging. We show that this filter achieves higher peak signal-to-noise ratio in denoised images and has a greater capability in identifying weak particles when applied to synthetic data. We have applied this approach to live-cell images resulting in enhanced detection of end-binding-protein 1 foci on dynamically extending microtubules in photo-sensitive Drosophila tissues. We show that our feature-preserving non-local means filter can reduce the threshold of imaging conditions required to obtain meaningful data.

  20. Moment preserving adaptive particle weights using octree velocity distributions for PIC simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Robert Scott; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2012-11-27

    The ratio of computational to physical particles is of primary concern to statistical particle based simulations such as DSMC and PIC. An adaptive computational particle weight algorithm is presented that conserves mass, momentum, and energy. This algorithm is then enhanced with an octree adaptive mesh in velocity space to mitigate artificial thermalization. The new octree merge is compared to a merge that randomly selects merge partners for a bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution. Results for crossing beams in a fixed potential well along with an electrostatic PIC version with and without MCC collisions based ionizing breakdown show the advantages of the merge algorithm to both fixed particle weights and randomly selected merge partners.

  1. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling of volcanic debris flows: Application to Huiloac Gorge lahars (Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Bouchra; Palacios, David; Pastor, Manuel; Zamorano, José Juan

    2016-09-01

    Lahars are among the most catastrophic volcanic processes, and the ability to model them is central to mitigating their effects. Several lahars recently generated by the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) moved downstream through the Huiloac Gorge towards the village of Santiago Xalitzintla. The most dangerous was the 2001 lahar, in which the destructive power of the debris flow was maintained throughout the extent of the flow. Identifying the zone of hazard can be based either on numerical or empirical models, but a calibration and validation process is required to ensure hazard map quality. The Geoflow-SPH depth integrated numerical model used in this study to reproduce the 2001 lahar was derived from the velocity-pressure version of the Biot-Zienkiewicz model, and was discretized using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The results of the calibrated SPH model were validated by comparing the simulated deposit depth with the field depth measured at 16 cross sections distributed strategically along the gorge channel. Moreover, the dependency of the results on topographic mesh resolution, initial lahar mass shape and dimensions is also investigated. The results indicate that to accurately reproduce the 2001 lahar flow dynamics the channel topography needed to be discretized using a mesh having a minimum 5 m resolution, and an initial lahar mass shape that adopted the source area morphology. Field validation of the calibrated model showed that there was a satisfactory relationship between the simulated and field depths, the error being less than 20% for 11 of the 16 cross sections. This study demonstrates that the Geoflow-SPH model was able to accurately reproduce the lahar path and the extent of the flow, but also reproduced other parameters including flow velocity and deposit depth.

  2. Modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics (MSPH) for the analysis of centrifugally assisted TiC-Fe-Al2O3 combustion synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, M. A.; Mahmoodian, Reza; Hamdi, M.

    2014-01-01

    A modified smoothed particle hydrodynamic (MSPH) computational technique was utilized to simulate molten particle motion and infiltration speed on multi-scale analysis levels. The radial velocity and velocity gradient of molten alumina, iron infiltration in the TiC product and solidification rate, were predicted during centrifugal self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) simulation, which assisted the coating process by MSPH. The effects of particle size and temperature on infiltration and solidification of iron and alumina were mainly investigated. The obtained results were validated with experimental microstructure evidence. The simulation model successfully describes the magnitude of iron and alumina diffusion in a centrifugal thermite SHS and Ti + C hybrid reaction under centrifugal acceleration. PMID:24430621

  3. Independent motion detection with a rival penalized adaptive particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Stefan; Hübner, Wolfgang; Arens, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Aggregation of pixel based motion detection into regions of interest, which include views of single moving objects in a scene is an essential pre-processing step in many vision systems. Motion events of this type provide significant information about the object type or build the basis for action recognition. Further, motion is an essential saliency measure, which is able to effectively support high level image analysis. When applied to static cameras, background subtraction methods achieve good results. On the other hand, motion aggregation on freely moving cameras is still a widely unsolved problem. The image flow, measured on a freely moving camera is the result from two major motion types. First the ego-motion of the camera and second object motion, that is independent from the camera motion. When capturing a scene with a camera these two motion types are adverse blended together. In this paper, we propose an approach to detect multiple moving objects from a mobile monocular camera system in an outdoor environment. The overall processing pipeline consists of a fast ego-motion compensation algorithm in the preprocessing stage. Real-time performance is achieved by using a sparse optical flow algorithm as an initial processing stage and a densely applied probabilistic filter in the post-processing stage. Thereby, we follow the idea proposed by Jung and Sukhatme. Normalized intensity differences originating from a sequence of ego-motion compensated difference images represent the probability of moving objects. Noise and registration artefacts are filtered out, using a Bayesian formulation. The resulting a posteriori distribution is located on image regions, showing strong amplitudes in the difference image which are in accordance with the motion prediction. In order to effectively estimate the a posteriori distribution, a particle filter is used. In addition to the fast ego-motion compensation, the main contribution of this paper is the design of the probabilistic

  4. Particle Swarm Social Adaptive Model for Multi-Agent Based Insurgency Warfare Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E

    2009-12-01

    To better understand insurgent activities and asymmetric warfare, a social adaptive model for modeling multiple insurgent groups attacking multiple military and civilian targets is proposed and investigated. This report presents a pilot study using the particle swarm modeling, a widely used non-linear optimal tool to model the emergence of insurgency campaign. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of insurgent social adaptation for the dynamically changing environment and to provide insight and understanding of insurgency warfare. Our results show that unified leadership, strategic planning, and effective communication between insurgent groups are not the necessary requirements for insurgents to efficiently attain their objective.

  5. Particle Swarm Social Model for Group Social Learning in Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N; Patton, Robert M; Pullum, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a study of integrating particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the social learning of self-organized groups and their collective searching behavior in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social learning for a dynamic environment. The research provides a platform for understanding and insights into knowledge discovery and strategic search in human self-organized social groups, such as insurgents or online communities.

  6. Adaptive Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Hirleman, E D; Dellenback, P A

    1989-11-15

    Integration of a magnetooptic spatial light modulator into a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument is proposed and demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. The concept gives the instrument the ability to reconfigure a detector array on-line and thereby adapt to the measurement context.

  7. Adaptive particle-cell algorithm for Fokker-Planck based rarefied gas flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, M.; Gorji, M. H.

    2017-04-01

    Recently, the Fokker-Planck (FP) kinetic model has been devised on the basis of the Boltzmann equation (Jenny et al., 2010; Gorji et al., 2011). Particle Monte-Carlo schemes are then introduced for simulations of rarefied gas flows based on the FP kinetics. Here the particles follow independent stochastic paths and thus a spatio-temporal resolution coarser than the collisional scales becomes possible. In contrast to the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC), the computational cost is independent of the Knudsen number resulting in efficient simulations at moderate/low Knudsen flows. In order to further exploit the efficiency of the FP method, the required particle-cell resolutions should be found, and a cell refinement strategy has to be developed accordingly. In this study, an adaptive particle-cell scheme applicable to a general unstructured mesh is derived for the FP model. Virtual sub cells are introduced for the adaptive mesh refinement. Moreover a sub cell-merging algorithm is provided to honor the minimum required number of particles per cell. For assessments, the 70 degree blunted cone reentry flow (Allgre et al., 1997) is studied. Excellent agreement between the introduced adaptive FP method and DSMC is achieved.

  8. Analysis and Implementation of Particle-to-Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) Kernel for Black-Box Adaptive Fast Multipole Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    ARL-TR-7315 ● JUNE 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Analysis and Implementation of Particle-to- Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor ...Particle-to- Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) Kernel for Black-Box Adaptive Fast Multipole Method by Richard H Haney and Dale Shires...reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection information

  9. Improving mouse controlling and movement for people with Parkinson's disease and involuntary tremor using adaptive path smoothing technique via B-spline.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Seyed Yashar Bani; Zin, Nor Azan Mat; Yatim, Noor Faezah Mohd; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Many input devices are available for interacting with computers, but the computer mouse is still the most popular device for interaction. People who suffer from involuntary tremor have difficulty using the mouse in the normal way. The target participants of this research were individuals who suffer from Parkinson's disease. Tremor in limbs makes accurate mouse movements impossible or difficult without any assistive technologies to help. This study explores a new assistive technique-adaptive path smoothing via B-spline (APSS)-to enhance mouse controlling based on user's tremor level and type. APSS uses Mean filtering and B-spline to provide a smoothed mouse trajectory. Seven participants who have unwanted tremor evaluated APSS. Results show that APSS is very promising and greatly increases their control of the computer mouse. Result of user acceptance test also shows that user perceived APSS as easy to use. They also believe it to be a useful tool and intend to use it once it is available. Future studies could explore the possibility of integrating APSS with one assistive pointing technique, such as the Bubble cursor or the Sticky target technique, to provide an all in one solution for motor disabled users.

  10. Contractile activity of circular smooth muscle in rats one year after small bowel transplantation: differing adaptive response of the jejunum and ileum to denervation.

    PubMed

    Shibata, C; Murr, M M; Balsiger, B; Anding, W J; Sarr, M G

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the long-term effects of isogeneic small bowel transplantation (SBT) on jejunal and ileal circular smooth muscle contractile activity in the rat. Transmural strips of circular muscle were prepared from proximal jejunum and distal ileum of 1-year-old control rats and rats 1 year after SBT (SBT-1Y) to measure isometric force. Spontaneous contractile activity and the dose-responses to bethanechol and norepinephrine were studied. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) at varying frequencies (1 to 20 Hz) was evaluated under adrenergic and cholinergic blockade to investigate inhibitory nerves. Spontaneous activity both in the jejunum and ileum in SBT-1Y rats was not different compared to control rats. Sensitivity to bethanechol did not differ between control and SBT-1Y rats in the jejunum or ileum. Sensitivity to norepinephrine, however, was significantly increased after SBT in the ileum but not in the jejunum. During EFS, inhibition was seen at low frequencies, and contractions were induced at high frequencies in all groups. The degree of inhibition did not differ between control and SBT-1Y rats in the jejunum; however, it tended to be increased in the ileum after SBT. The long-term adaptive response of smooth muscle to the extrinsic denervation accompanying SBT differs between the jejunum and the ileum.

  11. Adaptive reproducing kernel particle method for extraction of the cortical surface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihe; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W

    2006-06-01

    We propose a novel adaptive approach based on the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method (RKPM) to extract the cortical surfaces of the brain from three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance images (MRIs). To formulate the discrete equations of the deformable model, a flexible particle shape function is employed in the Galerkin approximation of the weak form of the equilibrium equations. The proposed support generation method ensures that support of all particles cover the entire computational domains. The deformable model is adaptively adjusted by dilating the shape function and by inserting or merging particles in the high curvature regions or regions stopped by the target boundary. The shape function of the particle with a dilation parameter is adaptively constructed in response to particle insertion or merging. The proposed method offers flexibility in representing highly convolved structures and in refining the deformable models. Self-intersection of the surface, during evolution, is prevented by tracing backward along gradient descent direction from the crest interface of the distance field, which is computed by fast marching. These operations involve a significant computational cost. The initial model for the deformable surface is simple and requires no prior knowledge of the segmented structure. No specific template is required, e.g., an average cortical surface obtained from many subjects. The extracted cortical surface efficiently localizes the depths of the cerebral sulci, unlike some other active surface approaches that penalize regions of high curvature. Comparisons with manually segmented landmark data are provided to demonstrate the high accuracy of the proposed method. We also compare the proposed method to the finite element method, and to a commonly used cortical surface extraction approach, the CRUISE method. We also show that the independence of the shape functions of the RKPM from the underlying mesh enhances the convergence speed of the deformable

  12. Adaptive particle swarm optimization for optimal orbital elements of binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Abdel-Fattah

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents an adaptive particle swarm optimization (APSO) as an alternative method to determine the optimal orbital elements of the star η Bootis of MK type G0 IV. The proposed algorithm transforms the problem of finding periodic orbits into the problem of detecting global minimizers as a function, to get a best fit of Keplerian and Phase curves. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach of APSO generally more accurate than the standard particle swarm optimization (PSO) and other published optimization algorithms, in terms of solution accuracy, convergence speed and algorithm reliability.

  13. Optimal Pid Tuning for Power System Stabilizers Using Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oonsivilai, Anant; Marungsri, Boonruang

    2008-10-01

    An application of the intelligent search technique to find optimal parameters of power system stabilizer (PSS) considering proportional-integral-derivative controller (PID) for a single-machine infinite-bus system is presented. Also, an efficient intelligent search technique, adaptive particle swarm optimization (APSO), is engaged to express usefulness of the intelligent search techniques in tuning of the PID—PSS parameters. Improve damping frequency of system is optimized by minimizing an objective function with adaptive particle swarm optimization. At the same operating point, the PID—PSS parameters are also tuned by the Ziegler-Nichols method. The performance of proposed controller compared to the conventional Ziegler-Nichols PID tuning controller. The results reveal superior effectiveness of the proposed APSO based PID controller.

  14. Crop classification by forward neural network with adaptive chaotic particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yudong; Wu, Lenan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid crop classifier for polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The feature sets consisted of span image, the H/A/α decomposition, and the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) based texture features. Then, the features were reduced by principle component analysis (PCA). Finally, a two-hidden-layer forward neural network (NN) was constructed and trained by adaptive chaotic particle swarm optimization (ACPSO). K-fold cross validation was employed to enhance generation. The experimental results on Flevoland sites demonstrate the superiority of ACPSO to back-propagation (BP), adaptive BP (ABP), momentum BP (MBP), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), and Resilient back-propagation (RPROP) methods. Moreover, the computation time for each pixel is only 1.08 × 10(-7) s.

  15. Crop Classification by Forward Neural Network with Adaptive Chaotic Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yudong; Wu, Lenan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid crop classifier for polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The feature sets consisted of span image, the H/A/α decomposition, and the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) based texture features. Then, the features were reduced by principle component analysis (PCA). Finally, a two-hidden-layer forward neural network (NN) was constructed and trained by adaptive chaotic particle swarm optimization (ACPSO). K-fold cross validation was employed to enhance generation. The experimental results on Flevoland sites demonstrate the superiority of ACPSO to back-propagation (BP), adaptive BP (ABP), momentum BP (MBP), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), and Resilient back-propagation (RPROP) methods. Moreover, the computation time for each pixel is only 1.08 × 10−7 s. PMID:22163872

  16. Adaptive Particle Filter for Nonparametric Estimation with Measurement Uncertainty in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofan; Zhao, Yubin; Zhang, Sha; Fan, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-30

    Particle filters (PFs) are widely used for nonlinear signal processing in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). However, the measurement uncertainty makes the WSN observations unreliable to the actual case and also degrades the estimation accuracy of the PFs. In addition to the algorithm design, few works focus on improving the likelihood calculation method, since it can be pre-assumed by a given distribution model. In this paper, we propose a novel PF method, which is based on a new likelihood fusion method for WSNs and can further improve the estimation performance. We firstly use a dynamic Gaussian model to describe the nonparametric features of the measurement uncertainty. Then, we propose a likelihood adaptation method that employs the prior information and a belief factor to reduce the measurement noise. The optimal belief factor is attained by deriving the minimum Kullback-Leibler divergence. The likelihood adaptation method can be integrated into any PFs, and we use our method to develop three versions of adaptive PFs for a target tracking system using wireless sensor network. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate that our likelihood adaptation method has greatly improved the estimation performance of PFs in a high noise environment. In addition, the adaptive PFs are highly adaptable to the environment without imposing computational complexity.

  17. FLIP: A method for adaptively zoned, particle-in-cell calculations of fluid in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1986-08-01

    A method is presented for calculating fluid flow in two dimensions using a full particle-in-cell representation on an adaptively zoned grid. The method has many interesting properties, among them an almost total absence of numerical dissipation and the ability to represent large variations in the data. The method is described using a standard formalism and its properties are illustrated by supersonic flow over a step and the interaction of a shock with a thin foil.

  18. Simulations of flow mode distributions on rough fracture surfaces using a parallelized Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, J.; Shigorina, E.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Pan, W.; Geyer, T.

    2015-12-01

    Under idealized conditions (smooth surfaces, linear relationship between Bond number and Capillary number of droplets) steady-state flow modes on fracture surfaces have been shown to develop from sliding droplets to rivulets and finally (wavy) film flow, depending on the specified flux. In a recent study we demonstrated the effect of surface roughness on droplet flow in unsaturated wide aperture fractures, however, its effect on other prevailing flow modes is still an open question. The objective of this work is to investigate the formation of complex flow modes on fracture surfaces employing an efficient three-dimensional parallelized SPH model. The model is able to simulate highly intermittent, gravity-driven free-surface flows under dynamic wetting conditions. The effect of surface tension is included via efficient pairwise interaction forces. We validate the model using various analytical and semi-analytical relationships for droplet and complex flow dynamics. To investigate the effect of surface roughness on flow dynamics we construct surfaces with a self-affine fractal geometry and roughness characterized by the Hurst exponent. We demonstrate the effect of surface roughness (on macroscopic scales this can be understood as a tortuosity) on the steady-state distribution of flow modes. Furthermore we show the influence of a wide range of natural wetting conditions (defined by static contact angles) on the final distribution of surface coverage, which is of high importance for matrix-fracture interaction processes.

  19. Multiphase flow modelling of volcanic ash particle settling in water using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, C. T.; Collins, G. S.; Piggott, M. D.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R. G.

    2013-02-01

    Small-scale experiments of volcanic ash particle settling in water have demonstrated that ash particles can either settle slowly and individually, or rapidly and collectively as a gravitationally unstable ash-laden plume. This has important implications for the emplacement of tephra deposits on the seabed. Numerical modelling has the potential to extend the results of laboratory experiments to larger scales and explore the conditions under which plumes may form and persist, but many existing models are computationally restricted by the fixed mesh approaches that they employ. In contrast, this paper presents a new multiphase flow model that uses an adaptive unstructured mesh approach. As a simulation progresses, the mesh is optimized to focus numerical resolution in areas important to the dynamics and decrease it where it is not needed, thereby potentially reducing computational requirements. Model verification is performed using the method of manufactured solutions, which shows the correct solution convergence rates. Model validation and application considers 2-D simulations of plume formation in a water tank which replicate published laboratory experiments. The numerically predicted settling velocities for both individual particles and plumes, as well as instability behaviour, agree well with experimental data and observations. Plume settling is clearly hindered by the presence of a salinity gradient, and its influence must therefore be taken into account when considering particles in bodies of saline water. Furthermore, individual particles settle in the laminar flow regime while plume settling is shown (by plume Reynolds numbers greater than unity) to be in the turbulent flow regime, which has a significant impact on entrainment and settling rates. Mesh adaptivity maintains solution accuracy while providing a substantial reduction in computational requirements when compared to the same simulation performed using a fixed mesh, highlighting the benefits of an

  20. Detection of Anthropogenic Particles in Fish Stomachs: An Isolation Method Adapted to Identification by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Collard, France; Gilbert, Bernard; Eppe, Gauthier; Parmentier, Eric; Das, Krishna

    2015-10-01

    Microplastic particles (MP) contaminate oceans and affect marine organisms in several ways. Ingestion combined with food intake is generally reported. However, data interpretation often is circumvented by the difficulty to separate MP from bulk samples. Visual examination often is used as one or the only step to sort these particles. However, color, size, and shape are insufficient and often unreliable criteria. We present an extraction method based on hypochlorite digestion and isolation of MP from the membrane by sonication. The protocol is especially well adapted to a subsequent analysis by Raman spectroscopy. The method avoids fluorescence problems, allowing better identification of anthropogenic particles (AP) from stomach contents of fish by Raman spectroscopy. It was developed with commercial samples of microplastics and cotton along with stomach contents from three different Clupeiformes fishes: Clupea harengus, Sardina pilchardus, and Engraulis encrasicolus. The optimized digestion and isolation protocol showed no visible impact on microplastics and cotton particles while the Raman spectroscopic spectrum allowed the precise identification of microplastics and textile fibers. Thirty-five particles were isolated from nine fish stomach contents. Raman analysis has confirmed 11 microplastics and 13 fibers mainly made of cellulose or lignin. Some particles were not completely identified but contained artificial dyes. The novel approach developed in this manuscript should help to assess the presence, quantity, and composition of AP in planktivorous fish stomachs.

  1. An adaptive and robust biological network based on the vacant-particle transportation model.

    PubMed

    Gunji, Yukio-Pegio; Shirakawa, Tomohiro; Niizato, Takayuki; Yamachiyo, Masaki; Tani, Iori

    2011-03-07

    A living system reveals local computing by referring to a whole system beyond the exploration-exploitation dilemma. The slime mold, Physarum polycephalum, uses protoplasmic flow to change its own outer shape, which yields the boundary condition and forms an adaptive and robust network. This observation suggests that the whole Physarum can be represented as a local protoplasmic flow system. Here, we show that a system composed of particles, which move and are modified based upon the particle transformation that contains the relationship between the parts and the whole, can emulate the network formed by Physarum. This system balances the exploration-exploitation trade-off and shows a scale-free sub-domain. By decreasing the number of particles, our model, VP-S, can emulate the Physarum adaptive network as it is attracted to a food stimulus. By increasing the number of particles, our model, VP-D, can emulate the pattern of a growing Physarum. The patterns produced by our model were compared with those of the Physarum pattern quantitatively, which showed that both patterns balance exploration with exploitation. This model should have a wide applicability to study biological collective phenomena in general.

  2. Artificial frame filling using adaptive neural fuzzy inference system for particle image velocimetry dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Bayram; Doǧan, Sercan; Aksoy, Muharrem H.; Canli, Eyüp; Özgören, Muammer

    2015-03-01

    Liquid behaviors are very important for many areas especially for Mechanical Engineering. Fast camera is a way to observe and search the liquid behaviors. Camera traces the dust or colored markers travelling in the liquid and takes many pictures in a second as possible as. Every image has large data structure due to resolution. For fast liquid velocity, there is not easy to evaluate or make a fluent frame after the taken images. Artificial intelligence has much popularity in science to solve the nonlinear problems. Adaptive neural fuzzy inference system is a common artificial intelligence in literature. Any particle velocity in a liquid has two dimension speed and its derivatives. Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System has been used to create an artificial frame between previous and post frames as offline. Adaptive neural fuzzy inference system uses velocities and vorticities to create a crossing point vector between previous and post points. In this study, Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System has been used to fill virtual frames among the real frames in order to improve image continuity. So this evaluation makes the images much understandable at chaotic or vorticity points. After executed adaptive neural fuzzy inference system, the image dataset increase two times and has a sequence as virtual and real, respectively. The obtained success is evaluated using R2 testing and mean squared error. R2 testing has a statistical importance about similarity and 0.82, 0.81, 0.85 and 0.8 were obtained for velocities and derivatives, respectively.

  3. A new smoothed particle hydrodynamics non-Newtonian model for friction stir welding: Process modeling and simulation of microstructure evolution in a magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Dongsheng; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ahzi, Said; Khraisheh, Marwan; Khaleel, Moe

    2013-09-01

    We present a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for friction stir welding (FSW). FSW has broad commercial application in the marine, aerospace, rail, and automotive industries. However, development of the FSW process for each new application has remained largely empirical. Few established numerical modeling techniques have been developed that can explain and predict important features of the process physics involved in FSW. This is particularly true in the areas of material flow and mixing mechanisms. In this paper, we present a novel modeling approach to simulate FSW that may have significant advantages over current finite element or finite difference based methods. Unlike traditional grid-based methods, Lagrangian particle methods such as SPH can simulate the dynamics of interfaces, large material deformations, and the material’s strain and temperature history without employing complex tracking schemes. Three-dimensional simulations of FSW on AZ31 Mg alloy are performed. The temperature history and distribution, grain size, microhardness as well as the texture evolution are presented. Numerical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  4. An adaptive image enhancement technique by combining cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhiwei; Wang, Mingwei; Hu, Zhengbing; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement is an important procedure of image processing and analysis. This paper presents a new technique using a modified measure and blending of cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization (CS-PSO) for low contrast images to enhance image adaptively. In this way, contrast enhancement is obtained by global transformation of the input intensities; it employs incomplete Beta function as the transformation function and a novel criterion for measuring image quality considering three factors which are threshold, entropy value, and gray-level probability density of the image. The enhancement process is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. CS-PSO is utilized to maximize the objective fitness criterion in order to enhance the contrast and detail in an image by adapting the parameters of a novel extension to a local enhancement technique. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with other existing techniques such as linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and evolutionary computing based image enhancement methods like backtracking search algorithm, differential search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization in terms of processing time and image quality. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and adaptive and exhibits the better performance than other methods involved in the paper.

  5. Adaptive feature selection using v-shaped binary particle swarm optimization

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongbin; Zhou, Xiurong

    2017-01-01

    Feature selection is an important preprocessing method in machine learning and data mining. This process can be used not only to reduce the amount of data to be analyzed but also to build models with stronger interpretability based on fewer features. Traditional feature selection methods evaluate the dependency and redundancy of features separately, which leads to a lack of measurement of their combined effect. Moreover, a greedy search considers only the optimization of the current round and thus cannot be a global search. To evaluate the combined effect of different subsets in the entire feature space, an adaptive feature selection method based on V-shaped binary particle swarm optimization is proposed. In this method, the fitness function is constructed using the correlation information entropy. Feature subsets are regarded as individuals in a population, and the feature space is searched using V-shaped binary particle swarm optimization. The above procedure overcomes the hard constraint on the number of features, enables the combined evaluation of each subset as a whole, and improves the search ability of conventional binary particle swarm optimization. The proposed algorithm is an adaptive method with respect to the number of feature subsets. The experimental results show the advantages of optimizing the feature subsets using the V-shaped transfer function and confirm the effectiveness and efficiency of the feature subsets obtained under different classifiers. PMID:28358850

  6. Modelling multi-phase liquid-sediment scour and resuspension induced by rapid flows using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) accelerated with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourtakas, G.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-06-01

    A two-phase numerical model using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is applied to two-phase liquid-sediments flows. The absence of a mesh in SPH is ideal for interfacial and highly non-linear flows with changing fragmentation of the interface, mixing and resuspension. The rheology of sediment induced under rapid flows undergoes several states which are only partially described by previous research in SPH. This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the geotechnics, non-Newtonian and Newtonian flows by proposing a model that combines the yielding, shear and suspension layer which are needed to predict accurately the global erosion phenomena, from a hydrodynamics prospective. The numerical SPH scheme is based on the explicit treatment of both phases using Newtonian and the non-Newtonian Bingham-type Herschel-Bulkley-Papanastasiou constitutive model. This is supplemented by the Drucker-Prager yield criterion to predict the onset of yielding of the sediment surface and a concentration suspension model. The multi-phase model has been compared with experimental and 2-D reference numerical models for scour following a dry-bed dam break yielding satisfactory results and improvements over well-known SPH multi-phase models. With 3-D simulations requiring a large number of particles, the code is accelerated with a graphics processing unit (GPU) in the open-source DualSPHysics code. The implementation and optimisation of the code achieved a speed up of x58 over an optimised single thread serial code. A 3-D dam break over a non-cohesive erodible bed simulation with over 4 million particles yields close agreement with experimental scour and water surface profiles.

  7. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae’s Colliding Winds Using 3D Prints of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, Theodore R.; Clementel, Nicola; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Kruip, Chael; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Teodoro, Mairan

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 MSun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary Eta Carinae. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (Makerbot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~110 AU) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. These 3D prints reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ~1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively-cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the hot, adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unknown physical features highlight the important role 3D printing can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  8. A fine grained parallel smooth particle mesh Ewald algorithm for biophysical simulation studies: Application to the 6-D torus QCDOC supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Bin; Martyna, Glenn; Deng, Yuefan

    2007-08-01

    In order to model complex heterogeneous biophysical macrostructures with non-trivial charge distributions such as globular proteins in water, it is important to evaluate the long range forces present in these systems accurately and efficiently. The Smooth Particle Mesh Ewald summation technique (SPME) is commonly used to determine the long range part of electrostatic energy in large scale molecular simulations. While the SPME technique does not give rise to a performance bottleneck on a single processor, current implementations of SPME on massively parallel, supercomputers become problematic at large processor numbers, limiting the time and length scales that can be reached. Here, a synergistic investigation involving method improvement, parallel programming and novel architectures is employed to address this difficulty. A relatively simple modification of the SPME technique is described which gives rise to both improved accuracy and efficiency on both massively parallel and scalar computing platforms. Our fine grained parallel implementation of the modified SPME method for the novel QCDOC supercomputer with its 6D-torus architecture is then given. Numerical tests of algorithm performance on up to 1024 processors of the QCDOC machine at BNL are presented for two systems of interest, a β-hairpin solvated in explicit water, a system which consists of 1142 water molecules and a 20 residue protein for a total of 3579 atoms, and the HIV-1 protease solvated in explicit water, a system which consists of 9331 water molecules and a 198 residue protein for a total of 29508 atoms.

  9. Collocated approximations on unstructured grids: a comparison between General Finite Differences (GFD), Moving Least Squares (MLS), and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Yaroslav; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    In the meshfree family of methods, partial differential equations are solved on unstructured grids where a search radius establishes an implicit nodal connectivity used to determine whether to include or exclude neighboring nodes in the constructed approximation. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is widely attributed to be the eldest of the meshfree methods dating back to an astrophysics paper published in 1977 by Gingold and Monaghan. However, beating them by five years was Jensen when he published Finite Differences for Arbitrary Grids (FIDAG) in 1972. Ultimately this work and others were generalized by Liszka and Orkisz in 1979 as a weighted least squares formulation solving for the Taylor coefficients and is now commonly known as General Finite Differences (GFD). Shortly after in 1981, Lancaster and Salkauskas introduced the Moving Least Squares (MLS) approximation for surface reconstruction using a weighted least squares formulation where the unknown coefficients are treated as functions varying from node to node in the support domain. Here we examine important differences, similarities and limitations of each method by solving the 2D Poisson equation on unstructured grids. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1148903.

  10. Geometric phases in electric dipole searches with trapped spin-1/2 particles in general fields and measurement cells of arbitrary shape with smooth or rough walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, R.; Kaufman, C.; Müller, G.; Steyerl, A.

    2015-12-01

    The important role of geometric phases in searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron, using Ramsey separated oscillatory field nuclear magnetic resonance, was first noted by Commins [Am. J. Phys. 59, 1077 (1991), 10.1119/1.16616] and investigated in detail by Pendlebury et al. [Phys. Rev. A 70, 032102 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevA.70.032102]. Their analysis was based on the Bloch equations. In subsequent work using the spin-density matrix, Lamoreaux and Golub [Phys. Rev. A 71, 032104 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.032104] showed the relation between the frequency shifts and the correlation functions of the fields seen by trapped particles in general fields (Redfield theory). More recently, we presented a solution of the Schrödinger equation for spin-1 /2 particles in circular cylindrical traps with smooth walls and exposed to arbitrary fields [A. Steyerl et al., Phys. Rev. A 89, 052129 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.052129]. Here, we extend this work to show how the Redfield theory follows directly from the Schrödinger equation solution. This serves to highlight the conditions of validity of the Redfield theory, a subject of considerable discussion in the literature [e.g., M. P. Nicholas et al., Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 57, 111 (2010), 10.1016/j.pnmrs.2010.04.003]. Our results can be applied where the Redfield result no longer holds, such as observation times on the order of or shorter than the correlation time and nonstochastic systems, and thus we can illustrate the transient spin dynamics, i.e., the gradual development of the shift with increasing time subsequent to the start of the free precession. We consider systems with rough, diffuse reflecting walls, cylindrical trap geometry with arbitrary cross section, and field perturbations that do not, in the frame of the moving particles, average to zero in time. We show by direct, detailed, calculation the agreement of the results from the Schrödinger equation with the Redfield theory for the

  11. Flight Wing Surface Pressure and Boundary-Layer Data Report from the F-111 Smooth Variable-Camber Supercritical Mission Adaptive Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke; Webb, Lannie D.

    1997-01-01

    Flight tests were conducted using the advanced fighter technology integration F-111 (AFTI/F-111) aircraft modified with a variable-sweep supercritical mission adaptive wing (MAW). The MAW leading- and trailing-edge variable-camber surfaces were deflected in flight to provide a near-ideal wing camber shape for the flight condition. The MAW features smooth, flexible upper surfaces and fully enclosed lower surfaces, which distinguishes it from conventional flaps that have discontinuous surfaces and exposed or semi-exposed mechanisms. Upper and lower surface wing pressure distributions were measured along four streamwise rows on the right wing for cruise, maneuvering, and landing configurations. Boundary-layer measurements were obtained near the trailing edge for one of the rows. Cruise and maneuvering wing leading-edge sweeps were 26 deg for Mach numbers less than 1 and 45 deg or 58 deg for Mach numbers greater than 1. The landing wing sweep was 9 deg or 16 deg. Mach numbers ranged from 0.27 to 1.41, angles of attack from 2 deg to 13 deg, and Reynolds number per unit foot from 1.4 x 10(exp 6) to 6.5 x 10(exp 6). Leading-edge cambers ranged from O deg to 20 deg down, and trailing-edge cambers ranged from 1 deg up to 19 deg down. Wing deflection data for a Mach number of 0.85 are shown for three cambers. Wing pressure and boundary-layer data are given. Selected data comparisons are shown. Measured wing coordinates are given for three streamwise semispan locations for cruise camber and one spanwise location for maneuver camber.

  12. Smooth Sailing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Beverley; Pincott, Maxine; Rebman, Ashley; Northcutt, Jen; Barsanti, Amy; Silkunas, Betty; Brighton, Susan K.; Reitz, David; Winkler, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Presents discipline tips from several teachers to keep classrooms running smoothly all year. Some of the suggestions include the following: a bear-cave warning system, peer mediation, a motivational mystery, problem students acting as the teacher's assistant, a positive-behavior-reward chain, a hallway scavenger hunt (to ensure quiet passage…

  13. Pairwise adaptive thermostats for improved accuracy and stability in dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimkuhler, Benedict; Shang, Xiaocheng

    2016-11-01

    We examine the formulation and numerical treatment of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and momentum-conserving molecular dynamics. We show that it is possible to improve both the accuracy and the stability of DPD by employing a pairwise adaptive Langevin thermostat that precisely matches the dynamical characteristics of DPD simulations (e.g., autocorrelation functions) while automatically correcting thermodynamic averages using a negative feedback loop. In the low friction regime, it is possible to replace DPD by a simpler momentum-conserving variant of the Nosé-Hoover-Langevin method based on thermostatting only pairwise interactions; we show that this method has an extra order of accuracy for an important class of observables (a superconvergence result), while also allowing larger timesteps than alternatives. All the methods mentioned in the article are easily implemented. Numerical experiments are performed in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium settings; using Lees-Edwards boundary conditions to induce shear flow.

  14. Beamline smoothing of the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Zhao, S.

    1995-06-01

    This paper outlines a general beamline smoothing concept based on the use of First Principle Component analysis. Bean-dine smoothing is commonly used for the detection of blunders in the positioning of beam elements and to provide a smooth particle beam path with the fewest adjustments to individual beam components. It also provides the data for assessment of the achieved positioning quality.

  15. 3D Boltzmann Simulation of the Io's Plasma Environment with Adaptive Mesh and Particle Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Combi, M. R.

    2002-12-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io [Combi et al., 2002; 1998; Kabin et al., 2001]. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD [Combi et al., 1998; Linker et al, 1998; Kabin et al., 2001] and the electrodynamic [Saur et al., 1999] approaches. In this report, we develop a method of kinetic ion-neutral simulation, which is based on a multiscale adaptive mesh, particle and algorithm refinement. This method employs the fluid description for electrons whereas for ions the drift-kinetic and particle approaches are used. This method takes into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. The first results of such simulation of the dynamics of ions in the Io's environment are discussed in this report. ~ M R Combi et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 9071, 1998. M R Combi, T I Gombosi, K Kabin, Atmospheres in the Solar System: Comparative\\ Aeronomy. Geophys. Monograph Series, 130, 151, 2002. K Kabin et al., Planetary and Space Sci., 49, 337, 2001. J A Linker et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103(E9), 19867, 1998. J Saur et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, 25105, 1999.

  16. AP-Cloud: Adaptive Particle-in-Cloud method for optimal solutions to Vlasov–Poisson equation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xingyu; Samulyak, Roman; Jiao, Xiangmin; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new adaptive Particle-in-Cloud (AP-Cloud) method for obtaining optimal numerical solutions to the Vlasov–Poisson equation. Unlike the traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which is commonly used for solving this problem, the AP-Cloud adaptively selects computational nodes or particles to deliver higher accuracy and efficiency when the particle distribution is highly non-uniform. Unlike other adaptive techniques for PIC, our method balances the errors in PDE discretization and Monte Carlo integration, and discretizes the differential operators using a generalized finite difference (GFD) method based on a weighted least square formulation. As a result, AP-Cloud is independent of the geometric shapes of computational domains and is free of artificial parameters. Efficient and robust implementation is achieved through an octree data structure with 2:1 balance. We analyze the accuracy and convergence order of AP-Cloud theoretically, and verify the method using an electrostatic problem of a particle beam with halo. Simulation results show that the AP-Cloud method is substantially more accurate and faster than the traditional PIC, and it is free of artificial forces that are typical for some adaptive PIC techniques.

  17. AP-Cloud: Adaptive particle-in-cloud method for optimal solutions to Vlasov–Poisson equation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xingyu; Samulyak, Roman; Jiao, Xiangmin; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-04-19

    We propose a new adaptive Particle-in-Cloud (AP-Cloud) method for obtaining optimal numerical solutions to the Vlasov–Poisson equation. Unlike the traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which is commonly used for solving this problem, the AP-Cloud adaptively selects computational nodes or particles to deliver higher accuracy and efficiency when the particle distribution is highly non-uniform. Unlike other adaptive techniques for PIC, our method balances the errors in PDE discretization and Monte Carlo integration, and discretizes the differential operators using a generalized finite difference (GFD) method based on a weighted least square formulation. As a result, AP-Cloud is independent of the geometric shapes of computational domains and is free of artificial parameters. Efficient and robust implementation is achieved through an octree data structure with 2:1 balance. We analyze the accuracy and convergence order of AP-Cloud theoretically, and verify the method using an electrostatic problem of a particle beam with halo. Here, simulation results show that the AP-Cloud method is substantially more accurate and faster than the traditional PIC, and it is free of artificial forces that are typical for some adaptive PIC techniques.

  18. AP-Cloud: Adaptive particle-in-cloud method for optimal solutions to Vlasov–Poisson equation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xingyu; Samulyak, Roman; Jiao, Xiangmin; ...

    2016-04-19

    We propose a new adaptive Particle-in-Cloud (AP-Cloud) method for obtaining optimal numerical solutions to the Vlasov–Poisson equation. Unlike the traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which is commonly used for solving this problem, the AP-Cloud adaptively selects computational nodes or particles to deliver higher accuracy and efficiency when the particle distribution is highly non-uniform. Unlike other adaptive techniques for PIC, our method balances the errors in PDE discretization and Monte Carlo integration, and discretizes the differential operators using a generalized finite difference (GFD) method based on a weighted least square formulation. As a result, AP-Cloud is independent of the geometric shapes ofmore » computational domains and is free of artificial parameters. Efficient and robust implementation is achieved through an octree data structure with 2:1 balance. We analyze the accuracy and convergence order of AP-Cloud theoretically, and verify the method using an electrostatic problem of a particle beam with halo. Here, simulation results show that the AP-Cloud method is substantially more accurate and faster than the traditional PIC, and it is free of artificial forces that are typical for some adaptive PIC techniques.« less

  19. AP-Cloud: Adaptive Particle-in-Cloud method for optimal solutions to Vlasov-Poisson equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingyu; Samulyak, Roman; Jiao, Xiangmin; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new adaptive Particle-in-Cloud (AP-Cloud) method for obtaining optimal numerical solutions to the Vlasov-Poisson equation. Unlike the traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which is commonly used for solving this problem, the AP-Cloud adaptively selects computational nodes or particles to deliver higher accuracy and efficiency when the particle distribution is highly non-uniform. Unlike other adaptive techniques for PIC, our method balances the errors in PDE discretization and Monte Carlo integration, and discretizes the differential operators using a generalized finite difference (GFD) method based on a weighted least square formulation. As a result, AP-Cloud is independent of the geometric shapes of computational domains and is free of artificial parameters. Efficient and robust implementation is achieved through an octree data structure with 2:1 balance. We analyze the accuracy and convergence order of AP-Cloud theoretically, and verify the method using an electrostatic problem of a particle beam with halo. Simulation results show that the AP-Cloud method is substantially more accurate and faster than the traditional PIC, and it is free of artificial forces that are typical for some adaptive PIC techniques.

  20. Radar data smoothing filter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of the current Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) data smoothing techniques for a variety of radars and payloads is examined. Alternative data reduction techniques are given and recommendations are made for improving radar data processing at WFF. A data adaptive algorithm, based on Kalman filtering and smoothing techniques, is also developed for estimating payload trajectories above the atmosphere from noisy time varying radar data. This algorithm is tested and verified using radar tracking data from WFF.

  1. Charging Guidance of Electric Taxis Based on Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Niu, Liyong; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    Electric taxis are playing an important role in the application of electric vehicles. The actual operational data of electric taxis in Shenzhen, China, is analyzed, and, in allusion to the unbalanced time availability of the charging station equipment, the electric taxis charging guidance system is proposed basing on the charging station information and vehicle information. An electric taxis charging guidance model is established and guides the charging based on the positions of taxis and charging stations with adaptive mutation particle swarm optimization. The simulation is based on the actual data of Shenzhen charging stations, and the results show that electric taxis can be evenly distributed to the appropriate charging stations according to the charging pile numbers in charging stations after the charging guidance. The even distribution among the charging stations in the area will be achieved and the utilization of charging equipment will be improved, so the proposed charging guidance method is verified to be feasible. The improved utilization of charging equipment can save public charging infrastructure resources greatly.

  2. Structural Basis for Conserved Regulation and Adaptation of the Signal Recognition Particle Targeting Complex.

    PubMed

    Wild, Klemens; Bange, Gert; Motiejunas, Domantas; Kribelbauer, Judith; Hendricks, Astrid; Segnitz, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-07-17

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ribonucleoprotein complex with a key role in targeting and insertion of membrane proteins. The two SRP GTPases, SRP54 (Ffh in bacteria) and FtsY (SRα in eukaryotes), form the core of the targeting complex (TC) regulating the SRP cycle. The architecture of the TC and its stimulation by RNA has been described for the bacterial SRP system while this information is lacking for other domains of life. Here, we present the crystal structures of the GTPase heterodimers of archaeal (Sulfolobus solfataricus), eukaryotic (Homo sapiens), and chloroplast (Arabidopsis thaliana) SRP systems. The comprehensive structural comparison combined with Brownian dynamics simulations of TC formation allows for the description of the general blueprint and of specific adaptations of the quasi-symmetric heterodimer. Our work defines conserved external nucleotide-binding sites for SRP GTPase activation by RNA. Structural analyses of the GDP-bound, post-hydrolysis states reveal a conserved, magnesium-sensitive switch within the I-box. Overall, we provide a general model for SRP cycle regulation by RNA.

  3. Fitting of adaptive neuron model to electrophysiological recordings using particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Bonan; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Lvxia; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2017-02-01

    In order to fit neural model’s spiking features to electrophysiological recordings, in this paper, a fitting framework based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is proposed to estimate the model parameters in an augmented multi-timescale adaptive threshold (AugMAT) model. PSO algorithm is an advanced evolutionary calculation method based on iteration. Selecting a reasonable criterion function will ensure the effectiveness of PSO algorithm. In this work, firing rate information is used as the main spiking feature and the estimation error of firing rate is selected as the criterion for fitting. A series of simulations are presented to verify the performance of the framework. The first step is model validation; an artificial training data is introduced to test the fitting procedure. Then we talk about the suitable PSO parameters, which exhibit adequate compromise between speediness and accuracy. Lastly, this framework is used to fit the electrophysiological recordings, after three adjustment steps, the features of experimental data are translated into realistic spiking neuron model.

  4. Goal-based angular adaptivity applied to a wavelet-based discretisation of the neutral particle transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Goffin, Mark A.; Buchan, Andrew G.; Dargaville, Steven; Pain, Christopher C.; Smith, Paul N.; Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.

    2015-01-15

    A method for applying goal-based adaptive methods to the angular resolution of the neutral particle transport equation is presented. The methods are applied to an octahedral wavelet discretisation of the spherical angular domain which allows for anisotropic resolution. The angular resolution is adapted across both the spatial and energy dimensions. The spatial domain is discretised using an inner-element sub-grid scale finite element method. The goal-based adaptive methods optimise the angular discretisation to minimise the error in a specific functional of the solution. The goal-based error estimators require the solution of an adjoint system to determine the importance to the specified functional. The error estimators and the novel methods to calculate them are described. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods. It is shown that the methods can significantly reduce the number of unknowns and computational time required to obtain a given error. The novelty of the work is the use of goal-based adaptive methods to obtain anisotropic resolution in the angular domain for solving the transport equation. -- Highlights: •Wavelet angular discretisation used to solve transport equation. •Adaptive method developed for the wavelet discretisation. •Anisotropic angular resolution demonstrated through the adaptive method. •Adaptive method provides improvements in computational efficiency.

  5. Membrane Composition Changes and Physiological Adaptation by Streptococcus mutans Signal Recognition Particle Pathway Mutants▿

    PubMed Central

    Hasona, Adnan; Zuobi-Hasona, Kheir; Crowley, Paula J.; Abranches, Jacqueline; Ruelf, Michael A.; Bleiweis, Arnold S.; Brady, L. Jeannine

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we presented evidence that the oral cariogenic species Streptococcus mutans remains viable but physiologically impaired and sensitive to environmental stress when genes encoding the minimal conserved bacterial signal recognition particle (SRP) elements are inactivated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of isolated membrane fractions from strain UA159 and three mutants (Δffh, ΔscRNA, and ΔftsY) grown at pH 7.0 or pH 5.0 allowed us to obtain insight into the adaptation process and the identities of potential SRP substrates. Mutant membrane preparations contained increased amounts of the chaperones DnaK and GroES and ClpP protease but decreased amounts of transcription- and translation-related proteins, the β subunit of ATPase, HPr, and several metabolic and glycolytic enzymes. Therefore, the acid sensitivity of SRP mutants might be caused in part by diminished ATPase activity, as well as the absence of an efficient mechanism for supplying ATP quickly at the site of proton elimination. Decreased amounts of LuxS were also observed in all mutant membranes. To further define physiological changes that occur upon disruption of the SRP pathway, we studied global gene expression in S. mutans UA159 (parent strain) and AH333 (Δffh mutant) using microarray analysis. Transcriptome analysis revealed up-regulation of 81 genes, including genes encoding chaperones, proteases, cell envelope biosynthetic enzymes, and DNA repair and replication enzymes, and down-regulation of 35 genes, including genes concerned with competence, ribosomal proteins, and enzymes involved in amino acid and protein biosynthesis. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis of eight selected genes confirmed the microarray data. Consistent with a demonstrated defect in competence and the suggested impairment of LuxS-dependent quorum sensing, biofilm formation was significantly decreased in each SRP mutant. PMID:17085548

  6. Adaptation of multidimensional group particle tracking and particle wall-boundary condition model to the FDNS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A particulate two-phase flow CFD model was developed based on the FDNS code which is a pressure based predictor plus multi-corrector Navier-Stokes flow solver. Turbulence models with compressibility correction and the wall function models were employed as submodels. A finite-rate chemistry model was used for reacting flow simulation. For particulate two-phase flow simulations, a Eulerian-Lagrangian solution method using an efficient implicit particle trajectory integration scheme was developed in this study. Effects of particle-gas reaction and particle size change to agglomeration or fragmentation were not considered in this investigation. At the onset of the present study, a two-dimensional version of FDNS which had been modified to treat Lagrangian tracking of particles (FDNS-2DEL) had already been written and was operational. The FDNS-2DEL code was too slow for practical use, mainly because it had not been written in a form amenable to vectorization on the Cray, nor was the full three-dimensional form of FDNS utilized. The specific objective of this study was to reorder to calculations into long single arrays for automatic vectorization on the Cray and to implement the full three-dimensional version of FDNS to produce the FDNS-3DEL code. Since the FDNS-2DEL code was slow, a very limited number of test cases had been run with it. This study was also intended to increase the number of cases simulated to verify and improve, as necessary, the particle tracking methodology coded in FDNS.

  7. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  8. Registration of 'Newell' Smooth Bromegrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Newell’ (Reg. No. CV-xxxx, PI 671851) smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss.) is a steppe or southern type cultivar that is primarily adapted in the USA to areas north of 40o N lat. and east of 100o W long. that have 500 mm or more annual precipitation or in areas that have similar climate cond...

  9. Moment Preserving Adaptive Particle Weights using Octree Velocity Distributions for PIC Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Gas Dynamics , Zaragoza, Spain, 9-13 July 2012. 14. ABSTRACT The ratio of computational to physical particles is of primary concern to statistical...oscillations without numerical heating or cooling. The timesteps were selected based on a CFL criteria such that the fastest particles in the...original distribution only cross a single computational cell in a timestep . Figure 2 shows number density results for the Analytical, Fixed Particle Weight

  10. Buffered Electropolishing – A New Way for Achieving Extremely Smooth Surface Finish on Nb SRF Cavities to be Used in Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley

    2009-05-01

    Future accelerators require unprecedented cavity performance, which is strongly influenced by interior surface nano-smoothness. Electropolishing (EP) is the technique of choice to be developed for high-field superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and related techniques point to the electropolishing mechanism of Nb in a sulphuric and hydrofluoric acid electrolyte controlled by a compact surface salt film under F- diffusion-limited mass transport control. These and other findings are guiding a systematic characterization to form the basis for cavities process optimization.

  11. Particle System Based Adaptive Sampling on Spherical Parameter Space to Improve the MDL Method for Construction of Statistical Shape Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Hirano, Yasushi; Tachibana, Rie; Hara, Takeshi; Kido, Shoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Minimum description length (MDL) based group-wise registration was a state-of-the-art method to determine the corresponding points of 3D shapes for the construction of statistical shape models (SSMs). However, it suffered from the problem that determined corresponding points did not uniformly spread on original shapes, since corresponding points were obtained by uniformly sampling the aligned shape on the parameterized space of unit sphere. We proposed a particle-system based method to obtain adaptive sampling positions on the unit sphere to resolve this problem. Here, a set of particles was placed on the unit sphere to construct a particle system whose energy was related to the distortions of parameterized meshes. By minimizing this energy, each particle was moved on the unit sphere. When the system became steady, particles were treated as vertices to build a spherical mesh, which was then relaxed to slightly adjust vertices to obtain optimal sampling-positions. We used 47 cases of (left and right) lungs and 50 cases of livers, (left and right) kidneys, and spleens for evaluations. Experiments showed that the proposed method was able to resolve the problem of the original MDL method, and the proposed method performed better in the generalization and specificity tests. PMID:23861721

  12. Machine remaining useful life prediction: An integrated adaptive neuro-fuzzy and high-order particle filtering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chaochao; Vachtsevanos, George; Orchard, Marcos E.

    2012-04-01

    Machine prognosis can be considered as the generation of long-term predictions that describe the evolution in time of a fault indicator, with the purpose of estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of a failing component/subsystem so that timely maintenance can be performed to avoid catastrophic failures. This paper proposes an integrated RUL prediction method using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) and high-order particle filtering, which forecasts the time evolution of the fault indicator and estimates the probability density function (pdf) of RUL. The ANFIS is trained and integrated in a high-order particle filter as a model describing the fault progression. The high-order particle filter is used to estimate the current state and carry out p-step-ahead predictions via a set of particles. These predictions are used to estimate the RUL pdf. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated via the real-world data from a seeded fault test for a UH-60 helicopter planetary gear plate. The results demonstrate that it outperforms both the conventional ANFIS predictor and the particle-filter-based predictor where the fault growth model is a first-order model that is trained via the ANFIS.

  13. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  14. Technical Assessment of Internal Surface Smoothness and Particle Transmission to the American National Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Barnett, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    Clause 6.4.4 in the American National Standards Institute / Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1 standard, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances From the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities, addresses the internal smoothness of sample transport lines present between the nozzle and the analyzer (or collector). This paper evaluates the appropriateness of this clause by comparing roughness length of various materials against the required relative roughness, and by conducting computational fluid dynamic modeling. The results indicate that the inclusion of numerical criteria for the relative roughness of pipe by the ANSI Standard N13.1 (Section 6.4.4) is not appropriate. Recommended alternatives would be elimination of the numerical criteria, or modification of the standard to include a variable criteria for relative roughness.

  15. An adaptive extended finite element method for the analysis of agglomeration of colloidal particles in a flowing fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Jorshari, Razzi Movassaghi; Djilali, Ned

    2015-03-10

    Direct numerical simulations of the flow-nanoparticle interaction in a colloidal suspension are presented using an extended finite element method (XFEM) in which the dynamics of the nanoparticles is solved in a fully-coupled manner with the flow. The method is capable of accurately describing solid-fluid interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes to investigate the dynamics of particles in complex flows. In order to accurately compute the high interparticle shear stresses and pressures while minimizing computing costs, an adaptive meshing technique is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm. The particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and the corresponding potential parameters are determined by a scaling procedure. The study is relevant to the preparation of inks used in the fabrication of catalyst layers for fuel cells. In this paper, we are particularly interested in investigating agglomeration of the nanoparticles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame. The results indicate that the external shear has a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension.

  16. An Adaptive Particle Filtering Approach to Tracking Modes in a Varying Shallow Ocean Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2011-03-22

    The shallow ocean environment is ever changing mostly due to temperature variations in its upper layers (< 100m) directly affecting sound propagation throughout. The need to develop processors that are capable of tracking these changes implies a stochastic as well as an 'adaptive' design. The stochastic requirement follows directly from the multitude of variations created by uncertain parameters and noise. Some work has been accomplished in this area, but the stochastic nature was constrained to Gaussian uncertainties. It has been clear for a long time that this constraint was not particularly realistic leading a Bayesian approach that enables the representation of any uncertainty distribution. Sequential Bayesian techniques enable a class of processors capable of performing in an uncertain, nonstationary (varying statistics), non-Gaussian, variable shallow ocean. In this paper adaptive processors providing enhanced signals for acoustic hydrophonemeasurements on a vertical array as well as enhanced modal function estimates are developed. Synthetic data is provided to demonstrate that this approach is viable.

  17. A feature extraction method of the particle swarm optimization algorithm based on adaptive inertia weight and chaos optimization for Brillouin scattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Zhao, Yu; Fu, Xinghu; Xu, Jinrui

    2016-10-01

    A novel particle swarm optimization algorithm based on adaptive inertia weight and chaos optimization is proposed for extracting the features of Brillouin scattering spectra. Firstly, the adaptive inertia weight parameter of the velocity is introduced to the basic particle swarm algorithm. Based on the current iteration number of particles and the adaptation value, the algorithm can change the weight coefficient and adjust the iteration speed of searching space for particles, so the local optimization ability can be enhanced. Secondly, the logical self-mapping chaotic search is carried out by using the chaos optimization in particle swarm optimization algorithm, which makes the particle swarm optimization algorithm jump out of local optimum. The novel algorithm is compared with finite element analysis-Levenberg Marquardt algorithm, particle swarm optimization-Levenberg Marquardt algorithm and particle swarm optimization algorithm by changing the linewidth, the signal-to-noise ratio and the linear weight ratio of Brillouin scattering spectra. Then the algorithm is applied to the feature extraction of Brillouin scattering spectra in different temperatures. The simulation analysis and experimental results show that this algorithm has a high fitting degree and small Brillouin frequency shift error for different linewidth, SNR and linear weight ratio. Therefore, this algorithm can be applied to the distributed optical fiber sensing system based on Brillouin optical time domain reflection, which can effectively improve the accuracy of Brillouin frequency shift extraction.

  18. Nonlinear Effects of Nanoparticles: Biological Variability From Hormetic Doses, Small Particle Sizes, and Dynamic Adaptive Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Iris R.; Ives, John A.; Jonas, Wayne B.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers are increasingly focused on the nanoscale level of organization where biological processes take place in living systems. Nanoparticles (NPs, e.g., 1–100 nm diameter) are small forms of natural or manufactured source material whose properties differ markedly from those of the respective bulk forms of the “same” material. Certain NPs have diagnostic and therapeutic uses; some NPs exhibit low-dose toxicity; other NPs show ability to stimulate low-dose adaptive responses (hormesis). Beyond dose, size, shape, and surface charge variations of NPs evoke nonlinear responses in complex adaptive systems. NPs acquire unique size-dependent biological, chemical, thermal, optical, electromagnetic, and atom-like quantum properties. Nanoparticles exhibit high surface adsorptive capacity for other substances, enhanced bioavailability, and ability to cross otherwise impermeable cell membranes including the blood-brain barrier. With super-potent effects, nano-forms can evoke cellular stress responses or therapeutic effects not only at lower doses than their bulk forms, but also for longer periods of time. Interactions of initial effects and compensatory systemic responses can alter the impact of NPs over time. Taken together, the data suggest the need to downshift the dose-response curve of NPs from that for bulk forms in order to identify the necessarily decreased no-observed-adverse-effect-level and hormetic dose range for nanoparticles. PMID:24910581

  19. Nonlinear effects of nanoparticles: biological variability from hormetic doses, small particle sizes, and dynamic adaptive interactions.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Ives, John A; Jonas, Wayne B

    2014-05-01

    Researchers are increasingly focused on the nanoscale level of organization where biological processes take place in living systems. Nanoparticles (NPs, e.g., 1-100 nm diameter) are small forms of natural or manufactured source material whose properties differ markedly from those of the respective bulk forms of the "same" material. Certain NPs have diagnostic and therapeutic uses; some NPs exhibit low-dose toxicity; other NPs show ability to stimulate low-dose adaptive responses (hormesis). Beyond dose, size, shape, and surface charge variations of NPs evoke nonlinear responses in complex adaptive systems. NPs acquire unique size-dependent biological, chemical, thermal, optical, electromagnetic, and atom-like quantum properties. Nanoparticles exhibit high surface adsorptive capacity for other substances, enhanced bioavailability, and ability to cross otherwise impermeable cell membranes including the blood-brain barrier. With super-potent effects, nano-forms can evoke cellular stress responses or therapeutic effects not only at lower doses than their bulk forms, but also for longer periods of time. Interactions of initial effects and compensatory systemic responses can alter the impact of NPs over time. Taken together, the data suggest the need to downshift the dose-response curve of NPs from that for bulk forms in order to identify the necessarily decreased no-observed-adverse-effect-level and hormetic dose range for nanoparticles.

  20. Adaptive particle-based pore-level modeling of incompressible fluid flow in porous media: a direct and parallel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovaysi, S.; Piri, M.

    2009-12-01

    obtained for sample B that has more uniform distribution of solid particles leading to a superior load balancing. The model is then used to simulate fluid flow directly in REV size three-dimensional x-ray images of a naturally occurring sandstone. We analyze the quality and consistency of the predicted flow behavior and calculate absolute permeability, which compares well with the available network modeling and Lattice-Boltzmann permeabilities available in the literature for the same sandstone. We show that the model conserves mass very well and is stable computationally even at very narrow fluid conduits. The transient- and the steady-state fluid flow patterns are presented as well as the steady-state flow rates to compute absolute permeability. Furthermore, we discuss the vital role of our adaptive particle resolution scheme in preserving the original pore connectivity of the samples and their narrow channels through splitting and merging of fluid particles.

  1. Human tracking in thermal images using adaptive particle filters with online random forest learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Byoung Chul; Kwak, Joon-Young; Nam, Jae-Yeal

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a fast and robust human tracking method to use in a moving long-wave infrared thermal camera under poor illumination with the existence of shadows and cluttered backgrounds. To improve the human tracking performance while minimizing the computation time, this study proposes an online learning of classifiers based on particle filters and combination of a local intensity distribution (LID) with oriented center-symmetric local binary patterns (OCS-LBP). Specifically, we design a real-time random forest (RF), which is the ensemble of decision trees for confidence estimation, and confidences of the RF are converted into a likelihood function of the target state. First, the target model is selected by the user and particles are sampled. Then, RFs are generated using the positive and negative examples with LID and OCS-LBP features by online learning. The learned RF classifiers are used to detect the most likely target position in the subsequent frame in the next stage. Then, the RFs are learned again by means of fast retraining with the tracked object and background appearance in the new frame. The proposed algorithm is successfully applied to various thermal videos as tests and its tracking performance is better than those of other methods.

  2. N-body simulations for f(R) gravity using a self-adaptive particle-mesh code

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Gongbo; Koyama, Kazuya; Li Baojiu

    2011-02-15

    We perform high-resolution N-body simulations for f(R) gravity based on a self-adaptive particle-mesh code MLAPM. The chameleon mechanism that recovers general relativity on small scales is fully taken into account by self-consistently solving the nonlinear equation for the scalar field. We independently confirm the previous simulation results, including the matter power spectrum, halo mass function, and density profiles, obtained by Oyaizu et al.[Phys. Rev. D 78, 123524 (2008)] and Schmidt et al.[Phys. Rev. D 79, 083518 (2009)], and extend the resolution up to k{approx}20 h/Mpc for the measurement of the matter power spectrum. Based on our simulation results, we discuss how the chameleon mechanism affects the clustering of dark matter and halos on full nonlinear scales.

  3. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, S. D.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Allison, P. A.

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier-Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE) DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two and three dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring model performance in capturing the range of dynamics on a range of meshes. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. The use of adaptive mesh optimisation is shown to reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude in comparison with fixed, uniform mesh simulations. This leads to a substantial reduction in computational cost. The computational savings and flexibility afforded by adaptivity along with the flexibility of FE methods make this model well suited to simulating turbidity currents in complex domains.

  4. Particle Swarm Optimization and Varying Chemotactic Step-Size Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithms Based Dynamic Economic Dispatch with Non-smooth Fuel Cost Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveena, P.; Vaisakh, K.; Rama Mohana Rao, S.

    The Dynamic economic dispatch (DED) problem is an optimization problem with an objective to determine the optimal combination of power outputs for all generating units over a certain period of time in order to minimize the total fuel cost while satisfying dynamic operational constraints and load demand in each interval. Recently social foraging behavior of Escherichia coli bacteria has been explored to develop a novel algorithm for distributed optimization and control. The Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithm (BFOA) is currently gaining popularity in the community of researchers, for its effectiveness in solving certain difficult real-world optimization problems. This article comes up with a hybrid approach involving Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and BFO algorithms with varying chemo tactic step size for solving the DED problem of generating units considering valve-point effects. The proposed hybrid algorithm has been extensively compared with those methods reported in the literature. The new method is shown to be statistically significantly better on two test systems consisting of five and ten generating units.

  5. Adaptive prognosis of lithium-ion batteries based on the combination of particle filters and radial basis function neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbarufatti, Claudio; Corbetta, Matteo; Giglio, Marco; Cadini, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Lithium-Ion rechargeable batteries are widespread power sources with applications to consumer electronics, electrical vehicles, unmanned aerial and spatial vehicles, etc. The failure to supply the required power levels may lead to severe safety and economical consequences. Thus, in view of the implementation of adequate maintenance strategies, the development of diagnostic and prognostic tools for monitoring the state of health of the batteries and predicting their remaining useful life is becoming a crucial task. Here, we propose a method for predicting the end of discharge of Li-Ion batteries, which stems from the combination of particle filters with radial basis function neural networks. The major innovation lies in the fact that the radial basis function model is adaptively trained on-line, i.e., its parameters are identified in real time by the particle filter as new observations of the battery terminal voltage become available. By doing so, the prognostic algorithm achieves the flexibility needed to provide sound end-of-discharge time predictions as the charge-discharge cycles progress, even in presence of anomalous behaviors due to failures or unforeseen operating conditions. The method is demonstrated with reference to actual Li-Ion battery discharge data contained in the prognostics data repository of the NASA Ames Research Center database.

  6. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, S. D.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Allison, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    High resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier-Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE) DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two, and three-dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring mesh performance in capturing the range of dynamics. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. Use of discontinuous discretisations and adaptive unstructured meshing technologies, which reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude, results in high resolution DNS models of turbidity currents at a fraction of the cost of traditional FE models. The benefits of this technique will enable simulation of turbidity currents in complex and large domains where DNS modelling was previously unachievable.

  7. An Incompressible Navier-Stokes with Particles Algorithm andParallel Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Daniel F.; Colella, Phillip; Keen, Noel D.

    2006-11-28

    We present a variation of an adaptive projection method forcomputing solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations withsuspended particles. To compute the divergence-free component of themomentum forcing due to the particle drag, we employ an approach whichexploits the locality and smoothness of the Laplacian of the projectionoperator applied to the discretized particle drag force. We presentconvergence and performance results to demonstrate the effectiveness ofthis approach.

  8. Comparison of smoothing methods for the development of a smoothed seismicity model for Alaska and the implications for seismic hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moschetti, Morgan P.; Mueller, Charles S.; Boyd, Oliver S.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    In anticipation of the update of the Alaska seismic hazard maps (ASHMs) by the U. S. Geological Survey, we report progress on the comparison of smoothed seismicity models developed using fixed and adaptive smoothing algorithms, and investigate the sensitivity of seismic hazard to the models. While fault-based sources, such as those for great earthquakes in the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone and for the ~10 shallow crustal faults within Alaska, dominate the seismic hazard estimates for locations near to the sources, smoothed seismicity rates make important contributions to seismic hazard away from fault-based sources and where knowledge of recurrence and magnitude is not sufficient for use in hazard studies. Recent developments in adaptive smoothing methods and statistical tests for evaluating and comparing rate models prompt us to investigate the appropriateness of adaptive smoothing for the ASHMs. We develop smoothed seismicity models for Alaska using fixed and adaptive smoothing methods and compare the resulting models by calculating and evaluating the joint likelihood test. We use the earthquake catalog, and associated completeness levels, developed for the 2007 ASHM to produce fixed-bandwidth-smoothed models with smoothing distances varying from 10 to 100 km and adaptively smoothed models. Adaptive smoothing follows the method of Helmstetter et al. and defines a unique smoothing distance for each earthquake epicenter from the distance to the nth nearest neighbor. The consequence of the adaptive smoothing methods is to reduce smoothing distances, causing locally increased seismicity rates, where seismicity rates are high and to increase smoothing distances where seismicity is sparse. We follow guidance from previous studies to optimize the neighbor number (n-value) by comparing model likelihood values, which estimate the likelihood that the observed earthquake epicenters from the recent catalog are derived from the smoothed rate models. We compare likelihood

  9. Particle hydrodynamics with tessellation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heß, Steffen; Springel, Volker

    2010-08-01

    Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a well-established approach to model fluids in astrophysical problems, thanks to its geometric flexibility and ability to automatically adjust the spatial resolution to the clumping of matter. However, a number of recent studies have emphasized inaccuracies of SPH in the treatment of fluid instabilities. The origin of these numerical problems can be traced back to spurious surface effects across contact discontinuities, and to SPH's inherent prevention of mixing at the particle level. We here investigate a new fluid particle model where the density estimate is carried out with the help of an auxiliary mesh constructed as the Voronoi tessellation of the simulation particles instead of an adaptive smoothing kernel. This Voronoi-based approach improves the ability of the scheme to represent sharp contact discontinuities. We show that this eliminates spurious surface tension effects present in SPH and that play a role in suppressing certain fluid instabilities. We find that the new `Voronoi Particle Hydrodynamics' (VPH) described here produces comparable results to SPH in shocks, and better ones in turbulent regimes of pure hydrodynamical simulations. We also discuss formulations of the artificial viscosity needed in this scheme and how judiciously chosen correction forces can be derived in order to maintain a high degree of particle order and hence a regular Voronoi mesh. This is especially helpful in simulating self-gravitating fluids with existing gravity solvers used for N-body simulations.

  10. Mapping high-resolution soil moisture and properties using distributed temperature sensing data and an adaptive particle batch smoother

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; Ochsner, Tyson E.; Hatch, Christine E.; Sayde, Chadi; Selker, John; Tyler, Scott; Cosh, Michael H.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrated a new method for mapping high-resolution (spatial: 1 m, and temporal: 1 h) soil moisture by assimilating distributed temperature sensing (DTS) observed soil temperatures at intermediate scales. In order to provide robust soil moisture and property estimates, we first proposed an adaptive particle batch smoother algorithm (APBS). In the APBS, a tuning factor, which can avoid severe particle weight degeneration, is automatically determined by maximizing the reliability of the soil temperature estimates of each batch window. A multiple truth synthetic test was used to demonstrate the APBS can robustly estimate soil moisture and properties using observed soil temperatures at two shallow depths. The APBS algorithm was then applied to DTS data along a 71 m transect, yielding an hourly soil moisture map with meter resolution. Results show the APBS can draw the prior guessed soil hydraulic and thermal properties significantly closer to the field measured reference values. The improved soil properties in turn remove the soil moisture biases between the prior guessed and reference soil moisture, which was particularly noticeable at depth above 20 cm. This high-resolution soil moisture map demonstrates the potential of characterizing soil moisture temporal and spatial variability and reflects patterns consistent with previous studies conducted using intensive point scale soil moisture samples. The intermediate scale high spatial resolution soil moisture information derived from the DTS may facilitate remote sensing soil moisture product calibration and validation. In addition, the APBS algorithm proposed in this study would also be applicable to general hydrological data assimilation problems for robust model state and parameter estimation.

  11. Enhanced production of Chikungunya virus-like particles using a high-pH adapted spodoptera frugiperda insect cell line.

    PubMed

    Wagner, James M; Pajerowski, J David; Daniels, Christopher L; McHugh, Patrick M; Flynn, Jessica A; Balliet, John W; Casimiro, Danilo R; Subramanian, Shyamsundar

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus-like particles (VLPs) have potential to be used as a prophylactic vaccine based on testing in multiple animal models and are currently being evaluated for human use in a Phase I clinical trial. The current method for producing these enveloped alphavirus VLPs by transient gene expression in mammalian cells presents challenges for scalable and robust industrial manufacturing, so the insect cell baculovirus expression vector system was evaluated as an alternative expression technology. Subsequent to recombinant baculovirus infection of Sf21 cells in standard culture media (pH 6.2-6.4), properly processed Chikungunya structural proteins were detected and assembled capsids were observed. However, an increase in culture pH to 6.6-6.8 was necessary to produce detectable concentrations of assembled VLPs. Since this elevated production pH exceeds the optimum for growth medium stability and Sf21 culture, medium modifications were made and a novel insect cell variant (SfBasic) was derived by exposure of Sf21 to elevated culture pH for a prolonged period of time. The high-pH adapted SfBasic insect cell line described herein is capable of maintaining normal cell growth into the typical mammalian cell culture pH range of 7.0-7.2 and produces 11-fold higher Chikungunya VLP yields relative to the parental Sf21 cell line. After scale-up into stirred tank bioreactors, SfBasic derived VLPs were chromatographically purified and shown to be similar in size and structure to a VLP standard derived from transient gene expression in HEK293 cells. Total serum anti-Chikungunya IgG and neutralizing titers from guinea pigs vaccinated with SfBasic derived VLPs or HEK293 derived VLPs were not significantly different with respect to production method, suggesting that this adapted insect cell line and production process could be useful for manufacturing Chikungunya VLPs for use as a vaccine. The adaptation of Sf21 to produce high levels of recombinant protein and VLPs in an

  12. Smoothing error pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Clarmann, T.

    2014-04-01

    The difference due to the content of a priori information between a constrained retrieval and the true atmospheric state is usually represented by the so-called smoothing error. In this paper it is shown that the concept of the smoothing error is questionable because it is not compliant with Gaussian error propagation. The reason for this is that the smoothing error does not represent the expected deviation of the retrieval from the true state but the expected deviation of the retrieval from the atmospheric state sampled on an arbitrary grid, which is itself a smoothed representation of the true state. The idea of a sufficiently fine sampling of this reference atmospheric state is untenable because atmospheric variability occurs on all scales, implying that there is no limit beyond which the sampling is fine enough. Even the idealization of infinitesimally fine sampling of the reference state does not help because the smoothing error is applied to quantities which are only defined in a statistical sense, which implies that a finite volume of sufficient spatial extent is needed to meaningfully talk about temperature or concentration. Smoothing differences, however, which play a role when measurements are compared, are still a useful quantity if the involved a priori covariance matrix has been evaluated on the comparison grid rather than resulting from interpolation. This is, because the undefined component of the smoothing error, which is the effect of smoothing implied by the finite grid on which the measurements are compared, cancels out when the difference is calculated.

  13. Smoothing spline primordial power spectrum reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Sealfon, Carolyn; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2005-11-15

    We reconstruct the shape of the primordial power spectrum (PPS) using a smoothing spline. Our adapted smoothing spline technique provides a complementary method to existing efforts to search for smooth features in the PPS, such as a running spectral index. With this technique we find no significant indication with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe first-year data that the PPS deviates from a Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum and no evidence for loss of power on large scales. We also examine the effect on the cosmological parameters of the additional PPS freedom. Smooth variations in the PPS are not significantly degenerate with other cosmological parameters, but the spline reconstruction greatly increases the errors on the optical depth and baryon fraction.

  14. Quantum State Smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Ivonne; Wiseman, Howard

    2015-10-01

    Smoothing is an estimation method whereby a classical state (probability distribution for classical variables) at a given time is conditioned on all-time (both earlier and later) observations. Here we define a smoothed quantum state for a partially monitored open quantum system, conditioned on an all-time monitoring-derived record. We calculate the smoothed distribution for a hypothetical unobserved record which, when added to the real record, would complete the monitoring, yielding a pure-state "quantum trajectory." Averaging the pure state over this smoothed distribution yields the (mixed) smoothed quantum state. We study how the choice of actual unraveling affects the purity increase over that of the conventional (filtered) state conditioned only on the past record.

  15. Quantum State Smoothing.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Ivonne; Wiseman, Howard

    2015-10-30

    Smoothing is an estimation method whereby a classical state (probability distribution for classical variables) at a given time is conditioned on all-time (both earlier and later) observations. Here we define a smoothed quantum state for a partially monitored open quantum system, conditioned on an all-time monitoring-derived record. We calculate the smoothed distribution for a hypothetical unobserved record which, when added to the real record, would complete the monitoring, yielding a pure-state "quantum trajectory." Averaging the pure state over this smoothed distribution yields the (mixed) smoothed quantum state. We study how the choice of actual unraveling affects the purity increase over that of the conventional (filtered) state conditioned only on the past record.

  16. Estimation of key parameters in adaptive neuron model according to firing patterns based on improved particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chunhua; Wang, Jiang; Yi, Guosheng

    2017-03-01

    Estimation of ion channel parameters is crucial to spike initiation of neurons. The biophysical neuron models have numerous ion channel parameters, but only a few of them play key roles in the firing patterns of the models. So we choose three parameters featuring the adaptation in the Ermentrout neuron model to be estimated. However, the traditional particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is still easy to fall into local optimum and has the premature convergence phenomenon in the study of some problems. In this paper, we propose an improved method that uses a concave function and dynamic logistic chaotic mapping mixed to adjust the inertia weights of the fitness value, effectively improve the global convergence ability of the algorithm. The perfect predicting firing trajectories of the rebuilt model using the estimated parameters prove that only estimating a few important ion channel parameters can establish the model well and the proposed algorithm is effective. Estimations using two classic PSO algorithms are also compared to the improved PSO to verify that the algorithm proposed in this paper can avoid local optimum and quickly converge to the optimal value. The results provide important theoretical foundations for building biologically realistic neuron models.

  17. The Multi Level Multi Domain (MLMD) method: a semi-implicit adaptive algorithm for Particle In Cell plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Maria Elena; Beck, Arnaud; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations of plasmas are not bound anymore by the stability constraints of explicit algorithms. Semi implicit and fully implicit methods allow to use larger grid spacings and time steps. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques permit to locally change the simulation resolution. The code proposed in Innocenti et al., 2013 and Beck et al., 2013 is however the first to combine the advantages of both. The use of the Implicit Moment Method allows to taylor the resolution used in each level to the physical scales of interest and to use high Refinement Factors (RF) between the levels. The Multi Level Multi Domain (MLMD) structure, where all levels are simulated as complete domains, conjugates algorithmic and practical advantages. The different levels evolve according to the local dynamics and achieve optimal level interlocking. Also, the capabilities of the Object Oriented programming model are fully exploited. The MLMD algorithm is demonstrated with magnetic reconnection and collisionless shocks simulations with very high RFs between the levels. Notable computational gains are achieved with respect to simulations performed on the entire domain with the higher resolution. Beck A. et al. (2013). submitted. Innocenti M. E. et al. (2013). JCP, 238(0):115-140.

  18. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics for Surf Zone Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    2010.) The GPU-SPHysics code, initiated by Dr. Alexis Hérault at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia in Sicily, has been applied to...Geofisica e Vulcanologia , sezione di Catania, for the development of GPU-SPHysics. Drs. Hérault and Bilotta were in residence at JHU during January of

  19. Modeling Water Waves with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    criterion (Jeong & Hussain, 1995), which uses the symmetric and antisymmetric components of the velocity gradient tensor to identify regions of low...surf zone or as a first approximation to a tsunami . Wave data was obtain from the laboratory experiments of Ting (2006). In Figure 4, the measured...R., Hérault, A., & Bilotta, G. SPH modeling of mean velocity transmission in a rip current system, International Conference on Coastal Engineering

  20. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics: Applications Within DSTO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    by Cartwright et al. [5], [6] and [7]. These authors have used an SPH model embedded in the commercial finite element code PAM-SHOCK to simulate the...already been made by Cartwright and McGuckin of Pacific ESI in collaboration with Stuart Cannon and Terry Turner from the SPS branch. They used the...method, noted by Cartwright et al. in a previous paper [6], is that considerable loss of wave amplitude can occur in an SPH simulation if a wave is

  1. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics for Surf Zone Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    universities. Collaboration with Dr. Moncho Gomez-Gesteira (University of Vigo ) and Dr. Benedict Rogers (University of Manchester) continues. A meeting was...held in Vigo , Spain this year for four days, where the three of us worked on improvements to the SPHysics model. In addition, the meeting coincided...with the dissertation defense of Dr. Alejandro Crespo, who has been active in SPHysics development. In addition, all four of us presented a half-day

  2. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics for Surf Zone Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    European universities. Collaboration with Dr. Moncho Gomez-Gesteira (University of Vigo ) and Dr. Benedict Rogers (University of Manchester) continues. A...meeting was held in Vigo , Spain this year for four days, where the three of us worked on improvements to the SPHysics model. In addition, the meeting...coincided with the dissertation defense of Dr. Alejandro Crespo, who has been active in SPHysics development. In addition, all four of us

  3. Diamond Smoothing Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Diamond smoothing tools have been proposed for use in conjunction with diamond cutting tools that are used in many finish-machining operations. Diamond machining (including finishing) is often used, for example, in fabrication of precise metal mirrors. A diamond smoothing tool according to the proposal would have a smooth spherical surface. For a given finish machining operation, the smoothing tool would be mounted next to the cutting tool. The smoothing tool would slide on the machined surface left behind by the cutting tool, plastically deforming the surface material and thereby reducing the roughness of the surface, closing microcracks and otherwise generally reducing or eliminating microscopic surface and subsurface defects, and increasing the microhardness of the surface layer. It has been estimated that if smoothing tools of this type were used in conjunction with cutting tools on sufficiently precise lathes, it would be possible to reduce the roughness of machined surfaces to as little as 3 nm. A tool according to the proposal would consist of a smoothing insert in a metal holder. The smoothing insert would be made from a diamond/metal functionally graded composite rod preform, which, in turn, would be made by sintering together a bulk single-crystal or polycrystalline diamond, a diamond powder, and a metallic alloy at high pressure. To form the spherical smoothing tip, the diamond end of the preform would be subjected to flat grinding, conical grinding, spherical grinding using diamond wheels, and finally spherical polishing and/or buffing using diamond powders. If the diamond were a single crystal, then it would be crystallographically oriented, relative to the machining motion, to minimize its wear and maximize its hardness. Spherically polished diamonds could also be useful for purposes other than smoothing in finish machining: They would likely also be suitable for use as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, unlubricated sliding-fit bearing inserts.

  4. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics modeling of particle uptake by an occupational air sampler using manually-scaled and adaptive grids.

    PubMed

    Landázuri, Andrea C; Sáez, A Eduardo; Anthony, T Renée

    2016-05-01

    This work presents fluid flow and particle trajectory simulation studies to determine the aspiration efficiency of a horizontally oriented occupational air sampler using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Grid adaption and manual scaling of the grids were applied to two sampler prototypes based on a 37-mm cassette. The standard k-ε model was used to simulate the turbulent air flow and a second order streamline-upwind discretization scheme was used to stabilize convective terms of the Navier-Stokes equations. Successively scaled grids for each configuration were created manually and by means of grid adaption using the velocity gradient in the main flow direction. Solutions were verified to assess iterative convergence, grid independence and monotonic convergence. Particle aspiration efficiencies determined for both prototype samplers were undistinguishable, indicating that the porous filter does not play a noticeable role in particle aspiration. Results conclude that grid adaption is a powerful tool that allows to refine specific regions that require lots of detail and therefore better resolve flow detail. It was verified that adaptive grids provided a higher number of locations with monotonic convergence than the manual grids and required the least computational effort.

  5. Adapting a Particle Model for Computing Sulfur Dioxide Concentrations in Mount Rainier Area and Comparing Them to Measured Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givati, Reuven

    In this work the SO_2 concentrations measured in the Mt. Rainier area during PREVENT Pacific Northwest Regional Visibility Experiment Using Natural Tracers, June to September 1990), were analyzed with the aid of the MATHEW/ADPIC models (a diagnostic wind model and a particle model) developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Some changes were made in the models to adapt them to the specific conditions of this experiment. The models were run on a large domain in western Washington, and the SO_2 concentrations were evaluated at two specific points, Tahoma Woods and Paradise in the Nisqually Valley, the only points near Mt. Rainier where SO_2 concentrations were measured during PREVENT. The changes that were made were: including loss rates of SO_2 by oxidation, using different heights of the top of the boundary layer at different locations, enabling limited area of influence of specific meteorological stations when interpolating the wind fields, and including the possibility of reflection of the air "particles", from the top of the mixed layer. Because of the paucity of the meteorological measurements near the sampling points, an estimation was made about the wind behavior in the valley, based on the phenomena of wind channeling, mountain and valley winds, and historical wind measurements near Mt. Rainier. The models were run for several non-rainy days of PREVENT having large SO_2 concentrations, or that were interesting for other reasons. The agreement between the measured and modeled SO_2 concentrations at Tahoma Woods during the daytime periods, was quite good. Out of 14 days, for which the emissions of the previous night were taken into account, for 12 days (86%) the ratio of the modeled to the measured SO_2 concentrations, at Tahoma Woods during the daytime periods, was in the interval 0.45-2.00. The agreement between the modeled and measured SO_2 concentrations at Tahoma Woods during the nights, and at Paradise, during the day and the night, were not

  6. Smoothing error pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Clarmann, T.

    2014-09-01

    The difference due to the content of a priori information between a constrained retrieval and the true atmospheric state is usually represented by a diagnostic quantity called smoothing error. In this paper it is shown that, regardless of the usefulness of the smoothing error as a diagnostic tool in its own right, the concept of the smoothing error as a component of the retrieval error budget is questionable because it is not compliant with Gaussian error propagation. The reason for this is that the smoothing error does not represent the expected deviation of the retrieval from the true state but the expected deviation of the retrieval from the atmospheric state sampled on an arbitrary grid, which is itself a smoothed representation of the true state; in other words, to characterize the full loss of information with respect to the true atmosphere, the effect of the representation of the atmospheric state on a finite grid also needs to be considered. The idea of a sufficiently fine sampling of this reference atmospheric state is problematic because atmospheric variability occurs on all scales, implying that there is no limit beyond which the sampling is fine enough. Even the idealization of infinitesimally fine sampling of the reference state does not help, because the smoothing error is applied to quantities which are only defined in a statistical sense, which implies that a finite volume of sufficient spatial extent is needed to meaningfully discuss temperature or concentration. Smoothing differences, however, which play a role when measurements are compared, are still a useful quantity if the covariance matrix involved has been evaluated on the comparison grid rather than resulting from interpolation and if the averaging kernel matrices have been evaluated on a grid fine enough to capture all atmospheric variations that the instruments are sensitive to. This is, under the assumptions stated, because the undefined component of the smoothing error, which is the

  7. Smoothly deformed light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenholm, Stig

    1993-01-01

    A single mode cavity is deformed smoothly to change its electromagnetic eigenfrequency. The system is modeled as a simple harmonic oscillator with a varying period. The Wigner function of the problem is obtained exactly by starting with a squeezed initial state. The result is evaluated for a linear change of the cavity length. The approach to the adiabatic limit is investigated. The maximum squeezing is found to occur for smooth change lasting only a fraction of the oscillational period. However, only a factor of two improvement over the adiabatic result proves to be possible. The sudden limit cannot be investigated meaningfully within the model.

  8. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict CI engine parameters fueled with nano-particles additive to diesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, M.; Najafi, G.; Ghobadian, B.; Mamat, R.; Noor, M. M.; Moosavian, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the use of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict the performance parameters and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine operating on nanodiesel blended fuels. In order to predict the engine parameters, the whole experimental data were randomly divided into training and testing data. For ANFIS modelling, Gaussian curve membership function (gaussmf) and 200 training epochs (iteration) were found to be optimum choices for training process. The results demonstrate that ANFIS is capable of predicting the diesel engine performance and emissions. In the experimental step, Carbon nano tubes (CNT) (40, 80 and 120 ppm) and nano silver particles (40, 80 and 120 ppm) with nanostructure were prepared and added as additive to the diesel fuel. Six cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with these new blended fuels and operated at different engine speeds. Experimental test results indicated the fact that adding nano particles to diesel fuel, increased diesel engine power and torque output. For nano-diesel it was found that the brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was decreased compared to the net diesel fuel. The results proved that with increase of nano particles concentrations (from 40 ppm to 120 ppm) in diesel fuel, CO2 emission increased. CO emission in diesel fuel with nano-particles was lower significantly compared to pure diesel fuel. UHC emission with silver nano-diesel blended fuel decreased while with fuels that contains CNT nano particles increased. The trend of NOx emission was inverse compared to the UHC emission. With adding nano particles to the blended fuels, NOx increased compared to the net diesel fuel. The tests revealed that silver & CNT nano particles can be used as additive in diesel fuel to improve combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  9. A Generalized Eigensolver based on Smoothed Aggregation (GES-SA) for Initializing Smoothed Aggregation Multigrid (SA)

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J; Sanders, G; Vassilevski, P S

    2007-05-31

    Consider the linear system Ax = b, where A is a large, sparse, real, symmetric, and positive definite matrix and b is a known vector. Solving this system for unknown vector x using a smoothed aggregation multigrid (SA) algorithm requires a characterization of the algebraically smooth error, meaning error that is poorly attenuated by the algorithm's relaxation process. For relaxation processes that are typically used in practice, algebraically smooth error corresponds to the near-nullspace of A. Therefore, having a good approximation to a minimal eigenvector is useful to characterize the algebraically smooth error when forming a linear SA solver. This paper discusses the details of a generalized eigensolver based on smoothed aggregation (GES-SA) that is designed to produce an approximation to a minimal eigenvector of A. GES-SA might be very useful as a standalone eigensolver for applications that desire an approximate minimal eigenvector, but the primary aim here is for GES-SA to produce an initial algebraically smooth component that may be used to either create a black-box SA solver or initiate the adaptive SA ({alpha}SA) process.

  10. Fluid and particle retention in the digestive tract of the addax antelope (Addax nasomaculatus)--adaptations of a grazing desert ruminant.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Jürgen; Steuer, Patrick; Südekum, Karl-Heinz; Hammer, Sven; Hammer, Catrin; Streich, W Jürgen; Clauss, Marcus

    2008-02-01

    Retention time of food in the digestive tract is a major aspect describing the digestive physiology of herbivores. Differences in feed retention times have been described for different ruminant feeding types. In this study, a dominantly grazing desert ruminant, the addax (Addax nasomaculatus), was investigated in this respect. Eight animals with a body weight (BW) of 87+/-5.3 kg on an ad libitum grass hay (Chloris gayana) diet were available. Co-EDTA and Cr-mordanted fibers (<2 mm) were used as pulse-dose markers. Mean retention time (MRT) in the digestive tract was calculated from faecal marker excretion. Average daily intake of the addax was found to be 1.7 kg dry matter (DM) or 60+/-8.3 g DM/kg BW(0.75). The MRT of fluid and particles in the reticulo-rumen (MRT(fluid)RR and MRT(particle)RR) were quantified to be 20+/-5.8 and 42+/-7.0 h respectively. When compared to literature data, MRT(fluid)RR was significantly longer than in cattle species, and MRT(particle)RR was significantly longer than in 11 taxa of all feeding types. The ratio of MRT(particle)RR/MRT(fluid)RR (2.3+/-0.5) was found to be within the range described for grazing ruminants. The long retention times found in the addax can be interpreted as an adaptation to a diet including a high proportion of slow fermenting grasses, while the long retention time of the fluid phase can be interpreted as a consequence of water saving mechanisms of the desert-adapted addax with a potentially low water turnover and capacious water storing rumen.

  11. Mechanics of Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ratz, Paul H

    2015-12-15

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM; see Table 1 for a list of abbreviations) is a heterogeneous biomaterial comprised of cells and extracellular matrix. By surrounding tubes of endothelial cells, VSM forms a regulated network, the vasculature, through which oxygenated blood supplies specialized organs, permitting the development of large multicellular organisms. VSM cells, the engine of the vasculature, house a set of regulated nanomotors that permit rapid stress-development, sustained stress-maintenance and vessel constriction. Viscoelastic materials within, surrounding and attached to VSM cells, comprised largely of polymeric proteins with complex mechanical characteristics, assist the engine with countering loads imposed by the heart pump, and with control of relengthening after constriction. The complexity of this smart material can be reduced by classical mechanical studies combined with circuit modeling using spring and dashpot elements. Evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of VSM requires a more complete understanding of the mechanics and regulation of its biochemical parts, and ultimately, an understanding of how these parts work together to form the machinery of the vascular tree. Current molecular studies provide detailed mechanical data about single polymeric molecules, revealing viscoelasticity and plasticity at the protein domain level, the unique biological slip-catch bond, and a regulated two-step actomyosin power stroke. At the tissue level, new insight into acutely dynamic stress-strain behavior reveals smooth muscle to exhibit adaptive plasticity. At its core, physiology aims to describe the complex interactions of molecular systems, clarifying structure-function relationships and regulation of biological machines. The intent of this review is to provide a comprehensive presentation of one biomachine, VSM.

  12. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the presence ...

  13. Particle Mesh Hydrodynamics for Astrophysics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelain, Philippe; Cottet, Georges-Henri; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    We present a particle method for the simulation of three dimensional compressible hydrodynamics based on a hybrid Particle-Mesh discretization of the governing equations. The method is rooted on the regularization of particle locations as in remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (rSPH). The rSPH method was recently introduced to remedy problems associated with the distortion of computational elements in SPH, by periodically re-initializing the particle positions and by using high order interpolation kernels. In the PMH formulation, the particles solely handle the convective part of the compressible Euler equations. The particle quantities are then interpolated onto a mesh, where the pressure terms are computed. PMH, like SPH, is free of the convection CFL condition while at the same time it is more efficient as derivatives are computed on a mesh rather than particle-particle interactions. PMH does not detract from the adaptive character of SPH and allows for control of its accuracy. We present simulations of a benchmark astrophysics problem demonstrating the capabilities of this approach.

  14. INTERMEDIATE FILAMENTS IN SMOOTH MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dale D.

    2008-01-01

    The intermediate filament (IF) network is one of the three cytoskeletal systems in smooth muscle. The type III IF proteins vimentin and desmin are major constituents of the network in smooth muscle cells and tissues. Lack of vimentin or desmin impairs contractile ability of various smooth muscle preparations, implying their important role for smooth muscle force development. The IF framework has long been viewed as a fixed cytostructure that solely provides mechanical integrity for the cell. However, recent studies suggest that the IF cytoskeleton is dynamic in mammalian cells in response to various external stimulation. In this review, the structure and biological properties of IF proteins in smooth muscle are summarized. The role of IF proteins in the modulation of smooth muscle force development and redistribution/translocation of signaling partners (such as p130 Crk-associated substrate, CAS) is depicted. This review also summarizes our latest understanding on how the IF network may be regulated in smooth muscle. PMID:18256275

  15. Study on a compact and adaptable Thomson Spectrometer for laser-initiated 11B(p,α)8Be reactions and low-medium energy particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Bonasera, A.; Sura, J.; Andreoli, P.; Cristofari, G.; Cipriani, M.; Di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Barbarino, M.; Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Yahia, V.

    2016-05-01

    Thomson Spectrometers are of primary importance in the discrimination of particles produced by laser-plasma interaction, according to their energy and charge-mass ratio. We describe here a detailed study on a set of Thomson Spectrometers, adaptable to different experimental situations, with the aim of being placed directly within the experimental chamber, rather than in additional extensions, in order to increase the solid angle of observation. These instruments are suitable for detection of low-medium energy particles and can be effectively employed in laser-plasma experiments of 11B(p,α)8Be fusion. They are provided with permanent magnets, have small dimensions and compact design. In these small configurations electric and magnetic fringing fields play a primary role for particle deflection, and their accurate characterization is required. It was accomplished by means of COMSOL electromagnetic solver coupled to an effective analytical model, very suitable for practical use of the spectrometers. Data from experimental measurements of the magnetic fields have been also used. We describe the application of the spectrometers to an experiment of laser-plasma interaction, coupled to Imaging Plate detectors. Data analysis for spectrum and yield of the detected radiation is discussed in detail.

  16. Adaptation to life in aeolian sand: how the sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus, prevents sand particles from entering its lungs

    PubMed Central

    Vihar, Boštjan; Günther, Mathias; Huemer, Michaela; Riedl, Martin; Shamiyeh, Stephanie; Mayrhofer, Bernhard; Böhme, Wolfgang; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus (Squamata: Scincidae), spends nearly its whole life in aeolian sand and only comes to the surface for foraging, defecating and mating. It is not yet understood how the animal can respire without sand particles entering its respiratory organs when buried under thick layers of sand. In this work, we integrated biological studies, computational calculations and physical experiments to understand this phenomenon. We present a 3D model of the upper respiratory system based on a detailed histological analysis. A 3D-printed version of this model was used in combination with characteristic ventilation patterns for computational calculations and fluid mechanics experiments. By calculating the velocity field, we identified a sharp decrease in velocity in the anterior part of the nasal cavity where mucus and cilia are present. The experiments with the 3D-printed model validate the calculations: particles, if present, were found only in the same area as suggested by the calculations. We postulate that the sandfish has an aerodynamic filtering system; more specifically, that the characteristic morphology of the respiratory channel coupled with specific ventilation patterns prevent particles from entering the lungs. PMID:27852763

  17. Regional-scale simulations of fungal spore aerosols using an emission parameterization adapted to local measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, M.; Hoose, C.; Gallagher, M.; Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D.; Pöschl, U.; Pöhlker, C.; Robinson, N. H.; Schnaiter, M.; Sodeau, J. R.; Toprak, E.; Vogel, H.

    2014-04-01

    Fungal spores as a prominent type of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) have been incorporated into the COSMO-ART regional atmospheric model, using and comparing three different emission parameterizations. Two literature-based emission rates derived from fungal spore colony counts and chemical tracer measurements were used as a parameterization baseline for this study. A third, new emission parameterization was adapted to field measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) from four locations across Northern Europe. FBAP concentrations can be regarded as a lower estimate of total PBAP concentrations. Size distributions of FBAP often show a distinct mode at approx. 3 μm, corresponding to a diameter range characteristic for many fungal spores. Previous studies have suggested the majority of FBAP in several locations are dominated by fungal spores. Thus, we suggest that simulated fungal spore concentrations obtained from the emission parameterizations can be compared to the sum of total FBAP concentrations. A comparison reveals that parameterized estimates of fungal spore concentrations based on literature numbers underestimate measured FBAP concentrations. In agreement with measurement data, the model results show a diurnal cycle in simulated fungal spore concentrations, which may develop partially as a consequence of a varying boundary layer height between day and night. Measured FBAP and simulated fungal spore concentrations also correlate similarly with simulated temperature and humidity. These meteorological variables, together with leaf area index, were chosen to drive the new emission parameterization discussed here. Using the new emission parameterization on a model domain covering Western Europe, fungal spores in the lowest model layer comprise a fraction of 15% of the total aerosol mass over land and reach average number concentrations of 26 L-1. The results confirm that fungal spores and biological particles may account for a

  18. Fast Particle Methods for Multiscale Phenomena Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.; Wray, A.; Shariff, K.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    We are developing particle methods oriented at improving computational modeling capabilities of multiscale physical phenomena in : (i) high Reynolds number unsteady vortical flows, (ii) particle laden and interfacial flows, (iii)molecular dynamics studies of nanoscale droplets and studies of the structure, functions, and evolution of the earliest living cell. The unifying computational approach involves particle methods implemented in parallel computer architectures. The inherent adaptivity, robustness and efficiency of particle methods makes them a multidisciplinary computational tool capable of bridging the gap of micro-scale and continuum flow simulations. Using efficient tree data structures, multipole expansion algorithms, and improved particle-grid interpolation, particle methods allow for simulations using millions of computational elements, making possible the resolution of a wide range of length and time scales of these important physical phenomena.The current challenges in these simulations are in : [i] the proper formulation of particle methods in the molecular and continuous level for the discretization of the governing equations [ii] the resolution of the wide range of time and length scales governing the phenomena under investigation. [iii] the minimization of numerical artifacts that may interfere with the physics of the systems under consideration. [iv] the parallelization of processes such as tree traversal and grid-particle interpolations We are conducting simulations using vortex methods, molecular dynamics and smooth particle hydrodynamics, exploiting their unifying concepts such as : the solution of the N-body problem in parallel computers, highly accurate particle-particle and grid-particle interpolations, parallel FFT's and the formulation of processes such as diffusion in the context of particle methods. This approach enables us to transcend among seemingly unrelated areas of research.

  19. A toxicology suite adapted for comparing parallel toxicity responses of model human lung cells to diesel exhaust particles and their extracts

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jane; Hernandez, Mark; Snawder, John E.; Handorean, Alina; McCabe, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to airborne particulate matter can be an important risk factor for some common respiratory diseases. While many studies have shown that particulate matter exposures are associated with inflammatory reactions, the role of specific cellular responses in the manifestation of primary hypersensitivities, and the progression of respiratory diseases remains unclear. In order to better understand mechanisms by which particulate matter can exert adverse health effects, more robust approaches to support in vitro studies are warranted. In response to this need, a group of accepted toxicology assays were adapted to create an analytical suite for screening and evaluating the effects of important, ubiquitous atmospheric pollutants on two model human lung cell lines (epithelial and immature macrophage). To demonstrate the utility of this suite, responses to intact diesel exhaust particles, and mass-based equivalent doses of their organic extracts were examined. Results suggest that extracts have the potential to induce greater biological responses than those associated with their colloidal counterpart. Additionally, macrophage cells appear to be more susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of both intact diesel exhaust particles and their organic extract, than epithelial cells tested in parallel. As designed, the suite provided a more robust basis for characterizing toxicity mechanisms than the analysis of any individual assay. Findings suggest that cellular responses to particulate matter are cell line dependent, and show that the collection and preparation of PM and/or their extracts have the potential to impact cellular responses relevant to screening fundamental elements of respiratory toxicity. PMID:26412929

  20. Smooth eigenvalue correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrikse, Anne; Veldhuis, Raymond; Spreeuwers, Luuk

    2013-12-01

    Second-order statistics play an important role in data modeling. Nowadays, there is a tendency toward measuring more signals with higher resolution (e.g., high-resolution video), causing a rapid increase of dimensionality of the measured samples, while the number of samples remains more or less the same. As a result the eigenvalue estimates are significantly biased as described by the Marčenko Pastur equation for the limit of both the number of samples and their dimensionality going to infinity. By introducing a smoothness factor, we show that the Marčenko Pastur equation can be used in practical situations where both the number of samples and their dimensionality remain finite. Based on this result we derive methods, one already known and one new to our knowledge, to estimate the sample eigenvalues when the population eigenvalues are known. However, usually the sample eigenvalues are known and the population eigenvalues are required. We therefore applied one of the these methods in a feedback loop, resulting in an eigenvalue bias correction method. We compare this eigenvalue correction method with the state-of-the-art methods and show that our method outperforms other methods particularly in real-life situations often encountered in biometrics: underdetermined configurations, high-dimensional configurations, and configurations where the eigenvalues are exponentially distributed.

  1. New smooth hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarides, George; Vamvasakis, Achilleas

    2007-10-15

    We consider the extension of the supersymmetric Pati-Salam model which solves the b-quark mass problem of supersymmetric grand unified models with exact Yukawa unification and universal boundary conditions and leads to the so-called new shifted hybrid inflationary scenario. We show that this model can also lead to a new version of smooth hybrid inflation based only on renormalizable interactions provided that a particular parameter of its superpotential is somewhat small. The potential possesses valleys of minima with classical inclination, which can be used as inflationary paths. The model is consistent with the fitting of the three-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe data by the standard power-law cosmological model with cold dark matter and a cosmological constant. In particular, the spectral index turns out to be adequately small so that it is compatible with the data. Moreover, the Pati-Salam gauge group is broken to the standard model gauge group during inflation and, thus, no monopoles are formed at the end of inflation. Supergravity corrections based on a nonminimal Kaehler potential with a convenient choice of a sign keep the spectral index comfortably within the allowed range without generating maxima and minima of the potential on the inflationary path. So, unnatural restrictions on the initial conditions for inflation can be avoided.

  2. Space debris tracking based on fuzzy running Gaussian average adaptive particle filter track-before-detect algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torteeka, Peerapong; Gao, Peng-Qi; Shen, Ming; Guo, Xiao-Zhang; Yang, Da-Tao; Yu, Huan-Huan; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Zhao, You

    2017-02-01

    Although tracking with a passive optical telescope is a powerful technique for space debris observation, it is limited by its sensitivity to dynamic background noise. Traditionally, in the field of astronomy, static background subtraction based on a median image technique has been used to extract moving space objects prior to the tracking operation, as this is computationally efficient. The main disadvantage of this technique is that it is not robust to variable illumination conditions. In this article, we propose an approach for tracking small and dim space debris in the context of a dynamic background via one of the optical telescopes that is part of the space surveillance network project, named the Asia-Pacific ground-based Optical Space Observation System or APOSOS. The approach combines a fuzzy running Gaussian average for robust moving-object extraction with dim-target tracking using a particle-filter-based track-before-detect method. The performance of the proposed algorithm is experimentally evaluated, and the results show that the scheme achieves a satisfactory level of accuracy for space debris tracking.

  3. Material approximation of data smoothing and spline curves inspired by slime mould.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    The giant single-celled slime mould Physarum polycephalum is known to approximate a number of network problems via growth and adaptation of its protoplasmic transport network and can serve as an inspiration towards unconventional, material-based computation. In Physarum, predictable morphological adaptation is prevented by its adhesion to the underlying substrate. We investigate what possible computations could be achieved if these limitations were removed and the organism was free to completely adapt its morphology in response to changing stimuli. Using a particle model of Physarum displaying emergent morphological adaptation behaviour, we demonstrate how a minimal approach to collective material computation may be used to transform and summarise properties of spatially represented datasets. We find that the virtual material relaxes more strongly to high-frequency changes in data, which can be used for the smoothing (or filtering) of data by approximating moving average and low-pass filters in 1D datasets. The relaxation and minimisation properties of the model enable the spatial computation of B-spline curves (approximating splines) in 2D datasets. Both clamped and unclamped spline curves of open and closed shapes can be represented, and the degree of spline curvature corresponds to the relaxation time of the material. The material computation of spline curves also includes novel quasi-mechanical properties, including unwinding of the shape between control points and a preferential adhesion to longer, straighter paths. Interpolating splines could not directly be approximated due to the formation and evolution of Steiner points at narrow vertices, but were approximated after rectilinear pre-processing of the source data. This pre-processing was further simplified by transforming the original data to contain the material inside the polyline. These exemplary results expand the repertoire of spatially represented unconventional computing devices by demonstrating a

  4. Ceramic coatings on smooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A. (Inventor); Brindley, W. J. (Inventor); Rouge, C. J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A metallic coating is plasma sprayed onto a smooth surface of a metal alloy substitute or on a bond coating. An initial thin ceramic layer is low pressure sprayed onto the smooth surface of the substrate or bond coating. Another ceramic layer is atmospheric plasma sprayed onto the initial ceramic layer.

  5. Ryanodine receptors in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Rueda, Angélica

    2002-07-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of smooth muscle is endowed with two different types of Ca2+ release channels, i.e. inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In general, both release channels mobilize Ca2+ from the same internal store in smooth muscle. While the importance of IP3Rs in agonist-induced contraction is well established, the role of RyRs in excitation-contraction coupling of smooth muscle is not clear. The participation of smooth muscle RyRs in the amplification of Ca2+ transients induced by either opening of Ca2+-permeable channels or IP3-triggered Ca2+ release has been studied. The efficacy of both processes to activate RyRs by calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is highly variable and not widely present in smooth muscle. Although RyRs in smooth muscle generate Ca2+ sparks that are similar to those observed in striated muscles, the contribution of these local Ca2+ events to depolarization-induced global rise in [Ca2+]i is rather limited. Recent data suggest that RyRs are involved in regulating the luminal [Ca2+] of SR and also in smooth muscle relaxation. This review summarizes studies that were carried out mainly in muscle strips or in freshly isolated myocytes, and that were aimed to determine the physiological role of RyRs in smooth muscle.

  6. The role of photo-osmotic adaptation in semi-continuous culture and lipid particle release from Dunaliella viridis

    DOE PAGES

    Davis, Ryan W.; Carvalho, Benjamin J.; Jones, Howland D. T.; ...

    2014-05-13

    Great efforts have been made to elucidate the phenotypic responses of alga to varying levels of nutrients, osmotic environments, and photosynthetically active radiation intensities, though the role of interactions among these variables is largely nebulous. We also describe a general method for establishing and maintaining semi-continuous cultures of the halophilic microalgal production strain, Dunaliella viridis, that is independent of variations in salinity and illumination intensity. Using this method, the cultures were evaluated to elucidate the overlapping roles of photosynthetic and osmotic adaptation on the accumulation and compositional variation of the biomass, photosynthetic productivity, and physiological biomarkers, as well as spectroscopicmore » and morphological details at the single-cell level. Correlation matrices defining the relationships among the observables and based on variation of the illumination intensity and salinity were constructed for predicting bioproduct yields for varying culture conditions. Following maintenance of stable cultures for 6-week intervals, phenotypic responses to photo-osmotic drift were explored using a combination of single-cell hyperspectral fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. In addition to morphological changes, release of lipid microparticles from the cells that is disproportionate to cell lysis was observed under hypotonic drift, indicating the existence of a reversible membrane permeation mechanism in Dunaliella. Furthermore, this phenomenon introduces the potential for low-cost strategies for recovering lipids and pigments from the microalgae by minimizing the requirement for energy intensive harvesting and dewatering of the biomass. The results should be applicable to outdoor culture, where seasonal changes resulting in variable solar flux and precipitation and evaporation rates are anticipated.« less

  7. The role of photo-osmotic adaptation in semi-continuous culture and lipid particle release from Dunaliella viridis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Ryan W.; Carvalho, Benjamin J.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Singh, Seema

    2014-05-13

    Great efforts have been made to elucidate the phenotypic responses of alga to varying levels of nutrients, osmotic environments, and photosynthetically active radiation intensities, though the role of interactions among these variables is largely nebulous. We also describe a general method for establishing and maintaining semi-continuous cultures of the halophilic microalgal production strain, Dunaliella viridis, that is independent of variations in salinity and illumination intensity. Using this method, the cultures were evaluated to elucidate the overlapping roles of photosynthetic and osmotic adaptation on the accumulation and compositional variation of the biomass, photosynthetic productivity, and physiological biomarkers, as well as spectroscopic and morphological details at the single-cell level. Correlation matrices defining the relationships among the observables and based on variation of the illumination intensity and salinity were constructed for predicting bioproduct yields for varying culture conditions. Following maintenance of stable cultures for 6-week intervals, phenotypic responses to photo-osmotic drift were explored using a combination of single-cell hyperspectral fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. In addition to morphological changes, release of lipid microparticles from the cells that is disproportionate to cell lysis was observed under hypotonic drift, indicating the existence of a reversible membrane permeation mechanism in Dunaliella. Furthermore, this phenomenon introduces the potential for low-cost strategies for recovering lipids and pigments from the microalgae by minimizing the requirement for energy intensive harvesting and dewatering of the biomass. The results should be applicable to outdoor culture, where seasonal changes resulting in variable solar flux and precipitation and evaporation rates are anticipated.

  8. Regional-scale simulations of fungal spore aerosols using an emission parameterization adapted to local measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, M.; Hoose, C.; Gallagher, M.; Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D.; Pöschl, U.; Pöhlker, C.; Robinson, N. H.; Schnaiter, M.; Sodeau, J. R.; Stengel, M.; Toprak, E.; Vogel, H.

    2015-06-01

    Fungal spores as a prominent type of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) have been incorporated into the COSMO-ART (Consortium for Small-scale Modelling-Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) regional atmospheric model. Two literature-based emission rates for fungal spores derived from fungal spore colony counts and chemical tracer measurements were used as a parameterization baseline for this study. A third, new emission parameterization for fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) was adapted to field measurements from four locations across Europe. FBAP concentrations can be regarded as a lower estimate of total PBAP concentrations. Size distributions of FBAP often show a distinct mode at approx. 3 μm, corresponding to a diameter range characteristic for many fungal spores. Previous studies for several locations have suggested that FBAP are in many cases dominated by fungal spores. Thus, we suggest that simulated FBAP and fungal spore concentrations obtained from the three different emission parameterizations can be compared to FBAP measurements. The comparison reveals that simulated fungal spore concentrations based on literature emission parameterizations are lower than measured FBAP concentrations. In agreement with the measurements, the model results show a diurnal cycle in simulated fungal spore concentrations, which may develop partially as a consequence of a varying boundary layer height between day and night. Temperature and specific humidity, together with leaf area index (LAI), were chosen to drive the new emission parameterization which is fitted to the FBAP observations. The new parameterization results in similar root mean square errors (RMSEs) and correlation coefficients compared to the FBAP observations as the previously existing fungal spore emission parameterizations, with some improvements in the bias. Using the new emission parameterization on a model domain covering western Europe, FBAP in the lowest model layer comprise a

  9. Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-02

    SIMPLE ROBUST FIXED LAG SMOOTHING by ~N. D. Le R.D. Martin 4 TECHNICAL RlEPORT No. 149 December 1988 Department of Statistics, GN-22 Accesion For...frLsD1ist Special A- Z Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing With Application To Radar Glint Noise * N. D. Le R. D. Martin Department of Statistics, GN...smoothers. The emphasis here is on fixed-lag smoothing , as opposed to the use of existing robust fixed interval smoothers (e.g., as in Martin, 1979

  10. Effects of Particle Size and Adaptation Duration on the Digestible and Metabolizable Energy Contents and Digestibility of Various Chemical Constituents in Wheat for Finishing Pigs Determined by the Direct or Indirect Method.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuanfang; Ma, Yongxi; Guo, Panpan; Yang, Yuyuan; Xia, Tian; Liu, Ling

    2016-08-19

    This experiment was conducted as a 3 × 2 × 2 factorial design to examine the effects of particle size (mean particle size of 331, 640 or 862 μm), evaluation method (direct vs. indirect method) and adaptation duration (7 or 26 days) on the energy content and the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of various chemical components in wheat when fed to finishing pigs. Forty-two barrows (Duroc x Landrace x Yorkshire) with an initial body weight of 63.0 ± 0.8 kg were individually placed in metabolic cages and randomly allotted to 1 of 7 diets with 6 pigs fed each diet. For the indirect method, the pigs were fed either a corn-soybean meal based basal diet or diets in which 38.94% of the basal diet was substituted by wheat of the different particle sizes. In the direct method, the diets contained 97.34% wheat with the different particle sizes. For both the direct and indirect methods, the pigs were adapted to their diets for either 7 or 26 days. A reduction in particle size linearly increased the digestible (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) contents as well as the ATTD of gross energy, crude protein, organic matter, ether extract (EE) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) (p<0.05), and had a trend to increase the ATTD of dry matter of wheat (p=0.084). The DE, ME contents and ATTD of gross energy, crud protein, dry matter and organic matter were higher (p<0.05) when determined by the direct method, but the ATTD of ADF, EE and neutral detergent fiber were higher when determined by the indirect method (p<0.05). Prolongation of the adaption duration decreased the ATTD of neutral detergent fiber (p<0.05) and had a trend to increase the ATTD of EE (P=0.061). There were no interactions between particle size and the duration of the adaptation duration. The ATTD of EE in wheat was influenced by a trend of interaction between method and adaptation duration (p=0.074). The ATTD of ADF and EE in wheat was influenced by an interaction between evaluation method and wheat particle size

  11. Active controls for ride smoothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.; Thompson, G. O.

    1976-01-01

    Active controls technology offers great promise for significantly smoothing the ride, and thus improving public and air carrier acceptance, of certain types of transport aircraft. Recent findings which support this promise are presented in the following three pertinent areas: (1) Ride quality versus degree of traveler satisfaction; (2) significant findings from a feasibility study of a ride smoothing system; and (3) potential ride problems identified for several advanced transport concepts.

  12. Image reconstruction for an electrical capacitance tomography system based on a least-squares support vector machine and a self-adaptive particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xia; Hu, Hong-li; Liu, Fei; Gao, Xiang Xiang

    2011-10-01

    The task of image reconstruction for an electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system is to determine the permittivity distribution and hence the phase distribution in a pipeline by measuring the electrical capacitances between sets of electrodes placed around its periphery. In view of the nonlinear relationship between the permittivity distribution and capacitances and the limited number of independent capacitance measurements, image reconstruction for ECT is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem. To solve this problem, a new image reconstruction method for ECT based on a least-squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) combined with a self-adaptive particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented. Regarded as a special small sample theory, the SVM avoids the issues appearing in artificial neural network methods such as difficult determination of a network structure, over-learning and under-learning. However, the SVM performs differently with different parameters. As a relatively new population-based evolutionary optimization technique, PSO is adopted to realize parameters' effective selection with the advantages of global optimization and rapid convergence. This paper builds up a 12-electrode ECT system and a pneumatic conveying platform to verify this image reconstruction algorithm. Experimental results indicate that the algorithm has good generalization ability and high-image reconstruction quality.

  13. Null steering of adaptive beamforming using linear constraint minimum variance assisted by particle swarm optimization, dynamic mutated artificial immune system, and gravitational search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Soodabeh; Kiong, Tiong Sieh; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ismail, Mahamod; Kibria, Salehin; Salem, Balasem

    2014-01-01

    Linear constraint minimum variance (LCMV) is one of the adaptive beamforming techniques that is commonly applied to cancel interfering signals and steer or produce a strong beam to the desired signal through its computed weight vectors. However, weights computed by LCMV usually are not able to form the radiation beam towards the target user precisely and not good enough to reduce the interference by placing null at the interference sources. It is difficult to improve and optimize the LCMV beamforming technique through conventional empirical approach. To provide a solution to this problem, artificial intelligence (AI) technique is explored in order to enhance the LCMV beamforming ability. In this paper, particle swarm optimization (PSO), dynamic mutated artificial immune system (DM-AIS), and gravitational search algorithm (GSA) are incorporated into the existing LCMV technique in order to improve the weights of LCMV. The simulation result demonstrates that received signal to interference and noise ratio (SINR) of target user can be significantly improved by the integration of PSO, DM-AIS, and GSA in LCMV through the suppression of interference in undesired direction. Furthermore, the proposed GSA can be applied as a more effective technique in LCMV beamforming optimization as compared to the PSO technique. The algorithms were implemented using Matlab program.

  14. PPM A highly efficient parallel particle mesh library for the simulation of continuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbalzarini, I. F.; Walther, J. H.; Bergdorf, M.; Hieber, S. E.; Kotsalis, E. M.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a highly efficient parallel particle-mesh (PPM) library, based on a unifying particle formulation for the simulation of continuous systems. In this formulation, the grid-free character of particle methods is relaxed by the introduction of a mesh for the reinitialization of the particles, the computation of the field equations, and the discretization of differential operators. The present utilization of the mesh does not detract from the adaptivity, the efficient handling of complex geometries, the minimal dissipation, and the good stability properties of particle methods. The coexistence of meshes and particles, allows for the development of a consistent and adaptive numerical method, but it presents a set of challenging parallelization issues that have hindered in the past the broader use of particle methods. The present library solves the key parallelization issues involving particle-mesh interpolations and the balancing of processor particle loading, using a novel adaptive tree for mixed domain decompositions along with a coloring scheme for the particle-mesh interpolation. The high parallel efficiency of the library is demonstrated in a series of benchmark tests on distributed memory and on a shared-memory vector architecture. The modularity of the method is shown by a range of simulations, from compressible vortex rings using a novel formulation of smooth particle hydrodynamics, to simulations of diffusion in real biological cell organelles. The present library enables large scale simulations of diverse physical problems using adaptive particle methods and provides a computational tool that is a viable alternative to mesh-based methods.

  15. A new seamless, smooth, interior, absorptive finishing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antonio, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Architects and acousticians have sought a field-applied, absorptive finishing system that resembles a smooth plaster or painted drywall surface, since the dawn of architectural acoustics. Some success has been achieved using sprayed cellulose or cementitious materials, but surface smoothness has been a challenge. A new approach utilizing a thin microporous layer of mineral particles applied over a mineral wool panel will be described. This material can be applied to almost any shape surface, internally pigmented to match almost any color and renovated. It is currently finding application in many architectural applications, including museums. A recent installation in the New Pinakothek Museum in Munich will be illustrated.

  16. A Novel Four-Node Quadrilateral Smoothing Element for Stress Enhancement and Error Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, A.; Riggs, H. R.; Dambach, M.

    1998-01-01

    A four-node, quadrilateral smoothing element is developed based upon a penalized-discrete-least-squares variational formulation. The smoothing methodology recovers C1-continuous stresses, thus enabling effective a posteriori error estimation and automatic adaptive mesh refinement. The element formulation is originated with a five-node macro-element configuration consisting of four triangular anisoparametric smoothing elements in a cross-diagonal pattern. This element pattern enables a convenient closed-form solution for the degrees of freedom of the interior node, resulting from enforcing explicitly a set of natural edge-wise penalty constraints. The degree-of-freedom reduction scheme leads to a very efficient formulation of a four-node quadrilateral smoothing element without any compromise in robustness and accuracy of the smoothing analysis. The application examples include stress recovery and error estimation in adaptive mesh refinement solutions for an elasticity problem and an aerospace structural component.

  17. Application of multi-objective controller to optimal tuning of PID gains for a hydraulic turbine regulating system using adaptive grid particle swam optimization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihuan; Yuan, Yanbin; Yuan, Xiaohui; Huang, Yuehua; Li, Xianshan; Li, Wenwu

    2015-05-01

    A hydraulic turbine regulating system (HTRS) is one of the most important components of hydropower plant, which plays a key role in maintaining safety, stability and economical operation of hydro-electrical installations. At present, the conventional PID controller is widely applied in the HTRS system for its practicability and robustness, and the primary problem with respect to this control law is how to optimally tune the parameters, i.e. the determination of PID controller gains for satisfactory performance. In this paper, a kind of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, named adaptive grid particle swarm optimization (AGPSO) is applied to solve the PID gains tuning problem of the HTRS system. This newly AGPSO optimized method, which differs from a traditional one-single objective optimization method, is designed to take care of settling time and overshoot level simultaneously, in which a set of non-inferior alternatives solutions (i.e. Pareto solution) is generated. Furthermore, a fuzzy-based membership value assignment method is employed to choose the best compromise solution from the obtained Pareto set. An illustrative example associated with the best compromise solution for parameter tuning of the nonlinear HTRS system is introduced to verify the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed AGPSO-based optimization approach, as compared with two another prominent multi-objective algorithms, i.e. Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGAII) and Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm II (SPEAII), for the quality and diversity of obtained Pareto solutions set. Consequently, simulation results show that this AGPSO optimized approach outperforms than compared methods with higher efficiency and better quality no matter whether the HTRS system works under unload or load conditions.

  18. Income Smoothing: Methodology and Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    that managers desire a pattern % of income that has low variability relative to a linear time trend. 2. Industry Trend. Target 2 assumes that firms...R167 55? INCOME SMOOTHING: METHODOLOGY ND NODELS(U) UMVL in1POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA 0 D HOSES "AY S6 UNCLASSIFIED NP5-604FO53 E * I* vu...California oCiD ELEC fl MAY 12 986 INCOME SMOOTHING - METHODOLOGY AND MODELS by 0. Douglas Moses May 1986 *Approved frpublic release; ditibto uniie

  19. Characterizing the Pressure Smoothing Scale of the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Oñorbe, Jose; Rorai, Alberto; Springel, Volker

    2015-10-01

    The thermal state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z < 6 constrains the nature and timing of cosmic reionization events, but its inference from the Lyα forest is degenerate with the 3D structure of the IGM on ˜100 kpc scales, where, analogous to the classical Jeans argument, the pressure of the T ≃ 104 K gas supports it against gravity. We simulate the IGM using smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and find that, at z < 6, the gas density power spectrum does not exhibit the expected filtering scale cutoff, because dense gas in collapsed halos dominates the small-scale power masking pressure smoothing effects. We introduce a new statistic, the real-space Lyα flux, Freal, which naturally suppresses dense gas, and is thus robust against the poorly understood physics of galaxy formation, revealing pressure smoothing in the diffuse IGM. The Freal power spectrum is accurately described by a simple fitting function with cutoff at λF, allowing us to rigorously quantify the pressure smoothing scale for the first time: we find λF = 79 kpc (comoving) at z = 3 for our fiducial thermal model. This statistic has the added advantage that it directly relates to observations of correlated Lyα forest absorption in close quasar pairs, recently proposed as a method to measure the pressure smoothing scale. Our results enable one to quantify the pressure smoothing scale in simulations, and ask meaningful questions about its dependence on reionization and thermal history. Accordingly, the standard description of the IGM in terms of the amplitude T0 and slope γ of the temperature-density relation T={T}0{(ρ /\\bar{ρ })}γ -1 should be augmented with a third pressure smoothing scale parameter λF.

  20. Image segmentation on adaptive sub-region smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junruo; Liu, Xin; He, Kun

    2017-01-01

    To improve the performance of the active contour segmentation on real images, a new segmentation method is proposed. In this model, we construct a function about Gaussian variance according to sub-regions intensity. Further, to avoid the curve vanishing, we design the convergence condition based on the confidence level of segmentation sub-regions. Experimental results show that the proposed method is less sensitive to noise and can suppress inhomogeneous intensity regions efficiently.

  1. Analytic elements of smooth shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, Otto D. L.; Nevison, Patrick R.

    2015-10-01

    We present a method for producing analytic elements of a smooth shape, obtained using conformal mapping. Applications are presented for a case of impermeable analytic elements as well as for head-specified ones. The mathematical operations necessary to use the elements in practical problems can be carried out before modeling of flow problems begins. A catalog of shapes, along with pre-determined coefficients could be established on the basis of the approach presented here, making applications in the field straight forward.

  2. Modeling partially coupled objects with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    A very simple phenomenological model is presented to model objects that are partially coupled (i.e. welded or bonded) where usually the coupled interface is weaker than the bulk material. The model works by letting objects fully interact in compression and having the objects only partially interact in tension. A disconnect factor is provided to adjust the tensile interaction to simulate coupling strengths. Three cases of an example impact calculation are shown-no coupling, full coupling and partial coupling.

  3. Tape-Smoothing Tool For Adhesion Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B.

    1992-01-01

    Small tool smoothes adhesive tape uniformly to ensure consistency and repeatability of tape-peel tests of adhesion of paint to substrate. Includes resilient pad covered with tough, smooth fabric. Internal spring regulates force applied to tape.

  4. Effectiveness of Analytic Smoothing in Equipercentile Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    An analytic procedure for smoothing in equipercentile equating using cubic smoothing splines is described and illustrated. The effectiveness of the procedure is judged by comparing the results from smoothed equipercentile equating with those from other equating methods using multiple cross-validations for a variety of sample sizes. (Author/JKS)

  5. 7 CFR 51.768 - Smooth texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Smooth texture. Smooth texture means that the skin is thin and smooth for the variety and size of the fruit. “Thin” means that the skin thickness does not average more than 3/8 inch (9.5 mm), on a...

  6. 7 CFR 51.768 - Smooth texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Smooth texture. Smooth texture means that the skin is thin and smooth for the variety and size of the fruit. “Thin” means that the skin thickness does not average more than 3/8 inch (9.5 mm), on a...

  7. A SAS IML Macro for Loglinear Smoothing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tim; von Davier, Alina

    2011-01-01

    Polynomial loglinear models for one-, two-, and higher-way contingency tables have important applications to measurement and assessment. They are essentially regarded as a smoothing technique, which is commonly referred to as loglinear smoothing. A SAS IML (SAS Institute, 2002a) macro was created to implement loglinear smoothing according to…

  8. Wavelet-based density estimation for noise reduction in plasma simulations using particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van yen, Romain Nguyen; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Chen, Guangye

    2010-04-01

    For given computational resources, the accuracy of plasma simulations using particles is mainly limited by the noise due to limited statistical sampling in the reconstruction of the particle distribution function. A method based on wavelet analysis is proposed and tested to reduce this noise. The method, known as wavelet-based density estimation (WBDE), was previously introduced in the statistical literature to estimate probability densities given a finite number of independent measurements. Its novel application to plasma simulations can be viewed as a natural extension of the finite size particles (FSP) approach, with the advantage of estimating more accurately distribution functions that have localized sharp features. The proposed method preserves the moments of the particle distribution function to a good level of accuracy, has no constraints on the dimensionality of the system, does not require an a priori selection of a global smoothing scale, and its able to adapt locally to the smoothness of the density based on the given discrete particle data. Moreover, the computational cost of the denoising stage is of the same order as one time step of a FSP simulation. The method is compared with a recently proposed proper orthogonal decomposition based method, and it is tested with three particle data sets involving different levels of collisionality and interaction with external and self-consistent fields.

  9. Wavelet-based density estimation for noise reduction in plasma simulations using particles

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen van yen, Romain; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Chen, Guangye

    2010-01-01

    For given computational resources, one of the main limitations in the accuracy of plasma simulations using particles comes from the noise due to limited statistical sampling in the reconstruction of the particle distribution function. A method based on wavelet multiresolution analysis is proposed and tested to reduce this noise. The method, known as wavelet based density estimation (WBDE), was previously introduced in the statistical literature to estimate probability densities given a nite number of independent measurements. Its novel application to plasma simulations can be viewed as a natural extension of the nite size particles (FSP) approach, with the advantage of estimating more accurately distribution functions that have localized sharp features. The proposed method preserves the moments of the particle distribution function to a good level of accuracy, has no constraints on the dimensionality of the system, does not require an a priori selection of a global smoothing scale, and its able to adapt locally to the smoothness of the density based on the given discrete particle data. Most importantly, the computational cost of the denoising stage is of the same order as one timestep of a FSP simulation. The method is compared with a recently proposed proper orthogonal decomposition based method, and it is tested with particle data corresponding to strongly collisional, weakly collisional, and collisionless plasmas simulations.

  10. Leptogenesis in smooth hybrid inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeannerot, R.; Khalil, S.; Lazarides, G.

    2001-05-01

    We present a concrete supersymmetric grand unified model based on the Pati-Salam gauge group SU(4)c×SU(2)L×SU(2)R and leading naturally to smooth hybrid inflation, which avoids the cosmological disaster encountered in the standard hybrid inflationary scenario from the overproduction of monopoles at the end of inflation. Successful `reheating' which satisfies the gravitino constraint takes place after the termination of inflation. Also, adequate baryogenesis via a primordial leptogenesis occurs consistently with the solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation data as well as the SU(4)c symmetry.

  11. Improving smoothing efficiency of rigid conformal polishing tool using time-dependent smoothing evaluation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chi; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Haifei; Zeng, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    A rigid conformal (RC) lap can smooth mid-spatial-frequency (MSF) errors, which are naturally smaller than the tool size, while still removing large-scale errors in a short time. However, the RC-lap smoothing efficiency performance is poorer than expected, and existing smoothing models cannot explicitly specify the methods to improve this efficiency. We presented an explicit time-dependent smoothing evaluation model that contained specific smoothing parameters directly derived from the parametric smoothing model and the Preston equation. Based on the time-dependent model, we proposed a strategy to improve the RC-lap smoothing efficiency, which incorporated the theoretical model, tool optimization, and efficiency limit determination. Two sets of smoothing experiments were performed to demonstrate the smoothing efficiency achieved using the time-dependent smoothing model. A high, theory-like tool influence function and a limiting tool speed of 300 RPM were o

  12. Smooth halos in the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaite, José

    2015-04-01

    Dark matter halos can be defined as smooth distributions of dark matter placed in a non-smooth cosmic web structure. This definition of halos demands a precise definition of smoothness and a characterization of the manner in which the transition from smooth halos to the cosmic web takes place. We introduce entropic measures of smoothness, related to measures of inequality previously used in economy and with the advantage of being connected with standard methods of multifractal analysis already used for characterizing the cosmic web structure in cold dark matter N-body simulations. These entropic measures provide us with a quantitative description of the transition from the small scales portrayed as a distribution of halos to the larger scales portrayed as a cosmic web and, therefore, allow us to assign definite sizes to halos. However, these ``smoothness sizes'' have no direct relation to the virial radii. Finally, we discuss the influence of N-body discreteness parameters on smoothness.

  13. Smooth halos in the cosmic web

    SciTech Connect

    Gaite, José

    2015-04-01

    Dark matter halos can be defined as smooth distributions of dark matter placed in a non-smooth cosmic web structure. This definition of halos demands a precise definition of smoothness and a characterization of the manner in which the transition from smooth halos to the cosmic web takes place. We introduce entropic measures of smoothness, related to measures of inequality previously used in economy and with the advantage of being connected with standard methods of multifractal analysis already used for characterizing the cosmic web structure in cold dark matter N-body simulations. These entropic measures provide us with a quantitative description of the transition from the small scales portrayed as a distribution of halos to the larger scales portrayed as a cosmic web and, therefore, allow us to assign definite sizes to halos. However, these ''smoothness sizes'' have no direct relation to the virial radii. Finally, we discuss the influence of N-body discreteness parameters on smoothness.

  14. Locally-Based Kernal PLS Smoothing to Non-Parametric Regression Curve Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosipal, Roman; Trejo, Leonard J.; Wheeler, Kevin; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel smoothing approach to non-parametric regression curve fitting. This is based on kernel partial least squares (PLS) regression in reproducing kernel Hilbert space. It is our concern to apply the methodology for smoothing experimental data where some level of knowledge about the approximate shape, local inhomogeneities or points where the desired function changes its curvature is known a priori or can be derived based on the observed noisy data. We propose locally-based kernel PLS regression that extends the previous kernel PLS methodology by incorporating this knowledge. We compare our approach with existing smoothing splines, hybrid adaptive splines and wavelet shrinkage techniques on two generated data sets.

  15. s-SMOOTH: Sparsity and Smoothness Enhanced EEG Brain Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Qin, Jing; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Osher, Stanley; Liu, Wentai

    2016-01-01

    EEG source imaging enables us to reconstruct current density in the brain from the electrical measurements with excellent temporal resolution (~ ms). The corresponding EEG inverse problem is an ill-posed one that has infinitely many solutions. This is due to the fact that the number of EEG sensors is usually much smaller than that of the potential dipole locations, as well as noise contamination in the recorded signals. To obtain a unique solution, regularizations can be incorporated to impose additional constraints on the solution. An appropriate choice of regularization is critically important for the reconstruction accuracy of a brain image. In this paper, we propose a novel Sparsity and SMOOthness enhanced brain TomograpHy (s-SMOOTH) method to improve the reconstruction accuracy by integrating two recently proposed regularization techniques: Total Generalized Variation (TGV) regularization and ℓ1−2 regularization. TGV is able to preserve the source edge and recover the spatial distribution of the source intensity with high accuracy. Compared to the relevant total variation (TV) regularization, TGV enhances the smoothness of the image and reduces staircasing artifacts. The traditional TGV defined on a 2D image has been widely used in the image processing field. In order to handle 3D EEG source images, we propose a voxel-based Total Generalized Variation (vTGV) regularization that extends the definition of second-order TGV from 2D planar images to 3D irregular surfaces such as cortex surface. In addition, the ℓ1−2 regularization is utilized to promote sparsity on the current density itself. We demonstrate that ℓ1−2 regularization is able to enhance sparsity and accelerate computations than ℓ1 regularization. The proposed model is solved by an efficient and robust algorithm based on the difference of convex functions algorithm (DCA) and the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Numerical experiments using synthetic data demonstrate the

  16. Mathematical description of geometric and kinematic aspects of smooth muscle plasticity and some related morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Lambert, R K; Paré, P D; Seow, C Y

    2004-02-01

    Despite considerable investigation, the mechanisms underlying the functional properties of smooth muscle are poorly understood. This can be attributed, at least in part, to a lack of knowledge about the structure and organization of the contractile apparatus inside the muscle cell. Recent observations of the plasticity of smooth muscle and of morphometry of the cell have provided enough information for us to propose a quantitative, although highly simplified, model for the geometric arrangement of contractile units and their collective kinematic functions in smooth muscle, particularly airway smooth muscle. We propose that, to a considerable extent, contractile machinery restructures upon activation of the muscle and adapts to cell geometry at the time of activation. We assume that, under steady-state conditions, the geometric arrangement of contractile units and the filaments within these units determines the kinematic characteristics of the muscle. The model successfully predicts the results of experiments on airway smooth muscle plasticity relating to maximal force generation, maximal velocity of shortening, and the variation of compliance with adapted length. The model is also concordant with morphometric observations that show an increase in myosin filament density when muscle is adapted to a longer length. The model provides a framework for design of experiments to quantitatively test various aspects of smooth muscle plasticity in terms of geometric arrangement of contractile units and the muscle's mechanical properties.

  17. Standard-smooth hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarides, George; Vamvasakis, Achilleas

    2007-12-15

    We consider the extended supersymmetric Pati-Salam model which, for {mu}>0 and universal boundary conditions, succeeds to yield experimentally acceptable b-quark masses by moderately violating Yukawa unification. It is known that this model can lead to new shifted or new smooth hybrid inflation. We show that a successful two-stage inflationary scenario can be realized within this model based only on renormalizable superpotential interactions. The cosmological scales exit the horizon during the first stage of inflation, which is of the standard hybrid type and takes place along the trivial flat direction with the inflaton driven by radiative corrections. Spectral indices compatible with the recent data can be achieved in global supersymmetry or minimal supergravity by restricting the number of e-foldings of our present horizon during the first inflationary stage. The additional e-foldings needed for solving the horizon and flatness problems are naturally provided by a second stage of inflation, which occurs mainly along the built-in new smooth hybrid inflationary path appearing right after the destabilization of the trivial flat direction at its critical point. Monopoles are formed at the end of the first stage of inflation and are, subsequently, diluted by the second stage of inflation to become utterly negligible in the present universe for almost all (for all) the allowed values of the parameters in the case of global supersymmetry (minimal supergravity)

  18. Smoothing of, and Parameter Estimation from, Noisy Biophysical Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Huys, Quentin J. M.; Paninski, Liam

    2009-01-01

    Biophysically detailed models of single cells are difficult to fit to real data. Recent advances in imaging techniques allow simultaneous access to various intracellular variables, and these data can be used to significantly facilitate the modelling task. These data, however, are noisy, and current approaches to building biophysically detailed models are not designed to deal with this. We extend previous techniques to take the noisy nature of the measurements into account. Sequential Monte Carlo (“particle filtering”) methods, in combination with a detailed biophysical description of a cell, are used for principled, model-based smoothing of noisy recording data. We also provide an alternative formulation of smoothing where the neural nonlinearities are estimated in a non-parametric manner. Biophysically important parameters of detailed models (such as channel densities, intercompartmental conductances, input resistances, and observation noise) are inferred automatically from noisy data via expectation-maximisation. Overall, we find that model-based smoothing is a powerful, robust technique for smoothing of noisy biophysical data and for inference of biophysical parameters in the face of recording noise. PMID:19424506

  19. Advantages and challenges in coupling an ideal gas to atomistic models in adaptive resolution simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, K.; Fogarty, A. C.; Kremer, K.; Potestio, R.

    2015-09-01

    In adaptive resolution simulations, molecular fluids are modeled employing different levels of resolution in different subregions of the system. When traveling from one region to the other, particles change their resolution on the fly. One of the main advantages of such approaches is the computational efficiency gained in the coarse-grained region. In this respect the best coarse-grained system to employ in the low resolution region would be the ideal gas, making intermolecular force calculations in the coarse-grained subdomain redundant. In this case, however, a smooth coupling is challenging due to the high energetic imbalance between typical liquids and a system of non-interacting particles. In the present work, we investigate this approach, using as a test case the most biologically relevant fluid, water. We demonstrate that a successful coupling of water to the ideal gas can be achieved with current adaptive resolution methods, and discuss the issues that remain to be addressed.

  20. Programming smooth muscle plasticity with chromatin dynamics.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Oliver G; Owens, Gary K

    2007-05-25

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) possess remarkable phenotypic plasticity that allows rapid adaptation to fluctuating environmental cues. For example, vascular SMCs undergo profound changes in their phenotype during neointimal formation in response to vessel injury or within atherosclerotic plaques. Recent studies have shown that interaction of serum response factor (SRF) and its numerous accessory cofactors with CArG box DNA sequences within promoter chromatin of SMC genes is a nexus for integrating signals that influence SMC differentiation in development and disease. During development, SMC-restricted sets of posttranslational histone modifications are acquired within the CArG box chromatin of SMC genes. These modifications in turn control the chromatin-binding properties of SRF. The histone modifications appear to encode a SMC-specific epigenetic program that is used by extracellular cues to influence SMC differentiation, by regulating binding of SRF and its partners to the chromatin template. Thus, SMC differentiation is dynamically regulated by the interplay between SRF accessory cofactors, the SRF-CArG interaction, and the underlying histone modification program. As such, the inherent plasticity of the SMC lineage offers unique glimpses into how cellular differentiation is dynamically controlled at the level of chromatin within the context of changing microenvironments. Further elucidation of how chromatin regulates SMC differentiation will undoubtedly yield valuable insights into both normal developmental processes and the pathogenesis of several vascular diseases that display detrimental SMC phenotypic behavior.

  1. Efficient sinogram smoothing for dynamic neuroreceptor PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaochuan; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Ye, James; Mukherjee, J.; Chen, Chin-Tu

    1997-05-01

    We have developed image-restoration techniques applicable to dynamic positron emission tomography that improve the visual quality and quantitative accuracy of neuroreceptor images. Starting wit data from a study of dopamine D-2 receptors in rhesus monkey striata using selective radioligands such as fallypride, we performed a novel effective 3D smoothing of the dynamic sinogram at a much lower computational cost than a truly 3D, adaptive smoothing. The processed sinogram was then input to a standard filtered back-projection algorithm and the resulting images were sharper and less noisy than images reconstructed from the unprocessed sinogram. Simulations were performed and the radioligand binding curves extracted from the restored images were found to be smoother and more accurate than those extracted form the unprocessed reconstructions. Comparison was also made to reconstructions from sinograms processed by the principal component analysis/projection onto convex sets algorithm.

  2. Robust Video Stabilization Using Particle Keypoint Update and l1-Optimized Camera Path

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Semi; Yoon, Inhye; Jang, Jinbeum; Yang, Seungji; Kim, Jisung; Paik, Joonki

    2017-01-01

    Acquisition of stabilized video is an important issue for various type of digital cameras. This paper presents an adaptive camera path estimation method using robust feature detection to remove shaky artifacts in a video. The proposed algorithm consists of three steps: (i) robust feature detection using particle keypoints between adjacent frames; (ii) camera path estimation and smoothing; and (iii) rendering to reconstruct a stabilized video. As a result, the proposed algorithm can estimate the optimal homography by redefining important feature points in the flat region using particle keypoints. In addition, stabilized frames with less holes can be generated from the optimal, adaptive camera path that minimizes a temporal total variation (TV). The proposed video stabilization method is suitable for enhancing the visual quality for various portable cameras and can be applied to robot vision, driving assistant systems, and visual surveillance systems. PMID:28208622

  3. Robust Video Stabilization Using Particle Keypoint Update and l₁-Optimized Camera Path.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Semi; Yoon, Inhye; Jang, Jinbeum; Yang, Seungji; Kim, Jisung; Paik, Joonki

    2017-02-10

    Acquisition of stabilized video is an important issue for various type of digital cameras. This paper presents an adaptive camera path estimation method using robust feature detection to remove shaky artifacts in a video. The proposed algorithm consists of three steps: (i) robust feature detection using particle keypoints between adjacent frames; (ii) camera path estimation and smoothing; and (iii) rendering to reconstruct a stabilized video. As a result, the proposed algorithm can estimate the optimal homography by redefining important feature points in the flat region using particle keypoints. In addition, stabilized frames with less holes can be generated from the optimal, adaptive camera path that minimizes a temporal total variation (TV). The proposed video stabilization method is suitable for enhancing the visual quality for various portable cameras and can be applied to robot vision, driving assistant systems, and visual surveillance systems.

  4. Adaptations of Phytoplankton to Sunlight and Other Optical Properties of Aquatic Ecosystem Particles Detected With a Portable Integrating Sphere Version of QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, B. R.

    2006-12-01

    Suspended particles in aquatic ecosystems include autotrophic and heterotrophic micro-organisms, organic detritus, and suspended mineral particles. Spectral optical properties of these particles can be useful in characterizing the attenuation of sunlight underwater, the distribution and types of organisms, and their biological response to the underwater physical gradients, including photosynthesis and the release of dissolved organic matter. Recent measurements of spectral absorption of phytoplankton exposed to strong ultraviolet radiation (UVR) near the surface and declining irradiance with depth have shown a tendency to produce natural UV-B sunscreen compounds (MAA's) in proportion to the intensity of exposure to UV-B. A down-regulation of chlorophyll-a pigment with increasing intensity of visible wavelengths is well known. Some recent data also suggest a negative correlation between phytoplankton biomass and water column exposure to UV-B as mediated by stratospheric ozone. The standard method of characterizing the spectral optical properties of particles in aquatic ecosystems is the Quantitative Filterpad Technique (QFT) in which a water sample is concentrated on a fine glass fiber filter (GFF) and its optical density is then measured in the beam of a scanning spectrophotometer. An improved QFT method (QFT-TR) established in the past decade involves laboratory measurement of both transmittance and reflectance for each sample using an integrating sphere attachment in a scanning spectrophotometer. Both methods have disadvantages. Particle spectral data from a number of freshwater ecosystems were collected using a new battery-powered instrument that combines integrating sphere, lamp, and fiber optic spectrometer to create a portable improved QFT (pQFT-TR). Transmittance, reflectances, and absorbance spectra for particles from streams (rich in mineral particles) and lakes (some with humic particles, others with predominantly phytoplankton) are compared using the old

  5. Lensing smoothing of BAO wiggles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, Enea

    2017-03-01

    We study non-perturbatively the effect of the deflection angle on the BAO wiggles of the matter power spectrum in real space. We show that from redshift z~2 this introduces a dispersion of roughly 1 Mpc at BAO scale, which corresponds approximately to a 1% effect. The lensing effect induced by the deflection angle, which is completely geometrical and survey independent, smears out the BAO wiggles. The effect on the power spectrum amplitude at BAO scale is about 0.1 % for z~2 and 0.2 % for z~4. We compare the smoothing effects induced by the lensing potential and non-linear structure formation, showing that the two effects become comparable at z ~ 4, while the lensing effect dominates for sources at higher redshifts. We note that this effect is not accounted through BAO reconstruction techniques.

  6. Autoregressive smoothing of GOMOS transmittances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussen, D.; Vanhellemont, F.; Bingen, C.; Kyrölä, B.; Tamminen, J.; Sofieva, V.; Hassinen, S.; Seppälä, A.; Verronen, P. T.; Bertaux, J. L.; Hauchecorne, A.; Dalaudier, F.; d'Andon, O. Fanton; Barrot, G.; Mangin, A.; Theodore, B.; Guirlet, M.; Renard, J. B.; Fraisse, R.; Snoeij, P.; Koopman, R.; Saavedra, L.

    GOMOS is a stellar occultation instrument onboard ENVISAT. It has already measured several hundreds of thousands occultations since March 2002. In some circumstances, the obliqueness of the star setting causes the remote sounding of possible horizontal turbulence that cannot be adequately corrected by using the fast photometer signals, leading to the presence of residual scintillation in the atmospheric transmittance. We investigate the mechanism that produces this spurious signal that may cause the retrieval of wavy constituent profiles. A special algorithm of vertical autoregressive smoothing (VAS) is proposed that takes into account the physical correlation between adjacent measurements at different tangent altitudes. A regularization parameter of the method may be optimized on basis of the minimal correlation between the residuals as prescribed by the Durbin-Watson statistics. The improvements obtained in the retrieval of both O 3 and NO 2 number density profiles is presented and discussed with respect to the results of the official data processing model.

  7. Smoothing and the second law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Marshal L.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of obtaining second-order oscillation-free total -variation-diminishing (TVD), scalar difference schemes by adding a limited diffusive flux ('smoothing') to a second-order centered scheme is explored. It is shown that such schemes do not always converge to the correct physical answer. The approach presented here is to construct schemes that numerically satisfy the second law of thermodynamics on a cell-by-cell basis. Such schemes can only converge to the correct physical solution and in some cases can be shown to be TVD. An explicit scheme with this property and second-order spatial accuracy was found to have extremely restrictive time-step limitation. Switching to an implicit scheme removed the time-step limitation.

  8. Smoothing and the second law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Marshal L.

    1986-01-01

    The technique of obtaining second order, oscillation free, total variation diminishing (TVD), scalar difference schemes by adding a limited diffusion flux (smoothing) to a second order centered scheme is explored. It is shown that such schemes do not always converge to the correct physical answer. The approach presented here is to construct schemes that numerically satisfy the second law of thermodynamics on a cell by cell basis. Such schemes can only converge to the correct physical solution and in some cases can be shown to be TVD. An explicit scheme with this property and second order spatial accuracy was found to have an extremely restrictive time step limitation (Delta t less than Delta x squared). Switching to an implicit scheme removed the time step limitation.

  9. Higgs Boson, Magnetic Monopoles and Exotic Smoothness in 4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, Torsten; Król, Jerzy

    We present a model where three incompatible smoothness structures on open 4-manifolds are partly responsible for different physical effects, like: i. the appearance of magnetic matter and Higgs field as non-perturbative solutions of Yang-Mills theory, ii. in cosmology: the inflation, its speed, finite time of the acceleration and the Higgs mass, iii. the perturbative quantum matter as in the standard model of particles. The corresponding 3 smoothness structures are: i. exotic {R}4s with its exotic end S3 × {R}, ii. the fake S3 × Θ (8_{10)}{R} of Freedman, iii. the standard {R}4. It is conjectured that the issue of quantum gravity relies on the incompatibility of the structures.

  10. A new seamless, smooth, interior, absorptive finishing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antonio, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Government architecture typically employs classic forms of vaults, domes and other focusing or reflective shapes, usually created with hard materials like concrete and plaster. The use of conventional porous absorption is typically rejected as an acoustical surface material for aesthetic reasons. Hence, many of these new and existing facilities have compromised speech intelligibility and music quality. Acousticians have sought a field-applied, absorptive finishing system that resembles a smooth plaster or painted drywall surface, since the dawn of architectural acoustics. Some success has been achieved using sprayed cellulose or cementitious materials, but surface smoothness has been a challenge. A new approach utilizing a thin microporous layer of mineral particles applied over a mineral wool panel will be described. This material can be applied to almost any shape surface, internally pigmented to match almost any color and renovated. Because of these unique characteristics the new seamless, absorptive, finishing system is being specified for many new and renovated spaces. Application examples will be presented.

  11. The Smooth Muscle of the Artery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    to keep up with inter- national standards. The German Cancer Research Center as well as the Hax-Planck Inntitutes of Heidelberg are well equipped to...SOMLYO: I plan to briefly review some of the aspects of normal function of vascular smooth muscle with particular ---- I SMOOTH MUSCLE STRUCTURE 35...schematic review of the data on catabolism in connective tissue cells smooth muscle cells. The increasing number of electron microscopic studies of

  12. Smooth GERBS, orthogonal systems and energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechevsky, Lubomir T.; Zanaty, Peter

    2013-12-01

    New results are obtained in three mutually related directions of the rapidly developing theory of generalized expo-rational B-splines (GERBS) [7, 6]: closed-form computability of C∞-smooth GERBS in terms of elementary and special functions, Hermite interpolation and least-squares best approximation via smooth GERBS, energy minimizing properties of smooth GERBS similar to those of the classical cubic polynomial B-splines.

  13. Smooth GERBS, orthogonal systems and energy minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Dechevsky, Lubomir T. E-mail: pza@hin.no; Zanaty, Peter E-mail: pza@hin.no

    2013-12-18

    New results are obtained in three mutually related directions of the rapidly developing theory of generalized expo-rational B-splines (GERBS) [7, 6]: closed-form computability of C{sup ∞}-smooth GERBS in terms of elementary and special functions, Hermite interpolation and least-squares best approximation via smooth GERBS, energy minimizing properties of smooth GERBS similar to those of the classical cubic polynomial B-splines.

  14. Smooth Passage For The Jetfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Flying Princess is a Boeing Jetfoil, one of a family of commercial waterjets built by Boeing Marine Systems, a division of The Boeing Company, Seattle, Washington. The new Jetfoil offers a number of advantages over earlier hydrofoils, a major one being a smooth ride in rough waters. NASA technology contributed to jolt-free passenger comfort. Hydrofoils skim the surface at speeds considerably greater than those of conventional ships because there is little friction between hull and water. Hulls are raised above the water by the lift of the foils, which resemble and function like an airplane wing. The foils are attached to the hull by rigid struts, which ordinarily cause a vessel operating in coastal seas to follow the contour of the waves. In wind-whipped waters, this makes for a rough ride. Seeking to increase passenger acceptance, Boeing Marine System engineers looked for ways to improve rough-water ride quality. Langley Research Center conducts continuing ride quality research. Initially, it was aimed at improving aircraft ride; it was later expanded to include all modes of transportation. Research includes studies of vibration, acceleration, temperature, humidity, passenger seats and posture, and the psychological aspects of passenger reaction to vehicle ride. As part of the program, Langley developed instrumentation, ride quality models and methods of data analysis.

  15. Smooth horizons and quantum ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey

    2015-05-01

    Black holes are unique objects which allow for meaningful theoretical studies of strong gravity and even quantum gravity effects. An infalling and a distant observer would have very different views on the structure of the world. However, a careful analysis has shown that it entails no genuine contradictions for physics, and the paradigm of observer complementarity has been coined. Recently this picture was put into doubt. In particular, it was argued that in old black holes a firewall must form in order to protect the basic principles of quantum mechanics. This AMPS paradox has already been discussed in a vast number of papers with different attitudes and conclusions. Here we want to argue that a possible source of confusion is the neglect of quantum gravity effects. Contrary to widespread perception, it does not necessarily mean that effective field theory is inapplicable in rather smooth neighbourhoods of large black hole horizons. The real offender might be an attempt to consistently use it over the huge distances from the near-horizon zone of old black holes to the early radiation. We give simple estimates to support this viewpoint and show how the Page time and (somewhat more speculative) scrambling time do appear.

  16. A Relation for Nanodroplet Diffusion on Smooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chu; Huang, Jizu; Li, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the diffusion of nanodroplets on smooth surfaces through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and theoretical analyses. Molecular dynamics simulations show that nanodroplet surface diffusion is different from that of single molecules and solid particles. The dependence of nanodroplet diffusion coefficient on temperature undergoes a transition from linear to nonlinear as the surface wettability is weakened due to the coupling of temperature and surface energy. We also develop a simple relation for the diffusion coefficient by using the contact angle and contact radius of the droplet. It works well for a wide range of surface wettabilities and different sized nanodroplets, as confirmed by MD simulations. PMID:27215471

  17. Fourier smoothing of digital photographic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupama, G. C.

    1990-03-01

    Fourier methods of smoothing one-dimensional data are discussed with particular reference to digital photographic spectra. Data smoothed using lowpass filters with different cut-off frequencies are intercompared. A method to scale densities in order to remove the dependence of grain noise on density is described. Optimal filtering technique which models signal and noise in Fourier domain is also explained.

  18. Smoothing the output from a DAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit smooths stepped waveform from analog-to-digital converter without appreciable phase shift between stepped input signal and smoothed output signal and without any effect from stepping rate. Waveform produced is suitable for driving controls used in manufacturing processes, aerospace systems, and automobiles.

  19. Leiomodin and tropomodulin in smooth muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that actin filament remodeling is critical for smooth muscle contraction, which implicates actin filament ends as important sites for regulation of contraction. Tropomodulin (Tmod) and smooth muscle leiomodin (SM-Lmod) have been found in many tissues containing smooth muscle by protein immunoblot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Both proteins cofractionate with tropomyosin in the Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton of rabbit stomach smooth muscle and are solubilized by high salt. SM-Lmod binds muscle tropomyosin, a biochemical activity characteristic of Tmod proteins. SM-Lmod staining is present along the length of actin filaments in rat intestinal smooth muscle, while Tmod stains in a punctate pattern distinct from that of actin filaments or the dense body marker alpha-actinin. After smooth muscle is hypercontracted by treatment with 10 mM Ca(2+), both SM-Lmod and Tmod are found near alpha-actinin at the periphery of actin-rich contraction bands. These data suggest that SM-Lmod is a novel component of the smooth muscle actin cytoskeleton and, furthermore, that the pointed ends of actin filaments in smooth muscle may be capped by Tmod in localized clusters.

  20. Myosin filament structure in vertebrate smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The in vivo structure of the myosin filaments in vertebrate smooth muscle is unknown. Evidence from purified smooth muscle myosin and from some studies of intact smooth muscle suggests that they may have a nonhelical, side-polar arrangement of crossbridges. However, the bipolar, helical structure characteristic of myosin filaments in striated muscle has not been disproved for smooth muscle. We have used EM to investigate this question in a functionally diverse group of smooth muscles (from the vascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and visual systems) from mammalian, amphibian, and avian species. Intact muscle under physiological conditions, rapidly frozen and then freeze substituted, shows many myosin filaments with a square backbone in transverse profile. Transverse sections of fixed, chemically skinned muscles also show square backbones and, in addition, reveal projections (crossbridges) on only two opposite sides of the square. Filaments gently isolated from skinned smooth muscles and observed by negative staining show crossbridges with a 14.5-nm repeat projecting in opposite directions on opposite sides of the filament. Such filaments subjected to low ionic strength conditions show bare filament ends and an antiparallel arrangement of myosin tails along the length of the filament. All of these observations are consistent with a side-polar structure and argue against a bipolar, helical crossbridge arrangement. We conclude that myosin filaments in all smooth muscles, regardless of function, are likely to be side-polar. Such a structure could be an important factor in the ability of smooth muscles to contract by large amounts. PMID:8698822

  1. Thermal smoothing of rough surfaces in vacuo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahl, G.

    1986-01-01

    The derivation of equations governing the smoothing of rough surfaces, based on Mullins' (1957, 1960, and 1963) theories of thermal grooving and of capillarity-governed solid surface morphology is presented. As an example, the smoothing of a one-dimensional sine-shaped surface is discussed.

  2. 7 CFR 51.1870 - Fairly smooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... Standards for Fresh Tomatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1870 Fairly smooth. Fairly smooth means that the tomato...

  3. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  4. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  5. Lunar Smooth Plains Identification and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, A. K.; Robinson, M. S.; Mahanti, P.; Lawrence, S. J.; Spudis, P.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Smooth plains are widespread on the Moon and have diverse origins. The maria comprise the majority of the smooth plains and are volcanic in origin. Highland smooth plains are patchy, and tend to fill large craters and basins; their origins have eluded unambiguous classification. Prior to the Apollo 16 mission, many workers thought that highland plains were volcanic, possibly more silicic than the maria. However, as the Apollo 16 samples are mostly impact breccias, the highland smooth plains were re-interpreted basin impact ejecta, most likely from the Imbrium and possibly Orientale basins. Conversely, some known non-mare volcanic units, such as the Apennine Bench Formation, contain light plains. These interpretations do not rule out alternate origins for a subset of highland smooth plains, including impact melt or volcanic origins (effusive or pyroclastic). We developed an algorithm to identify smooth plains using topographic parameters from the WAC Global Lunar Digital Terrain Model (DTM) (GLD100), sampled at 333 m/pixel. We classify the smooth plains using the Clementine UVVIS FeO map and photometrically corrected Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images. Terrain with slopes less than 2° (1 km baseline) and standard deviation of slope less than 0.75° (1 km x 1 km box, n=9) are defined as smooth plains. Highland smooth plains are distinguished from basaltic smooth plains using the following criteria: LROC WAC 643 nm normalized reflectance > 0.056, LROC WAC 321 nm / 415 nm ratio < 0.74, and Clementine FeO < 12 wt.% (excluding Clementine non-coverage areas). The remaining smooth plains are classified as maria and are subdivided into two classes: LROC WAC 321 nm / 415 nm ratio > 0.77 is termed blue maria and a ratio ≤ 0.77 is termed red maria. The automatic classification was limited to the 87% of the Moon covered by photometrically normalized WAC data (60°S to 60°N). The differences between the maria and highland smooth plains

  6. Influence of rough and smooth walls on macroscale flows in tumblers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ortona, Umberto; Thomas, Nathalie; Zaman, Zafir; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-12-01

    Walls in discrete element method simulations of granular flows are sometimes modeled as a closely packed monolayer of fixed particles, resulting in a rough wall rather than a geometrically smooth wall. An implicit assumption is that the resulting rough wall differs from a smooth wall only locally at the particle scale. Here we test this assumption by considering the impact of the wall roughness at the periphery of the flowing layer on the flow of monodisperse particles in a rotating spherical tumbler. We find that varying the wall roughness significantly alters average particle trajectories even far from the wall. Rough walls induce greater poleward axial drift of particles near the flowing layer surface but decrease the curvature of the trajectories. Increasing the volume fill level in the tumbler has little effect on the axial drift for rough walls but increases the drift while reducing curvature of the particle trajectories for smooth walls. The mechanism for these effects is related to the degree of local slip at the bounding wall, which alters the flowing layer thickness near the walls, affecting the particle trajectories even far from the walls near the equator of the tumbler. Thus, the proper choice of wall conditions is important in the accurate simulation of granular flows, even far from the bounding wall.

  7. SMACK - SMOOTHING FOR AIRCRAFT KINEMATICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, R.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program SMACK (SMoothing for AirCraft Kinematics) is designed to provide flightpath reconstruction of aircraft forces and motions from measurements that are noisy or incomplete. Additionally, SMACK provides a check on instrument accuracy and data consistency. The program can be used to analyze data from flight-test experiments prior to their use in performance, stability and control, or aerodynamic modeling calculations. It can also be used in the analysis of aircraft accidents, where the actual forces and motions may have to be determined from a very limited data set. Application of a state-estimation method for flightpath reconstruction is possible because aircraft forces and motions are related by well-known equations of motion. The task of postflight state estimation is known as a nonlinear, fixed-interval smoothing problem. SMACK utilizes a backward-filter, forward-smoother algorithm to solve the problem. The equations of motion are used to produce estimates that are compared with their corresponding measurement time histories. The procedure is iterative, providing improved state estimates until a minimum squared-error measure is achieved. In the SMACK program, the state and measurement models together represent a finite-difference approximation for the six-degree-of-freedom dynamics of a rigid body. The models are used to generate time histories which are likely to be found in a flight-test measurement set. These include onboard variables such as Euler angles, angular rates, and linear accelerations as well as tracking variables such as slant range, bearing, and elevation. Any bias or scale-factor errors associated with the state or measurement models are appended to the state vector and treated as constant but unknown parameters. The SMACK documentation covers the derivation of the solution algorithm, describes the state and measurement models, and presents several application examples that should help the analyst recognize the potential

  8. Bayesian smoothing of dipoles in magneto-/electroencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Valentina; Sorrentino, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We describe a novel method for dynamic estimation of multi-dipole states from magneto-/electroencephalography (M/EEG) time series. The new approach builds on the recent development of particle filters for M/EEG; these algorithms approximate, with samples and weights, the posterior distribution of the neural sources at time t given the data up to time t. However, for off-line inference purposes it is preferable to work with the smoothing distribution, i.e. the distribution for the neural sources at time t conditioned on the whole time series. In this study, we use a Monte Carlo algorithm to approximate the smoothing distribution for a time-varying set of current dipoles. We show, using numerical simulations, that the estimates provided by the smoothing distribution are more accurate than those provided by the filtering distribution, particularly at the appearance of the source. We validate the proposed algorithm using an experimental data set recorded from an epileptic patient. Improved localization of the source onset can be particularly relevant in source modeling of epileptic patients, where the source onset brings information on the epileptogenic zone.

  9. Bayesian smoothing of dipoles in Magneto-/Electro-encephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Valentina; Sorrentino, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    We describe a novel method for dynamic estimation of multi-dipole states from Magneto/Electro-encephalography (M/EEG) time series. The new approach builds on the recent development of particle filters for M/EEG; these algorithms approximate, with samples and weights, the posterior distribution of the neural sources at time t given the data up to time t. However, for off-line inference purposes it is preferable to work with the smoothing distribution, i.e. the distribution for the neural sources at time t conditioned on the whole time series. In this study, we use a Monte Carlo algorithm to approximate the smoothing distribution for a time-varying set of current dipoles. We show, using numerical simulations, that the estimates provided by the smoothing distribution are more accurate than those provided by the filtering distribution, particularly at the appearance of the source. We validate the proposed algorithm using an experimental dataset recorded from an epileptic patient. Improved localization of the source onset can be particularly relevant in source modeling of epileptic patients, where the source onset brings information on the epileptogenic zone.

  10. Ultra-smooth finishing of aspheric surfaces using CAST technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, John; Young, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    Growing applications for astronomical ground-based adaptive systems and air-born telescope systems demand complex optical surface designs combined with ultra-smooth finishing. The use of more sophisticated and accurate optics, especially aspheric ones, allows for shorter optical trains with smaller sizes and a reduced number of components. This in turn reduces fabrication and alignment time and costs. These aspheric components include the following: steep surfaces with large aspheric departures; more complex surface feature designs like stand-alone off-axis-parabola (OAP) and free form optics that combine surface complexity with a requirement for ultra-high smoothness, as well as special optic materials such as lightweight silicon carbide (SiC) for air-born systems. Various fabrication technologies for finishing ultra-smooth aspheric surfaces are progressing to meet these growing and demanding challenges, especially Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) and ion-milling. These methods have demonstrated some good success as well as a certain level of limitations. Amongst them, computer-controlled asphere surface-finishing technology (CAST), developed by Precision Asphere Inc. (PAI), plays an important role in a cost effective manufacturing environment and has successfully delivered numerous products for the applications mentioned above. One of the most recent successes is the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), the world's most powerful planet-hunting instrument, with critical aspheric components (seven OAPs and free form optics) made using CAST technology. GPI showed off its first images in a press release on January 7, 2014 . This paper reviews features of today's technologies in handling the ultra-smooth aspheric optics, especially the capabilities of CAST on these challenging products. As examples, three groups of aspheres deployed in astronomical optics systems, both polished and finished using CAST, will be discussed in detail.

  11. Spline-Based Smoothing of Airfoil Curvatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Krist, S.

    2008-01-01

    Constrained fitting for airfoil curvature smoothing (CFACS) is a splinebased method of interpolating airfoil surface coordinates (and, concomitantly, airfoil thicknesses) between specified discrete design points so as to obtain smoothing of surface-curvature profiles in addition to basic smoothing of surfaces. CFACS was developed in recognition of the fact that the performance of a transonic airfoil is directly related to both the curvature profile and the smoothness of the airfoil surface. Older methods of interpolation of airfoil surfaces involve various compromises between smoothing of surfaces and exact fitting of surfaces to specified discrete design points. While some of the older methods take curvature profiles into account, they nevertheless sometimes yield unfavorable results, including curvature oscillations near end points and substantial deviations from desired leading-edge shapes. In CFACS as in most of the older methods, one seeks a compromise between smoothing and exact fitting. Unlike in the older methods, the airfoil surface is modified as little as possible from its original specified form and, instead, is smoothed in such a way that the curvature profile becomes a smooth fit of the curvature profile of the original airfoil specification. CFACS involves a combination of rigorous mathematical modeling and knowledge-based heuristics. Rigorous mathematical formulation provides assurance of removal of undesirable curvature oscillations with minimum modification of the airfoil geometry. Knowledge-based heuristics bridge the gap between theory and designers best practices. In CFACS, one of the measures of the deviation of an airfoil surface from smoothness is the sum of squares of the jumps in the third derivatives of a cubicspline interpolation of the airfoil data. This measure is incorporated into a formulation for minimizing an overall deviation- from-smoothness measure of the airfoil data within a specified fitting error tolerance. CFACS has been

  12. Lattice-Boltzmann method combined with smoothed-profile method for particulate suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Saeed; Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Rahnama, Mohamad

    2011-02-01

    We developed a simulation scheme based on the coupling of the lattice-Boltzmann method with the smoothed-profile method (SPM) to predict the dynamic behavior of colloidal dispersions. The SPM provides a coupling scheme between continuum fluid dynamics and rigid-body dynamics through a smoothed profile of the fluid-particle interface. In this approach, the flow is computed on fixed Eulerian grids which are also used for the particles. Owing to the use of the same grids for simulation of fluid flow and particles, this method is highly efficient. Furthermore, an external boundary is used to impose the no-slip boundary condition at the fluid-particle interface. In addition, the operations in the present method are local; it can be easily programmed for parallel machines. The methodology is validated by comparing with previously published data.

  13. Lattice-Boltzmann method combined with smoothed-profile method for particulate suspensions.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Saeed; Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Rahnama, Mohamad

    2011-02-01

    We developed a simulation scheme based on the coupling of the lattice-Boltzmann method with the smoothed-profile method (SPM) to predict the dynamic behavior of colloidal dispersions. The SPM provides a coupling scheme between continuum fluid dynamics and rigid-body dynamics through a smoothed profile of the fluid-particle interface. In this approach, the flow is computed on fixed Eulerian grids which are also used for the particles. Owing to the use of the same grids for simulation of fluid flow and particles, this method is highly efficient. Furthermore, an external boundary is used to impose the no-slip boundary condition at the fluid-particle interface. In addition, the operations in the present method are local; it can be easily programmed for parallel machines. The methodology is validated by comparing with previously published data.

  14. AFSMO/AFSCL- AIRFOIL SMOOTHING AND SCALING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L

    1994-01-01

    Since its early beginnings, NASA has been actively involved in the design and testing of airfoil sections for a wide variety of applications. Recently a set of programs has been developed to smooth and scale arbitrary airfoil coordinates. The smoothing program, AFSMO, utilizes both least-squares polynomial and least-squares cubic-spline techniques to iteratively smooth the second derivatives of the y-axis airfoil coordinates with respect to a transformed x-axis system which unwraps the airfoil and stretches the nose and trailing-edge regions. The corresponding smooth airfoil coordinates are then determined by solving a tridiagonal matrix of simultaneous cubic-spline equations relating the y-axis coordinates and their corresponding second derivatives. The camber and thickness distribution of the smooth airfoil are also computed. The scaling program, AFSCL, may then be used to scale the thickness distribution generated by the smoothing program to a specified maximum thickness. Once the thickness distribution has been scaled, it is combined with the camber distribution to obtain the final scaled airfoil contour. The airfoil smoothing and scaling programs are written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and have been implemented on a CDC CYBER 170 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 70K (octal) of 60 bit words. Both programs generate plotted output via CALCOMP type plotting calls. These programs were developed in 1983.

  15. Approximation of Bivariate Functions via Smooth Extensions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    For a smooth bivariate function defined on a general domain with arbitrary shape, it is difficult to do Fourier approximation or wavelet approximation. In order to solve these problems, in this paper, we give an extension of the bivariate function on a general domain with arbitrary shape to a smooth, periodic function in the whole space or to a smooth, compactly supported function in the whole space. These smooth extensions have simple and clear representations which are determined by this bivariate function and some polynomials. After that, we expand the smooth, periodic function into a Fourier series or a periodic wavelet series or we expand the smooth, compactly supported function into a wavelet series. Since our extensions are smooth, the obtained Fourier coefficients or wavelet coefficients decay very fast. Since our extension tools are polynomials, the moment theorem shows that a lot of wavelet coefficients vanish. From this, with the help of well-known approximation theorems, using our extension methods, the Fourier approximation and the wavelet approximation of the bivariate function on the general domain with small error are obtained. PMID:24683316

  16. Smoothing analysis of HLSII storage ring magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; He, Xiao-Ye; Tang, Zheng; Yao, Qiu-Yang

    2016-12-01

    Hefei Light Source (HLS) has been upgraded to improve the quality and stability of the synchrotron light, and the new facility is named HLSII. However, a final accurate adjustment is required to smooth the beam orbit after the initial instalment and alignment of the magnets. We implement a reliable smoothing method for the beam orbit of the HLSII storage ring. In addition to greatly smoothing and stabilizing the beam orbit, this method also doubles the work efficiency and significantly reduces the number of magnets adjusted and the range of the adjustments. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275192) and the Upgrade Project of Hefei Light Source

  17. 7 CFR 51.768 - Smooth texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the skin is thin and smooth for the variety and size of the fruit. “Thin” means that the skin thickness does not average more than 3/8 inch (9.5 mm), on a central cross section, on grapefruit 41/8... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Smooth texture. 51.768 Section 51.768...

  18. 7 CFR 51.768 - Smooth texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the skin is thin and smooth for the variety and size of the fruit. “Thin” means that the skin thickness does not average more than 3/8 inch (9.5 mm), on a central cross section, on grapefruit 41/8... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Smooth texture. 51.768 Section 51.768...

  19. 7 CFR 51.768 - Smooth texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the skin is thin and smooth for the variety and size of the fruit. “Thin” means that the skin thickness does not average more than 3/8 inch (9.5 mm), on a central cross section, on grapefruit 41/8... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Smooth texture. 51.768 Section 51.768...

  20. Vascular smooth muscle phenotypic diversity and function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The control of force production in vascular smooth muscle is critical to the normal regulation of blood flow and pressure, and altered regulation is common to diseases such as hypertension, heart failure, and ischemia. A great deal has been learned about imbalances in vasoconstrictor and vasodilator signals, e.g., angiotensin, endothelin, norepinephrine, and nitric oxide, that regulate vascular tone in normal and disease contexts. In contrast there has been limited study of how the phenotypic state of the vascular smooth muscle cell may influence the contractile response to these signaling pathways dependent upon the developmental, tissue-specific (vascular bed) or disease context. Smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle lineages are traditionally classified into fast or slow sublineages based on rates of contraction and relaxation, recognizing that this simple dichotomy vastly underrepresents muscle phenotypic diversity. A great deal has been learned about developmental specification of the striated muscle sublineages and their phenotypic interconversions in the mature animal under the control of mechanical load, neural input, and hormones. In contrast there has been relatively limited study of smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity. This is surprising given the number of diseases in which smooth muscle contractile dysfunction plays a key role. This review focuses on smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity in the vascular system, how it is generated, and how it may determine vascular function in developmental and disease contexts. PMID:20736412

  1. A 3D Contact Smoothing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M A; Laursen, T A

    2002-05-02

    Smoothing of contact surfaces can be used to eliminate the chatter typically seen with node on facet contact and give a better representation of the actual contact surface. The latter affect is well demonstrated for problems with interference fits. In this work we present two methods for the smoothing of contact surfaces for 3D finite element contact. In the first method, we employ Gregory patches to smooth the faceted surface in a node on facet implementation. In the second method, we employ a Bezier interpolation of the faceted surface in a mortar method implementation of contact. As is well known, node on facet approaches can exhibit locking due to the failure of the Babuska-Brezzi condition and in some instances fail the patch test. The mortar method implementation is stable and provides optimal convergence in the energy of error. In the this work we demonstrate the superiority of the smoothed versus the non-smoothed node on facet implementations. We also show where the node on facet method fails and some results from the smoothed mortar method implementation.

  2. Beam-smoothing investigation on Heaven I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yi-huai; Gao, Zhi-xing; Tong, Xiao-hui; Dai, Hui; Tang, Xiu-zhang; Shan, Yu-sheng

    2007-01-01

    Directly driven targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) require laser beams with extremely smooth irradiance profiles to prevent hydrodynamic instabilities that destroy the spherical symmetry of the target during implosion. Such instabilities can break up and mix together the target's wall and fuel material, preventing it from reaching the density and temperature required for fusion ignition. 1,2 Measurements in the equation of state (EOS) experiments require laser beams with flat-roofed profiles to generate uniform shockwave 3. Some method for beam smooth, is thus needed. A technique called echelon-free induced spatial incoherence (EFISI) is proposed for producing smooth target beam profiles with large KrF lasers. The idea is basically an image projection technique that projects the desired time-averaged spatial profile onto the target via the laser system, using partially coherent broadband lighe. Utilize the technique, we developing beam- smoothing investigation on "Heaven I". At China Institute of Atomic Energy , a new angular multiplexing providing with beam-smoothing function has been developed, the total energy is 158J, the stability of energy is 4%, the pulse duration is 25ns, the effective diameter of focusing spot is 400um, and the ununiformity is about 1.6%, the power density on the target is about 3.7×10 12W/cm2. At present, the system have provided steady and smooth laser irradiation for EOS experiments.

  3. Diversity and plasticity in signaling pathways that regulate smooth muscle responsiveness: Paradigms and paradoxes for the myosin phosphatase, the master regulator of smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Eto, Masumi; Kitazawa, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of smooth muscle cells is their ability to adapt their functions to meet temporal and chronic fluctuations in their demands. These functions include force development and growth. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the functional plasticity of smooth muscles, the major constituent of organ walls, is fundamental to elucidating pathophysiological rationales of failures of organ functions. Also, the knowledge is expected to facilitate devising innovative strategies that more precisely monitor and normalize organ functions by targeting individual smooth muscles. Evidence has established a current paradigm that the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) is a master regulator of smooth muscle responsiveness to stimuli. Cellular MLCP activity is negatively and positively regulated in response to G-protein activation and cAMP/cGMP production, respectively, through the MYPT1 regulatory subunit and an endogenous inhibitor protein named CPI-17. In this article we review the outcomes from two decade of research on the CPI-17 signaling and discuss emerging paradoxes in the view of signaling pathways regulating smooth muscle functions through MLCP. PMID:28260704

  4. Did you smooth your well logs the right way for seismic interpretation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesne, Mathieu J.; Gaillot, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Correlations between physical properties and seismic reflection data are useful to determine the geological nature of seismic reflections and the lateral extent of geological strata. The difference in resolution between well logs and seismic data is a major hurdle faced by seismic interpreters when tying both data sets. In general, log data have a resolution of at least two orders of magnitude greater than seismic data. Smoothing physical property logs improves correlation at the seismic scale. Three different approaches were used and compared to smooth a density log: binomial filtering, seismic wavelet filtering and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) filtering. Regression plots between the density logs and the acoustic impedance show that the data smoothed with the DWT is the only method that preserves the original relationship between the raw density data and the acoustic impedance. Smoothed logs were then used to generate synthetic seismograms that were tied to seismic data at the borehole site. Best ties were achieved using the synthetic seismogram computed with the density log processed with the DWT. The good performance of the DWT is explained by its adaptive multi-scale characteristic which preserved significant local changes of density on the high-resolution data series that were also pictured at the seismic scale. Since synthetic seismograms are generated using smoothed logs, the choice of the smoothing method impacts on the quality of seismic-to-well ties. This ultimately can have economical implications during hydrocarbon exploration or exploitation phases.

  5. Shear flow of dense granular materials near smooth walls. II. Block formation and suppression of slip by rolling friction.

    PubMed

    Shojaaee, Zahra; Brendel, Lothar; Török, János; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2012-07-01

    The role of rotational degrees of freedom and of microscopic contact properties at smooth walls in two dimensional planar shear has been investigated by contact dynamics simulations of round hard frictional particles. Our default system setup consists of smooth frictional walls, giving rise to slip. We show that there exists a critical microscopic friction coefficient at the walls, above which they are able to shear the granular medium. We observe distinctive features at this critical point, which to our knowledge have not been reported before. Activating rolling friction at smooth walls reduces slip, leading to similar shear behavior as for rough walls (with particles glued on their surface). Our simulations with rough walls are in agreement with previous results, provided the roughness is strong enough. In the limit of small roughness amplitude, however, the distinctive features of shearing with smooth walls are confirmed.

  6. Model emulates human smooth pursuit system producing zero-latency target tracking.

    PubMed

    Bahill, A T; McDonald, J D

    1983-01-01

    Humans can overcome the 150 ms time delay of the smooth pursuit eye movement system and track smoothly moving visual targets with zero-latency. Our target-selective adaptive control model can also overcome an inherent time delay and produce zero-latency tracking. No other model or man-made system can do this. Our model is physically realizable and physiologically realistic. The technique used in our model should be useful for analyzing other time-delay systems, such as man-machine systems and robots.

  7. Effects of hydrogen sulphide in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dunn, William R; Alexander, Stephen P H; Ralevic, Vera; Roberts, Richard E

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that the gaseous pollutant, hydrogen sulphide (H2S) can be synthesised in the body and has a multitude of biological actions. This review summarizes some of the actions of this 'gasotransmitter' in influencing the smooth muscle that is responsible for controlling muscular activity of hollow organs. In the vasculature, while H2S can cause vasoconstriction by complex interactions with other biologically important gases, such as nitric oxide, the prevailing response is vasorelaxation. While most vasorelaxation responses occur by a direct action of H2S on smooth muscle cells, it has recently been proposed to be an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. H2S also promotes relaxation in other smooth muscle preparations including bronchioles, the bladder, gastrointestinal tract and myometrium, opening up the opportunity of exploiting the pharmacology of H2S in the treatment of conditions where smooth muscle tone is excessive. The original concept, that H2S caused smooth muscle relaxation by activating ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, has been supplemented with observations that H2S can also modify the activity of other potassium channels, intracellular pH, phosphodiesterase activity and transient receptor potential channels on sensory nerves. While the enzymes responsible for generating endogenous H2S are widely expressed in smooth muscle preparations, it is much less clear what the physiological role of H2S is in determining smooth muscle contractility. Clarification of this requires the development of potent and selective inhibitors of H2S-generating enzymes.

  8. Manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit eye movements

    PubMed Central

    Niehorster, Diederick C.; Siu, Wilfred W. F.; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit eye movements only when tracking a self-driven or a predictable moving target. Here, we used a control-theoretic approach to examine whether concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit of an unpredictable moving target. In the eye-hand tracking condition, participants used their eyes to track a Gaussian target that moved randomly along a horizontal axis. In the meantime, they used their dominant hand to move a mouse to control the horizontal movement of a Gaussian cursor to vertically align it with the target. In the eye-alone tracking condition, the target and cursor positions recorded in the eye-hand tracking condition were replayed, and participants only performed eye tracking of the target. Catch-up saccades were identified and removed from the recorded eye movements, allowing for a frequency-response analysis of the smooth pursuit response to unpredictable target motion. We found that the overall smooth pursuit gain was higher and the number of catch-up saccades made was less when eye tracking was accompanied by manual tracking than when not. We conclude that concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit. This enhancement is a fundamental property of eye-hand coordination that occurs regardless of the predictability of the target motion. PMID:26605840

  9. Interstitial cells: regulators of smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-07-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα(+) cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues.

  10. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  11. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boning; Herbold, Eric B.; Homel, Michael A.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  12. Directional bilateral filters for smoothing fluorescence microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Manasij; Mohan, Kavya; Seelamantula, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Images obtained through fluorescence microscopy at low numerical aperture (NA) are noisy and have poor resolution. Images of specimens such as F-actin filaments obtained using confocal or widefield fluorescence microscopes contain directional information and it is important that an image smoothing or filtering technique preserve the directionality. F-actin filaments are widely studied in pathology because the abnormalities in actin dynamics play a key role in diagnosis of cancer, cardiac diseases, vascular diseases, myofibrillar myopathies, neurological disorders, etc. We develop the directional bilateral filter as a means of filtering out the noise in the image without significantly altering the directionality of the F-actin filaments. The bilateral filter is anisotropic to start with, but we add an additional degree of anisotropy by employing an oriented domain kernel for smoothing. The orientation is locally adapted using a structure tensor and the parameters of the bilateral filter are optimized for within the framework of statistical risk minimization. We show that the directional bilateral filter has better denoising performance than the traditional Gaussian bilateral filter and other denoising techniques such as SURE-LET, non-local means, and guided image filtering at various noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). We also show quantitative improvements in low NA images of F-actin filaments.

  13. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  14. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  15. Bronchospasm and its biophysical basis in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2004-01-01

    Airways hyperresponsiveness is a cardinal feature of asthma but remains unexplained. In asthma, the airway smooth muscle cell is the key end-effector of bronchospasm and acute airway narrowing, but in just the past five years our understanding of the relationship of responsiveness to muscle biophysics has dramatically changed. It has become well established, for example, that muscle length is equilibrated dynamically rather than statically, and that non-classical features of muscle biophysics come to the forefront, including unanticipated interactions between the muscle and its time-varying load, as well as the ability of the muscle cell to adapt rapidly to changes in its dynamic microenvironment. These newly discovered phenomena have been described empirically, but a mechanistic basis to explain them is only beginning to emerge. PMID:15084229

  16. Structured mesh generation with smoothness controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaoxin; Jia, Yafei; Wang, Sam S. Y.

    2006-08-01

    In geometrically complex domains, the Ryskin and Leal (RL) orthogonal mesh generation system may cause mesh distortion and overlapping problems when using the weak constraint method with specified boundary point distribution for all boundaries. To resolve these problems, an improved RL system with automatic smoothness control is proposed. In this improved RL system, the automatic smoothness control mechanism is based on five types of smoothness conditions and includes the self-adjustment mechanism and the auto-evaluation mechanism for an empirical parameter. The proposed system is illustrated using several test examples. Several applications to natural domains are also demonstrated. It is shown that the improved RL system is capable of resolving the above problems at little cost of orthogonality.

  17. Archetypal oscillator for smooth and discontinuous dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qingjie; Wiercigroch, Marian; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina E; Grebogi, Celso; Thompson, J Michael T

    2006-10-01

    We propose an archetypal system to investigate transitions from smooth to discontinuous dynamics. In the smooth regime, the system bears significant similarities to the Duffing oscillator, exhibiting the standard dynamics governed by the hyperbolic structure associated with the stationary state of the double well. At the discontinuous limit, however, there is a substantial departure in the dynamics from the standard one. In particular, the velocity flow suffers a jump in crossing from one well to another, caused by the loss of local hyperbolicity due to the collapse of the stable and unstable manifolds of the stationary state. In the presence of damping and external excitation, the system has coexisting attractors and also a chaotic saddle which becomes a chaotic attractor when a smoothness parameter drops to zero. This attractor can bifurcate to a high-period periodic attractor or a chaotic sea with islands of quasiperiodic attractors depending on the strength of damping.

  18. Multiple predictor smoothing methods for sensitivity analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Helton, Jon Craig; Storlie, Curtis B.

    2006-08-01

    The use of multiple predictor smoothing methods in sampling-based sensitivity analyses of complex models is investigated. Specifically, sensitivity analysis procedures based on smoothing methods employing the stepwise application of the following nonparametric regression techniques are described: (1) locally weighted regression (LOESS), (2) additive models, (3) projection pursuit regression, and (4) recursive partitioning regression. The indicated procedures are illustrated with both simple test problems and results from a performance assessment for a radioactive waste disposal facility (i.e., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). As shown by the example illustrations, the use of smoothing procedures based on nonparametric regression techniques can yield more informative sensitivity analysis results than can be obtained with more traditional sensitivity analysis procedures based on linear regression, rank regression or quadratic regression when nonlinear relationships between model inputs and model predictions are present.

  19. Reduction in redundancy of multichannel telemetric information by the method of adaptive discretization with associative sorting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantor, A. V.; Timonin, V. G.; Azarova, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    The method of adaptive discretization is the most promising for elimination of redundancy from telemetry messages characterized by signal shape. Adaptive discretization with associative sorting was considered as a way to avoid the shortcomings of adaptive discretization with buffer smoothing and adaptive discretization with logical switching in on-board information compression devices (OICD) in spacecraft. Mathematical investigations of OICD are presented.

  20. ibr: Iterative bias reduction multivariate smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Hengartner, Nicholas W; Cornillon, Pierre-andre; Matzner - Lober, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Regression is a fundamental data analysis tool for relating a univariate response variable Y to a multivariate predictor X {element_of} E R{sup d} from the observations (X{sub i}, Y{sub i}), i = 1,...,n. Traditional nonparametric regression use the assumption that the regression function varies smoothly in the independent variable x to locally estimate the conditional expectation m(x) = E[Y|X = x]. The resulting vector of predicted values {cflx Y}{sub i} at the observed covariates X{sub i} is called a regression smoother, or simply a smoother, because the predicted values {cflx Y}{sub i} are less variable than the original observations Y{sub i}. Linear smoothers are linear in the response variable Y and are operationally written as {cflx m} = X{sub {lambda}}Y, where S{sub {lambda}} is a n x n smoothing matrix. The smoothing matrix S{sub {lambda}} typically depends on a tuning parameter which we denote by {lambda}, and that governs the tradeoff between the smoothness of the estimate and the goodness-of-fit of the smoother to the data by controlling the effective size of the local neighborhood over which the responses are averaged. We parameterize the smoothing matrix such that large values of {lambda} are associated to smoothers that averages over larger neighborhood and produce very smooth curves, while small {lambda} are associated to smoothers that average over smaller neighborhood to produce a more wiggly curve that wants to interpolate the data. The parameter {lambda} is the bandwidth for kernel smoother, the span size for running-mean smoother, bin smoother, and the penalty factor {lambda} for spline smoother.

  1. Airway epithelium stimulates smooth muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Malavia, Nikita K; Raub, Christopher B; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Panettieri, Reynold A; George, Steven C

    2009-09-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air-liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM) using commercially available Transwells. In some co-cultures, the NHBE were repeatedly (x4) scrape-injured. An in vivo model of tracheal injury consisted of gently denuding the tracheal epithelium (x3) of a rabbit over 5 days and then examining the trachea by histology 3 days after the last injury. Our results show that HASM cell number increases 2.5-fold in the presence of NHBE, and 4.3-fold in the presence of injured NHBE compared with HASM alone after 8 days of in vitro co-culture. In addition, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and, more markedly, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration increased in co-culture correlating with enhanced HASM growth. Inhibiting MMP-9 release significantly attenuated the NHBE-dependent HASM proliferation in co-culture. In vivo, the injured rabbit trachea demonstrated proliferation in the smooth muscle (trachealis) region and significant MMP-9 staining, which was absent in the uninjured control. The airway epithelium modulates smooth muscle cell proliferation via a mechanism that involves secretion of soluble mediators including potential smooth muscle mitogens such as IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, but also through a novel MMP-9-dependent mechanism.

  2. Intranasal Immunization with Influenza Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored Cholera Toxin B or Ricin Toxin B Enhances Adaptive Immune Responses and Protection against an Antigenically Distinct Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xianliang; Ren, Zhiguang; Xu, Na; Meng, Lingnan; Yu, Zhijun; Feng, Na; Sang, Xiaoyu; Li, Shengnan; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Jin, Hongli; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Cao, Jinshan; Liu, Wensen; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza virus infection, although current approaches are associated with suboptimal efficacy. Here, we generated virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of the hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and matrix protein (M1) of A/Changchun/01/2009 (H1N1) with or without either membrane-anchored cholera toxin B (CTB) or ricin toxin B (RTB) as molecular adjuvants. The intranasal immunization of mice with VLPs containing membrane-anchored CTB or RTB elicited stronger humoral and cellular immune responses when compared to mice immunized with VLPs alone. Administration of VLPs containing CTB or RTB significantly enhanced virus-specific systemic and mucosal antibody responses, hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers, virus neutralizing antibody titers, and the frequency of virus-specific IFN-γ and IL-4 secreting splenocytes. VLPs with and without CTB or RTB conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with a mouse-adapted homologous virus. When challenged with an antigenically distinct H1N1 virus, all mice immunized with VLPs containing CTB or RTB survived whereas mice immunized with VLPs alone showed only partial protection (80% survival). Our results suggest that membrane-anchored CTB and RTB possess strong adjuvant properties when incorporated into an intranasally-delivered influenza VLP vaccine. Chimeric influenza VLPs containing CTB or RTB may represent promising vaccine candidates for improved immunological protection against homologous and antigenically distinct influenza viruses. PMID:27110810

  3. Intranasal Immunization with Influenza Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored Cholera Toxin B or Ricin Toxin B Enhances Adaptive Immune Responses and Protection against an Antigenically Distinct Virus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xianliang; Ren, Zhiguang; Xu, Na; Meng, Lingnan; Yu, Zhijun; Feng, Na; Sang, Xiaoyu; Li, Shengnan; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Jin, Hongli; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Cao, Jinshan; Liu, Wensen; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-04-21

    Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza virus infection, although current approaches are associated with suboptimal efficacy. Here, we generated virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of the hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and matrix protein (M1) of A/Changchun/01/2009 (H1N1) with or without either membrane-anchored cholera toxin B (CTB) or ricin toxin B (RTB) as molecular adjuvants. The intranasal immunization of mice with VLPs containing membrane-anchored CTB or RTB elicited stronger humoral and cellular immune responses when compared to mice immunized with VLPs alone. Administration of VLPs containing CTB or RTB significantly enhanced virus-specific systemic and mucosal antibody responses, hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers, virus neutralizing antibody titers, and the frequency of virus-specific IFN-γ and IL-4 secreting splenocytes. VLPs with and without CTB or RTB conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with a mouse-adapted homologous virus. When challenged with an antigenically distinct H1N1 virus, all mice immunized with VLPs containing CTB or RTB survived whereas mice immunized with VLPs alone showed only partial protection (80% survival). Our results suggest that membrane-anchored CTB and RTB possess strong adjuvant properties when incorporated into an intranasally-delivered influenza VLP vaccine. Chimeric influenza VLPs containing CTB or RTB may represent promising vaccine candidates for improved immunological protection against homologous and antigenically distinct influenza viruses.

  4. Influence of rough and smooth walls on macroscale granular segregation patterns.

    PubMed

    D'Ortona, Umberto; Thomas, Nathalie; Lueptow, Richard M

    2016-02-01

    Size bidisperse granular materials in a spherical tumbler segregate into two different patterns of three bands with either small particles at the equator and large particles at the poles or vice versa, depending upon the fill level in the tumbler. Here we use discrete element method simulations with supporting qualitative experiments to explore the effect of the tumbler wall roughness on the segregation pattern, modeling the tumbler walls as either a closely packed monolayer of fixed particles resulting in a rough wall or a frictional geometrically smooth wall. Even though the tumbler wall is in contact with the flowing layer only at its periphery, the impact of wall roughness is profound. Smooth walls tend toward a small-large-small (SLS) band pattern at the pole-equator-pole at all but the highest fill fractions; rough walls tend toward a large-small-large (LSL) band pattern at all but the lowest fill fractions. This comes about because smooth walls induce poleward axial drift of small particles and an equator-directed drift for large particles, resulting in an SLS band pattern. On the other hand, rough walls result in both sizes of particles moving poleward at the surface of the flow. Due to radial segregation, small particles percolate lower in the flowing layer and when arriving near the pole are caught in the return current drift that carries them back toward the equator incrementally with each passage through the flowing layer, while large particles remain at the surface near the pole, resulting in an LSL band pattern. The tendency toward either of the two segregation patterns depends on the fill level in the tumbler and the roughness of the tumbler's bounding wall.

  5. Production of super-smooth articles

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.

    1983-03-15

    Super-smooth rounded or formed articles made of thermoplastic materials including various poly(Methyl methacrylate) or acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers are produced by immersing the articles into a bath, the composition of which is slowly changed with time. The starting composition of the bath is made up of at least one solvent for the polymer and a diluent made up of at least one nonsolvent for the polymer and optional materials which are soluble in the bath. The resulting extremely smooth articles are useful as mandrels for laser fusion and should be useful for a wide variety of other purposes, for example lenses.

  6. Geometrical Wake of a Smooth Flat Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    A transverse geometrical wake generated by a beam passing through a smooth flat collimator with a gradually varying gap between the upper and lower walls is considered. Based on generalization of the approach recently developed for a smooth circular taper we reduce the electromagnetic problem of the impedance calculation to the solution of two much simpler static problems - a magnetostatic and an electrostatic ones. The solution shows that in the limit of not very large frequencies, the impedance increases with the ratio h/d where h is the width and d is the distance between the collimating jaws. Numerical results are presented for the NLC Post Linac collimator.

  7. Production of super-smooth articles

    DOEpatents

    Duchane, David V.

    1983-01-01

    Super-smooth rounded or formed articles made of thermoplastic materials including various poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers are produced by immersing the articles into a bath, the composition of which is slowly changed with time. The starting composition of the bath is made up of at least one solvent for the polymer and a diluent made up of at least one nonsolvent for the polymer and optional materials which are soluble in the bath. The resulting extremely smooth articles are useful as mandrels for laser fusion and should be useful for a wide variety of other purposes, for example lenses.

  8. Production of super-smooth articles

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.

    1981-05-29

    Super-smooth rounded or formed articles made of thermoplastic materials including various poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers are produced by immersing the articles into a bath, the composition of which is slowly changed with time. The starting composition of the bath is made up of at least one solvent for the polymer and a diluent made up of at least one nonsolvent for the polymer and optional materials which are soluble in the bath. The resulting extremely smooth articles are useful as mandrels for laser fusion and should be useful for a wide variety of other purposes, for example lenses.

  9. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interactions: Coughing and choking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başaǧaoǧlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro

    2010-04-01

    We propose and numerically investigate a new particle retention mechanism for particle entrapment in creeping flows in a constricted section of a saturated rough-walled narrow flow channel. We hypothesize that particles, whose size is smaller than channel width, can be temporarily or permanently immobilized in a flow channel away from channel walls due to particle-particle and particle-wall repulsive potentials, and, consequently, the flow field is clogged temporarily (coughing) or permanently (choking). Two mathematically simplified repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interaction potentials are incorporated into a two-dimensional colloidal lattice-Boltzmann model. These potentials are two-body Lennard-Jones 12 and screened electrostatic repulsive potentials. Numerical simulations reveal that unlike in smooth-walled flow channels, particles are entrapped away from rough-walled channel walls and subsequently clog the flow field if fluid-drag and repulsive forces on particles are in balance. Off-balance forces, however, could result in temporary clogging if repulsive forces are stronger on the advancing edge of a particle than on its trailing edge. The new conceptualization and two-particle numerical simulations successfully captured (i) temporary entrapment of two particles (coughing), (ii) temporary entrapment of one of the particles with permanent entrapment of the other particle (coughing-choking), and (iii) permanent entrapment of both particles (choking) as a function of repulsive interaction strength.

  10. A Very Smooth Ride in a Rough Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel; Zheligovsky, Vladislav

    2014-03-01

    It has been known for some time that a 3D incompressible Euler flow that has initially a barely smooth velocity field nonetheless has Lagrangian fluid particle trajectories that are analytic in time for at least a finite time Serfati (C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris Série I 320:175-180, 1995), Shnirelman (Glob. Stoch. Anal., http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5837v1, 2012). Here an elementary derivation is given, based on Cauchy's form of the Euler equations in Lagrangian coordinates. This form implies simple recurrence relations among the time-Taylor coefficients of the Lagrangian map, used here to derive bounds for the C 1,γ Hölder norms of the coefficients and infer temporal analyticity of Lagrangian trajectories when the initial velocity is C 1,γ.

  11. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  12. A local particle filter for high-dimensional geophysical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Stephen G.; Miyoshi, Takemasa

    2016-11-01

    A local particle filter (LPF) is introduced that outperforms traditional ensemble Kalman filters in highly nonlinear/non-Gaussian scenarios, both in accuracy and computational cost. The standard sampling importance resampling (SIR) particle filter is augmented with an observation-space localization approach, for which an independent analysis is computed locally at each grid point. The deterministic resampling approach of Kitagawa is adapted for application locally and combined with interpolation of the analysis weights to smooth the transition between neighboring points. Gaussian noise is applied with magnitude equal to the local analysis spread to prevent particle degeneracy while maintaining the estimate of the growing dynamical instabilities. The approach is validated against the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) using the 40-variable Lorenz-96 (L96) model. The results show that (1) the accuracy of LPF surpasses LETKF as the forecast length increases (thus increasing the degree of nonlinearity), (2) the cost of LPF is significantly lower than LETKF as the ensemble size increases, and (3) LPF prevents filter divergence experienced by LETKF in cases with non-Gaussian observation error distributions.

  13. Endothelial and smooth muscle histamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, R.S.; Hollis, T.M.

    1986-03-01

    Histamine is produced within the vascular wall and mediates a variety of normal and pathologic vascular responses. The interaction of histamine with its vascular cell receptors has been shown to affect factors such as actin cable formation, cyclase activities, prostacyclin synthesis, cell motility, and proliferation. In addition, abundant evidence exists to implicate an arterial nascent histamine pool in the control of vessel wall permeability under conditions of stress and injury. However, endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors have been only incompletely characterized. The authors report here the time-dependent, saturable, and trypsin sensitive binding of /sup 3/H-histamine to the endothelial cell surface. The K/sub d/ for endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors are 0.70 and 2.80 ..mu..M respectively. Histamine binding to smooth muscle cells also exhibited saturation with concentrations of /sup 3/H-histamine up to 4 ..mu..M. While the smooth muscle cell H/sub 1/ receptor binding was negligible, the H/sub 2/ receptor appeared to represent a relatively low affinity, high capacity site for histamine binding. The uptake of /sup 3/H-histamine in both cell types displayed kinetics consistent with that of fluid-phase pinocytosis.

  14. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  15. Autonomic modification of intestinal smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Laura E A; Tansey, Etain A; Johnson, Chris D; Roe, Sean M; Quinn, Joe G

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe this spontaneous activity and its modification by agents associated with parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activity. A section of the rabbit small intestine is suspended in an organ bath, and the use of a pressure transducer and data-acquisition software allows the measurement of tension generated by the smooth muscle of intestinal walls. The application of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter ACh at varying concentrations allows students to observe an increase in intestinal smooth muscle tone with increasing concentrations of this muscarinic receptor agonist. Construction of a concentration-effect curve allows students to calculate an EC50 value for ACh and consider some basic concepts surrounding receptor occupancy and activation. Application of the hormone epinephrine to the precontracted intestine allows students to observe the inhibitory effects associated with sympathetic nerve activation. Introduction of the drug atropine to the preparation before a maximal concentration of ACh is applied allows students to observe the inhibitory effect of a competitive antagonist on the physiological response to a receptor agonist. The final experiment involves the observation of the depolarizing effect of K(+) on smooth muscle. Students are also invited to consider why the drugs atropine, codeine, loperamide, and botulinum toxin have medicinal uses in the management of gastrointestinal problems.

  16. Resting calcium influx in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Luis M; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca

    2005-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ leak remains the most uncertain of the cellular Ca2+ regulation pathways. During passive Ca2+ influx in non-stimulated smooth muscle cells, basal activity of constitutive Ca2+ channels seems to be involved. In vascular smooth muscle, the 3 following Ca2+ entry pathways contribute to this phenomenon: (i) via voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, (ii) receptor gated Ca2+ channels, and (iii) store operated Ca2+ channels, although, in airway smooth muscle it seems only 2 passive Ca2+ influx pathways are implicated, one sensitive to SKF 96365 (receptor gated Ca2+ channels) and the other to Ni2+ (store operated Ca2+ channels). Resting Ca2+ entry could provide a sufficient amount of Ca2+ and contribute to resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), maintenance of the resting membrane potential, myogenic tone, and sarcoplasmic reticulum-Ca2+ refilling. However, further research, especially in airway smooth muscle, is required to better explore the physiological role of this passive Ca2+ influx pathway as it could be involved in airway hyperresponsiveness.

  17. Germination and seedling development of switchgrass and smooth bromegrass exposed to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Peterson, M M; Horst, G L; Shea, P J; Comfort, S D

    1998-01-01

    It is estimated that explosives contaminate approximately 0.82 million cubic metres of soil at former military installations throughout the US; major contaminants often include 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its degradation products. At some sites, phytoremediation may be a viable option to incineration or other costly remediation treatments. Grasses may be particularly suited for remediation because of their growth habit and adaptability to a wide range of soil and climate conditions. We characterized the effects of TNT on germination and early seedling development of switchgrass and smooth bromegrass to evaluate their potential use on contaminated sites. Switchgrass and smooth bromegrass seeds were germinated in nutrient-free agar containing 0 to 60 mg TNT litre(-1). Smooth bromegrass germination decreased as TNT concentration increased, while switchgrass germination was unaffected by TNT. Concentrations up to 15 mg TNT litre(-1) did not affect switchgrass root growth rate, but bromegrass root growth was reduced at TNT concentrations above 7.5 mg litre(-1). At 7.5 mg TNT litre(-1), however, shoot growth rate was reduced in both species. Examination at 20-fold magnification revealed switchgrass radicles were unaffected by TNT, while smooth bromegrass radicles appeared slightly swollen. Results indicate switchgrass is more tolerant of TNT than smooth bromegrass, but the establishment of both species may be limited to soil containing less than 50 mg kg(-1) of extractable TNT.

  18. Calcium Sensitization Mechanisms in Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscles.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Brian A

    2016-04-30

    An increase in intracellular Ca(2+) is the primary trigger of contraction of gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscles. However, increasing the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the myofilaments by elevating myosin light chain phosphorylation also plays an essential role. Inhibiting myosin light chain phosphatase activity with protein kinase C-potentiated phosphatase inhibitor protein-17 kDa (CPI-17) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation is considered to be the primary mechanism underlying myofilament Ca(2+) sensitization. The relative importance of Ca(2+) sensitization mechanisms to the diverse patterns of GI motility is likely related to the varied functional roles of GI smooth muscles. Increases in CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in response to agonist stimulation regulate myosin light chain phosphatase activity in phasic, tonic, and sphincteric GI smooth muscles. Recent evidence suggests that MYPT1 phosphorylation may also contribute to force generation by reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanisms responsible for maintaining constitutive CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in GI smooth muscles are still largely unknown. The characteristics of the cell-types comprising the neuroeffector junction lead to fundamental differences between the effects of exogenous agonists and endogenous neurotransmitters on Ca(2+) sensitization mechanisms. The contribution of various cell-types within the tunica muscularis to the motor responses of GI organs to neurotransmission must be considered when determining the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) sensitization pathways are activated. The signaling pathways regulating Ca(2+) sensitization may provide novel therapeutic strategies for controlling GI motility. This article will provide an overview of the current understanding of the biochemical basis for the regulation of Ca(2+) sensitization, while also discussing the functional importance to different smooth muscles of the GI tract.

  19. Characterization of particles in cream cheese.

    PubMed

    Sainani, M R; Vyas, H K; Tong, P S

    2004-09-01

    Cream cheese is used as a spread and as an ingredient in many food applications. A gritty or grainy mouthfeel is an undesirable textural defect that occurs in cream cheese. However, the factors that cause the textural defect are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to isolate and characterize particles from cream cheese and to study the effect of particles on cheese texture. Particles were isolated by washing cream cheese with water first at 25 degrees C and then at 50 degrees C repeatedly 4 to 5 times. The size of these particles was determined using a particle size analyzer. The particles as well as the original cheeses were analyzed for moisture, fat, protein, ash, and lactose. The particle size ranged of 0.04 to 850 microm. It was found that isolated particles were significantly higher in protein content as compared with the whole cheese. To study the effect on the cheese texture, particles were added at 5, 15, and 25% (wt/wt) levels to smooth cream cheese, and a sensory ranking test was done on the samples. Isolated particles were further separated into 2 size classes of 2.5 to 150 microm and > or =150 microm. These particles were then mixed with smooth cream cheese at 16 and 29% (wt/wt), and a sensory test was conducted on these samples. Smooth cream cheese with only 5% (wt/wt) added particles was perceived as significantly grittier than the control sample. This experiment also revealed that the perceived grittiness increased with increase in amount and size of particles.

  20. Dissipative particle dynamics with attractive and repulsive particle-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin; Moubin Liu; Hai Huang

    2006-01-01

    In molecular dynamics simulations, a combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions allows the behavior of gases, liquids, solids, and multiphase systems to be simulated. We demonstrate that dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations with similar pairwise particle-particle interactions can also be used to simulate the dynamics of multiphase fluids. In these simulations, the positive, short-range, repulsive part of the interaction potentials were represented by polynomial spline functions such as those used as smoothing functions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and the negative long-range part of the interaction has the same form but a different range and amplitude. If a single spline function corresponding to a purely repulsive interaction is used, the DPD fluid is a gas, and we show that the Poiseuille flow of this gas can be described accurately by the Navier-Stokes equation at low Reynolds numbers. In a two-component system in which the purely repulsive interactions between different components are substantially larger than the purely repulsive intracomponent interactions, separation into two gas phases occurs, in agreement with results obtained using DPD simulations with standard repulsive particle-particle interactions. Finally, we show that a combination of short-range repulsive interactions and long-range attractive interactions can be used to simulate the behavior of liquid drops surrounded by a gas. Similar models can be used to simulate a wide range of processes such as multiphase fluid flow through fractures and porous media with complex geometries and wetting behaviors.

  1. Interactive Terascale Particle Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Moran, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce an interactive visualization of a 2 TB computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data set using particle tracing (streaklines). We use the method introduced by Bruckschen et al. [2001] that pre-computes a large number of particles, stores them on disk using a space-filling curve ordering that minimizes seeks, and then retrieves and displays the particles according to the user's command. We describe how the particle computation can be performed using a PC cluster, how the algorithm can be adapted to work with a multi-block curvilinear mesh, and how the out-of-core visualization can be scaled to 296 billion particles while still achieving interactive performance on PG hardware. Compared to the earlier work, our data set size and total number of particles are an order of magnitude larger. We also describe a new compression technique that allows the lossless compression of the particles by 41% and speeds the particle retrieval by about 30%.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide enhances oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein by copper ions, endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Maziere, C; Conte, M A; Dantin, F; Maziere, J C

    1999-03-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) on low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidative modification by copper ions, endothelial and smooth muscle cells was studied by determination of the level of lipid peroxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances or TBARS), the diene level and the electrophoretic mobility of the LDL particle. LPS 25-75 microg/ml induced a dose-dependent increase in LDL oxidation by copper ions, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. At 75 microg LPS/ml, the TBARS content was 1.9, 1.6, and 1.8-fold increased, respectively. The LDL degradation by J774 macrophage-like cells was concomitantly stimulated. Preincubation of the LDL particle with LPS induced a marked increase in the subsequent LDL oxidative modification either by copper ions or by endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In addition, pretreatment of endothelial and smooth muscle cells with LPS also induced an enhancement of LDL oxidative modification performed in the absence of LPS. This effect was accompanied by a parallel increase in superoxide anion release by the cells. These results point at one of the mechanisms involved in the described association between bacterial infection and acute myocardial infarction as well as coronary heart disease.

  3. MRI tissue segmentation incorporating a bias field modulated smoothness prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Enmin; Cardenas, Valerie A.; Sacrey, Diana; Blumenfeld, Robert; Weiner, Michael W.; Studholme, Colin

    2003-05-01

    This paper examines a refinement to probabilistic intensity based tissue segmentation methods, which makes use of knowledge derived from an MRI bias field estimate. Intensity based labeling techniques have employed local smoothness priors to reduce voxel level tissue labeling errors, by making use of the assumption that, within uniform regions of tissue, a voxel should be highly likely to have a similar tissue assignment to its neighbors. Increasing the size of this neighborhood provides more robustness to noise, but reduces the ability to describe small structures. However, when intensity bias due to RF field inhomogeneity is present within the MRI data, local contrast to noise may vary across the image. We therefore propose an approach to refining the labeling by making use of the bias field estimate, to adapt the neighborhood size applied to reduce local labeling errors. We explore the use of a radially symmetric Gaussian weighted neighborhood, and the use of the mean and median of the adapted region probabilities, to refine local probabilistic labeling. The approach is evaluated using the Montreal brainweb MRI simulator as a gold standard providing known gray, white and CSF tissue segmentation. These results show that the method is capable of improving the local tissue labeling in areas most influenced by inhomogeneity. The method appears most promising in its application to regional tissue volume analysis or higher field MRI data where bias field inhomogeneity can be significant.

  4. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Schultz, Larry Joe; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Sossong, Michael James; Blanpied, Gary

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  5. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans [Reno, NV; Chakrabarty, Rajan K [Reno, NV; Arnott, W Patrick [Reno, NV

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  6. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  7. Molecular memory with atomically smooth graphene contacts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the use of bilayer graphene as an atomically smooth contact for nanoscale devices. A two-terminal bucky-ball (C60) based molecular memory is fabricated with bilayer graphene as a contact on the polycrystalline nickel electrode. Graphene provides an atomically smooth covering over an otherwise rough metal surface. The use of graphene additionally prohibits the electromigration of nickel into the C60 layer. The devices exhibit a low-resistance state in the first sweep cycle and irreversibly switch to a high-resistance state at 0.8 to 1.2 V bias. In the subsequent cycles, the devices retain the high-resistance state, thus making it write-once read-many memory. PMID:24225345

  8. Compensating for estimation smoothing in kriging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olea, R.A.; Pawlowsky, Vera

    1996-01-01

    Smoothing is a characteristic inherent to all minimum mean-square-error spatial estimators such as kriging. Cross-validation can be used to detect and model such smoothing. Inversion of the model produces a new estimator-compensated kriging. A numerical comparison based on an exhaustive permeability sampling of a 4-fr2 slab of Berea Sandstone shows that the estimation surface generated by compensated kriging has properties intermediate between those generated by ordinary kriging and stochastic realizations resulting from simulated annealing and sequential Gaussian simulation. The frequency distribution is well reproduced by the compensated kriging surface, which also approximates the experimental semivariogram well - better than ordinary kriging, but not as well as stochastic realizations. Compensated kriging produces surfaces that are more accurate than stochastic realizations, but not as accurate as ordinary kriging. ?? 1996 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  9. A smoothing algorithm using cubic spline functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E., Jr.; Price, J. M.; Howser, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two algorithms are presented for smoothing arbitrary sets of data. They are the explicit variable algorithm and the parametric variable algorithm. The former would be used where large gradients are not encountered because of the smaller amount of calculation required. The latter would be used if the data being smoothed were double valued or experienced large gradients. Both algorithms use a least-squares technique to obtain a cubic spline fit to the data. The advantage of the spline fit is that the first and second derivatives are continuous. This method is best used in an interactive graphics environment so that the junction values for the spline curve can be manipulated to improve the fit.

  10. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  11. Regular and chaotic dynamics of a piecewise smooth bouncer

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, Cameron K. Miller, Bruce N.

    2015-07-15

    The dynamical properties of a particle in a gravitational field colliding with a rigid wall moving with piecewise constant velocity are studied. The linear nature of the wall's motion permits further analytical investigation than is possible for the system's sinusoidal counterpart. We consider three distinct approaches to modeling collisions: (i) elastic, (ii) inelastic with constant restitution coefficient, and (iii) inelastic with a velocity-dependent restitution function. We confirm the existence of distinct unbounded orbits (Fermi acceleration) in the elastic model, and investigate regular and chaotic behavior in the inelastic cases. We also examine in the constant restitution model trajectories wherein the particle experiences an infinite number of collisions in a finite time, i.e., the phenomenon of inelastic collapse. We address these so-called “sticking solutions” and their relation to both the overall dynamics and the phenomenon of self-reanimating chaos. Additionally, we investigate the long-term behavior of the system as a function of both initial conditions and parameter values. We find the non-smooth nature of the system produces novel bifurcation phenomena not seen in the sinusoidal model, including border-collision bifurcations. The analytical and numerical investigations reveal that although our piecewise linear bouncer is a simplified version of the sinusoidal model, the former not only captures essential features of the latter but also exhibits behavior unique to the discontinuous dynamics.

  12. Generation of Surfaces with Smooth Highlight Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    2 (s)ds/ si. (2) 0=i i=1 §3. Concept of Surface Generation Based on Evolute A surface is generated by moving a generatrix along two directrices . When...Fig. 1(a) shows an object surface Surfaces with Smooth Highlight Lines 147 Sgeneratrices v generated surface S u directrices evoluteseolesufc (a...the directrices , and suffix u denotes partial differentiation. Fig. 1(b) shows an evolute surface and a generated surface satisfying the constraints

  13. Structure-Preserving Smoothing of Biomedical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Debora; Hernàndez-Sabaté, Aura; Burnat, Mireia; Jansen, Steven; Martínez-Villalta, Jordi

    Smoothing of biomedical images should preserve gray-level transitions between adjacent tissues, while restoring contours consistent with anatomical structures. Anisotropic diffusion operators are based on image appearance discontinuities (either local or contextual) and might fail at weak inter-tissue transitions. Meanwhile, the output of block-wise and morphological operations is prone to present a block structure due to the shape and size of the considered pixel neighborhood.

  14. Wrench for smooth or damaged fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrillo, R.

    1981-01-01

    Smooth-surfaced or damaged fasteners that cannot be gripped by conventional wrench can be unscrewed by special wrench. It can be used in tight spaces and will not damage adjacent structures. Wrench consists of central handle and 2 independent jaws with serrated teeth. Teeth are placed on fastener to be removed, and handle is rotated until fastener is gripped with positive locking action. Rotation of wrench handle removes fastener.

  15. Variational algorithms for nonlinear smoothing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, R. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A variational approach is presented for solving a nonlinear, fixed-interval smoothing problem with application to offline processing of noisy data for trajectory reconstruction and parameter estimation. The nonlinear problem is solved as a sequence of linear two-point boundary value problems. Second-order convergence properties are demonstrated. Algorithms for both continuous and discrete versions of the problem are given, and example solutions are provided.

  16. Rotorcraft Smoothing Via Linear Time Periodic Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Optimal Control Methodology for Rotor Vibration Smoothing . . 30 vii Page IV. Mathematic Foundations of Linear Time Periodic Systems . . . . 33 4.1 The...62 6.3 The Maximum Likelihood Estimator . . . . . . . . . . . 63 6.4 The Cramer-Rao Inequality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 6.4.1 Statistical ...adjustments for vibration reduction. 2.2.2.4 1980’s to late 1990’s. Rotor vibrational reduction methods during the 1980’s began to adopt a mathematical

  17. Notch Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Baeten, J T; Lilly, B

    2017-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved pathway involved in cell fate determination in embryonic development and also functions in the regulation of physiological processes in several systems. It plays an especially important role in vascular development and physiology by influencing angiogenesis, vessel patterning, arterial/venous specification, and vascular smooth muscle biology. Aberrant or dysregulated Notch signaling is the cause of or a contributing factor to many vascular disorders, including inherited vascular diseases, such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, associated with degeneration of the smooth muscle layer in cerebral arteries. Like most signaling pathways, the Notch signaling axis is influenced by complex interactions with mediators of other signaling pathways. This complexity is also compounded by different members of the Notch family having both overlapping and unique functions. Thus, it is vital to fully understand the roles and interactions of each Notch family member in order to effectively and specifically target their exact contributions to vascular disease. In this chapter, we will review the Notch signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells as it relates to vascular development and human disease.

  18. On the thermodynamics of smooth muscle contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stålhand, Jonas; McMeeking, Robert M.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2016-09-01

    Cell function is based on many dynamically complex networks of interacting biochemical reactions. Enzymes may increase the rate of only those reactions that are thermodynamically consistent. In this paper we specifically treat the contraction of smooth muscle cells from the continuum thermodynamics point of view by considering them as an open system where matter passes through the cell membrane. We systematically set up a well-known four-state kinetic model for the cross-bridge interaction of actin and myosin in smooth muscle, where the transition between each state is driven by forward and reverse reactions. Chemical, mechanical and energy balance laws are provided in local forms, while energy balance is also formulated in the more convenient temperature form. We derive the local (non-negative) production of entropy from which we deduce the reduced entropy inequality and the constitutive equations for the first Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensor, the heat flux, the ion and molecular flux and the entropy. One example for smooth muscle contraction is analyzed in more detail in order to provide orientation within the established general thermodynamic framework. In particular the stress evolution, heat generation, muscle shorting rate and a condition for muscle cooling are derived.

  19. Smooth muscle tumours of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, T.; Danton, M. H.; Parks, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Neoplasms arising from smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are uncommon, comprising only 1% of gastrointestinal tumours. A total of 51 cases of smooth muscle tumour of the GI tract were analysed; 44 leiomyomas and 7 leiomyosarcomas. Lesions occurred in all areas from the oesophagus to the rectum, the stomach being the commonest site. Thirty-six patients had clinical features referable to the tumour. The tumour was detected during investigation or management of an unrelated disease process in 15 patients. The clinical presentation varied depending on tumour location, but abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the commonest presenting symptoms. The lesion was demonstrated preoperatively, mainly by endoscopy and barium studies, in 27 patients. Surgical excision was the treatment of choice, where possible. There was no recurrence in the leiomyoma group but four patients died in the leiomyosarcoma group. Although rare, smooth muscle tumours should be considered in situations where clinical presentation and investigations are not suggestive of any common GI disorder. The preoperative assessment and diagnosis is difficult because of the variability in clinical features and their inaccessibility to routine GI investigation. It is recommended that, where possible, the lesion, whether symptomatic or discovered incidentally, should be excised completely to achieve a cure and prevent future complications. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2221768

  20. Smooth muscle differentiation in scleroderma fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sappino, A. P.; Masouyé, I.; Saurat, J. H.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    Using antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin and desmin on paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue sections, the authors demonstrate that fibroblastic cells of localized and systemic scleroderma lesions express features of smooth muscle differentiation. Eleven of eleven skin specimens of systemic sclerosis patients and two of four skin specimens of localized scleroderma displayed the presence of fibroblasts expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin, a cell population that predominated in areas of prominent collagen deposition. A similar fibroblastic phenotype was found in the esophagus, the liver, and the lung specimens obtained from four patients who died of progressive systemic sclerosis. Immunostaining for desmin, performed on adjacent tissue sections, demonstrated that a minority of these fibroblastic cells present in skin and visceral lesions contained this protein. The authors' observations indicate that scleroderma fibroblasts are phenotypically related to the stromal cells previously identified in hypertrophic scars, fibromatoses, and desmoplasia; they might provide novel criteria for the characterization of scleroderma lesions and help to identify the factors responsible for phenotypic modulations in fibroblastic cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698026

  1. Symmetric smoothing filters from global consistency constraints.

    PubMed

    Haque, Sheikh Mohammadul; Pai, Gautam P; Govindu, Venu Madhav

    2015-05-01

    Many patch-based image denoising methods can be viewed as data-dependent smoothing filters that carry out a weighted averaging of similar pixels. It has recently been argued that these averaging filters can be improved using their doubly stochastic approximation, which are symmetric and stable smoothing operators. In this paper, we introduce a simple principle of consistency that argues that the relative similarities between pixels as imputed by the averaging matrix should be preserved in the filtered output. The resultant consistency filter has the theoretically desirable properties of being symmetric and stable, and is a generalized doubly stochastic matrix. In addition, we can also interpret our consistency filter as a specific form of Laplacian regularization. Thus, our approach unifies two strands of image denoising methods, i.e., symmetric smoothing filters and spectral graph theory. Our consistency filter provides high-quality image denoising and significantly outperforms the doubly stochastic version. We present a thorough analysis of the properties of our proposed consistency filter and compare its performance with that of other significant methods for image denoising in the literature.

  2. Interplay of particle shape and suspension properties: a study of cube-like particles.

    PubMed

    Audus, Debra J; Hassan, Ahmed M; Garboczi, Edward J; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-05-07

    With advances in anisotropic particle synthesis, particle shape is now a feasible parameter for tuning suspension properties. However, there is a need to determine how these newly synthesized particles affect suspension properties and a need to solve the inverse problem of inferring the particle shape from property measurements. Either way, accurate suspension property predictions are required. Towards this end, we calculated a set of dilute suspension properties for a family of cube-like particles that smoothly interpolate between spheres and cubes. Using three conceptually different methods, we numerically computed the electrical properties of particle suspensions, including the intrinsic conductivity of perfect conductors and insulators. We also considered hydrodynamic properties relevant to particle solutions including the hydrodynamic radius, the intrinsic viscosity and the intrinsic solvent diffusivity. Additionally, we determined the second osmotic virial coefficient using analytic expressions along with numerical integration. As the particles became more cube-like, we found that all of the properties investigated become more sensitive to particle shape.

  3. Autofluorescent particles of human uterine muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gosden, R. G.; Hawkins, H. K.; Gosden, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Smooth muscle tissue collected from the uterine fundus of 24 patients undergoing hysterectomy was examined for chromolipoid pigments by histochemical and electron microscopic techniques. Certain cytoplasmic particles were found, mainly in smooth muscle cells, which exhibited characteristic autofluorescence, sudanophilia, and acid phosphatase activity but did not correspond to any typical pigment described previously. These particles were present in all subjects and they tended to increase in number with age. Chemical tests on tissue lipid extracts failed to prove that vitamin A was responsible for the fluorescence. The ultrastructural appearance of the particles somewhat variable, but most particles were rounded and of low electron density, with a lucent central space and dense bodies, probably lysosomes, at the periphery. The whole complex was enclosed by a single trilaminar membrane. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 3 Figure 8 Figure 4 PMID:645817

  4. Conservative fluctuational-electromagnetic interaction of a conducting nanoparticle with a smooth surface of condensed medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedkov, G. V.; Kyasov, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    General expressions for a conservative force of the fluctuational-electromagnetic interaction between a neutral spherical conducting nanoparticle and a smooth surface of condensed medium are obtained for the first time with allowance for both electric and magnetic components. The results of calculations performed for a copper particle interacting with a copper surface show that the contribution of the magnetic components is predominating for all distances from the surface exceeding the particle radius R. The contribution due to the near-surface modes, which is proportional to the temperature and inversely proportional to the cube of the distance, is predominating at distances above ˜10 R.

  5. 7 CFR 51.772 - Fairly smooth texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.772 Fairly smooth texture. Fairly smooth texture means that the skin is fairly thin and not coarse for the variety and size of the fruit. “Fairly thin” means that the skin thickness does...

  6. 7 CFR 51.772 - Fairly smooth texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.772 Fairly smooth texture. Fairly smooth texture means that the skin is fairly thin and not coarse for the variety and size of the fruit. “Fairly thin” means that the skin thickness does...

  7. Comparison of True and Smoothed Puff Profile Replication on Smoking Behavior and Mainstream Smoke Emissions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To estimate exposures to smokers from cigarettes, smoking topography is typically measured and programmed into a smoking machine to mimic human smoking, and the resulting smoke emissions are tested for relative levels of harmful constituents. However, using only the summary puff data—with a fixed puff frequency, volume, and duration—may underestimate or overestimate actual exposure to smoke toxins. In this laboratory study, we used a topography-driven smoking machine that faithfully reproduces a human smoking session and individual human topography data (n = 24) collected during previous clinical research to investigate if replicating the true puff profile (TP) versus the mathematically derived smoothed puff profile (SM) resulted in differences in particle size distributions and selected toxic/carcinogenic organic compounds from mainstream smoke emissions. Particle size distributions were measured using an electrical low pressure impactor, the masses of the size-fractionated fine and ultrafine particles were determined gravimetrically, and the collected particulate was analyzed for selected particle-bound, semivolatile compounds. Volatile compounds were measured in real time using a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer. By and large, TP levels for the fine and ultrafine particulate masses as well as particle-bound organic compounds were slightly lower than the SM concentrations. The volatile compounds, by contrast, showed no clear trend. Differences in emissions due to the use of the TP and SM profiles are generally not large enough to warrant abandoning the procedures used to generate the simpler smoothed profile in favor of the true profile. PMID:25536227

  8. Sensitized airway smooth muscle plasticity and hyperreactivity: a review.

    PubMed

    Stephens, N L; Cheng, Z-Q; Fust, A

    2007-07-01

    To help elucidate the mechanisms underlying asthmatic bronchospasm, the goal of our research has been to determine whether airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperreactivity was the responsible factor. We reported that in a canine model of asthma, the shortening capacity (DeltaLmax) and velocity (Vo) of in vitro sensitized muscle were significantly increased. This increase was of sufficient magnitude to account for 75% narrowing of the in vivo airway, but maximal isometric force was unchanged. This last feature has been reported by others. Under lightly loaded conditions, ASM completes 75% of its isotonic shortening within the first 2 s. Furthermore, 90% of the increased shortening of ragweed pollen-sensitized ASM (SASM), compared with control (CASM), is complete within the first 2 s. The study of shortening beyond this period will apparently not yield much useful information, and studies of isotonic shortening should be focused on this interval. Although both CASM and SASM showed plasticity and adaptation with respect to isometric force, neither muscle type showed a difference in the force developed in these phases. During isotonic shortening, no evidence of plasticity was seen, but the equilibrated SASM showed increased DeltaLmax and Vo of shortening. Molecular mechanisms of changes in Vo could result from changes in the kinetics of the myosin heavy chain ATPase. Motility assay, however, showed no changes between CASM and SASM in the ability of the purified myosin molecule (SF1) to translocate a marker actin filament. On the other hand, we found that the state of activation of the ATPase by phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin light chain (molecular mass 20,000 Da) was greater in the SASM. This would account for the increased Vo. Investigating the signalling pathway, we found that whereas [Ca2+]i increased in both isometric and isotonic contraction, there was no significant difference between CASM and SASM. The content and activity of calmodulin were also not

  9. A Kalman Filter with Smoothing for Hurricane Tracking and Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    algorithms were categorized into three groups by Meditch [Ref. 51; Fixed Point Smoothing smooths the estimate iox at a fixed point k as K increases... Smoothing , Storm Trackig. I bstract (continue on reiersc if necr!:ry and ldetif by block number) T-he Performance of a Kalmnan filter used to track a...hurricane was substantially improved by implementing a fixed interval smoothing algofitin. This tracking routine was designed and imiplemencrted in a

  10. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  11. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  12. Highly smooth Nb surfaces fabricated by buffered electropolishing

    SciTech Connect

    Andy T. Wu; John Mammossor; H. Phillips; Jean Delayen; Charles Reece; Amy Wilkerson; David Smith; Robert Ike

    2005-05-01

    It is demonstrated that highly smooth Nb surfaces can be obtained through Buffered ElectroPolishing (BEP) employing an electrolyte consisting of lactic, sulfuric, and hydrofluoric acids. Parameters that control the polishing process are optimized to achieve the smoothest surface finish with the help of surface observations using a scanning electron microscope and a Metallographic Optical Microscope (MOM). The polishing rate of BEP is determined to be 0.646 {micro}m/min that is much higher than 0.381 {micro}m/min achieved by the conventional ElectroPolishing (EP) process widely used in the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) community. A high precision and large scan area 3-D profilometer is used to view morphology of the treated Nb surfaces. Statistical data, such as, rms, total indicator runout, and arithmetic mean deviation of the Nb surfaces are extracted from the profilometer images. It is found that Nb surfaces treated by BEP are an order of magnitude smoother than those treated by the optimized EP process. The chemical composition of the Nb surfaces after BEP is analyzed by static and dynamic Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) systems. Cracking patterns of the Nb surfaces under different primary ion sources of Ga{sup +}, Au{sup +}, and Ar{sup +} are reported. The depth profile of the surface niobium oxides is studied through continuously monitoring niobium and its relevant oxides' peaks as a function of time. Dynamic SIMS results imply that the surface oxide structure of Nb may be more complicated than what usually believed and can be inhomogeneous. Preliminary results of BEP on Nb SRF single cell cavities and half-cells are reported. It is shown that smooth and bright surfaces can be obtained in 30 minutes when the electric field inside a SRF cavity is uniform during a BEP process. This study reveals that BEP is a highly promising technique for surface treatment on Nb SRF cavities to be used in particle accelerators.

  13. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Smooth Pursuit in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved…

  14. Alternative Smoothing and Scaling Strategies for Weighted Composite Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tim

    2014-01-01

    In this study, smoothing and scaling approaches are compared for estimating subscore-to-composite scaling results involving composites computed as rounded and weighted combinations of subscores. The considered smoothing and scaling approaches included those based on raw data, on smoothing the bivariate distribution of the subscores, on smoothing…

  15. The Optimal Degree of Smoothing in Equipercentile Equating with Postsmoothing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Lingjia

    1995-01-01

    The effects of different degrees of smoothing on results of equipercentile equating in random groups design using a postsmoothing method based on cubic splines were investigated, and a computer-based procedure was introduced for selecting a desirable degree of smoothing. Results suggest that no particular degree of smoothing was always optimal.…

  16. Infant Attention and the Development of Smooth Pursuit Tracking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, John E.; Holley, Felecia B.

    1999-01-01

    Studied effect of attention on smooth pursuit and saccadic tracking in infants at 8, 14, 20, and 26 weeks old. Found an increase across age in overall tracking, gain of smooth-pursuit eye movements, and increased amplitude of compensatory saccades at faster tracking speeds. Findings show that development of smooth pursuit, targeted saccadic eye…

  17. Visual Short-Term Memory During Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerzel, Dirk; Ziegler, Nathalie E.

    2005-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) was probed while observers performed smooth pursuit eye movements. Smooth pursuit keeps a moving object stabilized in the fovea. VSTM capacity for position was reduced during smooth pursuit compared with a condition with eye fixation. There was no difference between a condition in which the items were approximately…

  18. Increased endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion on nanostructured titanium and CoCrMo

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Saba; Berhe, Mikal; Haberstroh, Karen M; Webster, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    In the body, vascular cells continuously interact with tissues that possess nanostructured surface features due to the presence of proteins (such as collagen and elastin) embedded in the vascular wall. Despite this fact, vascular stents intended to restore blood flow do not have nanoscale surface features but rather are smooth at the nanoscale. As the first step towards creating the next generation of vascular stent materials, the objective of this in vitro study was to investigate vascular cell (specifically, endothelial, and vascular smooth muscle cell) adhesion on nanostructured compared with conventional commercially pure (cp) Ti and CoCrMo. Nanostructured cp Ti and CoCrMo compacts were created by separately utilizing either constituent cp Ti or CoCrMo nanoparticles as opposed to conventional micronsized particles. Results of this study showed for the first time increased endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion on nanostructured compared with conventional cp Ti and CoCrMo after 4 hours’ adhesion. Moreover, compared with their respective conventional counterparts, the ratio of endothelial to vascular smooth muscle cells increased on nanostructured cp Ti and CoCrMo. In addition, endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells had a better spread morphology on the nanostructured metals compared with conventional metals. Overall, vascular cell adhesion was better on CoCrMo than on cp Ti. Results of surface characterization studies demonstrated similar chemistry but significantly greater root-mean-square (rms) surface roughness as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) for nanostructured compared with respective conventional metals. For these reasons, results from the present in vitro study provided evidence that vascular stents composed of nanometer compared with micron-sized metal particles (specifically, either cp Ti or CoCrMo) may invoke cellular responses promising for improved vascular stent applications. PMID:17722261

  19. Smooth muscle-selective CPI-17 expression increases vascular smooth muscle contraction and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wen; Xie, Zhongwen; Liu, Shu; Calderon, Lindsay E.; Guo, Zhenheng

    2013-01-01

    Recent data revealed that protein kinase C-potentiated myosin phosphatase inhibitor of 17 kDa (CPI-17), a myosin phosphatase inhibitory protein preferentially expressed in smooth muscle, is upregulated/activated in several diseases but whether this CPI-17 increase plays a causal role in pathologically enhanced vascular smooth muscle contractility and blood pressure remains unclear. To address this possibility, we generated a smooth muscle-specific CPI-17 transgenic mouse model (CPI-17-Tg) and demonstrated that the CPI-17 transgene was selectively expressed in smooth muscle-enriched tissues, including mesenteric arteries. The isometric contractions in the isolated second-order branch of mesenteric artery helical strips from CPI-17-Tg mice were significantly enhanced compared with controls in response to phenylephrine, U-46619, serotonin, ANG II, high potassium, and calcium. The perfusion pressure increases in isolated perfused mesenteric vascular beds in response to norepinephrine were also enhanced in CPI-17-Tg mice. The hypercontractility was associated with increased phosphorylation of CPI-17 and 20-kDa myosin light chain under basal and stimulated conditions. Surprisingly, the protein levels of rho kinase 2 and protein kinase Cα/δ were significantly increased in CPI-17-Tg mouse mesenteric arteries. Radiotelemetry measurements demonstrated that blood pressure was significantly increased in CPI-17-Tg mice. However, no vascular remodeling was detected by morphometric analysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that increased CPI-17 expression in smooth muscle promotes vascular smooth muscle contractility and increases blood pressure, implicating a pathological significant role of CPI-17 upregulation. PMID:23604714

  20. Irregular Wave Runup on Smooth Slopes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    CERC- CETA -81-17 N. IE D CETA 81-17 Z Irregular Wave Runup on Smooth Slopes by ot John P. Ahrens COASTAL ENGINEERING TECHNICAL AID NO. 81-17 DECEMBER...GOVT ACCESSION NO, 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER CETA 811 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Coastal Engineering IRREGULAR...Coastal Engineering Research Center, 1977); CETA 77-2 "Prediction of Irregular Wave Runup" by John P. Ahrens; and CETA 78-2 "Revised Wave Runup

  1. Old Basin Filled by Smooth Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Old basin, 190 km in diameter, filled by smooth plains at 43 degrees S, 55 degrees W. The basin's hummocky rim is partly degraded and cratered by later events. Mariner 10 frame 166607.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  2. Smoothed Analysis for the Conjugate Gradient Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Govind; Trogdon, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish bounds on the rate of convergence of the conjugate gradient algorithm when the underlying matrix is a random positive definite perturbation of a deterministic positive definite matrix. We estimate all finite moments of a natural halting time when the random perturbation is drawn from the Laguerre unitary ensemble in a critical scaling regime explored in Deift et al. (2016). These estimates are used to analyze the expected iteration count in the framework of smoothed analysis, introduced by Spielman and Teng (2001). The rigorous results are compared with numerical calculations in several cases of interest.

  3. Method for producing smooth inner surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Charles A.

    2016-05-17

    The invention provides a method for preparing superconducting cavities, the method comprising causing polishing media to tumble by centrifugal barrel polishing within the cavities for a time sufficient to attain a surface smoothness of less than 15 nm root mean square roughness over approximately a 1 mm.sup.2 scan area. The method also provides for a method for preparing superconducting cavities, the method comprising causing polishing media bound to a carrier to tumble within the cavities. The method also provides for a method for preparing superconducting cavities, the method comprising causing polishing media in a slurry to tumble within the cavities.

  4. Compressive Sensing via Nonlocal Smoothed Rank Function

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ya-Ru; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Xi-Le

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) theory asserts that we can reconstruct signals and images with only a small number of samples or measurements. Recent works exploiting the nonlocal similarity have led to better results in various CS studies. To better exploit the nonlocal similarity, in this paper, we propose a non-convex smoothed rank function based model for CS image reconstruction. We also propose an efficient alternating minimization method to solve the proposed model, which reduces a difficult and coupled problem to two tractable subproblems. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method performs better than several existing state-of-the-art CS methods for image reconstruction. PMID:27583683

  5. Compressive Sensing via Nonlocal Smoothed Rank Function.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ya-Ru; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Xi-Le

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) theory asserts that we can reconstruct signals and images with only a small number of samples or measurements. Recent works exploiting the nonlocal similarity have led to better results in various CS studies. To better exploit the nonlocal similarity, in this paper, we propose a non-convex smoothed rank function based model for CS image reconstruction. We also propose an efficient alternating minimization method to solve the proposed model, which reduces a difficult and coupled problem to two tractable subproblems. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method performs better than several existing state-of-the-art CS methods for image reconstruction.

  6. Airway smooth muscle growth in asthma: proliferation, hypertrophy, and migration.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Kelley; Hershenson, Marc B

    2008-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass is present in fatal and non-fatal asthma. However, little information is available regarding the cellular mechanism (i.e., hyperplasia vs. hypertrophy). Even less information exists regarding the functional consequences of airway smooth muscle remodeling. It would appear that increased airway smooth muscle mass would tend to increase airway narrowing and airflow obstruction. However, the precise effects of increased airway smooth muscle mass on airway narrowing are not known. This review will consider the evidence for airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and hypertrophy in asthma, potential functional effects, and biochemical mechanisms.

  7. Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Contraction and the Basis for Pharmacologic Treatment of Smooth Muscle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brozovich, F.V.; Nicholson, C.J.; Degen, C.V.; Gao, Yuan Z.; Aggarwal, M.

    2016-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell directly drives the contraction of the vascular wall and hence regulates the size of the blood vessel lumen. We review here the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which agonists, therapeutics, and diseases regulate contractility of the vascular smooth muscle cell and we place this within the context of whole body function. We also discuss the implications for personalized medicine and highlight specific potential target molecules that may provide opportunities for the future development of new therapeutics to regulate vascular function. PMID:27037223

  8. Investigation of smoothness-increasing accuracy-conserving filters for improving streamline integration through discontinuous fields.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Michael; Curtis, Sean; Kirby, Robert M; Ryan, Jennifer K

    2008-01-01

    Streamline integration of fields produced by computational fluid mechanics simulations is a commonly used tool for the investigation and analysis of fluid flow phenomena. Integration is often accomplished through the application of ordinary differential equation (ODE) integrators--integrators whose error characteristics are predicated on the smoothness of the field through which the streamline is being integrated--smoothness which is not available at the inter-element level of finite volume and finite element data. Adaptive error control techniques are often used to ameliorate the challenge posed by inter-element discontinuities. As the root of the difficulties is the discontinuous nature of the data, we present a complementary approach of applying smoothness-enhancing accuracy-conserving filters to the data prior to streamline integration. We investigate whether such an approach applied to uniform quadrilateral discontinuous Galerkin (high-order finite volume) data can be used to augment current adaptive error control approaches. We discuss and demonstrate through numerical example the computational trade-offs exhibited when one applies such a strategy.

  9. A generalized smoothness criterion for acoustic-to-articulatory inversion

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Prasanta Kumar; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2010-01-01

    The many-to-one mapping from representations in the speech articulatory space to acoustic space renders the associated acoustic-to-articulatory inverse mapping non-unique. Among various techniques, imposing smoothness constraints on the articulator trajectories is one of the common approaches to handle the non-uniqueness in the acoustic-to-articulatory inversion problem. This is because, articulators typically move smoothly during speech production. A standard smoothness constraint is to minimize the energy of the difference of the articulatory position sequence so that the articulator trajectory is smooth and low-pass in nature. Such a fixed definition of smoothness is not always realistic or adequate for all articulators because different articulators have different degrees of smoothness. In this paper, an optimization formulation is proposed for the inversion problem, which includes a generalized smoothness criterion. Under such generalized smoothness settings, the smoothness parameter can be chosen depending on the specific articulator in a data-driven fashion. In addition, this formulation allows estimation of articulatory positions recursively over time without any loss in performance. Experiments with the MOCHA TIMIT database show that the estimated articulator trajectories obtained using such a generalized smoothness criterion have lower RMS error and higher correlation with the actual measured trajectories compared to those obtained using a fixed smoothness constraint. PMID:20968386

  10. Adaptive capture of expert behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.D.; Barrett, C.L.; Hand, U.; Gordon, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The authors smoothed and captured a set of expert rules with adaptive networks. The motivation for doing this is discussed. (1) Smoothing leads to stabler control actions. (2) For some sets of rules, the evaluation of the rules can be sped up. This is important in large-scale simulations where many intelligent elements are present. (3) Variability of the intelligent elements can be achieved by adjusting the weights in an adaptive network. (4) After capture has occurred, the weights can be adjusted based on performance criteria. The authors thus have the capability of learning a new set of rules that lead to better performance. The set of rules the authors chose to capture were based on a set of threat determining rules for tank commanders. The approach in this paper: (1) They smoothed the rules. The rule set was converted into a simple set of arithmetic statements. Continuous, non-binary inputs, are now permitted. (2) An operational measure of capturability was developed. (3) They chose four candidate networks for the rule set capture: (a) multi-linear network, (b) adaptive partial least squares, (c) connectionist normalized local spline (CNLS) network, and (d) CNLS net with a PLS preprocessor. These networks were able to capture the rule set to within a few percent. For the simple tank rule set, the multi-linear network performed the best. When the rules were modified to include more nonlinear behavior, CNLS net performed better than the other three nets which made linear assumptions. (4) The networks were tested for robustness to input noise. Noise levels of plus or minus 10% had no real effect on the network performance. Noise levels in the plus or minus 30% range degraded performance by a factor of two. Some performance enhancement occurred when the networks were trained with noisy data. (5) The scaling of the evaluation time was calculated. (6) Human variation can be mimicked in all the networks by perturbing the weights.

  11. Smooth Tubercle Bacilli: Neglected Opportunistic Tropical Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Aboubaker Osman, Djaltou; Bouzid, Feriel; Canaan, Stéphane; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Smooth tubercle bacilli (STB) including “Mycobacterium canettii” are members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), which cause non-contagious tuberculosis in human. This group comprises <100 isolates characterized by smooth colonies and cordless organisms. Most STB isolates have been obtained from patients exposed to the Republic of Djibouti but seven isolates, including the three seminal ones obtained by Georges Canetti between 1968 and 1970, were recovered from patients in France, Madagascar, Sub-Sahara East Africa, and French Polynesia. STB form a genetically heterogeneous group of MTBC organisms with large 4.48 ± 0.05 Mb genomes, which may link Mycobacterium kansasii to MTBC organisms. Lack of inter-human transmission suggested a yet unknown environmental reservoir. Clinical data indicate a respiratory tract route of contamination and the digestive tract as an alternative route of contamination. Further epidemiological and clinical studies are warranted to elucidate areas of uncertainty regarding these unusual mycobacteria and the tuberculosis they cause. PMID:26793699

  12. Smooth blasting with the electronic delay detonator

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Ichijo, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Yoshiharu

    1995-12-31

    The authors utilized electronic detonators (EDs) to investigate the effect of high detonator delay accuracy on overbreak, remaining rock damage, and surface smoothness, in comparison with that of long-period delay detonators (0.25 sec interval) PDs. The experiments were conducted in a deep mine, in a test site region composed of very hard granodiorite with a seismic wave velocity of about 6.0 km/sec and a uniaxial compressive strength, uniaxial tensile strength, and Young`s modulus of 300 MPa, 12 MPa, and 73 GPa, respectively. The blasting design was for a test tunnel excavation of 8 m{sup 2} in cross section, with an advance per round of 2.5 m. Five rounds were performed, each with a large-hole cut and perimeter holes in a 0.4-m spacing charged with 20-mm-diameter water gel explosive to obtain low charge concentration. EDs were used in the holes on the perimeter of the right half, and PDs were used in all other holes. Following each shot, the cross section was measured by laser to determine amount of overbreak and surface smoothness. In situ seismic prospecting was used to estimate the depth of damage in the remaining rock, and the damage was further investigated by boring into both side walls.

  13. Sympathetic innervation promotes vascular smooth muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Damon, Deborah H

    2005-06-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is an important modulator of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) growth and function. Several lines of evidence suggest that the SNS also promotes VSM differentiation. The present study tests this hypothesis. Expression of smooth muscle myosin (SM2) and alpha-actin were assessed by Western analysis as indexes of VSM differentiation. SM2 expression (normalized to alpha-actin) in adult innervated rat femoral and tail arteries was 479 +/- 115% of that in noninnervated carotid arteries. Expression of alpha-actin (normalized to GAPDH or total protein) in 30-day-innervated rat femoral arteries was greater than in corresponding noninnervated femoral arteries from guanethidine-sympathectomized rats. SM2 expression (normalized to alpha-actin) in neonatal femoral arteries grown in vitro for 7 days in the presence of sympathetic ganglia was greater than SM2 expression in corresponding arteries grown in the absence of sympathetic ganglia. In VSM-endothelial cell cultures grown in the presence of dissociated sympathetic neurons, alpha-actin (normalized to GAPDH) was 300 +/- 66% of that in corresponding cultures grown in the absence of neurons. This effect was inhibited by an antibody that neutralized the activity of transforming growth factor-beta2. All of these data indicate that sympathetic innervation increased VSM contractile protein expression and thereby suggest that the SNS promotes and/or maintains VSM differentiation.

  14. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  15. Seismic hazard assessment in Central Asia using smoothed seismicity approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Shahid; Bindi, Dino; Zuccolo, Elisa; Mikhailova, Natalia; Danciu, Laurentiu; Parolai, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Central Asia has a long history of large to moderate frequent seismicity and is therefore considered one of the most seismically active regions with a high hazard level in the world. In the hazard map produced at global scale by GSHAP project in 1999( Giardini, 1999), Central Asia is characterized by peak ground accelerations with return period of 475 years as high as 4.8 m/s2. Therefore Central Asia was selected as a target area for EMCA project (Earthquake Model Central Asia), a regional project of GEM (Global Earthquake Model) for this area. In the framework of EMCA, a new generation of seismic hazard maps are foreseen in terms of macro-seismic intensity, in turn to be used to obtain seismic risk maps for the region. Therefore Intensity Prediction Equation (IPE) had been developed for the region based on the distribution of intensity data for different earthquakes occurred in Central Asia since the end of 19th century (Bindi et al. 2011). The same observed intensity distribution had been used to assess the seismic hazard following the site approach (Bindi et al. 2012). In this study, we present the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of Central Asia in terms of MSK-64 based on two kernel estimation methods. We consider the smoothed seismicity approaches of Frankel (1995), modified for considering the adaptive kernel proposed by Stock and Smith (2002), and of Woo (1996), modified for considering a grid of sites and estimating a separate bandwidth for each site. The activity rate maps are shown from Frankel approach showing the effects of fixed and adaptive kernel. The hazard is estimated for rock site condition based on 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years. Maximum intensity of about 9 is observed in the Hindukush region.

  16. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  17. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  18. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  19. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  20. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.