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Sample records for adaptive spatial intercell

  1. Adaptation Driven by Spatial Heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermsen, Rutger

    2011-03-01

    Biological evolution and ecology are intimately linked, because the reproductive success or ``fitness'' of an organism depends crucially on its ecosystem. Yet, most models of evolution (or population genetics) consider homogeneous, fixed-size populations subjected to a constant selection pressure. To move one step beyond such ``mean field'' descriptions, we discuss stochastic models of evolution driven by spatial heterogeneity. We imagine a population whose range is limited by a spatially varying environmental parameter, such as a temperature or the concentration of an antibiotic drug. Individuals in the population replicate, die and migrate stochastically. Also, by mutation, they can adapt to the environmental stress and expand their range. This way, adaptation and niche expansion go hand in hand. This mode of evolution is qualitatively different from the usual notion of a population climbing a fitness gradient. We analytically calculate the rate of adaptation by solving a first passage time problem. Interestingly, the joint effects of reproduction, death, mutation and migration result in two distinct parameter regimes depending on the relative time scales of mutation and migration. We argue that the proposed scenario may be relevant for the rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance. This work was supported by the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Grant PHY-0822283).

  2. Nonuniform spatially adaptive wavelet packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carre, Philippe; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new decomposition scheme for spatially adaptive wavelet packets. Contrary to the double tree algorithm, our method is non-uniform and shift- invariant in the time and frequency domains, and is minimal for an information cost function. We prose some-restrictions to our algorithm to reduce the complexity and permitting us to provide some time-frequency partitions of the signal in agreement with its structure. This new 'totally' non-uniform transform, more adapted than Malvar, Packets or dyadic double-tree decomposition, allows the study of all possible time-frequency partitions with the only restriction that the blocks are rectangular. It permits one to obtain a satisfying Time-Frequency representation, and is applied for the study of EEG signals.

  3. Intercell scheduling: A negotiation approach using multi-agent coalitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yunna; Li, Dongni; Zheng, Dan; Jia, Yunde

    2016-10-01

    Intercell scheduling problems arise as a result of intercell transfers in cellular manufacturing systems. Flexible intercell routes are considered in this article, and a coalition-based scheduling (CBS) approach using distributed multi-agent negotiation is developed. Taking advantage of the extended vision of the coalition agents, the global optimization is improved and the communication cost is reduced. The objective of the addressed problem is to minimize mean tardiness. Computational results show that, compared with the widely used combinatorial rules, CBS provides better performance not only in minimizing the objective, i.e. mean tardiness, but also in minimizing auxiliary measures such as maximum completion time, mean flow time and the ratio of tardy parts. Moreover, CBS is better than the existing intercell scheduling approach for the same problem with respect to the solution quality and computational costs.

  4. Spatial adaptation on video display terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhouse, D.S.; Bailey, I.L.; Howarth, P.A.; Berman, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Spatial adaptation, in the form of a frequency-specific reduction in contrast sensitivity, can occur when the visual system is exposed to certain stimuli. We employed vertical sinusoidal test gratings to investigate adaptation to the horizontal structure of text presented on a standard video display terminal. The parameters of the contrast sensitivity test were selected on the basis of waveform analysis of spatial luminance scans of the text stimulus. We found that subjects exhibited a small, but significant, frequency-specific adaptation consistent with the spatial frequency spectrum of the stimulus. Theoretical and practical significance of this finding are discussed. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Dynamics of Adaptation in Spatially Heterogeneous Metapopulations

    PubMed Central

    Papaïx, Julien; David, Olivier; Lannou, Christian; Monod, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    The selection pressure experienced by organisms often varies across the species range. It is hence crucial to characterise the link between environmental spatial heterogeneity and the adaptive dynamics of species or populations. We address this issue by studying the phenotypic evolution of a spatial metapopulation using an adaptive dynamics approach. The singular strategy is found to be the mean of the optimal phenotypes in each habitat with larger weights for habitats present in large and well connected patches. The presence of spatial clusters of habitats in the metapopulation is found to facilitate specialisation and to increase both the level of adaptation and the evolutionary speed of the population when dispersal is limited. By showing that spatial structures are crucial in determining the specialisation level and the evolutionary speed of a population, our results give insight into the influence of spatial heterogeneity on the niche breadth of species. PMID:23424618

  6. Compartmental Neural Simulations with Spatial Adaptivity

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Michael J.; Spruston, Nelson; Kath, William L.; Chopp, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Since their inception, computational models have become increasingly complex and useful counterparts to laboratory experiments within the field of neuroscience. Today several software programs exist to solve the underlying mathematical system of equations, but such programs typically solve these equations in all parts of a cell (or network of cells) simultaneously, regardless of whether or not all of the cell is active. This approach can be inefficient if only part of the cell is active and many simulations must be performed. We have previously developed a numerical method that provides a framework for spatial adaptivity by making the computations local to individual branches rather than entire cells (Rempe and Chopp, 2006). Once the computation is reduced to the level of branches instead of cells, spatial adaptivity is straightforward: the active regions of the cell are detected and computational effort is focused there, while saving computations in other regions of the cell that are at or near rest. Here we apply the adaptive method to four realistic neuronal simulation scenarios and demonstrate its improved efficiency over non-adaptive methods. We find that the computational cost of the method scales with the amount of activity present in the simulation, rather than the physical size of the system being simulated. For certain problems spatial adaptivity reduces the computation time by up to 80%. PMID:18459041

  7. Adaptive, template moderated, spatially varying statistical classification.

    PubMed

    Warfield, S K; Kaus, M; Jolesz, F A; Kikinis, R

    2000-03-01

    A novel image segmentation algorithm was developed to allow the automatic segmentation of both normal and abnormal anatomy from medical images. The new algorithm is a form of spatially varying statistical classification, in which an explicit anatomical template is used to moderate the segmentation obtained by statistical classification. The algorithm consists of an iterated sequence of spatially varying classification and nonlinear registration, which forms an adaptive, template moderated (ATM), spatially varying statistical classification (SVC). Classification methods and nonlinear registration methods are often complementary, both in the tasks where they succeed and in the tasks where they fail. By integrating these approaches the new algorithm avoids many of the disadvantages of each approach alone while exploiting the combination. The ATM SVC algorithm was applied to several segmentation problems, involving different image contrast mechanisms and different locations in the body. Segmentation and validation experiments were carried out for problems involving the quantification of normal anatomy (MRI of brains of neonates) and pathology of various types (MRI of patients with multiple sclerosis, MRI of patients with brain tumors, MRI of patients with damaged knee cartilage). In each case, the ATM SVC algorithm provided a better segmentation than statistical classification or elastic matching alone.

  8. Adaptive spatial sampling of contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L.A. Jr.

    1999-12-01

    Suppose that a residential neighborhood may have been contaminated by a nearby abandoned hazardous waste site. The suspected contamination consists of elevated soil concentrations o chemicals that are also found in the absence of site-related contamination. How should a risk manager decide which residential properties to sample and which ones to clean? This paper introduces an adaptive spatial sampling approach which uses initial observations to guide subsequent search. Unlike some recent model-based spatial data analysis methods, it does not require any specific statistical model for the spatial distribution of hazards, but instead constructs an increasingly accurate nonparametric approximation to it as sampling proceeds. Possible cost-effective sampling and cleanup decision rules are described by decision parameters such as the number of randomly selected locations used to initialize the process, the number of highest-concentration locations searched around, the number of samples taken at each location, a stopping rule, and a remediation action threshold. These decision parameters are optimized by simulating the performance of each decision rule. The simulation is performed using the data collected so far to impute multiple probably values of unknown soil concentration distributions during each simulation run.

  9. Novel detector design for reducing intercell x-ray cross-talk in the variable resolution x-ray CT scanner: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Arabi, Hosein; Asl, Ali Reza Kamali; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Zaidi, Habib

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The variable resolution x-ray (VRX) CT scanner provides substantial improvement in the spatial resolution by matching the scanner's field of view (FOV) to the size of the object being imaged. Intercell x-ray cross-talk is one of the most important factors limiting the spatial resolution of the VRX detector. In this work, a new cell arrangement in the VRX detector is suggested to decrease the intercell x-ray cross-talk. The idea is to orient the detector cells toward the opening end of the detector. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were used for performance assessment of the oriented cell detector design. Previously published design parameters and simulation results of x-ray cross-talk for the VRX detector were used for model validation using the GATE Monte Carlo package. In the first step, the intercell x-ray cross-talk of the actual VRX detector model was calculated as a function of the FOV. The obtained results indicated an optimum cell orientation angle of 28 deg. to minimize the x-ray cross-talk in the VRX detector. Thereafter, the intercell x-ray cross-talk in the oriented cell detector was modeled and quantified. Results: The intercell x-ray cross-talk in the actual detector model was considerably high, reaching up to 12% at FOVs from 24 to 38 cm. The x-ray cross-talk in the oriented cell detector was less than 5% for all possible FOVs, except 40 cm (maximum FOV). The oriented cell detector could provide considerable decrease in the intercell x-ray cross-talk for the VRX detector, thus leading to significant improvement in the spatial resolution and reduction in the spatial resolution nonuniformity across the detector length. Conclusions: The proposed oriented cell detector is the first dedicated detector design for the VRX CT scanners. Application of this concept to multislice and flat-panel VRX detectors would also result in higher spatial resolution.

  10. Spatial perception and adaptive sonar behavior.

    PubMed

    Aytekin, Murat; Mao, Beatrice; Moss, Cynthia F

    2010-12-01

    Bat echolocation is a dynamic behavior that allows for real-time adaptations in the timing and spectro-temporal design of sonar signals in response to a particular task and environment. To enable detailed, quantitative analyses of adaptive sonar behavior, echolocation call design was investigated in big brown bats, trained to rest on a stationary platform and track a tethered mealworm that approached from a starting distance of about 170 cm in the presence of a stationary sonar distracter. The distracter was presented at different angular offsets and distances from the bat. The results of this study show that the distance and the angular offset of the distracter influence sonar vocalization parameters of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus. Specifically, the bat adjusted its call duration to the closer of two objects, distracter or insect target, and the magnitude of the adjustment depended on the angular offset of the distracter. In contrast, the bat consistently adjusted its call rate to the distance of the insect, even when this target was positioned behind the distracter. The results hold implications for understanding spatial information processing and perception by echolocation.

  11. Spatial perception and adaptive sonar behavior

    PubMed Central

    Aytekin, Murat; Mao, Beatrice; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2010-01-01

    Bat echolocation is a dynamic behavior that allows for real-time adaptations in the timing and spectro-temporal design of sonar signals in response to a particular task and environment. To enable detailed, quantitative analyses of adaptive sonar behavior, echolocation call design was investigated in big brown bats, trained to rest on a stationary platform and track a tethered mealworm that approached from a starting distance of about 170 cm in the presence of a stationary sonar distracter. The distracter was presented at different angular offsets and distances from the bat. The results of this study show that the distance and the angular offset of the distracter influence sonar vocalization parameters of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus. Specifically, the bat adjusted its call duration to the closer of two objects, distracter or insect target, and the magnitude of the adjustment depended on the angular offset of the distracter. In contrast, the bat consistently adjusted its call rate to the distance of the insect, even when this target was positioned behind the distracter. The results hold implications for understanding spatial information processing and perception by echolocation. PMID:21218910

  12. Intercell ohmic contacts for high efficiency multijunction solar converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehr, S. W.; Miller, D. L.; Harris, J. S., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The monolithic multijunction converter is an attractive approach to achieving solar/electric conversion with greater than 30% efficiency. A major technical challenge in the development of such devices is the requirement for low resistance, optically transparent intercell contacts between adjacent junctions. These contacts should transmit, without significant loss, the spectral fraction of the incident sunlight which is not absorbed and converted in the overlying junction materials. Their contact resistances must be low enough to prevent significant I to the 2d power R loss at the designed current density levels. They should also exhibit adequate thermal conductivity to prevent device overheating when subjected to the designed illumination level. Recent encouraging results for the development of such contacts are presented.

  13. Microgeographic adaptation and the spatial scale of evolution.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jonathan L; Urban, Mark C; Bolnick, Daniel I; Skelly, David K

    2014-03-01

    Local adaptation has been a major focus of evolutionary ecologists working across diverse systems for decades. However, little of this research has explored variation at microgeographic scales because it has often been assumed that high rates of gene flow will prevent adaptive divergence at fine spatial scales. Here, we establish a quantitative definition of microgeographic adaptation based on Wright's dispersal neighborhood that standardizes dispersal abilities, enabling this measure to be compared across species. We use this definition to evaluate growing evidence of evolutionary divergence at fine spatial scales. We identify the main mechanisms known to facilitate this adaptation and highlight illustrative examples of microgeographic evolution in nature. Collectively, this evidence requires that we revisit our understanding of the spatial scale of adaptation and consider how microgeographic adaptation and its driving mechanisms can fundamentally alter ecological and evolutionary dynamics in nature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cascaded Effects of Spatial Adaptation in the Early Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Dhruv, Neel T.; Carandini, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Virtually all stages of the visual system exhibit adaptation: neurons adjust their responses based on the recent stimulus history. While some of these adjustments occur at specific stages, others may be inherited from earlier stages. How do adaptation effects cascade along the visual system? We measured spatially selective adaptation at two successive stages in the mouse visual system: visual thalamus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1). This form of adaptation affected both stages but in drastically different ways: in LGN it only changed response gain, while in V1 it also shifted spatial tuning away from the adaptor. These effects, however, are reconciled by a simple model whereby V1 neurons summate LGN inputs with a fixed, unadaptable weighting profile. These results indicate that adaptation effects cascade through the visual system, that this cascading can shape selectivity, and that the rules of integration from one stage to the next are not themselves adaptable. PMID:24507190

  15. Cascaded effects of spatial adaptation in the early visual system.

    PubMed

    Dhruv, Neel T; Carandini, Matteo

    2014-02-05

    Virtually all stages of the visual system exhibit adaptation: neurons adjust their responses based on the recent stimulus history. While some of these adjustments occur at specific stages, others may be inherited from earlier stages. How do adaptation effects cascade along the visual system? We measured spatially selective adaptation at two successive stages in the mouse visual system: visual thalamus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1). This form of adaptation affected both stages but in drastically different ways: in LGN it only changed response gain, while in V1 it also shifted spatial tuning away from the adaptor. These effects, however, are reconciled by a simple model whereby V1 neurons summate LGN inputs with a fixed, unadaptable weighting profile. These results indicate that adaptation effects cascade through the visual system, that this cascading can shape selectivity, and that the rules of integration from one stage to the next are not themselves adaptable.

  16. Interactive spatial tools for the design of regional adaptation strategies.

    PubMed

    Eikelboom, T; Janssen, R

    2013-09-01

    Regional adaptation strategies are plans that consist of feasible measures to shift a region towards a system that is flexible and robust for future climate changes. They apply to regional impacts of climate change and are imbedded in broader planning. Multiple adaptation frameworks and guidelines exist that describe the development stages of regional adaptation strategies. Spatial information plays a key role in the design of adaptation measures as both the effects of climate change as well as many adaptation measures have spatial impacts. Interactive spatial support tools such as drawing, simulation and evaluation tools can assist the development process. This paper presents how to connect tasks derived from the actual development stages to spatial support tools in an interactive multi-stakeholder context. This link helps to decide what spatial tools are suited to support which stages in the development process of regional adaptation strategies. The practical implication of the link is illustrated for three case study workshops in the Netherlands. The regional planning workshops combine expertise from both scientists and stakeholders with an interactive mapping device. This approach triggered participants to share their expertise and stimulated integration of knowledge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spatially constrained adaptive rewiring in cortical networks creates spatially modular small world architectures.

    PubMed

    Jarman, Nicholas; Trengove, Chris; Steur, Erik; Tyukin, Ivan; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2014-12-01

    A modular small-world topology in functional and anatomical networks of the cortex is eminently suitable as an information processing architecture. This structure was shown in model studies to arise adaptively; it emerges through rewiring of network connections according to patterns of synchrony in ongoing oscillatory neural activity. However, in order to improve the applicability of such models to the cortex, spatial characteristics of cortical connectivity need to be respected, which were previously neglected. For this purpose we consider networks endowed with a metric by embedding them into a physical space. We provide an adaptive rewiring model with a spatial distance function and a corresponding spatially local rewiring bias. The spatially constrained adaptive rewiring principle is able to steer the evolving network topology to small world status, even more consistently so than without spatial constraints. Locally biased adaptive rewiring results in a spatial layout of the connectivity structure, in which topologically segregated modules correspond to spatially segregated regions, and these regions are linked by long-range connections. The principle of locally biased adaptive rewiring, thus, may explain both the topological connectivity structure and spatial distribution of connections between neuronal units in a large-scale cortical architecture.

  18. An Adaptation-Induced Repulsion Illusion in Tactile Spatial Perception

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lux; Chan, Arielle; Iqbal, Shah M.; Goldreich, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Following focal sensory adaptation, the perceived separation between visual stimuli that straddle the adapted region is often exaggerated. For instance, in the tilt aftereffect illusion, adaptation to tilted lines causes subsequently viewed lines with nearby orientations to be perceptually repelled from the adapted orientation. Repulsion illusions in the nonvisual senses have been less studied. Here, we investigated whether adaptation induces a repulsion illusion in tactile spatial perception. In a two-interval forced-choice task, participants compared the perceived separation between two point-stimuli applied on the forearms successively. Separation distance was constant on one arm (the reference) and varied on the other arm (the comparison). In Experiment 1, we took three consecutive baseline measurements, verifying that in the absence of manipulation, participants’ distance perception was unbiased across arms and stable across experimental blocks. In Experiment 2, we vibrated a region of skin on the reference arm, verifying that this focally reduced tactile sensitivity, as indicated by elevated monofilament detection thresholds. In Experiment 3, we applied vibration between the two reference points in our distance perception protocol and discovered that this caused an illusory increase in the separation between the points. We conclude that focal adaptation induces a repulsion aftereffect illusion in tactile spatial perception. The illusion provides clues as to how the tactile system represents spatial information. The analogous repulsion aftereffects caused by adaptation in different stimulus domains and sensory systems may point to fundamentally similar strategies for dynamic sensory coding. PMID:28701936

  19. Weighted adaptive spatial filtering in digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yuan; Shi, Tielin; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Yichun; Chen, Kepeng; Liao, Guanglan

    2017-01-01

    Spatial filtering, a key point to realize real-time measurement, is used commonly in digital off-axis holography to extract desired terms. In this paper, we propose a weighted adaptive spatial filtering method by weighting the adaptive filtering window (obtained from image segmentation) based on signal to noise ratio. The advantages of this method are evaluated by simulations and further verified by recorded digital image plane holograms. The results demonstrate that our method is effective in suppressing noise and retaining the sharp edges in the reconstructed 3D profiles.

  20. A spatially and temporally adaptive solution of Richards’ equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Cass T.; Abhishek, Chandra; Farthing, Matthew W.

    2006-04-01

    Efficient, robust simulation of groundwater flow in the unsaturated zone remains computationally expensive, especially for problems characterized by sharp fronts in both space and time. Standard approaches that employ uniform spatial and temporal discretizations for the numerical solution of these problems lead to inefficient and expensive simulations. In this work, we solve Richards' equation using adaptive methods in both space and time. Spatial adaption is based upon a coarse grid solve and a gradient error indicator using a fixed-order approximation. Temporal adaption is accomplished using variable order, variable step size approximations based upon the backward difference formulas up to fifth order. Since the advantages of similar adaptive methods in time are now established, we evaluate our method by comparison with a uniform spatial discretization that is adaptive in time for four different one-dimensional test problems. The numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method provides a robust and efficient alternative to standard approaches for simulating variably saturated flow in one spatial dimension.

  1. Adaptive Gaussian Predictive Process Models for Large Spatial Datasets.

    PubMed

    Guhaniyogi, Rajarshi; Finley, Andrew O; Banerjee, Sudipto; Gelfand, Alan E

    2011-12-01

    Large point referenced datasets occur frequently in the environmental and natural sciences. Use of Bayesian hierarchical spatial models for analyzing these datasets is undermined by onerous computational burdens associated with parameter estimation. Low-rank spatial process models attempt to resolve this problem by projecting spatial effects to a lower-dimensional subspace. This subspace is determined by a judicious choice of "knots" or locations that are fixed a priori. One such representation yields a class of predictive process models (e.g., Banerjee et al., 2008) for spatial and spatial-temporal data. Our contribution here expands upon predictive process models with fixed knots to models that accommodate stochastic modeling of the knots. We view the knots as emerging from a point pattern and investigate how such adaptive specifications can yield more flexible hierarchical frameworks that lead to automated knot selection and substantial computational benefits.

  2. Spatial adaptations for plant foraging: women excel and calories count.

    PubMed

    New, Joshua; Krasnow, Max M; Truxaw, Danielle; Gaulin, Steven J C

    2007-11-07

    We present evidence for an evolved sexually dimorphic adaptation that activates spatial memory and navigation skills in response to fruits, vegetables and other traditionally gatherable sessile food resources. In spite of extensive evidence for a male advantage on a wide variety of navigational tasks, we demonstrate that a simple but ecologically important shift in content can reverse this sex difference. This effect is predicted by and consistent with the theory that a sexual division in ancestral foraging labour selected for gathering-specific spatial mechanisms, some of which are sexually differentiated. The hypothesis that gathering-specific spatial adaptations exist in the human mind is further supported by our finding that spatial memory is preferentially engaged for resources with higher nutritional quality (e.g. caloric density). This result strongly suggests that the underlying mechanisms evolved in part as adaptations for efficient foraging. Together, these results demonstrate that human spatial cognition is content sensitive, domain specific and designed by natural selection to mesh with important regularities of the ancestral world.

  3. Bayesian approaches for adaptive spatial sampling : an example application.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. L.; LePoire, D.; Huttenga, A.; Quinn, J.

    2005-05-25

    BAASS (Bayesian Approaches for Adaptive Spatial Sampling) is a set of computational routines developed to support the design and deployment of spatial sampling programs for delineating contamination footprints, such as those that might result from the accidental or intentional environmental release of radionuclides. BAASS presumes the existence of real-time measurement technologies that provide information quickly enough to affect the progress of data collection. This technical memorandum describes the application of BAASS to a simple example, compares the performance of a BAASS-based program with that of a traditional gridded program, and explores the significance of several of the underlying assumptions required by BAASS. These assumptions include the range of spatial autocorrelation present, the value of prior information, the confidence level required for decision making, and ''inside-out'' versus ''outside-in'' sampling strategies. In the context of the example, adaptive sampling combined with prior information significantly reduced the number of samples required to delineate the contamination footprint.

  4. Localization bias and spatial resolution of adaptive and non-adaptive spatial filters for MEG source reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sekihara, Kensuke; Sahani, Maneesh; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the location bias and the spatial resolution in the reconstruction of a single dipole source by various spatial filtering techniques used for neuromagnetic imaging. We first analyze the location bias for several representative adaptive and non-adaptive spatial filters using their resolution kernels. This analysis theoretically validates previously reported empirical findings that standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) has no location bias. We also find that the minimum-variance spatial filter does exhibit bias in the reconstructed location of a single source, but that this bias is eliminated by using the normalized lead field. We then focus on the comparison of sLORETA and the lead-field normalized minimum-variance spatial filter, and analyze the effect of noise on source location bias. We find that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the measurements determines whether the sLORETA reconstruction has source location bias, while the lead-field normalized minimum-variance spatial filter has no location bias even in the presence of noise. Finally, we compare the spatial resolution for sLORETA and the minimum-variance filter, and show that the minimum-variance filter attains much higher resolution than sLORETA does. The results of these analyses are validated by numerical experiments as well as by reconstructions based on two sets of evoked magnetic responses. PMID:15850724

  5. Localization bias and spatial resolution of adaptive and non-adaptive spatial filters for MEG source reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sekihara, Kensuke; Sahani, Maneesh; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses the location bias and the spatial resolution in the reconstruction of a single dipole source by various spatial filtering techniques used for neuromagnetic imaging. We first analyze the location bias for several representative adaptive and non-adaptive spatial filters using their resolution kernels. This analysis theoretically validates previously reported empirical findings that standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) has no location bias. We also find that the minimum-variance spatial filter does exhibit bias in the reconstructed location of a single source, but that this bias is eliminated by using the normalized lead field. We then focus on the comparison of sLORETA and the lead-field normalized minimum-variance spatial filter, and analyze the effect of noise on source location bias. We find that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the measurements determines whether the sLORETA reconstruction has source location bias, while the lead-field normalized minimum-variance spatial filter has no location bias even in the presence of noise. Finally, we compare the spatial resolution for sLORETA and the minimum-variance filter, and show that the minimum-variance filter attains much higher resolution than sLORETA does. The results of these analyses are validated by numerical experiments as well as by reconstructions based on two sets of evoked magnetic responses.

  6. Prism adaptation for spatial neglect after stroke: translational practice gaps.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A M; Goedert, Kelly M; Basso, Julia C

    2012-10-01

    Spatial neglect increases hospital morbidity and costs in around 50% of the 795,000 people per year in the USA who survive stroke, and an urgent need exists to reduce the care burden of this condition. However, effective acute treatment for neglect has been elusive. In this article, we review 48 studies of a treatment of intense neuroscience interest: prism adaptation training. Due to its effects on spatial motor 'aiming', prism adaptation training may act to reduce neglect-related disability. However, research failed, first, to suggest methods to identify the 50-75% of patients who respond to treatment; second, to measure short-term and long-term outcomes in both mechanism-specific and functionally valid ways; third, to confirm treatment utility during the critical first 8 weeks poststroke; and last, to base treatment protocols on systematic dose-response data. Thus, considerable investment in prism adaptation research has not yet touched the fundamentals needed for clinical implementation. We suggest improved standards and better spatial motor models for further research, so as to clarify when, how and for whom prism adaptation should be applied.

  7. Prism adaptation for spatial neglect after stroke: translational practice gaps

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, A. M.; Goedert, Kelly M.; Basso, Julia C.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial neglect increases hospital morbidity and costs in around 50% of the 795,000 people per year in the USA who survive stroke, and an urgent need exists to reduce the care burden of this condition. However, effective acute treatment for neglect has been elusive. In this article, we review 48 studies of a treatment of intense neuroscience interest: prism adaptation training. Due to its effects on spatial motor ‘aiming’, prism adaptation training may act to reduce neglect-related disability. However, research failed, first, to suggest methods to identify the 50–75% of patients who respond to treatment; second, to measure short-term and long-term outcomes in both mechanism-specific and functionally valid ways; third, to confirm treatment utility during the critical first 8 weeks poststroke; and last, to base treatment protocols on systematic dose–response data. Thus, considerable investment in prism adaptation research has not yet touched the fundamentals needed for clinical implementation. We suggest improved standards and better spatial motor models for further research, so as to clarify when, how and for whom prism adaptation should be applied. PMID:22926312

  8. Radiotherapy Adapted to Spatial and Temporal Variability in Tumor Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Sovik, Aste; Malinen, Eirik . E-mail: emalinen@fys.uio.no; Skogmo, Hege K.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility and clinical potential of adapting radiotherapy to temporal and spatial variations in tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: Repeated dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (DCEMR) images were taken of a canine sarcoma during the course of fractionated radiation therapy. The tumor contrast enhancement was assumed to represent the oxygen distribution. The IMRT plans were retrospectively adapted to the DCEMR images by employing tumor dose redistribution. Optimized nonuniform tumor dose distributions were calculated and compared with a uniform dose distribution delivering the same integral dose to the tumor. Clinical outcome was estimated from tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling. Results: The biologically adapted treatment was found to give a substantial increase in TCP compared with conventional radiotherapy, even when only pretreatment images were used as basis for the treatment planning. The TCP was further increased by repeated replanning during the course of treatment, and replanning twice a week was found to give near optimal TCP. Random errors in patient positioning were found to give a small decrease in TCP, whereas systematic errors were found to reduce TCP substantially. NTCP for the adapted treatment was similar to or lower than for the conventional treatment, both for parallel and serial normal tissue structures. Conclusion: Biologically adapted radiotherapy is estimated to improve treatment outcome of tumors having spatial and temporal variations in radiosensitivity.

  9. Adaptation to implied tilt: extensive spatial extrapolation of orientation gradients

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Neil W.; Webb, Ben S.

    2013-01-01

    To extract the global structure of an image, the visual system must integrate local orientation estimates across space. Progress is being made toward understanding this integration process, but very little is known about whether the presence of structure exerts a reciprocal influence on local orientation coding. We have previously shown that adaptation to patterns containing circular or radial structure induces tilt-aftereffects (TAEs), even in locations where the adapting pattern was occluded. These spatially “remote” TAEs have novel tuning properties and behave in a manner consistent with adaptation to the local orientation implied by the circular structure (but not physically present) at a given test location. Here, by manipulating the spatial distribution of local elements in noisy circular textures, we demonstrate that remote TAEs are driven by the extrapolation of orientation structure over remarkably large regions of visual space (more than 20°). We further show that these effects are not specific to adapting stimuli with polar orientation structure, but require a gradient of orientation change across space. Our results suggest that mechanisms of visual adaptation exploit orientation gradients to predict the local pattern content of unfilled regions of space. PMID:23882243

  10. Regional spatially adaptive total variation super-resolution with spatial information filtering and clustering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Liangpei; Shen, Huanfeng

    2013-06-01

    Total variation is used as a popular and effective image prior model in the regularization-based image processing fields. However, as the total variation model favors a piecewise constant solution, the processing result under high noise intensity in the flat regions of the image is often poor, and some pseudoedges are produced. In this paper, we develop a regional spatially adaptive total variation model. Initially, the spatial information is extracted based on each pixel, and then two filtering processes are added to suppress the effect of pseudoedges. In addition, the spatial information weight is constructed and classified with k-means clustering, and the regularization strength in each region is controlled by the clustering center value. The experimental results, on both simulated and real datasets, show that the proposed approach can effectively reduce the pseudoedges of the total variation regularization in the flat regions, and maintain the partial smoothness of the high-resolution image. More importantly, compared with the traditional pixel-based spatial information adaptive approach, the proposed region-based spatial information adaptive total variation model can better avoid the effect of noise on the spatial information extraction, and maintains robustness with changes in the noise intensity in the super-resolution process.

  11. A COMPARISON OF INTERCELL METRICS ON DISCRETE GLOBAL GRID SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A discrete global grid system (DGGS) is a spatial data model that aids in global research by serving as a framework for environmental modeling, monitoring and sampling across the earth at multiple spatial scales. Topological and geometric criteria have been proposed to evaluate a...

  12. A COMPARISON OF INTERCELL METRICS ON DISCRETE GLOBAL GRID SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A discrete global grid system (DGGS) is a spatial data model that aids in global research by serving as a framework for environmental modeling, monitoring and sampling across the earth at multiple spatial scales. Topological and geometric criteria have been proposed to evaluate a...

  13. Spatially heterogeneous stochasticity and the adaptive diversification of dormancy.

    PubMed

    Rajon, E; Venner, S; Menu, F

    2009-10-01

    Diversified bet-hedging, a strategy that leads several individuals with the same genotype to express distinct phenotypes in a given generation, is now well established as a common evolutionary response to environmental stochasticity. Life-history traits defined as diversified bet-hedging (e.g. germination or diapause strategies) display marked differences between populations in spatial proximity. In order to find out whether such differences can be explained by local adaptations to spatially heterogeneous environmental stochasticity, we explored the evolution of bet-hedging dormancy strategies in a metapopulation using a two-patch model with patch differences in stochastic juvenile survival. We found that spatial differences in the level of environmental stochasticity, restricted dispersal, increased fragmentation and intermediate survival during dormancy all favour the adaptive diversification of bet-hedging dormancy strategies. Density dependency also plays a major role in the diversification of dormancy strategies because: (i) it may interact locally with environmental stochasticity and amplify its effects; however, (ii) it can also generate chaotic population dynamics that may impede diversification. Our work proposes new hypotheses to explain the spatial patterns of bet-hedging strategies that we hope will encourage new empirical studies of this topic.

  14. Spatially adaptive regularized iterative high-resolution image reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Won Bae; Park, Min K.; Kang, Moon Gi

    2000-12-01

    High resolution images are often required in applications such as remote sensing, frame freeze in video, military and medical imaging. Digital image sensor arrays, which are used for image acquisition in many imaging systems, are not dense enough to prevent aliasing, so the acquired images will be degraded by aliasing effects. To prevent aliasing without loss of resolution, a dense detector array is required. But it may be very costly or unavailable, thus, many imaging systems are designed to allow some level of aliasing during image acquisition. The purpose of our work is to reconstruct an unaliased high resolution image from the acquired aliased image sequence. In this paper, we propose a spatially adaptive regularized iterative high resolution image reconstruction algorithm for blurred, noisy and down-sampled image sequences. The proposed approach is based on a Constrained Least Squares (CLS) high resolution reconstruction algorithm, with spatially adaptive regularization operators and parameters. These regularization terms are shown to improve the reconstructed image quality by forcing smoothness, while preserving edges in the reconstructed high resolution image. Accurate sub-pixel motion registration is the key of the success of the high resolution image reconstruction algorithm. However, sub-pixel motion registration may have some level of registration error. Therefore, a reconstruction algorithm which is robust against the registration error is required. The registration algorithm uses a gradient based sub-pixel motion estimator which provides shift information for each of the recorded frames. The proposed algorithm is based on a technique of high resolution image reconstruction, and it solves spatially adaptive regularized constrained least square minimization functionals. In this paper, we show that the reconstruction algorithm gives dramatic improvements in the resolution of the reconstructed image and is effective in handling the aliased information. The

  15. Adaptive conductance filtering for spatially varying noise in PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padfield, Dirk R.; Manjeshwar, Ravindra

    2006-03-01

    PET images that have been reconstructed with unregularized algorithms are commonly smoothed with linear Gaussian filters to control noise. Since these filters are spatially invariant, they degrade feature contrast in the image, compromising lesion detectability. Edge-preserving smoothing filters can differentially preserve edges and features while smoothing noise. These filters assume spatially uniform noise models. However, the noise in PET images is spatially variant, approximately following a Poisson behavior. Therefore, different regions of a PET image need smoothing by different amounts. In this work, we introduce an adaptive filter, based on anisotropic diffusion, designed specifically to overcome this problem. In this algorithm, the diffusion is varied according to a local estimate of the noise using either the local median or the grayscale image opening to weight the conductance parameter. The algorithm is thus tailored to the task of smoothing PET images, or any image with Poisson-like noise characteristics, by adapting itself to varying noise while preserving significant features in the image. This filter was compared with Gaussian smoothing and a representative anisotropic diffusion method using three quantitative task-relevant metrics calculated on simulated PET images with lesions in the lung and liver. The contrast gain and noise ratio metrics were used to measure the ability to do accurate quantitation; the Channelized Hotelling Observer lesion detectability index was used to quantify lesion detectability. The adaptive filter improved the signal-to-noise ratio by more than 45% and lesion detectability by more than 55% over the Gaussian filter while producing "natural" looking images and consistent image quality across different anatomical regions.

  16. Inter-cell interference mitigation in multi-cellular visible light communications.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sun-Young; Kwon, Do-Hoon; Yang, Se-Hoon; Han, Sang-Kook

    2016-04-18

    Inter-cell interference hinders multi-cellular optical wireless communication to support various applications. We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a multicarrier-based cell partitioning scheme, combined with frequency reuse, which could be effective in optical communications although it is inefficient in RF wireless communications. For multicarrier-based cell partitioning, Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-based multiple access (OFDMA) was employed to accommodate multi-cellular optical wireless communications without a large guard band between adjacent cells and without additional RF components. Moreover, we employed filter bank-based multicarrier (FBMC) to mitigate inter-cell interference generated in OFDMA-based cell partitioning due to asynchronous signals originated from RF path difference. By using FBMC-based cell partitioning, inter-cell interference could be effectively mitigated as well as capacity and spectral efficiency were improved about 1.5 times compared to those of OFDMA. Because no cyclic prefix (CP) is required in FBMC, the improvement factor could be increased if there is a large RF path difference between lighting cells. Moreover, it could be a stronger solution when many neighboring cells exist causing large interference. The proposed multicarrier-based cell partitioning combined with FBMC will effectively support visible light communication (VLC)-based localization-based services (LBS) and indoor positioning system by transparently providing trilateration-based positioning method.

  17. Spatial downscaling of precipitation using adaptable random forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaogang; Chaney, Nathaniel W.; Schleiss, Marc; Sheffield, Justin

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces Prec-DWARF (Precipitation Downscaling With Adaptable Random Forests), a novel machine-learning based method for statistical downscaling of precipitation. Prec-DWARF sets up a nonlinear relationship between precipitation at fine resolution and covariates at coarse/fine resolution, based on the advanced binary tree method known as Random Forests (RF). In addition to a single RF, we also consider a more advanced implementation based on two independent RFs which yield better results for extreme precipitation. Hourly gauge-radar precipitation data at 0.125° from NLDAS-2 are used to conduct synthetic experiments with different spatial resolutions (0.25°, 0.5°, and 1°). Quantitative evaluation of these experiments demonstrates that Prec-DWARF consistently outperforms the baseline (i.e., bilinear interpolation in this case) and can reasonably reproduce the spatial and temporal patterns, occurrence and distribution of observed precipitation fields. However, Prec-DWARF with a single RF significantly underestimates precipitation extremes and often cannot correctly recover the fine-scale spatial structure, especially for the 1° experiments. Prec-DWARF with a double RF exhibits improvement in the simulation of extreme precipitation as well as its spatial and temporal structures, but variogram analyses show that the spatial and temporal variability of the downscaled fields are still strongly underestimated. Covariate importance analysis shows that the most important predictors for the downscaling are the coarse-scale precipitation values over adjacent grid cells as well as the distance to the closest dry grid cell (i.e., the dry drift). The encouraging results demonstrate the potential of Prec-DWARF and machine-learning based techniques in general for the statistical downscaling of precipitation.

  18. An Intercell Interference Cancellation Method for Eigen-Beamforming Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jaewon; Jin, Gwuieon; Sung, Wonjin

    Eigen-beamforming (EB) transmission for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems is an effective means to maximize the receiver signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in a noise-limited environment, but suffers a performance degradation when strong interference signals exist. In this letter, we propose an interference cancellation method for EB signals by constructing a new receive beamforming vector which jointly utilizes the EB matrix and minimum mean-square error (MMSE) spatial demultiplexing. The proposed method is shown to outperform the conventional EB receiver in the entire cell range, with a significant increase in the effective signal-to-interference plus noise ratio (SINR) near the cell boundary.

  19. Spatial Compression Impairs Prism Adaptation in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Scriven, Rachel J.; Newport, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Neglect patients typically present with gross inattention to one side of space following damage to the contralateral hemisphere. While prism-adaptation (PA) is effective in ameliorating some neglect behaviors, the mechanisms involved and their relationship to neglect remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that conscious strategic control (SC) processes in PA may be impaired in neglect patients, who are also reported to show extraordinarily long aftereffects compared to healthy participants. Determining the underlying cause of these effects may be the key to understanding therapeutic benefits. Alternative accounts suggest that reduced SC might result from a failure to detect prism-induced reaching errors properly either because (a) the size of the error is underestimated in compressed visual space or (b) pathologically increased error-detection thresholds reduce the requirement for error correction. The purpose of this study was to model these two alternatives in healthy participants and to examine whether SC and subsequent aftereffects were abnormal compared to standard PA. Each participant completed three PA procedures within a MIRAGE mediated reality environment with direction errors recorded before, during and after adaptation. During PA, visual feedback of the reach could be compressed, perturbed by noise, or represented veridically. Compressed visual space significantly reduced SC and aftereffects compared to control and noise conditions. These results support recent observations in neglect patients, suggesting that a distortion of spatial representation may successfully model neglect and explain neglect performance while adapting to prisms. PMID:23675332

  20. Spatial structure enhanced cooperation in dissatisfied adaptive snowdrift game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Xu, Chen; Hui, Pak Ming

    2013-05-01

    The dissatisfied adaptive snowdrift game (DASG) describes the adaptive actions driven by the level of dissatisfaction when two connected agents interact. We study the DASG in static networks both numerically and analytically. In a random network of uniform degree k, the system evolves into a homogeneous state consisting only of cooperators when the cost-to-benefit ratio r < r 0 and a mixed phase with the coexistence of cooperators and defectors when r > r 0, where r 0 is a threshold. For an infinite population, the large k limit corresponding to the well-mixed case is solved analytically. A theory is developed based on the pair approximation. It gives the frequency of cooperation f c and the densities of different pairs that are in good agreement with simulation results. The results revealed that f c is enhanced in networked populations with a finite k, when compared with the well-mixed case. The reasons that the theory works well for the present model are traced back to the weak spatial correlation implied by the random network and the fact that the adaptive actions in DASG are driven only by the strategy pairs. The results shed light on the class of models that the pair approximation is applicable.

  1. Contribution of Cerebellar Sensorimotor Adaptation to Hippocampal Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Jean-Baptiste; Sheynikhovich, Denis; Duvelle, Éléonore; Arleo, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation. PMID:22485133

  2. Adaptive spatially dependent weighting scheme for tomosynthesis reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levakhina, Yulia; Duschka, Robert; Vogt, Florian; Barkhausen, JOErg; Buzug, Thorsten M.

    2012-03-01

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is an x-ray limited-angle imaging technique. An accurate image reconstruction in tomosynthesis is a challenging task due to the violation of the tomographic sufficiency conditions. A classical "shift-and-add" algorithm (or simple backprojection) suffers from blurring artifacts, produced by structures located above and below the plane of interest. The artifact problem becomes even more prominent in the presence of materials and tissues with a high x-ray attenuation, such as bones, microcalcifications or metal. The focus of the current work is on reduction of ghosting artifacts produced by bones in the musculoskeletal tomosynthesis. A novel dissimilarity concept and a modified backprojection with an adaptive spatially dependent weighting scheme (ωBP) are proposed. Simulated data of software phantom, a structured hardware phantom and a human hand raw-data acquired with a Siemens Mammomat Inspiration tomosynthesis system were reconstructed using conventional backprojection algorithm and the new ωBP-algorithm. The comparison of the results to the non-weighted case demonstrates the potential of the proposed weighted backprojection to reduce the blurring artifacts in musculoskeletal DT. The proposed weighting scheme is not limited to the tomosynthesis limitedangle geometry. It can also be adapted for Computed Tomography (CT) and included in iterative reconstruction algorithms (e.g. SART).

  3. Efficiency enhancement of RELAP/PANBOX using adaptive spatial kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, C.J.; Cacuci, D.G.; Finnemann, H.B.

    1996-12-31

    The coupled RELAP/PANBOX code system was developed to analyze more accurately those pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant transients in which the core neutron flux distribution changes significantly in time. Examples of such transients are those initiated by steam-line breaks and rapid boron dilution events. On the other hand, instances may occur during long thermal-hydraulic transients when the neutron flux shape varies slowly in time. During such slow transients, a one-dimensional (1-D) model in the axial direction or a point-kinetics model, rather than a three-dimensional (3-D) one, would suffice to calculate the power distribution. To switch between 3-D, 1-D, and/or point-kinetics models, it is very advantageous to generate the respective 1-D and/or point-kinetics parameters automatically and internally within the code. In this paper, the authors describe the features of an adaptive spatial kinetics algorithm that performs the switching process between 3-D and 1-D and/or point-kinetics models according to the physical phenomena underlying the specific plant transient under investigation. The adaptive algorithm has been implemented as a module of the core simulation package PANBOX and therefore does not disturb the subroutines that couple PANBOX to RELAP.

  4. Fast unsupervised Bayesian image segmentation with adaptive spatial regularisation.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Marcelo; McLaughlin, Stephen

    2017-03-15

    This paper presents a new Bayesian estimation technique for hidden Potts-Markov random fields with unknown regularisation parameters, with application to fast unsupervised K-class image segmentation. The technique is derived by first removing the regularisation parameter from the Bayesian model by marginalisation, followed by a small-variance-asymptotic (SVA) analysis in which the spatial regularisation and the integer-constrained terms of the Potts model are decoupled. The evaluation of this SVA Bayesian estimator is then relaxed into a problem that can be computed efficiently by iteratively solving a convex total-variation denoising problem and a least-squares clustering (K-means) problem, both of which can be solved straightforwardly, even in high-dimensions, and with parallel computing techniques. This leads to a fast fully unsupervised Bayesian image segmentation methodology in which the strength of the spatial regularisation is adapted automatically to the observed image during the inference procedure, and that can be easily applied in large 2D and 3D scenarios or in applications requiring low computing times. Experimental results on synthetic and real images, as well as extensive comparisons with state-ofthe- art algorithms, confirm that the proposed methodology offer extremely fast convergence and produces accurate segmentation results, with the important additional advantage of self-adjusting regularisation parameters.

  5. Practical issues for the use of liquid crystal spatial light modulators in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bold, G. T.; Barnes, T. H.; Gourlay, J.; Sharples, R. M.; Haskell, T. G.

    1998-03-01

    Low cost, accurate, high resolution spatial light modulators are of increasing interest for adaptive optics applications. Most adaptive optics systems currently use expensive segmented or deformable mirrors. Nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulators have been suggested as possible substitutes for these mirrors as the phase modulating arrays in adaptive optics systems. This paper discusses broad wavelength band, and polarisation insensitive operation of two different liquid crystal spatial light modulators currently available and under investigation as possible phase modulating arrays for adaptive optics systems. The results of our investigations give a good indication of how the devices will operate in practical adaptive optics systems.

  6. RF impedance measurements on the DARHT-II accelerator intercell assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William M.; Eylon, Shmuel; Briggs, Richard

    2003-05-05

    We report upon recent experimental measurements made of RF properties of the intercell assembly of the second axis accelerator[1] of Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at LANL. The intercells provide both pumping and diagnostic access to the main DARHT-II beamline. Their design includes a pumping plenum separated from the main beam pipe by return current rods together with RF shielding provided by a copper-coated stainless steel mesh. Measurements using the twin lead technique (see Ref. [2]) at low frequencies (f < 200 MHz) suggest a constant value for the ratio h of the radial and azimuthal magnetic field components to which the transverse impedance is linearly related. We find that these results compare favorably to predictions from a simple analytic, lumped circuit model which includes the effects of the mesh and return current rods. We also present RF loop-to-loop frequency scans above beam pipe cutoff ({approx}600 MHz) showing the existence of many RF modes with relatively high Q's.

  7. Flicker adaptation or superimposition raises the apparent spatial frequency of coarse test gratings.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Sae; Giaschi, Deborah; Anstis, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Independent channels respond to both the spatial and temporal characteristics of visual stimuli. Gratings <3 cycles per degree (cpd) are sensed by transient channels that prefer intermittent stimulation, while gratings >3 cpd are sensed by sustained channels that prefer steady stimulation. From this we predict that adaptation to a spatially uniform flickering field will selectively adapt the transient channels and raise the apparent spatial frequency of coarse sinusoidal gratings. Observers adapted to a spatially uniform field whose upper or lower half was steady and whose other half was flickering. They then adjusted the spatial frequency of a stationary test (matching) grating on the previously unmodulated half field until it matched the apparent spatial frequency of a grating falling on the previously flickering half field. The adapting field flickered at 8 Hz and the spatial frequency of the gratings was varied in octave steps from 0.25 to 16 cpd. As predicted, adapting to flicker raised the apparent spatial frequency of the test gratings. The aftereffect reached a peak of 11% between 0.5 and 1 cpd and disappeared above 4 cpd. We also observed that superimposed 10 Hz luminance flicker raised the apparent spatial frequency of 0.5 cpd test gratings. The effect was not seen with slower flicker or finer test gratings. Altogether, our study suggests that apparent spatial frequency is determined by the balance between transient and sustained channels and that an imbalance between the channels caused by flicker can alter spatial frequency perception.

  8. Poststroke hemiparesis impairs the rate but not magnitude of adaptation of spatial and temporal locomotor features.

    PubMed

    Savin, Douglas N; Tseng, Shih-Chiao; Whitall, Jill; Morton, Susanne M

    2013-01-01

    Persons with stroke and hemiparesis walk with a characteristic pattern of spatial and temporal asymmetry that is resistant to most traditional interventions. It was recently shown in nondisabled persons that the degree of walking symmetry can be readily altered via locomotor adaptation. However, it is unclear whether stroke-related brain damage affects the ability to adapt spatial or temporal gait symmetry. Determine whether locomotor adaptation to a novel swing phase perturbation is impaired in persons with chronic stroke and hemiparesis. Participants with ischemic stroke (14) and nondisabled controls (12) walked on a treadmill before, during, and after adaptation to a unilateral perturbing weight that resisted forward leg movement. Leg kinematics were measured bilaterally, including step length and single-limb support (SLS) time symmetry, limb angle center of oscillation, and interlimb phasing, and magnitude of "initial" and "late" locomotor adaptation rates were determined. All participants had similar magnitudes of adaptation and similar initial adaptation rates both spatially and temporally. All 14 participants with stroke and baseline asymmetry temporarily walked with improved SLS time symmetry after adaptation. However, late adaptation rates poststroke were decreased (took more strides to achieve adaptation) compared with controls. Mild to moderate hemiparesis does not interfere with the initial acquisition of novel symmetrical gait patterns in both the spatial and temporal domains, though it does disrupt the rate at which "late" adaptive changes are produced. Impairment of the late, slow phase of learning may be an important rehabilitation consideration in this patient population.

  9. Two-terminal monolithic InP-based tandem solar cells with tunneling intercell ohmic connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C. C.; Chang, P. T.; Emery, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    A monolithic two-terminal InP/InGaAsP tandem solar cell was successfully fabricated. This tandem solar cell consists of a p/n InP homojunction top subcell and a 0.95 eV p/n InGaAsP homojunction bottom subcell. A patterned 0.95 eV n(+)/p(+) InGaAsP tunnel diode was employed as an intercell ohmic connection. The solar cell structure was prepared by two-step liquid phase epitaxial growth. Under one sun, AM1.5 global illumination, the best tandem cell delivered a conversion efficiency of 14.8 pct.

  10. SU-F-I-10: Spatially Local Statistics for Adaptive Image Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Iliopoulos, AS; Sun, X; Floros, D; Zhang, Y; Yin, FF; Ren, L; Pitsianis, N

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To facilitate adaptive image filtering operations, addressing spatial variations in both noise and signal. Such issues are prevalent in cone-beam projections, where physical effects such as X-ray scattering result in spatially variant noise, violating common assumptions of homogeneous noise and challenging conventional filtering approaches to signal extraction and noise suppression. Methods: We present a computational mechanism for probing into and quantifying the spatial variance of noise throughout an image. The mechanism builds a pyramid of local statistics at multiple spatial scales; local statistical information at each scale includes (weighted) mean, median, standard deviation, median absolute deviation, as well as histogram or dynamic range after local mean/median shifting. Based on inter-scale differences of local statistics, the spatial scope of distinguishable noise variation is detected in a semi- or un-supervised manner. Additionally, we propose and demonstrate the incorporation of such information in globally parametrized (i.e., non-adaptive) filters, effectively transforming the latter into spatially adaptive filters. The multi-scale mechanism is materialized by efficient algorithms and implemented in parallel CPU/GPU architectures. Results: We demonstrate the impact of local statistics for adaptive image processing and analysis using cone-beam projections of a Catphan phantom, fitted within an annulus to increase X-ray scattering. The effective spatial scope of local statistics calculations is shown to vary throughout the image domain, necessitating multi-scale noise and signal structure analysis. Filtering results with and without spatial filter adaptation are compared visually, illustrating improvements in imaging signal extraction and noise suppression, and in preserving information in low-contrast regions. Conclusion: Local image statistics can be incorporated in filtering operations to equip them with spatial adaptivity to spatial

  11. How does spatial dispersal network affect the evolution of parasite local adaptation?

    PubMed

    Vogwill, Tom; Fenton, Andy; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2010-06-01

    Studying patterns of parasite local adaptation can provide insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of host-parasite coevolution. Many factors, both biotic and abiotic, have been identified that influence parasite local adaptation. In particular, dispersal and population structuring are considered important determinants of local adaptation. We investigated how the shape of the spatial dispersal network within experimental landscapes affected local adaptation of a bacteriophage parasite to its bacterial host. Regardless of landscape topology, dispersal always led to the evolution of phages with broader infectivity range. However, when the spatial dispersal network resulted in spatial variation in the breadth of phage infectivity range, significant levels of parasite local adaptation and local maladaptation were detected within the same landscape using the local versus foreign definition of local adaptation. By contrast, local adaptation was not detected using the home versus away or local versus global definitions of local adaptation. This suggests that spatial dispersal networks may play an important role in driving parasite local adaptation, particularly when the shape of the dispersal network generates nonuniform levels of host resistance or parasite infectivity throughout a species' range.

  12. Spatial and temporal adaptive procedures for the unsteady aerodynamic analysis of airfoils using unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, John R.; Batina, John T.; Williams, Marc H.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm which combines spatial and temporal adaption for the time integration of the two-dimensional Euler equations on unstructured meshes of triangles is presented. Spatial adaption involves mesh enrichment to add elements in high gradient regions of the flow and mesh coarsening to remove elements where they are no longer needed. Temporal adaption is a time accurate, local time stepping procedure which integrates the flow equations in each cell according to the local numerical stability constraint. The flow solver utilizes a four-stage Runge-Kutta time integration scheme with an upwind flux-split spatial discretization. Results obtained using spatial and temporal adaption indicate that highly accurate solutions can be obtained with a significant savings of computing time over global time stepping.

  13. Genomewide Spatial Correspondence Between Nonsynonymous Divergence and Neutral Polymorphism Reveals Extensive Adaptation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, J. Michael; Sella, Guy; Davis, Jerel C.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of recurrent selective sweeps is a spatially heterogeneous reduction in neutral polymorphism throughout the genome. The pattern of reduction depends on the selective advantage and recurrence rate of the sweeps. Because many adaptive substitutions responsible for these sweeps also contribute to nonsynonymous divergence, the spatial distribution of nonsynonymous divergence also reflects the distribution of adaptive substitutions. Thus, the spatial correspondence between neutral polymorphism and nonsynonymous divergence may be especially informative about the process of adaptation. Here we study this correspondence using genomewide polymorphism data from Drosophila simulans and the divergence between D. simulans and D. melanogaster. Focusing on highly recombining portions of the autosomes, at a spatial scale appropriate to the study of selective sweeps, we find that neutral polymorphism is both lower and, as measured by a new statistic QS, less homogeneous where nonsynonymous divergence is higher and that the spatial structure of this correlation is best explained by the action of strong recurrent selective sweeps. We introduce a method to infer, from the spatial correspondence between polymorphism and divergence, the rate and selective strength of adaptation. Our results independently confirm a high rate of adaptive substitution (∼1/3000 generations) and newly suggest that many adaptations are of surprisingly great selective effect (∼1%), reducing the effective population size by ∼15% even in highly recombining regions of the genome. PMID:18073425

  14. A Heat Vulnerability Index: Spatial Patterns of Exposure, Sensitivity and Adaptive Capacity for Santiago de Chile.

    PubMed

    Inostroza, Luis; Palme, Massimo; de la Barrera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will worsen the high levels of urban vulnerability in Latin American cities due to specific environmental stressors. Some impacts of climate change, such as high temperatures in urban environments, have not yet been addressed through adaptation strategies, which are based on poorly supported data. These impacts remain outside the scope of urban planning. New spatially explicit approaches that identify highly vulnerable urban areas and include specific adaptation requirements are needed in current urban planning practices to cope with heat hazards. In this paper, a heat vulnerability index is proposed for Santiago, Chile. The index was created using a GIS-based spatial information system and was constructed from spatially explicit indexes for exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity levels derived from remote sensing data and socio-economic information assessed via principal component analysis (PCA). The objective of this study is to determine the levels of heat vulnerability at local scales by providing insights into these indexes at the intra city scale. The results reveal a spatial pattern of heat vulnerability with strong variations among individual spatial indexes. While exposure and adaptive capacities depict a clear spatial pattern, sensitivity follows a complex spatial distribution. These conditions change when examining PCA results, showing that sensitivity is more robust than exposure and adaptive capacity. These indexes can be used both for urban planning purposes and for proposing specific policies and measures that can help minimize heat hazards in highly dynamic urban areas. The proposed methodology can be applied to other Latin American cities to support policy making.

  15. Spatial frequency-specific contrast adaptation originates in the primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Duong, Thang; Freeman, Ralph D

    2007-07-01

    Adaptation to a high-contrast grating stimulus causes reduced sensitivity to subsequent presentation of a visual stimulus with similar spatial characteristics. This behavioral finding has been attributed by neurophysiological studies to processes within the visual cortex. However, some evidence indicates that contrast adaptation phenomena are also found in early visual pathways. Adaptation effects have been reported in retina and lateral geniculation nucleus (LGN). It is possible that these early pathways could be the physiological origin of the cortical adaptation effect. To study this, we recorded from single neurons in the cat's LGN. We find that contrast adaptation in the LGN, unlike that in the visual cortex, is not spatial frequency specific, i.e., adaptation effects apply to a broad range of spatial frequencies. In addition, aside from the amplitude attenuation, the shape of spatial frequency tuning curves of LGN cells is not affected by contrast adaptation. Again, these findings are unlike those found for cells in the visual cortex. Together, these results demonstrate that pattern specific contrast adaptation is a cortical process.

  16. Method and system for spatial data input, manipulation and distribution via an adaptive wireless transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ray (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and system for spatial data manipulation input and distribution via an adaptive wireless transceiver. The method and system include a wireless transceiver for automatically and adaptively controlling wireless transmissions using a Waveform-DNA method. The wireless transceiver can operate simultaneously over both the short and long distances. The wireless transceiver is automatically adaptive and wireless devices can send and receive wireless digital and analog data from various sources rapidly in real-time via available networks and network services.

  17. The Impact of Spatial Structure on Viral Genomic Diversity Generated during Adaptation to Thermal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Dilara; Wiss, Valorie R.; Deckert, Gail E.; Green, Danielle; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Wichman, Holly A.; Brown, Celeste J.; Krone, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Most clinical and natural microbial communities live and evolve in spatially structured environments. When changes in environmental conditions trigger evolutionary responses, spatial structure can impact the types of adaptive response and the extent to which they spread. In particular, localized competition in a spatial landscape can lead to the emergence of a larger number of different adaptive trajectories than would be found in well-mixed populations. Our goal was to determine how two levels of spatial structure affect genomic diversity in a population and how this diversity is manifested spatially. Methodology/Principal Findings We serially transferred bacteriophage populations growing at high temperatures (40°C) on agar plates for 550 generations at two levels of spatial structure. The level of spatial structure was determined by whether the physical locations of the phage subsamples were preserved or disrupted at each passage to fresh bacterial host populations. When spatial structure of the phage populations was preserved, there was significantly greater diversity on a global scale with restricted and patchy distribution. When spatial structure was disrupted with passaging to fresh hosts, beneficial mutants were spread across the entire plate. This resulted in reduced diversity, possibly due to clonal interference as the most fit mutants entered into competition on a global scale. Almost all substitutions present at the end of the adaptation in the populations with disrupted spatial structure were also present in the populations with structure preserved. Conclusions/Significance Our results are consistent with the patchy nature of the spread of adaptive mutants in a spatial landscape. Spatial structure enhances diversity and slows fixation of beneficial mutants. This added diversity could be beneficial in fluctuating environments. We also connect observed substitutions and their effects on fitness to aspects of phage biology, and we provide

  18. Development of Climate Change Adaptation Platform using Spatial Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Oh, K. Y.; Lee, M. J.; Han, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change adaptation has attracted growing attention with the recent extreme weather conditions that affect people around the world. More and more countries, including the Republic of Korea, have begun to hatch adaptation plan to resolve these matters of great concern. They all, meanwhile, have mentioned that it should come first to integrate climate information in all analysed areas. That's because climate information is not independently made through one source; that is to say, the climate information is connected one another in a complicated way. That is the reason why we have to promote integrated climate change adaptation platform before setting up climate change adaptation plan. Therefore, the large-scaled project has been actively launched and worked on. To date, we researched 620 literatures and interviewed 51 government organizations. Based on the results of the researches and interviews, we obtained 2,725 impacts about vulnerability assessment information such as Monitoring and Forecasting, Health, Disaster, Agriculture, Forest, Water Management, Ecosystem, Ocean/Fisheries, Industry/Energy. Among 2,725 impacts, 995 impacts are made into a database until now. This database is made up 3 sub categories like Climate-Exposure, Sensitivity, Adaptive capacity, presented by IPCC. Based on the constructed database, vulnerability assessments were carried out in order to evaluate climate change capacity of local governments all over the country. These assessments were conducted by using web-based vulnerability assessment tool which was newly developed through this project. These results have shown that, metropolitan areas like Seoul, Pusan, Inchon, and so on have high risks more than twice than rural areas. Acknowledgements: The authors appreciate the support that this study has received from "Development of integrated model for climate change impact and vulnerability assessment and strengthening the framework for model implementation ", an initiative of the

  19. Poststroke Hemiparesis Impairs the Rate but not Magnitude of Adaptation of Spatial and Temporal Locomotor Features

    PubMed Central

    Savin, Douglas N.; Tseng, Shih-Chiao; Whitall, Jill; Morton, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Persons with stroke and hemiparesis walk with a characteristic pattern of spatial and temporal asymmetry that is resistant to most traditional interventions. It was recently shown in nondisabled persons that the degree of walking symmetry can be readily altered via locomotor adaptation. However, it is unclear whether stroke-related brain damage affects the ability to adapt spatial or temporal gait symmetry. Objective Determine whether locomotor adaptation to a novel swing phase perturbation is impaired in persons with chronic stroke and hemiparesis. Methods Participants with ischemic stroke (14) and nondisabled controls (12) walked on a treadmill before, during, and after adaptation to a unilateral perturbing weight that resisted forward leg movement. Leg kinematics were measured bilaterally, including step length and single-limb support (SLS) time symmetry, limb angle center of oscillation, and interlimb phasing, and magnitude of “initial” and “late” locomotor adaptation rates were determined. Results All participants had similar magnitudes of adaptation and similar initial adaptation rates both spatially and temporally. All 14 participants with stroke and baseline asymmetry temporarily walked with improved SLS time symmetry after adaptation. However, late adaptation rates poststroke were decreased (took more strides to achieve adaptation) compared with controls. Conclusions Mild to moderate hemiparesis does not interfere with the initial acquisition of novel symmetrical gait patterns in both the spatial and temporal domains, though it does disrupt the rate at which “late” adaptive changes are produced. Impairment of the late, slow phase of learning may be an important rehabilitation consideration in this patient population. PMID:22367915

  20. Spatial adaptation procedures on tetrahedral meshes for unsteady aerodynamic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, Russ D.; Batina, John T.; Yang, Henry T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    Spatial adaptation procedures for the accurate and efficient solution of steady and unsteady inviscid flow problems are described. The adaptation procedures were developed and implemented within a three-dimensional, unstructured-grid, upwind-type Euler code. These procedures involve mesh enrichment and mesh coarsening to either add points in high gradient regions of the flow or remove points where they are not needed, respectively, to produce solutions of high spatial accuracy at minimal computational cost. A detailed description of the enrichment and coarsening procedures are presented and comparisons with experimental data for an ONERA M6 wing and an exact solution for a shock-tube problem are presented to provide an assessment of the accuracy and efficiency of the capability. Steady and unsteady results, obtained using spatial adaptation procedures, are shown to be of high spatial accuracy, primarily in that discontinuities such as shock waves are captured very sharply.

  1. Preflight Adaptation Training for Spatial Orientation and Space Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Parker, Donald E.

    1994-01-01

    Two part-task preflight adaptation trainers (PATs) are being developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center to preadapt astronauts to novel sensory stimulus conditions similar to those present in microgravity to facilitate adaptation to microgravity and readaptation to Earth. This activity is a major component of a general effort to develop countermeasures aimed at minimizing sensory and sensorimotor disturbances and Space Motion Sickness (SMS) associated with adaptation to microgravity and readaptation to Earth. Design principles for the development of the two trainers are discussed, along with a detailed description of both devices. In addition, a summary of four ground-based investigations using one of the trainers to determine the extent to which various novel sensory stimulus conditions produce changes in compensatory eye movement responses, postural equilibrium, motion sickness symptoms, and electrogastric responses are presented. Finally, a brief description of the general concept of dual-adopted states that underly the development of the PATs, and ongoing and future operational and basic research activities are presented.

  2. The spatial architecture of protein function and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Richard N.; Poelwijk, Frank J.; Raman, Arjun; Gosal, Walraj S.; Ranganathan, Rama

    2014-01-01

    Statistical analysis of protein evolution suggests a design for natural proteins in which sparse networks of coevolving amino acids (termed sectors) comprise the essence of three-dimensional structure and function1, 2, 3, 4, 5. However, proteins are also subject to pressures deriving from the dynamics of the evolutionary process itself—the ability to tolerate mutation and to be adaptive to changing selection pressures6, 7, 8, 9, 10. To understand the relationship of the sector architecture to these properties, we developed a high-throughput quantitative method for a comprehensive single-mutation study in which every position is substituted individually to every other amino acid. Using a PDZ domain (PSD95pdz3) model system, we show that sector positions are functionally sensitive to mutation, whereas non-sector positions are more tolerant to substitution. In addition, we find that adaptation to a new binding specificity initiates exclusively through variation within sector residues. A combination of just two sector mutations located near and away from the ligand-binding site suffices to switch the binding specificity of PSD95pdz3 quantitatively towards a class-switching ligand. The localization of functional constraint and adaptive variation within the sector has important implications for understanding and engineering proteins. PMID:23041932

  3. Presence of Motor-Intentional Aiming Deficit Predicts Functional Improvement of Spatial Neglect with Prism Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, Kelly M.; Chen, Peii; Boston, Raymond C.; Foundas, Anne L.; Barrett, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial neglect is a debilitating disorder for which there is no agreed upon course of rehabilitation. The lack of consensus on treatment may result from systematic differences in the syndromes’ characteristics, with spatial cognitive deficits potentially affecting perceptual-attentional Where or motor-intentional Aiming spatial processing. Heterogeneity of response to treatment might be explained by different treatment impact on these dissociated deficits: prism adaptation, for example, might reduce Aiming deficits without affecting Where spatial deficits. Here, we tested the hypothesis that classifying patients by their profile of Where-vs-Aiming spatial deficit would predict response to prism adaptation, and specifically that patients with Aiming bias would have better recovery than those with isolated Where bias. We classified the spatial errors of 24 sub-acute right-stroke survivors with left spatial neglect as: 1) isolated Where bias, 2) isolated Aiming bias or 3) both. Participants then completed two weeks of prism adaptation treatment. They also completed the Behavioral Inattention Test (BIT) and Catherine Bergego Scale (CBS) tests of neglect recovery weekly for six weeks. As hypothesized, participants with only Aiming deficits improved on the CBS, whereas, those with only Where deficits did not improve. Participants with both deficits demonstrated intermediate improvement. These results support behavioral classification of spatial neglect patients as a potential valuable tool for assigning targeted, effective early rehabilitation. PMID:24376064

  4. Spatially adaptive block-based super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Su, Heng; Tang, Liang; Wu, Ying; Tretter, Daniel; Zhou, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Super-resolution technology provides an effective way to increase image resolution by incorporating additional information from successive input images or training samples. Various super-resolution algorithms have been proposed based on different assumptions, and their relative performances can differ in regions of different characteristics within a single image. Based on this observation, an adaptive algorithm is proposed in this paper to integrate a higher level image classification task and a lower level super-resolution process, in which we incorporate reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithms, single-image enhancement, and image/video classification into a single comprehensive framework. The target high-resolution image plane is divided into adaptive-sized blocks, and different suitable super-resolution algorithms are automatically selected for the blocks. Then, a deblocking process is applied to reduce block edge artifacts. A new benchmark is also utilized to measure the performance of super-resolution algorithms. Experimental results with real-life videos indicate encouraging improvements with our method.

  5. Neglect and prism adaptation: a new therapeutic tool for spatial cognition disorders.

    PubMed

    Rode, Gilles; Klos, Thomas; Courtois-Jacquin, Sophie; Rossetti, Yves; Pisella, Laure

    2006-01-01

    A large proportion of right-hemisphere stroke patients show unilateral neglect, a neurological deficit of perception, attention, representation, and/or performing actions within their left-sided space, inducing many functional debilitating effects on everyday life, and responsible for poor functional recovery and ability to benefit from treatment. This spatial cognition disorder affects the orientation of behaviour with a shift of proprioceptive representations toward the lesion side. This shift can be reduced after a prism adaptation period to a right lateral displacement of visual field (induced by a simple target-pointing task with base-left wedge prisms). The modification of visuo-motor or sensory-motor correspondences induced by prism adaptation involves improvement of different symptoms of neglect. Classical visuo-motor tests could be improved for at least 2h after adaptation, but also non-motor and non-visual tasks. In addition, cross-modal effects have been described (tactile extinction and dichotic listening), mental imagery tasks (geographic map, number bisection) and even visuo-constructive disorders. These cognitive effects are shown to result from indirect bottom-up effects of the deeper, adaptive realignment component of the reaction to prisms. Lesion studies and functional imaging data evoke a cerebello-cortical network in which each structure plays a specific role and not all structures are crucial for adaptation ability. These cognitive effects of prism adaptation suggest that prism adaptation does not act specifically on the ipsilesional bias characteristic of unilateral neglect but rehabilitates more generally the visuo-spatial functions attributed to the right cortical hemisphere. These results reinforce the idea that the process of prism adaptation may activate brain functions related to multisensory integration and higher spatial representations and show a generalization at a functional level. Prism adaptation therefore appears as a new

  6. Smart adaptive optic systems using spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Clark, N; Banish, M; Ranganath, H S

    1999-01-01

    Many factors contribute to the aberrations induced in an optical system. Atmospheric turbulence between the object and the imaging system, physical or thermal perturbations in optical elements degrade the system's point spread function, and misaligned optics are the primary sources of aberrations that affect image quality. The design of a nonconventional real-time adaptive optic system using a micro-mirror device for wavefront correction is presented. The unconventional compensated imaging system presented offers advantages in speed, cost, power consumption, and weight. A pulsed-coupled neural network is used to as a preprocessor to enhance the performance of the wavefront sensor for low-light applications. Modeling results that characterize the system performance are presented.

  7. A Heat Vulnerability Index: Spatial Patterns of Exposure, Sensitivity and Adaptive Capacity for Santiago de Chile

    PubMed Central

    Palme, Massimo; de la Barrera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will worsen the high levels of urban vulnerability in Latin American cities due to specific environmental stressors. Some impacts of climate change, such as high temperatures in urban environments, have not yet been addressed through adaptation strategies, which are based on poorly supported data. These impacts remain outside the scope of urban planning. New spatially explicit approaches that identify highly vulnerable urban areas and include specific adaptation requirements are needed in current urban planning practices to cope with heat hazards. In this paper, a heat vulnerability index is proposed for Santiago, Chile. The index was created using a GIS-based spatial information system and was constructed from spatially explicit indexes for exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity levels derived from remote sensing data and socio-economic information assessed via principal component analysis (PCA). The objective of this study is to determine the levels of heat vulnerability at local scales by providing insights into these indexes at the intra city scale. The results reveal a spatial pattern of heat vulnerability with strong variations among individual spatial indexes. While exposure and adaptive capacities depict a clear spatial pattern, sensitivity follows a complex spatial distribution. These conditions change when examining PCA results, showing that sensitivity is more robust than exposure and adaptive capacity. These indexes can be used both for urban planning purposes and for proposing specific policies and measures that can help minimize heat hazards in highly dynamic urban areas. The proposed methodology can be applied to other Latin American cities to support policy making. PMID:27606592

  8. Spatial Cognitive Performance During Adaptation to Conflicting Tilt-Translation Stimuli as a Sensorimotor Spaceflight Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayanickupuram, A. J.; Ramos, K. A.; Cordova, M. L.; Wood, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    The need to resolve new patterns of sensory feedback in altered gravitoinertial environments requires cognitive processes to develop appropriate reference frames for spatial orientation awareness. The purpose of this study was to examine deficits in spatial cognitive performance during adaptation to conflicting tilt-translation stimuli. Fourteen subjects were tilted within a lighted enclosure that simultaneously translated at one of 3 frequencies. Tilt and translation motion was synchronized to maintain the resultant gravitoinertial force aligned with the longitudinal body axis, resulting in a mismatch analogous to spaceflight in which the canals and vision signal tilt while the otoliths do not. Changes in performance on different spatial cognitive tasks were compared 1) without motion, 2) with tilt motion alone (pitch at 0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 Hz or roll at 0.3 Hz), and 3) with conflicting tilt-translation motion. The adaptation paradigm was continued for up to 30 min or until the onset of nausea. The order of the adaptation conditions were counter-balanced across 4 different test sessions. There was a significant effect of stimulus frequency on both motion sickness and spatial cognitive performance. Only 3 of 14 were able to complete the full 30 min protocol at 0.15 Hz, while 7 of 14 completed 0.3 Hz and 13 of 14 completed 0.6 Hz. There were no changes in simple visual-spatial cognitive tests, e.g., mental rotation or match-to-sample. There were significant deficits during 0.15 Hz adaptation in both accuracy and reaction time during a spatial reference task in which subjects are asked to identify a match of a 3D reoriented cube assemblage. Our results are consistent with antidotal reports of cognitive impairment that are common during sensorimotor adaptation with G-transitions. We conclude that these cognitive deficits stem from the ambiguity of spatial reference frames for central processing of inertial motion cues.

  9. Spatial Cognitive Performance During Adaptation to Conflicting Tilt-Translation Stimuli as a Sensorimotor Spaceflight Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayanickupuram, A. J.; Ramos, K. A.; Cordova, M. L.; Wood, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    The need to resolve new patterns of sensory feedback in altered gravitoinertial environments requires cognitive processes to develop appropriate reference frames for spatial orientation awareness. The purpose of this study was to examine deficits in spatial cognitive performance during adaptation to conflicting tilt-translation stimuli. Fourteen subjects were tilted within a lighted enclosure that simultaneously translated at one of 3 frequencies. Tilt and translation motion was synchronized to maintain the resultant gravitoinertial force aligned with the longitudinal body axis, resulting in a mismatch analogous to spaceflight in which the canals and vision signal tilt while the otoliths do not. Changes in performance on different spatial cognitive tasks were compared 1) without motion, 2) with tilt motion alone (pitch at 0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 Hz or roll at 0.3 Hz), and 3) with conflicting tilt-translation motion. The adaptation paradigm was continued for up to 30 min or until the onset of nausea. The order of the adaptation conditions were counter-balanced across 4 different test sessions. There was a significant effect of stimulus frequency on both motion sickness and spatial cognitive performance. Only 3 of 14 were able to complete the full 30 min protocol at 0.15 Hz, while 7 of 14 completed 0.3 Hz and 13 of 14 completed 0.6 Hz. There were no changes in simple visual-spatial cognitive tests, e.g., mental rotation or match-to-sample. There were significant deficits during 0.15 Hz adaptation in both accuracy and reaction time during a spatial reference task in which subjects are asked to identify a match of a 3D reoriented cube assemblage. Our results are consistent with antidotal reports of cognitive impairment that are common during sensorimotor adaptation with G-transitions. We conclude that these cognitive deficits stem from the ambiguity of spatial reference frames for central processing of inertial motion cues.

  10. Wall-resolved adaptive simulation with spatially-anisotropic wavelet-based refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stefano, Giuliano; Brown-Dymkoski, Eric; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2015-11-01

    In the wavelet-based adaptive multi-resolution approach to turbulence simulation, the separation between resolved energetic structures and unresolved flow is achieved through wavelet threshold filtering. Depending on the thresholding level, the effect of residual motions can be either neglected or modeled, leading to wavelet-based adaptive DNS or LES. Due to the ability to identify and efficiently represent energetic dynamically important flow structures, these methods have been proven reliable and effective for the computational modeling of wall-bounded turbulence. The wall-resolved adaptive approach however necessitates the use of high spatial resolution in the wall region, which practically limits the application to moderate Reynolds numbers. In order to address this issue, a new method that makes use of a spatially-anisotropic adaptive wavelet transform on curvilinear grids is introduced. In contrast to all known adaptive wavelet-based approaches that suffer from the ``curse of anisotropy,'' i.e., isotropic wavelet refinement and inability to have spatially varying aspect ratio of the mesh elements, this approach utilizes spatially-anisotropic wavelet-based refinement. The method is tested for the turbulent flow past a rectangular cylinder at moderately high Reynolds number. This work was supported by NSF under grant No. CBET-1236505.

  11. Reversible wavelet filter banks with side informationless spatially adaptive low-pass filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhayaratne, Charith

    2011-07-01

    Wavelet transforms that have an adaptive low-pass filter are useful in applications that require the signal singularities, sharp transitions, and image edges to be left intact in the low-pass signal. In scalable image coding, the spatial resolution scalability is achieved by reconstructing the low-pass signal subband, which corresponds to the desired resolution level, and discarding other high-frequency wavelet subbands. In such applications, it is vital to have low-pass subbands that are not affected by smoothing artifacts associated with low-pass filtering. We present the mathematical framework for achieving 1-D wavelet transforms that have a spatially adaptive low-pass filter (SALP) using the prediction-first lifting scheme. The adaptivity decisions are computed using the wavelet coefficients, and no bookkeeping is required for the perfect reconstruction. Then, 2-D wavelet transforms that have a spatially adaptive low-pass filter are designed by extending the 1-D SALP framework. Because the 2-D polyphase decompositions are used in this case, the 2-D adaptivity decisions are made nonseparable as opposed to the separable 2-D realization using 1-D transforms. We present examples using the 2-D 5/3 wavelet transform and their lossless image coding and scalable decoding performances in terms of quality and resolution scalability. The proposed 2-D-SALP scheme results in better performance compared to the existing adaptive update lifting schemes.

  12. Stabilizing Spatially-Structured Populations through Adaptive Limiter Control

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Pratha; Dey, Sutirth

    2014-01-01

    Stabilizing the dynamics of complex, non-linear systems is a major concern across several scientific disciplines including ecology and conservation biology. Unfortunately, most methods proposed to reduce the fluctuations in chaotic systems are not applicable to real, biological populations. This is because such methods typically require detailed knowledge of system specific parameters and the ability to manipulate them in real time; conditions often not met by most real populations. Moreover, real populations are often noisy and extinction-prone, which can sometimes render such methods ineffective. Here, we investigate a control strategy, which works by perturbing the population size, and is robust to reasonable amounts of noise and extinction probability. This strategy, called the Adaptive Limiter Control (ALC), has been previously shown to increase constancy and persistence of laboratory populations and metapopulations of Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we present a detailed numerical investigation of the effects of ALC on the fluctuations and persistence of metapopulations. We show that at high migration rates, application of ALC does not require a priori information about the population growth rates. We also show that ALC can stabilize metapopulations even when applied to as low as one-tenth of the total number of subpopulations. Moreover, ALC is effective even when the subpopulations have high extinction rates: conditions under which another control algorithm had previously failed to attain stability. Importantly, ALC not only reduces the fluctuation in metapopulation sizes, but also the global extinction probability. Finally, the method is robust to moderate levels of noise in the dynamics and the carrying capacity of the environment. These results, coupled with our earlier empirical findings, establish ALC to be a strong candidate for stabilizing real biological metapopulations. PMID:25153073

  13. Spatial-light-modulator-based adaptive optical system for the use of multiple phase retrieval methods.

    PubMed

    Lingel, Christian; Haist, Tobias; Osten, Wolfgang

    2016-12-20

    We propose an adaptive optical setup using a spatial light modulator (SLM), which is suitable to perform different phase retrieval methods with varying optical features and without mechanical movement. By this approach, it is possible to test many different phase retrieval methods and their parameters (optical and algorithmic) using one stable setup and without hardware adaption. We show exemplary results for the well-known transport of intensity equation (TIE) method and a new iterative adaptive phase retrieval method, where the object phase is canceled by an inverse phase written into part of the SLM. The measurement results are compared to white light interferometric measurements.

  14. A Framework for Spatial Assessment of Local Level Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity to Extreme Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmi, O.; Hayden, M.; Harlan, S.; Ruddell, D.; Komatsu, K.; England, B.; Uejio, C.

    2008-12-01

    Changing climate is predicted to increase the intensity and impacts of heat waves prompting the need to develop preparedness and adaptation strategies that reduce societal vulnerability. Central to understanding societal vulnerability, is adaptive capacity, the potential of a system or population to modify its features/behaviors so as to better cope with existing and anticipated stresses and fluctuations. Adaptive capacity influences adaptation, the actual adjustments made to cope with the impacts from current and future hazardous heat events. Understanding societal risks, vulnerabilities and adaptive capacity to extreme heat events and climate change requires an interdisciplinary approach that includes information about weather and climate, the natural and built environment, social processes and characteristics, interactions with the stakeholders, and an assessment of community vulnerability. This project presents a framework for an interdisciplinary approach and a case study that explore linkages between quantitative and qualitative data for a more comprehensive understanding of local level vulnerability and adaptive capacity to extreme heat events in Phoenix, Arizona. In this talk, we will present a methodological framework for conducting collaborative research on societal vulnerability and adaptive capacity on a local level that includes integration of household surveys into a quantitative spatial assessment of societal vulnerability. We highlight a collaborative partnership among researchers, community leaders and public health officials. Linkages between assessment of local adaptive capacity and development of regional climate change adaptation strategies will be discussed.

  15. Adaptive Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Hirleman, E D; Dellenback, P A

    1989-11-15

    Integration of a magnetooptic spatial light modulator into a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument is proposed and demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. The concept gives the instrument the ability to reconfigure a detector array on-line and thereby adapt to the measurement context.

  16. Adaptive Spatial Filtering with Principal Component Analysis for Biomedical Photoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Yamazaki, Rena; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    Photoacoustic (PA) signal is very sensitive to noise generated by peripheral equipment such as power supply, stepping motor or semiconductor laser. Band-pass filter is not effective because the frequency bandwidth of the PA signal also covers the noise frequency. The objective of the present study is to reduce the noise by using an adaptive spatial filter with principal component analysis (PCA).

  17. Multisensory adaptation of spatial-to-motor transformations in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    King, Bradley R; Kagerer, Florian A; Harring, Jeffrey R; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L; Clark, Jane E

    2011-07-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that adaptation to a visuomotor distortion systematically influenced movements to auditory targets in adults and typically developing (TD) children, suggesting that the adaptation of spatial-to-motor transformations for reaching movements is multisensory (i.e., generalizable across sensory modalities). The multisensory characteristics of these transformations in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have not been examined. Given that previous research has demonstrated that children with DCD have deficits in sensorimotor integration, these children may also have impairments in the formation of multisensory spatial-to-motor transformations for target-directed arm movements. To investigate this hypothesis, children with and without DCD executed discrete arm movements to visual and acoustic targets prior to and following exposure to an abrupt visual feedback rotation. Results demonstrated that the magnitudes of the visual aftereffects were equivalent in the TD children and the children with DCD, indicating that both groups of children adapted similarly to the visuomotor perturbation. Moreover, the influence of visuomotor adaptation on auditory-motor performance was similar in the two groups of children. This suggests that the multisensory processes underlying adaptation of spatial-to-motor transformations are similar in children with DCD and TD children.

  18. Spatial and temporal aspects of chromatic adaptation and their functional significance for colour constancy.

    PubMed

    Werner, Annette

    2014-11-01

    Illumination in natural scenes changes at multiple temporal and spatial scales: slow changes in global illumination occur in the course of a day, and we encounter fast and localised illumination changes when visually exploring the non-uniform light field of three-dimensional scenes; in addition, very long-term chromatic variations may come from the environment, like for example seasonal changes. In this context, I consider the temporal and spatial properties of chromatic adaptation and discuss their functional significance for colour constancy in three-dimensional scenes. A process of fast spatial tuning in chromatic adaptation is proposed as a possible sensory mechanism for linking colour constancy to the spatial structure of a scene. The observed middlewavelength selectivity of this process is particularly suitable for adaptation to the mean chromaticity and the compensation of interreflections in natural scenes. Two types of sensory colour constancy are distinguished, based on the functional differences of their temporal and spatial scales: a slow type, operating at a global scale for the compensation of the ambient illumination; and a fast colour constancy, which is locally restricted and well suited to compensate region-specific variations in the light field of three dimensional scenes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatially Common Sparsity Based Adaptive Channel Estimation and Feedback for FDD Massive MIMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhen; Dai, Linglong; Wang, Zhaocheng; Chen, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes a spatially common sparsity based adaptive channel estimation and feedback scheme for frequency division duplex based massive multi-input multi-output (MIMO) systems, which adapts training overhead and pilot design to reliably estimate and feed back the downlink channel state information (CSI) with significantly reduced overhead. Specifically, a non-orthogonal downlink pilot design is first proposed, which is very different from standard orthogonal pilots. By exploiting the spatially common sparsity of massive MIMO channels, a compressive sensing (CS) based adaptive CSI acquisition scheme is proposed, where the consumed time slot overhead only adaptively depends on the sparsity level of the channels. Additionally, a distributed sparsity adaptive matching pursuit algorithm is proposed to jointly estimate the channels of multiple subcarriers. Furthermore, by exploiting the temporal channel correlation, a closed-loop channel tracking scheme is provided, which adaptively designs the non-orthogonal pilot according to the previous channel estimation to achieve an enhanced CSI acquisition. Finally, we generalize the results of the multiple-measurement-vectors case in CS and derive the Cramer-Rao lower bound of the proposed scheme, which enlightens us to design the non-orthogonal pilot signals for the improved performance. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme outperforms its counterparts, and it is capable of approaching the performance bound.

  20. Ensembles of adaptive spatial filters increase BCI performance: an online evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannelli, Claudia; Vidaurre, Carmen; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Objective: In electroencephalographic (EEG) data, signals from distinct sources within the brain are widely spread by volume conduction and superimposed such that sensors receive mixtures of a multitude of signals. This reduction of spatial information strongly hampers single-trial analysis of EEG data as, for example, required for brain-computer interfacing (BCI) when using features from spontaneous brain rhythms. Spatial filtering techniques are therefore greatly needed to extract meaningful information from EEG. Our goal is to show, in online operation, that common spatial pattern patches (CSPP) are valuable to counteract this problem. Approach: Even though the effect of spatial mixing can be encountered by spatial filters, there is a trade-off between performance and the requirement of calibration data. Laplacian derivations do not require calibration data at all, but their performance for single-trial classification is limited. Conversely, data-driven spatial filters, such as common spatial patterns (CSP), can lead to highly distinctive features; however they require a considerable amount of training data. Recently, we showed in an offline analysis that CSPP can establish a valuable compromise. In this paper, we confirm these results in an online BCI study. In order to demonstrate the paramount feature that CSPP requires little training data, we used them in an adaptive setting with 20 participants and focused on users who did not have success with previous BCI approaches. Main results: The results of the study show that CSPP adapts faster and thereby allows users to achieve better feedback within a shorter time than previous approaches performed with Laplacian derivations and CSP filters. The success of the experiment highlights that CSPP has the potential to further reduce BCI inefficiency. Significance: CSPP are a valuable compromise between CSP and Laplacian filters. They allow users to attain better feedback within a shorter time and thus reduce BCI

  1. Spatial variation in soil biota mediates plant adaptation to a foliar pathogen.

    PubMed

    Mursinoff, Sini; Tack, Ayco J M

    2017-01-02

    Theory suggests that below-ground spatial heterogeneity may mediate host-parasite evolutionary dynamics and patterns of local adaptation, but this has rarely been tested in natural systems. Here, we test experimentally for the impact of spatial variation in the abiotic and biotic soil environment on the evolutionary outcome of the interaction between the host plant Plantago lanceolata and its specialist foliar pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis. Plants showed no adaptation to the local soil environment in the absence of natural enemies. However, quantitative, but not qualitative, plant resistance against local pathogens was higher when plants were grown in their local field soil than when they were grown in nonlocal field soil. This pattern was robust when extending the spatial scale beyond a single region, but disappeared with soil sterilization, indicating that soil biota mediated plant adaptation. We conclude that below-ground biotic heterogeneity mediates above-ground patterns of plant adaptation, resulting in increased plant resistance when plants are grown in their local soil environment. From an applied perspective, our findings emphasize the importance of using locally selected seeds in restoration ecology and low-input agriculture.

  2. The impact of natural transformation on adaptation in spatially structured bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Engelstädter, Jan

    2014-06-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that natural transformation and the formation of highly structured populations in bacteria are interconnected. In spite of growing evidence about this connection, little is known about the dynamics of natural transformation in spatially structured bacterial populations. In this work, we model the interdependency between the dynamics of the bacterial gene pool and those of environmental DNA in space to dissect the effect of transformation on adaptation. Our model reveals that even with only a single locus under consideration, transformation with a free DNA fragment pool results in complex adaptation dynamics that do not emerge in previous models focusing only on the gene shuffling effect of transformation at multiple loci. We demonstrate how spatial restriction on population growth and DNA diffusion in the environment affect the impact of transformation on adaptation. We found that in structured bacterial populations intermediate DNA diffusion rates predominantly cause transformation to impede adaptation by spreading deleterious alleles in the population. Overall, our model highlights distinctive evolutionary consequences of bacterial transformation in spatially restricted compared to planktonic bacterial populations.

  3. Adaptive spatial carrier frequency method for fast monitoring optical properties of fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokkar, T. Z. N.; El-Farahaty, K. A.; El-Bakary, M. A.; Omar, E. Z.; Agour, M.; Hamza, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an extension of the adaptive spatial carrier frequency method which is proposed for fast measuring optical properties of fibrous materials. The method can be considered as a two complementary steps. In the first step, the support of the adaptive filter shall be defined. In the second step, the angle between the sample under test and the interference fringe system generated by the utilized interferometer has to be determined. Thus, the support of the optical filter associated with the implementation of the adaptive spatial carrier frequency method is accordingly rotated. This method is experimentally verified by measuring optical properties of polypropylene (PP) fibre with the help of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The results show that errors resulting from rotating the fibre with respect to the interference fringes of the interferometer are reduced compared with the traditional band pass filter method. This conclusion was driven by comparing results of the mean refractive index of drown PP fibre at parallel polarization direction obtained from the new and adaptive spatial carrier frequency method.

  4. Ensemble-Based Parameter Estimation in a Coupled GCM Using the Adaptive Spatial Average Method

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, S.; ...

    2014-05-29

    Ensemble-based parameter estimation for a climate model is emerging as an important topic in climate research. And for a complex system such as a coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model, the sensitivity and response of a model variable to a model parameter could vary spatially and temporally. An adaptive spatial average (ASA) algorithm is proposed to increase the efficiency of parameter estimation. Refined from a previous spatial average method, the ASA uses the ensemble spread as the criterion for selecting “good” values from the spatially varying posterior estimated parameter values; these good values are then averaged to give the final globalmore » uniform posterior parameter. In comparison with existing methods, the ASA parameter estimation has a superior performance: faster convergence and enhanced signal-to-noise ratio.« less

  5. Ensemble-Based Parameter Estimation in a Coupled GCM Using the Adaptive Spatial Average Method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, S.; Rong, X.; Jacob, R.; Wu, S.; Lu, F.

    2014-05-29

    Ensemble-based parameter estimation for a climate model is emerging as an important topic in climate research. And for a complex system such as a coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model, the sensitivity and response of a model variable to a model parameter could vary spatially and temporally. An adaptive spatial average (ASA) algorithm is proposed to increase the efficiency of parameter estimation. Refined from a previous spatial average method, the ASA uses the ensemble spread as the criterion for selecting “good” values from the spatially varying posterior estimated parameter values; these good values are then averaged to give the final global uniform posterior parameter. In comparison with existing methods, the ASA parameter estimation has a superior performance: faster convergence and enhanced signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. The effects of adapted tango on spatial cognition and disease severity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    McKee, Kathleen E; Hackney, Madeleine E

    2013-01-01

    The authors determined effects of community-based adapted tango on spatial cognition and disease severity in Parkinson's disease (PD) while controlling for the effects of social interaction. Thirty-three individuals with mild-to-moderate PD (stage I-III) were assigned to twenty 90-min tango (n = 24) or education (n = 9) lessons over 12 weeks. Disease severity, spatial cognition, balance, and fall incidence were evaluated pre-, post-, and 10-12 weeks postintervention. The authors evaluated differences using t tests and analyses of variance. Twenty-three tango and 8 education participants finished. Tango participants improved on disease severity (p = .008), and spatial cognition (p = .021) compared with education participants. Tango participants also improved in balance (p = .038), and executive function (p = .012). Gains were maintained 10-12 weeks postintervention. Multimodal exercise with structured syllabi may improve disease severity and spatial cognition in PD.

  7. Noise-adaptive nonlinear diffusion filtering of MR images with spatially varying noise levels.

    PubMed

    Samsonov, Alexei A; Johnson, Chris R

    2004-10-01

    Anisotropic diffusion filtering is widely used for MR image enhancement. However, the anisotropic filter is nonoptimal for MR images with spatially varying noise levels, such as images reconstructed from sensitivity-encoded data and intensity inhomogeneity-corrected images. In this work, a new method for filtering MR images with spatially varying noise levels is presented. In the new method, a priori information regarding the image noise level spatial distribution is utilized for the local adjustment of the anisotropic diffusion filter. Our new method was validated and compared with the standard filter on simulated and real MRI data. The noise-adaptive method was demonstrated to outperform the standard anisotropic diffusion filter in both image error reduction and image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement. The method was also applied to inhomogeneity-corrected and sensitivity encoding (SENSE) images. The new filter was shown to improve segmentation of MR brain images with spatially varying noise levels.

  8. Spatially adaptive bases in wavelet-based coding of semi-regular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Leon; Florea, Ruxandra; Munteanu, Adrian; Schelkens, Peter

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present a wavelet-based coding approach for semi-regular meshes, which spatially adapts the employed wavelet basis in the wavelet transformation of the mesh. The spatially-adaptive nature of the transform requires additional information to be stored in the bit-stream in order to allow the reconstruction of the transformed mesh at the decoder side. In order to limit this overhead, the mesh is first segmented into regions of approximately equal size. For each spatial region, a predictor is selected in a rate-distortion optimal manner by using a Lagrangian rate-distortion optimization technique. When compared against the classical wavelet transform employing the butterfly subdivision filter, experiments reveal that the proposed spatially-adaptive wavelet transform significantly decreases the energy of the wavelet coefficients for all subbands. Preliminary results show also that employing the proposed transform for the lowest-resolution subband systematically yields improved compression performance at low-to-medium bit-rates. For the Venus and Rabbit test models the compression improvements add up to 1.47 dB and 0.95 dB, respectively.

  9. Pilot Signal Generation Scheme Using Frequency-Dependent Cyclic Shift ZC Sequence for Inter-Cell Interference Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Daichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiko; Iwai, Takashi; Takata, Tomohumi; Hiramatsu, Katsuhiko; Miya, Kazuyuki; Homma, Koichi

    In this paper, we study and propose an inter-cell co-channel interference (CCI) mitigation method for pilot signals using cyclic shift Zadoff-Chu (CS-ZC) sequences for SC-FDMA-based uplink without tight scheduler coordination among cells. Firstly, we investigate the issue of severe detection performance degradation created by the lack of orthogonality among the pilot signals without alignment of the allocated frequency resource positions among cells when using the conventional CS-ZC sequences generation scheme. Secondly, we identify the primary factor causing the issue. Thirdly, we propose a frequency-dependent CS-ZC sequence generation scheme by allocating the same spectrum elements of the ZC sequence to the overlapped subcarriers among cells to mitigate the inter-cell CCI of the pilot signals without alignment of the frequency resource positions among cells. Finally, we confirm the validity of the proposal using uplink data BLER evaluation under a multipath fading condition by computer simulation compared to the conventional method, and show that the proposal achieves around 0.9dB and 0.6dB better performance at 10% BLER than the conventional method for 1 RB and 2 RBs frequency offsets in 3 RBs transmission bandwidth, respectively.

  10. Motor adaptation and generalization of reaching movements using motor primitives based on spatial coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2014-01-01

    The brain processes sensory and motor information in a wide range of coordinate systems, ranging from retinal coordinates in vision to body-centered coordinates in areas that control musculature. Here we focus on the coordinate system used in the motor cortex to guide actions and examine physiological and psychophysical evidence for an allocentric reference frame based on spatial coordinates. When the equations of motion governing reaching dynamics are expressed as spatial vectors, each term is a vector cross product between a limb-segment position and a velocity or acceleration. We extend this computational framework to motor adaptation, in which the cross-product terms form adaptive bases for canceling imposed perturbations. Coefficients of the velocity- and acceleration-dependent cross products are assumed to undergo plastic changes to compensate the force-field or visuomotor perturbations. Consistent with experimental findings, each of the cross products had a distinct reference frame, which predicted how an acquired remapping generalized to untrained location in the workspace. In response to force field or visual rotation, mainly the coefficients of the velocity- or acceleration-dependent cross products adapted, leading to transfer in an intrinsic or extrinsic reference frame, respectively. The model further predicted that remapping of visuomotor rotation should under- or overgeneralize in a distal or proximal workspace. The cross-product bases can explain the distinct patterns of generalization in visuomotor and force-field adaptation in a unified way, showing that kinematic and dynamic motor adaptation need not arise through separate neural substrates. PMID:25429111

  11. Motor adaptation and generalization of reaching movements using motor primitives based on spatial coordinates.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2015-02-15

    The brain processes sensory and motor information in a wide range of coordinate systems, ranging from retinal coordinates in vision to body-centered coordinates in areas that control musculature. Here we focus on the coordinate system used in the motor cortex to guide actions and examine physiological and psychophysical evidence for an allocentric reference frame based on spatial coordinates. When the equations of motion governing reaching dynamics are expressed as spatial vectors, each term is a vector cross product between a limb-segment position and a velocity or acceleration. We extend this computational framework to motor adaptation, in which the cross-product terms form adaptive bases for canceling imposed perturbations. Coefficients of the velocity- and acceleration-dependent cross products are assumed to undergo plastic changes to compensate the force-field or visuomotor perturbations. Consistent with experimental findings, each of the cross products had a distinct reference frame, which predicted how an acquired remapping generalized to untrained location in the workspace. In response to force field or visual rotation, mainly the coefficients of the velocity- or acceleration-dependent cross products adapted, leading to transfer in an intrinsic or extrinsic reference frame, respectively. The model further predicted that remapping of visuomotor rotation should under- or overgeneralize in a distal or proximal workspace. The cross-product bases can explain the distinct patterns of generalization in visuomotor and force-field adaptation in a unified way, showing that kinematic and dynamic motor adaptation need not arise through separate neural substrates.

  12. A stable interface element scheme for the p-adaptive lifting collocation penalty formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnone, J. S.; Nadarajah, S. K.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a procedure for adaptive polynomial refinement in the context of the lifting collocation penalty (LCP) formulation. The LCP scheme is a high-order unstructured discretization method unifying the discontinuous Galerkin, spectral volume, and spectral difference schemes in single differential formulation. Due to the differential nature of the scheme, the treatment of inter-cell fluxes for spatially varying polynomial approximations is not straightforward. Specially designed elements are proposed to tackle non-conforming polynomial approximations. These elements are constructed such that a conforming interface between polynomial approximations of different degrees is recovered. The stability and conservation properties of the scheme are analyzed and various inviscid compressible flow calculations are performed to demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach.

  13. Spatial Variation in the Healthy Human Lung Microbiome and the Adapted Island Model of Lung Biogeography.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Robert P; Erb-Downward, John R; Freeman, Christine M; McCloskey, Lisa; Beck, James M; Huffnagle, Gary B; Curtis, Jeffrey L

    2015-06-01

    The lung microbiome is spatially heterogeneous in advanced airway diseases, but whether it varies spatially in health is unknown. We postulated that the primary determinant of lung microbiome constitution in health is the balance of immigration and elimination of communities from the upper respiratory tract (URT; "adapted island model of lung biogeography"), rather than differences in regional bacterial growth conditions. To determine if the lung microbiome is spatially varied in healthy adults. Bronchoscopy was performed on 15 healthy subjects. Specimens were sequentially collected in the lingula and right middle lobe (by bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL]), then in the right upper lobe, left upper lobe, and supraglottic space (by protected-specimen brush). Bacterial 16S ribosmal RNA-encoding genes were sequenced using MiSeq (Illumina, San Diego, CA). There were no significant differences between specimens collected by BAL and protected-specimen brush. Spatially separated intrapulmonary sites, when compared with each other, did not contain consistently distinct microbiota. On average, intrasubject variation was significantly less than intersubject variation (P = 0.00003). By multiple ecologic parameters (community richness, community composition, intersubject variability, and similarity to source community), right upper lobe microbiota more closely resembled those of the URT than did microbiota from more distal sites. As predicted by the adapted island model, community richness decreased with increasing distance from the source community of the URT (P < 0.05). In healthy lungs, spatial variation in microbiota within an individual is significantly less than variation across individuals. The lung microbiome in health is more influenced by microbial immigration and elimination (the adapted island model) than by the effects of local growth conditions on bacterial reproduction rates, which are more determinant in advanced lung diseases. BAL of a single lung segment is an

  14. Lost in space: multisensory conflict yields adaptation in spatial representations across frames of reference.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Johannes; Butz, Martin V

    2017-03-27

    According to embodied cognition, bodily interactions with our environment shape the perception and representation of our body and the surrounding space, that is, peripersonal space. To investigate the adaptive nature of these spatial representations, we introduced a multisensory conflict between vision and proprioception in an immersive virtual reality. During individual bimanual interaction trials, we gradually shifted the visual hand representation. As a result, participants unknowingly shifted their actual hands to compensate for the visual shift. We then measured the adaptation to the invoked multisensory conflict by means of a self-localization and an external localization task. While effects of the conflict were observed in both tasks, the effects systematically interacted with the type of localization task and the available visual information while performing the localization task (i.e., the visibility of the virtual hands). The results imply that the localization of one's own hands is based on a multisensory integration process, which is modulated by the saliency of the currently most relevant sensory modality and the involved frame of reference. Moreover, the results suggest that our brain strives for consistency between its body and spatial estimates, thereby adapting multiple, related frames of reference, and the spatial estimates within, due to a sensory conflict in one of them.

  15. [Clinical application of prism adaptation for patients with unilateral spatial neglect].

    PubMed

    Ota, Hisaaki

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) is defined as a failure to pay attention to the contralesional space due to the brain damage. As this symptom affects on many aspect of activities of daily living, a lots of therapeutic approaches were developed so far. Among them, prism adaptation (PA) technique is one of the most promising methods because it could produce generalized and long lasting after-effect and is effective even for chronic USN patients. It is, however, true that there are USN patients showing no PA effect. Unfortunately, we cannot tell in advance who can adapt to prisms and show improvement of their neglect symptom at this moment. In further studies, to know who is more likely to adapt to prisms we should analyze clinical data from USN patients showing improvement by PA. In addition, to be an effective PA technique for much more patients with USN we should clarify what it the best condition in PA task.

  16. An Attention-Information-Based Spatial Adaptation Framework for Browsing Videos via Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Houqiang; Wang, Yi; Chen, Chang Wen

    2007-12-01

    With the growing popularity of personal digital assistant devices and smart phones, more and more consumers are becoming quite enthusiastic to appreciate videos via mobile devices. However, limited display size of the mobile devices has been imposing significant barriers for users to enjoy browsing high-resolution videos. In this paper, we present an attention-information-based spatial adaptation framework to address this problem. The whole framework includes two major parts: video content generation and video adaptation system. During video compression, the attention information in video sequences will be detected using an attention model and embedded into bitstreams with proposed supplement-enhanced information (SEI) structure. Furthermore, we also develop an innovative scheme to adaptively adjust quantization parameters in order to simultaneously improve the quality of overall encoding and the quality of transcoding the attention areas. When the high-resolution bitstream is transmitted to mobile users, a fast transcoding algorithm we developed earlier will be applied to generate a new bitstream for attention areas in frames. The new low-resolution bitstream containing mostly attention information, instead of the high-resolution one, will be sent to users for display on the mobile devices. Experimental results show that the proposed spatial adaptation scheme is able to improve both subjective and objective video qualities.

  17. Pre-Surgical fMRI Data Analysis Using a Spatially Adaptive Conditionally Autoregressive Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuqing; Berrocal, Veronica J; Bartsch, Andreas J; Johnson, Timothy D

    2016-06-01

    Spatial smoothing is an essential step in the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. One standard smoothing method is to convolve the image data with a three-dimensional Gaussian kernel that applies a fixed amount of smoothing to the entire image. In pre-surgical brain image analysis where spatial accuracy is paramount, this method, however, is not reasonable as it can blur the boundaries between activated and deactivated regions of the brain. Moreover, while in a standard fMRI analysis strict false positive control is desired, for pre-surgical planning false negatives are of greater concern. To this end, we propose a novel spatially adaptive conditionally autoregressive model with variances in the full conditional of the means that are proportional to error variances, allowing the degree of smoothing to vary across the brain. Additionally, we present a new loss function that allows for the asymmetric treatment of false positives and false negatives. We compare our proposed model with two existing spatially adaptive conditionally autoregressive models. Simulation studies show that our model outperforms these other models; as a real model application, we apply the proposed model to the pre-surgical fMRI data of two patients to assess peri- and intra-tumoral brain activity.

  18. A class-adaptive spatially variant mixture model for image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nikou, Christophoros; Galatsanos, Nikolaos P; Likas, Aristidis C

    2007-04-01

    We propose a new approach for image segmentation based on a hierarchical and spatially variant mixture model. According to this model, the pixel labels are random variables and a smoothness prior is imposed on them. The main novelty of this work is a new family of smoothness priors for the label probabilities in spatially variant mixture models. These Gauss-Markov random field-based priors allow all their parameters to be estimated in closed form via the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation using the expectation-maximization methodology. Thus, it is possible to introduce priors with multiple parameters that adapt to different aspects of the data. Numerical experiments are presented where the proposed MAP algorithms were tested in various image segmentation scenarios. These experiments demonstrate that the proposed segmentation scheme compares favorably to both standard and previous spatially constrained mixture model-based segmentation.

  19. Comparing adaptive and fixed bandwidth-based kernel density estimates in spatial cancer epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Dorothea; Mattauch, Volkmar; Heidinger, Oliver; Pebesma, Edzer; Hense, Hans-Werner

    2015-03-31

    Monitoring spatial disease risk (e.g. identifying risk areas) is of great relevance in public health research, especially in cancer epidemiology. A common strategy uses case-control studies and estimates a spatial relative risk function (sRRF) via kernel density estimation (KDE). This study was set up to evaluate the sRRF estimation methods, comparing fixed with adaptive bandwidth-based KDE, and how they were able to detect 'risk areas' with case data from a population-based cancer registry. The sRRF were estimated within a defined area, using locational information on incident cancer cases and on a spatial sample of controls, drawn from a high-resolution population grid recognized as underestimating the resident population in urban centers. The spatial extensions of these areas with underestimated resident population were quantified with population reference data and used in this study as 'true risk areas'. Sensitivity and specificity analyses were conducted by spatial overlay of the 'true risk areas' and the significant (α=.05) p-contour lines obtained from the sRRF. We observed that the fixed bandwidth-based sRRF was distinguished by a conservative behavior in identifying these urban 'risk areas', that is, a reduced sensitivity but increased specificity due to oversmoothing as compared to the adaptive risk estimator. In contrast, the latter appeared more competitive through variance stabilization, resulting in a higher sensitivity, while the specificity was equal as compared to the fixed risk estimator. Halving the originally determined bandwidths led to a simultaneous improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the adaptive sRRF, while the specificity was reduced for the fixed estimator. The fixed risk estimator contrasts with an oversmoothing tendency in urban areas, while overestimating the risk in rural areas. The use of an adaptive bandwidth regime attenuated this pattern, but led in general to a higher false positive rate, because, in our study design

  20. Locally adaptive, spatially explicit projection of US population for 2030 and 2050

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Jacob J.; Rose, Amy N.; Bright, Edward A.; Huynh, Timmy; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.

    2015-01-01

    Localized adverse events, including natural hazards, epidemiological events, and human conflict, underscore the criticality of quantifying and mapping current population. Building on the spatial interpolation technique previously developed for high-resolution population distribution data (LandScan Global and LandScan USA), we have constructed an empirically informed spatial distribution of projected population of the contiguous United States for 2030 and 2050, depicting one of many possible population futures. Whereas most current large-scale, spatially explicit population projections typically rely on a population gravity model to determine areas of future growth, our projection model departs from these by accounting for multiple components that affect population distribution. Modeled variables, which included land cover, slope, distances to larger cities, and a moving average of current population, were locally adaptive and geographically varying. The resulting weighted surface was used to determine which areas had the greatest likelihood for future population change. Population projections of county level numbers were developed using a modified version of the US Census’s projection methodology, with the US Census’s official projection as the benchmark. Applications of our model include incorporating multiple various scenario-driven events to produce a range of spatially explicit population futures for suitability modeling, service area planning for governmental agencies, consequence assessment, mitigation planning and implementation, and assessment of spatially vulnerable populations. PMID:25605882

  1. Spatially filtered wave-front sensor for high-order adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Poyneer, Lisa A; Macintosh, Bruce

    2004-05-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems take sampled measurements of the wave-front phase. Because in the general case the spatial-frequency content of the phase aberration is not band limited, aliasing will occur. This aliasing will cause increased residual error and increased scattered light in the point-spread function (PSF). The spatially filtered wave-front sensor (SFWFS) mitigates this phenomenon by using a field stop at a focal plane before the wave-front sensor. This stop acts as a low-pass filter on the phase, significantly reducing the high-spatial-frequency content phase seen by the wave-front sensor at moderate to high Strehl ratios. We study the properties and performance of the SFWFS for open- and closed-loop correction of atmospheric turbulence, segmented-primary-mirror errors, and sensing with broadband light. In closed loop the filter reduces high-spatial-frequency phase power by a factor of 10(3) to 10(8). In a full AO-system simulation, this translates to a reduction by up to 625 times in the residual error power due to aliasing over a specific spatial frequency range. The final PSF (generated with apodization of the pupil) has up to a 100 times reduction in intensity out to lambda/2d.

  2. Locally-Adaptive, Spatially-Explicit Projection of U.S. Population for 2030 and 2050

    DOE PAGES

    McKee, Jacob J.; Rose, Amy N.; Bright, Eddie A.; ...

    2015-02-03

    Localized adverse events, including natural hazards, epidemiological events, and human conflict, underscore the criticality of quantifying and mapping current population. Moreover, knowing the spatial distribution of future population allows for increased preparation in the event of an emergency. Building on the spatial interpolation technique previously developed for high resolution population distribution data (LandScan Global and LandScan USA), we have constructed an empirically-informed spatial distribution of the projected population of the contiguous U.S. for 2030 and 2050. Whereas most current large-scale, spatially explicit population projections typically rely on a population gravity model to determine areas of future growth, our projection modelmore » departs from these by accounting for multiple components that affect population distribution. Modelled variables, which included land cover, slope, distances to larger cities, and a moving average of current population, were locally adaptive and geographically varying. The resulting weighted surface was used to determine which areas had the greatest likelihood for future population change. Population projections of county level numbers were developed using a modified version of the U.S. Census s projection methodology with the U.S. Census s official projection as the benchmark. Applications of our model include, but are not limited to, suitability modelling, service area planning for governmental agencies, consequence assessment, mitigation planning and implementation, and assessment of spatially vulnerable populations.« less

  3. Locally-Adaptive, Spatially-Explicit Projection of U.S. Population for 2030 and 2050

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, Jacob J.; Rose, Amy N.; Bright, Eddie A.; Huynh, Timmy N.; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.

    2015-02-03

    Localized adverse events, including natural hazards, epidemiological events, and human conflict, underscore the criticality of quantifying and mapping current population. Moreover, knowing the spatial distribution of future population allows for increased preparation in the event of an emergency. Building on the spatial interpolation technique previously developed for high resolution population distribution data (LandScan Global and LandScan USA), we have constructed an empirically-informed spatial distribution of the projected population of the contiguous U.S. for 2030 and 2050. Whereas most current large-scale, spatially explicit population projections typically rely on a population gravity model to determine areas of future growth, our projection model departs from these by accounting for multiple components that affect population distribution. Modelled variables, which included land cover, slope, distances to larger cities, and a moving average of current population, were locally adaptive and geographically varying. The resulting weighted surface was used to determine which areas had the greatest likelihood for future population change. Population projections of county level numbers were developed using a modified version of the U.S. Census s projection methodology with the U.S. Census s official projection as the benchmark. Applications of our model include, but are not limited to, suitability modelling, service area planning for governmental agencies, consequence assessment, mitigation planning and implementation, and assessment of spatially vulnerable populations.

  4. Common spatial pattern patches - an optimized filter ensemble for adaptive brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sannelli, Claudia; Vidaurre, Carmen; Muller, Klaus-Robert; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Laplacian filters are commonly used in Brain Computer Interfacing (BCI). When only data from few channels are available, or when, like at the beginning of an experiment, no previous data from the same user is available complex features cannot be used. In this case band power features calculated from Laplacian filtered channels represents an easy, robust and general feature to control a BCI, since its calculation does not involve any class information. For the same reason, the performance obtained with Laplacian features is poor in comparison to subject-specific optimized spatial filters, such as Common Spatial Patterns (CSP) analysis, which, on the other hand, can be used just in a later phase of the experiment, since they require a considerable amount of training data in order to enroll a stable and good performance. This drawback is particularly evident in case of poor performing BCI users, whose data is highly non-stationary and contains little class relevant information. Therefore, Laplacian filtering is preferred to CSP, e.g., in the initial period of co-adaptive calibration, a novel BCI paradigm designed to alleviate the problem of BCI illiteracy. In fact, in the co-adaptive calibration design the experiment starts with a subject-independent classifier and simple features are needed in order to obtain a fast adaptation of the classifier to the newly acquired user's data. Here, the use of an ensemble of local CSP patches (CSPP) is proposed, which can be considered as a compromise between Laplacians and CSP: CSPP needs less data and channels than CSP, while being superior to Laplacian filtering. This property is shown to be particularly useful for the co-adaptive calibration design and is demonstrated on off-line data from a previous co-adaptive BCI study.

  5. Age differences in spatial working memory contributions to visuomotor adaptation and transfer

    PubMed Central

    Langan, Jeanne; Seidler, Rachael. D.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout our life span we encounter challenges that require us to adapt to the demands of our changing environment; this entails learning new skills. Two primary components of motor skill learning are motor acquisition, the initial process of learning the skill, and motor transfer, when learning a new skill is benefitted by the overlap with a previously learned one. Older adults typically exhibit declines in motor acquisition compared to young adults, but remarkably, do not demonstrate deficits in motor transfer (Seidler, 2007). Our recent work demonstrates that a failure to engage spatial working memory (SWM) is associated with skill learning deficits in older adults (Anguera et al., 2011). Here, we investigate the role that SWM plays in both motor learning and transfer in young and older adults. Both age groups exhibited performance savings, or positive transfer, at transfer of learning for some performance variables. Measures of spatial working memory performance and reaction time correlated with both motor learning and transfer for young adults. Young adults recruited overlapping brain regions in prefrontal, premotor, parietal and occipital cortex for performance of a SWM and a visuomotor adaptation task, most notably during motor learning, replicating our prior findings (Anguera et al., 2010). Neural overlap between the SWM task and visuomotor adaptation for the older adults was limited to parietal cortex, with minimal changes from motor learning to transfer. Combined, these results suggest that age differences in engagement of cognitive strategies have a differential impact on motor learning and transfer. PMID:21784106

  6. A novel spatially adaptive guide-filter total variation (SAGFTV) regularization for image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hao; Li, Qian; Huang, Zhenghua

    2015-12-01

    Denoising algorithms based on gradient dependent energy functionals, such as Perona-Malik, total variation and adaptive total variation denoising, modify images towards piecewise constant functions. Although edge sharpness and location is well preserved, important information, encoded in image features like textures or certain details, is often compromised in the process of denoising. In this paper, We propose a novel Spatially Adaptive Guide-Filtering Total Variation (SAGFTV) regularization with image restoration algorithm for denoising images. The guide-filter is extended to the variational formulations of imaging problem, and the spatially adaptive operator can easily distinguish flat areas from texture areas. Our simulating experiments show the improvement of peak signal noise ratio (PSNR), root mean square error (RMSE) and structure similarity increment measurement (SSIM) over other prior algorithms. The results of both simulating and practical experiments are more appealing visually. This type of processing can be used for a variety of tasks in PDE-based image processing and computer vision, and is stable and meaningful from a mathematical viewpoint.

  7. Magnetic resonance image restoration via dictionary learning under spatially adaptive constraints.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Xia, Yong; Dong, Pei; Feng, David Dagan; Luo, Jianhua; Huang, Qiu

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a spatially adaptive constrained dictionary learning (SAC-DL) algorithm for Rician noise removal in magnitude magnetic resonance (MR) images. This algorithm explores both the strength of dictionary learning to preserve image structures and the robustness of local variance estimation to remove signal-dependent Rician noise. The magnitude image is first separated into a number of partly overlapping image patches. The statistics of each patch are collected and analyzed to obtain a local noise variance. To better adapt to Rician noise, a correction factor is formulated with the local signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, the trained dictionary is used to denoise each image patch under spatially adaptive constraints. The proposed algorithm has been compared to the popular nonlocal means (NLM) filtering and unbiased NLM (UNLM) algorithm on simulated T1-weighted, T2-weighted and PD-weighted MR images. Our results suggest that the SAC-DL algorithm preserves more image structures while effectively removing the noise than NLM and it is also superior to UNLM at low noise levels.

  8. Prism adaptation and spatial neglect: the need for dose-finding studies.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Kelly M; Zhang, Jeffrey Y; Barrett, A M

    2015-01-01

    Spatial neglect is a devastating disorder in 50-70% of right-brain stroke survivors, who have problems attending to, or making movements towards, left-sided stimuli, and experience a high risk of chronic dependence. Prism adaptation is a promising treatment for neglect that involves brief, daily visuo-motor training sessions while wearing optical prisms. Its benefits extend to functional behaviors such as dressing, with effects lasting 6 months or longer. Because one to two sessions of prism adaptation induce adaptive changes in both spatial-motor behavior (Fortis et al., 2011) and brain function (Saj et al., 2013), it is possible stroke patients may benefit from treatment periods shorter than the standard, intensive protocol of ten sessions over two weeks-a protocol that is impractical for either US inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. Demonstrating the effectiveness of a lower dose will maximize the availability of neglect treatment. We present preliminary data suggesting that four to six sessions of prism treatment may induce a large treatment effect, maintained three to four weeks post-treatment. We call for a systematic, randomized clinical trial to establish the minimal effective dose suitable for stroke intervention.

  9. Prism adaptation and spatial neglect: the need for dose-finding studies

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, Kelly M.; Zhang, Jeffrey Y.; Barrett, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial neglect is a devastating disorder in 50–70% of right-brain stroke survivors, who have problems attending to, or making movements towards, left-sided stimuli, and experience a high risk of chronic dependence. Prism adaptation is a promising treatment for neglect that involves brief, daily visuo-motor training sessions while wearing optical prisms. Its benefits extend to functional behaviors such as dressing, with effects lasting 6 months or longer. Because one to two sessions of prism adaptation induce adaptive changes in both spatial-motor behavior (Fortis et al., 2011) and brain function (Saj et al., 2013), it is possible stroke patients may benefit from treatment periods shorter than the standard, intensive protocol of ten sessions over two weeks—a protocol that is impractical for either US inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. Demonstrating the effectiveness of a lower dose will maximize the availability of neglect treatment. We present preliminary data suggesting that four to six sessions of prism treatment may induce a large treatment effect, maintained three to four weeks post-treatment. We call for a systematic, randomized clinical trial to establish the minimal effective dose suitable for stroke intervention. PMID:25983688

  10. Medical image classification using spatial adjacent histogram based on adaptive local binary patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Shengsheng; Huang, Dezhi; Deng, Gang; Zeng, Fantao; Chen, Huiling

    2016-05-01

    Medical image recognition is an important task in both computer vision and computational biology. In the field of medical image classification, representing an image based on local binary patterns (LBP) descriptor has become popular. However, most existing LBP-based methods encode the binary patterns in a fixed neighborhood radius and ignore the spatial relationships among local patterns. The ignoring of the spatial relationships in the LBP will cause a poor performance in the process of capturing discriminative features for complex samples, such as medical images obtained by microscope. To address this problem, in this paper we propose a novel method to improve local binary patterns by assigning an adaptive neighborhood radius for each pixel. Based on these adaptive local binary patterns, we further propose a spatial adjacent histogram strategy to encode the micro-structures for image representation. An extensive set of evaluations are performed on four medical datasets which show that the proposed method significantly improves standard LBP and compares favorably with several other prevailing approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatially adaptive stochastic numerical methods for intrinsic fluctuations in reaction-diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Atzberger, Paul J.

    2010-05-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations are introduced for the continuum concentration fields of reaction-diffusion systems. The stochastic partial differential equations account for fluctuations arising from the finite number of molecules which diffusively migrate and react. Spatially adaptive stochastic numerical methods are developed for approximation of the stochastic partial differential equations. The methods allow for adaptive meshes with multiple levels of resolution, Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, and domains having geometries with curved boundaries. A key issue addressed by the methods is the formulation of consistent discretizations for the stochastic driving fields at coarse-refined interfaces of the mesh and at boundaries. Methods are also introduced for the efficient generation of the required stochastic driving fields on such meshes. As a demonstration of the methods, investigations are made of the role of fluctuations in a biological model for microorganism direction sensing based on concentration gradients. Also investigated, a mechanism for spatial pattern formation induced by fluctuations. The discretization approaches introduced for SPDEs have the potential to be widely applicable in the development of numerical methods for the study of spatially extended stochastic systems.

  12. A spatially adaptive spectral re-ordering technique for lossless coding of hyper-spectral images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memon, Nasir D.; Galatsanos, Nikolas

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach, applicable to lossless compression of hyper-spectral images, that alleviates some limitations of linear prediction as applied to this problem. According to this approach, an adaptive re-ordering of the spectral components of each pixel is performed prior to prediction and encoding. This re-ordering adaptively exploits, on a pixel-by pixel basis, the presence of inter-band correlations for prediction. Furthermore, the proposed approach takes advantage of spatial correlations, and does not introduce any coding overhead to transmit the order of the spectral bands. This is accomplished by using the assumption that two spatially adjacent pixels are expected to have similar spectral relationships. We thus have a simple technique to exploit spectral and spatial correlations in hyper-spectral data sets, leading to compression performance improvements as compared to our previously reported techniques for lossless compression. We also look at some simple error modeling techniques for further exploiting any structure that remains in the prediction residuals prior to entropy coding.

  13. Adaptive Spatial Filtering of Interferometric Data Stack Oriented to Distributed Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xie, C.; Shao, Y.; Yuan, M.

    2013-07-01

    Standard interferometry poses a challenge in non-urban areas due to temporal and spatial decorrelation of the radar signal, where there is high signal noise. Techniques such as Small Baseline Subset Algorithm (SBAS) have been proposed to make use of multiple interferometric combinations to alleviate the problem. However, the interferograms used in SBAS are multilooked with a boxcar (rectangle) filter to reduce phase noise, resulting in a loss of resolution and signal superstition from different objects. In this paper, we proposed a modified adaptive spatial filtering algorithm for accurate estimation of interferogram and coherence without resolution loss even in rural areas, to better support the deformation monitoring with time series interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technique. The implemented method identifies the statistically homogenous pixels in a neighbourhood based on the goodness-of-fit test, and then applies an adaptive spatial filtering of interferograms. Three statistical tests for the identification of distributed targets will be presented, applied to real data. PALSAR data of the yellow river delta in China is used for demonstrating the effectiveness of this algorithm in rural areas.

  14. Prismatic Adaptation Induces Plastic Changes onto Spatial and Temporal Domains in Near and Far Space

    PubMed Central

    Patané, Ivan; Farnè, Alessandro; Frassinetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A large literature has documented interactions between space and time suggesting that the two experiential domains may share a common format in a generalized magnitude system (ATOM theory). To further explore this hypothesis, here we measured the extent to which time and space are sensitive to the same sensorimotor plasticity processes, as induced by classical prismatic adaptation procedures (PA). We also exanimated whether spatial-attention shifts on time and space processing, produced through PA, extend to stimuli presented beyond the immediate near space. Results indicated that PA affected both temporal and spatial representations not only in the near space (i.e., the region within which the adaptation occurred), but also in the far space. In addition, both rightward and leftward PA directions caused opposite and symmetrical modulations on time processing, whereas only leftward PA biased space processing rightward. We discuss these findings within the ATOM framework and models that account for PA effects on space and time processing. We propose that the differential and asymmetrical effects following PA may suggest that temporal and spatial representations are not perfectly aligned. PMID:26981286

  15. Adaptive data assimilation including the effect of spatial variations in observation error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehlich, Rod

    2006-04-01

    An optimal adaptive data assimilation algorithm is derived using the maximum likelihood method based on a conditional Gaussian probability density function for the first-guess and direct observations of the state variables but including local estimates of the observation and first-guess error statistics. An interpolation of the first-guess field to the observation coordinates is not required under the assumption of locally homogeneous statistics for the random atmosphere. However, the definition of observation error requires a definition of model 'truth' which is defined as a spatial average of the continuous random atmospheric variables. Then the total observation error consists of two independent components: an instrument error and an observation sampling error defined by the spatial average of the observation and the statistics of the local turbulence. Estimates of the observation sampling error statistics are determined from an ensemble of background or first-guess fields or from the analysis of the raw data from instrumented aircraft, Doppler lidars, or radar profilers. The spatial variations of the sampling error are referenced to the local turbulence conditions at each analysis coordinate and therefore each observation can have a different observation error for each nearby analysis coordinate. The extension of the adaptive assimilation concept to include the spatial variations in observation error for statistical interpolation, 3D-Var, 4D-Var, extended Kalman filtering, and ensemble Kalman filtering is also presented for the traditional meaning of observation error, i.e. each observation is assigned a single error. The conditional analysis error is derived for a single observation at the analysis coordinate and multiple observations around the analysis point. Example calculations of the conditional analysis error are presented for a few simple set of observation and measurement geometries to demonstrate the impact of the spatially variable observation errors

  16. Spatial and temporal adaptive procedures for the unsteady aerodynamic analysis of airfoils using unstructured meshes. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, John R.; Batina, John T.; Williams, Marc H.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm which combines spatial and temporal adaption for the time integration of the two dimensional Euler equations on unstructured meshes of triangles is presented. Spatial adaption involves mesh enrichment to add elements in high gradient regions of the flow and mesh coarsening to remove elements where they are no longer needed. Temporal adaption is a time accurate, local time stepping procedure which integrates the flow equations in each cell according to the local numerical stability constraint. The flow solver utilizes a four stage Runge-Kutta time integration scheme with an upwind flux-split spatial discretization. Results obtained using spatial and temporal adaption indicate that highly accurate solutions can be obtained with a significant savings of computing time over global time stepping.

  17. Quantifying the effects of migration and mutation on adaptation and demography in spatially heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    Débarre, F; Ronce, O; Gandon, S

    2013-06-01

    How do mutation and gene flow influence population persistence, niche expansion and local adaptation in spatially heterogeneous environments? In this article, we analyse a demographic and evolutionary model of adaptation to an environment containing two habitats in equal frequencies, and we bridge the gap between different theoretical frameworks. Qualitatively, our model yields four qualitative types of outcomes: (i) global extinction of the population, (ii) adaptation to one habitat only, but also adaptation to both habitats with, (iii) specialized phenotypes or (iv) with generalized phenotypes, and we determine the conditions under which each equilibrium is reached. We derive new analytical approximations for the local densities and the distributions of traits in each habitat under a migration-selection-mutation balance, compute the equilibrium values of the means, variances and asymmetries of the local distributions of phenotypes, and contrast the effects of migration and mutation on the evolutionary outcome. We then check our analytical results by solving our model numerically, and also assess their robustness in the presence of demographic stochasticity. Although increased migration results in a decrease in local adaptation, mutation in our model does not influence the values of the local mean traits. Yet, both migration and mutation can have dramatic effects on population size and even lead to metapopulation extinction when selection is strong. Niche expansion, the ability for the population to adapt to both habitats, can also be prevented by small migration rates and a reduced evolutionary potential characterized by rare mutation events of small effects; however, niche expansion is otherwise the most likely outcome. Although our results are derived under the assumption of clonal reproduction, we finally show and discuss the links between our model and previous quantitative genetics models. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European

  18. A spatial explicit strategy reduces error but interferes with sensorimotor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Bryan L.; Anguera, Joaquin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although sensorimotor adaptation is typically thought of as an implicit form of learning, it has been shown that participants who gain explicit awareness of the nature of the perturbation during adaptation exhibit more learning than those who do not. With rare exceptions, however, explicit awareness is typically polled at the end of the study. Here, we provided participants with either an explicit spatial strategy or no instructions before learning. Early in learning, explicit instructions greatly reduced movement errors but also resulted in increased trial-to-trial variability and longer reaction times. Late in adaptation, performance was indistinguishable between the explicit and implicit groups, but the mechanisms underlying performance improvements remained fundamentally different, as revealed by catch trials. The progression of implicit recalibration in the explicit group was modulated by the use of an explicit strategy: these participants showed a lower level of recalibration as well as decreased aftereffects. This phenomenon may be due to the reduced magnitude of errors made to the target during adaptation or inhibition of implicit learning mechanisms by explicit processing. PMID:21451054

  19. Spatial Organization Plasticity as an Adaptive Driver of Surface Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bridier, Arnaud; Piard, Jean-Christophe; Pandin, Caroline; Labarthe, Simon; Dubois-Brissonnet, Florence; Briandet, Romain

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are dynamic habitats which constantly evolve in response to environmental fluctuations and thereby constitute remarkable survival strategies for microorganisms. The modulation of biofilm functional properties is largely governed by the active remodeling of their three-dimensional structure and involves an arsenal of microbial self-produced components and interconnected mechanisms. The production of matrix components, the spatial reorganization of ecological interactions, the generation of physiological heterogeneity, the regulation of motility, the production of actives enzymes are for instance some of the processes enabling such spatial organization plasticity. In this contribution, we discussed the foundations of architectural plasticity as an adaptive driver of biofilms through the review of the different microbial strategies involved. Moreover, the possibility to harness such characteristics to sculpt biofilm structure as an attractive approach to control their functional properties, whether beneficial or deleterious, is also discussed. PMID:28775718

  20. Spatially adaptive probabilistic computation of a sub-kilometre resolution lightning climatology for New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etherington, Thomas R.; Perry, George L. W.

    2017-01-01

    Lightning is a key component of the Earth's atmosphere and climate systems, and there is a potential positive feedback between a warming climate and increased lightning activity. In the biosphere, lightning is important as the main natural ignition source for wildfires and because of its contribution to the nitrogen cycle. Therefore, it is important to develop lightning climatologies to characterise and monitor lightning activity. While traditional methods for constructing lightning climatologies are suitable for examining lightning's influence on atmospheric processes, they are less well suited for examining questions about biosphere-lightning interactions. For example, examining the interaction between lightning and wildfires requires linking atmospheric processes to finer scale terrestrial processes and patterns. Most wildfires ignited by lightning are less than one hectare in size, and so require lightning climatologies at a comparable spatial resolution. However, such high resolution lightning climatologies cannot be derived using the traditional cell-count methodology. Here we present a novel geocomputational approach for analysing lightning data at high spatial resolutions. Our approach is based on probabilistic computational methods and is capable of producing a sub-kilometre lightning climatology that honours the spatial accuracy of the strike locations and is adaptive to underlying spatial patterns. We demonstrate our methods by applying them to the mid-latitude oceanic landmass of New Zealand, an area with geographic conditions that are under-represented in existing lightning climatologies. Our resulting lightning climatology has unparalleled spatial resolution, and the spatial and temporal patterns we observe in it are consistent with other continental and tropical lightning climatologies. To encourage further use and development of our probabilistic approach, we provide Python scripts that demonstrate the method alongside our resulting New Zealand

  1. Photonic Lantern Adaptive Spatial Mode Control in LMA Fiber Amplifiers using SPGD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-15

    fiber amplifiers using SPGD ** Juan Montoya 1,* , Chris Aleshire 1 , Christopher Hwang 1 , Nicolas K. Fontaine 2 , Amado Velazquez 3 , Dale H. Martz...ll.mit.edu Abstract: We demonstrate adaptive-spatial mode control (ASMC) in few- moded double-clad large mode area (LMA) fiber amplifiers by using an...D. V. Murphy, A. Sanchez, and T. Y. Fan, "Coherent combining of a 4 kW, eight-element fiber amplifier array," Opt. Lett. 36, 2686-2688 (2011). 3. F

  2. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Abbas, Ahmed; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-26

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet's performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis.

  3. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Abbas, Ahmed; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet's performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis. PMID:25619991

  4. Geophysical evaluation of solute plume spatial moments using an adaptive POD algorithm for electrical resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oware, E. K.; Moysey, S. M. J.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the potential for characterizing spatial moments of subsurface solute plumes from surface-based electrical resistivity images produced within a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) inversion framework. The existing POD algorithm is improved here to allow for adaptive conditioning of the POD training images on resistivity measurements. The efficacy of the suggested technique is evaluated with two hypothetical transport scenarios: synthetic #1 is based on the case where the target plume and POD training images follow the same (unimodal) plume morphology, whereas a second source location in synthetic #2 makes the target plume bimodal and inconsistent with the POD training images. The resistivity imaging results indicate that the adaptive algorithm efficiently and robustly updates the POD training images to obtain good quality resistivity images of the target plumes, both in the presence of data noise and when conceptual model inaccuracies exist in the training simulations. Spatial moments of the solute plumes recovered from the resistivity images are also favorable, with relative mass recovery errors in the range of 0.6-4.4%, center of mass errors in the range of 0.6-9.6%, and spatial variance errors in the range of 3.4-45% for cases where the voltage data had 0-10% noise. These results are consistent with or improved upon those reported in the literature. Comparison of the resistivity-based moment estimates to those obtained from direct concentration sampling suggests that for cases with good quality resistivity data (i.e., <3% noise), the imaging results provide more accurate moments until 6-10 multi-level sampling wells are installed. While the specific number of wells will depend on the actual field scenario, we suggest that this finding illustrates the general value of POD-based resistivity imaging techniques for non-invasively estimating the spatial moments of a solute plume.

  5. Adaptive and Bounded Investment Returns Promote Cooperation in Spatial Public Goods Games

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaojie; Liu, Yongkui; Zhou, Yonghui; Wang, Long; Perc, Matjaž

    2012-01-01

    The public goods game is one of the most famous models for studying the evolution of cooperation in sizable groups. The multiplication factor in this game can characterize the investment return from the public good, which may be variable depending on the interactive environment in realistic situations. Instead of using the same universal value, here we consider that the multiplication factor in each group is updated based on the differences between the local and global interactive environments in the spatial public goods game, but meanwhile limited to within a certain range. We find that the adaptive and bounded investment returns can significantly promote cooperation. In particular, full cooperation can be achieved for high feedback strength when appropriate limitation is set for the investment return. Also, we show that the fraction of cooperators in the whole population can become larger if the lower and upper limits of the multiplication factor are increased. Furthermore, in comparison to the traditionally spatial public goods game where the multiplication factor in each group is identical and fixed, we find that cooperation can be better promoted if the multiplication factor is constrained to adjust between one and the group size in our model. Our results highlight the importance of the locally adaptive and bounded investment returns for the emergence and dominance of cooperative behavior in structured populations. PMID:22615836

  6. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups.

    PubMed

    Capitán, José A; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space.

  7. Adaptive and bounded investment returns promote cooperation in spatial public goods games.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojie; Liu, Yongkui; Zhou, Yonghui; Wang, Long; Perc, Matjaž

    2012-01-01

    The public goods game is one of the most famous models for studying the evolution of cooperation in sizable groups. The multiplication factor in this game can characterize the investment return from the public good, which may be variable depending on the interactive environment in realistic situations. Instead of using the same universal value, here we consider that the multiplication factor in each group is updated based on the differences between the local and global interactive environments in the spatial public goods game, but meanwhile limited to within a certain range. We find that the adaptive and bounded investment returns can significantly promote cooperation. In particular, full cooperation can be achieved for high feedback strength when appropriate limitation is set for the investment return. Also, we show that the fraction of cooperators in the whole population can become larger if the lower and upper limits of the multiplication factor are increased. Furthermore, in comparison to the traditionally spatial public goods game where the multiplication factor in each group is identical and fixed, we find that cooperation can be better promoted if the multiplication factor is constrained to adjust between one and the group size in our model. Our results highlight the importance of the locally adaptive and bounded investment returns for the emergence and dominance of cooperative behavior in structured populations.

  8. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitán, José A.; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space.

  9. The role of motor learning in spatial adaptation near a tool.

    PubMed

    Brown, Liana E; Doole, Robert; Malfait, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Some visual-tactile (bimodal) cells have visual receptive fields (vRFs) that overlap and extend moderately beyond the skin of the hand. Neurophysiological evidence suggests, however, that a vRF will grow to encompass a hand-held tool following active tool use but not after passive holding. Why does active tool use, and not passive holding, lead to spatial adaptation near a tool? We asked whether spatial adaptation could be the result of motor or visual experience with the tool, and we distinguished between these alternatives by isolating motor from visual experience with the tool. Participants learned to use a novel, weighted tool. The active training group received both motor and visual experience with the tool, the passive training group received visual experience with the tool, but no motor experience, and finally, a no-training control group received neither visual nor motor experience using the tool. After training, we used a cueing paradigm to measure how quickly participants detected targets, varying whether the tool was placed near or far from the target display. Only the active training group detected targets more quickly when the tool was placed near, rather than far, from the target display. This effect of tool location was not present for either the passive-training or control groups. These results suggest that motor learning influences how visual space around the tool is represented.

  10. Novel Near-Lossless Compression Algorithm for Medical Sequence Images with Adaptive Block-Based Spatial Prediction.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoying; Huang, Qijun; Chang, Sheng; He, Jin; Wang, Hao

    2016-12-01

    To address the low compression efficiency of lossless compression and the low image quality of general near-lossless compression, a novel near-lossless compression algorithm based on adaptive spatial prediction is proposed for medical sequence images for possible diagnostic use in this paper. The proposed method employs adaptive block size-based spatial prediction to predict blocks directly in the spatial domain and Lossless Hadamard Transform before quantization to improve the quality of reconstructed images. The block-based prediction breaks the pixel neighborhood constraint and takes full advantage of the local spatial correlations found in medical images. The adaptive block size guarantees a more rational division of images and the improved use of the local structure. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm can efficiently compress medical images and produces a better peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) under the same pre-defined distortion than other near-lossless methods.

  11. Prototype adaptive bow-tie filter based on spatial exposure time modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badal, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the development of dynamic bow-tie filters that are able to provide patient-specific x-ray beam shaping. We introduce the first physical prototype of a new adaptive bow-tie filter design based on the concept of "spatial exposure time modulation." While most existing bow-tie filters operate by attenuating the radiation beam differently in different locations using partially attenuating objects, the presented filter shapes the radiation field using two movable completely radio-opaque collimators. The aperture and speed of the collimators is modulated in synchrony with the x-ray exposure to selectively block the radiation emitted to different parts of the object. This mode of operation does not allow the reproduction of every possible attenuation profile, but it can reproduce the profile of any object with an attenuation profile monotonically decreasing from the center to the periphery, such as an object with an elliptical cross section. Therefore, the new adaptive filter provides the same advantages as the currently existing static bow-tie filters, which are typically designed to work for a pre-determined cylindrical object at a fixed distance from the source, and provides the additional capability to adapt its performance at image acquisition time to better compensate for the actual diameter and location of the imaged object. A detailed description of the prototype filter, the implemented control methods, and a preliminary experimental validation of its performance are presented.

  12. Adaptive optimal control of highly dissipative nonlinear spatially distributed processes with neuro-dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Wu, Huai-Ning; Li, Han-Xiong

    2015-04-01

    Highly dissipative nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) are widely employed to describe the system dynamics of industrial spatially distributed processes (SDPs). In this paper, we consider the optimal control problem of the general highly dissipative SDPs, and propose an adaptive optimal control approach based on neuro-dynamic programming (NDP). Initially, Karhunen-Loève decomposition is employed to compute empirical eigenfunctions (EEFs) of the SDP based on the method of snapshots. These EEFs together with singular perturbation technique are then used to obtain a finite-dimensional slow subsystem of ordinary differential equations that accurately describes the dominant dynamics of the PDE system. Subsequently, the optimal control problem is reformulated on the basis of the slow subsystem, which is further converted to solve a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. HJB equation is a nonlinear PDE that has proven to be impossible to solve analytically. Thus, an adaptive optimal control method is developed via NDP that solves the HJB equation online using neural network (NN) for approximating the value function; and an online NN weight tuning law is proposed without requiring an initial stabilizing control policy. Moreover, by involving the NN estimation error, we prove that the original closed-loop PDE system with the adaptive optimal control policy is semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, the developed method is tested on a nonlinear diffusion-convection-reaction process and applied to a temperature cooling fin of high-speed aerospace vehicle, and the achieved results show its effectiveness.

  13. [A spatial adaptive algorithm for endmember extraction on multispectral remote sensing image].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang-Ming; Luo, Jian-Cheng; Shen, Zhan-Feng; Li, Jun-Li; Hu, Xiao-Dong

    2011-10-01

    Due to the problem that the convex cone analysis (CCA) method can only extract limited endmember in multispectral imagery, this paper proposed a new endmember extraction method by spatial adaptive spectral feature analysis in multispectral remote sensing image based on spatial clustering and imagery slice. Firstly, in order to remove spatial and spectral redundancies, the principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm was used for lowering the dimensions of the multispectral data. Secondly, iterative self-organizing data analysis technology algorithm (ISODATA) was used for image cluster through the similarity of the pixel spectral. And then, through clustering post process and litter clusters combination, we divided the whole image data into several blocks (tiles). Lastly, according to the complexity of image blocks' landscape and the feature of the scatter diagrams analysis, the authors can determine the number of endmembers. Then using hourglass algorithm extracts endmembers. Through the endmember extraction experiment on TM multispectral imagery, the experiment result showed that the method can extract endmember spectra form multispectral imagery effectively. What's more, the method resolved the problem of the amount of endmember limitation and improved accuracy of the endmember extraction. The method has provided a new way for multispectral image endmember extraction.

  14. Generalized total variation-based MRI Rician denoising model with spatially adaptive regularization parameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ryan Wen; Shi, Lin; Huang, Wenhua; Xu, Jing; Yu, Simon Chun Ho; Wang, Defeng

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an outstanding medical imaging modality but the quality often suffers from noise pollution during image acquisition and transmission. The purpose of this study is to enhance image quality using feature-preserving denoising method. In current literature, most existing MRI denoising methods did not simultaneously take the global image prior and local image features into account. The denoising method proposed in this paper is implemented based on an assumption of spatially varying Rician noise map. A two-step wavelet-domain estimation method is developed to extract the noise map. Following a Bayesian modeling approach, a generalized total variation-based MRI denoising model is proposed based on global hyper-Laplacian prior and Rician noise assumption. The proposed model has the properties of backward diffusion in local normal directions and forward diffusion in local tangent directions. To further improve the denoising performance, a local variance estimator-based method is introduced to calculate the spatially adaptive regularization parameters related to local image features and spatially varying noise map. The main benefit of the proposed method is that it takes full advantage of the global MR image prior and local image features. Numerous experiments have been conducted on both synthetic and real MR data sets to compare our proposed model with some state-of-the-art denoising methods. The experimental results have demonstrated the superior performance of our proposed model in terms of quantitative and qualitative image quality evaluations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Relativistic Flows Using Spatial And Temporal Adaptive Structured Mesh Refinement. I. Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; Zhang, Weiqun; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-02

    Astrophysical relativistic flow problems require high resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations. In this paper, we describe a new parallel three-dimensional code for simulations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using both spatially and temporally structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We used method of lines to discrete SRHD equations spatially and used a total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. For spatial reconstruction, we have implemented piecewise linear method (PLM), piecewise parabolic method (PPM), third order convex essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) and third and fifth order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes. Flux is computed using either direct flux reconstruction or approximate Riemann solvers including HLL, modified Marquina flux, local Lax-Friedrichs flux formulas and HLLC. The AMR part of the code is built on top of the cosmological Eulerian AMR code enzo, which uses the Berger-Colella AMR algorithm and is parallel with dynamical load balancing using the widely available Message Passing Interface library. We discuss the coupling of the AMR framework with the relativistic solvers and show its performance on eleven test problems.

  16. Competition and time-dependent behavior in spatial iterated prisoner’s dilemma incorporating adaptive zero-determinant strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Xu, Chen; Liu, Jie; Hui, Pak Ming

    2016-10-01

    We propose and study the competitiveness of a class of adaptive zero-determinant strategies (ZDSs) in a population with spatial structure against four classic strategies in iterated prisoner’s dilemma. Besides strategy updating via a probabilistic mechanism by imitating the strategy of a better performing opponent, players using the ZDSs can also adapt their strategies to take advantage of their local competing environment with another probability. The adapted ZDSs could be extortionate-like to avoid being continually cheated by defectors or to take advantage of unconditional cooperators. The adapted ZDSs could also be a compliance strategy so as to cooperate with the conditionally cooperative players. This flexibility makes adaptive ZDSs more competitive than nonadaptive ZDSs. Results show that adaptive ZDSs can either dominate over other strategies or at least coexist with them when the ZDSs are allowed to adapt more readily than to imitate other strategies. The effectiveness of the adaptive ZDSs relies on how fast they can adapt to the competing environment before they are replaced by other strategies. The adaptive ZDSs generally work well as they could adapt gradually and make use of other strategies for suppressing their enemies. When adaptation happens more readily than imitation for the ZDSs, they outperform other strategies over a wide range of cost-to-benefit ratios.

  17. Adaptive electron beam shaping using a photoemission gun and spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxson, Jared; Lee, Hyeri; Bartnik, Adam C.; Kiefer, Jacob; Bazarov, Ivan

    2015-02-01

    The need for precisely defined beam shapes in photoelectron sources has been well established. In this paper, we use a spatial light modulator and simple shaping algorithm to create arbitrary, detailed transverse laser shapes with high fidelity. We transmit this shaped laser to the photocathode of a high voltage dc gun. Using beam currents where space charge is negligible, and using an imaging solenoid and fluorescent viewscreen, we show that the resultant beam shape preserves these detailed features with similar fidelity. Next, instead of transmitting a shaped laser profile, we use an active feedback on the unshaped electron beam image to create equally accurate and detailed shapes. We demonstrate that this electron beam feedback has the added advantage of correcting for electron optical aberrations, yielding shapes without skew. The method may serve to provide precisely defined electron beams for low current target experiments, space-charge dominated beam commissioning, as well as for online adaptive correction of photocathode quantum efficiency degradation.

  18. Sample-adaptive-prediction for HEVC SCC intra coding with ridge estimation from spatially neighboring samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Je-Won; Ryu, Soo-Kyung

    2017-02-01

    In this paper a sample-adaptive prediction technique is proposed to yield efficient coding performance in an intracoding for screen content video coding. The sample-based prediction is to reduce spatial redundancies in neighboring samples. To this aim, the proposed technique uses a weighted linear combination of neighboring samples and applies the robust optimization technique, namely, ridge estimation to derive the weights in a decoder side. The ridge estimation uses L2 norm based regularization term, and, thus the solution is more robust to high variance samples such as in sharp edges and high color contrasts exhibited in screen content videos. It is demonstrated with the experimental results that the proposed technique provides an improved coding gain as compared to the HEVC screen content video coding reference software.

  19. Standard Deviation and Intra Prediction Mode Based Adaptive Spatial Error Concealment (SEC) in H.264/AVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Lei; Ikenaga, Takeshi; Goto, Satoshi

    Transmission of compressed video over error prone channels may result in packet losses or errors, which can significantly degrade the image quality. Therefore an error concealment scheme is applied at the video receiver side to mask the damaged video. Considering there are 3 types of MBs (Macro Blocks) in natural video frame, i. e., Textural MB, Edged MB, and Smooth MB, this paper proposes an adaptive spatial error concealment which can choose 3 different methods for these 3 different MBs. For criteria of choosing appropriate method, 2 factors are taken into consideration. Firstly, standard deviation of our proposed edge statistical model is exploited. Secondly, some new features of latest video compression standard H.264/AVC, i. e., intra prediction mode is also considered for criterion formulation. Compared with previous works, which are only based on deterministic measurement, proposed method achieves the best image recovery. Subjective and objective image quality evaluations in experiments confirmed this.

  20. Analysis of spatial lamellar distribution from adaptive-optics second harmonic generation corneal images.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Juan M; Palacios, Raquel; Chessey, Mary K; Ginis, Harilaos

    2013-07-01

    The spatial organization of stromal collagen of ex-vivo corneas has been quantified in adaptive-optics second harmonic generation (SHG) images by means of an optimized Fourier transform (FT) based analysis. At a particular depth location, adjacent lamellae often present similar orientations and run parallel to the corneal surface. However this pattern might be combined with interweaved collagen bundles leading to crosshatched structures with different orientations. The procedure here reported provides us with both principal and crosshatched angles. This is also able to automatically distinguish a random distribution from a cross-shaped one, since it uses the ratio of the axes lengths of the best-fitted ellipse of the FT data as an auxiliary parameter. The technique has successfully been applied to SHG images of healthy corneas (both stroma and Bowman's layer) of different species and to corneas undergoing cross-linking treatment.

  1. Spatial aggregation across ephemeral resource patches in insect communities: an adaptive response to natural enemies?

    PubMed

    Rohlfs, Marko; Hoffmeister, Thomas S

    2004-08-01

    Although an increase in competition is a common cost associated with intraspecific crowding, spatial aggregation across food-limited resource patches is a widespread phenomenon in many insect communities. Because intraspecific aggregation of competing insect larvae across, e.show $132#g. fruits, dung, mushrooms etc., is an important means by which many species can coexist (aggregation model of species coexistence), there is a strong need to explore the mechanisms that contribute to the maintenance of this kind of spatial resource exploitation. In the present study, by using Drosophila-parasitoid interactions as a model system, we tested the hypothesis whether intraspecific aggregation reflects an adaptive response to natural enemies. Most of the studies that have hitherto been carried out on Drosophila-parasitoid interactions used an almost two-dimensional artificial host environment, where host larvae could not escape from parasitoid attacks, and have demonstrated positive density-dependent parasitism risk. To test whether these studies captured the essence of such interactions, we used natural breeding substrates (decaying fruits). In a first step, we analysed the parasitism risk of Drosophila larvae on a three-dimensional substrate in natural fly communities in the field, and found that the risk of parasitism decreased with increasing host larval density (inverse density dependence). In a second step, we analysed the parasitism risk of Drosophila subobscura larvae on three breeding substrate types exposed to the larval parasitoids Asobara tabida and Leptopilina heterotoma. We found direct density-dependent parasitism on decaying sloes, inverse density dependence on plums, and a hump-shaped relationship between fly larval density and parasitism risk on crab apples. On crab apples and plums, fly larvae benefited from a density-dependent refuge against the parasitoids. While the proportion of larvae feeding within the fruit tissues increased with larval density

  2. PCA-based spatially adaptive denoising of CFA images for single-sensor digital cameras.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Lukac, Rastislav; Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, David

    2009-04-01

    Single-sensor digital color cameras use a process called color demosiacking to produce full color images from the data captured by a color filter array (CAF). The quality of demosiacked images is degraded due to the sensor noise introduced during the image acquisition process. The conventional solution to combating CFA sensor noise is demosiacking first, followed by a separate denoising processing. This strategy will generate many noise-caused color artifacts in the demosiacking process, which are hard to remove in the denoising process. Few denoising schemes that work directly on the CFA images have been presented because of the difficulties arisen from the red, green and blue interlaced mosaic pattern, yet a well-designed "denoising first and demosiacking later" scheme can have advantages such as less noise-caused color artifacts and cost-effective implementation. This paper presents a principle component analysis (PCA)-based spatially-adaptive denoising algorithm, which works directly on the CFA data using a supporting window to analyze the local image statistics. By exploiting the spatial and spectral correlations existing in the CFA image, the proposed method can effectively suppress noise while preserving color edges and details. Experiments using both simulated and real CFA images indicate that the proposed scheme outperforms many existing approaches, including those sophisticated demosiacking and denoising schemes, in terms of both objective measurement and visual evaluation.

  3. High spectral and spatial resolution spectroscopy of YSOs with a silicon grism and adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Lloyd, J. P.; Gavel, D.; Macintosh, B.; Max, C. E.; Ciarlo, D.; Kuzmenko, P.; Graham, J. R.

    2000-12-01

    We have obtained complete K band spectra of a total of 6 T Tauri and Ae/Be stars and their close companions at a spectral resolution of R ≈ 5000 using a silicon grism at the Lick 3m telescope. These results represent our first scientific observations conducted by the high resolution silicon grisms. Coupled with the LLNL adaptive optics system, a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec was achieved to allow observations of the companions with separations between 0.3-1.3 arcsec. The complete wavelength coverage was achieved by placing 16 cross-dispersed echelle orders on a 256x256 HgCdTe array with the silicon grism operating on high diffraction orders and a low dispersing CaF2 grism as a cross-disperser. High spectral resolution observations allow us to characterize each of the companions. Analysis of the spectra of these YSOs will be reported. The observations also allow us to measure the optical performance of the second generation of silicon grisms made with the techniques developed in early 2000. The new silicon grism has a peak efficiency of 45% and scattered light of ~ 8% in the K band. New techniques have been developed at Penn State to further reduce scattered light in the K band (Bernecker et al. this meeting) and are being applied in fabricating the third generation of silicon grisms for scientific observations. Fabrication of the silicon grisms and work on the Lick adaptive optics system was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-ENG-48. Graham and Lloyd were also supported by the Center for Adaptive Optics under the STC Program of the National Science Foundation, Agreement No. AST-9876783

  4. An efficient content-adaptive motion-compensated 3-D DWT with enhanced spatial and temporal scalability.

    PubMed

    Mehrseresht, Nagita; Taubman, David

    2006-06-01

    We propose a novel, content adaptive method for motion-compensated three-dimensional wavelet transformation (MC 3-D DWT) of video. The proposed method overcomes problems of ghosting and nonaligned aliasing artifacts which can arise in regions of motion model failure, when the video is reconstructed at reduced temporal or spatial resolutions. Previous MC 3-D DWT structures either take the form of MC temporal DWT followed by a spatial transform ("t+2D"), or perform the spatial transform first ("2D + t"), limiting the spatial frequencies which can be jointly compensated in the temporal transform, and hence limiting the compression efficiency. When the motion model fails, the "t + 2D" structure causes nonaligned aliasing artifacts in reduced spatial resolution sequences. Essentially, the proposed transform continuously adapts itself between the "t + 2D" and "2D + t" structures, based on information available within the compressed bit stream. Ghosting artifacts may also appear in reduced frame-rate sequences due to temporal low-pass filtering along invalid motion trajectories. To avoid the ghosting artifacts, we continuously select between different low-pass temporal filters, based on the estimated accuracy of the motion model. Experimental results indicate that the proposed adaptive transform preserves high compression efficiency while substantially improving the quality of reduced spatial and temporal resolution sequences.

  5. A comparison of adaptive sampling designs and binary spatial models: A simulation study using a census of Bromus inermis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Kathryn M.; Thornton, Jamie; Backus, Vickie M.; Hohmann, Matthew G.; Lehnhoff, Erik A.; Maxwell, Bruce D.; Michels, Kurt; Rew, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Commonly in environmental and ecological studies, species distribution data are recorded as presence or absence throughout a spatial domain of interest. Field based studies typically collect observations by sampling a subset of the spatial domain. We consider the effects of six different adaptive and two non-adaptive sampling designs and choice of three binary models on both predictions to unsampled locations and parameter estimation of the regression coefficients (species–environment relationships). Our simulation study is unique compared to others to date in that we virtually sample a true known spatial distribution of a nonindigenous plant species, Bromus inermis. The census of B. inermis provides a good example of a species distribution that is both sparsely (1.9 % prevalence) and patchily distributed. We find that modeling the spatial correlation using a random effect with an intrinsic Gaussian conditionally autoregressive prior distribution was equivalent or superior to Bayesian autologistic regression in terms of predicting to un-sampled areas when strip adaptive cluster sampling was used to survey B. inermis. However, inferences about the relationships between B. inermis presence and environmental predictors differed between the two spatial binary models. The strip adaptive cluster designs we investigate provided a significant advantage in terms of Markov chain Monte Carlo chain convergence when trying to model a sparsely distributed species across a large area. In general, there was little difference in the choice of neighborhood, although the adaptive king was preferred when transects were randomly placed throughout the spatial domain.

  6. Adaptive spatial filtering for off-axis digital holographic microscopy based on region recognition approach with iterative thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuefei; Nguyen, Chuong Vinh; Pratap, Mrinalini; Zheng, Yujie; Wang, Yi; Nisbet, David R.; Rug, Melanie; Maier, Alexander G.; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Here we propose a region-recognition approach with iterative thresholding, which is adaptively tailored to extract the appropriate region or shape of spatial frequency. In order to justify the method, we tested it with different samples and imaging conditions (different objectives). We demonstrate that our method provides a useful method for rapid imaging of cellular dynamics in microfluidic and cell cultures.

  7. A comparison of the adaptations of strains of Lymantria dispar multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus to hosts from spatially isolated populations

    Treesearch

    V.V. Martemyanov; J.D. Podgwaite; I.A. Belousova; S.V. Pavlushin; J.M. Slavicek; O.A. Baturina; M.R. Kabilov; A.V. Ilyinykh

    2017-01-01

    The adaptation of pathogens to either their hosts or to environmental conditions is the focus of many current ecological studies. In this work we compared the ability of six spatially-distant Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) strains (three from eastern North America and three from central Asia) to induce acute...

  8. Contrast enhancement in microscopy of human thyroid tumors by means of acousto-optic adaptive spatial filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, Konstantin B.; Molchanov, Vladimir Y.; Belousov, Pavel V.; Abrosimov, Aleksander Y.

    2016-01-01

    We report a method for edge enhancement in the images of transparent samples using analog image processing in coherent light. The experimental technique is based on adaptive spatial filtering with an acousto-optic tunable filter in a telecentric optical system. We demonstrate processing of microscopic images of unstained and stained histological sections of human thyroid tumor with improved contrast.

  9. Conductivity image enhancement in MREIT using adaptively weighted spatial averaging filter.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Jeong, Woo Chul; Wi, Hun; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-06-26

    In magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), we reconstruct conductivity images using magnetic flux density data induced by externally injected currents. Since we extract magnetic flux density data from acquired MR phase images, the amount of measurement noise increases in regions of weak MR signals. Especially for local regions of MR signal void, there may occur excessive amounts of noise to deteriorate the quality of reconstructed conductivity images. In this paper, we propose a new conductivity image enhancement method as a postprocessing technique to improve the image quality. Within a magnetic flux density image, the amount of noise varies depending on the position-dependent MR signal intensity. Using the MR magnitude image which is always available in MREIT, we estimate noise levels of measured magnetic flux density data in local regions. Based on the noise estimates, we adjust the window size and weights of a spatial averaging filter, which is applied to reconstructed conductivity images. Without relying on a partial differential equation, the new method is fast and can be easily implemented. Applying the novel conductivity image enhancement method to experimental data, we could improve the image quality to better distinguish local regions with different conductivity contrasts. From phantom experiments, the estimated conductivity values had 80% less variations inside regions of homogeneous objects. Reconstructed conductivity images from upper and lower abdominal regions of animals showed much less artifacts in local regions of weak MR signals. We developed the fast and simple method to enhance the conductivity image quality by adaptively adjusting the weights and window size of the spatial averaging filter using MR magnitude images. Since the new method is implemented as a postprocessing step, we suggest adopting it without or with other preprocessing methods for application studies where conductivity contrast is of primary concern.

  10. An Attentional Adaptation Account of Spatial Negative Priming: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaonan L.; Walsh, Matthew M.; Reder, Lynne M.

    2014-01-01

    Negative priming (NP) refers to a slower response to a target stimulus if it has been previously ignored. To examine theoretical accounts of spatial NP, we recorded behavioral measures and event-related potentials (ERPs) in a target localization task. A target and distractor briefly appeared, and the participant pressed a key corresponding to the target's location. The probability of the distractor appearing in each of four locations varied, while the target appeared with equal probability in each location. We found that reaction times (RTs) were fastest when the prime distractor appeared in its most probable (frequent) location and when the prime target appeared in the location that never contained a distractor. Moreover, NP effects varied as a function of location: they were smallest when targets followed distractors in the frequent distractor location – a finding not predicted by episodic retrieval or suppression accounts of NP. ERP results showed that the P2, an ERP component associated with attentional orientation, was smaller in prime displays when the distractor appeared in its frequent location. Moreover there were no differences between negative prime and control trials in the N2, which is associated with suppression processes, nor in the P3, which is associated with episodic retrieval processes. These results indicate that the spatial NP effect is caused by both short- and long-term adaptation in preferences based on the history of inspecting unsuccessful locations. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Edward E. Smith and we indicate how this study is inspired by his research career. PMID:24464637

  11. An attentional-adaptation account of spatial negative priming: evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaonan L; Walsh, Matthew M; Reder, Lynne M

    2014-03-01

    Negative priming (NP) refers to a slower response to a target stimulus if it has been previously ignored. To examine theoretical accounts of spatial NP, we recorded behavioral measures and event-related potentials (ERPs) in a target localization task. A target and distractor briefly appeared, and the participant pressed a key corresponding to the target's location. The probability of the distractor appearing in each of four locations varied, whereas the target appeared with equal probabilities in all locations. We found that response times (RTs) were fastest when the prime distractor appeared in its most probable (frequent) location and when the prime target appeared in the location that never contained a distractor. Moreover, NP effects varied as a function of location: They were smallest when targets followed distractors in the frequent distractor location-a finding not predicted by episodic-retrieval or suppression accounts of NP. The ERP results showed that the P2, an ERP component associated with attentional orientation, was smaller in prime displays when the distractor appeared in its frequent location. Moreover, no differences were apparent between negative-prime and control trials in the N2, which is associated with suppression processes, nor in the P3, which is associated with episodic retrieval processes. These results indicate that the spatial NP effect is caused by both short- and long-term adaptation in preferences based on the history of inspecting unsuccessful locations. This article is dedicated to the memory of Edward E. Smith, and we indicate how this study was inspired by his research career.

  12. Fine-granularity and spatially-adaptive regularization for projection-based image deblurring.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin

    2011-04-01

    This paper studies two classes of regularization strategies to achieve an improved tradeoff between image recovery and noise suppression in projection-based image deblurring. The first is based on a simple fact that r-times Landweber iteration leads to a fixed level of regularization, which allows us to achieve fine-granularity control of projection-based iterative deblurring by varying the value r. The regularization behavior is explained by using the theory of Lagrangian multiplier for variational schemes. The second class of regularization strategy is based on the observation that various regularized filters can be viewed as nonexpansive mappings in the metric space. A deeper understanding about different regularization filters can be gained by probing into their asymptotic behavior--the fixed point of nonexpansive mappings. By making an analogy to the states of matter in statistical physics, we can observe that different image structures (smooth regions, regular edges and textures) correspond to different fixed points of nonexpansive mappings when the temperature(regularization) parameter varies. Such an analogy motivates us to propose a deterministic annealing based approach toward spatial adaptation in projection-based image deblurring. Significant performance improvements over the current state-of-the-art schemes have been observed in our experiments, which substantiates the effectiveness of the proposed regularization strategies.

  13. Evolution of cooperation in the spatial public goods game with adaptive reputation assortment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei-huan; Wang, Li; Sun, Shi-wen; Wang, Juan; Xia, Cheng-yi

    2016-01-01

    We present a new spatial public goods game model, which takes the individual reputation and behavior diversity into account at the same time, to investigate the evolution of cooperation. Initially, each player x will be endowed with an integer Rx between 1 and Rmax to characterize his reputation value, which will be adaptively varied according to the strategy action at each time step. Then, the agents play the game and the system proceeds in accordance with a Fermi-like rule, in which a multiplicative factor (wy) to denote the individual difference to perform the strategy transfer will be placed before the traditional Fermi probability. For influential participants, wy is set to be 1.0, but be a smaller value w (0 < w < 1) for non-influential ones. Large quantities of simulations demonstrate that the cooperation behavior will be obviously influenced by the reputation threshold (RC), and the greater the threshold, the higher the fraction of cooperators. The origin of promotion of cooperation will be attributed to the fact that the larger reputation threshold renders the higher heterogeneity in the fraction of two types of players and strategy spreading capability. Our work is conducive to a better understanding of the emergence of cooperation within many real-world systems.

  14. Survival and Adaptation of the Thermophilic Species Geobacillus thermantarcticus in Simulated Spatial Conditions.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Paola; Romano, Ida; Mastascusa, Vincenza; Poli, Annarita; Orlando, Pierangelo; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Nicolaus, Barbara

    2017-06-08

    Astrobiology studies the origin and evolution of life on Earth and in the universe. According to the panspermia theory, life on Earth could have emerged from bacterial species transported by meteorites, that were able to adapt and proliferate on our planet. Therefore, the study of extremophiles, i.e. bacterial species able to live in extreme terrestrial environments, can be relevant to Astrobiology studies. In this work we described the ability of the thermophilic species Geobacillus thermantarcticus to survive after exposition to simulated spatial conditions including temperature's variation, desiccation, X-rays and UVC irradiation. The response to the exposition to the space conditions was assessed at a molecular level by studying the changes in the morphology, the lipid and protein patterns, the nucleic acids. G. thermantarcticus survived to the exposition to all the stressing conditions examined, since it was able to restart cellular growth in comparable levels to control experiments carried out in the optimal growth conditions. Survival was elicited by changing proteins and lipids distribution, and by protecting the DNA's integrity.

  15. Adaptive engineering of coherent soft-x-rays by temporal and spatial laser-pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate qualitative amplitude shaping of the coherent soft x-ray spectrum produced in the process of high-harmonic generation. This is accomplished by applying adaptive femtosecond pulse shaping methods. We performed the basic operations of complete spectral control by 1) selective generation of extended parts of the high-harmonic spectra, 2) tunable single harmonic generation and 3) creation of spectral holes (suppression of harmonics) in the plateau region of the spectrum. Our ability to qualitatively ``engineer'' the coherent spectral properties by application of temporal and spatial laser-pulse-shaping methods has immediate consequences for the developing field of attosecond x-ray science. Control over the spectrum is directly related to the control over the attosecond pulse shape as we will show by comparing experiment with simulation. In addition, even more important is the prospect to extend the field of coherent control into the soft x-ray range. In the future, the proposed technique will allow us to directly manipulate electronic motion on its natural attosecond time scale.

  16. Improving spatial adaptivity of nonlocal means in low-dosed CT imaging using pointwise fractal dimension.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuqing; Liao, Zhiwu; Hu, Shaoxiang; Li, Ming; Zhou, Jiliu

    2013-01-01

    NLMs is a state-of-art image denoising method; however, it sometimes oversmoothes anatomical features in low-dose CT (LDCT) imaging. In this paper, we propose a simple way to improve the spatial adaptivity (SA) of NLMs using pointwise fractal dimension (PWFD). Unlike existing fractal image dimensions that are computed on the whole images or blocks of images, the new PWFD, named pointwise box-counting dimension (PWBCD), is computed for each image pixel. PWBCD uses a fixed size local window centered at the considered image pixel to fit the different local structures of images. Then based on PWBCD, a new method that uses PWBCD to improve SA of NLMs directly is proposed. That is, PWBCD is combined with the weight of the difference between local comparison windows for NLMs. Smoothing results for test images and real sinograms show that PWBCD-NLMs with well-chosen parameters can preserve anatomical features better while suppressing the noises efficiently. In addition, PWBCD-NLMs also has better performance both in visual quality and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) than NLMs in LDCT imaging.

  17. Adaptive electron beam shaping using a photoemission gun and spatial light modulator

    DOE PAGES

    Maxson, Jared; Lee, Hyeri; Bartnik, Adam C.; ...

    2015-02-01

    The need for precisely defined beam shapes in photoelectron sources has been well established. In this paper, we use a spatial light modulator and simple shaping algorithm to create arbitrary, detailed transverse laser shapes with high fidelity. We transmit this shaped laser to the photocathode of a high voltage dc gun. Using beam currents where space charge is negligible, and using an imaging solenoid and fluorescent viewscreen, we show that the resultant beam shape preserves these detailed features with similar fidelity. Next, instead of transmitting a shaped laser profile, we use an active feedback on the unshaped electron beam imagemore » to create equally accurate and detailed shapes. We demonstrate that this electron beam feedback has the added advantage of correcting for electron optical aberrations, yielding shapes without skew. The method may serve to provide precisely defined electron beams for low current target experiments, space-charge dominated beam commissioning, as well as for online adaptive correction of photocathode quantum efficiency degradation.« less

  18. Adaptive spatial compounding for improving ultrasound images of the epidural space on human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Denis; Hor, King-Wei; Kamani, Allaudin; Lessoway, Vickie; Rohling, Robert N.

    2008-03-01

    Administering epidural anesthesia can be a difficult procedure, especially for inexperienced physicians. The use of ultrasound imaging can help by showing the location of the key surrounding structures: the ligamentum flavum and the lamina of the vertebrae. The anatomical depiction of the interface between ligamentum flavum and epidural space is currently limited by speckle and anisotropic reflection. Previous work on phantoms showed that adaptive spatial compounding with non-rigid registration can improve the depiction of these features. This paper describes the development of an updated compounding algorithm and results from a clinical study. Average-based compounding may obscure anisotropic reflectors that only appear at certain beam angles, so a new median-based compounding technique is developed. In order to reduce the computational cost of the registration process, a linear prediction algorithm is used to reduce the search space for registration. The algorithms are tested on 20 human subjects. Comparisons are made among the reference image plus combinations of different compounding methods, warping and linear prediction. The gradient of the bone surfaces, the Laplacian of the ligamentum flavum, and the SNR and CNR are used to quantitatively assess the visibility of the features in the processed images. The results show a significant improvement in quality when median-based compounding with warping is used to align the set of beam-steered images and combine them. The improvement of the features makes detection of the epidural space easier.

  19. Radiative heat transfer between metallic gratings using Fourier modal method with adaptive spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Riccardo; Noto, Antonio; Guizal, Brahim; Antezza, Mauro

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the radiative heat transfer between two identical metallic one-dimensional lamellar gratings. To this aim we present and exploit a modification to the widely used Fourier modal method, known as adaptive spatial resolution, based on a stretch of the coordinate associated with the periodicity of the grating. We first show that this technique dramatically improves the rate of convergence when calculating the heat flux, allowing us to explore smaller separations. We then present a study of heat flux as a function of the grating height, highlighting a remarkable amplification of the exchanged energy, ascribed to the appearance of spoof-plasmon modes, whose behavior is also spectrally investigated. Differently from previous works, our method allows us to explore a range of grating heights extending over several orders of magnitude. By comparing our results to recent studies we find a consistent quantitative disagreement with some previously obtained results going up to 50%. In some cases, this disagreement is explained in terms of an incorrect connection between the reflection operators of the two gratings.

  20. Survival and Adaptation of the Thermophilic Species Geobacillus thermantarcticus in Simulated Spatial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, Paola; Romano, Ida; Mastascusa, Vincenza; Poli, Annarita; Orlando, Pierangelo; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Nicolaus, Barbara

    2017-06-01

    Astrobiology studies the origin and evolution of life on Earth and in the universe. According to the panspermia theory, life on Earth could have emerged from bacterial species transported by meteorites, that were able to adapt and proliferate on our planet. Therefore, the study of extremophiles, i.e. bacterial species able to live in extreme terrestrial environments, can be relevant to Astrobiology studies. In this work we described the ability of the thermophilic species Geobacillus thermantarcticus to survive after exposition to simulated spatial conditions including temperature's variation, desiccation, X-rays and UVC irradiation. The response to the exposition to the space conditions was assessed at a molecular level by studying the changes in the morphology, the lipid and protein patterns, the nucleic acids. G. thermantarcticus survived to the exposition to all the stressing conditions examined, since it was able to restart cellular growth in comparable levels to control experiments carried out in the optimal growth conditions. Survival was elicited by changing proteins and lipids distribution, and by protecting the DNA's integrity.

  1. Adaptive Bessel-autocorrelation of ultrashort pulses with phase-only spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huferath-von Luepke, Silke; Bock, Martin; Grunwald, Ruediger

    2009-06-01

    Recently, we proposed a new approach of a noncollinear correlation technique for ultrashort-pulsed coherent optical signals which was referred to as Bessel-autocorrelator (BAC). The BAC-principle combines the advantages of Bessellike nondiffracting beams like stable propagation, angular robustness and self-reconstruction with the principle of temporal autocorrelation. In comparison to other phase-sensitive measuring techniques, autocorrelation is most straightforward and time-effective because of non-iterative data processing. The analysis of nonlinearly converted fringe patterns of pulsed Bessel-like beams reveals their temporal signature from details of fringe envelopes. By splitting the beams with axicon arrays into multiple sub-beams, transversal resolution is approximated. Here we report on adaptive implementations of BACs with improved phase resolution realized by phase-only liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulators (LCoS-SLMs). Programming microaxicon phase functions in gray value maps enables for a flexible variation of phase and geometry. Experiments on the diagnostics of few-cycle pulses emitted by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser oscillator at wavelengths around 800 nm with 2D-BAC and angular tuned BAC were performed. All-optical phase shift BAC and fringe free BAC approaches are discussed.

  2. Dim small targets detection based on self-adaptive caliber temporal-spatial filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiangsuo; Xu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jianlin; Huang, Yongmei; Peng, Zhenming

    2017-09-01

    To boost the detect ability of dim small targets, this paper began by using improved anisotropy for background prediction (IABP), followed by target enhancement by improved high-order cumulates (HQS). Finally, on the basis of image pre-processing, to address the problem of missed and wrong detection caused by fixed caliber of traditional pipeline filtering, this paper used targets' multi-frame movement correlation in the time-space domain, combined with the scale-space theory, to propose a temporal-spatial filtering algorithm which allows the caliber to make self-adaptive changes according to the changes of the targets' scale, effectively solving the detection-related issues brought by unchanged caliber and decreased/increased size of the targets. Experiments showed that the improved anisotropic background predication could be loyal to the true background of the original image to the maximum extent, presenting a superior overall performance to other background prediction methods; the improved HQS significantly increased the signal-noise ratio of images; when the signal-noise ratio was lower than 2.6 dB, this detection algorithm could effectively eliminate noise and detect targets. For the algorithm, the lowest signal-to-noise ratio of the detectable target is 0.37.

  3. Using a "time machine" to test for local adaptation of aquatic microbes to temporal and spatial environmental variation.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jeremy W; Harder, Lawrence D

    2015-01-01

    Local adaptation occurs when different environments are dominated by different specialist genotypes, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions and relatively unfit under other conditions. Analogously, ecological species sorting occurs when different environments are dominated by different competing species, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions. The simplest theory predicts that spatial, but not temporal, environmental variation selects for local adaptation (or generates species sorting), but this prediction is difficult to test. Although organisms can be reciprocally transplanted among sites, doing so among times seems implausible. Here, we describe a reciprocal transplant experiment testing for local adaptation or species sorting of lake bacteria in response to both temporal and spatial variation in water chemistry. The experiment used a -80°C freezer as a "time machine." Bacterial isolates and water samples were frozen for later use, allowing transplantation of older isolates "forward in time" and newer isolates "backward in time." Surprisingly, local maladaptation predominated over local adaptation in both space and time. Such local maladaptation may indicate that adaptation, or the analogous species sorting process, fails to keep pace with temporal fluctuations in water chemistry. This hypothesis could be tested with more finely resolved temporal data.

  4. A collaborative adaptive Wiener filter for image restoration using a spatial-domain multi-patch correlation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Khaled M.; Hardie, Russell C.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new patch-based image restoration algorithm using an adaptive Wiener filter (AWF) with a novel spatial-domain multi-patch correlation model. The new filter structure is referred to as a collaborative adaptive Wiener filter (CAWF). The CAWF employs a finite size moving window. At each position, the current observation window represents the reference patch. We identify the most similar patches in the image within a given search window about the reference patch. A single-stage weighted sum of all of the pixels in the similar patches is used to estimate the center pixel in the reference patch. The weights are based on a new multi-patch correlation model that takes into account each pixel's spatial distance to the center of its corresponding patch, as well as the intensity vector distances among the similar patches. One key advantage of the CAWF approach, compared with many other patch-based algorithms, is that it can jointly handle blur and noise. Furthermore, it can also readily treat spatially varying signal and noise statistics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multi-patch algorithm to use a single spatial-domain weighted sum of all pixels within multiple similar patches to form its estimate and the first to use a spatial-domain multi-patch correlation model to determine the weights. The experimental results presented show that the proposed method delivers high performance in image restoration in a variety of scenarios.

  5. Adaptive Optics with a Liquid-Crystal-on-Silicon Spatial Light Modulator and Its Behavior in Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Tomohiro; Takeno, Kohei; Arimoto, Hidenobu; Furukawa, Hiromitsu

    2009-07-01

    An adaptive optics system with a brand-new device of a liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCOS) spatial light modulator (SLM) and its behavior in in vivo imaging of the human retina are described. We confirmed by experiments that closed-loop correction of ocular aberrations of the subject's eye was successfully achieved at the rate of 16.7 Hz in our system to obtain a clear retinal image in real time. The result suggests that an LCOS SLM is one of the promising candidates for a wavefront corrector in a prospective commercial ophthalmic instrument with adaptive optics.

  6. Spatially adaptive radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation during cosmological reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, Andreas H.; Schaye, Joop; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    We present a suite of cosmological radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the assembly of galaxies driving the reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z ≳ 6. The simulations account for the hydrodynamical feedback from photoionization heating and the explosion of massive stars as supernovae (SNe). Our reference simulation, which was carried out in a box of size 25 h-1 comovingMpc using 2 × 5123 particles, produces a reasonable reionization history and matches the observed UV luminosity function of galaxies. Simulations with different box sizes and resolutions are used to investigate numerical convergence, and simulations in which either SNe or photoionization heating or both are turned off, are used to investigate the role of feedback from star formation. Ionizing radiation is treated using accurate radiative transfer at the high spatially adaptive resolution at which the hydrodynamics is carried out. SN feedback strongly reduces the star formation rates (SFRs) over nearly the full mass range of simulated galaxies and is required to yield SFRs in agreement with observations. Photoheating helps to suppress star formation in low-mass galaxies, but its impact on the cosmic SFR is small. Because the effect of photoheating is masked by the strong SN feedback, it does not imprint a signature on the UV galaxy luminosity function, although we note that our resolution is insufficient to model star-forming minihaloes cooling through molecular hydrogen transitions. Photoheating does provide a strong positive feedback on reionization because it smooths density fluctuations in the IGM, which lowers the IGM recombination rate substantially. Our simulations demonstrate a tight non-linear coupling of galaxy formation and reionization, motivating the need for the accurate and simultaneous inclusion of photoheating and SN feedback in models of the early Universe.

  7. Development of a new computerized prism adaptation procedure for visuo-spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Champod, Anne Sophie; Taylor, Kristina; Eskes, Gail A

    2014-09-30

    Prism adaptation (PA) is a promising rehabilitation technique for visuo-spatial neglect. However, PA effects are often inconsistent across studies and the clinical application of this technique has been limited. The purpose of the present studies was to validate an easily standardized, home-friendly, and game-like PA technique (Peg-the-Mole) with healthy participants as a first step toward clinical development. In study 1, we used Peg-the-Mole with 32 participants wearing prism or sham goggles to investigate whether this procedure can induce significant after-effects on midline judgment and pointing tasks. In study 2, we compared Peg-the-Mole to a typical PA protocol in 42 participants for after-effects and level of enjoyment and to determine if the after-effects generalize to a throwing task. Study 1 showed that Peg-the-Mole induced significant after-effects on all outcome measures. Study 2 demonstrated that after-effects induced by Peg-the-Mole were equivalent to those induced by the typical PA procedure on all outcome measures. Peg-the-Mole was rated as more enjoyable than the typical procedure. Peg-the-Mole is a new computerized PA procedure that can be easily standardized and successfully used to induce significant after-effects. The present findings demonstrate that alterations can be made to the typical PA procedure to make it easier to use and more enjoyable, factors that could increase treatment availability, adherence and intensity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Spatial assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory interaction energy components: The atomic SAPT partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Robert M.; Sherrill, C. David

    2014-07-01

    We develop a physically-motivated assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory for intermolecular interactions (SAPT) into atom-pairwise contributions (the A-SAPT partition). The basic precept of A-SAPT is that the many-body interaction energy components are computed normally under the formalism of SAPT, following which a spatially-localized two-body quasiparticle interaction is extracted from the many-body interaction terms. For electrostatics and induction source terms, the relevant quasiparticles are atoms, which are obtained in this work through the iterative stockholder analysis (ISA) procedure. For the exchange, induction response, and dispersion terms, the relevant quasiparticles are local occupied orbitals, which are obtained in this work through the Pipek-Mezey procedure. The local orbital atomic charges obtained from ISA additionally allow the terms involving local orbitals to be assigned in an atom-pairwise manner. Further summation over the atoms of one or the other monomer allows for a chemically intuitive visualization of the contribution of each atom and interaction component to the overall noncovalent interaction strength. Herein, we present the intuitive development and mathematical form for A-SAPT applied in the SAPT0 approximation (the A-SAPT0 partition). We also provide an efficient series of algorithms for the computation of the A-SAPT0 partition with essentially the same computational cost as the corresponding SAPT0 decomposition. We probe the sensitivity of the A-SAPT0 partition to the ISA grid and convergence parameter, orbital localization metric, and induction coupling treatment, and recommend a set of practical choices which closes the definition of the A-SAPT0 partition. We demonstrate the utility and computational tractability of the A-SAPT0 partition in the context of side-on cation-π interactions and the intercalation of DNA by proflavine. A-SAPT0 clearly shows the key processes in these complicated noncovalent interactions, in

  9. Retrieval of Brain Tumors by Adaptive Spatial Pooling and Fisher Vector Representation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meiyan; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Yujia; Yang, Ru; Zhao, Jie; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2016-01-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques have currently gained increasing popularity in the medical field because they can use numerous and valuable archived images to support clinical decisions. In this paper, we concentrate on developing a CBIR system for retrieving brain tumors in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI images. Specifically, when the user roughly outlines the tumor region of a query image, brain tumor images in the database of the same pathological type are expected to be returned. We propose a novel feature extraction framework to improve the retrieval performance. The proposed framework consists of three steps. First, we augment the tumor region and use the augmented tumor region as the region of interest to incorporate informative contextual information. Second, the augmented tumor region is split into subregions by an adaptive spatial division method based on intensity orders; within each subregion, we extract raw image patches as local features. Third, we apply the Fisher kernel framework to aggregate the local features of each subregion into a respective single vector representation and concatenate these per-subregion vector representations to obtain an image-level signature. After feature extraction, a closed-form metric learning algorithm is applied to measure the similarity between the query image and database images. Extensive experiments are conducted on a large dataset of 3604 images with three types of brain tumors, namely, meningiomas, gliomas, and pituitary tumors. The mean average precision can reach 94.68%. Experimental results demonstrate the power of the proposed algorithm against some related state-of-the-art methods on the same dataset. PMID:27273091

  10. Does prism adaptation affect visual search in spatial neglect patients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    De Wit, Liselotte; Ten Brink, Antonia F; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2016-02-11

    Prism adaptation (PA) is a widely used intervention for (visuo-)spatial neglect. PA-induced improvements can be assessed by visual search tasks. It remains unclear which outcome measures are the most sensitive for the effects of PA in neglect. In this review, we aimed to evaluate PA effects on visual search measures. A systematic literature search was completed regarding PA intervention studies focusing on patients with neglect using visual search tasks. Information about study content and effectiveness was extracted. Out of 403 identified studies, 30 met the inclusion criteria. The quality of the studies was evaluated: Rankings were moderate-to-high for 7, and low for 23 studies. As feature search was only performed by five studies, low-to-moderate ranking, we were limited in drawing firm conclusions about the PA effect on feature search. All moderate-to-high-ranking studies investigated cancellation by measuring only omissions or hits. These studies found an overall improvement after PA. Measuring perseverations and total task duration provides more specific information about visual search. The two (low ranking) studies that measured this found an improvement after PA on perseverations and duration (while accuracy improved for one study and remained the same for the other). This review suggests there is an overall effect of PA on visual search, although complex visual search tasks and specific visual search measures are lacking. Suggestions for search measures that give insight in subcomponents of visual search are provided for future studies, such as perseverations, search path intersections, search consistency and using a speed-accuracy trade-off. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Spatial assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory interaction energy components: The atomic SAPT partition.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Robert M; Sherrill, C David

    2014-07-28

    We develop a physically-motivated assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory for intermolecular interactions (SAPT) into atom-pairwise contributions (the A-SAPT partition). The basic precept of A-SAPT is that the many-body interaction energy components are computed normally under the formalism of SAPT, following which a spatially-localized two-body quasiparticle interaction is extracted from the many-body interaction terms. For electrostatics and induction source terms, the relevant quasiparticles are atoms, which are obtained in this work through the iterative stockholder analysis (ISA) procedure. For the exchange, induction response, and dispersion terms, the relevant quasiparticles are local occupied orbitals, which are obtained in this work through the Pipek-Mezey procedure. The local orbital atomic charges obtained from ISA additionally allow the terms involving local orbitals to be assigned in an atom-pairwise manner. Further summation over the atoms of one or the other monomer allows for a chemically intuitive visualization of the contribution of each atom and interaction component to the overall noncovalent interaction strength. Herein, we present the intuitive development and mathematical form for A-SAPT applied in the SAPT0 approximation (the A-SAPT0 partition). We also provide an efficient series of algorithms for the computation of the A-SAPT0 partition with essentially the same computational cost as the corresponding SAPT0 decomposition. We probe the sensitivity of the A-SAPT0 partition to the ISA grid and convergence parameter, orbital localization metric, and induction coupling treatment, and recommend a set of practical choices which closes the definition of the A-SAPT0 partition. We demonstrate the utility and computational tractability of the A-SAPT0 partition in the context of side-on cation-π interactions and the intercalation of DNA by proflavine. A-SAPT0 clearly shows the key processes in these complicated noncovalent interactions, in

  12. Spatial assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory interaction energy components: The atomic SAPT partition

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, Robert M.; Sherrill, C. David

    2014-07-28

    We develop a physically-motivated assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory for intermolecular interactions (SAPT) into atom-pairwise contributions (the A-SAPT partition). The basic precept of A-SAPT is that the many-body interaction energy components are computed normally under the formalism of SAPT, following which a spatially-localized two-body quasiparticle interaction is extracted from the many-body interaction terms. For electrostatics and induction source terms, the relevant quasiparticles are atoms, which are obtained in this work through the iterative stockholder analysis (ISA) procedure. For the exchange, induction response, and dispersion terms, the relevant quasiparticles are local occupied orbitals, which are obtained in this work through the Pipek-Mezey procedure. The local orbital atomic charges obtained from ISA additionally allow the terms involving local orbitals to be assigned in an atom-pairwise manner. Further summation over the atoms of one or the other monomer allows for a chemically intuitive visualization of the contribution of each atom and interaction component to the overall noncovalent interaction strength. Herein, we present the intuitive development and mathematical form for A-SAPT applied in the SAPT0 approximation (the A-SAPT0 partition). We also provide an efficient series of algorithms for the computation of the A-SAPT0 partition with essentially the same computational cost as the corresponding SAPT0 decomposition. We probe the sensitivity of the A-SAPT0 partition to the ISA grid and convergence parameter, orbital localization metric, and induction coupling treatment, and recommend a set of practical choices which closes the definition of the A-SAPT0 partition. We demonstrate the utility and computational tractability of the A-SAPT0 partition in the context of side-on cation-π interactions and the intercalation of DNA by proflavine. A-SAPT0 clearly shows the key processes in these complicated noncovalent interactions, in

  13. The adaptive value of habitat preferences from a multi-scale spatial perspective: insights from marsh-nesting avian species.

    PubMed

    Jedlikowski, Jan; Brambilla, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    Habitat selection and its adaptive outcomes are crucial features for animal life-history strategies. Nevertheless, congruence between habitat preferences and breeding success has been rarely demonstrated, which may result from the single-scale evaluation of animal choices. As habitat selection is a complex multi-scale process in many groups of animal species, investigating adaptiveness of habitat selection in a multi-scale framework is crucial. In this study, we explore whether habitat preferences acting at different spatial scales enhance the fitness of bird species, and check the appropriateness of single vs. multi-scale models. We expected that variables found to be more important for habitat selection at individual scale(s), would coherently play a major role in affecting nest survival at the same scale(s). We considered habitat preferences of two Rallidae species, little crake (Zapornia parva) and water rail (Rallus aquaticus), at three spatial scales (landscape, territory, and nest-site) and related them to nest survival. Single-scale versus multi-scale models (GLS and glmmPQL) were compared to check which model better described adaptiveness of habitat preferences. Consistency between the effect of variables on habitat selection and on nest survival was checked to investigate their adaptive value. In both species, multi-scale models for nest survival were more supported than single-scale ones. In little crake, the multi-scale model indicated vegetation density and water depth at the territory scale, as well as vegetation height at nest-site scale, as the most important variables. The first two variables were among the most important for nest survival and habitat selection, and the coherent effects suggested the adaptive value of habitat preferences. In water rail, the multi-scale model of nest survival showed vegetation density at territory scale and extent of emergent vegetation within landscape scale as the most important ones, although we found a

  14. The adaptive value of habitat preferences from a multi-scale spatial perspective: insights from marsh-nesting avian species

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    Background Habitat selection and its adaptive outcomes are crucial features for animal life-history strategies. Nevertheless, congruence between habitat preferences and breeding success has been rarely demonstrated, which may result from the single-scale evaluation of animal choices. As habitat selection is a complex multi-scale process in many groups of animal species, investigating adaptiveness of habitat selection in a multi-scale framework is crucial. In this study, we explore whether habitat preferences acting at different spatial scales enhance the fitness of bird species, and check the appropriateness of single vs. multi-scale models. We expected that variables found to be more important for habitat selection at individual scale(s), would coherently play a major role in affecting nest survival at the same scale(s). Methods We considered habitat preferences of two Rallidae species, little crake (Zapornia parva) and water rail (Rallus aquaticus), at three spatial scales (landscape, territory, and nest-site) and related them to nest survival. Single-scale versus multi-scale models (GLS and glmmPQL) were compared to check which model better described adaptiveness of habitat preferences. Consistency between the effect of variables on habitat selection and on nest survival was checked to investigate their adaptive value. Results In both species, multi-scale models for nest survival were more supported than single-scale ones. In little crake, the multi-scale model indicated vegetation density and water depth at the territory scale, as well as vegetation height at nest-site scale, as the most important variables. The first two variables were among the most important for nest survival and habitat selection, and the coherent effects suggested the adaptive value of habitat preferences. In water rail, the multi-scale model of nest survival showed vegetation density at territory scale and extent of emergent vegetation within landscape scale as the most important ones

  15. Excitation and Adaptation in Bacteria–a Model Signal Transduction System that Controls Taxis and Spatial Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Othmer, Hans G.; Xin, Xiangrong; Xue, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    The machinery for transduction of chemotactic stimuli in the bacterium E. coli is one of the most completely characterized signal transduction systems, and because of its relative simplicity, quantitative analysis of this system is possible. Here we discuss models which reproduce many of the important behaviors of the system. The important characteristics of the signal transduction system are excitation and adaptation, and the latter implies that the transduction system can function as a “derivative sensor” with respect to the ligand concentration in that the DC component of a signal is ultimately ignored if it is not too large. This temporal sensing mechanism provides the bacterium with a memory of its passage through spatially- or temporally-varying signal fields, and adaptation is essential for successful chemotaxis. We also discuss some of the spatial patterns observed in populations and indicate how cell-level behavior can be embedded in population-level descriptions. PMID:23624608

  16. Excitation and adaptation in bacteria-a model signal transduction system that controls taxis and spatial pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Othmer, Hans G; Xin, Xiangrong; Xue, Chuan

    2013-04-26

    The machinery for transduction of chemotactic stimuli in the bacterium E. coli is one of the most completely characterized signal transduction systems, and because of its relative simplicity, quantitative analysis of this system is possible. Here we discuss models which reproduce many of the important behaviors of the system. The important characteristics of the signal transduction system are excitation and adaptation, and the latter implies that the transduction system can function as a "derivative sensor" with respect to the ligand concentration in that the DC component of a signal is ultimately ignored if it is not too large. This temporal sensing mechanism provides the bacterium with a memory of its passage through spatially- or temporally-varying signal fields, and adaptation is essential for successful chemotaxis. We also discuss some of the spatial patterns observed in populations and indicate how cell-level behavior can be embedded in population-level descriptions.

  17. Spatial perception changes associated with space flight: implications for adaptation to altered inertial environments.

    PubMed

    Parker, Donald E

    2003-01-01

    Preparation for extended travel by astronauts within the Solar System, including a possible manned mission to Mars, requires more complete understanding of adaptation to altered inertial environments. Improved understanding is needed to support development and evaluation of interventions to facilitate adaptations during transitions between those environments. Travel to another planet escalates the adaptive challenge because astronauts will experience prolonged exposure to microgravity before encountering a novel gravitational environment. This challenge would have to be met without ground support at the landing site. Evaluation of current adaptive status as well as intervention efficacy can be performed using perceptual, eye movement and postural measures. Due to discrepancies of adaptation magnitude and time-course among these measures, complete understanding of adaptation processes, as well as intervention evaluation, requires examination of all three. Previous research and theory that provide models for comprehending adaptation to altered inertial environments are briefly examined. Reports from astronauts of selected pre- in- and postflight self-motion illusions are described. The currently controversial tilt-translation reinterpretation hypothesis is reviewed and possible resolutions to the controversy are proposed. Finally, based on apparent gaps in our current knowledge, further research is proposed to achieve a more complete understanding of adaptation as well as to develop effective counter-measures.

  18. Adaptive evolution of Escherichia coli to Ciprofloxacin in controlled stress environments: emergence of tolerance in spatial and temporal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, J.; Sanford, R. A.; Dong, Y.; Shechtman, L. A.; Zhou, L.; Alcalde, R.; Werth, C. J.; Fouke, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    Microorganisms in nature have evolved in response to a variety of environmental stresses, including gradients of temperature, pH, substrate availability and aqueous chemistry. While environmental stresses are considered to be the driving forces of adaptive evolution, the impact and extent of any specific stress needed to drive such changes has not been well characterized. In this study, the antibiotic Ciprofloxacin was used as a stressor and systematically applied to E. coli st. 307 cells via a spatial gradient in a microfluidic pore network and a temporal gradient in batch cultures. The microfluidic device facilitated in vitro real-time tracking of bacterial abundances and dynamic spatial distributions in response to the gradients of both the antibiotic and nutrients. Cells collected from the microfluidic device showed growth on plates containing up to 10-times the original minimum inhibition concentration (MIC). In batch systems, Ciprofloxacin was used to evaluate adaptive responses via temporal gradients, in which the stressor concentration was incrementally increased over time with each transfer of the culture after 24 hours of growth. Responses of E. coli 307 to these stress patterns were measured by quantifying changes in the MIC for Ciprofloxacin. Over a period of 18 days of step-wise concentration increments, bacterial cells were observed to acquire tolerance gradually and eventually adapt to a 28-fold increase in the original MIC. Samples at different stages within the temporal Ciprofloxacin gradient treatment show different extents of resistance. All samples exhibited resistance exceeding the highest exposure stress concentration. In combination with the spatial and temporal gradient systems, this work provides the first comprehensive measure of the dynamic resistance of E. coli in response to Ciprofloxacin concentration gradients. These will provide invaluable insights to understand the effects of antibiotic stresses on bacterial adaptive evolution in

  19. A New Perspective on Changing Arctic Marine Ecosystems: Panarchy Adaptive Cycles in Pan-Arctic Spatial and Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, F. K.; Huntington, H. P.; Carmack, E.; Wassmann, P. F. J.; Leu, E. S.; Gradinger, R.

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the physical/biological interactions in the Arctic are occurring across a variety of spatial and temporal scales and may be mitigated or strengthened based on varying rates of evolutionary adaptation. A novel way to view these interactions and their social relevance is through the systems theory perspective of "Panarchy" proposed by Gunderson and Holling. Panarchy is an interdisciplinary approach in which structures, scales and linkages of complex-adaptive systems, including those of nature (e.g. ocean), humans (e.g. economics), and combined social-ecological systems (e.g. institutions that govern natural resource use), are mapped across multiple space and time scales in continual and interactive adaptive cycles of growth, accumulation, restructuring and renewal. In complex-adaptive systems the dynamics at a given scale are generally dominated by a small number of key internal variables that are forced by one or more external variables. The stability of such a system is characterized by its resilience, i.e. its capacity to absorb disturbance and re-organize while undergoing change, so as to retain essentially similar function, structure, identity and feedbacks. It is in the capacity of a system to cope with pressures and adversities such as exploitation, warming, governance restrictions, competition, etc. that resilience embraces human and natural systems as complex entities continually adapting through cycles of change. In this paper we explore processes at four linked spatial domains in the Arctic Ocean and link it to ecosystem resilience and re-organization characteristics. From this we derive a series of hypotheses concerning the biological responses to future physical changes and suggest ways how Panarchy theory can be applied to observational strategies to help detect early signs of environmental shifts affecting marine system services and functions. We close by discussing possible implications of the Panarchy framework for policy and governance.

  20. Adaptation of the speech, spatial, and qualities of hearing scale for use with children, parents, and teachers.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Karyn L; Noble, William

    2013-06-01

    Subjective assessment of hearing ability in everyday life complements more objective forms of evaluation. A broad evaluation of the additional benefit provided to children by a second bilateral cochlear implant required such an assessment. As no paediatric tool provided detailed evaluation of performance in the areas of daily listening in which benefit was likely to be demonstrated, an adult questionnaire was adapted. Items of the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) focused mainly, although not exclusively, on hearing functions requiring the binaural system. The adapted child, parent, and teacher versions of the SSQ retained the structure of rating listening performance in everyday scenarios across the domains of speech perception, spatial hearing, and other qualities of hearing. Modifications were minimized, although deletion of some items and wording changes were required, and some subdomains could not be included. Observation periods were introduced so that parents and teachers observe performance prior to providing ratings. The suggested minimum age is 11 years for the child version and 5 years for the parent and teacher versions. Instructions indicate interview-style administration in which interpretation of the described listening scenarios can be clarified and use of the ruler-style response format demonstrated. Researchers applying the SSQ for parents have reported higher performance ratings for bilateral over unilateral cochlear implants, particularly in the spatial hearing domain. Further research should provide evidence for the target age range, compare child and parent responses, and evaluate modifications for use with younger children.

  1. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Adaptive compensation of atmospheric phase distortions using the spatial spectrum of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriev, A. V.; Zimin, Yu A.; Tolmachev, Alexei I.

    1987-10-01

    A theoretical investigation is reported of an algorithm for adaptive compensation of atmospheric phase distortions using the spatial spectrum of images. This algorithm can be used to reconstruct images of incoherently illuminated objects of arbitrary shape.

  2. Parallel phase-shifting digital holography with adaptive function using phase-mode spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Miao; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2012-05-10

    Parallel phase-shifting digital holography using a phase-mode spatial light modulator (SLM) is proposed. The phase-mode SLM implements spatial distribution of phase retardation required in the parallel phase-shifting digital holography. This SLM can also compensate dynamically the phase distortion caused by optical elements such as beam splitters, lenses, and air fluctuation. Experimental demonstration using a static object is presented.

  3. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  4. Spatial, Hysteretic, and Adaptive Host-Guest Chemistry in a Metal-Organic Framework with Open Watson-Crick Sites.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong; Li, Mian; Lin, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Wei; Chen, Guang-Hui; Huang, Xiao-Chun; Li, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Biological and artificial molecules and assemblies capable of supramolecular recognition, especially those with nucleobase pairing, usually rely on autonomous or collective binding to function. Advanced site-specific recognition takes advantage of cooperative spatial effects, as in local folding in protein-DNA binding. Herein, we report a new nucleobase-tagged metal-organic framework (MOF), namely ZnBTCA (BTC=benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxyl, A=adenine), in which the exposed Watson-Crick faces of adenine residues are immobilized periodically on the interior crystalline surface. Systematic control experiments demonstrated the cooperation of the open Watson-Crick sites and spatial effects within the nanopores, and thermodynamic and kinetic studies revealed a hysteretic host-guest interaction attributed to mild chemisorption. We further exploited this behavior for adenine-thymine binding within the constrained pores, and a globally adaptive response of the MOF host was observed.

  5. Adapting geostatistics to analyze spatial and temporal trends in weed populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Geostatistics were originally developed in mining to estimate the location, abundance and quality of ore over large areas from soil samples to optimize future mining efforts. Here, some of these methods were adapted to weeds to account for a limited distribution area (i.e., inside a field), variatio...

  6. Adaptive illumination through spatial modulation of light intensity and image inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, P.; Cecchini, S.; Stroppa, L.; Paone, N.

    2013-05-01

    The paper introduces the concept of spatial modulation of light intensity in the context of vision-based quality control, with the aim to improve image quality, measurable by indices such as image contrast and Tenengrad, so as to enhance the level of confidence of the diagnosis performed by image processing. The proposed technique is based on the projection of spatially modulated light intensity distribution by a digital light projector that allows an arbitrary light distribution to be projected on the target. The projected spatial distribution of light is determined by implementing an algorithm based on image inversion: the image acquired by the camera under uniform illumination is inverted and it is then used to modulate the light spatial distribution for projection. The process is repeated iteratively with the purpose to enhance image quality until convergence. The technique proves particularly valuable to avoid saturation from reflecting surfaces, which are often found in industrial practice. The procedure is tested and validated both by a numerical model and by an experimental validation, referring to a significant problem for the washing machine manufacturing industry. The use of image quality estimators confirms the effectiveness of the method.

  7. Spatially distinct response of rice yield to autonomous adaptation under the CMIP5 multi-model projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yonghee; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Im, Eun-Soon; Jung, Il-Won

    2017-02-01

    Rice ( Oryza sativa L.) is a very important staple crop, as it feeds more than half of the world's population. Numerous studies have focused on the negative impacts of climate change on rice production. However, there is little debate on which region of the world is more vulnerable to climate change and how adaptation to this change can mitigate the negative impacts on rice production. We investigated the impacts of climate change on rice yield, based on simulations combining a global crop model, M-GAZE, and Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) multi-model projections. Our focus was the impact of mitigating emission forcings (representative concentration pathway RCP 4.5 vs. RCP 8.5) and autonomous adaptation (i.e., changing crop variety and planting date) on rice yield. In general, our results showed that climate change due to anthropogenic warming leads to a significant reduction in rice yield. However, autonomous adaptation provides the potential to reduce the negative impact of global warming on rice yields in a spatially distinct manner. The adaptation was less beneficial for countries located at a low latitude (e.g., Cambodia, Thailand, Brazil) compared to mid-latitude countries (e.g., USA, China, Pakistan), as regional climates at the lower latitudes are already near the upper temperature thresholds for acceptable rice growth. These findings suggest that the socioeconomic effects from rice production in lowlatitude countries can be highly vulnerable to anthropogenic global warming. Therefore, these countries need to be accountable to develop transformative adaptation strategies, such as adopting (or developing) heat-tolerant varieties, and/or improve irrigation systems and fertilizer use efficiency.

  8. Prism adaptation does not change the rightward spatial preference bias found with ambiguous stimuli in unilateral neglect

    PubMed Central

    Sarri, Margarita; Greenwood, Richard; Kalra, Lalit; Driver, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that prism adaptation (prism adaptation) can ameliorate several symptoms of spatial neglect after right-hemisphere damage. But the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Recently we reported that prisms may increase leftward awareness for neglect in a task using chimeric visual objects, despite apparently not affecting awareness in a task using chimeric emotional faces (Sarri et al., 2006). Here we explored potential reasons for this apparent discrepancy in outcome, by testing further whether the lack of a prism effect on the chimeric face task task could be explained by: i) the specific category of stimuli used (faces as opposed to objects); ii) the affective nature of the stimuli; and/or iii) the particular task implemented, with the chimeric face task requiring forced-choice judgements of lateral ‘preference’ between pairs of identical, but left/right mirror-reversed chimeric face tasks (as opposed to identification for the chimeric object task). We replicated our previous pattern of no impact of prisms on the emotional chimeric face task here in a new series of patients, while also similarly finding no beneficial impact on another lateral ‘preference’ measure that used non-face non-emotional stimuli, namely greyscale gradients. By contrast, we found the usual beneficial impact of prism adaptation (prism adaptation) on some conventional measures of neglect, and improvements for at least some patients in a different face task, requiring explicit discrimination of the chimeric or non-chimeric nature of face stimuli. The new findings indicate that prism therapy does not alter spatial biases in neglect as revealed by ‘lateral preference tasks’ that have no right or wrong answer (requiring forced-choice judgements on left/right mirror-reversed stimuli), regardless of whether these employ face or non-face stimuli. But our data also show that prism therapy can beneficially modulate some aspects of visual awareness in spatial

  9. Prism adaptation does not change the rightward spatial preference bias found with ambiguous stimuli in unilateral neglect.

    PubMed

    Sarri, Margarita; Greenwood, Richard; Kalra, Lalit; Driver, Jon

    2011-03-01

    Previous research has shown that prism adaptation (prism adaptation) can ameliorate several symptoms of spatial neglect after right-hemisphere damage. But the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Recently we reported that prisms may increase leftward awareness for neglect in a task using chimeric visual objects, despite apparently not affecting awareness in a task using chimeric emotional faces (Sarri et al., 2006). Here we explored potential reasons for this apparent discrepancy in outcome, by testing further whether the lack of a prism effect on the chimeric face task task could be explained by: i) the specific category of stimuli used (faces as opposed to objects); ii) the affective nature of the stimuli; and/or iii) the particular task implemented, with the chimeric face task requiring forced-choice judgements of lateral 'preference' between pairs of identical, but left/right mirror-reversed chimeric face tasks (as opposed to identification for the chimeric object task). We replicated our previous pattern of no impact of prisms on the emotional chimeric face task here in a new series of patients, while also similarly finding no beneficial impact on another lateral 'preference' measure that used non-face non-emotional stimuli, namely greyscale gradients. By contrast, we found the usual beneficial impact of prism adaptation (prism adaptation) on some conventional measures of neglect, and improvements for at least some patients in a different face task, requiring explicit discrimination of the chimeric or non-chimeric nature of face stimuli. The new findings indicate that prism therapy does not alter spatial biases in neglect as revealed by 'lateral preference tasks' that have no right or wrong answer (requiring forced-choice judgements on left/right mirror-reversed stimuli), regardless of whether these employ face or non-face stimuli. But our data also show that prism therapy can beneficially modulate some aspects of visual awareness in spatial neglect not

  10. Spatial co-adaptation of cortical control columns in a micro-ECoG brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, A. G.; Williams, J. J.; Wheeler, J. J.; Moran, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Electrocorticography (ECoG) has been used for a range of applications including electrophysiological mapping, epilepsy monitoring, and more recently as a recording modality for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Studies that examine ECoG electrodes designed and implanted chronically solely for BCI applications remain limited. The present study explored how two key factors influence chronic, closed-loop ECoG BCI: (i) the effect of inter-electrode distance on BCI performance and (ii) the differences in neural adaptation and performance when fixed versus adaptive BCI decoding weights are used. Approach. The amplitudes of epidural micro-ECoG signals between 75 and 105 Hz with 300 μm diameter electrodes were used for one-dimensional and two-dimensional BCI tasks. The effect of inter-electrode distance on BCI control was tested between 3 and 15 mm. Additionally, the performance and cortical modulation differences between constant, fixed decoding using a small subset of channels versus adaptive decoding weights using the entire array were explored. Main results. Successful BCI control was possible with two electrodes separated by 9 and 15 mm. Performance decreased and the signals became more correlated when the electrodes were only 3 mm apart. BCI performance in a 2D BCI task improved significantly when using adaptive decoding weights (80%-90%) compared to using constant, fixed weights (50%-60%). Additionally, modulation increased for channels previously unavailable for BCI control under the fixed decoding scheme upon switching to the adaptive, all-channel scheme. Significance. Our results clearly show that neural activity under a BCI recording electrode (which we define as a ‘cortical control column’) readily adapts to generate an appropriate control signal. These results show that the practical minimal spatial resolution of these control columns with micro-ECoG BCI is likely on the order of 3 mm. Additionally, they show that the combination and

  11. Adaptive Spatial-Temporal Filtering Methods for Clutter Removal and Target Tracking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    are many spatial A.G. Tartakovsky is with the Department of Mathematics, University of Southern California, 3620 S . Vermont Avenue, KAP-108, Los...result is an increase in the S (C+N)R (signal to clutter +noise ratio) of the target. The success of this approach is highly dependent upon, and extremely...Stocker [16] and Schaum [18], [19]. However, experience shows that even with all these sacrifices and an excellent registration algorithm, there is

  12. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  13. Spatial and temporal patterns of neutral and adaptive genetic variation in the endangered African wild dog (Lycaon pictus).

    PubMed

    Marsden, Clare D; Woodroffe, Rosie; Mills, Michael G L; McNutt, J Weldon; Creel, Scott; Groom, Rosemary; Emmanuel, Masenga; Cleaveland, Sarah; Kat, Pieter; Rasmussen, Gregory S A; Ginsberg, Joshua; Lines, Robin; André, Jean-Marc; Begg, Colleen; Wayne, Robert K; Mable, Barbara K

    2012-03-01

    Deciphering patterns of genetic variation within a species is essential for understanding population structure, local adaptation and differences in diversity between populations. Whilst neutrally evolving genetic markers can be used to elucidate demographic processes and genetic structure, they are not subject to selection and therefore are not informative about patterns of adaptive variation. As such, assessments of pertinent adaptive loci, such as the immunity genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are increasingly being incorporated into genetic studies. In this study, we combined neutral (microsatellite, mtDNA) and adaptive (MHC class II DLA-DRB1 locus) markers to elucidate the factors influencing patterns of genetic variation in the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus); an endangered canid that has suffered extensive declines in distribution and abundance. Our genetic analyses found all extant wild dog populations to be relatively small (N(e)  < 30). Furthermore, through coalescent modelling, we detected a genetic signature of a recent and substantial demographic decline, which correlates with human expansion, but contrasts with findings in some other African mammals. We found strong structuring of wild dog populations, indicating the negative influence of extensive habitat fragmentation and loss of gene flow between habitat patches. Across populations, we found that the spatial and temporal structure of microsatellite diversity and MHC diversity were correlated and strongly influenced by demographic stability and population size, indicating the effects of genetic drift in these small populations. Despite this correlation, we detected signatures of selection at the MHC, implying that selection has not been completely overwhelmed by genetic drift.

  14. Simulating spatial adaption of groundwater pumping on seawater intrusion in coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, Jens; Ladwig, Robert; Schütze, Niels; Walther, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Coastal aquifer systems are used intensively to meet the growing demands for water in those regions. They are especially at risk for the intrusion of seawater due to aquifer overpumping, limited groundwater replenishment and unsustainable groundwater management which in turn also impacts the social and economical development of coastal regions. One example is the Al-Batinah coastal plain in northern Oman where irrigated agriculture is practiced by lots of small scaled farms in different distances from the sea, each of them pumping their water from coastal aquifer. Due to continuous overpumping and progressing saltwater intrusion farms near the coast had to close since water for irrigation got too saline. For investigating appropriate management options numerical density dependent groundwater modelling is required which should also portray the adaption of groundwater abstraction schemes on the water quality. For addressing this challenge a moving inner boundary condition is implemented in the numerical density dependent groundwater model which adjusts the locations for groundwater abstraction according to the position of the seawater intrusion front controlled by thresholds of relative chloride concentration. The adaption process is repeated for each management cycle within transient model simulations and allows for considering feedbacks with the consumers e.g. the agriculture by moving agricultural farms more inland or towards the sea if more fertile soils at the coast could be recovered. For finding optimal water management strategies efficiently, the behaviour of the numerical groundwater model for different extraction and replenishment scenarios is approximated by an artificial neural network using a novel approach for state space surrogate model development. Afterwards the derived surrogate is coupled with an agriculture module within a simulation based water management optimisation framework to achieve optimal cropping pattern and water abstraction schemes

  15. Spatial and temporal variation of an ice-adapted predator's feeding ecology in a changing Arctic marine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Yurkowski, David J; Ferguson, Steven H; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Brown, Tanya M; Muir, Derek C G; Fisk, Aaron T

    2016-03-01

    Spatial and temporal variation can confound interpretations of relationships within and between species in terms of diet composition, niche size, and trophic position (TP). The cause of dietary variation within species is commonly an ontogenetic niche shift, which is a key dynamic influencing community structure. We quantified spatial and temporal variations in ringed seal (Pusa hispida) diet, niche size, and TP during ontogeny across the Arctic-a rapidly changing ecosystem. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis was performed on 558 liver and 630 muscle samples from ringed seals and on likely prey species from five locations ranging from the High to the Low Arctic. A modest ontogenetic diet shift occurred, with adult ringed seals consuming more forage fish (approximately 80 versus 60 %) and having a higher TP than subadults, which generally decreased with latitude. However, the degree of shift varied spatially, with adults in the High Arctic presenting a more restricted niche size and consuming more Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) than subadults (87 versus 44 %) and adults at the lowest latitude (29 %). The TPs of adult and subadult ringed seals generally decreased with latitude (4.7-3.3), which was mainly driven by greater complexity in trophic structure within the zooplankton communities. Adult isotopic niche size increased over time, likely due to the recent circumpolar increases in subarctic forage fish distribution and abundance. Given the spatial and temporal variability in ringed seal foraging ecology, ringed seals exhibit dietary plasticity as a species, suggesting adaptability in terms of their diet to climate change.

  16. Spatial pattern of nucleotide polymorphism indicates molecular adaptation in the bryophyte Sphagnum fimbriatum.

    PubMed

    Szövényi, P; Hock, Zs; Korpelainen, H; Shaw, A Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    In organisms with haploid-dominant life cycles, natural selection is expected to be especially effective because genetic variation is exposed directly to selection. However, in spore-producing plants with high dispersal abilities, among-population migration may counteract local adaptation by continuously redistributing genetic variability. In this study, we tested for adaptation at the molecular level by comparing nucleotide polymorphism in two genes (GapC and Rpb2) in 10 European populations of the peatmoss species, Sphagnum fimbriatum with variability at nine microsatellite loci assumed to be selectively neutral. In line with previous results, the GapC and Rpb2 genes showed strikingly different patterns of nucleotide polymorphism. Neutrality tests and comparison of population differentiation based on the GapC and Rpb2 genes with neutrally evolving microsatellites using coalescent simulations supported non-neutral evolution in GapC, but neutral evolution in the Rpb2 gene. These observations and the positions of the replacement mutations in the GAPDH enzyme (coded by GapC) indicate a significant impact of replacement mutations on enzyme function. Furthermore, the geographic distribution of alternate GapC alleles and/or linked genomic regions suggests that they have had differential success in the recolonization of Europe following the Last Glacial Maximum.

  17. Urban Infrastructure Monitoring with a Spatially Adaptive Multi-Looking InSAR Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Jayanti; Eppler, Jayson; Busler, Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    Surface displacements for urban infrastructure monitoring are derived using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). The analysis uses a novel InSAR method, Homogenous Distributed Scatterer (HDS)-InSAR, that exploits both persistent point and coherent distributed scatterers using adaptive multi-looking of statistically homogenous pixel neighbourhoods. An unwrapped phase model incorporating meteorological data enables separation of temperature-correlated displacement from potentially hazardous long-term trends. Results are presented over the Canadian cities of Regina, Winnipeg and Montreal using RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X data. The new combination of HDS-InSAR and the extended phase model permits large areas of infrastructure to be remotely monitored on a regular basis and enables a more targeted monitoring process to help identify infrastructure at greatest risk for damage.

  18. Temporal and spatial instability in neutral and adaptive (MHC) genetic variation in marginal salmon populations

    PubMed Central

    Ciborowski, Kate; Jordan, William C; Garcia de Leaniz, Carlos; Consuegra, Sofia

    2017-01-01

    The role of marginal populations for the long-term maintenance of species’ genetic diversity and evolutionary potential is particularly timely in view of the range shifts caused by climate change. The Centre-Periphery hypothesis predicts that marginal populations should bear reduced genetic diversity and have low evolutionary potential. We analysed temporal stability at neutral microsatellite and adaptive MHC genetic variation over five decades in four marginal Atlantic salmon populations located at the southern limit of the species’ distribution with a complicated demographic history, which includes stocking with foreign and native salmon for at least 2 decades. We found a temporal increase in neutral genetic variation, as well as temporal instability in population structuring, highlighting the importance of temporal analyses in studies that examine the genetic diversity of peripheral populations at the margins of the species’ range, particularly in face of climate change. PMID:28186200

  19. SDN-controlled topology-reconfigurable optical mobile fronthaul architecture for bidirectional CoMP and low latency inter-cell D2D in the 5G mobile era.

    PubMed

    Cvijetic, Neda; Tanaka, Akihiro; Kanonakis, Konstantinos; Wang, Ting

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate the first SDN-controlled optical topology-reconfigurable mobile fronthaul (MFH) architecture for bidirectional coordinated multipoint (CoMP) and low latency inter-cell device-to-device (D2D) connectivity in the 5G mobile networking era. SDN-based OpenFlow control is used to dynamically instantiate the CoMP and inter-cell D2D features as match/action combinations in control plane flow tables of software-defined optical and electrical switching elements. Dynamic re-configurability is thereby introduced into the optical MFH topology, while maintaining back-compatibility with legacy fiber deployments. 10 Gb/s peak rates with <7 μs back-to-back transmission latency and 29.6 dB total power budget are experimentally demonstrated, confirming the attractiveness of the new approach for optical MFH of future 5G mobile systems.

  20. Amoeboid migration mode adaption in quasi-3D spatial density gradients of varying lattice geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelashvili, Mari; Emmert, Martin; Hodeck, Kai F.; Heinrich, Doris

    2014-07-01

    Cell migration processes are controlled by sensitive interaction with external cues such as topographic structures of the cell’s environment. Here, we present systematically controlled assays to investigate the specific effects of spatial density and local geometry of topographic structure on amoeboid migration of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. This is realized by well-controlled fabrication of quasi-3D pillar fields exhibiting a systematic variation of inter-pillar distance and pillar lattice geometry. By time-resolved local mean-squared displacement analysis of amoeboid migration, we can extract motility parameters in order to elucidate the details of amoeboid migration mechanisms and consolidate them in a two-state contact-controlled motility model, distinguishing directed and random phases. Specifically, we find that directed pillar-to-pillar runs are found preferably in high pillar density regions, and cells in directed motion states sense pillars as attractive topographic stimuli. In contrast, cell motion in random probing states is inhibited by high pillar density, where pillars act as obstacles for cell motion. In a gradient spatial density, these mechanisms lead to topographic guidance of cells, with a general trend towards a regime of inter-pillar spacing close to the cell diameter. In locally anisotropic pillar environments, cell migration is often found to be damped due to competing attraction by different pillars in close proximity and due to lack of other potential stimuli in the vicinity of the cell. Further, we demonstrate topographic cell guidance reflecting the lattice geometry of the quasi-3D environment by distinct preferences in migration direction. Our findings allow to specifically control amoeboid cell migration by purely topographic effects and thus, to induce active cell guidance. These tools hold prospects for medical applications like improved wound treatment, or invasion assays for immune cells.

  1. Population processes at multiple spatial scales maintain diversity and adaptation in the Linum marginale--Melampsora lini association.

    PubMed

    Nemri, Adnane; Barrett, Luke G; Laine, Anna-Liisa; Burdon, Jeremy J; Thrall, Peter H

    2012-01-01

    Host-pathogen coevolution is a major driver of species diversity, with an essential role in the generation and maintenance of genetic variation in host resistance and pathogen infectivity. Little is known about how resistance and infectivity are structured across multiple geographic scales and what eco-evolutionary processes drive these patterns. Across southern Australia, the wild flax Linum marginale is frequently attacked by its rust fungus Melampsora lini. Here, we compare the genetic and phenotypic structure of resistance and infectivity among population pairs from two regions where environmental differences associate with specific life histories and mating systems. We find that both host and pathogen populations are genetically distinct between these regions. The region with outcrossing hosts and pathogens that go through asexual cycles followed by sexual reproduction showed greater diversity of resistance and infectivity phenotypes, higher levels of resistance and less clumped within-population spatial distribution of resistance. However, in the region where asexual pathogens infect selfing hosts, pathogens were more infective and better adapted to sympatric hosts. Our findings largely agree with expectations based on the distinctly different host mating systems in the two regions, with a likely advantage for hosts undergoing recombination. For the pathogen in this system, sexual reproduction may primarily be a survival mechanism in the region where it is observed. While it appears to potentially have adverse effects on local adaptation in the short term, it may be necessary for longer-term coevolution with outcrossing hosts.

  2. Unveiling SU Aurigae in the Near-Infrared: New High Spatial Resolution Results Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Ge, Jian

    2004-05-01

    We present new results on the circumstellar nebulosity around SU Aurigae, a T Tauri star of about 2 Msolar and 5 Myr old at 152 pc in the J, H, and K bands using high-resolution adaptive optics imaging (0.30") with the Penn State Near-IR Imager and Spectrograph at the 100 inch (2.5 m) Mount Wilson telescope. A comparison with Hubble Space Telescope STIS optical (0.2-1.1 μm) images shows that the orientation of the circumstellar nebulosity in the near-IR extends from position angle 210° to 270° in the H and K bands and up to 300° in the J band. We call the circumstellar nebulosity seen between 210° and 270° an ``IR nebulosity.'' We find that the IR nebulosity (which extends up to 3.5" in the J band and 2.5" in the K band) is due to scattered light from the central star. The IR nebulosity is either a cavity formed by the stellar outflows or part of the circumstellar disk. We present a schematic three-dimensional geometric model of the disk and jet of SU Aur based on STIS and our near-IR observations. According to this model, the IR nebulosity is part of the circumstellar disk seen at high inclination angles. The extension of the IR nebulosity is consistent with estimates of the disk diameter of 50-400 AU in radius, from earlier millimeter K-band interferometric observations and SED fittings.

  3. Spatial distribution of Io's volcanic activity from near-IR adaptive optics observations on 100 nights in 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, Katherine; de Pater, Imke

    2016-12-01

    The extreme and time-variable volcanic activity on Jupiter's moon Io is the result of periodic tidal forcing. The spatial distribution of Io's surface heat flux provides an important constraint on models for tidal heat dissipation, yielding information on interior properties and on the depth at which the tidal heat is primarily dissipated. We analyze the spatial distribution of 48 hot spots based on more than 400 total hot spot detections in adaptive optics images taken on 100 nights in 2013-2015 (data presented in de Kleer and de Pater [2016] Time variability of Io's volcanic activity from near-IR adaptive optics 13 observations on 100 nights in 2013-2015). We present full surface maps of Io at multiple near-infrared wavelengths for three epochs during this time period, and show that the longitudinal distribution of hot spots has not changed significantly since the Galileo mission. We find that hot spots that are persistently active at moderate intensities tend to occur at different latitudes/longitudes than those that exhibit sudden brightening events characterized by high peak intensities and subsequent decay phases. While persistent hot spots are located primarily between ± 30°N, hot spots exhibiting bright eruption events occur primarily between 40° and 65° in both the northern and southern hemispheres. In addition, while persistent hot spots occur preferentially on the leading hemisphere, all bright eruptions were detected on the trailing hemisphere, despite the comparable longitudinal coverage of our observations to both hemispheres. A subset of the bright hot spots which are not intense enough to qualify as outburst eruptions resemble outbursts in terms of temporal evolution and spatial distribution, and may be outbursts whose peak emission went unobserved, or else scaled-down versions of the same phenomenon. A statistical analysis finds that large eruptions are more spatially clustered and occur at higher latitudes than 95% of simulated datasets that

  4. Water availability drives signatures of local adaptation in whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) across fine spatial scales of the Lake Tahoe Basin, USA

    Treesearch

    Brandon M. Lind; Christopher J. Friedline; Jill L. Wegrzyn; Patricia E. Maloney; Detlev R. Vogler; David B. Neale; Andrew J. Eckert

    2017-01-01

    Patterns of local adaptation at fine spatial scales are central to understanding how evolution proceeds, and are essential to the effective management of economically and ecologically important forest tree species. Here, we employ single and multilocus analyses of genetic data (n = 116 231 SNPs) to describe signatures of fine-scale...

  5. A spatial analysis method (SAM) to detect candidate loci for selection: towards a landscape genomics approach to adaptation.

    PubMed

    Joost, S; Bonin, A; Bruford, M W; Després, L; Conord, C; Erhardt, G; Taberlet, P

    2007-09-01

    The detection of adaptive loci in the genome is essential as it gives the possibility of understanding what proportion of a genome or which genes are being shaped by natural selection. Several statistical methods have been developed which make use of molecular data to reveal genomic regions under selection. In this paper, we propose an approach to address this issue from the environmental angle, in order to complement results obtained by population genetics. We introduce a new method to detect signatures of natural selection based on the application of spatial analysis, with the contribution of geographical information systems (GIS), environmental variables and molecular data. Multiple univariate logistic regressions were carried out to test for association between allelic frequencies at marker loci and environmental variables. This spatial analysis method (SAM) is similar to current population genomics approaches since it is designed to scan hundreds of markers to assess a putative association with hundreds of environmental variables. Here, by application to studies of pine weevils and breeds of sheep we demonstrate a strong correspondence between SAM results and those obtained using population genetics approaches. Statistical signals were found that associate loci with environmental parameters, and these loci behave atypically in comparison with the theoretical distribution for neutral loci. The contribution of this new tool is not only to permit the identification of loci under selection but also to establish hypotheses about ecological factors that could exert the selection pressure responsible. In the future, such an approach may accelerate the process of hunting for functional genes at the population level.

  6. Cerebellar cathodal tDCS interferes with recalibration and spatial realignment during prism adaptation procedure in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Panico, Francesco; Sagliano, Laura; Grossi, Dario; Trojano, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the specific role of the cerebellum during prism adaptation procedure (PAP), considering its involvement in early prism exposure (i.e., in the recalibration process) and in post-exposure phase (i.e., in the after-effect, related to spatial realignment). For this purpose we interfered with cerebellar activity by means of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), while young healthy individuals were asked to perform a pointing task on a touch screen before, during and after wearing base-left prism glasses. The distance from the target dot in each trial (in terms of pixels) on horizontal and vertical axes was recorded and served as an index of accuracy. Results on horizontal axis, that was shifted by prism glasses, revealed that participants who received cathodal stimulation showed increased rightward deviation from the actual position of the target while wearing prisms and a larger leftward deviation from the target after prisms removal. Results on vertical axis, in which no shift was induced, revealed a general trend in the two groups to improve accuracy through the different phases of the task, and a trend, more visible in cathodal stimulated participants, to worsen accuracy from the first to the last movements in each phase. Data on horizontal axis allow to confirm that the cerebellum is involved in all stages of PAP, contributing to early strategic recalibration process, as well as to spatial realignment. On vertical axis, the improving performance across the different stages of the task and the worsening accuracy within each task phase can be ascribed, respectively, to a learning process and to the task-related fatigue.

  7. Behavioral Regulation, Visual Spatial Maturity in Kindergarten, and the Relationship of School Adaptation in the First Grade for a Sample of Turkish Children.

    PubMed

    Özer, Serap

    2016-04-01

    Behavioral regulation has recently become an important variable in research looking at kindergarten and first-grade achievement of children in private and public schools. The purpose of this study was to examine a measure of behavioral regulation, the Head Toes Knees Shoulders Task, and to evaluate its relationship with visual spatial maturity at the end of kindergarten. Later, in first grade, teachers were asked to rate the children (N = 82) in terms of academic and behavioral adaptation. Behavioral regulation and visual spatial maturity were significantly different between the two school types, but ratings by the teachers in the first grade were affected by children's visual spatial maturity rather than by behavioral regulation. Socioeducational opportunities provided by the two types of schools may be more important to school adaptation than behavioral regulation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Hartmann modelling in the discrete spatial-frequency domain: application to real-time reconstruction in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Carlos; Kulcsár, Caroline; Conan, Jean-Marc; Raynaud, Henri-François

    2008-07-01

    Adaptive Optical systems (AO) with a very large number of degrees-of-freedom (DoF) need the proper development of reconstruction and control algorithms mingling both increased performance and reduced computational burden. The Hartmann wave-front sensor (HS-WFS) is broadly used in AO, featuring a set of lenslet arrays aligned onto a Cartesian grid. It works by averaging the slope of the wave-front in each sub-aperture. Throughout this paper the suitability of the so-called Hudgin, Fried and Southwell geometries to model the HS are analysed. Methods of exploiting data obtained from the telescope's annular aperture through the DFT are revisited. An alternative approach based upon the discrete Gerchberg iterative algorithm is employed. It inherently solves the extrapolation and circularization. The inverse problem is regularised to form the minimum mean-square error (MMSE) reconstructor in the spatial-frequency domain. Results obtained through Monte-Carlo simulations allow for a comprehensive comparison to the standard vector-matrix multiplies (VMM/VMMr) algorithm. Computational burden is kept O(DoF log2(DoF)).

  9. Spatial pattern of adaptive and neutral genetic diversity across different biomes in the lesser anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla).

    PubMed

    Clozato, Camila L; Mazzoni, Camila J; Moraes-Barros, Nadia; Morgante, João S; Sommer, Simone

    2015-11-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) code for proteins involved in antigen recognition and activation of the adaptive immune response and are thought to be regulated by natural selection, especially due to pathogen-driven selective pressure. In this study, we investigated the spatial distribution of MHC class II DRB exon 2 gene diversity of the lesser anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla) across five Brazilian biomes using next-generation sequencing and compared the MHC pattern with that of neutral markers (microsatellites). We found a noticeable high level of diversity in DRB (60 amino acid alleles in 65 individuals) and clear signatures of historical positive selection acting on this gene. Higher allelic richness and proportion of private alleles were found in rain forest biomes, especially Amazon forest, a megadiverse biome, possibly harboring greater pathogen richness as well. Neutral markers, however, showed a similar pattern to DRB, demonstrating the strength of demography as an additional force to pathogen-driven selection in shaping MHC diversity and structure. This is the first characterization and description of diversity of a MHC gene for any member of the magna-order Xenarthra, one of the basal lineages of placental mammals.

  10. Closed-loop adaptive optics using a spatial light modulator for sensing and compensating of optical aberrations in ophthalmic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akondi, Vyas; Jewel, Md. Atikur Rahman; Vohnsen, Brian

    2014-09-01

    Sensing and compensating of optical aberrations in closed-loop mode using a single spatial light modulator (SLM) for ophthalmic applications is demonstrated. Notwithstanding the disadvantages of the SLM, in certain cases, this multitasking capability of the device makes it advantageous over existing deformable mirrors (DMs), which are expensive and in general used for aberration compensation alone. A closed-loop adaptive optics (AO) system based on a single SLM was built. Beam resizing optics were used to utilize the large active area of the device and hence make it feasible to generate 137 active subapertures for wavefront sensing. While correcting Zernike aberrations up to fourth order introduced with the help of a DM (for testing purposes), diffraction-limited resolution was achieved. It is shown that matched filter and intensity-weighted centroiding techniques stand out among others. Closed-loop wavefront correction of aberrations in backscattered light from the eyes of three healthy human subjects was demonstrated after satisfactory results were obtained using an artificial eye, which was simulated with a short focal length lens and a sheet of white paper as diffuser. It is shown that the closed-loop AO system based on a single SLM is capable of diffraction-limited correction for ophthalmic applications.

  11. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope using liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator: Performance study with involuntary eye movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongxin; Toyoda, Haruyoshi; Inoue, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    The performance of an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) using a liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was investigated. The system achieved high-resolution and high-contrast images of human retinas by dynamic compensation for the aberrations in the eyes. Retinal structures such as photoreceptor cells, blood vessels, and nerve fiber bundles, as well as blood flow, could be observed in vivo. We also investigated involuntary eye movements and ascertained microsaccades and drifts using both the retinal images and the aberrations recorded simultaneously. Furthermore, we measured the interframe displacement of retinal images and found that during eye drift, the displacement has a linear relationship with the residual low-order aberration. The estimated duration and cumulative displacement of the drift were within the ranges estimated by a video tracking technique. The AO-SLO would not only be used for the early detection of eye diseases, but would also offer a new approach for involuntary eye movement research.

  12. How urban system vulnerabilities to flooding could be assessed to improve resilience and adaptation in spatial planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasi, Riccardo; Viavattene, Christophe; La Loggia, Goffredo

    2016-04-01

    Natural hazards damage assets and infrastructure inducing disruptions to urban functions and key daily services. These disruptions may be short or long with a variable spatial scale of impact. From an urban planning perspective, measuring these disruptions and their consequences at an urban scale is fundamental in order to develop more resilient cities. Whereas the assessment of physical vulnerabilities and direct damages is commonly addressed, new methodologies for assessing the systemic vulnerability at the urban scale are required to reveal these disruptions and their consequences. Physical and systemic vulnerability should be measured in order to reflect the multifaceted fragility of cities in the face of external stress, both in terms of the natural/built environment and socio-economic sphere. Additionally, a systemic approach allows the consideration of vulnerability across different spatial scales, as impacts may vary and be transmitted across local, regional or national levels. Urban systems are spatially distributed and the nature of this can have significant effects on flood impacts. The proposed approach identifies the vulnerabilities of flooding within urban contexts, including both in terms of single elementary units (buildings, infrastructures, people, etc.) and systemic functioning (urban functions and daily life networks). Direct losses are appraised initially using conventional methodologies (e.g. depth-damage functions). This aims to both understand the spatial distribution of physical vulnerability and associated losses and, secondly, to identify the most vulnerable building types and ways to improve the physical adaptation of our cities, proposing changes to building codes, design principles and other municipal regulation tools. The subsequent systemic approach recognises the city as a collection of sub-systems or functional units (such as neighbourhoods and suburbs) providing key daily services for inhabitants (e.g. healthcare facilities

  13. Cell Edge Capacity Improvement by Using Adaptive Base Station Cooperation in Cellular Networks with Fractional Frequency Reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yamamoto, Koji; Murata, Hidekazu; Yoshida, Susumu

    The present paper focuses on the application of the base station cooperation (BSC) technique in fractional frequency reuse (FFR) networks. Fractional frequency reuse is considered to be a promising scheme for avoiding the inter-cell interference problem in OFDMA cellular systems, such as WiMAX, in which the edge mobile stations (MSs) of adjacent cells use different subchannels for separate transmission. However, the problem of FFR is that the cell edge spectral efficiency (SE) is much lower than that of the cell center. The BSC technique, in which adjacent BSs perform cooperative transmission for one cell edge MS with the same channel, may improve the cell edge SE. However, since more BSs transmit signals for one cell edge MS, the use of BSC can also increase the inter-cell interference, which might degrade the network performance. In this paper, with a focus on this tradeoff, we propose an adaptive BSC scheme in which BSC is only performed for the cell edge MSs that can achieve a significant capacity increase with only a slight increase in inter-cell interference. Moreover, a channel reallocation scheme is proposed in order to further improve the performance of the adaptive BSC scheme. The simulation results reveal that, compared to the conventional FFR scheme, the proposed schemes are effective for improving the performance of FFR networks.

  14. Adaptive beam steering implemented in a ferroelectric liquid-crystal spatial-light-modulator free-space, fiber-optic switch.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Mathias; Hård, Sverker; Robertson, Brian; Manolis, Ilias; Wilkinson, Timothy; Crossland, William

    2002-08-10

    Active alignment of a 1 x 8 free-space optical switch was studied experimentally. Optical signals, carried on single-mode fibers, were switched by a ferroelectric liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulator. Continuous measurement of the in-coupled power to the fibers provided feedback for the switch control. The switch automatically located and locked to the output fibers. An advantage with adaptive switches of a similar kind is relaxed geometrical tolerances in the switch assembly. Further, such switches can adapt to possible geometrical changes and light wavelength drift during operation.

  15. Spatial patterns of neutral and functional genetic variations reveal patterns of local adaptation in raccoon (Procyon lotor) populations exposed to raccoon rabies.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Christopher J; Rico, Yessica; Castillo, Sarrah; Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Cullingham, Catherine I; White, Bradley N; Pond, Bruce A

    2014-05-01

    Local adaptation is necessary for population survival and depends on the interplay between responses to selective forces and demographic processes that introduce or retain adaptive and maladaptive attributes. Host-parasite systems are dynamic, varying in space and time, where both host and parasites must adapt to their ever-changing environment in order to survive. We investigated patterns of local adaptation in raccoon populations with varying temporal exposure to the raccoon rabies virus (RRV). RRV infects approximately 85% of the population when epizootic and has been presumed to be completely lethal once contracted; however, disease challenge experiments and varying spatial patterns of RRV spread suggest some level of immunity may exist. We first assessed patterns of local adaptation in raccoon populations along the eastern seaboard of North America by contrasting spatial patterns of neutral (microsatellite loci) and functional, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genetic diversity and structure. We explored variation of MHC allele frequencies in the light of temporal population exposure to RRV (0-60 years) and specific RRV strains in infected raccoons. Our results revealed high levels of MHC variation (66 DRB exon 2 alleles) and pronounced genetic structure relative to neutral microsatellite loci, indicative of local adaptation. We found a positive association linking MHC genetic diversity and temporal RRV exposure, but no association with susceptibility and resistance to RRV strains. These results have implications for landscape epidemiology studies seeking to predict the spread of RRV and present an example of how population demographics influence the degree to which populations adapt to local selective pressures.

  16. The association of physical activity to neural adaptability during visuo-spatial processing in healthy elderly adults: A multiscale entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Hao; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Tseng, Philip; Yang, Albert C; Lo, Men-Tzung; Peng, Chung-Kang; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Muggleton, Neil G; Juan, Chi-Hung; Liang, Wei-Kuang

    2014-10-29

    Physical activity has been shown to benefit brain and cognition in late adulthood. However, this effect is still unexplored in terms of brain signal complexity, which reflects the level of neural adaptability and efficiency during cognitive processing that cannot be acquired via averaged neuroelectric signals. Here we employed multiscale entropy analysis (MSE) of electroencephalography (EEG), a new approach that conveys important information related to the temporal dynamics of brain signal complexity across multiple time scales, to reveal the association of physical activity with neural adaptability and efficiency in elderly adults. A between-subjects design that included 24 participants (aged 66.63±1.31years; female=12) with high physical activity and 24 age- and gender-matched low physical activity participants (aged 67.29±1.20years) was conducted to examine differences related to physical activity in performance and MSE of EEG signals during a visuo-spatial cognition task. We observed that physically active elderly adults had better accuracy on both visuo-spatial attention and working memory conditions relative to their sedentary counterparts. Additionally, these physically active elderly adults displayed greater MSE values at larger time scales at the Fz electrode in both attention and memory conditions. The results suggest that physical activity may be beneficial for adaptability of brain systems in tasks involving visuo-spatial information. MSE thus might be a promising approach to test the effects of the benefits of exercise on cognition.

  17. Adaptively Forward Modelling the Spatial Magnetic Effects Due to a Magnetized Structure by Tesseroids in Spherical Coordinate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao

    2015-04-01

    The continually accumulated magnetic measurements and also the reliable global lithospheric magnetic anomaly field models obtained by CHAMP satellite and Swarm constellation of three satellites, now present a requirement and also a challenge to develop the realistic forward modeling methods for the magnetic effects (i.e. magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor) that take into account the curvature of the Earth. The spatial discretization by a series of elementary tesseroids (spherical prisms, SPs) is utilized to approximate the complex magnetized source by the principle of superposition and saturate the source volume without "holes". Since there is no analytic solution for the magnetic effects of the SP, we explicitly present three kinds of efficient forward modeling methods for approximate calculation using Taylor's series expansion (TSE) to fourth-order, Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration (GLQI) and approximations by Cartesian elements including the magnetic dipole (MD) and rectangular prism (RP). Our derived new formulas do not suffer from the polar singularity and using the approximate approaches and subdivision technique, therefore, can be employed for any computing point with a required level of accuracy on the globe. Both theoretical analysis and numerical investigations suggest that the accuracy of modeling by the SP is significantly dependent on its geometric shape (i.e. size, latitude and depth) and particularly the distance between the source and the observation (DSO for short). Accuracies of forward modeling by all methods are relatively worse near the source but better far away the source. Besides, the numerical analysis shows that the error of magnetic potential is lower than those of magnetic vector and gradient tensor, and that of the gradient tensor is the highest but the error's decay of the tensor is the fastest. Analysis of accuracy shows that MD method is equivalent to GLQI when node is zero, and TSE method is nearly equivalent to

  18. Adaptive social learning strategies in temporally and spatially varying environments : how temporal vs. spatial variation, number of cultural traits, and costs of learning influence the evolution of conformist-biased transmission, payoff-biased transmission, and individual learning.

    PubMed

    Nakahashi, Wataru; Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Henrich, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    Long before the origins of agriculture human ancestors had expanded across the globe into an immense variety of environments, from Australian deserts to Siberian tundra. Survival in these environments did not principally depend on genetic adaptations, but instead on evolved learning strategies that permitted the assembly of locally adaptive behavioral repertoires. To develop hypotheses about these learning strategies, we have modeled the evolution of learning strategies to assess what conditions and constraints favor which kinds of strategies. To build on prior work, we focus on clarifying how spatial variability, temporal variability, and the number of cultural traits influence the evolution of four types of strategies: (1) individual learning, (2) unbiased social learning, (3) payoff-biased social learning, and (4) conformist transmission. Using a combination of analytic and simulation methods, we show that spatial-but not temporal-variation strongly favors the emergence of conformist transmission. This effect intensifies when migration rates are relatively high and individual learning is costly. We also show that increasing the number of cultural traits above two favors the evolution of conformist transmission, which suggests that the assumption of only two traits in many models has been conservative. We close by discussing how (1) spatial variability represents only one way of introducing the low-level, nonadaptive phenotypic trait variation that so favors conformist transmission, the other obvious way being learning errors, and (2) our findings apply to the evolution of conformist transmission in social interactions. Throughout we emphasize how our models generate empirical predictions suitable for laboratory testing.

  19. Water availability drives signatures of local adaptation in whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Englm.) across fine spatial scales of the Lake Tahoe Basin, USA.

    PubMed

    Lind, Brandon M; Friedline, Christopher J; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Maloney, Patricia E; Vogler, Detlev R; Neale, David B; Eckert, Andrew J

    2017-03-17

    Patterns of local adaptation at fine spatial scales are central to understanding how evolution proceeds, and are essential to the effective management of economically and ecologically important forest tree species. Here, we employ single and multilocus analyses of genetic data (n = 116,231 SNPs) to describe signatures of fine-scale adaptation within eight whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) populations across the local extent of the environmentally heterogeneous Lake Tahoe Basin, USA. We show that despite highly shared genetic variation (FST = 0.0069) there is strong evidence for adaptation to the rain shadow experienced across the eastern Sierra Nevada. Specifically, we build upon evidence from a common garden study and find that allele frequencies of loci associated with four phenotypes (mean = 236 SNPs), 18 environmental variables (mean = 99 SNPs), and those detected through genetic differentiation (n = 110 SNPs) exhibit significantly higher signals of selection (covariance of allele frequencies) than could be expected to arise, given the data. We also provide evidence that this covariance tracks environmental measures related to soil water availability through subtle allele frequency shifts across populations. Our results replicate empirical support for theoretical expectations of local adaptation for populations exhibiting strong gene flow and high selective pressures, and suggest that ongoing adaptation of many P. albicaulis populations within the Lake Tahoe Basin will not be constrained by the lack of genetic variation. Even so, some populations exhibit low levels of heritability for the traits presumed to be related to fitness. These instances could be used to prioritize management to maintain adaptive potential. Overall, we suggest that established practices regarding whitebark pine conservation be maintained, with the additional context of fine-scale adaptation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessing The Spatial Dependence of Adaptive Loci in 43 European and Western Asian Goat Breeds Using AFLP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Negrini, Riccardo; Nicoloso, Letizia; Crepaldi, Paola; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background During the past decades, neutral DNA markers have been extensively employed to study demography, population genetics and structure in livestock, but less interest has been devoted to the evaluation of livestock adaptive potential through the identification of genomic regions likely to be under natural selection. Methodology/Principal findings Landscape genomics can greatly benefit the entire livestock system through the identification of genotypes better adapted to specific or extreme environmental conditions. Therefore we analyzed 101 AFLP markers in 43 European and Western Asian goat breeds both with Matsam software, based on a correlative approach (SAM), and with Mcheza and Bayescan, two FST based software able to detect markers carrying signatures of natural selection. Matsam identified four loci possibly under natural selection – also confirmed by FST-outlier methods – and significantly associated with environmental variables such as diurnal temperature range, frequency of precipitation, relative humidity and solar radiation. Conclusions/Significance These results show that landscape genomics can provide useful information on the environmental factors affecting the adaptive potential of livestock living in specific climatic conditions. Besides adding conservation value to livestock genetic resources, this knowledge may lead to the development of novel molecular tools useful to preserve the adaptive potential of local breeds during genetic improvement programs, and to increase the adaptability of industrial breeds to changing environments. PMID:24497965

  1. Evolution at ‘Sutures’ and ‘Centers’: Recombination Can Aid Adaptation of Spatially Structured Populations on Rugged Fitness Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jacob D.; Kerr, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Epistatic interactions among genes can give rise to rugged fitness landscapes, in which multiple “peaks” of high-fitness allele combinations are separated by “valleys” of low-fitness genotypes. How populations traverse rugged fitness landscapes is a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. Sexual reproduction may affect how a population moves within a rugged fitness landscape. Sex may generate new high-fitness genotypes by recombination, but it may also destroy high-fitness genotypes by shuffling the genes of a fit parent with a genetically distinct mate, creating low-fitness offspring. Either of these opposing aspects of sex require genotypic diversity in the population. Spatially structured populations may harbor more diversity than well-mixed populations, potentially amplifying both positive and negative effects of sex. On the other hand, spatial structure leads to clumping in which mating is more likely to occur between like types, diminishing the effects of recombination. In this study, we use computer simulations to investigate the combined effects of recombination and spatial structure on adaptation in rugged fitness landscapes. We find that spatially restricted mating and offspring dispersal may allow multiple genotypes inhabiting suboptimal peaks to coexist, and recombination at the “sutures” between the clusters of these genotypes can create genetically novel offspring. Sometimes such an offspring genotype inhabits a new peak on the fitness landscape. In such a case, spatially restricted mating allows this fledgling subpopulation to avoid recombination with distinct genotypes, as mates are more likely to be the same genotype. Such population “centers” can allow nascent peaks to establish despite recombination. Spatial structure may therefore allow an evolving population to enjoy the creative side of sexual recombination while avoiding its destructive side. PMID:27973606

  2. A Socio-Ecological Approach for Identifying and Contextualising Spatial Ecosystem-Based Adaptation Priorities at the Sub-National Level

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Amanda; Holness, Stephen; Holden, Petra; Scorgie, Sarshen; Donatti, Camila I.; Midgley, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Climate change adds an additional layer of complexity to existing sustainable development and biodiversity conservation challenges. The impacts of global climate change are felt locally, and thus local governance structures will increasingly be responsible for preparedness and local responses. Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) options are gaining prominence as relevant climate change solutions. Local government officials seldom have an appropriate understanding of the role of ecosystem functioning in sustainable development goals, or access to relevant climate information. Thus the use of ecosystems in helping people adapt to climate change is limited partially by the lack of information on where ecosystems have the highest potential to do so. To begin overcoming this barrier, Conservation South Africa in partnership with local government developed a socio-ecological approach for identifying spatial EbA priorities at the sub-national level. Using GIS-based multi-criteria analysis and vegetation distribution models, the authors have spatially integrated relevant ecological and social information at a scale appropriate to inform local level political, administrative, and operational decision makers. This is the first systematic approach of which we are aware that highlights spatial priority areas for EbA implementation. Nodes of socio-ecological vulnerability are identified, and the inclusion of areas that provide ecosystem services and ecological resilience to future climate change is innovative. The purpose of this paper is to present and demonstrate a methodology for combining complex information into user-friendly spatial products for local level decision making on EbA. The authors focus on illustrating the kinds of products that can be generated from combining information in the suggested ways, and do not discuss the nuance of climate models nor present specific technical details of the model outputs here. Two representative case studies from rural South Africa

  3. A Socio-Ecological Approach for Identifying and Contextualising Spatial Ecosystem-Based Adaptation Priorities at the Sub-National Level.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Amanda; Holness, Stephen; Holden, Petra; Scorgie, Sarshen; Donatti, Camila I; Midgley, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Climate change adds an additional layer of complexity to existing sustainable development and biodiversity conservation challenges. The impacts of global climate change are felt locally, and thus local governance structures will increasingly be responsible for preparedness and local responses. Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) options are gaining prominence as relevant climate change solutions. Local government officials seldom have an appropriate understanding of the role of ecosystem functioning in sustainable development goals, or access to relevant climate information. Thus the use of ecosystems in helping people adapt to climate change is limited partially by the lack of information on where ecosystems have the highest potential to do so. To begin overcoming this barrier, Conservation South Africa in partnership with local government developed a socio-ecological approach for identifying spatial EbA priorities at the sub-national level. Using GIS-based multi-criteria analysis and vegetation distribution models, the authors have spatially integrated relevant ecological and social information at a scale appropriate to inform local level political, administrative, and operational decision makers. This is the first systematic approach of which we are aware that highlights spatial priority areas for EbA implementation. Nodes of socio-ecological vulnerability are identified, and the inclusion of areas that provide ecosystem services and ecological resilience to future climate change is innovative. The purpose of this paper is to present and demonstrate a methodology for combining complex information into user-friendly spatial products for local level decision making on EbA. The authors focus on illustrating the kinds of products that can be generated from combining information in the suggested ways, and do not discuss the nuance of climate models nor present specific technical details of the model outputs here. Two representative case studies from rural South Africa

  4. Contouring Of Tooth Imprints By Means Of A Fluorescence Technique Adapted To A Spatially Filtered Moire Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongsma, Frans H. M.; Lambrechts, Paul; Vanherle, Guido

    1983-07-01

    A technique has been developed to produce plane equidistant contouring surfaces on tooth-imprints. This technique consists of spatially filtering a negative obtained by photographing the imprint under a Moire illumination. Unfortunately this technique turned out to be very sensitive for a non-uniform surface reflectivity. To obtain an object-brightness depending only upon the contouring mechanism, the imprint has been coated with a fluorescent dye. A HeCd-laser (λ=422 nm) served as a lightsource for the projection of the Moire-interference pattern on the imprint. The radiation of the fluorescent coating (λ=530 nm) is used to form an image on the negative. In this way the surface with specular reflection properties is transformed into a Labertian surface. The spatial filtering technique allows multiple exposures of the final negative enabling an increased depth of field. Contour mappings with a resolution in depth of less than 10 μm have been obtained.

  5. Spatial clustering and associations of two savannah tsetse species, Glossina morsitans submorsitans and Glossina pallidipes (Diptera: Glossinidae), for guiding interventions in an adaptive cattle health management framework.

    PubMed

    Sciarretta, A; Tikubet, Getachew; Baumgärtner, J; Girma, Melaku; Trematerra, P

    2010-12-01

    The paper deals with tsetse (family Glossinidae) control and aims at improving the methodology for precision targeting interventions in an adaptive pest management system. The spatio-temporal distribution of Glossina morsitans submorsitans Newstead, and Glossina pallidipes Austen, at Ethiopia's Keto pilot site, is analyzed with the spatial analysis by distance indices (SADIE) methodology that focus on clustering and spatial associations between species and between sexes. Both species displayed an aggregated distribution characterised by two main patches in the south and an extended gap in the north. Spatial patterns were positively correlated and stable in most cases, with the exception of the early dry season and the short rainy season when there were differences between the species and sexes. For precision targeting interventions, the presented methods here are more effective than the previously used geostatistical analyses for identifying and delimiting hot spots on maps, measuring shapes and sizes of patches, and discarding areas with low tsetse density. Because of the improved knowledge on hot spot occurrences, the methods allow a better delimitation of the territory for control operations and a more precise computation of the number of the relatively expensive traps used for monitoring and control purposes.

  6. Spatial Structure and Climatic Adaptation in African Maize Revealed by Surveying SNP Diversity in Relation to Global Breeding and Landrace Panels

    PubMed Central

    Westengen, Ola T.; Berg, Paul R.; Kent, Matthew P.; Brysting, Anne K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Climate change threatens maize productivity in sub-Saharan Africa. To ensure food security, access to locally adapted genetic resources and varieties is an important adaptation measure. Most of the maize grown in Africa is a genetic mix of varieties introduced at different historic times following the birth of the trans-Atlantic economy, and knowledge about geographic structure and local adaptations is limited. Methodology A panel of 48 accessions of maize representing various introduction routes and sources of historic and recent germplasm introductions in Africa was genotyped with the MaizeSNP50 array. Spatial genetic structure and genetic relationships in the African panel were analysed separately and in the context of a panel of 265 inbred lines representing global breeding material (based on 26,900 SNPs) and a panel of 1127 landraces from the Americas (270 SNPs). Environmental association analysis was used to detect SNPs associated with three climatic variables based on the full 43,963 SNP dataset. Conclusions The genetic structure is consistent between subsets of the data and the markers are well suited for resolving relationships and admixture among the accessions. The African accessions are structured in three clusters reflecting historical and current patterns of gene flow from the New World and within Africa. The Sahelian cluster reflects original introductions of Meso-American landraces via Europe and a modern introduction of temperate breeding material. The Western cluster reflects introduction of Coastal Brazilian landraces, as well as a Northeast-West spread of maize through Arabic trade routes across the continent. The Eastern cluster most strongly reflects gene flow from modern introduced tropical varieties. Controlling for population history in a linear model, we identify 79 SNPs associated with maximum temperature during the growing season. The associations located in genes of known importance for abiotic stress tolerance are

  7. Prism adaptation aftereffects in stroke patients with spatial neglect: pathological effects on subjective straight ahead but not visual open-loop pointing.

    PubMed

    Sarri, Margarita; Greenwood, Richard; Kalra, Lalit; Papps, Ben; Husain, Masud; Driver, Jon

    2008-03-07

    Prism adaptation to rightward optical shifts during visually guided pointing is considered a promising intervention in right-hemisphere stroke patients with left spatial neglect. Conventionally, prism adaptation is assessed via aftereffects, on subjective straight ahead (SSA) pointing with eyes closed; or by visual open-loop pointing (VOL), i.e. pointing to a visual target without seeing the hand. Previous data suggest indirectly that prism aftereffects in neglect patients may be larger (pathologically so) when assessed by SSA than by VOL. But these measures have never been directly compared within the same patients after identical prism exposure. Accordingly we implemented both measures here within the same group of 13 neglect patients and 13 controls. Prism aftereffects were much larger for SSA than VOL in neglect patients, falling outside the normative range only for SSA. This may arise because the SSA task can itself involve aspects of neglect that may be ameliorated by the prism intervention, hence showing abnormal changes after prisms. The extent of SSA change after prisms varied between patients, and correlated with improvements on a standard cancellation measure for neglect. The lesions of patients who did versus did not show neglect improvement immediately after prisms provide an initial indication that lack of improvement may potentially relate to cortical damage in right intraparietal sulcus and white matter damage in inferior parietal lobe and middle frontal gyrus. Future studies of possible rehabilitative impact from prisms upon neglect may need to consider carefully how to measure prism adaptation per se, separately from any impact of such adaptation upon manifestations of neglect.

  8. A spatial socio-ecosystem approach to analyse human-environment interactions on climate change adaptation for water resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giupponi, Carlo; Mojtahed, Vahid

    2017-04-01

    Global climate and socio-economic drivers determine the future patterns of the allocation and the trade of resources and commodities in all markets. The agricultural sector is an emblematic case in which natural (e.g. climate), social (e.g. demography) and economic (e.g. the market) drivers of change interact, determining the evolution of social and ecological systems (or simply socio-ecosystems; SES) over time. In order to analyse the dynamics and possible future evolutions of SES, the combination of local complex systems and global drivers and trends require the development of multiscale approaches. At global level, climatic general circulation models (CGM) and computable general equilibrium or partial equilibrium models have been used for many years to explore the effects of global trends and generate future climate and socio-economic scenarios. Al local level, the inherent complexity of SESs and their spatial and temporal variabilities require different modelling approaches of physical/environmental sub-systems (e.g. field scale crop modelling, GIS-based models, etc.) and of human agency decision makers (e.g. agent based models). Global and local models have different assumption, limitations, constrains, etc., but in some cases integration is possible and several attempts are in progress to couple different models within the so-called Integrated Assessment Models. This work explores an innovative proposal to integrate the global and local approaches, where agent-based models (ABM) are used to simulate spatial (i.e. grid-based) and temporal dynamics of land and water resource use spatial and temporal dynamics, under the effect of global drivers. We focus in particular on how global change may affect land-use allocation at the local to regional level, under the influence of limited natural resources, land and water in particular. We specifically explore how constrains and competition for natural resources may induce non-linearities and discontinuities in socio

  9. Spatial variation in osteon population density at the human femoral midshaft: histomorphometric adaptations to habitual load environment.

    PubMed

    Gocha, Timothy P; Agnew, Amanda M

    2016-05-01

    Intracortical remodeling, and the osteons it produces, is one aspect of the bone microstructure that is influenced by and, in turn, can influence its mechanical properties. Previous research examining the spatial distribution of intracortical remodeling density across the femoral midshaft has been limited to either considering only small regions of the cortex or, when looking at the entirety of the cortex, considering only a single individual. This study examined the spatial distribution of all remodeling events (intact osteons, fragmentary osteons, and resorptive bays) across the entirety of the femoral midshaft in a sample of 30 modern cadaveric donors. The sample consisted of 15 males and 15 females, aged 21-97 years at time of death. Using geographic information systems software, the femoral cortex was subdivided radially into thirds and circumferentially into octants, and the spatial location of all remodeling events was marked. Density maps and calculation of osteon population density in cortical regions of interest revealed that remodeling density is typically highest in the periosteal third of the bone, particularly in the lateral and anterolateral regions of the cortex. Due to modeling drift, this area of the midshaft femur has some of the youngest primary tissue, which consequently reveals that the lateral and anterolateral regions of the femoral midshaft have higher remodeling rates than elsewhere in the cortex. This is likely the result of tension/shear forces and/or greater strain magnitudes acting upon the anterolateral femur, which results in a greater amount of microdamage in need of repair than is seen in the medial and posterior regions of the femoral midshaft, which are more subject to compressive forces and/or lesser strain magnitudes.

  10. Effects of spatial pattern of green space on land surface temperature: implications for sustainable urban planning and climate change adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimaitiyiming, M.; Ghulam, A.

    2013-12-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) refers to the phenomenon of higher atmospheric and surface temperatures occurring in urban areas than in the surrounding rural areas. Numerous studies have shown that increased percent cover of green space (PLAND) can significantly decrease land surface temperatures (LST). Fewer studies, however, have investigated the effects of configuration of green space on LST. This paper aims at to fill this gap using oasis city Aksu in northwestern China as a case study. PLAND along with two configuration metrics are used to measure the composition and configuration of green space. The metrics are calculated by moving window method based on a green space map derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery, and LST data are retrieved from Landsat TM thermal band. Normalized mutual information measure is employed to investigate the relationship between LST and the spatial pattern of green space. The results show that while the PLAND is the most important variable that elicits LST dynamics, spatial configuration of green space also has significant effect on LST. In addition, the variance of LST is largely explained by both composition and configuration of green space. Results from this study can expand our understanding of the relationship between LST and vegetation, and provide insights for sustainable urban planning and management under changing climate.

  11. Effect of spatial configuration of an extended nonlinear Kierstead-Slobodkin reaction-transport model with adaptive numerical scheme.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, Kolade M; Patidar, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the numerical simulations of an extended nonlinear form of Kierstead-Slobodkin reaction-transport system in one and two dimensions. We employ the popular fourth-order exponential time differencing Runge-Kutta (ETDRK4) schemes proposed by Cox and Matthew (J Comput Phys 176:430-455, 2002), that was modified by Kassam and Trefethen (SIAM J Sci Comput 26:1214-1233, 2005), for the time integration of spatially discretized partial differential equations. We demonstrate the supremacy of ETDRK4 over the existing exponential time differencing integrators that are of standard approaches and provide timings and error comparison. Numerical results obtained in this paper have granted further insight to the question 'What is the minimal size of the spatial domain so that the population persists?' posed by Kierstead and Slobodkin (J Mar Res 12:141-147, 1953), with a conclusive remark that the population size increases with the size of the domain. In attempt to examine the biological wave phenomena of the solutions, we present the numerical results in both one- and two-dimensional space, which have interesting ecological implications. Initial data and parameter values were chosen to mimic some existing patterns.

  12. High-performance adaptive optics system with long-term stability using liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulator for high-resolution retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongxin; Inoue, Takashi; Toyoda, Haruyoshi; Hara, Tsutomu

    2011-11-01

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) using a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator was developed. For routine clinical applications, long-term stability of the AO system is very important because unavoidable eye movement may degrade the instrument's performance. We studied the long-term performance of the aberration correction with healthy human eyes. Retinal image acquisition and AO data collection were performed simultaneously for periods of several minutes. We confirmed that, for more than 90% of the periods, the root-mean-square errors of residual wavefront were below the Marechal criterion. Drifts and microsaccades of fixational eye movement were examined using retinal images and residual aberrations. The results showed significant correlation between the transverse shift of retinal image and the low-order residual wavefront aberration during the drifts.

  13. Prism adaptation changes perceptual awareness for chimeric visual objects but not for chimeric faces in spatial neglect after right-hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Sarri, Margarita; Kalra, Lalit; Greenwood, Richard; Driver, Jon

    2006-06-01

    Prism adaptation can ameliorate some symptoms of left spatial neglect after right-hemisphere stroke. The mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Prism therapy may increase exploration towards the contralesional side, yet without improving perceptual awareness, as apparently for the left side of chimeric face stimuli (Ferber et al. 2003). However, other prism studies suggest that perceptual awareness might be improved (e.g., Maravita et al., 2003). We tested the impact of prism therapy on visual awareness for the left side of chimeric objects as well as chimeric faces, in three neglect patients. Prism therapy dramatically improved awareness for the identity of the left side of chimeric non-face objects, but had no effect on judging expressions for chimeric faces. The latter may thus be unique in showing no prism benefit.

  14. Diffeomorphic registration with self-adaptive spatial regularization for the segmentation of non-human primate brains.

    PubMed

    Risser, Laurent; Dolius, Lionel; Fonta, Caroline; Mescam, Muriel

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral aging has been linked to structural and functional changes in the brain throughout life. Here, we study the marmoset, a small non-human primate, in order to get insights into the mechanisms of brain aging in normal and pathological conditions. Imaging the brain of small animals with techniques such as MRI, quickly becomes a challenging task when compared with human brain imaging. Very often, a simple pre-processing step such as brain extraction cannot be achieved with classical tools. In this paper, we propose a diffeomorphic registration algorithm, which makes use of learned constraints to propagate the manual segmentation of a marmoset brain template to other MR images of marmoset brains. The main methological contribution of our paper is to explore a new strategy to automatically tune the spatial regularization of the deformations. Results show that we obtain a robust segmentation of the brain, even for images with a low contrast.

  15. Spatial and Temporal Control Contribute to Step Length Asymmetry during Split-Belt Adaptation and Hemiparetic Gait

    PubMed Central

    Finley, James M.; Long, Andrew; Bastian, Amy J.; Torres-Oviedo, Gelsy

    2014-01-01

    Background Step length asymmetry (SLA) is a common hallmark of gait post-stroke. Though conventionally viewed as a spatial deficit, SLA can result from differences in where the feet are placed relative to the body (spatial strategy), the timing between foot-strikes (step time strategy), or the velocity of the body relative to the feet (step velocity strategy). Objective The goal of this study was to characterize the relative contributions of each of these strategies to SLA. Methods We developed an analytical model that parses SLA into independent step position, step time, and step velocity contributions. This model was validated by reproducing SLA values for twenty-five healthy participants when their natural symmetric gait was perturbed on a split-belt treadmill moving at either a 2:1 or 3:1 belt-speed ratio. We then applied the validated model to quantify step position, step time, and step velocity contributions to SLA in fifteen stroke survivors while walking at their self-selected speed. Results SLA was predicted precisely by summing the derived contributions, regardless of the belt-speed ratio. Although the contributions to SLA varied considerably across our sample of stroke survivors, the step position contribution tended to oppose the other two – possibly as an attempt to minimize the overall SLA. Conclusions Our results suggest that changes in where the feet are placed or changes in interlimb timing could be used as compensatory strategies to reduce overall SLA in stroke survivors. These results may allow clinicians and researchers to identify patient-specific gait abnormalities and personalize their therapeutic approaches accordingly. PMID:25589580

  16. Detecting short spatial scale local adaptation and epistatic selection in climate-related candidate genes in European beech (Fagus sylvatica) populations.

    PubMed

    Csilléry, Katalin; Lalagüe, Hadrien; Vendramin, Giovanni G; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Fady, Bruno; Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie

    2014-10-01

    Detecting signatures of selection in tree populations threatened by climate change is currently a major research priority. Here, we investigated the signature of local adaptation over a short spatial scale using 96 European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) individuals originating from two pairs of populations on the northern and southern slopes of Mont Ventoux (south-eastern France). We performed both single and multilocus analysis of selection based on 53 climate-related candidate genes containing 546 SNPs. FST outlier methods at the SNP level revealed a weak signal of selection, with three marginally significant outliers in the northern populations. At the gene level, considering haplotypes as alleles, two additional marginally significant outliers were detected, one on each slope. To account for the uncertainty of haplotype inference, we averaged the Bayes factors over many possible phase reconstructions. Epistatic selection offers a realistic multilocus model of selection in natural populations. Here, we used a test suggested by Ohta based on the decomposition of the variance of linkage disequilibrium. Overall populations, 0.23% of the SNP pairs (haplotypes) showed evidence of epistatic selection, with nearly 80% of them being within genes. One of the between gene epistatic selection signals arose between an FST outlier and a nonsynonymous mutation in a drought response gene. Additionally, we identified haplotypes containing selectively advantageous allele combinations which were unique to high or low elevations and northern or southern populations. Several haplotypes contained nonsynonymous mutations situated in genes with known functional importance for adaptation to climatic factors.

  17. A Sparse Dictionary Learning-Based Adaptive Patch Inpainting Method for Thick Clouds Removal from High-Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan; Yang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Chenghu; Li, Zhi

    2017-09-15

    Cloud cover is inevitable in optical remote sensing (RS) imagery on account of the influence of observation conditions, which limits the availability of RS data. Therefore, it is of great significance to be able to reconstruct the cloud-contaminated ground information. This paper presents a sparse dictionary learning-based image inpainting method for adaptively recovering the missing information corrupted by thick clouds patch-by-patch. A feature dictionary was learned from exemplars in the cloud-free regions, which was later utilized to infer the missing patches via sparse representation. To maintain the coherence of structures, structure sparsity was brought in to encourage first filling-in of missing patches on image structures. The optimization model of patch inpainting was formulated under the adaptive neighborhood-consistency constraint, which was solved by a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm. In light of these ideas, the thick-cloud removal scheme was designed and applied to images with simulated and true clouds. Comparisons and experiments show that our method can not only keep structures and textures consistent with the surrounding ground information, but also yield rare smoothing effect and block effect, which is more suitable for the removal of clouds from high-spatial resolution RS imagery with salient structures and abundant textured features.

  18. A Sparse Dictionary Learning-Based Adaptive Patch Inpainting Method for Thick Clouds Removal from High-Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Chenghu; Li, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Cloud cover is inevitable in optical remote sensing (RS) imagery on account of the influence of observation conditions, which limits the availability of RS data. Therefore, it is of great significance to be able to reconstruct the cloud-contaminated ground information. This paper presents a sparse dictionary learning-based image inpainting method for adaptively recovering the missing information corrupted by thick clouds patch-by-patch. A feature dictionary was learned from exemplars in the cloud-free regions, which was later utilized to infer the missing patches via sparse representation. To maintain the coherence of structures, structure sparsity was brought in to encourage first filling-in of missing patches on image structures. The optimization model of patch inpainting was formulated under the adaptive neighborhood-consistency constraint, which was solved by a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm. In light of these ideas, the thick-cloud removal scheme was designed and applied to images with simulated and true clouds. Comparisons and experiments show that our method can not only keep structures and textures consistent with the surrounding ground information, but also yield rare smoothing effect and block effect, which is more suitable for the removal of clouds from high-spatial resolution RS imagery with salient structures and abundant textured features. PMID:28914787

  19. Anti-aliasing Wiener filtering for wave-front reconstruction in the spatial-frequency domain for high-order astronomical adaptive-optics systems.

    PubMed

    Correia, Carlos M; Teixeira, Joel

    2014-12-01

    Computationally efficient wave-front reconstruction techniques for astronomical adaptive-optics (AO) systems have seen great development in the past decade. Algorithms developed in the spatial-frequency (Fourier) domain have gathered much attention, especially for high-contrast imaging systems. In this paper we present the Wiener filter (resulting in the maximization of the Strehl ratio) and further develop formulae for the anti-aliasing (AA) Wiener filter that optimally takes into account high-order wave-front terms folded in-band during the sensing (i.e., discrete sampling) process. We employ a continuous spatial-frequency representation for the forward measurement operators and derive the Wiener filter when aliasing is explicitly taken into account. We further investigate and compare to classical estimates using least-squares filters the reconstructed wave-front, measurement noise, and aliasing propagation coefficients as a function of the system order. Regarding high-contrast systems, we provide achievable performance results as a function of an ensemble of forward models for the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (using sparse and nonsparse representations) and compute point-spread-function raw intensities. We find that for a 32×32 single-conjugated AOs system the aliasing propagation coefficient is roughly 60% of the least-squares filters, whereas the noise propagation is around 80%. Contrast improvements of factors of up to 2 are achievable across the field in the H band. For current and next-generation high-contrast imagers, despite better aliasing mitigation, AA Wiener filtering cannot be used as a standalone method and must therefore be used in combination with optical spatial filters deployed before image formation actually takes place.

  20. A Novel approach to monitor chlorophyll-a concentration using an adaptive model from MODIS data at 250 metres spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Alem, A.; Chokmani, K.; Laurion, I.; El Adlouni, S.

    2013-12-01

    Occurrence and extent of Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) has increased in inland water bodies around the world. The appearance of these blooms reflects the advanced state of eutrophication of several aquatic systems caused by urban, agricultural, and industrial development. Algal blooms, especially those cyanobacterial origins, are capable to produce and release toxins, threatening human and animal health, quality of drinking water, and recreational water bodies. Conventional monitoring networks, based on infrequent sampling in a few fixed monitoring stations, cannot provide the information needed as HABs are spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Remote sensing represents an interesting alternative to provide the required spatial and temporal coverage. The usefulness of air-borne and satellite remote sensing data to detect HABs was demonstrated since three decades ago, and since several empirical and semi-empirical models, using satellite imagery, were developed to estimate chlorophyll-a concentration [Chl-a] as a proxy to detect bloom proliferations. However, most of those models presented several weaknesses that are generally linked to the range of [Chl-a] to be estimated. Indeed, models originally calibrated for high [Chl-a] fail to estimate low concentrations and vice versa. In this study, an adaptive model to estimate [Chl-a], spread over a wide range of concentrations, is developed for optically complex inland water bodies based on combination of water spectral response classification and three developed semi-empirical algorithms using a multivariate regression. Three distinct water types (low, medium, and high [Chl-a]) are first identified using the Classification and Regression Tree (CART) method performed on remote sensing reflectance over a dataset of 44 [Chl-a] samples collected from Lakes over Quebec province. Based on the water classification, a specific multivariate model to each water type is developed using the same dataset and the MODIS data at 250-m

  1. Coping with Spatial Heterogeneity and Temporal Variability in Resources and Risks: Adaptive Movement Behaviour by a Large Grazing Herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jodie; Benhamou, Simon; Yoganand, K.; Owen-Smith, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Movement is a key mean for mobile species to cope with heterogeneous environments. While in herbivorous mammals large-scale migration has been widely investigated, fine-scale movement responses to local variations in resources and predation risk remain much less studied, especially in savannah environments. We developed a novel approach based on complementary movement metrics (residence time, frequency of visits and regularity of visits) to relate movement patterns of a savannah grazer, the blue wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus, to fine-scale variations in food availability, predation risk and water availability in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Wildebeests spent more time in grazing lawns where the grass is of higher quality but shorter than in seep zones, where the grass is of lower quality but more abundant. Although the daily distances moved were longer during the wet season compared to the dry season, the daily net displacement was lower, and the residence time higher, indicating a more frequent occurrence of area-concentred searching. In contrast, during the late dry season the foraging sessions were more fragmented and wildebeests moved more frequently between foraging areas. Surprisingly, predation risk appeared to be the second factor, after water availability, influencing movement during the dry season, when resources are limiting and thus expected to influence movement more. Our approach, using complementary analyses of different movement metrics, provided an integrated view of changes in individual movement with varying environmental conditions and predation risk. It makes it possible to highlight the adaptive behavioral decisions made by wildebeest to cope with unpredictable environmental variations and provides insights for population conservation. PMID:25719494

  2. Adaptations in corticospinal excitability and inhibition are not spatially confined to the agonist muscle following strength training.

    PubMed

    Mason, Joel; Frazer, Ashlyn; Horvath, Deanna M; Pearce, Alan J; Avela, Janne; Howatson, Glyn; Kidgell, Dawson

    2017-07-01

    We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to determine the corticospinal responses from an agonist and synergist muscle following strength training of the right elbow flexors. Motor-evoked potentials were recorded from the biceps brachii and flexor carpi radialis during a submaximal contraction from 20 individuals (10 women, 10 men, aged 18-35 years; training group; n = 10 and control group; n = 10) before and after 3 weeks of strength training at 80% of 1-repetition maximum (1-RM). To characterise the input-output properties of the corticospinal tract, stimulus-response curves for corticospinal excitability and inhibition of the right biceps brachii and flexor carpi radialis were constructed and assessed by examining the area under the recruitment curve (AURC). Strength training resulted in a 29% (P < 0.001) increase in 1-RM biceps brachii strength and this was accompanied by a 19% increase in isometric strength of the wrist flexors (P = 0.001). TMS revealed an increase in corticospinal excitability AURC and a decrease in silent period duration AURC for the biceps brachii and flexor carpi radialis following strength training (all P < 0.05). However, the changes in corticospinal function were not associated with increased muscle strength. These findings show that the corticospinal responses to strength training of a proximal upper limb muscle are not spatially restricted, but rather, results in a change in connectivity, among an agonist and a synergistic muscle relevant to force production.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Control Contribute to Step Length Asymmetry During Split-Belt Adaptation and Hemiparetic Gait.

    PubMed

    Finley, James M; Long, Andrew; Bastian, Amy J; Torres-Oviedo, Gelsy

    2015-09-01

    Step length asymmetry (SLA) is a common hallmark of gait poststroke. Though conventionally viewed as a spatial deficit, SLA can result from differences in where the feet are placed relative to the body (step position strategy), the timing between foot strikes (step time strategy), or the velocity of the body relative to the feet (step velocity strategy). The goal of this study was to characterize the relative contributions of each of these strategies to SLA. We developed an analytical model that parses SLA into independent step position, step time, and step velocity contributions. This model was validated by reproducing SLA values for 25 healthy participants when their natural symmetric gait was perturbed on a split-belt treadmill moving at either a 2:1 or 3:1 belt-speed ratio. We then applied the validated model to quantify step position, step time, and step velocity contributions to SLA in 15 stroke survivors while walking at their self-selected speed. SLA was predicted precisely by summing the derived contributions, regardless of the belt-speed ratio. Although the contributions to SLA varied considerably across our sample of stroke survivors, the step position contribution tended to oppose the other 2-possibly as an attempt to minimize overall SLA. Our results suggest that changes in where the feet are placed or changes in interlimb timing could be used as compensatory strategies to reduce overall SLA in stroke survivors. These results may allow clinicians and researchers to identify patient-specific gait abnormalities and personalize their therapeutic approaches accordingly. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Spatial and seasonal toxicity in a stormwater management facility: evidence obtained by adapting an integrated sediment quality assessment approach.

    PubMed

    Tixier, Guillaume; Rochfort, Quintin; Grapentine, Lee; Marsalek, Jiri; Lafont, Michel

    2012-12-15

    Stormwater ponds have been widely used to control increased surface runoff resulting from urbanization, and to enhance runoff quality. As receiving waters, they are impacted by intermittent stormwater pollution while also serving as newly created aquatic habitats, which partly offset changes of aquatic ecosystems and their biodiversity by urbanization. Thus, determining ecological risks in stormwater ponds is important for the preservation and rehabilitation of biodiversity in urban areas. Limitations of the conventional toxicity assessment techniques in stormwater ponds have led us to use the sediment quality triad approach with the specific analyses of oligochaetes. The latter analyses build on the earlier work by the Cemagref (Lyon, France) and use the oligochaetes as bioindicators of the sediment quality. This integrative approach was tested at eight sites in the Terraview-Willowfield stormwater facility in Toronto, Ontario, in all four seasons (summer 2008-spring 2009). The facility receives direct runoff from the MacDonald-Cartier freeway with a traffic intensity of 340,000 vehicles/d. Sediment chemistry results indicate that several heavy metals and PAH compounds exceeded the Ontario sediment quality guidelines in the facility. Regardless of the season, laboratory bioassays revealed a strong spatial variation in sediment toxicity along the flow path from the inlet to the outlet, agreeing with decreasing concentrations of contaminants in sediment, especially of heavy metals. However, in situ assessments of the benthic macroinvertebrate community structure and in particular of the oligochaete community revealed an overriding influence of seasonally varying toxicity. This seasonal pattern was described as high toxicity in spring and recovery in fall and corresponded to the influx and flushing-out of road salts and of several heavy metals within the facility. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Reconstructing cone-beam CT with spatially varying qualities for adaptive radiotherapy: a proof-of-principle study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenting; Yan, Hao; Gu, Xuejun; Tian, Zhen; Luo, Ouyang; Yang, Liu; Zhou, Linghong; Cervino, Laura; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2014-10-21

    With the aim of maximally reducing imaging dose while meeting requirements for adaptive radiation therapy (ART), we propose in this paper a new cone beam CT (CBCT) acquisition and reconstruction method that delivers images with a low noise level inside a region of interest (ROI) and a relatively high noise level outside the ROI. The acquired projection images include two groups: densely sampled projections at a low exposure with a large field of view (FOV) and sparsely sampled projections at a high exposure with a small FOV corresponding to the ROI. A new algorithm combining the conventional filtered back-projection algorithm and the tight-frame iterative reconstruction algorithm is also designed to reconstruct the CBCT based on these projection data. We have validated our method on a simulated head-and-neck (HN) patient case, a semi-real experiment conducted on a HN cancer patient under a full-fan scan mode, as well as a Catphan phantom under a half-fan scan mode. Relative root-mean-square errors (RRMSEs) of less than 3% for the entire image and ~1% within the ROI compared to the ground truth have been observed. These numbers demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to reconstruct high-quality images inside the ROI. As for the part outside ROI, although the images are relatively noisy, it can still provide sufficient information for radiation dose calculations in ART. Dose distributions calculated on our CBCT image and on a standard CBCT image are in agreement, with a mean relative difference of 0.082% inside the ROI and 0.038% outside the ROI. Compared with the standard clinical CBCT scheme, an imaging dose reduction of approximately 3-6 times inside the ROI was achieved, as well as an 8 times outside the ROI. Regarding computational efficiency, it takes 1-3 min to reconstruct a CBCT image depending on the number of projections used. These results indicate that the proposed method has the potential for application in ART.

  6. Reconstructing cone-beam CT with spatially varying qualities for adaptive radiotherapy: a proof-of-principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenting; Yan, Hao; Gu, Xuejun; Tian, Zhen; Ouyang, Luo; Yang, Liu; Zhou, Linghong; Cervino, Laura; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2014-10-01

    With the aim of maximally reducing imaging dose while meeting requirements for adaptive radiation therapy (ART), we propose in this paper a new cone beam CT (CBCT) acquisition and reconstruction method that delivers images with a low noise level inside a region of interest (ROI) and a relatively high noise level outside the ROI. The acquired projection images include two groups: densely sampled projections at a low exposure with a large field of view (FOV) and sparsely sampled projections at a high exposure with a small FOV corresponding to the ROI. A new algorithm combining the conventional filtered back-projection algorithm and the tight-frame iterative reconstruction algorithm is also designed to reconstruct the CBCT based on these projection data. We have validated our method on a simulated head-and-neck (HN) patient case, a semi-real experiment conducted on a HN cancer patient under a full-fan scan mode, as well as a Catphan phantom under a half-fan scan mode. Relative root-mean-square errors (RRMSEs) of less than 3% for the entire image and ~1% within the ROI compared to the ground truth have been observed. These numbers demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to reconstruct high-quality images inside the ROI. As for the part outside ROI, although the images are relatively noisy, it can still provide sufficient information for radiation dose calculations in ART. Dose distributions calculated on our CBCT image and on a standard CBCT image are in agreement, with a mean relative difference of 0.082% inside the ROI and 0.038% outside the ROI. Compared with the standard clinical CBCT scheme, an imaging dose reduction of approximately 3-6 times inside the ROI was achieved, as well as an 8 times outside the ROI. Regarding computational efficiency, it takes 1-3 min to reconstruct a CBCT image depending on the number of projections used. These results indicate that the proposed method has the potential for application in ART.

  7. Reconstructing Cone-beam CT with Spatially Varying Qualities for Adaptive Radiotherapy, a Proof-of-Principle Study1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenting; Yan, Hao; Gu, Xuejun; Tian, Zhen; Luo, Ouyang; Yang, Liu; Zhou, Linghong; Cervino, Laura; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of maximally reducing imaging dose while meeting requirements for adaptive radiation therapy (ART), we propose in this paper a new cone beam CT (CBCT) acquisition and reconstruction method that delivers images with a low noise level inside a region of interest (ROI) and a relatively high noise level outside the ROI. The acquired projection images include two groups: densely sampled projections at a low exposure with a large field of view (FOV) and sparsely sampled projections at a high exposure with a small FOV corresponding to the ROI. A new algorithm combining the conventional filtered back-projection algorithm and the tight-frame iterative reconstruction algorithm is also designed to reconstruct the CBCT based on these projection data. We have validated our method on a simulated head-and-neck (HN) patient case, a semi-real experiment conducted on a HN cancer patient under a full-fan scan mode, as well as a Catphan phantom under a half-fan scan mode. Relative root-mean-square errors (RRMSE) of less than 3% for the entire image and ~1% within the ROI compared to the ground truth have been observed. These numbers demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to reconstruct high-quality images inside the ROI. As for the part outside ROI, although the images are relatively noisy, it can still provide sufficient information for radiation dose calculations in ART. Dose distributions calculated on our CBCT image and on a standard CBCT image are in agreement, with a mean relative difference of 0.082% inside the ROI and 0.038% outside the ROI. Compared with the standard clinical CBCT scheme, an imaging dose reduction of approximately 3–6 times inside the ROI was achieved, as well as an 8 times outside the ROI. Regarding computational efficiency, it takes 1–3 min to reconstruct a CBCT image depending on the number of projections used. These results indicate that the proposed method has the potential for application in ART. PMID:25255957

  8. A Scale-Adaptive Approach for Spatially-Varying Urban Morphology Characterization in Boundary Layer Parametrization Using Multi-Resolution Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzourides, P.; Kyprianou, A.; Neophytou, M. K.-A.

    2013-12-01

    Urban morphology characterization is crucial for the parametrization of boundary-layer development over urban areas. One complexity in such a characterization is the three-dimensional variation of the urban canopies and textures, which are customarily reduced to and represented by one-dimensional varying parametrization such as the aerodynamic roughness length and zero-plane displacement . The scope of the paper is to provide novel means for a scale-adaptive spatially-varying parametrization of the boundary layer by addressing this 3-D variation. Specifically, the 3-D variation of urban geometries often poses questions in the multi-scale modelling of air pollution dispersion and other climate or weather-related modelling applications that have not been addressed yet, such as: (a) how we represent urban attributes (parameters) appropriately for the multi-scale nature and multi-resolution basis of weather numerical models, (b) how we quantify the uniqueness of an urban database in the context of modelling urban effects in large-scale weather numerical models, and (c) how we derive the impact and influence of a particular building in pre-specified sub-domain areas of the urban database. We illustrate how multi-resolution analysis (MRA) addresses and answers the afore-mentioned questions by taking as an example the Central Business District of Oklahoma City. The selection of MRA is motivated by its capacity for multi-scale sampling; in the MRA the "urban" signal depicting a city is decomposed into an approximation, a representation at a higher scale, and a detail, the part removed at lower scales to yield the approximation. Different levels of approximations were deduced for the building height and planar packing density . A spatially-varying characterization with a scale-adaptive capacity is obtained for the boundary-layer parameters (aerodynamic roughness length and zero-plane displacement ) using the MRA-deduced results for the building height and the planar packing

  9. Long-term sensorimotor and therapeutical effects of a mild regime of prism adaptation in spatial neglect. A double-blind RCT essay.

    PubMed

    Rode, G; Lacour, S; Jacquin-Courtois, S; Pisella, L; Michel, C; Revol, P; Alahyane, N; Luauté, J; Gallagher, S; Halligan, P; Pélisson, D; Rossetti, Y

    2015-04-01

    Spatial neglect (SN) is commonly associated with poor functional outcome. Adaptation to a rightward optical deviation of vision has been shown to benefit to SN rehabilitation. The neurophysiological foundations and the optimal modalities of prism adaptation (PA) therapy however remain to be validated. This study is aimed at exploring the long-term sensory-motor, cognitive and functional effects produced by weekly PA sessions over a period of four weeks. A double-blind, monocentric randomized and controlled trial (RCT) was carried out. Twenty patients with left SN secondary to stroke were included, 10 in the "prism" group and 10 in the "control" group. The sensory-motor effects of PA were evaluated by measurement of manual and visual straight-ahead, and also by precision of pointing without visual feedback before and after each PA session. The functional independence measure (FIM) was evaluated before and at 1, 3 and 6 months after PA, while SN severity was assessed using the Behavioural Inattention Test (BIT) before and 6 months after PA. Before the intervention, only manual straight-ahead pointing constituted a reproducible sensory-motor measurement. During prism exposure, a questionnaire showed that not a single patient were aware of the direct effects of optical deviation on pointing movement performance. The sensory-motor after-effects produced by the PA produced a more rapid reduction of the rightward manual straight-ahead, which was secondarily followed by visual straight-ahead. These sensory-motor effects helped to clarify the action mechanisms of PA on SN. At the conclusion of the 6-month follow-up, the two groups showed similar improvement, indicating that a weekly PA session over 4 weeks was not sufficient to produce long-term functional benefit. This improvement was correlated with the evolution of visual straight-ahead, which can be proposed as a marker for patients outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Adaptive shaping system for both spatial and temporal profiles of a highly stabilized UV laser light source for a photocathode RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomizawa, H.; Dewa, H.; Taniuchi, T.; Mizuno, A.; Asaka, T.; Yanagida, K.; Suzuki, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Hanaki, H.; Matsui, F.

    2006-02-01

    We have been developing a stable and highly qualified ultraviolet (UV) laser pulse as a light source of an RF gun for an injector candidate of future light sources. Our gun cavity is a single-cell pillbox, and the copper inner wall is used as a photocathode. The chirped pulse amplification (CPA) Ti:sapphire laser system is operated at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. At the third harmonic generation (central wavelength—263 nm), the laser pulse energy after a 45 cm silica rod is up to 850 μJ/pulse. In its present status, the laser's pulse energy stability has been improved down to 0.2˜0.3% at the fundamental, and 0.7-1.4% (rms; 10 pps; 33,818 shots) at the third harmonic generation, respectively. This stability has been held for 1 month continuously, 24 h a day. The improvements we had passively implemented were to stabilize the laser system as well as the environmental conditions. We introduced a humidity-control system kept at 50-60% in a clean room to reduce damage to the optics. In addition, we prepared a deformable mirror for spatial shaping and a spatial light modulator based on fused-silica plates for temporal shaping. We are applying both the adaptive optics to automatic optimization of the electron beam bunch to produce lower emittance with the feedback routine. Before the improvements, the electron beam produced from a cathode suffered inhomogeneous distribution caused by the quantum efficiency effect, and some pulse distortions caused by its response time. However, we can now freely form any arbitrary electron beam distribution on the surface of the cathode.

  11. In absence of local adaptation, plasticity and spatially varying selection rule: a view from genomic reaction norms in a panmictic species (Anguilla rostrata)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background American eel (Anguilla rostrata) is one of the few species for which panmixia has been demonstrated at the scale of the entire species. As such, the development of long term local adaptation is impossible. However, both plasticity and spatially varying selection have been invoked in explaining how American eel may cope with an unusual broad scope of environmental conditions. Here, we address this question through transcriptomic analyses and genomic reaction norms of eels from two geographic origins reared in controlled environments. Results The null hypothesis of no difference in gene expression between eels from the two origins was rejected. Many unique transcripts and two out of seven gene clusters showed significant difference in expression, both at time of capture and after three months of common rearing. Differences in expression were observed at numerous genes representing many functional groups when comparing eels from a same origin reared under different salinity conditions. Plastic response to different rearing conditions varied among gene clusters with three clusters showing significant origin-environment interactions translating into differential genomic norms of reaction. Most genes and functional categories showing differences between origins were previously shown to be differentially expressed in a study comparing transcription profiles between adult European eels acclimated to different salinities. Conclusions These results emphasize that while plasticity in expression may be important, there is also a role for local genetic (and/or epigenetic) differences in explaining differences in gene expression between eels from different geographic origins. Such differences match those reported in genetically distinct populations in other fishes, both in terms of the proportion of genes that are differentially expressed and the diversity of biological functions involved. We thus propose that genetic differences between glass eels of different

  12. Adaptive Assessment of Spatial Abilities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Alexandria, VA 22333 San Diego, CA 92152-6800 Dr. James McBride Dr. Michael Levine Psychological Corporation Educational Psychology c/o Harcourt, Brace...Center San Diego, CA 92152-6800 Mr. Gary Thomasson University of Illinois Dr. Paul Speckman Educational Psychology University of Missouri Champaign, IL...Groningen North Chicago, IL 60064 The NETHERLANDS Mr. Robert McKinley Dr. Robert Linn University of Toledo College of Education Department of Educational

  13. Subaru adaptive-optics high-spatial-resolution infrared K- and L'-band imaging search for deeply buried dual AGNs in merging galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Saito, Yuriko

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of infrared K- (2.2 μm) and L'-band (3.8 μm) high-spatial-resolution (<0.''2) imaging observations of nearby gas- and dust-rich infrared luminous merging galaxies, assisted by the adaptive optics system on the Subaru 8.2 m telescope. We investigate the presence and frequency of red K – L' compact sources, which are sensitive indicators of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including AGNs that are deeply buried in gas and dust. We observed 29 merging systems and confirmed at least one AGN in all but one system. However, luminous dual AGNs were detected in only four of the 29 systems (∼14%), despite our method's being sensitive to buried AGNs. For multiple nuclei sources, we compared the estimated AGN luminosities with supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses inferred from large-aperture K-band stellar emission photometry in individual nuclei. We found that mass accretion rates onto SMBHs are significantly different among multiple SMBHs, such that larger-mass SMBHs generally show higher mass accretion rates when normalized to SMBH mass. Our results suggest that non-synchronous mass accretion onto SMBHs in gas- and dust-rich infrared luminous merging galaxies hampers the observational detection of kiloparsec-scale multiple active SMBHs. This could explain the significantly smaller detection fraction of kiloparsec-scale dual AGNs when compared with the number expected from simple theoretical predictions. Our results also indicate that mass accretion onto SMBHs is dominated by local conditions, rather than by global galaxy properties, reinforcing the importance of observations to our understanding of how multiple SMBHs are activated and acquire mass in gas- and dust-rich merging galaxies.

  14. Spatial Ecology of Bacteria at the Microscale in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Raynaud, Xavier; Nunan, Naoise

    2014-01-01

    Despite an exceptional number of bacterial cells and species in soils, bacterial diversity seems to have little effect on soil processes, such as respiration or nitrification, that can be affected by interactions between bacterial cells. The aim of this study is to understand how bacterial cells are distributed in soil to better understand the scaling between cell-to-cell interactions and what can be measured in a few milligrams, or more, of soil. Based on the analysis of 744 images of observed bacterial distributions in soil thin sections taken at different depths, we found that the inter-cell distance was, on average 12.46 µm and that these inter-cell distances were shorter near the soil surface (10.38 µm) than at depth (>18 µm), due to changes in cell densities. These images were also used to develop a spatial statistical model, based on Log Gaussian Cox Processes, to analyse the 2D distribution of cells and construct realistic 3D bacterial distributions. Our analyses suggest that despite the very high number of cells and species in soil, bacteria only interact with a few other individuals. For example, at bacterial densities commonly found in bulk soil (108 cells g−1 soil), the number of neighbours a single bacterium has within an interaction distance of ca. 20 µm is relatively limited (120 cells on average). Making conservative assumptions about the distribution of species, we show that such neighbourhoods contain less than 100 species. This value did not change appreciably as a function of the overall diversity in soil, suggesting that the diversity of soil bacterial communities may be species-saturated. All in all, this work provides precise data on bacterial distributions, a novel way to model them at the micrometer scale as well as some new insights on the degree of interactions between individual bacterial cells in soils. PMID:24489873

  15. Spatial ecology of bacteria at the microscale in soil.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Xavier; Nunan, Naoise

    2014-01-01

    Despite an exceptional number of bacterial cells and species in soils, bacterial diversity seems to have little effect on soil processes, such as respiration or nitrification, that can be affected by interactions between bacterial cells. The aim of this study is to understand how bacterial cells are distributed in soil to better understand the scaling between cell-to-cell interactions and what can be measured in a few milligrams, or more, of soil. Based on the analysis of 744 images of observed bacterial distributions in soil thin sections taken at different depths, we found that the inter-cell distance was, on average 12.46 µm and that these inter-cell distances were shorter near the soil surface (10.38 µm) than at depth (>18 µm), due to changes in cell densities. These images were also used to develop a spatial statistical model, based on Log Gaussian Cox Processes, to analyse the 2D distribution of cells and construct realistic 3D bacterial distributions. Our analyses suggest that despite the very high number of cells and species in soil, bacteria only interact with a few other individuals. For example, at bacterial densities commonly found in bulk soil (10(8) cells g(-1) soil), the number of neighbours a single bacterium has within an interaction distance of ca. 20 µm is relatively limited (120 cells on average). Making conservative assumptions about the distribution of species, we show that such neighbourhoods contain less than 100 species. This value did not change appreciably as a function of the overall diversity in soil, suggesting that the diversity of soil bacterial communities may be species-saturated. All in all, this work provides precise data on bacterial distributions, a novel way to model them at the micrometer scale as well as some new insights on the degree of interactions between individual bacterial cells in soils.

  16. Deformation field validation and inversion applied to adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Olteanu, Luiza A. M.; Madani, Indira; Duprez, Fréderic; Berwouts, Dieter; Speleers, Bruno; De Neve, Wilfried

    2013-08-01

    Development and implementation of chronological and anti-chronological adaptive dose accumulation strategies in adaptive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. An algorithm based on Newton iterations was implemented to efficiently compute inverse deformation fields (DFs). Four verification steps were performed to ensure a valid dose propagation: intra-cell folding detection finds zero or negative Jacobian determinants in the input DF; inter-cell folding detection is implemented on the resolution of the output DF; a region growing algorithm detects undefined values in the output DF; DF domains can be composed and displayed on the CT data. In 2011, one patient with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer selected from a three phase adaptive DPBN study was used to illustrate the algorithms implemented for adaptive chronological and anti-chronological dose accumulation. The patient received three 18F-FDG-PET/CTs prior to each treatment phase and one CT after finalizing treatment. Contour propagation and DF generation between two consecutive CTs was performed in Atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS). Deformable image registration based dose accumulations were performed on CT1 and CT4. Dose propagation was done using combinations of DFs or their inversions. We have implemented a chronological and anti-chronological dose accumulation algorithm based on DF inversion. Algorithms were designed and implemented to detect cell folding.

  17. A geometry preserving, conservative, mesh-to-mesh isogeometric interpolation algorithm for spatial adaptivity of the multigroup, second-order even-parity form of the neutron transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, J. A.; Kópházi, J.; Owens, A. R.; Eaton, M. D.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper a method is presented for the application of energy-dependent spatial meshes applied to the multigroup, second-order, even-parity form of the neutron transport equation using Isogeometric Analysis (IGA). The computation of the inter-group regenerative source terms is based on conservative interpolation by Galerkin projection. The use of Non-Uniform Rational B-splines (NURBS) from the original computer-aided design (CAD) model allows for efficient implementation and calculation of the spatial projection operations while avoiding the complications of matching different geometric approximations faced by traditional finite element methods (FEM). The rate-of-convergence was verified using the method of manufactured solutions (MMS) and found to preserve the theoretical rates when interpolating between spatial meshes of different refinements. The scheme's numerical efficiency was then studied using a series of two-energy group pincell test cases where a significant saving in the number of degrees-of-freedom can be found if the energy group with a complex variation in the solution is refined more than an energy group with a simpler solution function. Finally, the method was applied to a heterogeneous, seven-group reactor pincell where the spatial meshes for each energy group were adaptively selected for refinement. It was observed that by refining selected energy groups a reduction in the total number of degrees-of-freedom for the same total L2 error can be obtained.

  18. Retinal cell imaging in myopic chickens using adaptive optics multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Juan M; Palacios, Raquel; Giakoumaki, Anastasia; Gualda, Emilio J; Schaeffel, Frank; Artal, Pablo

    2014-03-01

    Abnormal eye growth induced by visual deprivation can modify the structure and density of the retinal cells. We have used an adaptive optics multiphoton microscope to image photoreceptors (PRs) and ganglion cells (GCs) at different retinal locations in unstained retinas of chicken eyes with about 10D of myopia and their normal-sighted fellow eyes. In all samples, the local averaged inter-PR distance increased with eccentricity. No significant differences in PR density were found between control and myopic eyes. GC density declined in myopic eyes compared to control eyes and the inter-cell distance increased. In normal eyes, the size of the GC cell bodies increased approximately two-fold between the area centralis and the peripheral retina. In myopic eyes, this trend was preserved but the GC bodies were larger at each retinal location, compared to control eyes. Obviously, GC morphology is changing when the retinal area is enlarged in myopic eyes.

  19. Retinal cell imaging in myopic chickens using adaptive optics multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Juan M.; Palacios, Raquel; Giakoumaki, Anastasia; Gualda, Emilio J.; Schaeffel, Frank; Artal, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal eye growth induced by visual deprivation can modify the structure and density of the retinal cells. We have used an adaptive optics multiphoton microscope to image photoreceptors (PRs) and ganglion cells (GCs) at different retinal locations in unstained retinas of chicken eyes with about 10D of myopia and their normal-sighted fellow eyes. In all samples, the local averaged inter-PR distance increased with eccentricity. No significant differences in PR density were found between control and myopic eyes. GC density declined in myopic eyes compared to control eyes and the inter-cell distance increased. In normal eyes, the size of the GC cell bodies increased approximately two-fold between the area centralis and the peripheral retina. In myopic eyes, this trend was preserved but the GC bodies were larger at each retinal location, compared to control eyes. Obviously, GC morphology is changing when the retinal area is enlarged in myopic eyes. PMID:24688804

  20. Adapting Japanese Lesson Study to Enhance the Teaching and Learning of Geometry and Spatial Reasoning in Early Years Classrooms: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Joan; Hawes, Zachary; Naqvi, Sarah; Caswell, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Increased efforts are needed to meet the demand for high quality mathematics in early years classrooms. Despite the foundational role of geometry and spatial reasoning for later mathematics success, the strand receives inadequate instructional time and is limited to concepts of static geometry. Moreover, early years teachers typically lack both…

  1. Adapting Japanese Lesson Study to Enhance the Teaching and Learning of Geometry and Spatial Reasoning in Early Years Classrooms: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Joan; Hawes, Zachary; Naqvi, Sarah; Caswell, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Increased efforts are needed to meet the demand for high quality mathematics in early years classrooms. Despite the foundational role of geometry and spatial reasoning for later mathematics success, the strand receives inadequate instructional time and is limited to concepts of static geometry. Moreover, early years teachers typically lack both…

  2. Altitudinal gradients, biogeographic history and microhabitat adaptation affect fine-scale spatial genetic structure in African and Neotropical populations of an ancient tropical tree species.

    PubMed

    Torroba-Balmori, Paloma; Budde, Katharina B; Heer, Katrin; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Olsson, Sanna; Scotti-Saintagne, Caroline; Casalis, Maxime; Sonké, Bonaventure; Dick, Christopher W; Heuertz, Myriam

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of fine-scale spatial genetic structure (FSGS) within populations can provide insights into eco-evolutionary processes. Restricted dispersal and locally occurring genetic drift are the primary causes for FSGS at equilibrium, as described in the isolation by distance (IBD) model. Beyond IBD expectations, spatial, environmental or historical factors can affect FSGS. We examined FSGS in seven African and Neotropical populations of the late-successional rain forest tree Symphonia globulifera L. f. (Clusiaceae) to discriminate the influence of drift-dispersal vs. landscape/ecological features and historical processes on FSGS. We used spatial principal component analysis and Bayesian clustering to assess spatial genetic heterogeneity at SSRs and examined its association with plastid DNA and habitat features. African populations (from Cameroon and São Tomé) displayed a stronger FSGS than Neotropical populations at both marker types (mean Sp = 0.025 vs. Sp = 0.008 at SSRs) and had a stronger spatial genetic heterogeneity. All three African populations occurred in pronounced altitudinal gradients, possibly restricting animal-mediated seed dispersal. Cyto-nuclear disequilibria in Cameroonian populations also suggested a legacy of biogeographic history to explain these genetic patterns. Conversely, Neotropical populations exhibited a weaker FSGS, which may reflect more efficient wide-ranging seed dispersal by Neotropical bats and other dispersers. The population from French Guiana displayed an association of plastid haplotypes with two morphotypes characterized by differential habitat preferences. Our results highlight the importance of the microenvironment for eco-evolutionary processes within persistent tropical tree populations.

  3. Altitudinal gradients, biogeographic history and microhabitat adaptation affect fine-scale spatial genetic structure in African and Neotropical populations of an ancient tropical tree species

    PubMed Central

    Torroba-Balmori, Paloma; Budde, Katharina B.; Heer, Katrin; González-Martínez, Santiago C.; Olsson, Sanna; Scotti-Saintagne, Caroline; Sonké, Bonaventure; Dick, Christopher W.

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of fine-scale spatial genetic structure (FSGS) within populations can provide insights into eco-evolutionary processes. Restricted dispersal and locally occurring genetic drift are the primary causes for FSGS at equilibrium, as described in the isolation by distance (IBD) model. Beyond IBD expectations, spatial, environmental or historical factors can affect FSGS. We examined FSGS in seven African and Neotropical populations of the late-successional rain forest tree Symphonia globulifera L. f. (Clusiaceae) to discriminate the influence of drift-dispersal vs. landscape/ecological features and historical processes on FSGS. We used spatial principal component analysis and Bayesian clustering to assess spatial genetic heterogeneity at SSRs and examined its association with plastid DNA and habitat features. African populations (from Cameroon and São Tomé) displayed a stronger FSGS than Neotropical populations at both marker types (mean Sp = 0.025 vs. Sp = 0.008 at SSRs) and had a stronger spatial genetic heterogeneity. All three African populations occurred in pronounced altitudinal gradients, possibly restricting animal-mediated seed dispersal. Cyto-nuclear disequilibria in Cameroonian populations also suggested a legacy of biogeographic history to explain these genetic patterns. Conversely, Neotropical populations exhibited a weaker FSGS, which may reflect more efficient wide-ranging seed dispersal by Neotropical bats and other dispersers. The population from French Guiana displayed an association of plastid haplotypes with two morphotypes characterized by differential habitat preferences. Our results highlight the importance of the microenvironment for eco-evolutionary processes within persistent tropical tree populations. PMID:28771629

  4. Generalization of Prism Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redding, Gordon M.; Wallace, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Prism exposure produces 2 kinds of adaptive response. Recalibration is ordinary strategic remapping of spatially coded movement commands to rapidly reduce performance error. Realignment is the extraordinary process of transforming spatial maps to bring the origins of coordinate systems into correspondence. Realignment occurs when spatial…

  5. Generalization of Prism Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redding, Gordon M.; Wallace, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Prism exposure produces 2 kinds of adaptive response. Recalibration is ordinary strategic remapping of spatially coded movement commands to rapidly reduce performance error. Realignment is the extraordinary process of transforming spatial maps to bring the origins of coordinate systems into correspondence. Realignment occurs when spatial…

  6. Bidirectional Regulation of the Cyclic-AMP Response Element Binding Protein Encodes Spatial Map Alignment in Prism-Adapting Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2012-01-01

    The barn owl midbrain contains mutually aligned maps of auditory and visual space. Throughout life, map alignment is maintained through the actions of an instructive signal that encodes the magnitude of auditory-visual mismatch. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by this signal are unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) provides a cell-specific readout of instructive information. Owls were fitted with prismatic or control spectacles and provided rich auditory-visual experience - hunting live mice. CREB activation was analyzed within 30 minutes of hunting using phosphorylation state-specific (pCREB) and CREB antibodies, confocal imaging and immunofluorescence measurements at individual cell nuclei. In control owls or prism-adapted owls, which experience small instructive signals, the frequency distributions of pCREB/CREB values obtained for cell nuclei within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) were unimodal. In contrast, in owls adapting to prisms or re-adapting to normal conditions, the distributions were bimodal: certain cells had received a signal that positively regulated CREB, and by extension, transcription of CREB-dependent genes, while others a signal that negatively regulated it. These changes were restricted to the sub-region of the inferior colliculus that received optically displaced input, the rostral ICX, and not evident in the caudal ICX or central nucleus. Finally, the topographic pattern of CREB regulation was patchy, not continuous, as expected from the actions of a topographically precise signal encoding discrete events. These results support a model in which the magnitude of CREB activation within individual cells provides a readout of the instructive signal that guides plasticity and learning. PMID:18829948

  7. Adaptive compensation of atmospheric turbulence utilizing an interferometric wave-front sensor and a high-resolution MEMS-based spatial light modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Wilks, S; Olivier, S; Olsen, J

    2004-08-12

    Horizontal path correction of optical beam propagation presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by propagation along these paths. The system presented operates with nearly monochromatic light. It does not require a global reconstruction of the phase, thereby eliminating issues with branch points and making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The systems pixel count, 1024, and relatively high correction speed, in excess of 800 Hz, enable its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. We present results from laboratory and field tests of the system in which we have achieved Strehl ratios greater than 0.5.

  8. Bidirectional regulation of the cAMP response element binding protein encodes spatial map alignment in prism-adapting barn owls.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2008-10-01

    The barn owl midbrain contains mutually aligned maps of auditory and visual space. Throughout life, map alignment is maintained through the actions of an instructive signal that encodes the magnitude of auditory-visual mismatch. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by this signal are unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) provides a cell-specific readout of instructive information. Owls were fitted with prismatic or control spectacles and provided rich auditory-visual experience: hunting live mice. CREB activation was analyzed within 30 min of hunting using phosphorylation state-specific CREB (pCREB) and CREB antibodies, confocal imaging, and immunofluorescence measurements at individual cell nuclei. In control owls or prism-adapted owls, which experience small instructive signals, the frequency distributions of pCREB/CREB values obtained for cell nuclei within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) were unimodal. In contrast, in owls adapting to prisms or readapting to normal conditions, the distributions were bimodal: certain cells had received a signal that positively regulated CREB and, by extension, transcription of CREB-dependent genes, whereas others received a signal that negatively regulated it. These changes were restricted to the subregion of the inferior colliculus that received optically displaced input, the rostral ICX, and were not evident in the caudal ICX or central nucleus. Finally, the topographic pattern of CREB regulation was patchy, not continuous, as expected from the actions of a topographically precise signal encoding discrete events. These results support a model in which the magnitude of CREB activation within individual cells provides a readout of the instructive signal that guides plasticity and learning.

  9. Investigation of adaptive filtering and MDL mitigation based on space-time block-coding for spatial division multiplexed coherent receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yi; He, Xuan; Yao, Wang; Pacheco, Michelle C.; Wang, Junyi; Pan, Zhongqi

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we explored the performance of space-time block-coding (STBC) assisted multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) scheme for modal dispersion and mode-dependent loss (MDL) mitigation in spatial-division multiplexed optical communication systems, whereas the weight matrices of frequency-domain equalization (FDE) were updated heuristically using decision-directed recursive least squares (RLS) algorithm for convergence and channel estimation. The proposed STBC-RLS algorithm can achieve 43.6% enhancement on convergence rate over conventional least mean squares (LMS) for quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) signals with merely 16.2% increase in hardware complexity. The overall optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) tolerance can be improved via STBC by approximately 3.1, 4.9, 7.8 dB for QPSK, 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) and 64-QAM with respective bit-error-rates (BER) and minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE).

  10. Spatial Query for Planetary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Khawaja S.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Powell, Mark W.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Fox, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    Science investigators need to quickly and effectively assess past observations of specific locations on a planetary surface. This innovation involves a location-based search technology that was adapted and applied to planetary science data to support a spatial query capability for mission operations software. High-performance location-based searching requires the use of spatial data structures for database organization. Spatial data structures are designed to organize datasets based on their coordinates in a way that is optimized for location-based retrieval. The particular spatial data structure that was adapted for planetary data search is the R+ tree.

  11. Spatial Analysis of Soil Subsidence in Peat Meadow Areas in Friesland in Relation to Land and Water Management, Climate Change, and Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Eikelboom, Tessa; Jansen, Peter C.; Janssen, Ron; Kwakernaak, Cees; van den Akker, Jan J. H.; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.

    2015-02-01

    Dutch peatlands have been subsiding due to peat decomposition, shrinkage and compression, since their reclamation in the 11th century. Currently, subsidence amounts to 1-2 cm/year. Water management in these areas is complex and costly, greenhouse gases are being emitted, and surface water quality is relatively poor. Regional and local authorities and landowners responsible for peatland management have recognized these problems. In addition, the Netherlands Royal Meteorological Institute predicts higher temperatures and drier summers, which both are expected to enhance peat decomposition. Stakeholder workshops have been organized in three case study areas in the province of Friesland to exchange knowledge on subsidence and explore future subsidence rates and the effects of land use and management changes on subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were up to 3 cm/year in deeply drained parcels and increased when we included climate change in the modeling exercises. This means that the relatively thin peat layers in this province (ca 1 m) would shrink or even disappear by the end of the century when current practices continue. Adaptation measures were explored, such as extensive dairy farming and the production of new crops in wetter conditions, but little experience has been gained on best practices. The workshops have resulted in useful exchange of ideas on possible measures and their consequences for land use and water management in the three case study areas. The province and the regional water board will use the results to develop land use and water management policies for the next decades.

  12. Spatial analysis of soil subsidence in peat meadow areas in Friesland in relation to land and water management, climate change, and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Brouns, Karlijn; Eikelboom, Tessa; Jansen, Peter C; Janssen, Ron; Kwakernaak, Cees; van den Akker, Jan J H; Verhoeven, Jos T A

    2015-02-01

    Dutch peatlands have been subsiding due to peat decomposition, shrinkage and compression, since their reclamation in the 11th century. Currently, subsidence amounts to 1-2 cm/year. Water management in these areas is complex and costly, greenhouse gases are being emitted, and surface water quality is relatively poor. Regional and local authorities and landowners responsible for peatland management have recognized these problems. In addition, the Netherlands Royal Meteorological Institute predicts higher temperatures and drier summers, which both are expected to enhance peat decomposition. Stakeholder workshops have been organized in three case study areas in the province of Friesland to exchange knowledge on subsidence and explore future subsidence rates and the effects of land use and management changes on subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were up to 3 cm/year in deeply drained parcels and increased when we included climate change in the modeling exercises. This means that the relatively thin peat layers in this province (ca 1 m) would shrink or even disappear by the end of the century when current practices continue. Adaptation measures were explored, such as extensive dairy farming and the production of new crops in wetter conditions, but little experience has been gained on best practices. The workshops have resulted in useful exchange of ideas on possible measures and their consequences for land use and water management in the three case study areas. The province and the regional water board will use the results to develop land use and water management policies for the next decades.

  13. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  14. Understanding hydrologic budgets, dynamics in an arid basin and explore spatial scaling properties using Process-based Adaptive Watershed Simulator (PAWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, K.; Shen, C.; Salve, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Southern California hot desert hosts a fragile ecosystem as well as a range of human economic activities, primarily mining, energy production and recreation. This inland arid landscape is characterized by occasional intensive precipitation events and year-round strong potential evapotranspiration. In this landscape, water and especially groundwater is vital for ecosystem functions and human use. However, the impact of recent development on the sustainability of groundwater resources in the area has not been thoroughly investigated. We apply an integrated, physically-based hydrologic-land surface model, the Process-based Adaptive Watershed Simulator + Community Land Model (PAWS+CLM) to evaluate the sustainability of the groundwater resources in the area. We elucidate the spatio-temporal patterns of hydrologic fluxes and budgets. The modeling results indicate that mountain front recharge is the essential recharging mechanism for the alluvial aquifer. Although pumping activities do not exceed annual-average recharge values, they are still expected to contribute significantly to groundwater drawdown in business-as-usual scenario. The impact of groundwater withdrawals is significant on the desert ecosystem. The relative importance of groundwater flow on NPP rises significantly as compared to other ecosystems. We further evaluate the fractal scaling properties of soil moisture in this very arid system and found the relationship to be much more static in time than that found in a humid continental climate system. The scaling exponents can be predicted using simple functions of the mean. Therefore, multi-scale model based on coarse-resolution surrogate model is expected to perform well in this system. The modeling result is also important for assessing the groundwater sustainability and impact of human activities in the desert environment.

  15. In situ adaptive response to climate and habitat quality variation: spatial and temporal variation in European badger (Meles meles) body weight.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Andrew W; Fogarty, Ursula; O'Keeffe, James; Newman, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Variation in climatic and habitat conditions can affect populations through a variety of mechanisms, and these relationships can act at different temporal and spatial scales. Using post-mortem badger body weight records from 15 878 individuals captured across the Republic of Ireland (7224 setts across ca. 15 000 km(2) ; 2009-2012), we employed a hierarchical multilevel mixed model to evaluate the effects of climate (rainfall and temperature) and habitat quality (landscape suitability), while controlling for local abundance (unique badgers caught/sett/year). Body weight was affected strongly by temperature across a number of temporal scales (preceding month or season), with badgers being heavier if preceding temperatures (particularly during winter/spring) were warmer than the long-term seasonal mean. There was less support for rainfall across different temporal scales, although badgers did exhibit heavier weights when greater rainfall occurred one or 2 months prior to capture. Badgers were also heavier in areas with higher landscape habitat quality, modulated by the number of individuals captured per sett, consistent with density-dependent effects reducing weights. Overall, the mean badger body weight of culled individuals rose during the study period (2009-2012), more so for males than for females. With predicted increases in temperature, and rainfall, augmented by ongoing agricultural land conversion in this region, we project heavier individual badger body weights in the future. Increased body weight has been associated with higher fecundity, recruitment and survival rates in badgers, due to improved food availability and energetic budgets. We thus predict that climate change could increase the badger population across the Republic of Ireland. Nevertheless, we emphasize that, locally, populations could still be vulnerable to extreme weather variability coupled with detrimental agricultural practice, including population management.

  16. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  17. Spatial Databases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-19

    for a city . Spatial attributes are used to define the spatial location and extent of spatial objects [35]. The spatial attributes of a spatial object...regarding both geometry and thematic differentiation. It can be used to model 2.5D data (e.g., digital terrain model), as well as 3D data ( walkable ...within a city , if the coverage area of a wireless antenna is considered to be the visible area, then the union of coverage areas of all the antennas in

  18. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D.

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The default parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST

  19. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  20. Spatial cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary Kister; Remington, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Spatial cognition is the ability to reason about geometric relationships in the real (or a metaphorical) world based on one or more internal representations of those relationships. The study of spatial cognition is concerned with the representation of spatial knowledge, and our ability to manipulate these representations to solve spatial problems. Spatial cognition is utilized most critically when direct perceptual cues are absent or impoverished. Examples are provided of how human spatial cognitive abilities impact on three areas of space station operator performance: orientation, path planning, and data base management. A videotape provides demonstrations of relevant phenomena (e.g., the importance of orientation for recognition of complex, configural forms). The presentation is represented by abstract and overhead visuals only.

  1. Lossless Video Sequence Compression Using Adaptive Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ying; Sayood, Khalid

    2007-01-01

    We present an adaptive lossless video compression algorithm based on predictive coding. The proposed algorithm exploits temporal, spatial, and spectral redundancies in a backward adaptive fashion with extremely low side information. The computational complexity is further reduced by using a caching strategy. We also study the relationship between the operational domain for the coder (wavelet or spatial) and the amount of temporal and spatial redundancy in the sequence being encoded. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme provides significant improvements in compression efficiencies.

  2. Lossless Video Sequence Compression Using Adaptive Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ying; Sayood, Khalid

    2007-01-01

    We present an adaptive lossless video compression algorithm based on predictive coding. The proposed algorithm exploits temporal, spatial, and spectral redundancies in a backward adaptive fashion with extremely low side information. The computational complexity is further reduced by using a caching strategy. We also study the relationship between the operational domain for the coder (wavelet or spatial) and the amount of temporal and spatial redundancy in the sequence being encoded. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme provides significant improvements in compression efficiencies.

  3. Adaptation strategies and approaches: Chapter 2

    Treesearch

    Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Maria Janowiak; Linda Parker; Matt St. Pierre; Leslie. Brandt

    2012-01-01

    A wealth of information is available on climate change adaptation, but much of it is very broad and of limited use at the finer spatial scales most relevant to land managers. This chapter contains a "menu" of adaptation actions and provides land managers in northern Wisconsin with a range of options to help forest ecosystems adapt to climate change impacts....

  4. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  5. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  6. Spatial Displays and Spatial Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R. (Editor); Kaiser, Mary K. (Editor); Grunwald, Arthur J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The conference proceedings topics are divided into two main areas: (1) issues of spatial and picture perception raised by graphical electronic displays of spatial information; and (2) design questions raised by the practical experience of designers actually defining new spatial instruments for use in new aircraft and spacecraft. Each topic is considered from both a theoretical and an applied direction. Emphasis is placed on discussion of phenomena and determination of design principles.

  7. Spatial agraphia.

    PubMed

    Ardila, A; Rosselli, M

    1993-07-01

    Twenty-one patients with right hemisphere damage were studied (11 men, 10 women; average age = 41.33; age range 19-65). Subjects were divided into two groups: pre-Rolandic (6) and retro-Rolandic (15) right hemisphere damaged patients. A special writing test was given to each patient. The writing errors observed included literal substitutions, feature omissions and additions, letter omissions and additions, inability to maintain horizontal writing, inappropriate grouping and fragmentation of elements, and changes in handwriting style. Associated disorders included left-hemiparesis, visual field defects, spatial hemi-neglect, constructional apraxia, spatial alexia, and spatial acalculia. It is proposed that spatial agraphia is related to: (1) left hemi-neglect, (2) constructional deficits, (3) general spatial defects, and (4) some motor disautomatization and tendency to perseverate. In cases of right frontal damage, motor-associated deficits (iterations of features and letters) predominated, whereas in cases of posterior right hemisphere damage, spatial defects (inappropriate distribution of written material in the space, grouping of letters belonging to different words, and splitting of words) were more evident. Writing impairments are in general more noticeable in cases of retro-Rolandic damage.

  8. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  9. Pulse front adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important in multiphoton microscopy. Using adaptive optics to manipulate the incident ultrafast beam in either the spectral or spatial domain can introduce significant benefits when imaging. Here we introduce pulse front adaptive optics: manipulating an ultrashort pulse in both the spatial and temporal domains. A deformable mirror and a spatial light modulator are operated in concert to modify contours of constant intensity in space and time within an ultrashort pulse. Through adaptive control of the pulse front, we demonstrate an enhancement in the measured fluorescence from a two photon microscope.

  10. Producing Spatial Words Is Not Enough: Understanding the Relation Between Language and Spatial Cognition.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hilary E; Vlach, Haley A; Simmering, Vanessa R

    2016-11-08

    Prior research has investigated the relation between children's language and spatial cognition by assessing the quantity of children's spatial word production, with limited attention to the context in which children use such words. This study tested whether 4-year-olds children's (N = 41, primarily white middle class) adaptive use of task-relevant language across contexts predicted their spatial skills. Children were presented with a spatial scene description task, four spatial tasks, and vocabulary assessments. Children's adaptive use of task-relevant language was more predictive of their spatial skills than demographic and language factors (e.g., quantity of spatial words produced). These findings identify new links between language and spatial cognition and highlight the importance of understanding the quality, not just quantity, of children's language use. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  11. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  12. Adaptive Nodal Transport Methods for Reactor Transient Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Downar; E. Lewis

    2005-08-31

    Develop methods for adaptively treating the angular, spatial, and time dependence of the neutron flux in reactor transient analysis. These methods were demonstrated in the DOE transport nodal code VARIANT and the US NRC spatial kinetics code, PARCS.

  13. Adaptation of prey and predators between patches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendi; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-21

    Mathematical models are proposed to simulate migrations of prey and predators between patches. In the absence of predators, it is shown that the adaptation of prey leads to an ideal spatial distribution in the sense that the maximal capacity of each patch is achieved. With the introduction of co-adaptation of predators, it is proved that both prey and predators achieve ideal spatial distributions when the adaptations are weak. Further, it is shown that the adaptation of prey and predators increases the survival probability of predators from the extinction in both patches to the persistence in one patch. It is also demonstrated that there exists a pattern that prey and predators cooperate well through adaptations such that predators are permanent in every patch in the case that predators become extinct in each patch in the absence of adaptations. For strong adaptations, it is proved that the model admits periodic cycles and multiple stability transitions.

  14. Spatial data interoperability for multi-platform GIS based on Oracle Spatial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Zhu, Xinyan

    2006-10-01

    Spatial data sharing among multiple GIS (Geographic Information System) platforms is a fundamental requirement of many GIS applications, yet conventional methods of spatial data interoperability don't adequately consider practical application circumstance, which now becomes a primary barrier to more efficient spatial data sharing among multiple GIS platforms. In this paper, after analyzing the disadvantages of conventional methods and the causation of the disadvantages, and analyzing the principle of spatial data access of ArcGIS, MapInfo and GeoStar based on Oracle Spatial storage, the authors propose a new spatial data interoperability method called Different meta information and Same spatial data Method. This method is based on Oracle Spatial, through which spatial data interoperability for multi-platform of GIS is available. The results of experiments demonstrate that this method is a new simple practical approach adapted for current application circumstance, and it provides us a new idea for spatial data interoperability.

  15. Cold adaptations.

    PubMed

    Launay, Jean-Claude; Savourey, Gustave

    2009-07-01

    Nowdays, occupational and recreational activities in cold environments are common. Exposure to cold induces thermoregulatory responses like changes of behaviour and physiological adjustments to maintain thermal balance either by increasing metabolic heat production by shivering and/or by decreasing heat losses consecutive to peripheral cutaneous vasoconstriction. Those physiological responses present a great variability among individuals and depend mainly on biometrical characteristics, age, and general cold adaptation. During severe cold exposure, medical disorders may occur such as accidental hypothermia and/or freezing or non-freezing cold injuries. General cold adaptations have been qualitatively classified by Hammel and quantitatively by Savourey. This last classification takes into account the quantitative changes of the main cold reactions: higher or lower metabolic heat production, higher or lesser heat losses and finally the level of the core temperature observed at the end of a standardized exposure to cold. General cold adaptations observed previously in natives could also be developed in laboratory conditions by continuous or intermittent cold exposures. Beside general cold adaptation, local cold adaptation exists and is characterized by a lesser decrease of skin temperature, a more pronounced cold induced vasodilation, less pain and a higher manual dexterity. Adaptations to cold may reduce the occurrence of accidents and improve human performance as surviving in the cold. The present review describes both general and local cold adaptations in humans and how they are of interest for cold workers.

  16. Prism adaptation in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Velásquez-Perez, Luis; Díaz, Rosalinda; Drucker-Colín, René; Pérez-González, Ruth; Canales, Nalia; Sánchez-Cruz, Gilberto; Martínez-Góngora, Edilberto; Medrano, Yaquelín; Almaguer-Mederos, Luis; Seifried, Carola; Auburger, Georg

    2007-09-20

    Patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), develop severe pontine nuclei, inferior olives, and Purkinje cell degeneration. This form of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia is accompanied by progressive ataxia and dysarthria. Although the motor dysfunction is well characterized in these patients, nothing is known about their motor learning capabilities. Here we tested 43 SCA2 patients and their matched controls in prism adaptation, a kind of visuomotor learning task. Our results show that their pattern of brain damage does not entirely disrupt motor learning. Rather, patients had impaired adaptation decrement, but surprisingly a normal aftereffect. Moreover, the mutation degree could discriminate the degree of adaptation. This pattern could reflect the net contribution of two adaptive mechanisms: strategic control and spatial realignment. Accordingly, SCA2 patients show an impaired strategic control that affects the adaptation rate, but a normal spatial realignment measured through the aftereffect. Our results suggest that the neural areas subserving spatial realignment are spared in this form of spinocerebellar ataxia.

  17. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  18. Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Shu-Hui; Song, Juntao Li, Yu-Xian

    2013-11-14

    We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

  19. [The model of adaptive primary image processing].

    PubMed

    Dudkin, K N; Mironov, S V; Dudkin, A K; Chikhman, V N

    1998-07-01

    A computer model of adaptive segmentation of the 2D visual objects was developed. Primary image descriptions are realised via spatial frequency filters and feature detectors performing as self-organised mechanisms. Simulation of the control processes related to attention, lateral, frequency-selective and cross-orientation inhibition, determines the adaptive image processing.

  20. Spatial Displays and Spatial Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Direction Judgements in Computer-Generated Displays and Actual Scenes 19-1 Stephen R. Ellis, Stephen Smith, Michael W. McGreevy, and Arthur...can be used to correct underlying natural biases in spatial judgements . For example, exocentric direction judgements (Howard, 1982) made of extended...Roscoe, S. N. (1984). Judgements of size and distance with imaging displays. Human Factors, 26, 617-629. Roscoe, S. N. (1987). The trouble with

  1. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  2. Pulse front control with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important for processes including microscopy, laser fabrication and fundamental science. Adaptive optic elements, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators or membrane deformable mirrors, are routinely used for the correction of aberrations in these systems, leading to improved resolution and efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that adaptive elements used with ultrashort pulses should not be considered simply in terms of wavefront modification, but that changes to the incident pulse front can also occur. We experimentally show how adaptive elements may be used to engineer pulse fronts with spatial resolution.

  3. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  4. Adaptation of adaptive optics systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Zhao, Dazun; Li, Chen

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a concept of an adaptation of adaptive optical system (AAOS) is proposed. The AAOS has certain real time optimization ability against the variation of the brightness of detected objects m, atmospheric coherence length rO and atmospheric time constant τ by means of changing subaperture number and diameter, dynamic range, and system's temporal response. The necessity of AAOS using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and some technical approaches are discussed. Scheme and simulation of an AAOS with variable subaperture ability by use of both hardware and software are presented as an example of the system.

  5. Spatial organization of cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desprat, Nicolas

    The structure of the environment spatially confines bacteria inside groups where they live and evolve with their siblings. This population structure may not only select for individual abilities but also for group properties that would eventually enhance the fitness of the colony. In poor media, we might think that maximizing the contact with the environment would maximize the fitness of individual cells. However, we will show that the microcolony of P. aeruginosa adapts its morphogenesis to maximize cell-cell contacts rather than cell-environment interactions when iron becomes scarce in the environment. In this case, reducing the surface of exchange with the environment allows to limit the loss of secreted molecules required to efficiently fetch extracelllular iron at very low concentration.

  6. Effects of Intraframe Distortion on Measures of Cone Mosaic Geometry from Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Robert F.; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Dubis, Adam M.; Chui, Toco Y.; Rosen, Richard B.; Michaelides, Michel; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the effects of intraframe distortion due to involuntary eye motion on measures of cone mosaic geometry derived from adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images. Methods We acquired AOSLO image sequences from 20 subjects at 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0° temporal from fixation. An expert grader manually selected 10 minimally distorted reference frames from each 150-frame sequence for subsequent registration. Cone mosaic geometry was measured in all registered images (n = 600) using multiple metrics, and the repeatability of these metrics was used to assess the impact of the distortions from each reference frame. In nine additional subjects, we compared AOSLO-derived measurements to those from adaptive optics (AO)-fundus images, which do not contain system-imposed intraframe distortions. Results We observed substantial variation across subjects in the repeatability of density (1.2%–8.7%), inter-cell distance (0.8%–4.6%), percentage of six-sided Voronoi cells (0.8%–10.6%), and Voronoi cell area regularity (VCAR) (1.2%–13.2%). The average of all metrics extracted from AOSLO images (with the exception of VCAR) was not significantly different than those derived from AO-fundus images, though there was variability between individual images. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the intraframe distortion found in AOSLO images can affect the accuracy and repeatability of cone mosaic metrics. It may be possible to use multiple images from the same retinal area to approximate a “distortionless” image, though more work is needed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. Translational Relevance Even in subjects with good fixation, images from AOSLOs contain intraframe distortions due to eye motion during scanning. The existence of these artifacts emphasizes the need for caution when interpreting results derived from scanning instruments. PMID:26933523

  7. Effects of Intraframe Distortion on Measures of Cone Mosaic Geometry from Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Robert F; Sulai, Yusufu N; Dubis, Adam M; Chui, Toco Y; Rosen, Richard B; Michaelides, Michel; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the effects of intraframe distortion due to involuntary eye motion on measures of cone mosaic geometry derived from adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images. We acquired AOSLO image sequences from 20 subjects at 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0° temporal from fixation. An expert grader manually selected 10 minimally distorted reference frames from each 150-frame sequence for subsequent registration. Cone mosaic geometry was measured in all registered images (n = 600) using multiple metrics, and the repeatability of these metrics was used to assess the impact of the distortions from each reference frame. In nine additional subjects, we compared AOSLO-derived measurements to those from adaptive optics (AO)-fundus images, which do not contain system-imposed intraframe distortions. We observed substantial variation across subjects in the repeatability of density (1.2%-8.7%), inter-cell distance (0.8%-4.6%), percentage of six-sided Voronoi cells (0.8%-10.6%), and Voronoi cell area regularity (VCAR) (1.2%-13.2%). The average of all metrics extracted from AOSLO images (with the exception of VCAR) was not significantly different than those derived from AO-fundus images, though there was variability between individual images. Our data demonstrate that the intraframe distortion found in AOSLO images can affect the accuracy and repeatability of cone mosaic metrics. It may be possible to use multiple images from the same retinal area to approximate a "distortionless" image, though more work is needed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. Even in subjects with good fixation, images from AOSLOs contain intraframe distortions due to eye motion during scanning. The existence of these artifacts emphasizes the need for caution when interpreting results derived from scanning instruments.

  8. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  9. Adaptive equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, S. U. H.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical work which has been effective in improving data transmission by telephone and radio links using adaptive equalization (AE) techniques is reviewed. AE has been applied to reducing the temporal dispersion effects, such as intersymbol interference, caused by the channel accessed. Attention is given to the Nyquist telegraph transmission theory, least mean square error adaptive filtering and the theory and structure of linear receive and transmit filters for reducing error. Optimum nonlinear receiver structures are discussed in terms of optimality criteria as a function of error probability. A suboptimum receiver structure is explored in the form of a decision-feedback equalizer. Consideration is also given to quadrature amplitude modulation and transversal equalization for receivers.

  10. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  11. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Bobby L.; Aeby, Ian

    1982-01-01

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data having variable frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  12. Spatial play.

    PubMed

    Forrest, D V

    1978-02-01

    More than sharpening our tools or making them sterile, our task in psychotherapy and analysis is to enliven them, find in them the organic, the animate, and the fecund. For our tools are formed of language, more like living nets than like knives, dies, taps, or templates, and our familiary with them might as well be a marriage of love as one of convenience. One's own onymy (Forrest, 1973) of words and phrases that seem to be one's property and private treasury will include, in the case of a doctor who uses words, several such verbal tools that have acquired greater frequency of use and richer and deeper meanings with experience. For me the word play in its affinity for very spatial senses has grown increasingly helpful in meeting both the practical demands of therapeutic communication and the personal need to maintain theoretical structures to support therapeutic work. I wish here to explore the concept of play--contributions to its definition, its developmental stages, applications of play, and its extended properties.

  13. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  14. Test Target for Adaptive Optics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    adaptive optics comprising, in the preferred embodiment, a plurality of nine adjacent, stacked, and aligned rows of a multiplicity of alternate opaque sections and transparent sections in a repeating bar pattern, with all sections being positioned on a flat transparent medium (such as film or glass), and with each opaque section being an opaque bar and with each transparent section being a transparent bar. Each row has a different spatial frequency than any other of the nine rows, with the spatial frequency of any one row being of a different multiple of the row having the

  15. Multichannel spatial auditory display for speech communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, D. R.; Erbe, T.; Wenzel, E. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A spatial auditory display for multiple speech communications was developed at NASA/Ames Research Center. Input is spatialized by the use of simplified head-related transfer functions, adapted for FIR filtering on Motorola 56001 digital signal processors. Hardware and firmware design implementations are overviewed for the initial prototype developed for NASA-Kennedy Space Center. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of four-letter call signs used by launch personnel at NASA against diotic speech babble. Spatial positions at 30 degrees azimuth increments were evaluated. The results from eight subjects showed a maximum intelligibility improvement of about 6-7 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 or 90 degrees azimuth positions.

  16. Multichannel spatial auditory display for speech communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, D. R.; Erbe, T.; Wenzel, E. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A spatial auditory display for multiple speech communications was developed at NASA/Ames Research Center. Input is spatialized by the use of simplified head-related transfer functions, adapted for FIR filtering on Motorola 56001 digital signal processors. Hardware and firmware design implementations are overviewed for the initial prototype developed for NASA-Kennedy Space Center. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of four-letter call signs used by launch personnel at NASA against diotic speech babble. Spatial positions at 30 degrees azimuth increments were evaluated. The results from eight subjects showed a maximum intelligibility improvement of about 6-7 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 or 90 degrees azimuth positions.

  17. Multichannel Spatial Auditory Display for Speed Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Erbe, Tom

    1994-01-01

    A spatial auditory display for multiple speech communications was developed at NASA/Ames Research Center. Input is spatialized by the use of simplifiedhead-related transfer functions, adapted for FIR filtering on Motorola 56001 digital signal processors. Hardware and firmware design implementations are overviewed for the initial prototype developed for NASA-Kennedy Space Center. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of four-letter call signs used by launch personnel at NASA against diotic speech babble. Spatial positions at 30 degree azimuth increments were evaluated. The results from eight subjects showed a maximum intelligibility improvement of about 6-7 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 or 90 degree azimuth positions.

  18. Multichannel spatial auditory display for speech communications.

    PubMed

    Begault, D R; Erbe, T

    1994-10-01

    A spatial auditory display for multiple speech communications was developed at NASA/Ames Research Center. Input is spatialized by the use of simplified head-related transfer functions, adapted for FIR filtering on Motorola 56001 digital signal processors. Hardware and firmware design implementations are overviewed for the initial prototype developed for NASA-Kennedy Space Center. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of four-letter call signs used by launch personnel at NASA against diotic speech babble. Spatial positions at 30 degrees azimuth increments were evaluated. The results from eight subjects showed a maximum intelligibility improvement of about 6-7 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 or 90 degrees azimuth positions.

  19. Adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin Approximation to Richards' Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Farthing, M. W.; Miller, C. T.

    2006-12-01

    Due to the occurrence of large gradients in fluid pressure as a function of space and time resulting from nonlinearities in closure relations, numerical solutions to Richards' equations are notoriously difficult for certain media properties and auxiliary conditions that occur routinely in describing physical systems of interest. These difficulties have motivated a substantial amount of work aimed at improving numerical approximations to this physically important and mathematically rich model. In this work, we build upon recent advances in temporal and spatial discretization methods by developing spatially and temporally adaptive solution approaches based upon the local discontinuous Galerkin method in space and a higher order backward difference method in time. Spatial step-size adaption, h adaption, approaches are evaluated and a so-called hp-adaption strategy is considered as well, which adjusts both the step size and the order of the approximation. Solution algorithms are advanced and performance is evaluated. The spatially and temporally adaptive approaches are shown to be robust and offer significant increases in computational efficiency compared to similar state-of-the-art methods that adapt in time alone. In addition, we extend the proposed methods to two dimensions and provide preliminary numerical results.

  20. An adaptive level set method

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, Roger Brent

    1995-12-01

    This thesis describes a new method for the numerical solution of partial differential equations of the parabolic type on an adaptively refined mesh in two or more spatial dimensions. The method is motivated and developed in the context of the level set formulation for the curvature dependent propagation of surfaces in three dimensions. In that setting, it realizes the multiple advantages of decreased computational effort, localized accuracy enhancement, and compatibility with problems containing a range of length scales.

  1. Spatial priming in ecologically relevant reference frames.

    PubMed

    Tower-Richardi, Sarah M; Leber, Andrew B; Golomb, Julie D

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have observed many phenomena demonstrating how the visual system exploits spatial regularities in the environment in order to benefit behavior. In this paper, we question whether spatial priming can be considered one such phenomenon. Spatial priming is defined as a response time facilitation to a visual search target when its spatial position has been repeated in recent trials (Maljkovic & Nakayama, 1996, Perception & Psychophysics, 58, 977-991). Does this priming serve a behaviorally adaptive role or is it merely a byproduct of ongoing visual processing? Critically, an adaptive priming mechanism must actively transform visual inputs from native retinotopic (eye-centered) coordinates into ecologically relevant coordinates, e.g., spatiotopic (world-centered) and/or object-centered. In Experiment 1, we tested this hypothesis by having participants move their eyes between trials, which dissociated retinotopic and spatiotopic frames of reference. Results showed only weak retinotopic priming, but robust spatiotopic priming. The second experiment again had participants move their eyes between trials but also manipulated the placement of a grouped array of display objects from trial to trial. This allowed us to measure not just retinotopic and spatiotopic priming, but object-centered priming as well. Results from this experiment did not yield retinotopic priming but showed robust spatiotopic and object-centered priming. These findings demonstrate that spatial priming operates within ecologically relevant coordinate systems, and the findings support the notion that spatial priming serves an adaptive role in human behavior.

  2. The spatial patterns of directional phenotypic selection.

    PubMed

    Siepielski, Adam M; Gotanda, Kiyoko M; Morrissey, Michael B; Diamond, Sarah E; DiBattista, Joseph D; Carlson, Stephanie M

    2013-11-01

    Local adaptation, adaptive population divergence and speciation are often expected to result from populations evolving in response to spatial variation in selection. Yet, we lack a comprehensive understanding of the major features that characterise the spatial patterns of selection, namely the extent of variation among populations in the strength and direction of selection. Here, we analyse a data set of spatially replicated studies of directional phenotypic selection from natural populations. The data set includes 60 studies, consisting of 3937 estimates of selection across an average of five populations. We performed meta-analyses to explore features characterising spatial variation in directional selection. We found that selection tends to vary mainly in strength and less in direction among populations. Although differences in the direction of selection occur among populations they do so where selection is often weakest, which may limit the potential for ongoing adaptive population divergence. Overall, we also found that spatial variation in selection appears comparable to temporal (annual) variation in selection within populations; however, several deficiencies in available data currently complicate this comparison. We discuss future research needs to further advance our understanding of spatial variation in selection.

  3. Hybrid Surface Mesh Adaptation for Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed Khamayseh; Valmor de Almeida; Glen Hansen

    2008-10-01

    Solution-driven mesh adaptation is becoming quite popular for spatial error control in the numerical simulation of complex computational physics applications, such as climate modeling. Typically, spatial adaptation is achieved by element subdivision (h adaptation) with a primary goal of resolving the local length scales of interest. A second, less-popular method of spatial adaptivity is called “mesh motion” (r adaptation); the smooth repositioning of mesh node points aimed at resizing existing elements to capture the local length scales. This paper proposes an adaptation method based on a combination of both element subdivision and node point repositioning (rh adaptation). By combining these two methods using the notion of a mobility function, the proposed approach seeks to increase the flexibility and extensibility of mesh motion algorithms while providing a somewhat smoother transition between refined regions than is produced by element subdivision alone. Further, in an attempt to support the requirements of a very general class of climate simulation applications, the proposed method is designed to accommodate unstructured, polygonal mesh topologies in addition to the most popular mesh types.

  4. Adaptive walking in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nineteen elders with AD participated in the study. A veteran neuropsychiatrist established the degree of AD in the sample. To determine dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait, patients performed five trials for each experimental condition: free and adaptive gait with and without a dual-task (regressive countdown). Spatial and temporal parameters were collected through an optoelectronic tridimensional system. The central stride was analyzed in free gait, and the steps immediately before (approaching phase) and during the obstacle crossing were analyzed in adaptive gait. Results indicated that AD patients walked more slowly during adaptive gait and free gait, using conservative strategies when confronted either with an obstacle or a secondary task. Furthermore, patients sought for stability to perform the tasks, particularly for adaptive gait with dual task, who used anticipatory and online adjustments to perform the task. Therefore, the increase of task complexity enhances cognitive load and risk of falls for AD patients.

  5. Adaptive Walking in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nineteen elders with AD participated in the study. A veteran neuropsychiatrist established the degree of AD in the sample. To determine dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait, patients performed five trials for each experimental condition: free and adaptive gait with and without a dual-task (regressive countdown). Spatial and temporal parameters were collected through an optoelectronic tridimensional system. The central stride was analyzed in free gait, and the steps immediately before (approaching phase) and during the obstacle crossing were analyzed in adaptive gait. Results indicated that AD patients walked more slowly during adaptive gait and free gait, using conservative strategies when confronted either with an obstacle or a secondary task. Furthermore, patients sought for stability to perform the tasks, particularly for adaptive gait with dual task, who used anticipatory and online adjustments to perform the task. Therefore, the increase of task complexity enhances cognitive load and risk of falls for AD patients. PMID:22991684

  6. A Space/Fast-Time Adaptive Monopulse Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliktar, Yaron; Williams, Douglas B.; Holder, E. Jeff

    2006-12-01

    Mainbeam jamming poses a particularly difficult challenge for conventional monopulse radars. In such cases spatially adaptive processing provides some interference suppression when the target and jammer are not exactly coaligned. However, as the target angle approaches that of the jammer, mitigation performance is increasingly hampered and distortions are introduced into the resulting beam pattern. Both of these factors limit the reliability of a spatially adaptive monopulse processor. The presence of coherent multipath in the form of terrain-scattered interference (TSI), although normally considered a nuisance, can be exploited to suppress mainbeam jamming with space/fast-time processing. A method is presented offering space/fast-time monopulse processing with distortionless spatial array patterns that can achieve improved angle estimation over spatially adaptive monopulse. Performance results for the monopulse processor are obtained for mountaintop data containing a jammer and TSI, which demonstrate a dramatic improvement in performance over conventional monopulse and spatially adaptive monopulse.

  7. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  8. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac-Neice, Peter; Olson, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library (PARAMESH) is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide a computer programmer with an easy route to extension of (1) a previously written serial code that uses a logically Cartesian structured mesh into (2) a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, PARAMESH can operate as a domain-decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes but who do not wish to utilize adaptivity. The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain of a given application program, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. The sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data structure (a quad-tree in two or an oct-tree in three dimensions). Each grid block has a logically Cartesian mesh. The package supports one-, two- and three-dimensional models.

  9. Spatial Encounters: Exercises in Spatial Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque.

    This series of activities on spatial relationships was designed to help users acquire the skills of spatial visualization and orientation and to improve their effectiveness in applying those skills. The series contains an introduction to spatial orientation with several self-directed activities to help improve that skill. It also contains seven…

  10. SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL RESOLUTION IN GEOBOTANY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, Nancy M.; Mouat, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Remotely sensed data are now available from a wide variety of instruments, each data set having a particular spectral and spatial resolution. The changes in vegetation associated with changes in lithology or the presence of mineral deposits can also occur at different scales. The task of geobotanical remote sensing is to choose or adapt the remotely sensed data to the appropriate geobotanical technique to solve the geological problem of interest. Examples are given of a number of applications of data sets of different spectral and spatial resolution. The relative importance of spectral and spatial resolution is discussed.

  11. Adaptive local discontinuous Galerkin approximation to Richards’ equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Farthing, M. W.; Miller, C. T.

    2007-09-01

    We propose a spatially and temporally adaptive solution to Richards' equation based upon a local discontinuous Galerkin approximation in space and a high-order, backward difference method in time. We cast our approach in terms of a general, decoupled adaption algorithm based upon operators. We define non-unique instances of all operators to result in an adaption method from within the general class of methods that is defined. We formally decouple the spatial adaption from the temporal adaption using a method of lines approach and limit the temporal truncation error so that the total error is dominated by the spatial component. We use a multiple grid approach to guide adaption and support the data structures. Spatial adaption decisions are based upon error and regularity indicators, which are economical to compute. The resultant methods are compared for two test problems. The results show that the proposed adaption methods are superior to methods that adapt only in time and that in cases in which the problem has sufficient smoothness, adapting the order of the elements in addition to the grid spacing can further improve the efficiency of this robust solution approach.

  12. Auditory spatial processing in the human cortex.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Nelli H; Tiitinen, Hannu; May, Patrick J C

    2012-12-01

    The auditory system codes spatial locations in a way that deviates from the spatial representations found in other modalities. This difference is especially striking in the cortex, where neurons form topographical maps of visual and tactile space but where auditory space is represented through a population rate code. In this hemifield code, sound source location is represented in the activity of two widely tuned opponent populations, one tuned to the right and the other to the left side of auditory space. Scientists are only beginning to uncover how this coding strategy adapts to various spatial processing demands. This review presents the current understanding of auditory spatial processing in the cortex. To this end, the authors consider how various implementations of the hemifield code may exist within the auditory cortex and how these may be modulated by the stimulation and task context. As a result, a coherent set of neural strategies for auditory spatial processing emerges.

  13. A Bayesian spatial assimilation scheme for snow coverage observations in a gridded snow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolberg, S.; Rue, H.; Gottschalk, L.

    2006-06-01

    A method for assimilating remotely sensed snow covered area (SCA) into the snow subroutine of a grid distributed precipitation-runoff model (PRM) is presented. The PRM is assumed to simulate the snow state in each grid cell by a snow depletion curve (SDC), which relates that cell's SCA to its snow cover mass balance. The assimilation is based on Bayes' theorem, which requires a joint prior distribution of the SDC variables in all the grid cells. In this paper we propose a spatial model for this prior distribution, and include similarities and dependencies among the grid cells. Used to represent the PRM simulated snow cover state, our joint prior model regards two elevation gradients and a degree-day factor as global variables, rather than describing their effect separately for each cell. This transformation results in smooth normalised surfaces for the two related mass balance variables, supporting a strong inter-cell dependency in their joint prior model. The global features and spatial interdependency in the prior model cause each SCA observation to provide information for many grid cells. The spatial approach similarly facilitates the utilisation of observed discharge. Assimilation of SCA data using the proposed spatial model is evaluated in a 2400 km2 mountainous region in central Norway (61° N, 9° E), based on two Landsat 7 ETM+ images generalized to 1 km2 resolution. An image acquired on 11 May, a week before the peak flood, removes 78% of the variance in the remaining snow storage. Even an image from 4 May, less than a week after the melt onset, reduces this variance by 53%. These results are largely improved compared to a cell-by-cell independent assimilation routine previously reported. Including observed discharge in the updating information improves the 4 May results, but has weak effect on 11 May. Estimated elevation gradients are shown to be sensitive to informational deficits occurring at high altitude, where snowmelt has not started and the snow

  14. Assessing urban adaptive capacity to climate change.

    PubMed

    Araya-Muñoz, Dahyann; Metzger, Marc J; Stuart, Neil; Wilson, A Meriwether W; Alvarez, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Despite the growing number of studies focusing on urban vulnerability to climate change, adaptive capacity, which is a key component of the IPCC definition of vulnerability, is rarely assessed quantitatively. We examine the capacity of adaptation in the Concepción Metropolitan Area, Chile. A flexible methodology based on spatial fuzzy modelling was developed to standardise and aggregate, through a stepwise approach, seventeen indicators derived from widely available census statistical data into an adaptive capacity index. The results indicate that all the municipalities in the CMA increased their level of adaptive capacity between 1992 and 2002. However, the relative differences between municipalities did not change significantly over the studied timeframe. Fuzzy overlay allowed us to standardise and to effectively aggregate indicators with differing ranges and granularities of attribute values into an overall index. It also provided a conceptually sound and reproducible means of exploring the interplay of many indicators that individually influence adaptive capacity. Furthermore, it captured the complex, aggregated and continued nature of the adaptive capacity, favouring to deal with gaps of data and knowledge associated with the concept of adaptive capacity. The resulting maps can help identify municipalities where adaptive capacity is weak and identify which components of adaptive capacity need strengthening. Identification of these capacity conditions can stimulate dialogue amongst policymakers and stakeholders regarding how to manage urban areas and how to prioritise resources for urban development in ways that can also improve adaptive capacity and thus reduce vulnerability to climate change.

  15. Spatial remapping of tactile events

    PubMed Central

    Azañón, Elena

    2008-01-01

    During the apparently mindless act of localizing a tactile sensation, our brain must realign its initial spatial representation (somatotopicaly arranged) according to current body posture (arising from proprioception, vision and even audition).1–3 We have recently illustrated4 the temporal course of this recoding of tactile space from somatotopic to external coordinates using a crossmodal cueing psychophysical paradigm5,6 where behavioral reactions to visual targets are evaluated as a function of the location of irrelevant tactile cues. We found that the tactile events are initially represented in terms of a fleeting, non-conscious but nevertheless behaviorally consequential somatotopic format, which is quickly replaced by the representations referred to external spatial locations that prevail in our everyday experience. In this addendum, we test the intuition that frequent changes in body posture will make it harder to update the spatial remapping system and thus, produce stronger psychophysical correlates of the initial somatotopically-based spatial representations. Contrary to this expectation, however, we found no evidence for a modulation when preventing adaptation to a body posture. PMID:19704788

  16. Dynamic patterns of adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Gavrilets, Sergey; Vose, Aaron

    2005-12-13

    Adaptive radiation is defined as the evolution of ecological and phenotypic diversity within a rapidly multiplying lineage. When it occurs, adaptive radiation typically follows the colonization of a new environment or the establishment of a "key innovation," which opens new ecological niches and/or new paths for evolution. Here, we take advantage of recent developments in speciation theory and modern computing power to build and explore a large-scale, stochastic, spatially explicit, individual-based model of adaptive radiation driven by adaptation to multidimensional ecological niches. We are able to model evolutionary dynamics of populations with hundreds of thousands of sexual diploid individuals over a time span of 100,000 generations assuming realistic mutation rates and allowing for genetic variation in a large number of both selected and neutral loci. Our results provide theoretical support and explanation for a number of empirical patterns including "area effect," "overshooting effect," and "least action effect," as well as for the idea of a "porous genome." Our findings suggest that the genetic architecture of traits involved in the most spectacular radiations might be rather simple. We show that a great majority of speciation events are concentrated early in the phylogeny. Our results emphasize the importance of ecological opportunity and genetic constraints in controlling the dynamics of adaptive radiation.

  17. Spatial attention systems in spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2015-08-01

    It has been established that processes relating to 'spatial attention' are implemented at cortical level by goal-directed (top-down) and stimulus-driven (bottom-up) networks. Spatial neglect in brain-damaged individuals has been interpreted as a distinguished exemplar for a disturbance of these processes. The present paper elaborates this assumption. Functioning of the two attentional networks seem to dissociate in spatial neglect; behavioral studies of patients' orienting and exploration behavior point to a disturbed stimulus-driven but preserved goal-directed attention system. When a target suddenly appears somewhere in space, neglect patients demonstrate disturbed detection and orienting if it is located in contralesional direction. In contrast, if neglect patients explore a scene with voluntarily, top-down controlled shifts of spatial attention, they perform movements that are oriented into all spatial directions without any direction-specific disturbances. The paper thus argues that not the top-down control of spatial attention itself, rather a body-related matrix on top of which this process is executed, seems affected. In that sense, the traditional role of spatial neglect as a stroke model for 'spatial attention' requires adjustment. Beyond its insights into the human stimulus-driven attentional system, the disorder most notably provides vistas in how our brain encodes topographical information and organizes spatially oriented action - including the top-down control of spatial attention - in relation to body position.

  18. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    A model for approximate spatial reasoning using fuzzy logic to represent the uncertainty in the environment is presented. Algorithms are developed which can be used to reason about spatial information expressed in the form of approximate linguistic descriptions similar to the kind of spatial information processed by humans. Particular attention is given to static spatial reasoning.

  19. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    A model for approximate spatial reasoning using fuzzy logic to represent the uncertainty in the environment is presented. Algorithms are developed which can be used to reason about spatial information expressed in the form of approximate linguistic descriptions similar to the kind of spatial information processed by humans. Particular attention is given to static spatial reasoning.

  20. Neuromapping: Inflight Evaluation of Cognition and Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, I. S.; De Dios, Y. E.; Lawrence, K.; Schade, A.; Reschke, M. F.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidle, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers during flight and postflight, we are conducting a controlled prospective longitudinal study to investigate the effects of spaceflight on the extent, longevity and neural bases of sensorimotor, cognitive, and neural changes. Previous studies investigating sensorimotor adaptation to the microgravity environment longitudinally inflight have shown reduction in the ability to perform complex dual tasks. In this study we perform a series of tests investigating the longitudinal effects of adaptation to the microgravity environment and how it affects spatial cognition, manual visuo-motor adaption and dual tasking.

  1. The Development of Spatial Frequency Biases in Face Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Hayley C.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Johnson, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that a mid-band of spatial frequencies is critical to face recognition in adults, but few studies have explored the development of this bias in children. We present a paradigm adapted from the adult literature to test spatial frequency biases throughout development. Faces were presented on a screen with particular…

  2. The Development of Spatial Frequency Biases in Face Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Hayley C.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Johnson, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that a mid-band of spatial frequencies is critical to face recognition in adults, but few studies have explored the development of this bias in children. We present a paradigm adapted from the adult literature to test spatial frequency biases throughout development. Faces were presented on a screen with particular…

  3. Adaptive scale fixing for multiscale texture segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kung-Hao; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses two challenging issues in unsupervised multiscale texture segmentation: determining adequate spatial and feature resolutions for different regions of the image, and utilizing information across different scales/resolutions. The center of a homogeneous texture is analyzed using coarse spatial resolution, and its border is detected using fine spatial resolution so as to locate the boundary accurately. The extraction of texture features is achieved via a multiresolution pyramid. The feature values are integrated across scales/resolutions adaptively. The number of textures is determined automatically using the variance ratio criterion. Experimental results on synthetic and real images demonstrate the improvement in performance of the proposed multiscale scheme over single scale approaches.

  4. Differentiating Spatial Memory from Spatial Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Whitney N.; Wang, Ranxiao Frances

    2014-01-01

    The perspective-taking task is one of the most common paradigms used to study the nature of spatial memory, and better performance for certain orientations is generally interpreted as evidence of spatial representations using these reference directions. However, performance advantages can also result from the relative ease in certain…

  5. Differentiating Spatial Memory from Spatial Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Whitney N.; Wang, Ranxiao Frances

    2014-01-01

    The perspective-taking task is one of the most common paradigms used to study the nature of spatial memory, and better performance for certain orientations is generally interpreted as evidence of spatial representations using these reference directions. However, performance advantages can also result from the relative ease in certain…

  6. Digital adaptation algorithms of adaptive optics corrected images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polskikh, Sergey D.; Sviridov, Konstantin N.

    2000-07-01

    The technology is considered of space object image obtainment with high angular resolution, based on the adaptive tuning of image spatial spectra (digital adaptation), corrected by adaptive optics. As the basis of the technology, the algorithm is taken of the integral equation of the I-st kind of convolution type with unknown core and imprecisely given right part. It's shown the procedure of the inverse operator construction for this equation solution is connected with minimization of nonlinear regularizing multiextremel functionals and could be realized on the base of global optimization methods. The structure of multiextremel functionals is analyzed, and the main global extremum search methods are researched. It is shown, that as the basis of the optimal construction of the channel for the obtainment of images with high resolution, the principle must be taken of the sequential reduction of the global extremum search space dimensionality, and what's more, the predetector processing of the wavefront by the adaptive optics is the first stage of this reduction. The results are given of numerical modelling including the examples of the distorted and restorated images of model objects under different signal-to-noise ratios.

  7. DARK ADAPTATION IN DINEUTES

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Leonard B.

    1938-01-01

    The level of dark adaptation of the whirligig beetle can be measured in terms of the threshold intensity calling forth a response. The course of dark adaptation was determined at levels of light adaptation of 6.5, 91.6, and 6100 foot-candles. All data can be fitted by the same curve. This indicates that dark adaptation follows parts of the same course irrespective of the level of light adaptation. The intensity of the adapting light determines the level at which dark adaptation will begin. The relation between log aI0 (instantaneous threshold) and log of adapting light intensity is linear over the range studied. PMID:19873056

  8. Adapting populations in space: clonal interference and genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Daniel; Barton, Nick

    Most species inhabit ranges much larger than the scales over which individuals interact. How does this spatial structure interact with adaptive evolution? We consider a simple model of a spatially-extended, adapting population and show that, while clonal interference severely limits the adaptation of purely asexual populations, even rare recombination is enough to allow adaptation at rates approaching those of well-mixed populations. We also find that the genetic hitchhiking produced by the adaptive alleles sweeping through the population has strange effects on the patterns of genetic diversity. In large spatial ranges, even low rates of adaptation cause all individuals in the population to rapidly trace their ancestry back to individuals living in a small region in the center of the range. The probability of fixation of an allele is thus strongly dependent on the allele's spatial location, with alleles from the center favored. Surprisingly, these effects are seen genome-wide (instead of being localized to the regions of the genome undergoing the sweeps). The spatial concentration of ancestry produces a power-law dependence of relatedness on distance, so that even individuals sampled far apart are likely to be fairly closely related, masking the underlying spatial structure.

  9. a New Spatial and Temporal Fusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Huang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    As Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) has a tradeoff between the high temporal resolution and high spatial resolution, this paper proposed a spatial and temporal model with auto-regression error correction (AREC) method to blend the two types of images in order to obtain the composed image with both high spatial and temporal resolution. Experiments and validation were conducted on a data set located in Shenzhen, China and compared with Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) in several objective indexes and visual analysis. It was found that AREC could effectively predict the land cover changes and the fusion results had better performances versus the ones of STARFM.

  10. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  11. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H.; Nguyen, Truong Q.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the Expectation-Maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad-hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper: First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. Experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  12. Coherent Digital Holographic Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng

    A new type of adaptive optics (AO) based on the principles of digital holography (DH) is proposed and developed for the use in wide-field and confocal retinal imaging. Digital holographic adaptive optics (DHAO) dispenses with the wavefront sensor and wavefront corrector of the conventional AO system. DH is an emergent imaging technology that gives direct numerical access to the phase of the optical field, thus allowing precise control and manipulation of the optical field. Incorporation of DH in an ophthalmic imaging system can lead to versatile imaging capabilities at substantially reduced complexity and cost of the instrument. A typical conventional AO system includes several critical hardware pieces: spatial light modulator, lenslet array, and a second CCD camera in addition to the camera for imaging. The proposed DHAO system replaces these hardware components with numerical processing for wavefront measurement and compensation of aberration through the principles of DH. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  13. Plasticity in human sound localization induced by compressed spatial vision.

    PubMed

    Zwiers, Marcel P; Van Opstal, A John; Paige, Gary D

    2003-02-01

    Auditory and visual target locations are encoded differently in the brain, but must be co-calibrated to maintain cross-sensory concordance. Mechanisms that adjust spatial calibration across modalities have been described (for example, prism adaptation in owls), though rudimentarily in humans. We quantified the adaptation of human sound localization in response to spatially compressed vision (0.5x lenses for 2-3 days). This induced a corresponding compression of auditory localization that was most pronounced for azimuth (minimal for elevation) and was restricted to the visual field of the lenses. Sound localization was also affected outside the field of visual-auditory interaction (shifted centrally, not compressed). These results suggest that spatially modified vision induces adaptive changes in adult human sound localization, including novel mechanisms that account for spatial compression. Findings are consistent with a model in which the central processing of sound location is encoded by recruitment rather than by a place code.

  14. Constrained Adaptive Beamforming for Improved Contrast in Breast Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    led us to utilize a recently proposed method, Spatial Processing Optimized and Constrained ( SPOC ). In initial simulations this method not only...6 Review of the Adaptive Beamforming Literature ................... 7 SPOC Progress...given the parameters of in vivo ultrasound imaging. SPOC Progress: Most of the Adaptive Beamforming algorithms previously described fail when applied to

  15. An Adaptive Framework for Image and Video Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    bandwidth on the camera transmission or memory is not optimally utilized. In this paper we outline a framework for an adaptive sensor where the spatial and...scene can be realized, with small distortion. Keywords: Adaptive Imaging, Varying Sampling Rate, Image Content Measure, Scene Adaptive, Camera ...second order effect on the spatio-temporal trade-off. Figure 1 is an example of the spatio-temporal sampling rate tradeoff in a typical camera (e.g

  16. Adaptation illustrations: Chapter 4

    Treesearch

    Maria Janowiak; Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Matt St. Pierre; Linda. Parker

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we demonstrate how the Adaptation Workbook (Chapter 3) can be used with the Adaptation Strategies and Approaches (Chapter 2) to develop adaptation tactics for two real-world management issues. The two illustrations in this chapter are intended to provide helpful tips to managers completing the Adaptation Workbook, as well as to show how the anticipated...

  17. Spatially adaptive migration tomography for multistatic GPR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Paglieroni, David W; Beer, N. Reginald

    2013-08-13

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  18. Spatially Adaptive Techniques for Level Set Methods and Incompressible Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-03

    can be advected by simply solving the ordinary differential equation ~xt = ~u(~x). The drawback however is that the elements that make up the interface...incurred from the par- abolic nature of a nonlinear partial differential equation . To remedy this, [36] showed a connection between the model proposed...a partial differential equation for battling this weakness, without which their work would not have been possible. In this paper, we discuss both

  19. Spatial Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Zhengling

    2016-01-01

    Spatial language constitutes part of the basic fabric of language. Although languages may have the same number of terms to cover a set of spatial relations, they do not always do so in the same way. Spatial languages differ across languages quite radically, thus providing a real semantic challenge for second language learners. The essay first…

  20. Spatial Reasoning and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Pierre, Sharon D.; Fellenz, Robert A.

    This monograph contains two studies in which the notion of intelligence as one general basic ability is rejected and in its place is posited the existence of a specific type of mental ability described as "spatial intelligence.""Spatial Reasoning and Its Measurement" investigates the process of spatial reasoning in the adult through an analysis of…

  1. Space-time adaptive wavelet methods for parabolic evolution problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Christoph; Stevenson, Rob

    2009-09-01

    With respect to space-time tensor-product wavelet bases, parabolic initial boundary value problems are equivalently formulated as bi-infinite matrix problems. Adaptive wavelet methods are shown to yield sequences of approximate solutions which converge at the optimal rate. In case the spatial domain is of product type, the use of spatial tensor product wavelet bases is proved to overcome the so-called curse of dimensionality, i.e., the reduction of the convergence rate with increasing spatial dimension.

  2. On Tenth Order Central Spatial Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sjogreen, B; Yee, H C

    2007-05-14

    This paper explores the performance of the tenth-order central spatial scheme and derives the accompanying energy-norm stable summation-by-parts (SBP) boundary operators. The objective is to employ the resulting tenth-order spatial differencing with the stable SBP boundary operators as a base scheme in the framework of adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order multistep filter schemes of Yee et al. (1999), Yee and Sj{umlt o}green (2002, 2005, 2006, 2007), and Sj{umlt o}green and Yee (2004). These schemes were designed for multiscale turbulence flows including strong shock waves and combustion.

  3. Adaptive synthetic vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julier, Simon J.; Brown, Dennis; Livingston, Mark A.; Thomas, Justin

    2006-05-01

    Through their ability to safely collect video and imagery from remote and potentially dangerous locations, UAVs have already transformed the battlespace. The effectiveness of this information can be greatly enhanced through synthetic vision. Given knowledge of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the camera, synthetic vision superimposes spatially-registered computer graphics over the video feed from the UAV. This technique can be used to show many types of data such as landmarks, air corridors, and the locations of friendly and enemy forces. However, the effectiveness of a synthetic vision system strongly depends on the accuracy of the registration - if the graphics are poorly aligned with the real world they can be confusing, annoying, and even misleading. In this paper, we describe an adaptive approach to synthetic vision that modifies the way in which information is displayed depending upon the registration error. We describe an integrated software architecture that has two main components. The first component automatically calculates registration error based on information about the uncertainty in the camera parameters. The second component uses this information to modify, aggregate, and label annotations to make their interpretation as clear as possible. We demonstrate the use of this approach on some sample datasets.

  4. Habituation of visual adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue; Gao, Yi; Lv, Lili; Bao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Our sensory system adjusts its function driven by both shorter-term (e.g. adaptation) and longer-term (e.g. learning) experiences. Most past adaptation literature focuses on short-term adaptation. Only recently researchers have begun to investigate how adaptation changes over a span of days. This question is important, since in real life many environmental changes stretch over multiple days or longer. However, the answer to the question remains largely unclear. Here we addressed this issue by tracking perceptual bias (also known as aftereffect) induced by motion or contrast adaptation across multiple daily adaptation sessions. Aftereffects were measured every day after adaptation, which corresponded to the degree of adaptation on each day. For passively viewed adapters, repeated adaptation attenuated aftereffects. Once adapters were presented with an attentional task, aftereffects could either reduce for easy tasks, or initially show an increase followed by a later decrease for demanding tasks. Quantitative analysis of the decay rates in contrast adaptation showed that repeated exposure of the adapter appeared to be equivalent to adaptation to a weaker stimulus. These results suggest that both attention and a non-attentional habituation-like mechanism jointly determine how adaptation develops across multiple daily sessions. PMID:26739917

  5. The spatial brain.

    PubMed

    Nadel, Lynn; Hardt, Oliver

    2004-07-01

    Themes emerging from the collection of articles in the Special Section on Long-Term Spatial Memory include the notion of multiple spatial systems, the relation between spatial representations and episodic memory, the role of context, and the neural systems involved in space. The authors conclude that distinguishing between egocentric and allocentric spatial systems makes sense of both behavioral and neurobiological data. The special role of the hippocampal system in allocentric space, and as a consequence, in context, suggests how a spatial system might end up central to the ability to remember episodes.

  6. Spatially-Heterodyned Holography

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Clarence E [Knoxville, TN; Hanson, Gregory R [Clinton, TN

    2006-02-21

    A method of recording a spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram, including spatially heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis, includes: splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and an object beam; interacting the object beam with an object; focusing the reference beam and the object beam at a focal plane of a digital recorder to form a spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram including spatially heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; digital recording the spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram; Fourier transforming axes of the recorded spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram including spatially heterodyne fringes in Fourier space to sit on top of a heterodyne carrier frequency defined by an angle between the reference beam and the object beam; cutting off signals around an origin; and performing an inverse Fourier transform.

  7. Perceptually-Based Adaptive JPEG Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Rosenholtz, Ruth; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    An extension to the JPEG standard (ISO/IEC DIS 10918-3) allows spatial adaptive coding of still images. As with baseline JPEG coding, one quantization matrix applies to an entire image channel, but in addition the user may specify a multiplier for each 8 x 8 block, which multiplies the quantization matrix, yielding the new matrix for the block. MPEG 1 and 2 use much the same scheme, except there the multiplier changes only on macroblock boundaries. We propose a method for perceptual optimization of the set of multipliers. We compute the perceptual error for each block based upon DCT quantization error adjusted according to contrast sensitivity, light adaptation, and contrast masking, and pick the set of multipliers which yield maximally flat perceptual error over the blocks of the image. We investigate the bitrate savings due to this adaptive coding scheme and the relative importance of the different sorts of masking on adaptive coding.

  8. Perceptually-Based Adaptive JPEG Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Rosenholtz, Ruth; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    An extension to the JPEG standard (ISO/IEC DIS 10918-3) allows spatial adaptive coding of still images. As with baseline JPEG coding, one quantization matrix applies to an entire image channel, but in addition the user may specify a multiplier for each 8 x 8 block, which multiplies the quantization matrix, yielding the new matrix for the block. MPEG 1 and 2 use much the same scheme, except there the multiplier changes only on macroblock boundaries. We propose a method for perceptual optimization of the set of multipliers. We compute the perceptual error for each block based upon DCT quantization error adjusted according to contrast sensitivity, light adaptation, and contrast masking, and pick the set of multipliers which yield maximally flat perceptual error over the blocks of the image. We investigate the bitrate savings due to this adaptive coding scheme and the relative importance of the different sorts of masking on adaptive coding.

  9. Adaptive holography for optical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Residori, S.; Bortolozzo, U.; Peigné, A.; Molin, S.; Nouchi, P.; Dolfi, D.; Huignard, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive holography is a promising method for high sensitivity phase modulation measurements in the presence of slow perturbations from the environment. The technique is based on the use of a nonlinear recombining medium, here an optically addressed spatial light modulator specifically realized to operate at 1.55 μm. Owing to the physical mechanisms involved, the interferometer adapts to slow phase variations within a range of 5-10 Hz, thus filtering out low frequency noise while transmitting higher frequency phase modulations. We present the basic principles of the adaptive interferometer and show that it can be used in association with a sensing fiber in order to detect phase modulations. Finally, a phase-OTDR architecture using the adaptive holographic interferometer is presented and shown to allows the detection of localized perturbations along the sensing fiber.

  10. Adaptive tracking of narrowband HF channel response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, F.; Arikan, O.

    2003-12-01

    Estimation of channel impulse response constitutes a first step in computation of scattering function, channel equalization, elimination of multipath, and optimum detection and identification of transmitted signals through the HF channel. Due to spatial and temporal variations, HF channel impulse response has to be estimated adaptively. Based on developed state-space and measurement models, an adaptive Kalman filter is proposed to track the HF channel variation in time. Robust methods of initialization and adaptively adjusting the noise covariance in the system dynamics are proposed. In simulated examples under good, moderate and poor ionospheric conditions, it is observed that the adaptive Kalman filter based channel estimator provides reliable channel estimates and can track the variation of the channel in time with high accuracy.

  11. Spatial-spectral method for classification of hyperspectral images.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Tianxu; Yan, Luxin; Zhang, Xiaolong; Fang, Houzhang; Liu, Hai

    2013-03-15

    Spatial-spectral approach with spatially adaptive classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. The rotation-invariant spatial texture information for each object is exploited and incorporated into the classifier by using the modified local Gabor binary pattern to distinguish different types of classes of interest. The proposed method can effectively suppress anisotropic texture in spatially separate classes as well as improve the discrimination among classes. Moreover, it becomes more robust with the within-class variation. Experimental results on the classification of three real hyperspectral remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. Discrete adaptive zone light elements (DAZLE): a new approach to adaptive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Robert L.; Escuti, Michael J.

    2007-09-01

    New advances in Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulators (LCSLM) offer opportunities for large adaptive optics in the midwave infrared spectrum. A light focusing adaptive imaging system, using the zero-order diffraction state of a polarizer-free liquid crystal polarization grating modulator to create millions of high transmittance apertures, is envisioned in a system called DAZLE (Discrete Adaptive Zone Light Elements). DAZLE adaptively selects large sets of LCSLM apertures using the principles of coded masks, embodied in a hybrid Discrete Fresnel Zone Plate (DFZP) design. Issues of system architecture, including factors of LCSLM aperture pattern and adaptive control, image resolution and focal plane array (FPA) matching, and trade-offs between filter bandwidths, background photon noise, and chromatic aberration are discussed.

  13. Roundoff error effects on spatial lattice algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, S. H.; Yao, K.

    1986-01-01

    The floating-point roundoff error effect under finite word length limitations is analyzed for the time updates of reflection coefficients in the spatial lattice algorithm. It is shown that recursive computation is superior to direct computation under finite word length limitations. Moreover, the forgetting factor, which is conventionally used to smooth the time variations of the inputs, is also a crucial parameter in the consideration of the system stability and adaptability under finite word length constraints.

  14. Object size determines the spatial spread of visual time

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Paul V.; Roach, Neil W.; Whitaker, David

    2016-01-01

    A key question for temporal processing research is how the nervous system extracts event duration, despite a notable lack of neural structures dedicated to duration encoding. This is in stark contrast with the orderly arrangement of neurons tasked with spatial processing. In this study, we examine the linkage between the spatial and temporal domains. We use sensory adaptation techniques to generate after-effects where perceived duration is either compressed or expanded in the opposite direction to the adapting stimulus' duration. Our results indicate that these after-effects are broadly tuned, extending over an area approximately five times the size of the stimulus. This region is directly related to the size of the adapting stimulus—the larger the adapting stimulus the greater the spatial spread of the after-effect. We construct a simple model to test predictions based on overlapping adapted versus non-adapted neuronal populations and show that our effects cannot be explained by any single, fixed-scale neural filtering. Rather, our effects are best explained by a self-scaled mechanism underpinned by duration selective neurons that also pool spatial information across earlier stages of visual processing. PMID:27466452

  15. Expressing Adaptation Strategies Using Adaptation Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemirline, N.; Bourda, Y.; Reynaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a real challenge to enable personalized access to information. Several systems have been proposed to address this challenge including Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHSs). However, the specification of adaptation strategies remains a difficult task for creators of such systems. In this paper, we consider the problem of the definition…

  16. Expressing Adaptation Strategies Using Adaptation Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemirline, N.; Bourda, Y.; Reynaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a real challenge to enable personalized access to information. Several systems have been proposed to address this challenge including Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHSs). However, the specification of adaptation strategies remains a difficult task for creators of such systems. In this paper, we consider the problem of the definition…

  17. Temporal Factors in Tactile Spatial Acuity: Evidence for RA Interference in Fine Spatial Processing

    PubMed Central

    Bensmaïa, S. J.; Craig, J. C.; Johnson, K. O.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the extent to which subjects’ ability to perceive the fine spatial structure of a stimulus depends on its temporal properties (namely the frequency at which it vibrates). Subjects were presented with static or vibrating gratings that varied in spatial period (1–8 mm) and vibratory frequency (5–80 Hz) and judged the orientation of the gratings, presented either parallel or perpendicular to the long axis of the finger. We found that the grating orientation threshold (GOT)—the spatial period at which subjects can reliably discriminate the orientation of the grating—increased as the vibratory frequency of the gratings increased. As the spatial modulation of SA1 and RA afferent fibers has been found to be independent of vibratory frequency, the frequency dependence of spatial acuity cannot be attributed to changes in the quality of the peripheral signal. Furthermore, we found GOTs to be relatively independent of stimulus amplitude, so the low spatial acuity at high flutter frequencies does not appear to be due to an inadequacy in the strength of the afferent response at those frequencies. We hypothesized that the RA signal, the strength of which increases with vibratory frequency, interfered with the spatially modulated signal conveyed by SA1 fibers. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that adapting RA afferent fibers improved spatial acuity, as gauged by GOTs, at the high flutter frequencies. PMID:16236778

  18. Spatial services grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Li, Qi; Cheng, Jicheng

    2005-10-01

    This paper discusses the concept, key technologies and main application of Spatial Services Grid. The technologies of Grid computing and Webservice is playing a revolutionary role in studying the spatial information services. The concept of the SSG (Spatial Services Grid) is put forward based on the SIG (Spatial Information Grid) and OGSA (open grid service architecture). Firstly, the grid computing is reviewed and the key technologies of SIG and their main applications are reviewed. Secondly, the grid computing and three kinds of SIG (in broad sense)--SDG (spatial data grid), SIG (spatial information grid) and SSG (spatial services grid) and their relationships are proposed. Thirdly, the key technologies of the SSG (spatial services grid) is put forward. Finally, three representative applications of SSG (spatial services grid) are discussed. The first application is urban location based services gird, which is a typical spatial services grid and can be constructed on OGSA (Open Grid Services Architecture) and digital city platform. The second application is region sustainable development grid which is the key to the urban development. The third application is Region disaster and emergency management services grid.

  19. Individual differences in multitasking ability and adaptability.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brent; D'Mello, Sidney; Abbott, Robert; Radvansky, Gabriel; Haass, Michael; Tamplin, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the cognitive factors that predictability and adaptability during multitasking with a flight simulator. Multitasking has become increasingly prevalent as most professions require individuals to perform multiple tasks simultaneously. Considerable research has been undertaken to identify the characteristics of people (i.e., individual differences) that predict multitasking ability. Although working memory is a reliable predictor of general multitasking ability (i.e., performance in normal conditions), there is the question of whether different cognitive faculties are needed to rapidly respond to changing task demands (adaptability). Participants first completed a battery of cognitive individual differences tests followed by multitasking sessions with a flight simulator. After a baseline condition, difficulty of the flight simulator was incrementally increased via four experimental manipulations, and performance metrics were collected to assess multitasking ability and adaptability. Scholastic aptitude and working memory predicted general multitasking ability (i.e., performance at baseline difficulty), but spatial manipulation (in conjunction with working memory) was a major predictor of adaptability (performance in difficult conditions after accounting for baseline performance). Multitasking ability and adaptability may be overlapping but separate constructs that draw on overlapping (but not identical) sets of cognitive abilities. The results of this study are applicable to practitioners and researchers in human factors to assess multitasking performance in real-world contexts and with realistic task constraints. We also present a framework for conceptualizing multitasking adaptability on the basis of five adaptability profiles derived from performance on tasks with consistent versus increased difficulty.

  20. Spatial and motor neglect in children.

    PubMed

    Laurent-Vannier, A; Pradat-Diehl, P; Chevignard, M; Abada, G; De Agostini, M

    2003-01-28

    To determine if unilateral spatial neglect can be found in very young children with acquired brain lesions. A retrospective study was carried out over a 10-year period in a pediatric rehabilitation department specializing in acquired brain lesions. Twelve cases were selected involving children aged 7 months to 14 years. Neglect was assessed by behavior observation for all children and, depending on age, by drawing, copying, reading, writing, and arithmetic tasks. Seven patients underwent the experimental "Teddy Bear" cancellation task, specially adapted to children. All children exhibited spatial and motor neglect in daily activities. In addition, children who were over 2 years of age made lateralized omissions in paper and pencil tasks as well as in the "Teddy Bear" cancellation task. Nine of the 12 children exhibited left spatial and motor neglect, whereas the other three, all of whom were very young (under 4 years), exhibited right spatial neglect. In three cases, cortical lesions were restricted to one lobe, either the parietal, frontal, or temporal. In eight children, lesions extended over more than one lobe, and one child sustained only subcortical lesions. Unilateral spatial and motor neglect occurs even in very young children. Right spatial neglect described in very young children may be related to the development of hemispheric specialization.

  1. Control of spatial orienting: context-specific proportion cued effects in an exogenous spatial cueing task.

    PubMed

    Gough, Alex; Garcia, Jesse; Torres-Quesada, Maryem; Milliken, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive control refers to the ability to adjust strategy use based on the demands of a current context or task. Recent research using attentional filtering tasks has shown that cognitive control can adapt rapidly and automatically in accord with learning that is specific to particular tasks, items, and contexts (Crump, Gong, & Milliken, 2006; Fernandez-Duque & Knight, 2008; Jacoby, Lindsay, & Hessels, 2003). However, the role of context-specific control has not been investigated in detail in spatial orienting tasks. In a series of three experiments, the proportion of validly cued trials in an exogenous spatial cueing task was manipulated for one context but not for another context, with the two contexts intermixed randomly across trials. The results revealed that spatial/temporal contextual cues in conjunction, but not individually, produced context-specific control over spatial orienting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spatial capture-recapture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Chandler, Richard B.; Sollmann, Rahel; Gardner, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Spatial Capture-Recapture provides a revolutionary extension of traditional capture-recapture methods for studying animal populations using data from live trapping, camera trapping, DNA sampling, acoustic sampling, and related field methods. This book is a conceptual and methodological synthesis of spatial capture-recapture modeling. As a comprehensive how-to manual, this reference contains detailed examples of a wide range of relevant spatial capture-recapture models for inference about population size and spatial and temporal variation in demographic parameters. Practicing field biologists studying animal populations will find this book to be a useful resource, as will graduate students and professionals in ecology, conservation biology, and fisheries and wildlife management.

  3. Adapting to life: ocean biogeochemical modelling and adaptive remeshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J.; Popova, E. E.; Ham, D. A.; Piggott, M. D.; Srokosz, M.

    2013-11-01

    An outstanding problem in biogeochemical modelling of the ocean is that many of the key processes occur intermittently at small scales, such as the sub-mesoscale, that are not well represented in global ocean models. As an example, state-of-the-art models give values of primary production approximately two orders of magnitude lower than those observed in the ocean's oligotrophic gyres, which cover a third of the Earth's surface. This is partly due to their failure to resolve sub-mesoscale phenomena, which play a significant role in nutrient supply. Simply increasing the resolution of the models may be an inefficient computational solution to this problem. An approach based on recent advances in adaptive mesh computational techniques may offer an alternative. Here the first steps in such an approach are described, using the example of a~simple vertical column (quasi 1-D) ocean biogeochemical model. We present a novel method of simulating ocean biogeochemical behaviour on a vertically adaptive computational mesh, where the mesh changes in response to the biogeochemical and physical state of the system throughout the simulation. We show that the model reproduces the general physical and biological behaviour at three ocean stations (India, Papa and Bermuda) as compared to a high-resolution fixed mesh simulation and to observations. The simulations capture both the seasonal and inter-annual variations. The use of an adaptive mesh does not increase the computational error, but reduces the number of mesh elements by a factor of 2-3, so reducing computational overhead. We then show the potential of this method in two case studies where we change the metric used to determine the varying mesh sizes in order to capture the dynamics of chlorophyll at Bermuda and sinking detritus at Papa. We therefore demonstrate adaptive meshes may provide a~suitable numerical technique for simulating seasonal or transient biogeochemical behaviour at high spatial resolution whilst minimising

  4. Adaptation and Cultural Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormrod, Richard K.

    1992-01-01

    Explores the role of adaptation in cultural diffusion. Explains that adaptation theory recognizes the lack of independence between innovations and their environmental settings. Discusses testing and selection, modification, motivation, and cognition. Suggests that adaptation effects are pervasive in cultural diffusion but require a broader, more…

  5. Adapting to climate change

    Treesearch

    Constance I. Millar; Christopher W. Swanston; David L. Peterson

    2014-01-01

    Federal agencies have led the development of adaptation principles and tools in forest ecosystems over the past decade. Successful adaptation efforts generally require organizations to: (1) develop science-management partnerships, (2) provide education on climate change science, (3) provide a toolkit of methods and processes for vulnerability assessment and adaptation...

  6. Extreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, B.; Graham, J. R.; Ghez, A.; Kalas, P.; Lloyd, J.; Makidon, R.; Olivier, S.; Patience, J.; Perrin, M.; Poyneer, L.; Severson, S.; Sheinis, A.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Troy, M.; Wallace, J.; Wilhelmsen, J.

    2002-12-01

    Direct detection of photons emitted or reflected by extrasolar planets is the next major step in extrasolar planet studies. Current adaptive optics (AO) systems, with <300 subapertures and Strehl ratio 0.4-0.7, can achieve contrast levels of 106 at 2" separations; this is sufficient to see very young planets in wide orbits but insufficient to detect solar systems more like our own. Contrast levels of 107 - 108 in the near-IR are needed to probe a significant part of the extrasolar planet phase space. The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics is carrying out a design study for a dedicated ultra-high-contrast "Extreme" adaptive optics system for an 8-10m telescope. With 3000 controlled subapertures it should achieve Strehl ratios > 0.9 in the near-IR. Using a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, the system will be optimized to control scattered light over a large radius and suppress artifacts caused static errors. We predict that it will achieve contrast levels of 107-108 around a large sample of stars (R<7-10), sufficient to detect Jupiter-like planets through their near-IR emission over a wide range of ages and masses. The system will be capable of a variety of high-contrast science including studying circumstellar dust disks at densities a factor of 10-100 lower than currently feasible and a systematic inventory of other solar systems on 10-100 AU scale. This work was supported by the NSF Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by UC Santa Cruz under AST-9876783. Portions of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  7. Spatial Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    With increasing accessibility to geographic information systems (GIS) software, statisticians and data analysts routinely encounter scientific data sets with geocoded locations. This has generated considerable interest in statistical modeling for location-referenced spatial data. In public health, spatial data routinely arise as aggregates over regions, such as counts or rates over counties, census tracts, or some other administrative delineation. Such data are often referred to as areal data. This review article provides a brief overview of statistical models that account for spatial dependence in areal data. It does so in the context of two applications: disease mapping and spatial survival analysis. Disease maps are used to highlight geographic areas with high and low prevalence, incidence, or mortality rates of a specific disease and the variability of such rates over a spatial domain. They can also be used to detect hot spots or spatial clusters that may arise owing to common environmental, demographic, or cultural effects shared by neighboring regions. Spatial survival analysis refers to the modeling and analysis for geographically referenced time-to-event data, where a subject is followed up to an event (e.g., death or onset of a disease) or is censored, whichever comes first. Spatial survival analysis is used to analyze clustered survival data when the clustering arises from geographical regions or strata. Illustrations are provided in these application domains.

  8. Dyslexia and Spatial Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Arthur L.

    1984-01-01

    Research on spatial thinking impairments, with special reference to right-left orientation, visuomotor and visuoconstructive performances, and finger recognition are examined. It is concluded that, although some dyslexic children do show spatial disabilities, there is little evidence to support the existence of a visuospatial type of developmental…

  9. Individual Differences in Spatial Text Processing: High Spatial Ability Can Compensate for Spatial Working Memory Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneghetti, Chiara; Gyselinck, Valerie; Pazzaglia, Francesca; De Beni, Rossana

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the relation between spatial ability and visuo-spatial and verbal working memory in spatial text processing. In two experiments, participants listened to a spatial text (Experiments 1 and 2) and a non-spatial text (Experiment 1), at the same time performing a spatial or a verbal concurrent task, or no secondary task.…

  10. Individual Differences in Spatial Text Processing: High Spatial Ability Can Compensate for Spatial Working Memory Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneghetti, Chiara; Gyselinck, Valerie; Pazzaglia, Francesca; De Beni, Rossana

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the relation between spatial ability and visuo-spatial and verbal working memory in spatial text processing. In two experiments, participants listened to a spatial text (Experiments 1 and 2) and a non-spatial text (Experiment 1), at the same time performing a spatial or a verbal concurrent task, or no secondary task.…

  11. Multi-channel spatial auditory display for speech communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand; Erbe, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A spatial auditory display for multiple speech communications was developed at NASA-Ames Research Center. Input is spatialized by use of simplified head-related transfer functions, adapted for FIR filtering on Motorola 56001 digital signal processors. Hardware and firmware design implementations are overviewed for the initial prototype developed for NASA-Kennedy Space Center. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of four letter call signs used by launch personnel at NASA, against diotic speech babble. Spatial positions at 30 deg azimuth increments were evaluated. The results from eight subjects showed a maximal intelligibility improvement of about 6 to 7 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 deg or 90 deg azimuth positions.

  12. Multi-channel spatial auditory display for speech communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begault, Durand; Erbe, Tom

    1993-10-01

    A spatial auditory display for multiple speech communications was developed at NASA-Ames Research Center. Input is spatialized by use of simplified head-related transfer functions, adapted for FIR filtering on Motorola 56001 digital signal processors. Hardware and firmware design implementations are overviewed for the initial prototype developed for NASA-Kennedy Space Center. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of four letter call signs used by launch personnel at NASA, against diotic speech babble. Spatial positions at 30 deg azimuth increments were evaluated. The results from eight subjects showed a maximal intelligibility improvement of about 6 to 7 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 deg or 90 deg azimuth positions.

  13. Multi-channel spatial auditory display for speech communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand; Erbe, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A spatial auditory display for multiple speech communications was developed at NASA-Ames Research Center. Input is spatialized by use of simplified head-related transfer functions, adapted for FIR filtering on Motorola 56001 digital signal processors. Hardware and firmware design implementations are overviewed for the initial prototype developed for NASA-Kennedy Space Center. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of four letter call signs used by launch personnel at NASA, against diotic speech babble. Spatial positions at 30 deg azimuth increments were evaluated. The results from eight subjects showed a maximal intelligibility improvement of about 6 to 7 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 deg or 90 deg azimuth positions.

  14. GRACE: A visual comparison framework for integrated spatial and non-spatial geriatric data.

    PubMed

    Maries, Adrian; Mays, Nathan; Hunt, Meganolson; Wong, Kim F; Layton, William; Boudreau, Robert; Rosano, Caterina; Marai, G Elisabeta

    2013-12-01

    We present the design of a novel framework for the visual integration, comparison, and exploration of correlations in spatial and non-spatial geriatric research data. These data are in general high-dimensional and span both the spatial, volumetric domain--through magnetic resonance imaging volumes--and the non-spatial domain, through variables such as age, gender, or walking speed. The visual analysis framework blends medical imaging, mathematical analysis and interactive visualization techniques, and includes the adaptation of Sparse Partial Least Squares and iterated Tikhonov Regularization algorithms to quantify potential neurologymobility connections. A linked-view design geared specifically at interactive visual comparison integrates spatial and abstract visual representations to enable the users to effectively generate and refine hypotheses in a large, multidimensional, and fragmented space. In addition to the domain analysis and design description, we demonstrate the usefulness of this approach on two case studies. Last, we report the lessons learned through the iterative design and evaluation of our approach, in particular those relevant to the design of comparative visualization of spatial and non-spatial data.

  15. GRACE: A Visual Comparison Framework for Integrated Spatial and Non-Spatial Geriatric Data

    PubMed Central

    Maries, Adrian; Mays, Nathan; Hunt, Megan Olson; Wong, Kim F.; Layton, William; Boudreau, Robert; Rosano, Caterina; Marai, G. Elisabeta

    2015-01-01

    We present the design of a novel framework for the visual integration, comparison, and exploration of correlations in spatial and non-spatial geriatric research data. These data are in general high-dimensional and span both the spatial, volumetric domain – through magnetic resonance imaging volumes – and the non-spatial domain, through variables such as age, gender, or walking speed. The visual analysis framework blends medical imaging, mathematical analysis and interactive visualization techniques, and includes the adaptation of Sparse Partial Least Squares and iterated Tikhonov Regularization algorithms to quantify potential neurology-mobility connections. A linked-view design geared specifically at interactive visual comparison integrates spatial and abstract visual representations to enable the users to effectively generate and refine hypotheses in a large, multidimensional, and fragmented space. In addition to the domain analysis and design description, we demonstrate the usefulness of this approach on two case studies. Last, we report the lessons learned through the iterative design and evaluation of our approach, in particular those relevant to the design of comparative visualization of spatial and non-spatial data. PMID:24051859

  16. Spatial heterogeneity in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Morrissy, A Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M G; Remke, Marc; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Shih, David J H; Holgado, Borja L; Farooq, Hamza; Donovan, Laura K; Garzia, Livia; Agnihotri, Sameer; Kiehna, Erin N; Mercier, Eloi; Mayoh, Chelsea; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Nikbakht, Hamid; Gayden, Tenzin; Torchia, Jonathon; Picard, Daniel; Merino, Diana M; Vladoiu, Maria; Luu, Betty; Wu, Xiaochong; Daniels, Craig; Horswell, Stuart; Thompson, Yuan Yao; Hovestadt, Volker; Northcott, Paul A; Jones, David T W; Peacock, John; Wang, Xin; Mack, Stephen C; Reimand, Jüri; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam M; Thiessen, Nina; Li, Yisu; Schein, Jacqueline E; Lee, Darlene; Carlsen, Rebecca; Mayo, Michael; Tse, Kane; Tam, Angela; Dhalla, Noreen; Ally, Adrian; Chuah, Eric; Cheng, Young; Plettner, Patrick; Li, Haiyan I; Corbett, Richard D; Wong, Tina; Long, William; Loukides, James; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Tabori, Uri; Rood, Brian R; Myseros, John S; Packer, Roger J; Korshunov, Andrey; Lichter, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan M; Schüller, Ulrich; Dirks, Peter; Huang, Annie; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Bader, Gary D; Swanton, Charles; Ma, Yusanne; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Majewski, Jacek; Jones, Steven J M; Das, Sunit; Malkin, David; Jabado, Nada; Marra, Marco A; Taylor, Michael D

    2017-04-10

    Spatial heterogeneity of transcriptional and genetic markers between physically isolated biopsies of a single tumor poses major barriers to the identification of biomarkers and the development of targeted therapies that will be effective against the entire tumor. We analyzed the spatial heterogeneity of multiregional biopsies from 35 patients, using a combination of transcriptomic and genomic profiles. Medulloblastomas (MBs), but not high-grade gliomas (HGGs), demonstrated spatially homogeneous transcriptomes, which allowed for accurate subgrouping of tumors from a single biopsy. Conversely, somatic mutations that affect genes suitable for targeted therapeutics demonstrated high levels of spatial heterogeneity in MB, malignant glioma, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Actionable targets found in a single MB biopsy were seldom clonal across the entire tumor, which brings the efficacy of monotherapies against a single target into question. Clinical trials of targeted therapies for MB should first ensure the spatially ubiquitous nature of the target mutation.

  17. Resilience through adaptation

    PubMed Central

    van Voorn, George A. K.; Ligtenberg, Arend; Molenaar, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation of agents through learning or evolution is an important component of the resilience of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). Without adaptation, the flexibility of such systems to cope with outside pressures would be much lower. To study the capabilities of CAS to adapt, social simulations with agent-based models (ABMs) provide a helpful tool. However, the value of ABMs for studying adaptation depends on the availability of methodologies for sensitivity analysis that can quantify resilience and adaptation in ABMs. In this paper we propose a sensitivity analysis methodology that is based on comparing time-dependent probability density functions of output of ABMs with and without agent adaptation. The differences between the probability density functions are quantified by the so-called earth-mover’s distance. We use this sensitivity analysis methodology to quantify the probability of occurrence of critical transitions and other long-term effects of agent adaptation. To test the potential of this new approach, it is used to analyse the resilience of an ABM of adaptive agents competing for a common-pool resource. Adaptation is shown to contribute positively to the resilience of this ABM. If adaptation proceeds sufficiently fast, it may delay or avert the collapse of this system. PMID:28196372

  18. Application of liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Haruyoshi

    2015-08-01

    A high performance 2D Spatial Light Phase Modulator named LCOS-SLM has been developed for wide range usefulness from basic researches to practical applications. We show the fundamental characteristics of LCOS-SLM device we developed, and introduce the activity examples such as the scientific researches of singular optics, fluorescence microscopy and adaptive optics. We have also applied the device for industrial applications in laser processing and machining, and medical application using adaptive optics system in scanning laser opthalmoscope.

  19. Locomotor adaptability in persons with unilateral transtibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Darter, Benjamin J; Bastian, Amy J; Wolf, Erik J; Husson, Elizabeth M; Labrecque, Bethany A; Hendershot, Brad D

    2017-01-01

    Locomotor adaptation enables walkers to modify strategies when faced with challenging walking conditions. While a variety of neurological injuries can impair locomotor adaptability, the effect of a lower extremity amputation on adaptability is poorly understood. Determine if locomotor adaptability is impaired in persons with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA). The locomotor adaptability of 10 persons with a TTA and 8 persons without an amputation was tested while walking on a split-belt treadmill with the parallel belts running at the same (tied) or different (split) speeds. In the split condition, participants walked for 15 minutes with the respective belts moving at 0.5 m/s and 1.5 m/s. Temporal spatial symmetry measures were used to evaluate reactive accommodations to the perturbation, and the adaptive/de-adaptive response. Persons with TTA and the reference group of persons without amputation both demonstrated highly symmetric walking at baseline. During the split adaptation and tied post-adaptation walking both groups responded with the expected reactive accommodations. Likewise, adaptive and de-adaptive responses were observed. The magnitude and rate of change in the adaptive and de-adaptive responses were similar for persons with TTA and those without an amputation. Furthermore, adaptability was no different based on belt assignment for the prosthetic limb during split adaptation walking. Reactive changes and locomotor adaptation in response to a challenging and novel walking condition were similar in persons with TTA to those without an amputation. Results suggest persons with TTA have the capacity to modify locomotor strategies to meet the demands of most walking conditions despite challenges imposed by an amputation and use of a prosthetic limb.

  20. Locomotor adaptability in persons with unilateral transtibial amputation

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Amy J.; Wolf, Erik J.; Husson, Elizabeth M.; Labrecque, Bethany A.; Hendershot, Brad D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Locomotor adaptation enables walkers to modify strategies when faced with challenging walking conditions. While a variety of neurological injuries can impair locomotor adaptability, the effect of a lower extremity amputation on adaptability is poorly understood. Objective Determine if locomotor adaptability is impaired in persons with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA). Methods The locomotor adaptability of 10 persons with a TTA and 8 persons without an amputation was tested while walking on a split-belt treadmill with the parallel belts running at the same (tied) or different (split) speeds. In the split condition, participants walked for 15 minutes with the respective belts moving at 0.5 m/s and 1.5 m/s. Temporal spatial symmetry measures were used to evaluate reactive accommodations to the perturbation, and the adaptive/de-adaptive response. Results Persons with TTA and the reference group of persons without amputation both demonstrated highly symmetric walking at baseline. During the split adaptation and tied post-adaptation walking both groups responded with the expected reactive accommodations. Likewise, adaptive and de-adaptive responses were observed. The magnitude and rate of change in the adaptive and de-adaptive responses were similar for persons with TTA and those without an amputation. Furthermore, adaptability was no different based on belt assignment for the prosthetic limb during split adaptation walking. Conclusions Reactive changes and locomotor adaptation in response to a challenging and novel walking condition were similar in persons with TTA to those without an amputation. Results suggest persons with TTA have the capacity to modify locomotor strategies to meet the demands of most walking conditions despite challenges imposed by an amputation and use of a prosthetic limb. PMID:28704467

  1. Forest climate change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment in Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitale, V. S.; Shrestha, H. L.; Agarwal, N. K.; Choudhurya, D.; Gilani, H.; Dhonju, H. K.; Murthy, M. S. R.

    2014-11-01

    Forests offer an important basis for creating and safeguarding more climate-resilient communities over Hindu Kush Himalayan region. The forest ecosystem vulnerability assessment to climate change and developing knowledge base to identify and support relevant adaptation strategies is realized as an urgent need. The multi scale adaptation strategies portray increasing complexity with the increasing levels in terms of data requirements, vulnerability understanding and decision making to choose a particular adaptation strategy. We present here how such complexities could be addressed and adaptation decisions could be either directly supported by open source remote sensing based forestry products or geospatial analysis and modelled products. The forest vulnerability assessment under climate change scenario coupled with increasing forest social dependence was studied using IPCC Landscape scale Vulnerability framework in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL) situated in Nepal. Around twenty layers of geospatial information on climate, forest biophysical and forest social dependence data was used to assess forest vulnerability and associated adaptation needs using self-learning decision tree based approaches. The increase in forest fires, evapotranspiration and reduction in productivity over changing climate scenario was observed. The adaptation measures on enhancing productivity, improving resilience, reducing or avoiding pressure with spatial specificity are identified to support suitable decision making. The study provides spatial analytical framework to evaluate multitude of parameters to understand vulnerabilities and assess scope for alternative adaptation strategies with spatial explicitness.

  2. Encouraging Spatial Talk: Using Children's Museums to Bolster Spatial Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinsky, Naomi; Perez, Jasmin; Grehl, Mora; McCrink, Koleen

    2017-01-01

    Longitudinal spatial language intervention studies have shown that greater exposure to spatial language improves children's performance on spatial tasks. Can short naturalistic, spatial language interactions also evoke improved spatial performance? In this study, parents were asked to interact with their child at a block wall exhibit in a…

  3. Children's Spatial Thinking: Does Talk about the Spatial World Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruden, Shannon M.; Levine, Susan C.; Huttenlocher, Janellen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examine the relations between parent spatial language input, children's own production of spatial language, and children's later spatial abilities. Using a longitudinal study design, we coded the use of spatial language (i.e. words describing the spatial features and properties of objects; e.g. big, tall, circle, curvy, edge) from…

  4. Organizational Adaptation and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim S.

    1984-01-01

    Organizational adaptation and types of adaptation needed in academe in the future are reviewed and major conceptual approaches to organizational adaptation are presented. The probable environment that institutions will face in the future that will require adaptation is discussed. (MLW)

  5. Dengue Vectors and their Spatial Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Yukiko

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, is affected by climatic factors. In addition, since their life cycles are well adapted to the human environment, environmental changes resulting from human activity such as urbanization exert a great impact on vector distribution. The different responses of Ae. aegypti and Ae albopictus to various environments result in a difference in spatial distribution along north-south and urban-rural gradients, and between the indoors and outdoors. In the north-south gradient, climate associated with survival is an important factor in spatial distribution. In the urban-rural gradient, different distribution reflects a difference in adult niches and is modified by geographic and human factors. The direct response of the two species to the environment around houses is related to different spatial distribution indoors and outdoors. Dengue viruses circulate mainly between human and vector mosquitoes, and the vector presence is a limiting factor of transmission. Therefore, spatial distribution of dengue vectors is a significant concern in the epidemiology of the disease. Current technologies such as GIS, satellite imagery and statistical models allow researchers to predict the spatial distribution of vectors in the changing environment. Although it is difficult to confirm the actual effect of environmental and climate changes on vector abundance and vector-borne diseases, environmental changes caused by humans and human behavioral changes due to climate change can be expected to exert an impact on dengue vectors. Longitudinal monitoring of dengue vectors and viruses is therefore necessary. PMID:22500133

  6. Robustness of spatial micronetworks.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Thomas C; Danforth, Christopher M; Bagrow, James P

    2015-04-01

    Power lines, roadways, pipelines, and other physical infrastructure are critical to modern society. These structures may be viewed as spatial networks where geographic distances play a role in the functionality and construction cost of links. Traditionally, studies of network robustness have primarily considered the connectedness of large, random networks. Yet for spatial infrastructure, physical distances must also play a role in network robustness. Understanding the robustness of small spatial networks is particularly important with the increasing interest in microgrids, i.e., small-area distributed power grids that are well suited to using renewable energy resources. We study the random failures of links in small networks where functionality depends on both spatial distance and topological connectedness. By introducing a percolation model where the failure of each link is proportional to its spatial length, we find that when failures depend on spatial distances, networks are more fragile than expected. Accounting for spatial effects in both construction and robustness is important for designing efficient microgrids and other network infrastructure.

  7. Robustness of spatial micronetworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAndrew, Thomas C.; Danforth, Christopher M.; Bagrow, James P.

    2015-04-01

    Power lines, roadways, pipelines, and other physical infrastructure are critical to modern society. These structures may be viewed as spatial networks where geographic distances play a role in the functionality and construction cost of links. Traditionally, studies of network robustness have primarily considered the connectedness of large, random networks. Yet for spatial infrastructure, physical distances must also play a role in network robustness. Understanding the robustness of small spatial networks is particularly important with the increasing interest in microgrids, i.e., small-area distributed power grids that are well suited to using renewable energy resources. We study the random failures of links in small networks where functionality depends on both spatial distance and topological connectedness. By introducing a percolation model where the failure of each link is proportional to its spatial length, we find that when failures depend on spatial distances, networks are more fragile than expected. Accounting for spatial effects in both construction and robustness is important for designing efficient microgrids and other network infrastructure.

  8. Human heat adaptation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S

    2014-01-01

    In this overview, human morphological and functional adaptations during naturally and artificially induced heat adaptation are explored. Through discussions of adaptation theory and practice, a theoretical basis is constructed for evaluating heat adaptation. It will be argued that some adaptations are specific to the treatment used, while others are generalized. Regarding ethnic differences in heat tolerance, the case is put that reported differences in heat tolerance are not due to natural selection, but can be explained on the basis of variations in adaptation opportunity. These concepts are expanded to illustrate how traditional heat adaptation and acclimatization represent forms of habituation, and thermal clamping (controlled hyperthermia) is proposed as a superior model for mechanistic research. Indeed, this technique has led to questioning the perceived wisdom of body-fluid changes, such as the expansion and subsequent decay of plasma volume, and sudomotor function, including sweat habituation and redistribution. Throughout, this contribution was aimed at taking another step toward understanding the phenomenon of heat adaptation and stimulating future research. In this regard, research questions are posed concerning the influence that variations in morphological configuration may exert upon adaptation, the determinants of postexercise plasma volume recovery, and the physiological mechanisms that modify the cholinergic sensitivity of sweat glands, and changes in basal metabolic rate and body core temperature following adaptation. © 2014 American Physiological Society.

  9. Reference Device-Assisted Adaptive Location Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongjin; Xia, Linyuan

    2016-01-01

    Location fingerprinting suffers in dynamic environments and needs recalibration from time to time to maintain system performance. This paper proposes an adaptive approach for location fingerprinting. Based on real-time received signal strength indicator (RSSI) samples measured by a group of reference devices, the approach applies a modified Universal Kriging (UK) interpolant to estimate adaptive temporal and environmental radio maps. The modified UK can take the spatial distribution characteristics of RSSI into account. In addition, the issue of device heterogeneity caused by multiple reference devices is further addressed. To compensate the measuring differences of heterogeneous reference devices, differential RSSI metric is employed. Extensive experiments were conducted in an indoor field and the results demonstrate that the proposed approach not only adapts to dynamic environments and the situation of changing APs’ positions, but it is also robust toward measuring differences of heterogeneous reference devices. PMID:27258284

  10. Gestures maintain spatial imagery.

    PubMed

    Wesp, R; Hesse, J; Keutmann, D; Wheaton, K

    2001-01-01

    Recent theories suggest alternatives to the commonly held belief that the sole role of gestures is to communicate meaning directly to listeners. Evidence suggests that gestures may serve a cognitive function for speakers, possibly acting as lexical primes. We observed that participants gestured more often when describing a picture from memory than when the picture was present and that gestures were not influenced by manipulating eye contact of a listener. We argue that spatial imagery serves a short-term memory function during lexical search and that gestures may help maintain spatial images. When spatial imagery is not necessary, as in conditions of direct visual stimulation, reliance on gestures is reduced or eliminated.

  11. Spatial Light Amplifier Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Sverre T.; Olsson, N. Anders

    1992-01-01

    Spatial light amplifier modulators (SLAM's) are conceptual devices that effect two-dimensional spatial modulation in optical computing and communication systems. Unlike current spatial light modulators, these provide gain. Optical processors incorporating SLAM's designed to operate in reflection or transmission mode. Each element of planar SLAM array is optical amplifier - surface-emitting diode laser. Array addressed electrically with ac modulating signals superimposed on dc bias currents supplied to lasers. SLAM device provides both desired modulation and enough optical gain to enable splitting of output signal into many optical fibers without excessive loss of power.

  12. Temporal patterns of local adaptation in soil pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Susanne A; Kassen, Rees

    2016-10-12

    Strong divergent selection leading to local adaptation is often invoked to explain the staggering diversity of bacteria in microbial ecosystems. However, examples of specialization by bacterial clones to alternative niches in nature are rare. Here, we investigate the extent of local adaptation in natural isolates of pseudomonads and their relatives to their soil environments across both space and time. Though most isolates grew well in most environments, patchily distributed low-quality environments were found to drive specialization. In contrast to experimental evolution work on microbial adaptation, temporal adaptation was stronger than spatial adaptation among the isolates and environments we sampled. Time-shift analysis of fitness across two seasons of growth revealed an unexpectedly strong effect of preadaptation. This pattern of apparent future adaptation may be caused by unknown abiotic properties of these environments, phages, bacterial competitors or general mechanisms of ecological niche release, and warrants future study. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Keck adaptive optics: control subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1996-03-08

    Adaptive optics on the Keck 10 meter telescope will provide an unprecedented level of capability in high resolution ground based astronomical imaging. The system is designed to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance with Strehl {gt} 0.3 n median Keck seeing of r0 = 25 cm, T =10 msec at 500 nm wavelength. The system will be equipped with a 20 watt sodium laser guide star to provide nearly full sky coverage. The wavefront control subsystem is responsible for wavefront sensing and the control of the tip-tilt and deformable mirrors which actively correct atmospheric turbulence. The spatial sampling interval for the wavefront sensor and deformable mirror is de=0.56 m which gives us 349 actuators and 244 subapertures. This paper summarizes the wavefront control system and discusses particular issues in designing a wavefront controller for the Keck telescope.

  14. Multi-scale Adaptive Computational Ghost Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuai; Liu, Wei-Tao; Lin, Hui-Zu; Zhang, Er-Feng; Liu, Ji-Ying; Li, Quan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2016-01-01

    In some cases of imaging, wide spatial range and high spatial resolution are both required, which requests high performance of detection devices and huge resource consumption for data processing. We propose and demonstrate a multi-scale adaptive imaging method based on the idea of computational ghost imaging, which can obtain a rough outline of the whole scene with a wide range then accordingly find out the interested parts and achieve high-resolution details of those parts, by controlling the field of view and the transverse coherence width of the pseudo-thermal field illuminated on the scene with a spatial light modulator. Compared to typical ghost imaging, the resource consumption can be dramatically reduced using our scheme. PMID:27841339

  15. Multi-scale Adaptive Computational Ghost Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuai; Liu, Wei-Tao; Lin, Hui-Zu; Zhang, Er-Feng; Liu, Ji-Ying; Li, Quan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2016-11-01

    In some cases of imaging, wide spatial range and high spatial resolution are both required, which requests high performance of detection devices and huge resource consumption for data processing. We propose and demonstrate a multi-scale adaptive imaging method based on the idea of computational ghost imaging, which can obtain a rough outline of the whole scene with a wide range then accordingly find out the interested parts and achieve high-resolution details of those parts, by controlling the field of view and the transverse coherence width of the pseudo-thermal field illuminated on the scene with a spatial light modulator. Compared to typical ghost imaging, the resource consumption can be dramatically reduced using our scheme.

  16. Gravitational adaptation of animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Burton, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of gravitational adaptation is studied in a group of five Leghorn cocks which had become physiologically adapted to 2 G after 162 days of centrifugation. After this period of adaptation, they are periodically exposed to a 2 G field, accompanied by five previously unexposed hatch-mates, and the degree of retained acceleration adaptation is estimated from the decrease in lymphocyte frequency after 24 hr at 2 G. Results show that the previously adapted birds exhibit an 84% greater lymphopenia than the unexposed birds, and that the lymphocyte frequency does not decrease to a level below that found at the end of 162 days at 2 G. In addition, the capacity for adaptation to chronic acceleration is found to be highly heritable. An acceleration tolerant strain of birds shows lesser mortality during chronic acceleration, particularly in intermediate fields, although the result of acceleration selection is largely quantitative (a greater number of survivors) rather than qualitative (behavioral or physiological changes).

  17. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  18. Technology transfer for adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  19. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  20. Molecular Adaptation during a Rapid Adaptive Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kapralov, Maxim V.; Votintseva, Antonina A.; Filatov, Dmitry A.

    2013-01-01

    “Explosive” adaptive radiations on islands remain one of the most puzzling evolutionary phenomena and the evolutionary genetic processes behind such radiations remain unclear. Rapid morphological and ecological evolution during island radiations suggests that many genes may be under fairly strong selection, although this remains untested. Here, we report that during a rapid recent diversification in the Hawaiian endemic plant genus Schiedea (Caryophyllaceae), 5 in 36 studied genes evolved under positive selection. Positively selected genes are involved in defence mechanisms, photosynthesis, and reproduction. Comparison with eight mainland plant groups demonstrates both the relaxation of purifying selection and more widespread positive selection in Hawaiian Schiedea. This provides compelling evidence that adaptive evolution of protein-coding genes may play a significant role during island adaptive radiations. PMID:23355532

  1. Spatial Data Supply Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadharajulu, P.; Azeem Saqiq, M.; Yu, F.; McMeekin, D. A.; West, G.; Arnold, L.; Moncrieff, S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes current research into the supply of spatial data to the end user in as close to real time as possible via the World Wide Web. The Spatial Data Infrastructure paradigm has been discussed since the early 1990s. The concept has evolved significantly since then but has almost always examined data from the perspective of the supplier. It has been a supplier driven focus rather than a user driven focus. The current research being conducted is making a paradigm shift and looking at the supply of spatial data as a supply chain, similar to a manufacturing supply chain in which users play a significant part. A comprehensive consultation process took place within Australia and New Zealand incorporating a large number of stakeholders. Three research projects that have arisen from this consultation process are examining Spatial Data Supply Chains within Australia and New Zealand and are discussed within this paper.

  2. Adaptation as organism design

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andy

    2009-01-01

    The problem of adaptation is to explain the apparent design of organisms. Darwin solved this problem with the theory of natural selection. However, population geneticists, whose responsibility it is to formalize evolutionary theory, have long neglected the link between natural selection and organismal design. Here, I review the major historical developments in theory of organismal adaptation, clarifying what adaptation is and what it is not, and I point out future avenues for research. PMID:19793739

  3. Embodied spatial cognition.

    PubMed

    Trafton, J Gregory; Harrison, Anthony M

    2011-10-01

    We present a spatial system called Specialized Egocentrically Coordinated Spaces embedded in an embodied cognitive architecture (ACT-R Embodied). We show how the spatial system works by modeling two different developmental findings: gaze-following and Level 1 perspective taking. The gaze-following model is based on an experiment by Corkum and Moore (1998), whereas the Level 1 visual perspective-taking model is based on an experiment by Moll and Tomasello (2006). The models run on an embodied robotic system.

  4. Space-Time Adaptive Processing for GPS Anti-Jamming Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongwei; Lian, Baowang; Feng, Juan

    A space-time adaptive processing (STAP) algorithm which can reject interference in spatial domain as well as temporal domain has been widely used in GPS anti-jamming system. According to the characteristic which GPS signal power is far less than the interference signal power, we adopt the subspace orthogonal algorithm in the space-time blind adaptive beamforming. Computer simulation results show that the algorithm can produce filter weight coefficient adaptively in both a simplex spatial filtering and STAP, which reject interference effectively. Simulation results also indicate that using this algorithm, STAP can reject interference of temporal and spatial signal at the same time without GPS signal degradation.

  5. Call sign intelligibility improvement using a spatial auditory display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begault, Durand R.

    1993-04-01

    A spatial auditory display was used to convolve speech stimuli, consisting of 130 different call signs used in the communications protocol of NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center, to different virtual auditory positions. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of the signal against diotic speech babble, with spatial positions at 30 deg azimuth increments. Non-individualized, minimum-phase approximations of head-related transfer functions were used. The results showed a maximal intelligibility improvement of about 6 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 deg or 90 deg azimuth positions.

  6. Call sign intelligibility improvement using a spatial auditory display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.

    1993-01-01

    A spatial auditory display was used to convolve speech stimuli, consisting of 130 different call signs used in the communications protocol of NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center, to different virtual auditory positions. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of the signal against diotic speech babble, with spatial positions at 30 deg azimuth increments. Non-individualized, minimum-phase approximations of head-related transfer functions were used. The results showed a maximal intelligibility improvement of about 6 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 deg or 90 deg azimuth positions.

  7. Quantifying the adaptive cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  8. The purpose of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andy

    2017-10-06

    A central feature of Darwin's theory of natural selection is that it explains the purpose of biological adaptation. Here, I: emphasize the scientific importance of understanding what adaptations are for, in terms of facilitating the derivation of empirically testable predictions; discuss the population genetical basis for Darwin's theory of the purpose of adaptation, with reference to Fisher's 'fundamental theorem of natural selection'; and show that a deeper understanding of the purpose of adaptation is achieved in the context of social evolution, with reference to inclusive fitness and superorganisms.

  9. Adaptation and visual salience

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Kyle C.; Malkoc, Gokhan; Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Webster, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    We examined how the salience of color is affected by adaptation to different color distributions. Observers searched for a color target on a dense background of distractors varying along different directions in color space. Prior adaptation to the backgrounds enhanced search on the same background while adaptation to orthogonal background directions slowed detection. Advantages of adaptation were seen for both contrast adaptation (to different color axes) and chromatic adaptation (to different mean chromaticities). Control experiments, including analyses of eye movements during the search, suggest that these aftereffects are unlikely to reflect simple learning or changes in search strategies on familiar backgrounds, and instead result from how adaptation alters the relative salience of the target and background colors. Comparable effects were observed along different axes in the chromatic plane or for axes defined by different combinations of luminance and chromatic contrast, consistent with visual search and adaptation mediated by multiple color mechanisms. Similar effects also occurred for color distributions characteristic of natural environments with strongly selective color gamuts. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that adaptation may play an important functional role in highlighting the salience of novel stimuli by discounting ambient properties of the visual environment. PMID:21106682

  10. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle.

    PubMed

    Angeler, David G; Allen, Craig R; Garmestani, Ahjond S; Gunderson, Lance H; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994-2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  11. Human adaptation to smog

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.W. Jacobs, S.V.; Frager, N.B.

    1982-10-01

    This study examined the health effects of human adaptation to photochemical smog. A group of recent arrivals to the Los Angeles air basin were compared to long-term residents of the basin. Evidence for adaptation included greater irritation and respiratory problems among the recent arrivals and desensitization among the long-term residents in their judgments of the severity of the smog problem to their health. There was no evidence for biochemical adaptation as measured by hemoglobin response to oxidant challenge. The results were discussed in terms of psychological adaption to chronic environmental stressors.

  12. Adaptive parallel logic networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Tony R.; Vidal, Jacques J.

    1988-01-01

    Adaptive, self-organizing concurrent systems (ASOCS) that combine self-organization with massive parallelism for such applications as adaptive logic devices, robotics, process control, and system malfunction management, are presently discussed. In ASOCS, an adaptive network composed of many simple computing elements operating in combinational and asynchronous fashion is used and problems are specified by presenting if-then rules to the system in the form of Boolean conjunctions. During data processing, which is a different operational phase from adaptation, the network acts as a parallel hardware circuit.

  13. Acquired spatial dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Siéroff, E

    2015-08-10

    Acquired spatial dyslexia is a reading disorder frequently occurring after left or right posterior brain lesions. This article describes several types of spatial dyslexia with an attentional approach. After right posterior lesions, patients show left neglect dyslexia with errors on the left side of text, words, and non-words. The deficit is frequently associated with left unilateral spatial neglect. Severe left neglect dyslexia can be detected with unlimited exposure duration of words or non-words. Minor neglect dyslexia is detected with brief presentation of bilateral words, one in the left and one in the right visual field (phenomenon of contralesional extinction). Neglect dyslexia can be explained as a difficulty in orienting attention to the left side of verbal stimuli. With left posterior lesions, spatial dyslexia is also frequent but multiform. Right neglect dyslexia is frequent, but right unilateral spatial neglect is rare. Attentional dyslexia represents difficulty in selecting a stimulus, letter or word among other similar stimuli; it is a deficit of attentional selection, and the left hemisphere plays a crucial role in selection. Two other types of spatial dyslexia can be found after left posterior lesions: paradoxical ipsilesional extinction and stimulus-centred neglect dyslexia. Disconnections between left or right parietal attentional areas and the left temporal visual word form area could explain these deficits. Overall, a model of attention dissociating modulation, selection control, and selection positioning can help in understanding these reading disorders.

  14. Spatial language and converseness.

    PubMed

    Burigo, Michele; Coventry, Kenny R; Cangelosi, Angelo; Lynott, Dermot

    2016-12-01

    Typical spatial language sentences consist of describing the location of an object (the located object) in relation to another object (the reference object) as in "The book is above the vase". While it has been suggested that the properties of the located object (the book) are not translated into language because they are irrelevant when exchanging location information, it has been shown that the orientation of the located object affects the production and comprehension of spatial descriptions. In line with the claim that spatial language apprehension involves inferences about relations that hold between objects it has been suggested that during spatial language apprehension people use the orientation of the located object to evaluate whether the logical property of converseness (e.g., if "the book is above the vase" is true, then also "the vase is below the book" must be true) holds across the objects' spatial relation. In three experiments using sentence acceptability rating tasks we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that when converseness is violated people's acceptability ratings of a scene's description are reduced indicating that people do take into account geometric properties of the located object and use it to infer logical spatial relations.

  15. Visuomotor adaptability in older adults with mild cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Schaffert, Jeffrey; Lee, Chi-Mei; Neill, Rebecca; Bo, Jin

    2017-02-01

    The current study examined the augmentation of error feedback on visuomotor adaptability in older adults with varying degrees of cognitive decline (assessed by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; MoCA). Twenty-three participants performed a center-out computerized visuomotor adaptation task when the visual feedback of their hand movement error was presented in a regular (ratio=1:1) or enhanced (ratio=1:2) error feedback schedule. Results showed that older adults with lower scores on the MoCA had less adaptability than those with higher MoCA scores during the regular feedback schedule. However, participants demonstrated similar adaptability during the enhanced feedback schedule, regardless of their cognitive ability. Furthermore, individuals with lower MoCA scores showed larger after-effects in spatial control during the enhanced schedule compared to the regular schedule, whereas individuals with higher MoCA scores displayed the opposite pattern. Additional neuro-cognitive assessments revealed that spatial working memory and processing speed were positively related to motor adaptability during the regular scheduled but negatively related to adaptability during the enhanced schedule. We argue that individuals with mild cognitive decline employed different adaptation strategies when encountering enhanced visual feedback, suggesting older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may benefit from enhanced visual error feedback during sensorimotor adaptation.

  16. Spatial frequency specific interaction of dot patterns and gratings.

    PubMed Central

    De Valois, K K; Switkes, E

    1980-01-01

    Adaptation to patterns of paired random dots produces loss of contrast sensitivity to sinusoidal luminance gratings oriented perpendicularly to the dot-pair direction. This adaptation loss is spatial frequency- and orientation-specific and varies with dot-pair separation in a manner predictable from the Fourier spectra of the stimuli and observed characteristics of the visual system. These results support the idea that the visual system acts as a periodicity analyzer with known restrictions and cannot be accounted for by a feature-detector model. When the bars of the test gratings are aligned in the dot-pair direction, there is no adaptational loss at any frequency despite the fact that the adaptation pattern contains significant spectral power at all frequencies in this orientation. This lack of adaptation may be due to inhibitory interactions among channels or to nonlinear effects within local receptive fields. Images PMID:6928651

  17. Evolutionary advantages of adaptive rewarding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2012-09-01

    Our well-being depends on both our personal success and the success of our society. The realization of this fact makes cooperation an essential trait. Experiments have shown that rewards can elevate our readiness to cooperate, but since giving a reward inevitably entails paying a cost for it, the emergence and stability of such behavior remains elusive. Here we show that allowing for the act of rewarding to self-organize in dependence on the success of cooperation creates several evolutionary advantages that instill new ways through which collaborative efforts are promoted. Ranging from indirect territorial battle to the spontaneous emergence and destruction of coexistence, phase diagrams and the underlying spatial patterns reveal fascinatingly rich social dynamics that explain why this costly behavior has evolved and persevered. Comparisons with adaptive punishment, however, uncover an Achilles heel of adaptive rewarding, coming from over-aggression, which in turn hinders optimal utilization of network reciprocity. This may explain why, despite its success, rewarding is not as firmly embedded into our societal organization as punishment.

  18. Teaching Spatial Awareness to Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens-Smith, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    An important component in the early stages of skill development is spatial awareness. This article discusses how good spatial awareness in children results from concepts that are reinforced throughout the school's curriculum. Activities for developing spatial awareness are also provided.

  19. Space-Time Adaptive Solution of Richards' Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhishek, C.; Miller, C. T.; Farthing, M. W.

    2003-12-01

    Efficient, robust simulation of groundwater flow in the unsaturated zone remains computationally expensive, especially for problems characterized by sharp fronts in both space and time. Standard approaches that employ uniform spatial and temporal discretizations for the numerical solution of these problems lead to inefficient and expensive simulations. In this work, we solve Richards' equation using adaptive methods in both space and time. Spatial adaption is based upon a coarse grid solve and gradient-based error indicators, while the spatial step size is adjusted using a fixed-order approximation. Temporal adaption is accomplished using variable-order, variable-step-size approximations based upon the backward difference formulas up to fifth order. Since the advantages of similar adaptive methods in time are now established, we evaluate our method by comparison with a uniform spatial discretization that is adaptive in time for four different test problems. The numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method provides a robust and efficient alternative to standard approaches for simulating variably saturated flow.

  20. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1996-12-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradients with multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  1. Adaptive control of waveguide modes using a directional coupler.

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng; Shipton, Matthew; Wang, Anbo; Xu, Yong

    2014-08-25

    Using adaptive optics (AO) and a directional coupler, we demonstrate adaptive control of linearly polarized (LP) modes in a two mode fiber. The AO feedback is provided by the coupling ratio of the directional coupler, and does not depend on the spatial profiles of optical field distributions. As a proof of concept demonstration, this work confirms the feasibility of using AO and all fiber devices to control the waveguide modes in a multimode network in a quasi-distributed manner.

  2. Adaptive shaping of cortical response selectivity in the vibrissa pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He J. V.; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    One embodiment of context-dependent sensory processing is bottom-up adaptation, where persistent stimuli decrease neuronal firing rate over hundreds of milliseconds. Adaptation is not, however, simply the fatigue of the sensory pathway, but shapes the information flow and selectivity to stimulus features. Adaptation enhances spatial discriminability (distinguishing stimulus location) while degrading detectability (reporting presence of the stimulus), for both the ideal observer of the cortex and awake, behaving animals. However, how the dynamics of the adaptation shape the cortical response and this detection and discrimination tradeoff is unknown, as is to what degree this phenomenon occurs on a continuum as opposed to a switching of processing modes. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in anesthetized rats to capture the temporal and spatial characteristics of the cortical response to tactile inputs, we showed that the suppression of the cortical response, in both magnitude and spatial spread, is continuously modulated by the increasing amount of energy in the adapting stimulus, which is nonuniquely determined by its frequency and velocity. Single-trial ideal observer analysis demonstrated a tradeoff between detectability and spatial discriminability up to a moderate amount of adaptation, which corresponds to the frequency range in natural whisking. This was accompanied by a decrease in both detectability and discriminability with high-energy adaptation, which indicates a more complex coupling between detection and discrimination than a simple switching of modes. Taken together, the results suggest that adaptation operates on a continuum and modulates the tradeoff between detectability and discriminability that has implications for information processing in ethological contexts. PMID:25787959

  3. Collaborating in spatial tasks: how partners coordinate their spatial memories and descriptions.

    PubMed

    Galati, Alexia; Avraamides, Marios N

    2013-05-01

    We summarize findings from a study examining whether the availability of the conversational partner's spatial viewpoint influences the speaker's spatial memories, description strategies, their joint efficiency and accuracy on the task, as well as the partner's resulting spatial memories. In 18 pairs, Directors described to a misaligned Matcher arrays that they learned while either knowing their Matcher's viewpoint or not. Memory tests preceding descriptions revealed that Directors represented their Matcher's viewpoint when known in advance. Moreover, Directors adapted the perspective of their descriptions according to each other's cognitive demands, given their misalignment. The number of conversational turns pairs took to coordinate suggested that pairs' strategies were effective at minimizing their collective effort. Nonetheless, in terms of accuracy on the task, pairs reconstructed more distorted arrays the more partner-centered descriptions Directors used. The Directors' descriptions also predicted Matchers' facilitation for their own perspective in memory tests following the description. Together, these findings demonstrate that partners in collaborative spatial tasks adapt their respective memory representations and descriptions contingently with the aim of optimizing coordination.

  4. Constrained Adaptive Beamforming for Improved Contrast in Breast Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    us to modify the Spatial Processing Optimized and Constrained algorithm ( SPOC ) to yield the Time-Domain Optimized Near-field Estimator (TONE). In...beamformers - Improvement and evaluation of adaptive imaging algorithms based loosely on SPOC - Invention and testing of the basic TONE algorithm...named the Time-domain Optimized Near-Filed Estimator, or TONE. The novel ABF was developed from Spatial Processing: Optimized and Constrained ( SPOC

  5. Physiologic adaptation to space - Space adaptation syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderploeg, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The adaptive changes of the neurovestibular system to microgravity, which result in space motion sickness (SMS), are studied. A list of symptoms, which range from vomiting to drowsiness, is provided. The two patterns of symptom development, rapid and gradual, and the duration of the symptoms are described. The concept of sensory conflict and rearrangements to explain SMS is being investigated.

  6. Contributions of Spatial Working Memory to Visuomotor Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anguera, Joaquin A.; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.; Willingham, Daniel T.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of motor learning have described the importance of cognitive processes during the early stages of learning; however, the precise nature of these processes and their neural correlates remains unclear. The present study investigated whether spatial working memory (SWM) contributes to visuomotor adaptation depending on the stage of…

  7. The Conversational Partner's Perspective Affects Spatial Memory and Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galati, Alexia; Michael, Christina; Mello, Catherine; Greenauer, Nathan M.; Avraamides, Marios N.

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether people spontaneously represent the partner's viewpoint in spatial memory when it is available in advance and whether they adapt their spontaneous descriptions accordingly. In 18 pairs, Directors studied arrays of objects while: (1) not knowing about having to describe the array to a Matcher, (2) knowing about the subsequent…

  8. Spatial Relative Risk Patterns of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Bilder, Deborah A.; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Heightened areas of spatial relative risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), or ASD hotspots, in Utah were identified using adaptive kernel density functions. Children ages four, six, and eight with ASD from multiple birth cohorts were identified by the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Each ASD case was gender-matched to…

  9. The Conversational Partner's Perspective Affects Spatial Memory and Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galati, Alexia; Michael, Christina; Mello, Catherine; Greenauer, Nathan M.; Avraamides, Marios N.

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether people spontaneously represent the partner's viewpoint in spatial memory when it is available in advance and whether they adapt their spontaneous descriptions accordingly. In 18 pairs, Directors studied arrays of objects while: (1) not knowing about having to describe the array to a Matcher, (2) knowing about the subsequent…

  10. Spatial Relative Risk Patterns of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Bilder, Deborah A.; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Heightened areas of spatial relative risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), or ASD hotspots, in Utah were identified using adaptive kernel density functions. Children ages four, six, and eight with ASD from multiple birth cohorts were identified by the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Each ASD case was gender-matched to…

  11. Thinking Egyptian: Active Models for Understanding Spatial Representation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiferl, Ellen

    This paper highlights how introductory textbooks on Egyptian art inhibit understanding by reinforcing student preconceptions, and demonstrates another approach to discussing space with a classroom exercise and software. The alternative approach, an active model for spatial representation, introduced here was developed by adapting classroom…

  12. Contributions of Spatial Working Memory to Visuomotor Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anguera, Joaquin A.; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.; Willingham, Daniel T.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of motor learning have described the importance of cognitive processes during the early stages of learning; however, the precise nature of these processes and their neural correlates remains unclear. The present study investigated whether spatial working memory (SWM) contributes to visuomotor adaptation depending on the stage of…

  13. Uncertainty in adaptive capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adger, W. Neil; Vincent, Katharine

    2005-03-01

    The capacity to adapt is a critical element of the process of adaptation: it is the vector of resources that represent the asset base from which adaptation actions can be made. Adaptive capacity can in theory be identified and measured at various scales, from the individual to the nation. The assessment of uncertainty within such measures comes from the contested knowledge domain and theories surrounding the nature of the determinants of adaptive capacity and the human action of adaptation. While generic adaptive capacity at the national level, for example, is often postulated as being dependent on health, governance and political rights, and literacy, and economic well-being, the determinants of these variables at national levels are not widely understood. We outline the nature of this uncertainty for the major elements of adaptive capacity and illustrate these issues with the example of a social vulnerability index for countries in Africa. To cite this article: W.N. Adger, K. Vincent, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  14. Water Resource Adaptation Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

  15. Electrochromic Adaptive Infrared Camouflage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    Electrochromic Adaptive Infrared Camouflage Interim Progress Report Eli Yablonovitch Period covered: August 1999...August 1999 - January 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electrochromic Adaptive Infrared Camouflage 5. FUNDING NUMBERS DAAD19-99-1-0316...emissivity is made possible by electrochromics . Today, electrochromics is becoming a common technology that is used, for example, in self-dimming

  16. Management for adaptation

    Treesearch

    John Innes; Linda A. Joyce; Seppo Kellomaki; Bastiaan Louman; Aynslie Ogden; John Parrotta; Ian Thompson; Matthew Ayres; Chin Ong; Heru Santoso; Brent Sohngen; Anita Wreford

    2009-01-01

    This chapter develops a framework to explore examples of adaptation options that could be used to ensure that the ecosystem services provided by forests are maintained under future climates. The services are divided into broad areas within which managers can identify specific management goals for individual forests or landscapes. Adaptation options exist for the major...

  17. Research, Adaptation, & Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Lee A., Ed.; And Others

    Research adaptation is an endeavor that implies solid collaboration among school practitioners and university and college researchers. This volume addresses the broad issues of research as an educational endeavor, adaptation as a necessary function associated with applying research findings to school situations, and change as an inevitable…

  18. Evolution: Sex Limits Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Nosil, Patrik

    2015-07-20

    Evolution is affected by survival of individuals and by mate choice, but how sexual selection affects adaptation remains unclear. A new study finds that sexual selection can limit adaptation by causing male-induced harm to females and thus opposing natural selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Speededness and Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Xiong, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    Two simple constraints on the item parameters in a response--time model are proposed to control the speededness of an adaptive test. As the constraints are additive, they can easily be included in the constraint set for a shadow-test approach (STA) to adaptive testing. Alternatively, a simple heuristic is presented to control speededness in plain…

  20. Retinal Imaging: Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. S.; Iroshnikov, N. G.; Larichev, Andrey V.

    This chapter describes several factors influencing the performance of ophthalmic diagnostic systems with adaptive optics compensation of human eye aberration. Particular attention is paid to speckle modulation, temporal behavior of aberrations, and anisoplanatic effects. The implementation of a fundus camera with adaptive optics is considered.

  1. Computerized Adaptive Ability Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    The general objective of a research program on adaptive testing was to identify several sources of potential error in test scores, and to study adaptive testing as a means for reducing these errors. Errors can result from the mismatch of item difficulty to the individual's ability; the psychological effects of testing and the test environment; the…

  2. Adaptation to astigmatic blur

    PubMed Central

    Sawides, Lucie; Marcos, Susana; Ravikumar, Sowmya; Thibos, Larry; Bradley, Arthur; Webster, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Adapting to blurred or sharpened images alters the perceived focus of subsequently viewed images. We examined whether these adaptation effects could arise from actual sphero-cylindrical refractive errors, by testing aftereffects in images simulating second-order astigmatism. Image blur was varied from negative (vertical) through isotropic to positive (horizontal) astigmatism while maintaining constant blur strength. A 2AFC staircase was used to estimate the stimulus that appeared isotropically blurred before or after adapting to images with astigmatism. Adaptation to horizontal blur caused isotropically blurred images to appear vertically biased and vice versa, shifting the perceived isotropic point toward the adapting level. Aftereffects were similar for different types of images and showed partial selectivity so that strongest effects generally occurred when testing and adapting images were the same. Further experiments explored whether the adaptation depended more strongly on the blurring or “fuzziness” in the images vs. the apparent “figural” changes introduced by the blur, by comparing how the aftereffects transfer across changes in size or orientation. Our results suggest that strong selective adaptation can occur for different lower order aberrations of the eye and that these may be at least partly driven by the apparent figural changes that blurring introduces into the retinal image. PMID:21047754

  3. Research, Adaptation, & Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Lee A., Ed.; And Others

    Research adaptation is an endeavor that implies solid collaboration among school practitioners and university and college researchers. This volume addresses the broad issues of research as an educational endeavor, adaptation as a necessary function associated with applying research findings to school situations, and change as an inevitable…

  4. Water Resource Adaptation Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

  5. On Teaching Adaptively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corno, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    New theory on adaptive teaching reflects the social dynamics of classrooms to explain what practicing teachers do to address student differences related to learning. In teaching adaptively, teachers respond to learners as they work. Teachers read student signals to diagnose needs on the fly and tap previous experience with similar learners to…

  6. Adaptive Wavelet Transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Szu, H.; Hsu, C.

    1996-12-31

    Human sensors systems (HSS) may be approximately described as an adaptive or self-learning version of the Wavelet Transforms (WT) that are capable to learn from several input-output associative pairs of suitable transform mother wavelets. Such an Adaptive WT (AWT) is a redundant combination of mother wavelets to either represent or classify inputs.

  7. Turbine system and adapter

    DOEpatents

    Hogberg, Nicholas Alvin; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2017-05-30

    A turbine system and adapter are disclosed. The adapter includes a turbine attachment portion having a first geometry arranged to receive a corresponding geometry of a wheelpost of a turbine rotor, and a bucket attachment portion having a second geometry arranged to receive a corresponding geometry of a root portion of a non-metallic turbine bucket. Another adapter includes a turbine attachment portion arranged to receive a plurality of wheelposts of a turbine rotor, and a bucket attachment portion arranged to receive a plurality of non-metallic turbine buckets having single dovetail configuration root portions. The turbine system includes a turbine rotor wheel configured to receive metal buckets, at least one adapter secured to at least one wheelpost on the turbine rotor wheel, and at least one non-metallic bucket secured to the at least one adapter.

  8. Adaptive signal processor

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, H.V.

    1980-07-01

    An experimental, general purpose adaptive signal processor system has been developed, utilizing a quantized (clipped) version of the Widrow-Hoff least-mean-square adaptive algorithm developed by Moschner. The system accommodates 64 adaptive weight channels with 8-bit resolution for each weight. Internal weight update arithmetic is performed with 16-bit resolution, and the system error signal is measured with 12-bit resolution. An adapt cycle of adjusting all 64 weight channels is accomplished in 8 ..mu..sec. Hardware of the signal processor utilizes primarily Schottky-TTL type integrated circuits. A prototype system with 24 weight channels has been constructed and tested. This report presents details of the system design and describes basic experiments performed with the prototype signal processor. Finally some system configurations and applications for this adaptive signal processor are discussed.

  9. Financing climate change adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Laurens M; Aerts, Jeroen C J H

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the topic of financing adaptation in future climate change policies. A major question is whether adaptation in developing countries should be financed under the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), or whether funding should come from other sources. We present an overview of financial resources and propose the employment of a two-track approach: one track that attempts to secure climate change adaptation funding under the UNFCCC; and a second track that improves mainstreaming of climate risk management in development efforts. Developed countries would need to demonstrate much greater commitment to the funding of adaptation measures if the UNFCCC were to cover a substantial part of the costs. The mainstreaming of climate change adaptation could follow a risk management path, particularly in relation to disaster risk reduction. 'Climate-proofing' of development projects that currently do not consider climate and weather risks could improve their sustainability.

  10. 75 FR 57859 - Specially Adapted Housing and Special Home Adaptation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN21 Specially Adapted Housing and Special Home Adaptation AGENCY... housing and special home adaptation grants. This final rule incorporates certain provisions from the... adapted housing (SAH) grants and special home adaptation (SHA) grants. The public comment period ended on...

  11. Prism adaptation does not alter configural processing of faces

    PubMed Central

    Bultitude, Janet H.; Downing, Paul E.; Rafal, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with hemispatial neglect (‘neglect’) following a brain lesion show difficulty responding or orienting to objects and events on the left side of space. Substantial evidence supports the use of a sensorimotor training technique called prism adaptation as a treatment for neglect. Reaching for visual targets viewed through prismatic lenses that induce a rightward shift in the visual image results in a leftward recalibration of reaching movements that is accompanied by a reduction of symptoms in patients with neglect. The understanding of prism adaptation has also been advanced through studies of healthy participants, in whom adaptation to leftward prismatic shifts results in temporary neglect-like performance. Interestingly, prism adaptation can also alter aspects of non-lateralised spatial attention. We previously demonstrated that prism adaptation alters the extent to which neglect patients and healthy participants process local features versus global configurations of visual stimuli. Since deficits in non-lateralised spatial attention are thought to contribute to the severity of neglect symptoms, it is possible that the effect of prism adaptation on these deficits contributes to its efficacy. This study examines the pervasiveness of the effects of prism adaptation on perception by examining the effect of prism adaptation on configural face processing using a composite face task. The composite face task is a persuasive demonstration of the automatic global-level processing of faces: the top and bottom halves of two familiar faces form a seemingly new, unknown face when viewed together. Participants identified the top or bottom halves of composite faces before and after prism adaptation. Sensorimotor adaptation was confirmed by significant pointing aftereffect, however there was no significant change in the extent to which the irrelevant face half interfered with processing. The results support the proposal that the therapeutic effects of prism adaptation

  12. Vision, spatial cognition and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Fabienne; Schenk, Françoise

    2015-02-01

    Vision is the most synthetic sensory channel and it provides specific information about the relative position of distant landmarks during visual exploration. In this paper we propose that visual exploration, as assessed by the recording of eye movements, offers an original method to analyze spatial cognition and to reveal alternative adaptation strategies in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Our general assumption is that eye movement exploration may simultaneously reveal whether, why, and how, compensatory strategies point to specific difficulties related to neurological symptoms. An understanding of these strategies will also help in the development of optimal rehabilitation procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatial population structure of Yellowstone bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olexa, E.M.; Gogan, P.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in Yellowstone National Park, USA, bison (Bison bison) numbers and shifts in seasonal distribution have resulted in more frequent movements of bison beyond park boundaries and development of an interagency management plan for the Yellowstone bison population. Implementation of the plan under the adaptive management paradigm requires an understanding of the spatial and temporal structure of the population. We used polythetic agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis of radiolocations obtained from free-ranging bison to investigate seasonal movements and aggregations. We classified radiolocations into 4 periods: annual, peak rut (15 Jul-15 Sep), extended rut (1 Jun-31 Oct), and winter (1 Nov-31 May). We documented spatial separation of Yellowstone bison into 2 segments, the northern and central herds, during all periods. The estimated year-round exchange rate (4.85-5.83%) of instrumented bison varied with the fusion strategy employed. We did not observe exchange between the 2 segments during the peak rut and it varied during the extended rut (2.15-3.23%). We estimated a winter exchange of 4.85-7.77%. The outcome and effectiveness of management actions directed at Yellowstone bison may be affected by spatial segregation and herd affinity within the population. Reductions based on total population size, but not applied to the entire population, may adversely affect one herd while having little effect on the other. Similarly, management actions targeting a segment of the population may benefit from the spatial segregation exhibited.

  14. Training generalized spatial skills.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rebecca; Thompson, William L; Ganis, Giorgio; Newcombe, Nora S; Kosslyn, Stephen M

    2008-08-01

    Spatial transformation skills are an essential aspect of cognitive ability. These skills can be improved by practice, but such improvement has usually been specific to tasks and stimuli. The present study investigated whether intensive long-term practice leads to change that transcends stimulus and task parameters. Thirty-one participants (14 male, 17 female) were tested on three cognitive tasks: a computerized version of the Shepard-Metzler (1971) mental rotation task (MRT), a mental paper-folding task (MPFT), and a verbal analogies task (VAT). Each individual then participated in daily practice sessions with the MRT or the MPFT over 21 days. Postpractice comparisons revealed transfer of practice gains to novel stimuli for the practiced task, as well as transfer to the other, nonpracticed spatial task. Thus, practice effects were process based, not instance based. Improvement in the nonpracticed spatial task was greater than that in the VAT; thus, improvement was not merely due to greater ease with computerized testing.

  15. Spatial ecology across scales.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Alan; Petrovskii, Sergei; Morozov, Andrew

    2011-04-23

    The international conference 'Models in population dynamics and ecology 2010: animal movement, dispersal and spatial ecology' took place at the University of Leicester, UK, on 1-3 September 2010, focusing on mathematical approaches to spatial population dynamics and emphasizing cross-scale issues. Exciting new developments in scaling up from individual level movement to descriptions of this movement at the macroscopic level highlighted the importance of mechanistic approaches, with different descriptions at the microscopic level leading to different ecological outcomes. At higher levels of organization, different macroscopic descriptions of movement also led to different properties at the ecosystem and larger scales. New developments from Levy flight descriptions to the incorporation of new methods from physics and elsewhere are revitalizing research in spatial ecology, which will both increase understanding of fundamental ecological processes and lead to tools for better management.

  16. Adaptation Dynamics in Densely Clustered Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Pontius, William; Sneddon, Michael W.; Emonet, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    In many sensory systems, transmembrane receptors are spatially organized in large clusters. Such arrangement may facilitate signal amplification and the integration of multiple stimuli. However, this organization likely also affects the kinetics of signaling since the cytoplasmic enzymes that modulate the activity of the receptors must localize to the cluster prior to receptor modification. Here we examine how these spatial considerations shape signaling dynamics at rest and in response to stimuli. As a model system, we use the chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli, a canonical system for the study of how organisms sense, respond, and adapt to environmental stimuli. In bacterial chemotaxis, adaptation is mediated by two enzymes that localize to the clustered receptors and modulate their activity through methylation-demethylation. Using a novel stochastic simulation, we show that distributive receptor methylation is necessary for successful adaptation to stimulus and also leads to large fluctuations in receptor activity in the steady state. These fluctuations arise from noise in the number of localized enzymes combined with saturated modification kinetics between the localized enzymes and the receptor substrate. An analytical model explains how saturated enzyme kinetics and large fluctuations can coexist with an adapted state robust to variation in the expression levels of the pathway constituents, a key requirement to ensure the functionality of individual cells within a population. This contrasts with the well-mixed covalent modification system studied by Goldbeter and Koshland in which mean activity becomes ultrasensitive to protein abundances when the enzymes operate at saturation. Large fluctuations in receptor activity have been quantified experimentally and may benefit the cell by enhancing its ability to explore empty environments and track shallow nutrient gradients. Here we clarify the mechanistic relationship of these large fluctuations to well

  17. Spatial Transformation of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Wood, Scott J.; Reschke, Millard F.

    1996-01-01

    It was hypothesized that the absence of the gravitational reference cues may be responsible for adaptive changes in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). These changes result in the alteration of the direction of the compensatory slow phase (SP) eye movements in microgravity. In order to test this hypothesis, the direction of the VOR SP relative to head motion was investigated in three astronauts during and after an eight-day orbital flight by passive sinusoidal pitch or yaw angular motion at two frequencies. The results of the inflight and postflight testing are considered. The observed deviation between VOR SP and head motion suggests that spatial transformation in the VOR occurred during adaptation to microgravity. It is considered that, although this spatial transformation might be due to a sensory bias, it may reflect central changes in the reference system used for spatial orientation in microgravity.

  18. Spatial Transformation of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Wood, Scott J.; Reschke, Millard F.

    1996-01-01

    It was hypothesized that the absence of the gravitational reference cues may be responsible for adaptive changes in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). These changes result in the alteration of the direction of the compensatory slow phase (SP) eye movements in microgravity. In order to test this hypothesis, the direction of the VOR SP relative to head motion was investigated in three astronauts during and after an eight-day orbital flight by passive sinusoidal pitch or yaw angular motion at two frequencies. The results of the inflight and postflight testing are considered. The observed deviation between VOR SP and head motion suggests that spatial transformation in the VOR occurred during adaptation to microgravity. It is considered that, although this spatial transformation might be due to a sensory bias, it may reflect central changes in the reference system used for spatial orientation in microgravity.

  19. The Spatial Standard Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The spatial standard observer is a computational model that provides a measure of the visibility of a target in a uniform background image or of the visual discriminability of two images. Standard observers have long been used in science and industry to quantify the discriminability of colors. Color standard observers address the spectral characteristics of visual stimuli, while the spatial standard observer (SSO), as its name indicates, addresses spatial characteristics. The SSO is based on a model of human vision. The SSO was developed in a process that included evaluation of a number of earlier mathematical models that address optical, physiological, and psychophysical aspects of spatial characteristics of human visual perception. Elements of the prior models are incorporated into the SSO, which is formulated as a compromise between accuracy and simplicity. The SSO operates on a digitized monochrome still image or on a pair of such images. The SSO consists of three submodels that operate sequentially on the input image(s): 1. A contrast model, which converts an input monochrome image to a luminance contrast image, wherein luminance values are expressed as excursions from, and normalized to, a mean; 2. A contrast-sensitivity-filter model that includes an oblique-effect filter (which accounts for the decline in contrast sensitivity at oblique viewing angles); and 3. A spatial summation model, in which responses are spatially pooled by raising each pixel to the power beta, adding the results, and raising the sum to the 1/b power. In this model, b=2.9 was found to be a suitable value. The net effect of the SSO is to compute a numerical measure of the perceptual strength of the single image, or of the visible difference (denoted the perceptual distance) between two images. The unit of a measure used in the SSO is the just noticeable difference (JND), which is a standard measure of perceptual discriminability. A target that is just visible has a measure of 1 JND.

  20. Adaptive optics parallel near-confocal scanning ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Gu, Boyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2016-08-15

    We present an adaptive optics parallel near-confocal scanning ophthalmoscope (AOPCSO) using a digital micromirror device (DMD). The imaging light is modulated to be a line of point sources by the DMD, illuminating the retina simultaneously. By using a high-speed line camera to acquire the image and using adaptive optics to compensate the ocular wave aberration, the AOPCSO can image the living human eye with cellular level resolution at the frame rate of 100 Hz. AOPCSO has been demonstrated with improved spatial resolution in imaging of the living human retina compared with adaptive optics line scan ophthalmoscopy.

  1. Adaptive mesh refinement for stochastic reaction-diffusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bayati, Basil; Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2011-01-01

    We present an algorithm for adaptive mesh refinement applied to mesoscopic stochastic simulations of spatially evolving reaction-diffusion processes. The transition rates for the diffusion process are derived on adaptive, locally refined structured meshes. Convergence of the diffusion process is presented and the fluctuations of the stochastic process are verified. Furthermore, a refinement criterion is proposed for the evolution of the adaptive mesh. The method is validated in simulations of reaction-diffusion processes as described by the Fisher-Kolmogorov and Gray-Scott equations.

  2. Block-based adaptive lifting schemes for multiband image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmoudi, Hela; Benazza-Benyahia, Amel; Pesquet, Jean-Christophe

    2004-02-01

    In this paper, we are interested in designing lifting schemes adapted to the statistics of the wavelet coefficients of multiband images for compression applications. More precisely, nonseparable vector lifting schemes are used in order to capture simultaneously the spatial and the spectral redundancies. The underlying operators are then computed in order to minimize the entropy of the resulting multiresolution representation. To this respect, we have developed a new iterative block-based classification algorithm. Simulation tests carried out on remotely sensed multispectral images indicate that a substantial gain in terms of bit-rate is achieved by the proposed adaptive coding method w.r.t the non-adaptive one.

  3. Adaptive Optics Parallel Near-Confocal Scanning Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Gu, Boyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    We present an adaptive optics parallel confocal scanning ophthalmoscope (AOPCSO) using a digital micromirror device (DMD). The imaging light is modulated to be a line of point sources by the DMD, illuminating the retina simultaneously. By using a high speed line camera to acquire the image and using adaptive optics to compensate ocular wave aberration, the AOPCSO can image the living human eye with cellular level resolution at the frame rate of 100 Hz. AOPCSO has been demonstrated with improved spatial resolution in imaging of the living human retina compared with adaptive optics line scan ophthalmoscopy. PMID:27519106

  4. Planetary Spatial Analyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keely, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    This is a status report for the project entitled Planetary Spatial Analyst (PSA). This report covers activities from the project inception on October 1, 2007 to June 1, 2008. Originally a three year proposal, PSA was awarded funding for one year and required a revised work statement and budget. At the time of this writing the project is well on track both for completion of work as well as budget. The revised project focused on two objectives: build a solid connection with the target community and implement a prototype software application that provides 3D visualization and spatial analysis technologies for that community. Progress has been made for both of these objectives.

  5. Differentiating spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, D.

    1985-04-01

    A differentiating spatial light modulator device in which a photoreceptor and an electro-optic crystal are isolated by a dielectric mirror is discussed. The electro-optic crystal is configured to have low or zero longitudinal response, yet is sensitive to transverse electric fields. The fringe field generated by the photoreceptor (photodiode) modulates the crystal birefringence. Readout via a polarizing beamsplitter gives an output light related to the spatial gradient of the input light. In a liquid crystal embodiment of the invention, reversal of the applied voltage gives a driven off state which speeds the erasure. Storage is possible in the smectic liquid crystal phase.

  6. Spatial fluctuation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Redig, Frank; Giardinà, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    For non-equilibrium systems of interacting particles and for interacting diffusions in d-dimensions, a novel fluctuation relation is derived. The theorem establishes a quantitative relation between the probabilities of observing two current values in different spatial directions. The result is a consequence of spatial symmetries of the microscopic dynamics, generalizing in this way the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem related to the time-reversal symmetry. This new perspective opens up the possibility of direct experimental measurements of fluctuation relations of vectorial observables.

  7. Dynamical Adaptation in Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Damon A.; Benichou, Raphael; Meister, Markus; Azeredo da Silveira, Rava

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is at the heart of sensation and nowhere is it more salient than in early visual processing. Light adaptation in photoreceptors is doubly dynamical: it depends upon the temporal structure of the input and it affects the temporal structure of the response. We introduce a non-linear dynamical adaptation model of photoreceptors. It is simple enough that it can be solved exactly and simulated with ease; analytical and numerical approaches combined provide both intuition on the behavior of dynamical adaptation and quantitative results to be compared with data. Yet the model is rich enough to capture intricate phenomenology. First, we show that it reproduces the known phenomenology of light response and short-term adaptation. Second, we present new recordings and demonstrate that the model reproduces cone response with great precision. Third, we derive a number of predictions on the response of photoreceptors to sophisticated stimuli such as periodic inputs, various forms of flickering inputs, and natural inputs. In particular, we demonstrate that photoreceptors undergo rapid adaptation of response gain and time scale, over ∼ 300 ms—i. e., over the time scale of the response itself—and we confirm this prediction with data. For natural inputs, this fast adaptation can modulate the response gain more than tenfold and is hence physiologically relevant. PMID:24244119

  8. Adaptation to blur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Michael A.; Webster, Shernaaz M.; MacDonald, Jennifer; Bahradwadj, Shrikant R.

    2001-06-01

    Blur is an intrinsic property of the retinal image that can vary substantially in natural viewing. We examined how processes of contrast adaptation might adjust the visual system to regulate the perception of blur. Observers viewed a blurred or sharpened image for 2-5 minutes, and then judged the apparent focus of a series of 0.5-sec test images interleaved with 6-sec of readaptation. A 2AFC staircase procedure was used to vary the amplitude spectrum of successive test to find the image that appeared in focus. Adapting to a blurred image causes a physically focused image to appear too sharp. Opposite after-effects occur for sharpened adapting images. Pronounced biases were observed over a wide range of magnitudes of adapting blur, and were similar for different types of blur. After-effects were also similar for different classes of images but were generally weaker when the adapting and test stimuli were different images, showing that the adaptation is not adjusting simply to blur per se. These adaptive adjustments may strongly influence the perception of blur in normal vision and how it changes with refractive errors.

  9. Adaptive clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Chow, Shein-Chung

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the use of adaptive design methods in clinical trials based on accumulated data at interim has received much attention because of its flexibility and efficiency in pharmaceutical/clinical development. In practice, adaptive design may provide the investigators a second chance to modify or redesign the trial while the study is still ongoing. However, it is a concern that a shift in target patient population may occur after significant adaptations are made. In addition, the overall type I error rate may not be preserved. Moreover, the results may not be reliable and hence are difficult to interpret. As indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration draft guidance on adaptive design clinical trials, the adaptive design has to be a prospectively planned opportunity and should be based on information collected within the study, with or without formal statistical hypothesis testing. This article reviews the relative advantages, limitations, and feasibility of commonly considered adaptive designs in clinical trials. Statistical concerns when implementing adaptive designs are also discussed.

  10. The effect of space flight on spatial orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Harm, Deborah L.; Paloski, William H.; Satake, Hirotaka

    1992-01-01

    Both during and following early space missions, little neurosensory change in the astronauts was noted as a result of their exposure to microgravity. It is believed that this lack of in-flight adaptation in the spatial orientation and perceptual-motor system resulted from short exposure times and limited interaction with the new environment. Parker and Parker (1990) have suggested that while spatial orientation and motion information can be detected by a passive observer, adaptation to stimulus rearrangement is greatly enhanced when the observer moves through or acts on the environment. Experience with the actual consequences of action can be compared with those consequences expected on the basis of prior experience. Space flight today is of longer duration, and space craft volume has increased. These changes have forced the astronauts to interact with the new environment of microgravity, and as a result substantial changes occur in the perceptual and sensory-motor repsonses reflecting adaptation to the stimulus rearrangement of space flight. We are currently evaluating spatial orientation and the perceptual-motor systems' adaptation to microgravity by examining responses of postural control, head and gaze stability during locomotion, goal oriented vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and structured quantitative perceptual reports. Evidence suggests that humans can successfully replace the gravitational reference available on Earth with cues available within the spacecraft or within themselves, but that adaptation to microgravity is not appropriate for a return to Earth. Countermeasures for optimal performance on-orbit and a successful return to earth will require development of preflight and in-flight training to help the astronauts acquire and maintain a dual adaptive state. An understanding of spatial orientation and motion perception, postural control, locomotion, and the VOR will aid in this process.

  11. Spatial Data Transfer Standard (SDTS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The Spatial Data Transfer Standard (SOTS) is a mechanism for the transfer of spatial data between dissimilar computer systems. The SOTS specifies exchange constructs, addressing formats, structure, and content for spatially referenced vector and raster (including gridded) data. SOTS components are a conceptual model, specifications for a quality report, transfer module specifications, data dictionary specifications, and definitions of spatial features and attributes.

  12. Heredity Factors in Spatial Visualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberg, S. G.

    Spatial visualization is not yet clearly understood. Some researchers have concluded that two factors or abilities are involved, spatial orientation and spatial visualization. Different definitions and different tests have been proposed for these two abilities. Several studies indicate that women generally perform more poorly on spatial tests than…

  13. Adaptive network countermeasures.

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland-Bane, Randy; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Carathimas, Anthony G.; Thomas, Eric D.

    2003-10-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year LDRD funded by the Differentiating Technologies investment area. The project investigated the use of countermeasures in protecting computer networks as well as how current countermeasures could be changed in order to adapt with both evolving networks and evolving attackers. The work involved collaboration between Sandia employees and students in the Sandia - California Center for Cyber Defenders (CCD) program. We include an explanation of the need for adaptive countermeasures, a description of the architecture we designed to provide adaptive countermeasures, and evaluations of the system.

  14. Adaptive algebraic reconstruction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wenkai; Yin Fangfang

    2004-12-01

    Algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART) are iterative procedures for reconstructing objects from their projections. It is proven that ART can be computationally efficient by carefully arranging the order in which the collected data are accessed during the reconstruction procedure and adaptively adjusting the relaxation parameters. In this paper, an adaptive algebraic reconstruction technique (AART), which adopts the same projection access scheme in multilevel scheme algebraic reconstruction technique (MLS-ART), is proposed. By introducing adaptive adjustment of the relaxation parameters during the reconstruction procedure, one-iteration AART can produce reconstructions with better quality, in comparison with one-iteration MLS-ART. Furthermore, AART outperforms MLS-ART with improved computational efficiency.

  15. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Roorda, A

    2000-01-01

    Retinal images in the human eye are normally degraded because we are forced to use the optical system of the human eye--which is fraught with aberrations--as the objective lens. The recent application of adaptive optics technology to measure and compensate for these aberrations has produced retinal images in human eyes with unprecedented resolution. The adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is used to take pictures of photoreceptors and capillaries and to study spectral and angular tuning properties of individual photoreceptors. Application of adaptive optics technology for ophthalmoscopy promises continued progress toward understanding the basic properties of the living human retina and also for clinical applications.

  17. Adaptive Neuromorphic Architecture (ANA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Frank Zhigang; Chua, Leon O; Yang, Xiao; Helian, Na; Tetzlaff, Ronald; Schmidt, Torsten; Li, Caroline; Carrasco, Jose Manuel Garcia; Chen, Wanlong; Chu, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    We designed Adaptive Neuromorphic Architecture (ANA) that self-adjusts its inherent parameters (for instance, the resonant frequency) naturally following the stimuli frequency. Such an architecture is required for brain-like engineered systems because some parameters of the stimuli (for instance, the stimuli frequency) are not known in advance. Such adaptivity comes from a circuit element with memory, namely mem-inductor or mem-capacitor (memristor's sisters), which is history-dependent in its behavior. As a hardware model of biological systems, ANA can be used to adaptively reproduce the observed biological phenomena in amoebae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adaptive Telemetry Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinderson, R. L.; Salazar, G. A.; Haddick, C. M., Jr.; Spahn, C. J.; Venkatesh, C. N.

    1989-01-01

    Telemetry-data-acquisition unit adjusted remotely to produce changes in sampling rate, sampling channels, measurement scale, and output-bias level. Functional configuration adapted to changing conditions or new requirements by distant operator over telemetry link. Reconfiguration done in real time, without removing equipment from service. Bus-interface unit accepts reprogramming commands and translates them for low-rate adaptive multiplexer. Reprogrammable equipment reduces need for spare parts, since not necessary to stock variety of hardware with fixed characteristics. Adaptive multiplexer performs well in tests, amplitude errors less than 0.5 percent, distortion less than 0.25 percent, and crosstalk and common-mode rejection indiscernible.

  19. The effects of molecular diffusion in spatially encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marhabaie, Sina; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    In spatially encoded MRI, the signal is acquired sequentially for different coordinates. In particular for single-scan acquisitions in inhomogeneous fields, spatially encoded methods improve the image quality compared to traditional k-space encoding. Previously, much attention has been paid in order to homogenize T2 losses across the sample. In this work, we investigate the effects of diffusion on the image quality in spatially encoded MRI. We show that losses due to diffusion are often not uniform along the spatially encoded dimension, and how to adapt spatially encoded sequences in order to obtain uniformly diffusion-weighted images.

  20. Wayfinding in the Blind: Larger Hippocampal Volume and Supranormal Spatial Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, Madeleine; Voss, Patrice; Lord, Catherine; Lassonde, Maryse; Pruessner, Jens; Saint-Amour, Dave; Rainville, Constant; Lepore, Franco

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of visual input, the question arises as to how complex spatial abilities develop and how the brain adapts to the absence of this modality. We explored navigational skills in both early and late blind individuals and structural differences in the hippocampus, a brain region well known to be involved in spatial processing.…