Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive t-cell response

  1. T cell memory. Resident memory CD8 T cells trigger protective innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Jason M; Fraser, Kathryn A; Beura, Lalit K; Pauken, Kristen E; Vezys, Vaiva; Masopust, David

    2014-10-03

    The pathogen recognition theory dictates that, upon viral infection, the innate immune system first detects microbial products and then responds by providing instructions to adaptive CD8 T cells. Here, we show in mice that tissue resident memory CD8 T cells (T(RM) cells), non-recirculating cells located at common sites of infection, can achieve near-sterilizing immunity against viral infections by reversing this flow of information. Upon antigen resensitization within the mouse female reproductive mucosae, CD8(+) T(RM) cells secrete cytokines that trigger rapid adaptive and innate immune responses, including local humoral responses, maturation of local dendritic cells, and activation of natural killer cells. This provided near-sterilizing immunity against an antigenically unrelated viral infection. Thus, CD8(+) T(RM) cells rapidly trigger an antiviral state by amplifying receptor-derived signals from previously encountered pathogens. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. gammadelta T cells link innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    While most T cells use a CD3-associated alpha/beta T cell receptor as antigen recognition structure, a second population of T cells expresses the alternative gamma/delta T cell receptor. gamma/delta T cells are a minor population in the peripheral blood but constitute a major population among intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. Most gamma/delta T cells recognize ligands which are fundamentally different from the short peptides that are seen by alpha/beta T cells in the context of MHC class I or class II molecules. Thus, human Vdelta2 T cells recognize small bacterial phosphoantigens, alkylamines and synthetic aminobisphosphonates, whereas Vdelta1 T cells recognize stress-inducible MHC-related molecules MICA/B as well as several other ligands. At the functional level, gamma/delta T cells rapidly produce a variety of cytokines and usually exert potent cytotoxic activity, also towards many tumor cells. In this article, we discuss the role of gamma/delta T cells as a bridge between the innate and the adaptive immune system, based on the interpretation that gamma/delta T cells use their T cell receptor as a pattern recognition receptor. Our increasing understanding of the ligand recognition and activation mechanisms of gamma/delta T cells also opens new perspectives for the development of gamma/delta T cell-based immunotherapies.

  3. RAGE Expression in Human T Cells: A Link between Environmental Factors and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Akirav, Eitan M.; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Garyu, Justin; Henegariu, Octavian; Clynes, Raphael; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Herold, Kevan C.

    2012-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) is a scavenger ligand that binds glycated endproducts as well as molecules released during cell death such as S100b and HMGB1. RAGE is expressed on antigen presenting cells where it may participate in activation of innate immune responses but its role in adaptive human immune responses has not been described. We have found that RAGE is expressed intracellularly in human T cells following TCR activation but constitutively on T cells from patients with diabetes. The levels of RAGE on T cells from patients with diabetes are not related to the level of glucose control. It co-localizes to the endosomes. Its expression increases in activated T cells from healthy control subjects but bystander cells also express RAGE after stimulation of the antigen specific T cells. RAGE ligands enhance RAGE expression. In patients with T1D, the level of RAGE expression decreases with T cell activation. RAGE+ T cells express higher levels of IL-17A, CD107a, and IL-5 than RAGE− cells from the same individual with T1D. Our studies have identified the expression of RAGE on adaptive immune cells and a role for this receptor and its ligands in modulating human immune responses. PMID:22509345

  4. T cell proliferation and adaptive immune responses are critically regulated by protein phosphatase 4

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fang-Hsuean; Hsiao, Wan-Yi; Lin, Yu-Chun; Chan, Yi-Chiao; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clonal expansion of activated T cells is pivotal for the induction of protective immunity. Protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine phosphatase with reported functions in thymocyte development and DNA damage responses. However, the role of PP4 in T cell immunity has not been thoroughly investigated. In this report, our data showed that T cell-specific ablation of PP4 resulted in defective adaptive immunity, impaired T cell homeostatic expansion, and inefficient T cell proliferation. This hypo-proliferation was associated with a partial G1-S cell cycle arrest, enhanced transcriptions of CDK inhibitors and elevated activation of AMPK. In addition, resveratrol, a known AMPK activator, induced similar G1-S arrests, while lentivirally-transduced WT or constitutively-active AMPKα1 retarded the proliferation of WT T cells. Further investigations showed that PP4 co-immunoprecipitated with AMPKα1, and the over-expression of PP4 inhibited AMPK phosphorylation, thereby implicating PP4 for the negative regulation of AMPK. In summary, our results indicate that PP4 is an essential modulator for T cell proliferation and immune responses; they further suggest a potential link between PP4 functions, AMPK activation and G1-S arrest in activated T cells. PMID:26940341

  5. Resident memory CD8 T cells trigger protective innate and adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, Jason M.; Fraser, Kathryn A.; Beura, Lalit K.; Pauken, Kristen E.; Vezys, Vaiva; Masopust, David

    2015-01-01

    The pathogen recognition theory dictates that upon viral infection, the innate immune system first detects microbial products, and then responds by providing instructions to adaptive CD8 T cells. Here, we show in mice that resident memory CD8 T cells (TRM), non-recirculating cells located at common sites of infection, can achieve near sterilizing immunity against viral infections by reversing this flow of information. Upon antigen re-sensitization within the mouse female reproductive mucosae, CD8+ TRM secrete cytokines that trigger rapid adaptive and innate immune responses including local humoral responses, maturation of local dendritic cells, and activation of natural killer cells. This provided near sterilizing immunity against an antigenically unrelated viral infection. Thus, CD8+ TRM rapidly trigger an antiviral state by amplifying receptor-derived signals from previously encountered pathogens. PMID:25170049

  6. Inflammatory Monocytes Facilitate Adaptive CD4 T Cell Responses during Respiratory Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Tobias M.; Rivera, Amariliz; Lipuma, Lauren; Gallegos, Alena; Shi, Chao; Mack, Mathias; Pamer, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Aspergillus fumigatus, a ubiquitous fungus, causes invasive disease in immunocompromised humans. Although monocytes and antigen-specific CD4 T cells contribute to defense against inhaled fungal spores, how these cells interact during infection remains undefined. Investigating the role of inflammatory monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during fungal infection, we find that A. fumigatus infection induces an influx of chemokine receptor CCR2- and Ly6C-expressing inflammatory monocytes into lungs and draining lymph nodes. Depletion of CCR2+ cells reduced A. fumigatus conidial transport from lungs to draining lymph nodes, abolished CD4 T cell priming following respiratory challenge, and impaired pulmonary fungal clearance. In contrast, depletion of CCR2+Ly6Chi monocytes during systemic fungal infection did not prevent CD4 T cell priming in the spleen. Our findings demonstrate that pulmonary CD4 T cell responses to inhaled spores require CCR2+Ly6Chi monocytes and their derivatives, revealing a compartmentally restricted function for these cells in adaptive respiratory immune responses. PMID:19917501

  7. Innate-like CD4 T cells selected by thymocytes suppress adaptive immune responses against bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yu; Gray, Brian M.; Sofi, Mohammed H.; Bauler, Laura D.; Eaton, Kathryn A.; O'Riordan, Mary X. D.; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-01-01

    We have reported a new innate-like CD4 T cell population that expresses cell surface makers of effector/memory cells and produce Th1 and Th2 cytokines immediately upon activation. Unlike conventional CD4 T cells that are selected by thymic epithelial cells, these CD4 T cells, named T-CD4 T cells, are selected by MHC class II expressing thymocytes. Previously, we showed that the presence of T-CD4 T cells protected mice from airway inflammation suggesting an immune regulatory role of T-CD4 T cells. To further understand the function of T-CD4 T cells, we investigated immune responses mediated by T-CD4 T cells during bacterial infection because the generation of antigen specific CD4 T cells contributes to clearance of infection and for the development of immune memory. The current study shows a suppressive effect of T-CD4 T cells on both CD8 and CD4 T cell-mediated immune responses during Listeria and Helicobacter infections. In the mouse model of Listeria monocytogenes infection, T-CD4 T cells resulted in decreasedfrequency of Listeria-specific CD8 T cells and the killing activity of them. Furthermore, mice with T-CD4 T cells developed poor immune memory, demonstrated by reduced expansion of antigen-specific T cells and high bacterial burden upon re-infection. Similarly, the presence of T-CD4 T cells suppressed the generation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in Helicobacter pylori infected mice. Thus, our studies reveal a novel function of T-CD4 T cells in suppressing anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:23264931

  8. Tumor-localized ligation of CD3 and CD28 with systemic regulatory T-cell depletion induces potent innate and adaptive antitumor responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chien-Hsin; Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Chang, Shih-En; Chong, Chin-Liew; Cheng, Bing-Mae; Roffler, Steve R

    2009-04-15

    Tumor-localized activation of immune cells by membrane-tethered anti-CD3 antibodies (CD3L) is under investigation to treat poorly immunogenic tumors. Here we sought to elucidate the mechanism of antitumor immunity elicited by CD3L. CD3L and CD86 were expressed on poorly immunogenic B16 melanoma cells (B16/3L86 cells) and the effect of various lymphocytes, including CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, natural killer T (NKT) cells, and regulatory T cells, on antitumor activity was investigated. B16/3L86 cells activated naïve T cells; suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous, peritoneal, and metastasis models; and protected mice from rechallenge with B16 melanoma cells. However, in vivo antitumor activity against primary B16/3L86 tumors unexpectedly depended on NKT cells rather than CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells. Treatment of mice with low-dose cyclophosphamide or anti-CD25 antibody to deplete regulatory T cells unmasked latent T-cell antitumor activity; the number of activated CD8(+) T cells in tumors increased and B16/3L86 tumors were completely rejected in a CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell-dependent fashion. Furthermore, fibroblasts expressing CD3L and CD86 suppressed the growth of neighboring B16 cancer cells in vivo, and direct intratumoral injection of adenoviral vectors expressing CD3L and CD86 or CD3L and a membrane-tethered anti-CD28 antibody significantly suppressed the growth of subcutaneous tumors. Tumor-located ligation of CD3 and CD28 can activate both innate (NKT cells) and adaptive (CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells) responses to create a tumor-destructive environment to control tumor growth, but modulation of regulatory T cells is necessary to unmask local adaptive antitumor responses.

  9. A stochastic T cell response criterion

    PubMed Central

    Currie, James; Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Palmer, Ed; Molina-París, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The adaptive immune system relies on different cell types to provide fast and coordinated responses, characterized by recognition of pathogenic challenge, extensive cellular proliferation and differentiation, as well as death. T cells are a subset of the adaptive immune cellular pool that recognize immunogenic peptides expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells by means of specialized receptors on their membrane. T cell receptor binding to ligand determines T cell responses at different times and locations during the life of a T cell. Current experimental evidence provides support to the following: (i) sufficiently long receptor–ligand engagements are required to initiate the T cell signalling cascade that results in productive signal transduction and (ii) counting devices are at work in T cells to allow signal accumulation, decoding and translation into biological responses. In the light of these results, we explore, with mathematical models, the timescales associated with T cell responses. We consider two different criteria: a stochastic one (the mean time it takes to have had N receptor–ligand complexes bound for at least a dwell time, τ, each) and one based on equilibrium (the time to reach a threshold number N of receptor–ligand complexes). We have applied mathematical models to previous experiments in the context of thymic negative selection and to recent two-dimensional experiments. Our results indicate that the stochastic criterion provides support to the thymic affinity threshold hypothesis, whereas the equilibrium one does not, and agrees with the ligand hierarchy experimentally established for thymic negative selection. PMID:22745227

  10. Human γδ T cells are quickly reconstituted after stem-cell transplantation and show adaptive clonal expansion in response to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ravens, Sarina; Schultze-Florey, Christian; Raha, Solaiman; Sandrock, Inga; Drenker, Melanie; Oberdörfer, Linda; Reinhardt, Annika; Ravens, Inga; Beck, Maleen; Geffers, Robert; von Kaisenberg, Constantin; Heuser, Michael; Thol, Felicitas; Ganser, Arnold; Förster, Reinhold; Koenecke, Christian; Prinz, Immo

    2017-02-20

    To investigate how the human γδ T cell pool is shaped during ontogeny and how it is regenerated after transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), we applied an RNA-based next-generation sequencing approach to monitor the dynamics of the repertoires of γδ T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) before and after transplantation in a prospective cohort study. We found that repertoires of rearranged genes encoding γδ TCRs (TRG and TRD) in the peripheral blood of healthy adults were stable over time. Although a large fraction of human TRG repertoires consisted of public sequences, the TRD repertoires were private. In patients undergoing HSC transplantation, γδ T cells were quickly reconstituted; however, they had profoundly altered TCR repertoires. Notably, the clonal proliferation of individual virus-reactive γδ TCR sequences in patients with reactivation of cytomegalovirus revealed strong evidence for adaptive anti-viral γδ T cell immune responses.

  11. Innate immunity regulates adaptive immune response: lessons learned from studying the interplay between NK and CD8+ T cells during MCMV infection.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Maja; Arapović, Jurica; Traven, Luka; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan

    2012-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a crucial role in early immune response against cytomegalovirus infection. A large and mounting body of data indicate that these cells are involved in the regulation of the adaptive immune response as well. By using mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) as a model, several groups provided novel insights into the role of NK cells in the development and kinetics of antiviral CD8(+) T cell response. Depending on infection conditions, virus strain and the genetic background of mice used, NK cells are either positive or negative regulators of the CD8(+) T cell response. At present, there is no unique explanation for the observed differences between various experimental systems used. In this review we discuss the mechanisms involved in the interplay between NK and CD8(+) T cells in the early control of MCMV infection.

  12. Innate immunity regulates adaptive immune response: lessons learned from studying the interplay between NK and CD8+ T cells during MCMV infection

    PubMed Central

    Mitrović, Maja; Arapović, Jurica; Traven, Luka; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a crucial role in early immune response against cytomegalovirus infection. A large and mounting body of data indicate that these cells are involved in the regulation of the adaptive immune response as well. By using mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) as a model, several groups provided novel insights into the role of NK cells in the development and kinetics of antiviral CD8+ T cell response. Depending on infection conditions, virus strain and the genetic background of mice used, NK cells are either positive or negative regulators of the CD8+ T cell response. At present, there is no unique explanation for the observed differences between various experimental systems used. In this review we discuss the mechanisms involved in the interplay between NK and CD8+ T cells in the early control of MCMV infection. PMID:22965169

  13. The T Cell Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bröker, Barbara M.; Mrochen, Daniel; Péton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a dangerous pathogen and a leading cause of both nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infection worldwide. However, on the other hand, we are all exposed to this bacterium, often within the first hours of life, and usually manage to establish equilibrium and coexist with it. What does the adaptive immune system contribute toward lifelong control of S. aureus? Will it become possible to raise or enhance protective immune memory by vaccination? While in the past the S. aureus-specific antibody response has dominated this discussion, the research community is now coming to appreciate the role that the cellular arm of adaptive immunity, the T cells, plays. There are numerous T cell subsets, each with differing functions, which together have the ability to orchestrate the immune response to S. aureus and hence to tip the balance between protection and pathology. This review summarizes the state of the art in this dynamic field of research. PMID:26999219

  14. T cells and adaptive immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Jasenosky, Luke D; Scriba, Thomas J; Hanekom, Willem A; Goldfeld, Anne E

    2015-03-01

    The adaptive immune response mediated by T cells is critical for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection in humans. However, the M. tuberculosis antigens and host T-cell responses that are required for an effective adaptive immune response to M. tuberculosis infection are yet to be defined. Here, we review recent findings on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses to M. tuberculosis infection and examine the roles of distinct M. tuberculosis-specific T-cell subsets in control of de novo and latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in the evolution of T-cell immunity to M. tuberculosis in response to tuberculosis treatment. In addition, we discuss recent studies that elucidate aspects of M. tuberculosis-specific adaptive immunity during human immunodeficiency virus co-infection and summarize recent findings from vaccine trials that provide insight into effective adaptive immune responses to M. tuberculosis infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Thiol dependent NF-κB suppression and inhibition of T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses by a naturally occurring steroidal lactone Withaferin A.

    PubMed

    Gambhir, Lokesh; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, M; Patil, Anand; Degani, M; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K

    2015-12-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a steroidal lactone isolated from ayurvedic medicinal plant Withania somnifera, was shown to inhibit tumor growth by inducing oxidative stress and suppressing NF-κB pathway. However, its effect on T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses and the underlying mechanism has not been investigated. Since both T-cell responses and NF-κB pathway are known to be redox sensitive, the present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of WA on adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. WA inhibited mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation in vitro without inducing any cell death. It inhibited upregulation of T-cell (CD25, CD69, CD71 and CD54) and B-cell (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II) activation markers and secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. WA induced oxidative stress by increasing the basal ROS levels and the immunosuppressive effects of WA were abrogated only by thiol anti-oxidants. The redox modulatory effects of WA in T-cells were attributed to its ability to directly interact with free thiols. WA inhibited NF-κB nuclear translocation in lymphocytes and prevented the direct binding of nuclear NF-κB to its consensus sequence. MALDI-TOF analysis using a synthetic NF-κB-p50 peptide containing Cys-62 residue suggested that WA can modify the cysteine residue of NF-κB. The pharmacokinetic studies for WA were also carried out and in vivo efficacy of WA was studied using mouse model of Graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, WA is a potent inhibitor of T-cell responses and acts via a novel thiol dependent mechanism and inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

  16. Regulating the adaptive immune response to blood-stage malaria: role of dendritic cells and CD4⁺Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Mary M; Ing, Rebecca; Berretta, Floriana; Miu, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Although a clearer understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved in protection and immunopathology during blood-stage malaria has emerged, the mechanisms involved in regulating the adaptive immune response especially those required to maintain a balance between beneficial and deleterious responses remain unclear. Recent evidence suggests the importance of CD11c⁺ dendritic cells (DC) and CD4⁺Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells in regulating immune responses during infection and autoimmune disease, but information concerning the contribution of these cells to regulating immunity to malaria is limited. Here, we review recent findings from our laboratory and others in experimental models of malaria in mice and in Plasmodium-infected humans on the roles of DC and natural regulatory T cells in regulating adaptive immunity to blood-stage malaria.

  17. Trogocytosis of MHC-I/Peptide Complexes Derived from Tumors and Infected Cells Enhances Dendritic Cell Cross-Priming and Promotes Adaptive T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian-Jin; Li, Xiao-Lin; Wang, David; Huang, Xiao-Cong; Mathis, J. Michael; Duan, Wei-Ming; Knight, David; Shi, Runhua; Glass, Jonathan; Zhang, Dong-Qing; Eisenbach, Lea; Jefferies, Wilfred A.

    2008-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), two important components of the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway, are often deficient in tumor cells. The restoration of their expression has been shown to restore the antigenicity and immunogenicity of tumor cells. However, it is unclear whether TAP and MHC-I expression in tumor cells can affect the induction phase of the T cell response. To address this issue, we expressed viral antigens in tumors that are either deficient or proficient in TAP and MHC-I expression. The relative efficiency of direct immunization or immunization through cross-presentation in promoting adaptive T cell responses was compared. The results demonstrated that stimulation of animals with TAP and MHC-I proficient tumor cells generated antigen specific T cells with greater killing activities than those of TAP and MHC-I deficient tumor cells. This discrepancy was traced to differences in the ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to access and sample different antigen reservoirs in TAP and MHC-I proficient versus deficient cells and thereby stimulate adaptive immune responses through the process of cross-presentation. In addition, our data suggest that the increased activity of T cells is caused by the enhanced DC uptake and utilization of MHC-I/peptide complexes from the proficient cells as an additional source of processed antigen. Furthermore, we demonstrate that immune-escape and metastasis are promoted in the absence of this DC ‘arming’ mechanism. Physiologically, this novel form of DC antigen sampling resembles trogocytosis, and acts to enhance T cell priming and increase the efficacy of adaptive immune responses against tumors and infectious pathogens. PMID:18769733

  18. T Cell Responses to Arenavirus Infections.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP T cells; Arenaviruses ; Hemorrhagic fevers, Lassa fever, 06 13 LCMV Lassa fever virus; Synthetic peptides; Vaccine; I Recombinant...virus-specific effector T cells and that some of the T cell determinants they recognize are conserved among O.W. arenaviruses . For example, Jahrling...specific T cells were not represented by these peptides. fl4AM17.817073 (MFBM24) CONCLUSIONS Our knowledge of the immune response to arenaviruses is

  19. Dysregulation of Toll-Like Receptor 7 Compromises Innate and Adaptive T Cell Responses and Host Resistance to an Attenuated West Nile Virus Infection in Old Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guorui; Luo, Huanle; Pang, Lan; Peng, Bi-hung; Winkelmann, Evandro; McGruder, Brenna; Hesse, Joseph; Whiteman, Melissa; Campbell, Gerald; Milligan, Gregg N.; Cong, Yingzi; Barrett, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The elderly are known to have enhanced susceptibility to infections and an impaired capacity to respond to vaccination. West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, has induced severe neurological symptoms, mostly in the elderly population. No vaccines are available for human use. Recent work showed that an attenuated WNV, a nonstructural (NS) 4B-P38G mutant, induced no lethality but strong immune responses in young (6- to 10-week-old) mice. While studying protective efficacy, we found unexpectedly that old (21- to 22-month) mice were susceptible to WNV NS4B-P38G mutant infection but were protected from subsequent lethal wild-type WNV challenge. Compared to responses in young mice, the NS4B-P38G mutant triggered higher inflammatory cytokine and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, a delayed γδ T cell expansion, and lower antibody and WNV-specific T cell responses in old mice. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is expressed on multiple types of cells. Impaired TLR7 signaling in old mice led to dendritic cell (DC) antigen-presenting function compromise and a reduced γδ T cell and regulatory T cell (Treg) expansion during NS4B-P38G mutant infection. R848, a TLR7 agonist, decreased host vulnerability in NS4B-P38G-infected old mice by enhancing γδ T cell and Treg expansion and the antigen-presenting capacity of DCs, thereby promoting T cell responses. In summary, our results suggest that dysregulation of TLR7 partially contributes to impaired innate and adaptive T cell responses and an enhanced vulnerability in old mice during WNV NS4B-P38G mutant infection. R848 increases the safety and efficacy during immunization of old mice with the WNV NS4B-P38G mutant. IMPORTANCE The elderly are known to have enhanced susceptibility to infections and an impaired capacity to respond to vaccination. West Nile virus (WNV), an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus, has induced severe neurological symptoms more frequently in the elderly population. No vaccines are available

  20. Infection with a Mouse-Adapted Strain of the 2009 Pandemic Virus Causes a Highly Severe Disease Associated with an Impaired T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Isabelle; Morisseau, Olivier; Garneau, Émilie; Marois, Isabelle; Cloutier, Alexandre; Richter, Martin V.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a relatively low fatality rate, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus differed from other seasonal viruses in that it caused mortality and severe pneumonia in the young and middle-aged population (18–59 years old). The mechanisms underlying this increased disease severity are still poorly understood. In this study, a human isolate of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was adapted to the mouse (MAp2009). The pathogenicity of the MAp2009 virus and the host immune responses were evaluated in the mouse model and compared to the laboratory H1N1 strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8). The MAp2009 virus reached consistently higher titers in the lungs over 14 days compared to the PR8 virus, and caused severe disease associated with high morbidity and 85% mortality rate, contrasting with the 0% death rate in the PR8 group. During the early phase of infection, both viruses induced similar pathology in the lungs. However, MAp2009-induced lung inflammation was sustained until the end of the study (day 14), while there was no sign of inflammation in the PR8-infected group by day 10. Furthermore, at day 3 post-infection, MAp2009 induced up to 10- to 40-fold more cytokine and chemokine gene expression, respectively. More importantly, the numbers of CD4+ T cells and virus-specific CD8+ T cells were significantly lower in the lungs of MAp2009-infected mice compared to PR8-infected mice. Interestingly, there was no difference in the number of dendritic cells in the lung and in the draining lymph node. Moreover, mice infected with PR8 or MAp2009 had similar numbers of CCR5 and CXCR3-expressing T cells, suggesting that the impaired T cell response was not due to a lack of chemokine responsiveness or priming of T cells. This study demonstrates that a mouse-adapted virus from an isolate of the 2009 pandemic virus interferes with the adaptive immune response leading to a more severe disease. PMID:26381265

  1. Delineation of the innate and adaptive T-cell immune outcome in the human host in response to Campylobacter jejuni infection.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Lindsey A; Nistala, Kiran; Mills, Dominic C; Stephenson, Holly N; Zilbauer, Matthias; Wren, Brendan W; Dorrell, Nick; Lindley, Keith J; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona

    2010-11-09

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite the significant health burden this infection presents, molecular understanding of C. jejuni-mediated disease pathogenesis remains poorly defined. Here, we report the characterisation of the early, innate immune response to C. jejuni using an ex-vivo human gut model of infection. Secondly, impact of bacterial-driven dendritic cell activation on T-cell mediated immunity was also sought. Healthy, control paediatric terminal ileum or colonic biopsy tissue was infected with C. jejuni for 8-12 hours. Bacterial colonisation was followed by confocal microscopy and mucosal innate immune responses measured by ELISA. Marked induction of IFNγ with modest increase in IL-22 and IL-17A was noted. Increased mucosal IL-12, IL-23, IL-1β and IL-6 were indicative of a cytokine milieu that may modulate subsequent T-cell mediated immunity. C. jejuni-driven human monocyte-derived dendritic cell activation was followed by analyses of T cell immune responses utilising flow cytometry and ELISA. Significant increase in Th-17, Th-1 and Th-17/Th-1 double-positive cells and corresponding cytokines was observed. The ability of IFNγ, IL-22 and IL-17 cytokines to exert host defence via modulation of C. jejuni adhesion and invasion to intestinal epithelia was measured by standard gentamicin protection assay. Both innate and adaptive T cell-immunity to C. jejuni infection led to the release of IFNγ, IL-22 and IL-17A; suggesting a critical role for this cytokine triad in establishing host anti-microbial immunity during the acute and effectors phase of infection. In addition, to their known anti-microbial functions; IL-17A and IL-17F reduced the number of intracellular C. jejuni in intestinal epithelia, highlighting a novel aspect of how IL-17 family members may contribute to protective immunity against C. jejuni.

  2. Blockage of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase regulates Japanese encephalitis via enhancement of type I/II IFN innate and adaptive T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Bum; Choi, Jin Young; Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Hossain, Ferdaus Mohd Altaf; Hur, Jin; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John-Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2016-04-18

    contributed to JE amelioration and that HSC-derived leukocytes played a key role in the enhanced IFN-I innate responses in the IDO-ablated environment. Inhibition of IDO activity ameliorated JE via enhancement of antiviral IFN-I/II innate and adaptive T-cell responses and increased CNS infiltration of peripheral leukocytes. Therefore, our data provide valuable insight into the use of IDO inhibition by specific inhibitors as a promising tool for therapeutic and prophylactic strategies against viral encephalitis caused by neurotropic viruses.

  3. Cellular factors targeting APCs to modulate adaptive T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Visperas, Anabelle; Do, Jeongsu; Min, Booki

    2014-01-01

    The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity.

  4. Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Both Contribute to Pathological CD4 T Cell Activation in HIV-1 Infected Ugandans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    well U-bottom plates with Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) hexon peptides (Miltenyi Biotec Inc., Auburn, CA) at 1 mg/ml, Candida albicans allergenic extract...particular CMV and Candida antigens, provoked significant expansions of triple- positive CD4 T cells (Figure 6B). In a second approach, we assessed CD4 T... Candida antigens resulted in effective expansion of such cells. In addition, there was an enrichment of HIV-specific and CMV- specific cells in the DEM

  5. T Cell Responses during Influenza Infection: Getting and Keeping Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taeg S.; Sun, Jie; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 influenza pandemic highlights the threat that type A influenza poses to human health. Thus there is an urgency to understand the pathobiology of influenza infection and the contribution of the host immune response to both virus elimination and the development of lung injury. This review focuses on the T cell arm of the adaptive host immune response to influenza and assesses recent developments in our understanding of the induction of primary influenza virus-specific T cell responses by antigen-presenting cells, the interaction of activated effector T cells with antigen-bearing cells in the infected lungs, and the contribution of influenza-specific effector T cells to the development and control of lung injury and inflammation during infection. PMID:21435950

  6. CD4+ regulatory T cell responses induced by T cell vaccination in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jian; Zang, Ying C. Q.; Nie, Hong; Zhang, Jingwu Z.

    2006-01-01

    Immunization with irradiated autologous T cells (T cell vaccination) is shown to induce regulatory T cell responses that are poorly understood. In this study, CD4+ regulatory T cell lines were generated from patients with multiple sclerosis that received immunization with irradiated autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells. The resulting CD4+ regulatory T cell lines had marked inhibition on autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells and displayed two distinctive patterns distinguishable by the expression of transcription factor Foxp3 and cytokine profile. The majority of the T cell lines had high Foxp3 expression and secreted both IFN-γ and IL-10 as compared with the other pattern characteristic of low Foxp3 expression and predominant production of IL-10 but not IFN-γ. CD4+ regulatory T cell lines of both patterns expressed CD25 and reacted with activated autologous T cells but not resting T cells, irrespective of antigen specificity of the target T cells. It was evident that they recognized preferentially a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 61–73 of the IL-2 receptor α chain. T cell vaccination correlated with increased Foxp3 expression and T cell reactivity to peptide 61–73. The findings have important implications in the understanding of the role of CD4+ regulatory T cell response induced by T cell vaccination. PMID:16547138

  7. Aggregation of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies influences the capacity of dendritic cells to stimulate adaptive T-cell responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Karle, Anette C; Wolf, Babette; Sordé, Laetitia; Koepke, Stephan; Gottlieb, Sascha; Krieg, Jennifer; Djidja, Marie-Claude; Baban, Aida; Spindeldreher, Sebastian; Koulov, Atanas V; Kiessling, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Subvisible proteinaceous particles which are present in all therapeutic protein formulations are in the focus of intense discussions between health authorities, academics and biopharmaceutical companies in the context of concerns that such particles could promote unwanted immunogenicity via anti-drug antibody formation. In order to provide further understanding of the subject, this study closely examines the specific biological effects proteinaceous particles may exert on dendritic cells (DCs) as the most efficient antigen-presenting cell population crucial for the initiation of the adaptive immune response. Two different model IgG antibodies were subjected to three different types of exaggerated physical stress to generate subvisible particles in far greater concentrations than the ones typical for the currently marketed biotherapeutical antibodies. The aggregated samples were used in in vitro biological assays in order to interrogate the early DC-driven events that initiate CD4 T-cell dependent humoral adaptive immune responses--peptide presentation capacity and co-stimulatory activity of DCs. Most importantly, antigen presentation was addressed with a unique approach called MHC-associated Peptide Proteomics (MAPPs), which allows for identifying the sequences of HLA-DR associated peptides directly from human dendritic cells. The experiments demonstrated that highly aggregated solutions of two model mAbs generated under controlled conditions can induce activation of human monocyte-derived DCs as indicated by upregulation of typical maturation markers including co-stimulatory molecules necessary for CD4 T-cell activation. Additional data suggest that highly aggregated proteins could induce in vitro T-cell responses. Intriguingly, strong aggregation-mediated changes in the pattern and quantity of antigen-derived HLA-DR associated peptides presented on DCs were observed, indicating a change in protein processing and presentation. Increasing the amounts of subvisible

  8. T cell responses and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2006-01-01

    The enhancement of severe disease upon secondary infection makes dengue almost unique among infectious pathogens and presents a serious challenge to vaccine design. Several key observations have been made which shed light onto this phenomenon particularly that antibodies can enhance Fc receptor-dependent uptake of virus into macrophages thereby increasing virus replication. Furthermore there seems to be a relationship between the peak virus load and disease severity. However, a second key feature of dengue is that the life-threatening symptoms do not correlate with the period of high viraemia; instead they occur at a time when the virus load is in steep decline. The coincidence of severe disease manifestations with defervescence and virus control suggests that the symptoms may be a consequence of the immune response to the virus rather than virus induced cytopathology. One of the key elements in the immune response to viruses are T cells which can both secrete a host of inflammatory cytokines and also be directly cytotoxic to infected cells. There are a number of experimental models of T cell-induced immunopathology including in responses to viruses. Particularly interesting in this respect are models of RSV-induced immunopathology, which have direct relevance to vaccine design as a formalin-inactivated vaccine to RSV actually enhanced disease in children when they became naturally infected with RSV, an echo of the disease enhancement seen in dengue. We will present an analysis of CD8+ T cell responses to a number of novel T cell epitopes during dengue infection and also analyse the function and cytokine secretion of these cells. We suggest that an exaggerated and partially misdirected T cell response seen in secondary dengue infection may be part of the complex series of events leading to dengue haemorrhagic fever and shock.

  9. Persistence and Adaptation in Immunity: T Cells Balance the Extent and Thoroughness of Search

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, G. Matthew; Letendre, Kenneth A.; Moses, Melanie E.; Cannon, Judy L.

    2016-01-01

    Effective search strategies have evolved in many biological systems, including the immune system. T cells are key effectors of the immune response, required for clearance of pathogenic infection. T cell activation requires that T cells encounter antigen-bearing dendritic cells within lymph nodes, thus, T cell search patterns within lymph nodes may be a crucial determinant of how quickly a T cell immune response can be initiated. Previous work suggests that T cell motion in the lymph node is similar to a Brownian random walk, however, no detailed analysis has definitively shown whether T cell movement is consistent with Brownian motion. Here, we provide a precise description of T cell motility in lymph nodes and a computational model that demonstrates how motility impacts T cell search efficiency. We find that both Brownian and Lévy walks fail to capture the complexity of T cell motion. Instead, T cell movement is better described as a correlated random walk with a heavy-tailed distribution of step lengths. Using computer simulations, we identify three distinct factors that contribute to increasing T cell search efficiency: 1) a lognormal distribution of step lengths, 2) motion that is directionally persistent over short time scales, and 3) heterogeneity in movement patterns. Furthermore, we show that T cells move differently in specific frequently visited locations that we call “hotspots” within lymph nodes, suggesting that T cells change their movement in response to the lymph node environment. Our results show that like foraging animals, T cells adapt to environmental cues, suggesting that adaption is a fundamental feature of biological search. PMID:26990103

  10. Shaping of Peripheral T Cell Responses by Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Marion; Hugues, Stéphanie; Dubrot, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node stromal cells (LNSCs) have newly been promoted to the rank of new modulators of T cell responses. The different non-hematopoietic cell subsets in lymph node (LN) were considered for years as a simple scaffold, forming routes and proper environment for antigen (Ag)-lymphocyte encountering. Deeper characterization of those cells has recently clearly shown their impact on both dendritic cell and T cell functions. In particular, lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) control lymphocyte trafficking and homeostasis in LNs and limit adaptive immune responses. Therefore, the new role of LECs in shaping immune responses has drawn the attention of immunologists. Striking is the discovery that LECs, among other LNSCs, ectopically express a large range of peripheral tissue-restricted Ags (PTAs), and further present PTA-derived peptides through major histocompatibility class I molecules to induce self-reactive CD8+ T cell deletional tolerance. In addition, both steady-state and tumor-associated LECs were described to be capable of exogenous Ag cross-presentation. Whether LECs can similarly impact CD4+ T cell responses through major histocompatibility class II restricted Ag presentation is still a matter of debate. Here, we review and discuss our current knowledge on the contribution of Ag-presenting LECs as regulators of peripheral T cell responses in different immunological contexts, including autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:28127298

  11. Connecting the innate and adaptive immune responses in mouse choroidal neovascularization via the anaphylatoxin C5a and γδT-cells

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Beth; Schnabolk, Gloriane; Joseph, Kusumam; Raikwar, Himanshu; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Johnson, Krista; Moore, Kristi; Wang, Yi; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). An overactive complement system is associated with AMD pathogenesis, and serum pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-17, are elevated in AMD patients. IL-17 is produced by complement C5a-receptor-expressing T-cells. In murine CNV, infiltrating γδT- rather than Th17-cells produce the IL-17 measurable in lesioned eyes. Here we asked whether C5a generated locally in response to CNV recruits IL-17-producing T-cells to the eye. CNV lesions were generated using laser photocoagulation and quantified by imaging; T-lymphocytes were characterized by QRT-PCR. CNV resulted in an increase in splenic IL-17-producing γδT- and Th17-cells; yet in the CNV eye, only elevated levels of γδT-cells were observed. Systemic administration of anti-C5- or anti-C5a-blocking antibodies blunted the CNV-induced production of splenic Th17- and γδT-cells, reduced CNV size and eliminated ocular γδT-cell infiltration. In ARPE-19 cell monolayers, IL-17 triggered a pro-inflammatory state; and splenocyte proliferation was elevated in response to ocular proteins. Thus, we demonstrated that CNV lesions trigger a systemic immune response, augmenting local ocular inflammation via the infiltration of IL-17-producing γδT-cells, which are presumably recruited to the eye in a C5a-dependent manner. Understanding the complexity of complement-mediated pathological mechanisms will aid in the development of an AMD treatment. PMID:27029558

  12. T cell intrinsic roles of autophagy in promoting adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Craig M.; Bell, Bryan D.

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy, an ancient cellular response where autophagic vacuoles are formed within the cytosol, is induced in response to a variety of cellular insults, including growth factor or nutrient withdrawal, organelle damage and misfolded proteins. Autophagy is rapidly induced in T lymphocytes following antigenic stimulation and blockade of autophagic signaling greatly reduces T cell clonal expansion, suggesting that autophagy is primarily involved in promoting T cell survival. In contrast, a recently identified negative feedback loop involving FADD and caspase-8, limits the level of autophagy in T cells. Failure to activate caspase-8 during T cell mitogenesis leads to hyperactive autophagy and cellular death through a programmed necrotic mechanism. These findings suggest that crosstalk between these cellular processes is essential for T cell activation and homeostasis. PMID:20392618

  13. Pushing the frontiers of T-cell vaccines: accurate measurement of human T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Saade, Fadi; Gorski, Stacey Ann; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2012-12-01

    There is a need for novel approaches to tackle major vaccine challenges such as malaria, tuberculosis and HIV, among others. Success will require vaccines able to induce a cytotoxic T-cell response--a deficiency of most current vaccine approaches. The successful development of T-cell vaccines faces many hurdles, not least being the lack of consensus on a standardized T-cell assay format able to be used as a correlate of vaccine efficacy. Hence, there remains a need for reproducible measures of T-cell immunity proven in human clinical trials to correlate with vaccine protection. The T-cell equivalent of a neutralizing antibody assay would greatly accelerate the development and commercialization of T-cell vaccines. Recent advances have seen a plethora of new T-cell assays become available, including some like cytometry by time-of-flight with extreme multiparameter T-cell phenotyping capability. However, whether it is historic thymidine-based proliferation assays or sophisticated new cytometry assays, each assay has its relative advantages and disadvantages, and relatively few of these assays have yet to be validated in large-scale human vaccine trials. This review examines the current range of T-cell assays and assesses their suitability for use in human vaccine trials. Should one or more of these assays be accepted as an agreed surrogate of T-cell protection by a regulatory agency, this would significantly accelerate the development of T-cell vaccines.

  14. Nutrient and Metabolic Sensing in T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun; Raynor, Jana; Nguyen, Thanh-Long M.; Chi, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    T cells play pivotal roles in shaping host immune responses in infectious diseases, autoimmunity, and cancer. The activation of T cells requires immune and growth factor-derived signals. However, alterations in nutrients and metabolic signals tune T cell responses by impinging upon T cell fates and immune functions. In this review, we summarize how key nutrients, including glucose, amino acids, and lipids, and their sensors and transporters shape T cell responses. We also briefly discuss regulation of T cell responses by oxygen and energy sensing mechanisms. PMID:28337199

  15. Measuring T cell receptor and T cell gene expression diversity in antigen-responsive human CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Eugster, Anne; Lindner, Annett; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Wilhelm, Carmen; Dietz, Sevina; Catani, Mara; Ziegler, Anette-G; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2013-12-31

    T cells have diversity in TCR, epitope recognition, and cytokine production, and can be used for immune monitoring. Furthermore, clonal expansion of TCR families in disease may provide opportunities for TCR-directed therapies. We developed methodology for sequencing expressed genes of TCR alpha and beta chains from single cells and applied this to vaccine (tetanus-toxoid)-responsive CD4(+) T cells. TCR alpha and beta chains were both successfully sequenced in 1309 (43%) of 3038 CD4(+) T cells yielding 677 different receptors. TRAV and TRBV gene usage differed between tetanus-toxoid-responsive and non-responsive cells (p=0.004 and 0.0002), and there was extensive TCR diversity in tetanus-toxoid-responsive cells within individuals. Identical TCRs could be recovered in different samples from the same subject: TCRs identified after booster vaccination were frequent in pre-booster memory T cells (31% of pre-booster TCR), and also identified in pre-booster vaccination naïve cells (6.5%). No TCR was shared between subjects, but tetanus toxoid-responsive cells sharing one of their TCR chains were observed within and between subjects. Coupling single-cell gene expression profiling to TCR sequencing revealed examples of distinct cytokine profiles in cells bearing identical TCR. Novel molecular methodology demonstrates extensive diversity of Ag-responsive CD4(+) T cells within and between individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulatory T Cell Responses in Participants with Type 1 Diabetes after a Single Dose of Interleukin-2: A Non-Randomised, Open Label, Adaptive Dose-Finding Trial

    PubMed Central

    Todd, John A.; Porter, Linsey; Smyth, Deborah J.; Rainbow, Daniel B.; Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Yang, Jennie H.; Bell, Charles J. M.; Schuilenburg, Helen; Challis, Ben; Clarke, Pamela; Coleman, Gillian; Dawson, Sarah; Goymer, Donna; Kennet, Jane; Brown, Judy; Greatorex, Jane; Goodfellow, Ian; Evans, Mark; Mander, Adrian P.; Bond, Simon; Wicker, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin-2 (IL-2) has an essential role in the expansion and function of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs reduce tissue damage by limiting the immune response following infection and regulate autoreactive CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs) to prevent autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). Genetic susceptibility to T1D causes alterations in the IL-2 pathway, a finding that supports Tregs as a cellular therapeutic target. Aldesleukin (Proleukin; recombinant human IL-2), which is administered at high doses to activate the immune system in cancer immunotherapy, is now being repositioned to treat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders at lower doses by targeting Tregs. Methods and Findings To define the aldesleukin dose response for Tregs and to find doses that increase Tregs physiologically for treatment of T1D, a statistical and systematic approach was taken by analysing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single doses of subcutaneous aldesleukin in the Adaptive Study of IL-2 Dose on Regulatory T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes (DILT1D), a single centre, non-randomised, open label, adaptive dose-finding trial with 40 adult participants with recently diagnosed T1D. The primary endpoint was the maximum percentage increase in Tregs (defined as CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127low) from the baseline frequency in each participant measured over the 7 d following treatment. There was an initial learning phase with five pairs of participants, each pair receiving one of five pre-assigned single doses from 0.04 × 106 to 1.5 × 106 IU/m2, in order to model the dose-response curve. Results from each participant were then incorporated into interim statistical modelling to target the two doses most likely to induce 10% and 20% increases in Treg frequencies. Primary analysis of the evaluable population (n = 39) found that the optimal doses of aldesleukin to induce 10% and 20% increases in Tregs were 0.101 × 106 IU/m2 (standard error [SE] = 0.078, 95% CI = −0

  17. Recall T cell responses to bluetongue virus produce a narrowing of the T cell repertoire.

    PubMed

    Rojas, José-Manuel; Rodríguez-Calvo, Teresa; Sevilla, Noemí

    2017-06-29

    In most viral infections, recall T cell responses are critical for protection. The magnitude of these secondary responses can also affect the CD8 and CD4 epitope repertoire diversity. Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection in sheep elicits a T cell response that contributes to viremia control and could be relevant for cross-protection between BTV serotypes. Here, we characterized CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses during primary and recall responses. During primary immune responses, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell populations expanded by 14 days post-infection (dpi). CD4(+) T cell populations showed a lower peak of expansion and prolonged contraction phase compared to CD8(+) T cell populations. Recall responses to BTV challenge led to BTV-specific expansion and activation of CD8(+) but not of CD4(+) T cells. The evolution of the BTV-specific TCR repertoire was also characterized in response to VP7 peptide stimulation. Striking differences in repertoire development were noted over the time-course of infection. During primary responses, a broader repertoire was induced for MHC-I and MHC-II epitopes. However, during memory responses, a narrowed repertoire was activated towards a dominant motif in VP7 comprising amino acids 139-291. Monocytes were also examined, and expanded during acute infection resolution. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokine levels increased after BTV inoculation and persisted throughout the experiment, indicative of a prolonged inflammatory state during BTV infections. These findings could have implications for vaccine design as the narrowing memory T cell repertoire induced after BTV re-infection could lead to the development of protective immunodominant TCR repertoires that differs between individual sheep.

  18. Adaptive NK cell and KIR-expressing T cell responses are induced by CMV and are associated with protection against CMV reactivation after allogeneic donor hematopoietic cell transplantation1

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Zachary B.; Cooley, Sarah A.; Cichocki, Frank; Felices, Martin; Wangen, Rose; Luo, Xianghua; DeFor, Todd E.; Bryceson, Yenan T.; Diamond, Don J.; Brunstein, Claudio; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wagner, John E.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Horowitz, Amir; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Parham, Peter; Verneris, Michael R.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivates in >30% of CMV seropositive patients after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Previously, we reported an increase of NK cells expressing NKG2C, CD57 and inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in response to CMV reactivation post-HCT. These NK cells persist after the resolution of infection and display ‘adaptive’ or memory properties. Despite these findings, the differential impact of persistent/inactive vs. reactivated CMV on NK vs. T cell maturation following HCT from different graft sources has not been defined. We compared the phenotype of NK and T cells from 292 recipients of allogeneic sibling (n = 118) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 174) grafts based on recipient pre-transplant CMV serostatus and post-HCT CMV reactivation. This cohort was utilized to evaluate CMV-dependent increases in KIR-expressing NK cells exhibiting an ‘adaptive’ phenotype (NKG2C+CD57+). Compared to CMV seronegative recipients, those who reactivated CMV (React+) had the highest adaptive cell frequencies, while intermediate frequencies were observed in CMV seropositive recipients harboring persistent/non-replicating CMV. The same effect was observed in T cells and CD56+ T cells. These adaptive lymphocyte subsets were increased in CMV seropositive recipients of sibling, but not UCB grafts, and correlated with lower rates of CMV reactivation (sibling 33% vs. UCB 51%; p<0.01). These data suggest that persistent/non-replicating recipient CMV induces rapid production of adaptive NK and T cells from mature cells from sibling, but not UCB grafts. These adaptive lymphocytes are associated with protection from CMV reactivation. PMID:26055301

  19. The α4 Nicotinic Receptor Promotes CD4+ T-Cell Proliferation and a Helper T-Cell Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Nordman, Jacob C.; Muldoon, Pretal; Clark, Sarah; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is a common addiction and a leading cause of disease. Chronic nicotine exposure is known to activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in immune cells. We demonstrate a novel role for α4 nAChRs in the effect of nicotine on T-cell proliferation and immunity. Using cell-based sorting and proteomic analysis we define an α4 nAChR expressing helper T-cell population (α4+CD3+CD4+) and show that this group of cells is responsive to sustained nicotine exposure. In the circulation, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus, we find that nicotine promotes an increase in CD3+CD4+ cells via its activation of the α4 nAChR and regulation of G protein subunit o, G protein regulated–inducer of neurite outgrowth, and CDC42 signaling within T cells. In particular, nicotine is found to promote a helper T cell 2 adaptive immunologic response within T cells that is absent in α4−/− mice. We thus present a new mechanism of α4 nAChR signaling and immune regulation in T cells, possibly accounting for the effect of smoking on the immune system. PMID:24107512

  20. SjTat-TPI facilitates adaptive T-cell responses and reduces hepatic pathology during Schistosoma japonicum infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyue; Luo, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Yuxiao; Yang, Bingya; Hou, Min; Xu, Zhipeng; Yu, Chuanxin; Chen, Yingying; Chen, Lin; Ji, Minjun

    2015-12-30

    Schistosomiasis is a kind of parasitic zoonoses which causes serious damage to public health and social development. China is one of the countries most affected by Schistosoma japonicum and an effective vaccine is still needed. In this study, we adopted Tat-mediated protein transduction technology to investigate the impact of different antigen presented approaches on host's immune response and the potential protection against Schistosoma japonicum infection. We successfully constructed the recombinant S. japonicum triosephosphate isomerase, Tat-TPI, as a vaccine candidate. Whether injected with Tat-TPI in foot pad or vaccinated with Tat-TPI in the back subcutaneously for three times, the draining popliteal lymph nodes and spleen both developed a stronger CD8(+)T response (Tc1) in mice. Not only that, but it also helped CD4(+)T cells to produce more IFN-γ than TPI immunisation. In addition, it could boost IgG production, especially IgG1 subclass. Most importantly, Tat-TPI immunisation led to the significant smaller area of a single egg granuloma in the livers as compared with TPI-vaccinated or control groups. However, the anti-infection efficiency induced by Tat-TPI was still restricted. This study indicated that immunisation with Tat-fused TPI could contribute to enhance CD4(+)T-cell response and decrease hepatic egg granulomatous area after S. japonicum infection though it did not achieve our expected protection against Schistosoma japonicum infection. The optimal vaccine strategy warrants further research.

  1. Design of T cell receptor libraries with diverse binding properties to examine adoptive T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, A.S.; Stone, J.D.; Soto, C.M.; Engels, B.; Schreiber, H.; Roy, E.J.; Kranz, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapies have shown significant promise in the treatment of cancer and viral diseases. One approach, that introduces antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) into ex vivo activated T cells, is designed to overcome central tolerance mechanisms that prevent responses by endogenous T cell repertoires. Studies have suggested that use of higher affinity TCRs against class I MHC antigens could drive the activity of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, but the rules that govern the TCR binding optimal for in vivo activity are unknown. Here we describe a high-throughput platform of “reverse biochemistry” whereby a library of TCRs with a wide range of binding properties to the same antigen is introduced into T cells and adoptively transferred into mice with antigen-positive tumors. Extraction of RNA from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes or lymphoid organs allowed high-throughput sequencing to determine which TCRs were selected in vivo. The results showed that CD8+ T cells expressing the highest affinity TCR variants were deleted in both the tumor infiltrating lymphocyte population and in peripheral lymphoid tissues. In contrast, these same high-affinity TCR variants were preferentially expressed within CD4+ T cells in the tumor, suggesting they played a role in antigen-specific tumor control. The findings thus revealed that the affinity of the transduced TCRs controlled the survival and tumor infiltration of the transferred T cells. Accordingly, the TCR library strategy enables rapid assessment of TCR binding properties that promote peripheral T cell survival and tumor elimination. PMID:23052828

  2. Vaccinia Virus Inhibits T Cell Receptor–Dependent Responses by Human γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O.; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S.; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C. David

    2008-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human γδ T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in γδ T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light–inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vγ2Vδ2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vγ2Vδ2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of γδ T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens. PMID:17152007

  3. Vaccinia virus inhibits T cell receptor-dependent responses by human gammadelta T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C David

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human gammadelta T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in gammadelta T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light-inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of gammadelta T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens.

  4. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Adaptive B and T Cell Responses to a Prototype Monovalent Attenuated Human Rotavirus Vaccine and Virulent Human Rotavirus Challenge in a Gnotobiotic Piglet Model

    PubMed Central

    Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Saif, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RV) are a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Widespread vitamin A deficiency is associated with reduced efficacy of vaccines and higher incidence of diarrheal infections in children in developing countries. We established a vitamin A deficient (VAD) gnotobiotic piglet model that mimics subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children to study its effects on an oral human rotavirus (HRV) vaccine and virulent HRV challenge. Piglets derived from VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS) sows were orally vaccinated with attenuated HRV or mock, with/without supplemental vitamin A and challenged with virulent HRV. Unvaccinated VAD control piglets had significantly lower hepatic vitamin A, higher severity and duration of diarrhea and HRV fecal shedding post-challenge as compared to VAS control pigs. Reduced protection coincided with significantly higher innate (IFNα) cytokine and CD8 T cell frequencies in the blood and intestinal tissues, higher pro-inflammatory (IL12) and 2-3 fold lower anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines, in VAD compared to VAS control pigs. Vaccinated VAD pigs had higher diarrhea severity scores compared to vaccinated VAS pigs, which coincided with lower serum IgA HRV antibody titers and significantly lower intestinal IgA antibody secreting cells post-challenge in the former groups suggesting lower anamnestic responses. A trend for higher serum HRV IgG antibodies was observed in VAD vs VAS vaccinated groups post-challenge. The vaccinated VAD (non-vitamin A supplemented) pigs had significantly higher serum IL12 (PID2) and IFNγ (PID6) compared to vaccinated VAS groups suggesting higher Th1 responses in VAD conditions. Furthermore, regulatory T-cell responses were compromised in VAD pigs. Supplemental vitamin A in VAD pigs did not fully restore the dysregulated immune responses to AttHRV vaccine or moderate virulent HRV diarrhea. Our findings suggest that that VAD in children in developing countries may partially contribute to more severe

  5. Reprogramming the T cell response to Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, Joshua S.; Andersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Coscolla, Copin et al. use comparative genomics of M.tuberculosis strains to show that most human T cell-recognized epitopes are hyperconserved, but bona fide variable epitopes also exist. This identification of two sets of antigens implies opposing evolutionary processes and has an important impact on Tuberculosis vaccine strategy and design. PMID:26777728

  6. Adaptive Immunity in Schizophrenia: Functional Implications of T Cells in the Etiology, Course and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Monojit

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and highly complex neurodevelopmental disorder with an unknown etiopathology. Recently, immunopathogenesis has emerged as one of the most compelling etiological models of schizophrenia. Over the past few years considerable research has been devoted to the role of innate immune responses in schizophrenia. The findings of such studies have helped to conceptualize schizophrenia as a chronic low-grade inflammatory disorder. Although the contribution of adaptive immune responses has also been emphasized, however, the precise role of T cells in the underlying neurobiological pathways of schizophrenia is yet to be ascertained comprehensively. T cells have the ability to infiltrate brain and mediate neuro-immune cross-talk. Conversely, the central nervous system and the neurotransmitters are capable of regulating the immune system. Neurotransmitter like dopamine, implicated widely in schizophrenia risk and progression can modulate the proliferation, trafficking and functions of T cells. Within brain, T cells activate microglia, induce production of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as reactive oxygen species and subsequently lead to neuroinflammation. Importantly, such processes contribute to neuronal injury/death and are gradually being implicated as mediators of neuroprogressive changes in schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs, commonly used to treat schizophrenia are also known to affect adaptive immune system; interfere with the differentiation and functions of T cells. This understanding suggests a pivotal role of T cells in the etiology, course and treatment of schizophrenia and forms the basis of this review.

  7. The architects of B and T cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Lane, Peter J L

    2008-08-15

    Published work links adult lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) with T cell-dependent antibody responses. In this issue of Immunity, Tsuji et al. (2008) associate LTi with T cell-independent IgA antibody responses in the gut.

  8. The role of adapter proteins in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Koretzky, G A; Boerth, N J

    1999-12-01

    Engagement of antigen receptors on lymphocytes leads to a myriad of complex signal transduction cascades. Recently, work from several laboratories has led to the identification and characterization of novel adapter molecules, proteins with no intrinsic enzymatic activity but which integrate signal transduction pathways by mediating protein-protein interactions. Interestingly, it appears that many of these adapter proteins play as critical a role as the effector enzymes themselves in both lymphocyte development and activation. This review describes some of the biochemical and molecular features of several of these newly identified hematopoietic cell-specific adapter molecules highlighting their importance in regulating (both positively and negatively) signal transduction mediated by the T cell antigen receptor.

  9. Diversity of T-cell responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.; Carlson, Jean M.

    2013-04-01

    Using a dynamic model we study the adaptive immune response to a sequence of two infections. We incorporate lymphocyte diversity by modeling populations as continuous distributions in a multi-dimensional space. As expected, memory cells generated by the primary infection invoke a rapid response when the secondary infection is identical (homologous). When the secondary infection is different (heterologous), the memory cells have a positive effect or no effect at all depending on the similarity of the infections. This model displays ‘original antigenic sin’ where the average effector affinity for the heterologous infection is lower than it would be for a naive response, but in cases with original antigenic sin we see a reduction in pathogen density. We model pathology resulting from the immune system itself (immunopathology) but find that in cases of original antigenic sin, immunopathology is still reduced. Average effector affinity is not an accurate measure of the quality of an immune response. The effectivity, which is the total pathogen killing rate, provides a direct measure of quality. This quantity takes both affinity and magnitude into account.

  10. Distinct CD4 T-cell effects on primary versus recall CD8 T-cell responses during viral encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mihyun; Phares, Timothy W; Hinton, David R; Stohlman, Stephen A; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Min, Booki

    2015-03-01

    CD4 T-cell help is not a universal requirement for effective primary CD8 T cells but is essential to generate memory CD8 T cells capable of recall responses. This study examined how CD4 T cells affect primary and secondary anti-viral CD8 T-cell responses within the central nervous system (CNS) during encephalomyelitis induced by sublethal gliatropic coronavirus. CD4 T-cell depletion before infection did not impair peripheral expansion, interferon-γ production, CNS recruitment or initial CNS effector capacity of virus-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Nevertheless, impaired virus control in the absence of CD4 T cells was associated with gradually diminished CNS CD8 T-cell interferon-γ production. Furthermore, within the CD8 T-cell population short-lived effector cells were increased and memory precursor effector cells were significantly decreased, consistent with higher T-cell turnover. Transfer of memory CD8 T cells to reduce viral load in CD4-depleted mice reverted the recipient CNS CD8 T-cell phenotype to that in wild-type control mice. However, memory CD8 T cells primed without CD4 T cells and transferred into infected CD4-sufficient recipients expanded less efficiently and were not sustained in the CNS, contrasting with their helped counterparts. These data suggest that CD4 T cells are dispensable for initial expansion, CNS recruitment and differentiation of primary resident memory CD8 T cells as long as the duration of antigen exposure is limited. By contrast, CD4 T cells are essential to prolong primary CD8 T-cell function in the CNS and imprint memory CD8 T cells for recall responses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Distinct CD4 T-cell effects on primary versus recall CD8 T-cell responses during viral encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Mihyun; Phares, Timothy W; Hinton, David R; Stohlman, Stephen A; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Min, Booki

    2015-01-01

    CD4 T-cell help is not a universal requirement for effective primary CD8 T cells but is essential to generate memory CD8 T cells capable of recall responses. This study examined how CD4 T cells affect primary and secondary anti-viral CD8 T-cell responses within the central nervous system (CNS) during encephalomyelitis induced by sublethal gliatropic coronavirus. CD4 T-cell depletion before infection did not impair peripheral expansion, interferon-γ production, CNS recruitment or initial CNS effector capacity of virus-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Nevertheless, impaired virus control in the absence of CD4 T cells was associated with gradually diminished CNS CD8 T-cell interferon-γ production. Furthermore, within the CD8 T-cell population short-lived effector cells were increased and memory precursor effector cells were significantly decreased, consistent with higher T-cell turnover. Transfer of memory CD8 T cells to reduce viral load in CD4-depleted mice reverted the recipient CNS CD8 T-cell phenotype to that in wild-type control mice. However, memory CD8 T cells primed without CD4 T cells and transferred into infected CD4-sufficient recipients expanded less efficiently and were not sustained in the CNS, contrasting with their helped counterparts. These data suggest that CD4 T cells are dispensable for initial expansion, CNS recruitment and differentiation of primary resident memory CD8 T cells as long as the duration of antigen exposure is limited. By contrast, CD4 T cells are essential to prolong primary CD8 T-cell function in the CNS and imprint memory CD8 T cells for recall responses. PMID:25187405

  12. T Cell Responses: Naive to Memory and Everything in Between

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennock, Nathan D.; White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Cheney, Elizabeth E.; Tamburini, Beth A.; Kedl, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the actions that take place in T cells because of their amazing capacity to proliferate and adopt functional roles aimed at clearing a host of an infectious agent. There is a drastic decline in the T cell population once the primary response is over and the infection is terminated. What remains afterward is a population of T…

  13. T Cell Responses: Naive to Memory and Everything in Between

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennock, Nathan D.; White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Cheney, Elizabeth E.; Tamburini, Beth A.; Kedl, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the actions that take place in T cells because of their amazing capacity to proliferate and adopt functional roles aimed at clearing a host of an infectious agent. There is a drastic decline in the T cell population once the primary response is over and the infection is terminated. What remains afterward is a population of T…

  14. The activation of the adaptive immune system: cross-talk between antigen-presenting cells, T cells and B cells.

    PubMed

    den Haan, Joke M M; Arens, Ramon; van Zelm, Menno C

    2014-12-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of T and B cells that express clonally distributed antigen receptors. To achieve functional adaptive immune responses, antigen-specific T cell populations are stimulated by professional antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells (DCs), which provide crucial stimulatory signals for efficient expansion and development of effector functions. Antigen-specific B cells receive costimulatory signals from helper T cells to stimulate affinity maturation and isotype switching. Here we elaborate on the interactions between DCs, T cells and B cells, and on the important signals for efficient induction of adaptive immune responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. CD8(+) T Cell Immune Response in Immunocompetent Mice during Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huarong; Li, Shihua; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Xiaojuan; Jia, Baoqian; Liu, Hongtao; Liu, Dandan; Tan, Shuguang; Wang, Qihui; Bi, Yuhai; Liu, William J; Hou, Baidong; Gao, George Fu; Zhang, Fuping

    2017-08-23

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection cause neurologic complications, including Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in adults and central nerve system (CNS) abnormalities in fetuses. We investigated the immune response, especially CD8(+) T cell response in C57BL/6 (B6) wild type (WT) mouse during ZIKV infection. We found that robust CD8(+) T cell response was elicited, MHC-I restricted CD8(+) T cell epitopes were identified and a tetramer that recognized ZIKV specific CD8(+) T cells was developed. Finally, virus specific memory CD8(+) T cells were generated in these mice. The CD8(+) T cells from these infected mice were functional, as evidenced by that adoptive transfer of ZIKV specific CD8(+) T cells could protect CNS against ZIKV infection and cross protective to Dengue virus (DENV) infection. Thus, our findings provided comprehensive insight into the immune responses against ZIKV and demonstrated that WT mouse could be a natural and easy access model for evaluating immune response to ZIKV infection.IMPORTANCE ZIKV infection cause severe clinical consequences, including Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in adults, microcephaly, congenital malformations in fetuses and newborn infants, therefore, study of the immune response especially adaptive immune response to ZIKV infection is important to understand the disease caused by ZIKV infection. The importance of our finding is that we characterized the CD8(+) T cell immune response to ZIKV in a comprehensive manner, and identified ZIKV epitopes. Using the identified immunodominant epitope, we developed a tetramer that could recognize ZIKV specific CD8(+) T cells in vivo, which simplified detection and evaluation of ZIKV specific immune responses. In addition, the finding that a tetramer positive memory CD8(+) T cell responses were generated and that CD8(+) T cells could traffic to ZIKV infected brain greatly enhanced our understanding of ZIKV infection and will provide important insight for ZIKV vaccines design. Copyright © 2017

  16. Chaperone-mediated autophagy regulates T cell responses through targeted degradation of negative regulators of T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Valdor, Rut; Mocholi, Enric; Botbol, Yair; Guerrero-Ros, Ignacio; Chandra, Dinesh; Koga, Hiroshi; Gravekamp, Claudia; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Macian, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) targets soluble proteins for lysosomal degradation. Here we found that CMA was activated in T cells in response to engagement of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), which induced expression of the CMA-related lysosomal receptor LAMP-2A. In activated T cells, CMA targeted the ubiquitin ligase Itch and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN1 for degradation to maintain activation-induced responses. Consequently, deletion of the gene encoding LAMP-2A in T cells caused deficient in vivo responses to immunization or infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Impaired CMA activity also occurred in T cells with age, which negatively affected their function. Restoration of LAMP-2A in T cells from old mice resulted in enhancement of activation-induced responses. Our findings define a role for CMA in regulating T cell activation through the targeted degradation of negative regulators of T cell activation.

  17. Requirements for effective antitumor responses of TCR transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    de Witte, Moniek A; Jorritsma, Annelies; Kaiser, Andrew; van den Boom, Marly D; Dokter, Maarten; Bendle, Gavin M; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2008-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of TCR gene-modified T cells has been proposed as an attractive approach to target tumors for which it is difficult or impossible to induce strong tumor-specific T cell responses by vaccination. Whereas the feasibility of generating tumor Ag-specific T cells by gene transfer has been demonstrated, the factors that determine the in vivo effectiveness of TCR-modified T cells are largely unknown. We have analyzed the value of a number of clinically feasible strategies to enhance the antitumor potential of TCR modified T cells. These experiments reveal three factors that contribute greatly to the in vivo potency of TCR-modified T cells. First, irradiation-induced host conditioning is superior to vaccine-induced activation of genetically modified T cells. Second, increasing TCR expression through genetic optimization of TCR sequences has a profound effect on in vivo antitumor activity. Third, a high precursor frequency of TCR modified T cells within the graft is essential. Tumors that ultimately progress in animals treated with this optimized regimen for TCR-based adoptive cell transfer invariably display a reduced expression of the target Ag. This suggests TCR gene therapy can achieve a sufficiently strong selective pressure to warrant the simultaneous targeting of multiple Ags. The strategies outlined in this study should be of value to enhance the antitumor activity of TCR-modified T cells in clinical trials.

  18. IL-22 dampens the T cell response in experimental malaria.

    PubMed

    Sellau, Julie; Alvarado, Catherine Fuentes; Hoenow, Stefan; Mackroth, Maria Sophie; Kleinschmidt, Dörte; Huber, Samuel; Jacobs, Thomas

    2016-06-17

    A tight regulation between the pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses during plasmodial infection is of crucial importance, since a disruption leads to severe malaria pathology. IL-22 is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family, which is known to be highly important in immune regulation. We could detect high plasma levels of IL-22 in Plasmodium falciparum malaria as well as in Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA)-infected C57BL/6J mice. The deficiency of IL-22 in mice during PbA infection led to an earlier occurrence of cerebral malaria but is associated with a lower parasitemia compared to wt mice. Furthermore, at an early time point of infection T cells from PbA-infected Il22(-/-) mice showed an enhanced IFNγ but a diminished IL-17 production. Moreover, dendritic cells from Il22(-/-) mice expressed a higher amount of the costimulatory ligand CD86 upon infection. This finding can be corroborated in vitro since bone marrow-derived dendritic cells from Il22(-/-) mice are better inducers of an antigen-specific IFNγ response by CD8(+) T cells. Even though there is no IL-22 receptor complex known on hematopoietic cells, our data suggest a link between IL-22 and the adaptive immune system which is currently not identified.

  19. IL-22 dampens the T cell response in experimental malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sellau, Julie; Alvarado, Catherine Fuentes; Hoenow, Stefan; Mackroth, Maria Sophie; Kleinschmidt, Dörte; Huber, Samuel; Jacobs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A tight regulation between the pro– and anti–inflammatory immune responses during plasmodial infection is of crucial importance, since a disruption leads to severe malaria pathology. IL-22 is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family, which is known to be highly important in immune regulation. We could detect high plasma levels of IL-22 in Plasmodium falciparum malaria as well as in Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA)-infected C57BL/6J mice. The deficiency of IL-22 in mice during PbA infection led to an earlier occurrence of cerebral malaria but is associated with a lower parasitemia compared to wt mice. Furthermore, at an early time point of infection T cells from PbA-infected Il22−/− mice showed an enhanced IFNγ but a diminished IL-17 production. Moreover, dendritic cells from Il22−/− mice expressed a higher amount of the costimulatory ligand CD86 upon infection. This finding can be corroborated in vitro since bone marrow-derived dendritic cells from Il22−/− mice are better inducers of an antigen-specific IFNγ response by CD8+ T cells. Even though there is no IL-22 receptor complex known on hematopoietic cells, our data suggest a link between IL-22 and the adaptive immune system which is currently not identified. PMID:27311945

  20. γδ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Disease and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Latha, T. Sree; Reddy, Madhava C.; Durbaka, Prasad V. R.; Rachamallu, Aparna; Pallu, Reddanna; Lomada, Dakshayani

    2014-01-01

    The role of γδ T cells in immunotherapy has gained specific importance in the recent years because of their prominent function involving directly or indirectly in the rehabilitation of the diseases. γδ T cells represent a minor population of T cells that express a distinct T cell receptor (TCR) composed of γδ chains instead of αβ chains. Unlike αβ T cells, γδ T cells display a restricted TCR repertoire and recognize mostly unknown non-peptide antigens. γδ T cells act as a link between innate and adaptive immunity, because they lack precise major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction and seize the ability to recognize ligands that are generated during affliction. Skin epidermal γδ T cells recognize antigen expressed by damaged or stressed keratinocytes and play an indispensable role in tissue homeostasis and repair through secretion of distinct growth factors. γδ T cell based immunotherapy strategies possess great prominence in the treatment because of the property of their MHC-independent cytotoxicity, copious amount of cytokine release, and a immediate response in infections. Understanding the role of γδ T cells in pathogenic infections, wound healing, autoimmune diseases, and cancer might provide knowledge for the successful treatment of these diseases using γδ T cell based immunotherapy. Enhancing the human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells functions by administration of aminobisphosphonates like zoledronate, pamidronate, and bromohydrin pyrophosphate along with cytokines and monoclonal antibodies shows a hopeful approach for treatment of tumors and infections. The current review summarizes the role of γδ T cells in various human diseases and immunotherapeutic approaches using γδ T cells. PMID:25426120

  1. Helper T Cell Responses to Respiratory Viruses in the Lung: Development, Virus Suppression, and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Kosuke

    The lung is an important line of defense that is exposed to respiratory infectious pathogens, including viruses. Lung epithelial cells and/or alveolar macrophages are initially targeted by respiratory viruses. Once respiratory viruses invade the cells of the lung, innate immunity is activated to inhibit viral replication. Innate immune signaling also activates virus-specific adaptive immune responses. The helper T cells play pivotal roles in the humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. Helper T cells are categorized into several distinct subsets (e.g., TH1, TH2, TFH, TH17, and Treg), differentiated by their corresponding signature cytokine production profiles. Helper T cells migrate into the airways and the lung after respiratory virus infections. The behavior of the helper T cells differs with each respiratory virus-in some cases, the response is beneficial; in other cases, it is harmful. Here, the general mechanisms underlying helper T cell responses to viral infections are summarized, and functions and reactions of the helper T cells against some respiratory viral infections are discussed. In influenza virus infections, TH1 cells, which regulate the cytotoxic T lymphocytes and IgG2 responses, are efficiently activated. TFH cells required for highly specific and memory humoral responses are also activated on influenza infections. In infections with respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus, TH2 cells develop in the lung and contribute to pathogenesis. In many cases, Treg cells inhibit excessive virus-specific T cell responses that can contribute to viral pathogenicity.

  2. Stepwise B-cell-dependent expansion of T helper clonotypes diversifies the T-cell response

    PubMed Central

    Merkenschlager, Julia; Ploquin, Mickaël J.; Eksmond, Urszula; Andargachew, Rakieb; Thorborn, Georgina; Filby, Andrew; Pepper, Marion; Evavold, Brian; Kassiotis, George

    2016-01-01

    Antigen receptor diversity underpins adaptive immunity by providing the ground for clonal selection of lymphocytes with the appropriate antigen reactivity. Current models attribute T cell clonal selection during the immune response to T-cell receptor (TCR) affinity for either foreign or self peptides. Here, we report that clonal selection of CD4+ T cells is also extrinsically regulated by B cells. In response to viral infection, the antigen-specific TCR repertoire is progressively diversified by staggered clonotypic expansion, according to functional avidity, which correlates with self-reactivity. Clonal expansion of lower-avidity T-cell clonotypes depends on availability of MHC II-expressing B cells, in turn influenced by B-cell activation. B cells clonotypically diversify the CD4+ T-cell response also to vaccination or tumour challenge, revealing a common effect. PMID:26728651

  3. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting natural killer T cell responses in cancer.

    PubMed

    Shissler, Susannah C; Bollino, Dominique R; Tiper, Irina V; Bates, Joshua P; Derakhshandeh, Roshanak; Webb, Tonya J

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells possess a classic αβ T cell receptor (TCR) that is able to recognize self and foreign glycolipid antigens presented by the nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, CD1d. Type I NKT cells (referred to as invariant NKT cells) express a semi-invariant Vα14Jα18 TCR in mice and Vα24Jα18 TCR in humans. Type II NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that express a more diverse set of TCR α chains. The two types of NKT cells often exert opposing effects especially in tumor immunity, where type II cells generally suppress tumor immunity while type I NKT cells can enhance anti-tumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on the role of NKT cells in cancer. We discuss their effector and suppressive functions, as well as describe preclinical and clinical studies utilizing therapeutic strategies focused on harnessing their potent anti-tumor effector functions, and conclude with a discussion on potential next steps for the utilization of NKT cell-targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer.

  4. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting Natural killer T cell responses in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shissler, Susannah C.; Bollino, Dominique R.; Tiper, Irina V.; Bates, Joshua; Derakhshandeh, Roshanak; Webb, Tonya J.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells possess a classic αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) that is able to recognize self and foreign glycolipid antigens presented by the nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, CD1d. Type I NKT cells (referred to as invariant NKT cells) express a semi-invariant Vα14Jα18 TCR in mice and Vα24Jα18 TCR in humans. Type II NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that express a more diverse set of TCR α chains. The two types of NKT cells often exert opposing effects especially in tumor immunity, where Type II cells generally suppress tumor immunity while Type I NKT cells can enhance antitumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on the role of NKT cells in cancer. We discuss their effector and suppressive functions, as well as describe preclinical and clinical studies utilizing therapeutic strategies focused on harnessing their potent anti-tumor effector functions, and conclude with a discussion on potential next steps for the utilization of NKT cell targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:27393665

  5. Longitudinal Requirement for CD4+ T Cell Help for Adenovirus Vector–Elicited CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Borducchi, Erica N.; McNally, Anna; Parenteau, Lily R.; Kaufman, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of replication-incompetent recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vectors as candidate vaccine platforms, the mechanism by which these vectors elicit CD8+ T cell responses remains poorly understood. Our data demonstrate that induction and maintenance of CD8+ T cell responses by Ad vector immunization is longitudinally dependent on CD4+ T cell help for a prolonged period. Depletion of CD4+ T cells in wild type mice within the first 8 d following Ad immunization resulted in dramatically reduced induction of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells, decreased T-bet and eomesodermin expression, impaired KLRG1+ effector differentiation, and atypical expression of the memory markers CD127, CD27, and CD62L. Moreover, these CD8+ T cells failed to protect against a lethal recombinant Listeria monocytogenes challenge. Depletion of CD4+ T cells between weeks 1 and 4 following immunization resulted in increased contraction of memory CD8+ T cells. These data demonstrate a prolonged temporal requirement for CD4+ T cell help for vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cell responses in mice. These findings have important implications in the design of vaccines aimed at eliciting CD8+ T cell responses and may provide insight into the impaired immunogenicity of vaccines in the context of AIDS and other CD4+ T cell immune deficiencies. PMID:24778441

  6. T-cell responses to minor histocompatibility antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, P K; Waterfield, J D; Gascoigne, N R; Sharrock, C E; Mitchison, N A

    1982-01-01

    We have investigated the helper and cytotoxic T-cell response to minor histocompatibility antigens and generated long term antigen-specific cell lines to them. Antigen-specific activity was selected for by regular restimulation with irradiated cells bearing the antigens in the presence of interleukin 2, so that alloreactivity to other cell surface antigens was gradually lost. Helper T cells cultured over several months were active in vivo and in vitro, but the culturing method eventually selected for cytotoxic T cells at the expense of helper T cells, with concomitant changes in the proportions of cells expressing the Lyt phenotypes. Individual long term cultures of cytotoxic T cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens were restricted by either H2K or D but not both. Helper T cells to minor histocompatibility antigens derived directly from primed F1 mice did not show restriction to the priming parental haplotype. This is consistent with antigen reprocessing by the F1 antigen presenting cells such that populations of helper T cells restricted by both parental H-2 haplotypes were primed. F1 cytotoxic T cells were restricted to the parental H-2 haplotype used for in vitro boosting, irrespective of which H-2 was used for in vivo priming. PMID:6214502

  7. T-cell responses to dengue virus in humans.

    PubMed

    Kurane, Ichiro; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A

    2011-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue virus infection induces specific CD4+CD8- and CD8+CD4- T cells in humans. In primary infection, T-cell responses to DENV are serotype cross-reactive, but the highest response is to the serotype that caused the infection. The epitopes recognized by DENV-specific T cells are located in most of the structural and non-structural proteins, but NS3 is the protein that is most dominantly recognized. In patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) caused by secondary DENV infection, T cells are highly activated in vivo. These highly activated T cells are DENV-specific and oligoclonal. Multiple kinds of lymphokines are produced by the activated T cells, and it has been hypothesized that these lymphokines are responsible for induction of plasma leakage, one of the most characteristic features of DHF. Thus, T-cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of DHF and in the recovery from DENV infection.

  8. T cell Vaccinology: Beyond the Reflection of Infectious Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pennock, Nathan D.; Kedl, Justin D.; Kedl, Ross M.

    2016-01-01

    Inducing sustained, robust CD8+ T cell responses is necessary for therapeutic intervention in chronic infectious diseases and cancer. Unfortunately, most adjuvant formulations fail to induce substantial cellular immunity in humans. Attenuated acute infectious agents induce strong CD8+ T cell immunity, and are thought to therefore represent a good road map for guiding the development of subunit vaccines capable of inducing the same. However, recent evidence suggests that this assumption may need reconsideration. Here we provide an overview of subunit vaccine history as it pertains to instigating T cell responses. We argue that in light of evidence demonstrating that T cell responses to vaccination differ from those induced by infectious challenge, research in pursuit of cellular immunity-inducing vaccine adjuvants should no longer follow only the infection paradigm. PMID:26830540

  9. LPS-activated monocytes suppress T-cell immune responses and induce FOXP3+ T cells through a COX-2-PGE2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bryn, Tone; Yaqub, Sheraz; Mahic, Milada; Henjum, Karen; Aandahl, Einar M; Taskén, Kjetil

    2008-02-01

    Monocytes initiate innate immune responses and interact with T cells to induce antigen-specific immune responses by antigen presentation and secretion of humoral factors. We have previously shown that adaptive regulatory T cells inhibit T-cell effector functions in a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-dependent manner and that PGE(2) converts resting CD4+CD25- T cells into FOXP3+ T cells with a suppressive phenotype. Here, we demonstrate that stimulation of monocytes with LPS leads to suppression of T-cell immune responses by a COX-2-PGE(2)-dependent mechanism that is reversible with COX-2 inhibitors as well as PGE(2)-neutralizing antibody and cAMP antagonist. Furthermore, we show that LPS-activated monocytes induce FOXP3 expression in resting CD4+CD25- T cells by the same pathway. These results suggest that monocytes are able to efficiently suppress T-cell immune responses in a regulatory manner and elicit an inhibitory immune profile.

  10. Improving T cell responses to modified peptides in tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-03-01

    Immune recognition and elimination of cancerous cells is the primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. However, obstacles including immune tolerance and tumor-induced immunosuppression often limit beneficial immune responses. Vaccination is one proposed intervention that may help to overcome these issues and is an active area of study in cancer immunotherapy. Immunizing with tumor antigenic peptides is a promising, straight-forward vaccine strategy hypothesized to boost preexisting antitumor immunity. However, tumor antigens are often weak T cell agonists, attributable to several mechanisms, including immune self-tolerance and poor immunogenicity of self-derived tumor peptides. One strategy for overcoming these mechanisms is vaccination with mimotopes, or peptide mimics of tumor antigens, which alter the antigen presentation and/or T cell activation to increase the expansion of tumor-specific T cells. Evaluation of mimotope vaccine strategies has revealed that even subtle alterations in peptide sequence can dramatically alter antigen presentation and T cell receptor recognition. Most of this research has been performed using T cell clones, which may not be accurate representations of the naturally occurring antitumor response. The relationship between clones generated after mimotope vaccination and the polyclonal T cell repertoire is unclear. Our work with mimotopes in a mouse model of colon carcinoma has revealed important insights into these issues. We propose that the identification of mimotopes based on stimulation of the naturally responding T cell repertoire will dramatically improve the efficacy of mimotope vaccination.

  11. Human CD4+ T Cell Response to Human Herpesvirus 6

    PubMed Central

    Nastke, Maria-D.; Becerra, Aniuska; Yin, Liusong; Dominguez-Amorocho, Omar; Gibson, Laura; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Following primary infection, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) establishes a persistent infection for life. HHV-6 reactivation has been associated with transplant rejection, delayed engraftment, encephalitis, muscular dystrophy, and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. The poor understanding of the targets and outcome of the cellular immune response to HHV-6 makes it difficult to outline the role of HHV-6 in human disease. To fill in this gap, we characterized CD4 T cell responses to HHV-6 using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and T cell lines generated from healthy donors. CD4+ T cells responding to HHV-6 in peripheral blood were observed at frequencies below 0.1% of total T cells but could be expanded easily in vitro. Analysis of cytokines in supernatants of PBMC and T cell cultures challenged with HHV-6 preparations indicated that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were appropriate markers of the HHV-6 cellular response. Eleven CD4+ T cell epitopes, all but one derived from abundant virion components, were identified. The response was highly cross-reactive between HHV-6A and HHV-6B variants. Seven of the CD4+ T cell epitopes do not share significant homologies with other known human pathogens, including the closely related human viruses human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramers generated with these epitopes were able to detect HHV-6-specific T cell populations. These findings provide a window into the immune response to HHV-6 and provide a basis for tracking HHV-6 cellular immune responses. PMID:22357271

  12. TIGIT predominantly regulates the immune response via regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kurtulus, Sema; Sakuishi, Kaori; Ngiow, Shin-Foong; Joller, Nicole; Tan, Dewar J; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Anderson, Ana C

    2015-11-02

    Coinhibitory receptors are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Upregulation of these receptors on effector T cells terminates T cell responses, while their expression on Tregs promotes their suppressor function. Understanding the function of coinhibitory receptors in effector T cells and Tregs is crucial, as therapies that target coinhibitory receptors are currently at the forefront of treatment strategies for cancer and other chronic diseases. T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is a recently identified coinhibitory receptor that is found on the surface of a variety of lymphoid cells, and its role in immune regulation is just beginning to be elucidated. We examined TIGIT-mediated immune regulation in different murine cancer models and determined that TIGIT marks the most dysfunctional subset of CD8+ T cells in tumor tissue as well as tumor-tissue Tregs with a highly active and suppressive phenotype. We demonstrated that TIGIT signaling in Tregs directs their phenotype and that TIGIT primarily suppresses antitumor immunity via Tregs and not CD8+ T cells. Moreover, TIGIT+ Tregs upregulated expression of the coinhibitory receptor TIM-3 in tumor tissue, and TIM-3 and TIGIT synergized to suppress antitumor immune responses. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into how TIGIT regulates immune responses in chronic disease settings.

  13. TIGIT predominantly regulates the immune response via regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurtulus, Sema; Sakuishi, Kaori; Ngiow, Shin-Foong; Joller, Nicole; Tan, Dewar J.; Teng, Michele W.L.; Smyth, Mark J.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Coinhibitory receptors are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Upregulation of these receptors on effector T cells terminates T cell responses, while their expression on Tregs promotes their suppressor function. Understanding the function of coinhibitory receptors in effector T cells and Tregs is crucial, as therapies that target coinhibitory receptors are currently at the forefront of treatment strategies for cancer and other chronic diseases. T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is a recently identified coinhibitory receptor that is found on the surface of a variety of lymphoid cells, and its role in immune regulation is just beginning to be elucidated. We examined TIGIT-mediated immune regulation in different murine cancer models and determined that TIGIT marks the most dysfunctional subset of CD8+ T cells in tumor tissue as well as tumor-tissue Tregs with a highly active and suppressive phenotype. We demonstrated that TIGIT signaling in Tregs directs their phenotype and that TIGIT primarily suppresses antitumor immunity via Tregs and not CD8+ T cells. Moreover, TIGIT+ Tregs upregulated expression of the coinhibitory receptor TIM-3 in tumor tissue, and TIM-3 and TIGIT synergized to suppress antitumor immune responses. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into how TIGIT regulates immune responses in chronic disease settings. PMID:26413872

  14. Adaptive human regulatory T cells: myth or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Chatenoud, Lucienne; Bach, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    It is now well established that a distinct subset of T lymphocytes is essential for downregulating immune responses to both endogenous (self) and exogenous antigens. These Tregs are CD4+ and express high levels of CD25 (the α chain of the IL-2 receptor) and the transcription factor Foxp3. The mechanisms determining the lifespan, homeostasis, and in vivo generation of these Tregs are still ill defined. A study by Vukmanovic-Stejic et al. in this issue of the JCI shows that in humans, Tregs are present throughout life but that despite their high throughput, they are short lived (see the related article beginning on page 2423). It is thus unlikely that all CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs are generated as a separate lineage in the thymus. The authors propose that during adulthood, Tregs essentially emerge at the periphery from the memory T cell pool. PMID:16955134

  15. Osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes stimulate autologous T cell responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sakata, M; Masuko-Hongo, K; Nakamura, H; Onuma, H; Tsuruha, J I; Aoki, H; Nishioka, K; Kato, T

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the presence of specific T cell immune response to autologous chondrocytes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from OA or post-traumatic patients were co-cultured with irradiated autologous chondrocytes, and their proliferative response was assessed using 3H-thymidine incorporation. Expression of HLA-class II molecules was also assessed on chondrocytes by immunohistochemistry or flow cytometry. T cell responses to autologous chondrocytes in OA yielded a significantly greater mean stimulation index (6.35 +/- 1.63) compared to controls (1.21 +/- 0.09, p < 0.01). This response was partially blocked by antibodies against HLA class I, class II, CD4 or CD8. Increased expression of HLA-DP, -DQ, and -DR was observed. This study showed the autologous T cell-stimulating property of OA chondrocytes in vitro. The elucidation of the autoimmune responses may contribute to the understanding of immune-mediated mechanisms in OA.

  16. T cell responses in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Diani, Marco; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2015-04-01

    According to the current view the histological features of psoriasis arise as a consequence of the interplay between T cells, dendritic cells and keratinocytes giving rise to a self-perpetuating loop that amplifies and sustains inflammation in lesional skin. In particular, myeloid dendritic cell secretion of IL-23 and IL-12 activates IL-17-producing T cells, Th22 and Th1 cells, leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17, IFN-γ, TNF and IL-22. These cytokines mediate effects on keratinocytes thus establishing the inflammatory loop. Unlike psoriasis the immunopathogenic features of psoriatic arthritis are poorly characterized and there is a gap in the knowledge of the pathogenic link between inflammatory T cell responses arising in the skin and the development of joint inflammation. Here we review the knowledge accumulated over the years from the early evidence of autoreactive CD8 T cells that was studied mainly in the years 1990s and 2000s to the recent findings of the role of Th17, Tc17 cells and γδ T cells in psoriatic disease pathogenesis. The review will also focus on common and distinguishing features of T cell responses in psoriatic plaques and in synovial fluid of patients with psoriatic arthritis. The integration of this information could help to distinguish the role played by T cells in the initiation phase of the disease from the role of T cells as downstream effectors sustaining inflammation in psoriatic plaques and potentially leading to disease manifestation in distant joints. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. γδ T cells and the immune response to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    McGill, Jodi L; Sacco, Randy E

    2016-11-15

    γδ T cells are a subset of nonconventional T cells that play a critical role in bridging the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. γδ T cells are particularly abundant in ruminant species and may constitute up to 60% of the circulating lymphocyte pool in young cattle. The frequency of circulating γδ T cells is highest in neonatal calves and declines as the animal ages, suggesting these cells may be particularly important in the immune system of the very young. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is a significant cause of respiratory infection in calves, and is most severe in animals under one year of age. BRSV is also a significant factor in the development of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is closely related to BRSV and a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants and children worldwide. BRSV infection in calves shares striking similarities with RSV infection in human infants. To date, there have been few studies defining the role of γδ T cells in the immune response to BRSV or RSV infection in animals or humans, respectively. However, emerging evidence suggests that γδ T cells may play a critical role in the early recognition of infection and in shaping the development of the adaptive immune response through inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production. Further, while it is clear that γδ T cells accumulate in the lungs during BRSV and RSV infection, their role in protection vs. immunopathology remains unclear. This review will summarize what is currently known about the role of γδ T cells in the immune response to BRSV and BRDC in cattle, and where appropriate, draw parallels to the role of γδ T cells in the human response to RSV infection.

  18. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Memory CD4+ T cells induce innate responses independently of pathogen.

    PubMed

    Strutt, Tara M; McKinstry, K Kai; Dibble, John P; Winchell, Caylin; Kuang, Yi; Curtis, Jonathan D; Huston, Gail; Dutton, Richard W; Swain, Susan L

    2010-05-01

    Inflammation induced by recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns markedly affects subsequent adaptive responses. We asked whether the adaptive immune system can also affect the character and magnitude of innate inflammatory responses. We found that the response of memory, but not naive, CD4(+) T cells enhances production of multiple innate inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IICs) in the lung and that, during influenza infection, this leads to early control of virus. Memory CD4(+) T cell-induced IICs and viral control require cognate antigen recognition and are optimal when memory cells are either T helper type 1 (T(H)1) or T(H)17 polarized but are independent of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and do not require activation of conserved pathogen recognition pathways. This represents a previously undescribed mechanism by which memory CD4(+) T cells induce an early innate response that enhances immune protection against pathogens.

  20. Dickkopf-3, a tissue-derived modulator of local T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Meister, Michael; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Nordström, Viola; Kumar, Varun; Ludwig, Julia; Lui, Kathy O; Boyd, Ashleigh S; Popovic, Zoran V; Fleming, Thomas Henry; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Nawroth, Peter P; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Waldmann, Herman; Oelert, Thilo; Arnold, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune system protects organisms from harmful environmental insults. In parallel, regulatory mechanisms control immune responses in order to assure preservation of organ integrity. Yet, molecules involved in the control of T-cell responses in peripheral tissues are poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the function of Dickkopf-3 in the modulation of local T-cell reactivity. Dkk3 is a secreted, mainly tissue-derived protein with highest expression in organs considered as immune-privileged such as the eye, embryo, placenta, and brain. While T-cell development and activation status in naïve Dkk3-deficient mice was comparable to littermate controls, we found that Dkk3 contributes to the immunosuppressive microenvironment that protects transplanted, class-I mismatched embryoid bodies from T-cell-mediated rejection. Moreover, genetic deletion or antibody-mediated neutralization of Dkk3 led to an exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This phenotype was accompanied by a change of T-cell polarization displayed by an increase of IFNγ-producing T cells within the central nervous system. In the wild-type situation, Dkk3 expression in the brain was up-regulated during the course of EAE in an IFNγ-dependent manner. In turn, Dkk3 decreased IFNγ activity and served as part of a negative feedback mechanism. Thus, our findings suggest that Dkk3 functions as a tissue-derived modulator of local CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses.

  1. Functional adaptation to oxidative stress by memory T cells: an analysis of the role in the cardiovascular disease process.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Matata, Bashir M

    2008-11-21

    T cells participate in combating infection and critically determine the outcomes in any given disease process. Impaired immune response occurs in a number disease processes such as in cancer and atherosclerosis although the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. This article gives an up-to-date review of T cells development and functional adaptation to pathophysiological stimuli and participation in the cardiovascular disease process. In addition, we have discussed the signaling pathways controlled by the microenvironment that determine T cells function and resultant type of immune response. We have also discussed in detail how oxidative stress is a key component of the micro environmental interaction.

  2. Itk: The Rheostat of the T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Grasis, Juris A.; Tsoukas, Constantine D.

    2011-01-01

    The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Itk plays a key role in TCR-initiated signaling that directly and significantly affects the regulation of PLCγ1 and the consequent mobilization of Ca2+. Itk also participates in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization as well as cellular adhesion, which is necessary for a productive T cell response. The functional cellular outcome of these molecular regulations by Itk renders it an important mediator of T cell development and differentiation. This paper encompasses the structure of Itk, the signaling parameters leading to Itk activation, and Itk effects on molecular pathways resulting in functional cellular outcomes. The incorporation of these factors persuades one to believe that Itk serves as a modulator, or rheostat, critically fine-tuning the T cell response. PMID:21747996

  3. Itk: the rheostat of the T cell response.

    PubMed

    Grasis, Juris A; Tsoukas, Constantine D

    2011-01-01

    The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Itk plays a key role in TCR-initiated signaling that directly and significantly affects the regulation of PLCγ1 and the consequent mobilization of Ca(2+). Itk also participates in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization as well as cellular adhesion, which is necessary for a productive T cell response. The functional cellular outcome of these molecular regulations by Itk renders it an important mediator of T cell development and differentiation. This paper encompasses the structure of Itk, the signaling parameters leading to Itk activation, and Itk effects on molecular pathways resulting in functional cellular outcomes. The incorporation of these factors persuades one to believe that Itk serves as a modulator, or rheostat, critically fine-tuning the T cell response.

  4. Immune-responsiveness of CD4+ T cells during Streptococcus suis serotype 2 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lecours, Marie-Pier; Letendre, Corinne; Clarke, Damian; Lemire, Paul; Galbas, Tristan; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile; Thibodeau, Jacques; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Segura, Mariela

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Streptococcus suis infection, a major swine and human pathogen, is only partially understood and knowledge on the host adaptive immune response is critically scarce. Yet, S. suis virulence factors, particularly its capsular polysaccharide (CPS), enable this bacterium to modulate dendritic cell (DC) functions and potentially impair the immune response. This study aimed to evaluate modulation of T cell activation during S. suis infection and the role of DCs in this response. S. suis-stimulated total mouse splenocytes readily produced TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, CCL3, CXCL9, and IL-10. Ex vivo and in vivo analyses revealed the involvement of CD4+ T cells and a Th1 response. Nevertheless, during S. suis infection, levels of the Th1-derived cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ were very low. A transient splenic depletion of CD4+ T cells and a poor memory response were also observed. Moreover, CD4+ T cells secreted IL-10 and failed to up-regulate optimal levels of CD40L and CD69 in coculture with DCs. The CPS hampered release of several T cell-derived cytokines in vitro. Finally, a correlation was established between severe clinical signs of S. suis disease and impaired antibody responses. Altogether, these results suggest S. suis interferes with the adaptive immune response. PMID:27905502

  5. Induction of anti-tumor immunity and T-cell responses using nanodelivery systems engrafting TLR-5 ligand.

    PubMed

    Panda, Amulya K

    2011-02-01

    Induction of activated T-cell responses is a prerequisite for the development of vaccine against intracellular infection and for the control of cancer. Particulate nanoscale delivery systems deliver antigens intracellularly and help in inducing T-cell responses. T-cell responses can be further augmented by targeting these particles to dendritic cells, which have the ability to induce both innate and adaptive immune responses. Flagellin, which acts as a TLR-5 ligand, has been extensively explored for its adjuvant activity. The paper under evaluation reports a novel vaccine delivery platform technology for induction of a T-cell response using a nanoscale liposome containing antigen and a small synthetic peptide representing TLR-5-binding motifs of flagellin. Vaccination using this nanodelivery system activated dendritic cells through TLR-5 activation and induced both innate and adaptive immune responses. Such novel delivery systems can improve modern vaccine formulation, particularly for the generation of activated T-cell responses and anti-tumor immunity.

  6. Success and failure of virus-specific T cell responses in hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph; Thimme, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is only cleared in a minority of infected individuals, the majority of patients develop chronic infection. Chronic HCV infection potentially leads to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and finally hepatocellular carcinoma. The host immune response is an important determinant in the outcome of HCV infection. Innate as well as adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses mediate important antiviral actions; however, virus-specific T cell responses appear to be most critical. Indeed, strong and multispecific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cell responses are required for viral clearance. Interestingly, individuals who express certain HLA alleles (which are important for antigen presentation to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells) have a higher chance to clear the virus. The mechanisms of protection by HLA class I alleles such as HLA-B27 have been characterized recently. In most individuals, however, the HCV-specific immune response fails to clear the virus. Several mechanisms underlying this HCV-specific T cell failure have been identified. These include viral factors such as viral escape mutations and immunological factors such as the expression of inhibitory receptors, which lead to CD8+ T cell dysfunction. An in-depth understanding of the determinants of success or failure of the HCV-specific T cell response is critical for the development of prophylactic as well as therapeutic vaccination regimes against HCV. Here, we will discuss the virological and immunological determinants of HCV clearance and persistence.

  7. Innate lymphoid cells regulate CD4+ T-cell responses to intestinal commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Monticelli, Laurel A; Fung, Thomas C; Ziegler, Carly G K; Grunberg, Stephanie; Sinha, Rohini; Mantegazza, Adriana R; Ma, Hak-Ling; Crawford, Alison; Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John; Koni, Pandelakis A; Bushman, Frederic D; Elson, Charles O; Eberl, Gérard; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2013-06-06

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently characterized family of immune cells that have critical roles in cytokine-mediated regulation of intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity. Alterations in ILC responses are associated with multiple chronic human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, implicating a role for ILCs in disease pathogenesis. Owing to an inability to target ILCs selectively, experimental studies assessing ILC function have predominantly used mice lacking adaptive immune cells. However, in lymphocyte-sufficient hosts ILCs are vastly outnumbered by CD4(+) T cells, which express similar profiles of effector cytokines. Therefore, the function of ILCs in the presence of adaptive immunity and their potential to influence adaptive immune cell responses remain unknown. To test this, we used genetic or antibody-mediated depletion strategies to target murine ILCs in the presence of an adaptive immune system. We show that loss of retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor-γt-positive (RORγt(+)) ILCs was associated with dysregulated adaptive immune cell responses against commensal bacteria and low-grade systemic inflammation. Remarkably, ILC-mediated regulation of adaptive immune cells occurred independently of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 or IL-23. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses revealed that RORγt(+) ILCs express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and can process and present antigen. However, rather than inducing T-cell proliferation, ILCs acted to limit commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses. Consistent with this, selective deletion of MHCII in murine RORγt(+) ILCs resulted in dysregulated commensal bacteria-dependent CD4(+) T-cell responses that promoted spontaneous intestinal inflammation. These data identify that ILCs maintain intestinal homeostasis through MHCII-dependent interactions with CD4(+) T cells that limit pathological adaptive immune cell responses to commensal

  8. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  9. Autoimmune melanocyte destruction is required for robust CD8+ memory T cell responses to mouse melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Katelyn T.; Côté, Anik L.; Zhang, Peisheng; Steinberg, Shannon M.; Guo, Yanxia; Allie, Rameeza; Zhang, Weijun; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Usherwood, Edward J.; Turk, Mary Jo

    2011-01-01

    A link between autoimmunity and improved antitumor immunity has long been recognized, although the exact mechanistic relationship between these two phenomena remains unclear. In the present study we have found that vitiligo, the autoimmune destruction of melanocytes, generates self antigen required for mounting persistent and protective memory CD8+ T cell responses to melanoma. Vitiligo developed in approximately 60% of mice that were depleted of regulatory CD4+ T cells and then subjected to surgical excision of large established B16 melanomas. Mice with vitiligo generated 10-fold larger populations of CD8+ memory T cells specific for shared melanoma/melanocyte antigens. CD8+ T cells in mice with vitiligo acquired phenotypic and functional characteristics of effector memory, suggesting that they were supported by ongoing antigen stimulation. Such responses were not generated in melanocyte-deficient mice, indicating a requirement for melanocyte destruction in maintaining CD8+ T cell immunity to melanoma. Vitiligo-associated memory CD8+ T cells provided durable tumor protection, were capable of mounting a rapid recall response to melanoma, and did not demonstrate phenotypic or functional signs of exhaustion even after many months of exposure to antigen. This work establishes melanocyte destruction as a key determinant of lasting melanoma-reactive immune responses, thus illustrating that immune-mediated destruction of normal tissues can perpetuate adaptive immune responses to cancer. PMID:21540555

  10. Activation requirements and responses to TLR ligands in human CD4+ T cells: comparison of two T cell isolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Christina L; Thomas, Jeremy J; Rojas, Roxana E

    2009-05-15

    Direct regulation of T cell function by microbial ligands through Toll-like receptors (TLR) is an emerging area of T cell biology. Currently either immunomagnetic cell sorting (IMACS) or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), are utilized to isolate T-cell subsets for such studies. However, it is unknown to what extent differences in T cell purity between these isolation techniques influence T cell functional assays. We compared the purity, response to mitogen, activation requirements, and response to TLR ligands between human CD4(+) T cells isolated either by IMACS (IMACS-CD4(+)) or by IMACS followed by FACS (IMACS/FACS-CD4(+)). As expected, IMACS-CD4(+) were less pure than IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) (92.5%+/-1.4% versus 99.7%+/-0.2%, respectively). Consequently, IMACS-CD4(+) proliferated and produced cytokines in response to mitogen alone and had lower activation requirements compared to IMACS/FACS-CD4(+). In addition IMACS-CD4(+) but not IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) responses were upregulated by the TLR-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, TLR-2 and TLR-5 engagement induced costimulation in both IMACS-CD4(+) and highly purified IMACS-/FACS-CD4(+). Altogether these results indicate that small differences in cell purity can significantly alter T cell responses to TLR ligands. This study stresses the importance of a stringent purification method when investigating the role of microbial ligands in T cell function.

  11. Primary antitumor immune response mediated by CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Corthay, Alexandre; Skovseth, Dag K; Lundin, Katrin U; Røsjø, Egil; Omholt, Hilde; Hofgaard, Peter O; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Bogen, Bjarne

    2005-03-01

    Gene-targeted mice have recently revealed a role for lymphocytes and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) in conferring protection against cancer, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we have characterized a successful primary antitumor immune response initiated by naive CD4+ T cells. Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-negative myeloma cells injected subcutaneously into syngeneic mice were surrounded within 3 days by macrophages that captured tumor antigens. Within 6 days, naive myeloma-specific CD4+ T cells became activated in draining lymph nodes and subsequently migrated to the incipient tumor site. Upon recognition of tumor-derived antigenic peptides presented on MHC-II by macrophages, the myeloma-specific CD4+ T cells were reactivated and started to secrete cytokines. T cell-derived IFNgamma activated macrophages in close proximity to the tumor cells. Tumor cell growth was completely inhibited by such locally activated macrophages. These data indicate a mechanism for immunosurveillance of MHC-II-negative cancer cells by tumor-specific CD4+ T cells through collaboration with macrophages.

  12. A response calculus for immobilized T cell receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P S; Menné, C; Mariuzza, R A; Geisler, C; Karjalainen, K

    2001-12-28

    To address the molecular mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, we have formulated a model for T cell activation, termed the 2D-affinity model, in which the density of TCR on the T cell surface, the density of ligand on the presenting surface, and their corresponding two-dimensional affinity determine the level of T cell activation. When fitted to T cell responses against purified ligands immobilized on plastic surfaces, the 2D-affinity model adequately simulated changes in cellular activation as a result of varying ligand affinity and ligand density. These observations further demonstrated the importance of receptor cross-linking density in determining TCR signaling. Moreover, it was found that the functional two-dimensional affinity of TCR ligands was affected by the chemical composition of the ligand-presenting surface. This makes it possible that cell-bound TCR ligands, despite their low affinity in solution, are of optimal two-dimensional affinity thereby allowing effective TCR binding under physiological conditions, i.e. at low ligand densities in cellular interfaces.

  13. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    PubMed

    Sandalova, Elena; Laccabue, Diletta; Boni, Carolina; Tan, Anthony T; Fink, Katja; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chua, Robert; Shafaeddin Schreve, Bahar; Ferrari, Carlo; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2010-08-19

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza) pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR), proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low)) and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV). CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza) were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  14. Insights into the Relationship between Toll Like Receptors and Gamma Delta T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Asif Amin; Patil, Rushikesh Sudam; Chiplunkar, Shubhada Vivek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is an important aspect of cancer biology that contributes to tumor initiation, tumor progression and responses to therapy. The composition and characteristics of the tumor microenvironment vary widely and are important in determining the anti-tumor immune response. Successful immunization requires activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. Generally, immune system is compromised in patients with cancer due to immune suppression, loss of tumor antigen expression and dysfunction of antigen presenting cells (APC). Thus, therapeutic immunization leading to cancer regression remains a significant challenge. Certain cells of the immune system, including dendritic cells (DCs) and gamma delta (γδ) T cells are capable of driving potent anti-tumor responses. The property of MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, high potential of cytokine release, tissue tropism and early activation in infections and malignant disease makes γδ T cells as an emerging candidate for immunotherapy. Various strategies are being developed to enhance anti-tumor immune responses of γδ T cells and DCs one of them is the use of novel adjuvants like toll like receptors (TLR) agonists, which enhance γδ T cell function directly or through DC activation, which has ability to prime γδ T cells. TLR agonists are being used clinically either alone or in combination with tumor antigens and has shown initial success in both enhancing immune responses and eliciting anti-tumor activity. TLR activated γδ T cells and DCs nurture each other’s activation. This provides a potent base for first line of defense and manipulation of the adaptive response against pathogens and cancer. The available data provides a strong rationale for initiating combinatorial therapy for the treatment of diseases and this review will summarize the application of adjuvants (TLRs) for boosting immune response of γδ T cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases and their use in combinatorial therapy

  15. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  16. Mitochondrial Respiration Controls Lysosomal Function during Inflammatory T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4(+) T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation, and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward proinflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD(+) levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Activated group 3 innate lymphoid cells promote T-cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed

    von Burg, Nicole; Chappaz, Stéphane; Baerenwaldt, Anne; Horvath, Edit; Bose Dasgupta, Somdeb; Ashok, Devika; Pieters, Jean; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Rolink, Antonius; Acha-Orbea, Hans; Finke, Daniela

    2014-09-02

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) have emerged as important cellular players in tissue repair and innate immunity. Whether these cells meaningfully regulate adaptive immune responses upon activation has yet to be explored. Here we show that upon IL-1β stimulation, peripheral ILC3s become activated, secrete cytokines, up-regulate surface MHC class II molecules, and express costimulatory molecules. ILC3s can take up latex beads, process protein antigen, and consequently prime CD4(+) T-cell responses in vitro. The cognate interaction of ILC3s and CD4(+) T cells leads to T-cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, whereas its disruption impairs specific T-cell and T-dependent B-cell responses in vivo. In addition, the ILC3-CD4(+) T-cell interaction is bidirectional and leads to the activation of ILC3s. Taken together, our data reveal a novel activation-dependent function of peripheral ILC3s in eliciting cognate CD4(+) T-cell immune responses.

  18. Interleukin-2 from Adaptive T Cells Enhances Natural Killer Cell Activity against Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeguang; Frascaroli, Giada; Bayer, Carina; Schmal, Tatjana; Mertens, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) requires a continuous immune surveillance, thus HCMV is the most important viral pathogen in severely immunocompromised individuals. Both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to the control of HCMV. Here, we report that peripheral blood natural killer cells (PBNKs) from HCMV-seropositive donors showed an enhanced activity toward HCMV-infected autologous macrophages. However, this enhanced response was abolished when purified NK cells were applied as effectors. We demonstrate that this enhanced PBNK activity was dependent on the interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion of CD4(+) T cells when reexposed to the virus. Purified T cells enhanced the activity of purified NK cells in response to HCMV-infected macrophages. This effect could be suppressed by IL-2 blocking. Our findings not only extend the knowledge on the immune surveillance in HCMV-namely, that NK cell-mediated innate immunity can be enhanced by a preexisting T cell antiviral immunity-but also indicate a potential clinical implication for patients at risk for severe HCMV manifestations due to immunosuppressive drugs, which mainly suppress IL-2 production and T cell responsiveness. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is never cleared by the host after primary infection but instead establishes a lifelong latent infection with possible reactivations when the host's immunity becomes suppressed. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity are important for the control of viral infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are main innate effectors providing a rapid response to virus-infected cells. Virus-specific T cells are the main adaptive effectors that are critical for the control of the latent infection and limitation of reinfection. In this study, we found that IL-2 secreted by adaptive CD4(+) T cells after reexposure to HCMV enhances the activity of NK cells in response to HCMV-infected target cells. This is the first direct evidence that the adaptive T cells can help NK cells to act

  19. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cells Share this page Facebook Twitter Email T Cells Definition of MS Myelin Immune-Mediated Disease T ... other immune cells. Three broad categories of T cells Helper T cells augment the immune response by ...

  20. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-09-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development.

  1. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development. PMID:26038429

  2. Identification of novel gammadelta T-cell subsets following bacterial infection in the absence of Vgamma1+ T cells: homeostatic control of gammadelta T-cell responses to pathogen infection by Vgamma1+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Newton, Darren J; Andrew, Elizabeth M; Dalton, Jane E; Mears, Rainy; Carding, Simon R

    2006-02-01

    Although gammadelta T cells are a common feature of many pathogen-induced immune responses, the factors that influence, promote, or regulate the response of individual gammadelta T-cell subsets to infection is unknown. Here we show that in the absence of Vgamma1+ T cells, novel subsets of gammadelta T cells, expressing T-cell receptor (TCR)-Vgamma chains that normally define TCRgammadelta+ dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) (Vgamma5+), intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIELs) (Vgamma7+), and lymphocytes associated with the vaginal epithelia (Vgamma6+), are recruited to the spleen in response to bacterial infection in TCR-Vgamma1-/- mice. By comparison of phenotype and structure of TCR-Vgamma chains and/or -Vdelta chains expressed by these novel subsets with those of their epithelium-associated counterparts, the Vgamma6+ T cells elicited in infected Vgamma1-/- mice were shown to be identical to those found in the reproductive tract, from where they are presumably recruited in the absence of Vgamma1+ T cells. By contrast, Vgamma5+ and Vgamma7+ T cells found in infected Vgamma1-/- mice were distinct from Vgamma5+ DETCs and Vgamma7+ iIELs. Functional analyses of the novel gammadelta T-cell subsets identified for infected Vgamma1-/- mice showed that whereas the Vgamma5+ and Vgamma7+ subsets may compensate for the absence of Vgamma1+ T cells by producing similar cytokines, they do not possess cytocidal activity and they cannot replace the macrophage homeostasis function of Vgamma1+ T cells. Collectively, these findings identify novel subsets of gammadelta T cells, the recruitment and activity of which is under the control of Vgamma1+ T cells.

  3. Identification of Novel γδ T-Cell Subsets following Bacterial Infection in the Absence of Vγ1+ T Cells: Homeostatic Control of γδ T-Cell Responses to Pathogen Infection by Vγ1+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Darren J.; Andrew, Elizabeth M.; Dalton, Jane E.; Mears, Rainy; Carding, Simon R.

    2006-01-01

    Although γδ T cells are a common feature of many pathogen-induced immune responses, the factors that influence, promote, or regulate the response of individual γδ T-cell subsets to infection is unknown. Here we show that in the absence of Vγ1+ T cells, novel subsets of γδ T cells, expressing T-cell receptor (TCR)-Vγ chains that normally define TCRγδ+ dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) (Vγ5+), intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIELs) (Vγ7+), and lymphocytes associated with the vaginal epithelia (Vγ6+), are recruited to the spleen in response to bacterial infection in TCR-Vγ1−/− mice. By comparison of phenotype and structure of TCR-Vγ chains and/or -Vδ chains expressed by these novel subsets with those of their epithelium-associated counterparts, the Vγ6+ T cells elicited in infected Vγ1−/− mice were shown to be identical to those found in the reproductive tract, from where they are presumably recruited in the absence of Vγ1+ T cells. By contrast, Vγ5+ and Vγ7+ T cells found in infected Vγ1−/− mice were distinct from Vγ5+ DETCs and Vγ7+ iIELs. Functional analyses of the novel γδ T-cell subsets identified for infected Vγ1−/− mice showed that whereas the Vγ5+ and Vγ7+ subsets may compensate for the absence of Vγ1+ T cells by producing similar cytokines, they do not possess cytocidal activity and they cannot replace the macrophage homeostasis function of Vγ1+ T cells. Collectively, these findings identify novel subsets of γδ T cells, the recruitment and activity of which is under the control of Vγ1+ T cells. PMID:16428757

  4. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H.; Ollert, Markus W.; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  5. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Côme, Christophe; Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H; Ollert, Markus W; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects.

  6. Healthy Human T-Cell Responses to Aspergillus fumigatus Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Neelkamal; Staab, Janet F.; Marr, Kieren A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with both invasive and allergic pulmonary diseases, in different hosts. The organism is inhaled as a spore, which, if not cleared from the airway, germinates into hyphal morphotypes that are responsible for tissue invasion and resultant inflammation. Hyphae secrete multiple products that function as antigens, evoking both a protective (TH1–TH17) and destructive allergic (TH2) immunity. How Aspergillus allergens (Asp f proteins) participate in the development of allergic sensitization is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine whether Asp f proteins are strictly associated with TH2 responses, or represent soluble hyphal products recognized by healthy hosts, human T cell responses to crude and recombinant products were characterized by ELISPOT. While responses (number of spots producing IFN-γ, IL-4 or IL-17) to crude hyphal antigen preparations were weak, responses to recombinant Asp f proteins were higher. Recombinant allergens stimulated cells to produce IFN-γ more so than IL-4 or IL-17. Volunteers exhibited a diverse CD4+ and CD8+ T cell antigen recognition profile, with prominent CD4 TH1-responses to Asp f3 (a putative peroxismal membrane protein), Asp f9/16 (cell wall glucanase), Asp f11 (cyclophilin type peptidyl-prolyl isomerase) and Asp f22 (enolase). Strong IFN-γ responses were reproduced in most subjects tested over 6 month intervals. Conclusions Products secreted after conidial germination into hyphae are differentially recognized by protective T cells in healthy, non-atopic individuals. Defining the specificity of the human T cell repertoire, and identifying factors that govern early responses may allow for development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for both invasive and allergic Aspergillus diseases. PMID:20174463

  7. Human T cell responses to Japanese encephalitis virus in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Lance; Bali, Tanushka; Buxton, Gemma; Chib, Savita; Chan, Sajesh; Soni, Mohammed; Hussain, Mohammed; Isenman, Heather; Fadnis, Prachi; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Satishkumar, Vishali; Lewthwaite, Penny; Kurioka, Ayako; Krishna, Srinivasa; Shankar, M Veera; Ahmed, Riyaz; Begum, Ashia; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Desai, Anita; Yoksan, Sutee; Fernandez, Stefan; Willberg, Christian B; Kloverpris, Henrik N; Conlon, Christopher; Klenerman, Paul; Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Solomon, Tom

    2016-06-27

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis in children of South and Southeast Asia. However, the majority of individuals exposed to JEV only develop mild symptoms associated with long-lasting adaptive immunity. The related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) cocirculates in many JEV-endemic areas, and clinical data suggest cross-protection between DENV and JEV. To address the role of T cell responses in protection against JEV, we conducted the first full-breadth analysis of the human memory T cell response using a synthetic peptide library. Ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses to JEV in healthy JEV-exposed donors were mostly CD8(+) and targeted nonstructural (NS) proteins, whereas IFN-γ responses in recovered JE patients were mostly CD4(+) and targeted structural proteins and the secreted protein NS1. Among patients, a high quality, polyfunctional CD4(+) T cell response was associated with complete recovery from JE. T cell responses from healthy donors showed a high degree of cross-reactivity to DENV that was less apparent in recovered JE patients despite equal exposure. These data reveal divergent functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses linked to different clinical outcomes of JEV infection, associated with distinct targeting and broad flavivirus cross-reactivity including epitopes from DENV, West Nile, and Zika virus.

  8. Human T cell responses to Japanese encephalitis virus in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Tanushka; Buxton, Gemma; Chib, Savita; Chan, Sajesh; Soni, Mohammed; Hussain, Mohammed; Isenman, Heather; Fadnis, Prachi; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Satishkumar, Vishali; Lewthwaite, Penny; Kurioka, Ayako; Krishna, Srinivasa; Shankar, M. Veera; Ahmed, Riyaz; Begum, Ashia; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Desai, Anita; Yoksan, Sutee; Fernandez, Stefan; Willberg, Christian B.; Kloverpris, Henrik N.; Conlon, Christopher; Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis in children of South and Southeast Asia. However, the majority of individuals exposed to JEV only develop mild symptoms associated with long-lasting adaptive immunity. The related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) cocirculates in many JEV-endemic areas, and clinical data suggest cross-protection between DENV and JEV. To address the role of T cell responses in protection against JEV, we conducted the first full-breadth analysis of the human memory T cell response using a synthetic peptide library. Ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses to JEV in healthy JEV-exposed donors were mostly CD8+ and targeted nonstructural (NS) proteins, whereas IFN-γ responses in recovered JE patients were mostly CD4+ and targeted structural proteins and the secreted protein NS1. Among patients, a high quality, polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response was associated with complete recovery from JE. T cell responses from healthy donors showed a high degree of cross-reactivity to DENV that was less apparent in recovered JE patients despite equal exposure. These data reveal divergent functional CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses linked to different clinical outcomes of JEV infection, associated with distinct targeting and broad flavivirus cross-reactivity including epitopes from DENV, West Nile, and Zika virus. PMID:27242166

  9. Transcriptional insights into the CD8(+) T cell response to infection and memory T cell formation.

    PubMed

    Best, J Adam; Blair, David A; Knell, Jamie; Yang, Edward; Mayya, Viveka; Doedens, Andrew; Dustin, Michael L; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2013-04-01

    After infection, many factors coordinate the population expansion and differentiation of CD8+ effector and memory T cells. Using data of unparalleled breadth from the Immunological Genome Project, we analyzed the CD8+ T cell transcriptome throughout infection to establish gene-expression signatures and identify putative transcriptional regulators. Notably, we found that the expression of key gene signatures can be used to predict the memory-precursor potential of CD8+ effector cells. Long-lived memory CD8+ cells ultimately expressed a small subset of genes shared by natural killer T and γδ T cells. Although distinct inflammatory milieu and T cell precursor frequencies influenced the differentiation of CD8+ effector and memory populations, core transcriptional signatures were regulated similarly, whether polyclonal or transgenic, and whether responding to bacterial or viral model pathogens. Our results provide insights into the transcriptional regulation that influence memory formation and CD8+ T cell immunity.

  10. Adaptive Memory of Human NK-like CD8(+) T-Cells to Aging, and Viral and Tumor Antigens.

    PubMed

    Pita-López, María Luisa; Pera, Alejandra; Solana, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK)-like CD8(+) T-cells are singular T-cells that express both T and NK cell markers such as CD56; their frequencies depend on their differentiation and activation during their lifetime. There is evidence of the presence of these innate CD8(+) T-cells in the human umbilical cord, highlighting the necessity of investigating whether the NK-like CD8(+) T-cells arise in the early stages of life (gestation). Based on the presence of cell surface markers, these cells have also been referred to as CD8(+)KIR(+) T-cells, innate CD8(+) T-cells, CD8(+)CD28(-)KIR(+) T-cells or NKT-like CD8(+)CD56(+) cells. However, the functional and co-signaling significance of these NK cell receptors on NK-like CD8(+) T-cells is less clear. Also, the diverse array of costimulatory and co-inhibitory receptors are spatially and temporally regulated and may have distinct overlapping functions on NK-like CD8(+) T-cell priming, activation, differentiation, and memory responses associated with different cell phenotypes. Currently, there is no consensus regarding the functional properties and phenotypic characterization of human NK-like CD8(+) T-cells. Environmental factors, such as aging, autoimmunity, inflammation, viral antigen re-exposure, or the presence of persistent tumor antigens have been shown to allow differentiation ("adaptation") of the NK-like CD8(+) T-cells; the elucidation of this differentiation process and a greater understanding of the characteristics of these cells could be important for their eventual in potential therapeutic applications aimed at improving protective immunity. This review will attempt to elucidate an understanding of the characteristics of these cells with the goal toward their eventual use in potential therapeutic applications aimed at improving protective immunity.

  11. Modulation of T cell response by Phellinus linteus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Lien, Hsiu-Man; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Huang, Chao-Lu; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Wang, Chien-Kuo; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Yin-Kuang; Wu, Hua-Shan; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Phellinus linteus, a species of mushroom, has been shown to contribute to health benefits, such as anti-inflammatory activity and immunomodulatory efficacy. The aim of this study was to analyze the most effective constituents of P. linteus fermented broths, polysaccharides, and to evaluate their immunoregulatory effects on T cells. Four fermented broths (PL1-4) and the dialyzate medium (MD) were prepared from P. linteus mycelia, and the polysaccharide contents of each were analyzed. The P. linteus samples were tested for biological activity in the regulation of T cell activation. In T cells, the production of mitogen-induced interleukin (IL)-2 and cell cycle progression were dose-responsively inhibited by PL3 and MD, primarily through cell-cycle arrest in S phase. PL3 broth, which contained large quantities of polysaccharides, significantly decreased the ratio of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) to interleukin 4 (IL-4) in T cells. Thus, P. linteus fermented broths produced additive effects on the regulation of the Th1/Th2 balance and show promise for the development of immunomodulatory therapeutics.

  12. Positive and negative regulation of T cell responses by fibroblastic reticular cells within paracortical regions of lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Stefanie; Luther, Sanjiv A.

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRC) form the structural backbone of the T cell rich zones in secondary lymphoid organs (SLO), but also actively influence the adaptive immune response. They provide a guidance path for immigrating T lymphocytes and dendritic cells (DC) and are the main local source of the cytokines CCL19, CCL21, and IL-7, all of which are thought to positively regulate T cell homeostasis and T cell interactions with DC. Recently, FRC in lymph nodes (LN) were also described to negatively regulate T cell responses in two distinct ways. During homeostasis they express and present a range of peripheral tissue antigens, thereby participating in peripheral tolerance induction of self-reactive CD8+ T cells. During acute inflammation T cells responding to foreign antigens presented on DC very quickly release pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon γ. These cytokines are sensed by FRC which transiently produce nitric oxide (NO) gas dampening the proliferation of neighboring T cells in a non-cognate fashion. In summary, we propose a model in which FRC engage in a bidirectional crosstalk with both DC and T cells to increase the efficiency of the T cell response. However, during an acute response, FRC limit excessive expansion and inflammatory activity of antigen-specific T cells. This negative feedback loop may help to maintain tissue integrity and function during rapid organ growth. PMID:22973278

  13. Nonlymphoid peritoneal cells suppress the T cell response to Mls.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Laura; Matlack, Robin; Taylor, Justin; Howell, Koko F; Yeh, Kenneth; Pennello, Anthony; Riggs, James E

    2004-01-01

    Comparative analyses of the ability of lymphoid tissue to present the minor lymphocyte stimulatory (Mls) superantigen Mls-1a in vitro revealed that all tissues containing mature B cells, except peritoneal cavity (PerC) cells, induced Mls-1a-specific T cell activation. Irradiation and mitomycin C treatment, addition of IL-2 and IL-12, and neutralization of IL-10 and TGF-beta did not restore Mls-1a antigen presentation by PerC cells. Co-culture studies revealed that PerC cells actively suppress the T cell response to Mls-1a. PerC cells from severe-combined immune-defective (SCID) mice also suppressed this response indicating that nonlymphoid cells mediate this effect. These results suggest that in addition to antigen processing and presentation, resident peritoneal cavity cells may temper lymphocyte activation.

  14. γδ T Cells Cross-Link Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meraviglia, Serena; El Daker, Sary; Dieli, Francesco; Martini, Federico; Martino, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    Protective immunity against mycobacterial infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by interactions between specific T cells and activated antigen presenting cells. To date, many aspects of mycobacterial immunity have shown that innate cells could be the key elements that substantially may influence the subsequent adaptive host response. During the early phases of infection, innate lymphocyte subsets play a pivotal role in this context. Here we summarize the findings of recent investigations on γδ T lymphocytes and their role in tuberculosis immunity. PMID:21253470

  15. CD8+ T-cell response promotes evolution of hepatitis C virus nonstructural proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Marianne; Knuschke, Torben; Schewior, Kevin; Glavinic, Lejla; Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph; Chang, Dae-In; Klein, Marina; Heinemann, Falko M; Tenckhoff, Hannelore; Wiese, Manfred; Horn, Peter A; Viazov, Sergei; Spengler, Ulrich; Roggendorf, Michael; Scherbaum, Norbert; Nattermann, Jacob; Hoffmann, Daniel; Timm, Jörg

    2011-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) acquires mutations that allow it to escape the CD8+ T-cell response, although the extent to which this process contributes to viral evolution at the population level is not clear. We studied viral adaptation using data from a large outbreak of HCV genotype 1b infection that occurred among women immunized with contaminated immunoglobulin from 1977 to 1978. The HCV nonstructural protein coding regions NS3-NS5B were sequenced from 78 patients, and mutations were mapped according to their location inside or outside previously described CD8+ T-cell epitopes. A statistical approach was developed to identify sites/regions under reproducible selection pressure associated with HLA class I. The frequency of nonsynonymous mutations was significantly higher inside previously described CD8+ T-cell epitopes than outside-particularly in NS3/4A and NS5B. We identified new regions that are under selection pressure, indicating that not all CD8+ T-cell epitopes have been identified; 6 new epitopes that interact with CD8+ T cells were identified and confirmed in vitro. In some CD8+ T-cell epitopes mutations were reproducibly identified in patients that shared the relevant HLA allele, indicating immune pressure at the population level. There was statistical support for selection of mutations in 18 individual epitopes. Interestingly, 14 of these were restricted by HLA-B allele. HLA class I-associated selection pressure on the nonstructural proteins and here predominantly on NS3/4A and NS5B promotes evolution of HCV. HLA-B alleles have a dominant effect in this selection process. Adaptation of HCV to the CD8+ T-cell response at the population level creates challenges for vaccine design. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effector, Memory, and Dysfunctional CD8(+) T Cell Fates in the Antitumor Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Reiser, John; Banerjee, Arnob

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive immune system plays a pivotal role in the host's ability to mount an effective, antigen-specific immune response against tumors. CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) mediate tumor rejection through recognition of tumor antigens and direct killing of transformed cells. In growing tumors, TILs are often functionally impaired as a result of interaction with, or signals from, transformed cells and the tumor microenvironment. These interactions and signals can lead to transcriptional, functional, and phenotypic changes in TILs that diminish the host's ability to eradicate the tumor. In addition to effector and memory CD8(+) T cells, populations described as exhausted, anergic, senescent, and regulatory CD8(+) T cells have been observed in clinical and basic studies of antitumor immune responses. In the context of antitumor immunity, these CD8(+) T cell subsets remain poorly characterized in terms of fate-specific biomarkers and transcription factor profiles. Here we discuss the current characterization of CD8(+) T cell fates in antitumor immune responses and discuss recent insights into how signals in the tumor microenvironment influence TIL transcriptional networks to promote CD8(+) T cell dysfunction.

  17. Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells inhibit endogenous cytotoxic T cell responses to lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Anusha-Preethi; Johansson, Magnus; Ruffell, Brian; Beltran, Adam; Lau, Jonathan; Jablons, David M.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Immune cells comprise a substantial proportion of the tumor mass in human non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), but the precise composition and significance of this infiltration is unclear. Herein we examined immune complexity of human NSCLC as well as NSCLC developing in CC10-TAg transgenic mice, and revealed that CD4+ T lymphocytes represent the dominant population of CD45+ immune cells, and relative to normal lung tissue, CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were significantly increased as a proportion of total CD4+ cells. To assess the functional significance of increased Treg cells, we evaluated CD8+ T cell-deficient/CC10-TAg mice and revealed that CD8+ T cells significantly controlled tumor growth with anti-tumor activity that was partially repressed by Treg cells. However, while treatment with anti-CD25 depleting mAb as monotherapy preferentially depleted Tregs and improved CD8+ T cell-mediated control of tumor progression during early tumor development, similar monotherapy was ineffective at later stages. Since mice bearing early NSCLC treated with anti-CD25 mAb exhibited increased tumor cell death associated with infiltration by CD8+ T cells expressing elevated levels of granzyme A, granzyme B, perforin and interferon-γ, we therefore evaluated carboplatin combination therapy resulting in a significantly extended survival beyond that observed with chemotherapy alone, indicating that Treg depletion in combination with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial as a treatment strategy for advanced NSCLC. PMID:23851682

  18. Myeloid Dendritic Cells (DCs) of Mice Susceptible to Paracoccidioidomycosis Suppress T Cell Responses whereas Myeloid and Plasmacytoid DCs from Resistant Mice Induce Effector and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Adriana; Frank de Araujo, Eliseu; Felonato, Maíra; Loures, Flávio V.; Feriotti, Claudia; Bernardino, Simone; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.

    2013-01-01

    The protective adaptive immune response in paracoccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic among humans, is mediated by T cell immunity, whereas impaired T cell responses are associated with severe, progressive disease. The early host response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection is not known since the disease is diagnosed at later phases of infection. Our laboratory established a murine model of infection where susceptible mice reproduce the severe disease, while resistant mice develop a mild infection. This work aimed to characterize the influence of dendritic cells in the innate and adaptive immunity of susceptible and resistant mice. We verified that P. brasiliensis infection induced in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of susceptible mice a prevalent proinflammatory myeloid phenotype that secreted high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-β, whereas in resistant mice, a mixed population of myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs secreting proinflammatory cytokines and expressing elevated levels of secreted and membrane-bound transforming growth factor β was observed. In proliferation assays, the proinflammatory DCs from B10.A mice induced anergy of naïve T cells, whereas the mixed DC subsets from resistant mice induced the concomitant proliferation of effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Equivalent results were observed during pulmonary infection. The susceptible mice displayed preferential expansion of proinflammatory myeloid DCs, resulting in impaired proliferation of effector T cells. Conversely, the resistant mice developed myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs that efficiently expanded gamma interferon-, IL-4-, and IL-17-positive effector T cells associated with increased development of Tregs. Our work highlights the deleterious effect of excessive innate proinflammatory reactions and provides new evidence for the importance of immunomodulation during pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:23340311

  19. Myd88 Initiates Early Innate Immune Responses and Promotes CD4 T Cells during Coronavirus Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Butchi, Niranjan; Kapil, Parul; Puntambekar, Shweta; Stohlman, Stephen A.; Hinton, David R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myd88 signaling is critical to the control of numerous central nervous system (CNS) infections by promoting both innate and adaptive immune responses. Nevertheless, the extent to which Myd88 regulates type I interferon (IFN) versus proinflammatory factors and T cell function, as well as the anatomical site of action, varies extensively with the pathogen. CNS infection by neurotropic coronavirus with replication confined to the brain and spinal cord induces protective IFN-α/β via Myd88-independent activation of melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). However, a contribution of Myd88-dependent signals to CNS pathogenesis has not been assessed. Infected Myd88−/− mice failed to control virus, exhibited enhanced clinical disease coincident with increased demyelination, and succumbed to infection within 3 weeks. The induction of IFN-α/β, as well as of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, was impaired early during infection. However, defects in both IFN-α/β and select proinflammatory factors were rapidly overcome prior to T cell recruitment. Myd88 deficiency also specifically blunted myeloid and CD4 T cell recruitment into the CNS without affecting CD8 T cells. Moreover, CD4 T cells but not CD8 T cells were impaired in IFN-γ production. Ineffective virus control indeed correlated most prominently with reduced antiviral IFN-γ in the CNS of Myd88−/− mice. The results demonstrate a crucial role for Myd88 both in early induction of innate immune responses during coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis and in specifically promoting protective CD4 T cell activation. In the absence of these responses, functional CD8 T cells are insufficient to control viral spread within the CNS, resulting in severe demyelination. IMPORTANCE During central nervous system (CNS) infections, signaling through the adaptor protein Myd88 promotes both innate and adaptive immune responses. The extent to which Myd88 regulates antiviral type I IFN, proinflammatory

  20. Bifidobacterium infantis attenuates colitis by regulating T cell subset responses

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Li; Yuan, Kai-Tao; Yu, Li; Meng, Qing-Hong; Chung, Peter Chee-Keung; Yang, Ding-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium infantis (B. infantis) on the T cell subsets and in attenuating the severity of experimental colitis in mice. METHODS: Normal BALB/c mice were fed different doses of B. infantis for 3 wk, and T cell subsets and related cytokine profiles in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were detected by flow cytometry and real-time RT-PCR. Colitis was induced by administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in mice. Before colitis induction, mice were fed high dose B. infantis for 3 wk. Cytokine profiles in MLNs and histological changes of colonic tissue were examined 6 d after colitis induction. RESULTS: No significant change in cytokine profiles was observed in normal mice fed low dose B. infantis. However, Th1-related cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12p40), Th17-related transcription factor and cytokines (RORγt, IL-21, IL-23), regulatory T cell (Treg)-related transcription factor and cytokines (Foxp3, IL-10) were increased in normal mice fed high dose B. infantis. Furthermore, flow cytometry assay showed B. infantis increased the numbers of CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs and Th17 cells in MLNs. Colitis was successfully induced by TNBS in mice, characterized by colonic inflammation and aberrant Th1 and Th17 responses. Feeding high dose B. infantis for 3 wk before colitis induction decreased the inflammatory cell infiltration and goblet cell depletion and restored the intestinal epithelium. In addition, B. infantis feeding reduced Th1-related cytokines (T-bet, IL-2 and IFN-γ) and Th17-related cytokines (IL-12p40, RORγt, IL-17A, IL-21 and IL-23), and increased Treg-related molecules (Foxp3, IL-10 and TGF-β) in colitis mice. CONCLUSION: B. infantis effectively attenuates TNBS-induced colitis by decreasing Th1 and Th17 responses and increasing Foxp3+ Treg response in the colonic mucosa. PMID:25561798

  1. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  2. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines.

  3. T cell responses induced by allergen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, E

    2010-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is recognized as a highly effective practice in the treatment of patients with severe allergic rhinitis and/or asthma and is recommended by World Health Organization as an integrated part of allergy management strategy. Several studies have shown that allergen-specific immunotherapy, based on the administration of increasing doses of allergen, achieves a hyposensitization and reduces both early and late responses occurring during the natural exposure to the allergen itself. This is the unique antigen-specific immunomodulatory treatment in current use for human diseases. Successful immunotherapy is associated with reductions in symptoms and medication scores and improved quality of life. After interruption it usually confers long-term remission of symptoms and prevents the onset of new sensitizations in children up to a number of years. Subcutaneous immunotherapy usually suppresses the allergen-induced late response in target organs, likely due to the reduction of the infiltration of T cells, eosinophils, basophils, mast cells and neutrophils. In addition to the reduction of cells of allergic inflammation, immunotherapy also decreases inflammatory mediators at the site of allergen exposure. This review provides an update on the immunological T cell responses induced by conventional subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy, and gives a unifying view to reconciling the old dualism between immunoredirecting and immunoregulating mechanisms. PMID:20408857

  4. Dissecting human T cell responses against Bordetella species

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    To identify the minimal structures that may be important for the creation of a synthetic and/or recombinant vaccine against whooping cough, human T cell clones were obtained against Bordetella antigens. Cloned peripheral blood T lymphocytes from an immune donor were grown in IL-2 and tested for proliferation in response to inactivated Bordetella species (B. pertussis, B. parapertussis, and B. bronchiseptica) and mutants deficient for the expression of virulence- associated antigens. All the T cell clones obtained were CD4+8- and recognized specifically the Bordetella antigens when presented by autologous B cells. On the basis of the responsiveness to the whole inactivated bacteria, it was possible to cluster the 12 clones obtained into four groups with the following specificity: (1) filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA); (2) B. pertussis-specific antigens; (3) virulence- associated Bordetella-specific antigens; and (4) nonvirulence- associated Bordetella-specific antigens. Using two new B. pertussis deletion mutants, clone 6 (representative of cluster 1) was found to recognize the COOH terminus of FHA. Furthermore, three out of four clones of cluster 3 were specifically stimulated by the soluble 69-kD protein from the outer membrane of B. pertussis. Surprisingly, none of the twelve clones obtained by stimulation in vitro with whole inactivated bacteria recognized pertussis toxin (PT), which is believed to be the most important protein to be included in an acellular vaccine. However, when a new generation of clones was obtained using soluble PT as the in vitro stimulus, it was observed that 11 clones of this group recognized this antigen. Thus, PT does not seem to be the most representative antigen on the whole inactivated bacteria, although T cell memory against PT exists in a donor who had the disease several years ago. PMID:2902185

  5. CD1-Restricted T Cells at the Crossroad of Innate and Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Catia S; Macedo, M Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-specific T cells comprise a group of T cells that recognize lipids bound to the MHC class I-like CD1 molecules. There are four isoforms of CD1 that are expressed at the surface of antigen presenting cells and therefore capable of presenting lipid antigens: CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d. Each one of these isoforms has distinct structural features and cellular localizations, which promotes binding to a broad range of different types of lipids. Lipid antigens originate from either self-tissues or foreign sources, such as bacteria, fungus, or plants and their recognition by CD1-restricted T cells has important implications in infection but also in cancer and autoimmunity. In this review, we describe the characteristics of CD1 molecules and CD1-restricted lipid-specific T cells, highlighting the innate-like and adaptive-like features of different CD1-restricted T cell subtypes.

  6. CD1-Restricted T Cells at the Crossroad of Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Catia S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-specific T cells comprise a group of T cells that recognize lipids bound to the MHC class I-like CD1 molecules. There are four isoforms of CD1 that are expressed at the surface of antigen presenting cells and therefore capable of presenting lipid antigens: CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d. Each one of these isoforms has distinct structural features and cellular localizations, which promotes binding to a broad range of different types of lipids. Lipid antigens originate from either self-tissues or foreign sources, such as bacteria, fungus, or plants and their recognition by CD1-restricted T cells has important implications in infection but also in cancer and autoimmunity. In this review, we describe the characteristics of CD1 molecules and CD1-restricted lipid-specific T cells, highlighting the innate-like and adaptive-like features of different CD1-restricted T cell subtypes. PMID:28070524

  7. Hemolysin-producing Listeria monocytogenes affects the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hage-Chahine, C M; Del Giudice, G; Lambert, P H; Pechere, J C

    1992-01-01

    A murine experimental infection with a hemolysin-producing (Hly+) strain of Listeria monocytogenes and a non-hemolysin-producing (Hly-) mutant was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the role of hemolysin production in the immune response. No antilisterial antibodies were detectable following sublethal infection with Hly+ bacteria, but consistent antilisterial immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibody production was observed following sublethal infection with the Hly- mutant. Hly+ but not Hly- L. monocytogenes induced transient inhibition of antibody response to Hly- bacteria and to unrelated T-cell-dependent (tetanus toxoid) and T-cell-independent (pneumococcal polysaccharide 3) antigens. Transient inhibition of the activation of an antigen-specific T-cell clone was also observed following Hly+ infection of antigen-presenting cells but not following Hly- infection. These results suggest that hemolysin production by L. monocytogenes is an important factor in modulating the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens in infected individuals. Images PMID:1548067

  8. SAG/Rbx2-Dependent Neddylation Regulates T-Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Nathan D; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Wu, Shin-Rong; Toubai, Tomomi; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine; Sun, Yaping; Rossi, Corinne; Zajac, Cynthia; Sun, Yi; Reddy, Pavan

    2016-10-01

    Neddylation is a crucial post-translational modification that depends on the E3 cullin ring ligase (CRL). The E2-adapter component of the CRL, sensitive to apoptosis gene (SAG), is critical for the function of CRL-mediated ubiquitination; thus, the deletion of SAG regulates neddylation. We examined the role of SAG-dependent neddylation in T-cell-mediated immunity using multiple approaches: a novel T-cell-specific, SAG genetic knockout (KO) and chemical inhibition with small-molecule MLN4924. The KO animals were viable and showed phenotypically normal mature T-cell development. However, in vitro stimulation of KO T cells revealed significantly decreased activation, proliferation, and T-effector cytokine release, compared with WT. Using in vivo clinically relevant models of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation also demonstrated reduced proliferation and effector cytokine secretion associated with markedly reduced graft-versus-host disease. Similar in vitro and in vivo results were observed with the small-molecule inhibitor of neddylation, MLN4924. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that SAG-mediated effects in T cells were concomitant with an increase in suppressor of cytokine signaling, but not NF-κB translocation. Our studies suggest that SAG is a novel molecular target that regulates T-cell responses and that inhibiting neddylation with the clinically available small-molecule MLN4924 may represent a novel strategy to mitigate T-cell-mediated immunopathologies, such as graft-versus-host disease. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gamma delta T cells and the immune response to respiratory syncytial virus infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    'd T cells are a subset of nonconventional T cells that play a critical role in bridging the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. 'd T cells are particularly abundant in ruminant species and may constitute of up 60% of the circulating lymphocyte pool in young cattle. The frequency of circ...

  10. Natural Killer Cells Promote Early CD8 T Cell Responses against Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Scott H; Bessou, Gilles; Cornillon, Amélie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Rupp, Brigitte; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Sacher, Torsten; Tomasello, Elena; Vivier, Eric; Koszinowski, Ulrich H; Dalod, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that help promote protective immune responses to pathogens is a major challenge in biomedical research and an important goal for the design of innovative therapeutic or vaccination strategies. While natural killer (NK) cells can directly contribute to the control of viral replication, whether, and how, they may help orchestrate global antiviral defense is largely unknown. To address this question, we took advantage of the well-defined molecular interactions involved in the recognition of mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) by NK cells. By using congenic or mutant mice and wild-type versus genetically engineered viruses, we examined the consequences on antiviral CD8 T cell responses of specific defects in the ability of the NK cells to control MCMV. This system allowed us to demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that NK cells accelerate CD8 T cell responses against a viral infection in vivo. Moreover, we identify the underlying mechanism as the ability of NK cells to limit IFN-α/β production to levels not immunosuppressive to the host. This is achieved through the early control of cytomegalovirus, which dramatically reduces the activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) for cytokine production, preserves the conventional dendritic cell (cDC) compartment, and accelerates antiviral CD8 T cell responses. Conversely, exogenous IFN-α administration in resistant animals ablates cDCs and delays CD8 T cell activation in the face of NK cell control of viral replication. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the ability of NK cells to respond very early to cytomegalovirus infection critically contributes to balance the intensity of other innate immune responses, which dampens early immunopathology and promotes optimal initiation of antiviral CD8 T cell responses. Thus, the extent to which NK cell responses benefit the host goes beyond their direct antiviral effects and extends to the prevention of innate cytokine shock and to the

  11. Regulatory T Cell Effect on CD8(+) T Cell Responses to Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Development of Kaposi's Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lepone, Lauren M; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Piazza, Paolo A; Campbell, Diana M; Jenkins, Frank J; Rinaldo, Charles R

    2017-03-02

    We assessed CD8(+) T cell reactivity to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8; Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) and the role of CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who did or did not develop KS. There were similarly low CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ responses to MHC class I-restricted epitopes of HHV-8 lytic and latent proteins over 5.7 years before KS in participants who developed KS compared to those who did not. T cell reactivity to HHV-8 antigens was low relative to responses to a combination of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and influenza A virus (CEF) peptide epitopes, and dominant HIV peptide epitopes. There was no change in %Treg in the HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did not develop KS, whereas there was a significant increase in %Treg in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who developed KS beginning 1.8 years before development of KS. Removal of Treg enhanced HHV-8-specific T cell responses in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did or did not develop KS, with a similar pattern observed in response to CEF and HIV peptides. Thus, long-term, low levels of anti-HHV-8 CD8(+) T cell reactivity were present in both HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected men who did and did not develop KS. This was related to moderately enhanced Treg function.

  12. Analysis of the T Cell Response to Zika Virus and Identification of a Novel CD8+ T Cell Epitope in Immunocompetent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pardy, Ryan D.; Rajah, Maaran M.; Taylor, Nathan G.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family. Although ZIKV infection is typically mild and self-limiting in healthy adults, infection has been associated with neurological symptoms such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, and a causal link has been established between fetal microcephaly and ZIKV infection during pregnancy. These risks, and the magnitude of the ongoing ZIKV pandemic, have created an urgent need for the development of animal models to study the immune response to ZIKV infection. Previous animal models have primarily focused on pathogenesis in immunocompromised mice. In this study, we provide a model of ZIKV infection in wild-type immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, and have provided an analysis of the immune response to infection. We evaluated the activation of several innate immune cell types, and studied the kinetics, phenotype, and functionality of T cell responses to ZIKV infection. Our results demonstrate that ZIKV infection is mild in wild-type immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, resulting in minimal morbidity. Our data establish that at the peak of the adaptive response, antigen-experienced CD4+ T cells polarize to a Th1 phenotype, and antigen-experienced CD8+ T cells exhibit an activated effector phenotype, producing both effector cytokines and cytolytic molecules. Furthermore, we have identified a novel ZIKV CD8+ T cell epitope in the envelope protein that is recognized by the majority of responding cells. Our model provides an important reference point that will help dissect the impact of polymorphisms in the circulating ZIKV strains on the immune response and ZIKV pathogenesis. In addition, the identification of a ZIKV epitope will allow for the design of tetramers to study epitope-specific T cell responses, and will have important implications for the design and development of ZIKV vaccine strategies. PMID:28231312

  13. Analysis of the T Cell Response to Zika Virus and Identification of a Novel CD8+ T Cell Epitope in Immunocompetent Mice.

    PubMed

    Pardy, Ryan D; Rajah, Maaran M; Condotta, Stephanie A; Taylor, Nathan G; Sagan, Selena M; Richer, Martin J

    2017-02-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family. Although ZIKV infection is typically mild and self-limiting in healthy adults, infection has been associated with neurological symptoms such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, and a causal link has been established between fetal microcephaly and ZIKV infection during pregnancy. These risks, and the magnitude of the ongoing ZIKV pandemic, have created an urgent need for the development of animal models to study the immune response to ZIKV infection. Previous animal models have primarily focused on pathogenesis in immunocompromised mice. In this study, we provide a model of ZIKV infection in wild-type immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, and have provided an analysis of the immune response to infection. We evaluated the activation of several innate immune cell types, and studied the kinetics, phenotype, and functionality of T cell responses to ZIKV infection. Our results demonstrate that ZIKV infection is mild in wild-type immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, resulting in minimal morbidity. Our data establish that at the peak of the adaptive response, antigen-experienced CD4+ T cells polarize to a Th1 phenotype, and antigen-experienced CD8+ T cells exhibit an activated effector phenotype, producing both effector cytokines and cytolytic molecules. Furthermore, we have identified a novel ZIKV CD8+ T cell epitope in the envelope protein that is recognized by the majority of responding cells. Our model provides an important reference point that will help dissect the impact of polymorphisms in the circulating ZIKV strains on the immune response and ZIKV pathogenesis. In addition, the identification of a ZIKV epitope will allow for the design of tetramers to study epitope-specific T cell responses, and will have important implications for the design and development of ZIKV vaccine strategies.

  14. Essential role for retinoic acid in the promotion of CD4+ T cell effector responses via retinoic acid receptor alpha

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J.A.; Cannons, J.L.; Grainger, J.R.; Santos, L.M. Dos; Hand, T.W.; Naik, S.; Wohlfert, E.A.; Chou, D.B.; Oldenhove, G.; Robinson, M.; Grigg, M.E.; Kastenmayer, R.; Schwartzberg, P.L.; Belkaid, Y.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Vitamin A and its metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), have recently been implicated in the regulation of immune homeostasis via the peripheral induction of regulatory T cells. Here we show that RA is also required to elicit proinflammatory CD4+ helper T cell responses to infection and mucosal vaccination. Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) is the critical mediator of these effects. Strikingly, antagonism of RAR signaling and deficiency in RARα(Rara−/−) results in a cell autonomous CD4+ T cell activation defect. Altogether, these findings reveal a fundamental role for the RA/RARα axis in the development of both regulatory and inflammatory arms of adaptive immunity and establish nutritional status as a broad regulator of adaptive T cell responses. PMID:21419664

  15. Innate Valpha14(+) natural killer T cells mature dendritic cells, leading to strong adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Steinman, Ralph M

    2007-12-01

    The observation that the glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) is a potent stimulator of natural killer T (NKT) cells has provided an important means for investigating NKT cell biology. alpha-GalCer is presented on CD1d to the invariant NKT receptor, leading to interleukin-12 (IL-12) production by dendritic cells (DCs) and to NK cell activation. We review our research on the tumor-protective properties of alpha-GalCer, particularly the major role played by DCs. We compared administration of alpha-GalCer on mature DCs with soluble glycolipid and found that DCs induced more prolonged interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by NKT cells and better protection against B16 melanoma. Human alpha-GalCer-loaded DCs also expanded NKT cell numbers in cancer patients. alpha-GalCer-activated NKT cells were then found to induce DC maturation in vivo. The maturing DCs produced IL-12, upregulated co-stimulatory molecules, and induced adaptive immunity to captured cellular antigens, including prolonged, combined CD4(+)/CD8(+) T-cell immunity to dying tumor cells. Surprisingly, co-stimulator-poor tumor cells, if directly loaded with alpha-GalCer ('tumor/Gal') and injected intravenously, also induced strong NKT- and NK-cell responses. The latter killed the tumor/Gal, which were subsequently cross presented by CD1d on DCs to elicit DC maturation and prolonged adaptive T-cell immunity, which lasted 6-12 months. These findings help explain tumor protection via alpha-GalCer and urge development of the DC-NKT axis to provide innate and adaptive immunity to human cancers.

  16. Dimethyl Fumarate Therapy Significantly Improves the Responsiveness of T Cells in Multiple Sclerosis Patients for Immunoregulation by Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schlöder, Janine; Berges, Carsten; Luessi, Felix; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease caused by an insufficient suppression of autoreactive T lymphocytes. One reason for the lack of immunological control is the reduced responsiveness of T effector cells (Teff) for the suppressive properties of regulatory T cells (Treg), a process termed Treg resistance. Here we investigated whether the disease-modifying therapy of relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) with dimethyl fumarate (DMF) influences the sensitivity of T cells in the peripheral blood of patients towards Treg-mediated suppression. We demonstrated that DMF restores responsiveness of Teff to the suppressive function of Treg in vitro, presumably by down-regulation of interleukin-6R (IL-6R) expression on T cells. Transfer of human immune cells into immunodeficient mice resulted in a lethal graft-versus-host reaction triggered by human CD4+ Teff. This systemic inflammation can be prevented by activated Treg after transfer of immune cells from DMF-treated MS patients, but not after injection of Treg-resistant Teff from therapy-naïve MS patients. Furthermore, after DMF therapy, proliferation and expansion of T cells and the immigration into the spleen of the animals is reduced and modulated by activated Treg. In summary, our data reveals that DMF therapy significantly improves the responsiveness of Teff in MS patients to immunoregulation. PMID:28134847

  17. PRMT5-Selective Inhibitors Suppress Inflammatory T Cell Responses and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Webb, Lindsay M; Amici, Stephanie A; Jablonski, Kyle A; Savardekar, Himanshu; Panfil, Amanda R; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Wei; Peine, Kevin; Karkhanis, Vrajesh; Bachelder, Eric M; Ainslie, Kristy M; Green, Patrick L; Li, Chenglong; Baiocchi, Robert A; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia

    2017-02-15

    In the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), expansion of pathogenic, myelin-specific Th1 cell populations drives active disease; selectively targeting this process may be the basis for a new therapeutic approach. Previous studies have hinted at a role for protein arginine methylation in immune responses, including T cell-mediated autoimmunity and EAE. However, a conclusive role for the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) enzymes that catalyze these reactions has been lacking. PRMT5 is the main PRMT responsible for symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues of histones and other proteins. PRMT5 drives embryonic development and cancer, but its role in T cells, if any, has not been investigated. In this article, we show that PRMT5 is an important modulator of CD4(+) T cell expansion. PRMT5 was transiently upregulated during maximal proliferation of mouse and human memory Th cells. PRMT5 expression was regulated upstream by the NF-κB pathway, and it promoted IL-2 production and proliferation. Blocking PRMT5 with novel, highly selective small molecule PRMT5 inhibitors severely blunted memory Th expansion, with preferential suppression of Th1 cells over Th2 cells. In vivo, PRMT5 blockade efficiently suppressed recall T cell responses and reduced inflammation in delayed-type hypersensitivity and clinical disease in EAE mouse models. These data implicate PRMT5 in the regulation of adaptive memory Th cell responses and suggest that PRMT5 inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic approach for T cell-mediated inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: harnessing the T cell response.

    PubMed

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2012-03-22

    Immunotherapy based on the adoptive transfer of naturally occurring or gene-engineered T cells can mediate tumour regression in patients with metastatic cancer. Here, we discuss progress in the use of adoptively transferred T cells, focusing on how they can mediate tumour cell eradication. Recent advances include more accurate targeting of antigens expressed by tumours and the associated vasculature, and the successful use of gene engineering to re-target T cells before their transfer into the patient. We also describe how new research has helped to identify the particular T cell subsets that can most effectively promote tumour eradication.

  19. Aging influences the response of T cells to stimulation by the ellagitannin, oenothein B.

    PubMed

    Ramstead, Andrew G; Schepetkin, Igor A; Todd, Kimberly; Loeffelholz, James; Berardinelli, James G; Quinn, Mark T; Jutila, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    Several plant extracts, including certain polyphenols, prime innate lymphocytes and enhance responses to secondary stimuli. Oenothein B, a polyphenol isolated from Epilobium angustifolium and other plant sources, enhances IFNγ production by both bovine and human NK cells and T cells, alone and in response to secondary stimulation by cytokines or tumor cells. Innate immune cell responsiveness is known to be affected by aging, but whether polyphenol responses by these cells are also impacted by aging is not known. Therefore, we examined oenothein B responsiveness in T cells from cord blood, young, and adult donors. We found that oenothein B stimulates bovine and human T cells from individuals over a broad range of ages, as measured by increased IL-2Rα and CD69 expression. However, clear differences in induction of cytokine production by T cells were seen. In T cells from human cord blood and bovine calves, oenothein B was unable to induce IFNγ production. However, oenothein B induced IFNγ production by T cells from adult humans and cattle. In addition, oenothein B induced GM-CSF production by human adult T cells, but not cord blood T cells. Within the responsive T cell population, we found that CD45RO+ memory T cells expressed more cytokines in response to oenothein B than CD45RO- T cells. In summary, our data suggest that the immunostimulation of T cells by oenothein B is influenced by age, particularly with respect to immune cytokine production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Adaptive immunity to leukemia is inhibited by cross-reactive induced regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Manlove, Luke S.; Berquam-Vrieze, Katherine E.; Pauken, Kristen E.; Williams, Richard T.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have transient responses to current therapies. However, the fusion of BCR to ABL generates a potential leukemia-specific antigen that could be a target for immunotherapy. We demonstrate that the immune system can limit BCR-ABL+ leukemia progression although ultimately this immune response fails. To address how BCR-ABL+ leukemia escapes immune surveillance, we developed a peptide: MHC-II tetramer that labels endogenous BCR-ABL-specific CD4+ T cells. Naïve mice harbored a small population of BCR-ABL-specific T cells that proliferated modestly upon immunization. The small number of naïve BCR-ABL specific T cells was due to negative selection in the thymus, which depleted BCR-ABL specific T cells. Consistent with this observation, we saw that BCR-ABL specific T cells were cross-reactive with an endogenous peptide derived from ABL. Despite this cross-reactivity, the remaining population of BCR-ABL reactive T cells proliferated upon immunization with the BCR-ABL fusion peptide and adjuvant. In response to BCR-ABL+ leukemia, BCR-ABL specific T cells proliferated and converted into regulatory T cells (Treg cells), a process that was dependent on cross-reactivity with self-antigen, TGFβ1, and MHC-II antigen presentation by leukemic cells. Treg cells were critical for leukemia progression in C57Bl/6 mice, as transient Treg cell ablation led to extended survival of leukemic mice. Thus, BCR-ABL+ leukemia actively suppresses anti-leukemia immune responses by converting cross-reactive leukemia-specific T cells into Treg cells. PMID:26378075

  1. Clonal selection in the human Vδ1 T cell repertoire indicates γδ TCR-dependent adaptive immune surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Martin S.; Willcox, Carrie R.; Joyce, Stephen P.; Ladell, Kristin; Kasatskaya, Sofya A.; McLaren, James E.; Hunter, Stuart; Salim, Mahboob; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Price, David A.; Chudakov, Dmitriy M.; Willcox, Benjamin E.

    2017-01-01

    γδ T cells are considered to be innate-like lymphocytes that respond rapidly to stress without clonal selection and differentiation. Here we use next-generation sequencing to probe how this paradigm relates to human Vδ2neg T cells, implicated in responses to viral infection and cancer. The prevalent Vδ1 T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is private and initially unfocused in cord blood, typically becoming strongly focused on a few high-frequency clonotypes by adulthood. Clonal expansions have differentiated from a naive to effector phenotype associated with CD27 downregulation, retaining proliferative capacity and TCR sensitivity, displaying increased cytotoxic markers and altered homing capabilities, and remaining relatively stable over time. Contrastingly, Vδ2+ T cells express semi-invariant TCRs, which are present at birth and shared between individuals. Human Vδ1+ T cells have therefore evolved a distinct biology from the Vδ2+ subset, involving a central, personalized role for the γδ TCR in directing a highly adaptive yet unconventional form of immune surveillance. PMID:28248310

  2. Leukocyte TLR5 deficiency inhibits atherosclerosis by reduced macrophage recruitment and defective T-cell responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbroek, Guilielmus H.J.M.; van Puijvelde, Gijs H.M.; Anas, Adam A.; Bot, Martine; Asbach, Miriam; Schoneveld, Arjan; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Foks, Amanda C.; Timmers, Leo; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E.; van der Poll, Tom; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) provide a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity, both important players in atherosclerosis. Since evidence for the role of TLR5 is lacking, we aimed to establish this in the immune axis of atherosclerosis. We assessed the effect of the TLR5-specific ligand Flagellin on macrophage maturation and T-cell polarisation. Next, we generated TLR5−/−LDLr−/− chimeras to study the effect of hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency on atherosclerosis formation. Flagellin stimulation did not influence wildtype or TLR5−/− macrophage maturation. Only in wildtype macrophages, Flagellin exposure increased MCP-1 and IL6 expression. Flagellin alone reduced T-helper 1 proliferation, which was completely overruled in the presence of T-cell receptor activation. In vivo, hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency attenuated atherosclerotic lesion formation by ≈25% (1030*103 ± 63*103 vs. 792*103 ± 61*103 μm2; p = 0.013) and decreased macrophage area (81.3 ± 12.0 vs. 44.2 ± 6.6 μm2; p = 0.011). In TLR5−/− chimeric mice, we observed lower IL6 plasma levels (36.4 ± 5.6 vs. 15.1 ± 2.2 pg/mL; p = 0.003), lower (activated) splenic CD4+ T-cell content (32.3 ± 2.1 vs. 21.0 ± 1.2%; p = 0.0018), accompanied by impaired T-cell proliferative responses. In conclusion, hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency inhibits atherosclerotic lesion formation by attenuated macrophage accumulation and defective T-cell responsiveness. PMID:28202909

  3. Agonistic Anti-TIGIT Treatment Inhibits T Cell Responses in LDLr Deficient Mice without Affecting Atherosclerotic Lesion Development

    PubMed Central

    Foks, Amanda C.; Ran, Ingrid A.; Frodermann, Vanessa; Bot, Ilze; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Kuiper, Johan; van Puijvelde, Gijs H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules are mainly expressed on T cells and antigen presenting cells and strongly orchestrate adaptive immune responses. Whereas co-stimulatory molecules enhance immune responses, signaling via co-inhibitory molecules dampens the immune system, thereby showing great therapeutic potential to prevent cardiovascular diseases. Signaling via co-inhibitory T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT) directly inhibits T cell activation and proliferation, and therefore represents a novel therapeutic candidate to specifically dampen pro-atherogenic T cell reactivity. In the present study, we used an agonistic anti-TIGIT antibody to determine the effect of excessive TIGIT-signaling on atherosclerosis. Methods and Results TIGIT was upregulated on CD4+ T cells isolated from mice fed a Western-type diet in comparison with mice fed a chow diet. Agonistic anti-TIGIT suppressed T cell activation and proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. However, agonistic anti-TIGIT treatment of LDLr−/− mice fed a Western-type diet for 4 or 8 weeks did not affect atherosclerotic lesion development in comparison with PBS and Armenian Hamster IgG treatment. Furthermore, elevated percentages of dendritic cells were observed in the blood and spleen of agonistic anti-TIGIT-treated mice. Additionally, these cells showed an increased activation status but decreased IL-10 production. Conclusions Despite the inhibition of splenic T cell responses, agonistic anti-TIGIT treatment does not affect initial atherosclerosis development, possibly due to increased activity of dendritic cells. PMID:24376654

  4. Effect of pemetrexed on innate immune killer cells and adaptive immune T cells in subjects with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Davis, Marcherie; Conlon, Kevin; Bohac, Gerald C; Barcenas, John; Leslie, William; Watkins, LaTanja; Lamzabi, Ihab; Deng, Youping; Li, Yan; Plate, Janet M D

    2012-10-01

    Baseline levels of innate and adaptive immune cell functions were studied in patients with pancreatic cancer. The effects of pemetrexed were measured at 7 and 14 days after initial therapy then 14 days after combination therapy with gemcitabine. Pretherapy levels of absolute numbers of natural killer (NK) cells positively correlated with survival. Cytolytic units of NK activity correlated positively with NK cell numbers. Pemetrexed decreased NK cytolytic units to significance when combined with gemcitabine. Pemetrexed increased intracellular accumulation of interferon gamma (IFNγ) in NK cells that correlated negatively with survival. Addition of gemcitabine decreased IFNγ-producing NK cells to baseline. Memory (CD45RO*) T cells enumerated at baseline correlated negatively with survival but were decreased by pemetrexed therapy. Memory T cells were increased in subjects with greater B7-H3 expression in tumor tissue, whereas OX40*-activated total T cells and helper T-cell subset were decreased. FoxP3*, CD8* T cells correlated positively with progression-free interval and survival. In conclusion, innate NK-cell immunity and FoxP3*, CD8* T cells seemed beneficial to pancreatic cancer patients. Higher levels of B7-H3 expression in pancreatic tumors were detrimental to effective immunity. Although pemetrexed therapy increased activation of a subset of NK cells to produce IFNγ, addition of gemcitabine abated those responses, decreasing IFNγ-producing NK cells, whereas NK cells producing interleukin-2 without IFNγ at this timepoint positively correlated with survival. Innate immunity and adaptive immunity thus are important in defense against pancreatic cancer. Progression-free interval and survival were longer than observed in a phase III trial where gemcitabine preceded pemetrexed suggesting that a larger trial of pemetrexed preceding gemcitabine is warranted.

  5. Regulatory T cells in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures suppress anti-tumor T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P.; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R.; Farago, Anna F.; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically-engineered mouse lung adenocarcinoma model and found Treg cells suppress anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLS). TA-TLS have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLS in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLS upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose Treg cells in TA-TLS can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells may provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. PMID:26341400

  6. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1.

  7. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1. PMID:28378566

  8. The effector T cell response to ryegrass pollen is counterregulated by simultaneous induction of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Diana; Scholzen, Anja; Varese, Nirupama; Baxter, Lorraine; Paukovics, Geza; Harrison, Leonard C; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn E

    2010-05-01

    Allergy is associated with pathological Th2 responses to otherwise harmless environmental Ags. In contrast, nonallergic individuals mount nonpathological immune responses to allergens, partly attributed to regulatory T cell (Treg) activity. Although thymus-derived natural Tregs have been shown to maintain tolerance to self-Ags and prevent autoimmunity, the generation of Tregs specific to non-self-Ags is less well understood. We investigated the potential for induction of Tregs from PBMCs of ryegrass pollen-allergic or healthy subjects by stimulation in vitro with ryegrass pollen extract in the absence of additional exogenous stimuli. We found that two subsets of proliferating CD4(+) T cells were induced, one expressing intermediate levels of Foxp3 (and IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-17, or IL-2) and the other expressing high levels of Foxp3 (and no effector cytokines). After enrichment based on CD39 expression, the Foxp3(hi) subset suppressed CD4(+) T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production. The Foxp3(hi) Treg originated from both conversion of dividing non-Tregs (CD4(+)CD25(-)CD127(hi)) and expansion of natural Tregs (CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(lo)). Stable functional Tregs expressing high levels of Foxp3 were induced simultaneously with effector T cells by allergen stimulation. Induction of Foxp3(hi) Tregs was reduced in allergic subjects. These results indicate that the cogeneration of Foxp3(hi) Tregs in response to allergen may be a mechanism for controlling allergic reactions in healthy individuals, which is impaired in those with allergies.

  9. The T cell response to secreted antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P

    1994-10-01

    Recent information from several laboratories points to proteins secreted from live Mycobacterium tuberculosis as being involved in protective immunity. We have studied protein release from M. tuberculosis during growth and have defined 3 different groups of proteins: excreted proteins, secreted proteins of the outer cell wall and cytoplasmic proteins released at late culture timepoints. These findings have lead to the definition of a short-term culture filtrate (ST-CF) enriched in excreted/secreted proteins and with a minimal content of autolytic products. ST-CF was tested as antigen in experimental vaccines against tuberculosis. A vaccine based on the adjuvant dimethyldioctadecylammonium chloride (DDA) was constructed and demonstrated to induce a potent cell mediated immune response of the Th-1 type. The vaccine was tested in parallel with a BCG standard vaccine and both vaccines induced a highly significant protection of the same magnitude. Molecules within the Ag85 complex and a 6-kDA secreted protein were mapped as the major antigenic targets for long-lived T cells involved in protective immunity against M. tuberculosis.

  10. The requirement of LAT in the primary and memory responses of CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ou-Yang, Chih-wen; Zhu, Minghua; Sullivan, Sarah A; Fuller, Deirdre M.; Zhang, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a transmembrane adaptor protein that links T cell receptor (TCR) engagement to downstream signaling events. While it is clear that LAT is essential in thymocyte development and initiation of T cell activation, its function during T cell expansion, contraction, and memory formation remains unknown. To study the role of TCR-mediated signaling in CD8 T cells during the course of pathogen infection, we used an inducible mouse model to delete LAT in antigen-specific CD8 T cells at different stages of Listeria infection and analyzed the effect of deletion on T cell responses. Our data showed that LAT is important for maintaining CD8 T cell expansion during the priming phase; however, it is not required for CD8 T cell contraction and memory maintenance. Moreover, LAT deficiency accelerates memory differentiation during the effector-to-memory transition, leading to a higher frequency of KLRG1lowIL-7RhighCD62Lhigh memory T cells. Nonetheless, these LAT-deficient memory T cells were unable to proliferate or produce cytokines upon secondary infection. Our data demonstrated that, while it is dispensable for contraction and memory maintenance, TCR-mediated signaling regulates CD8 T cell memory differentiation and is essential for the memory response against pathogens. PMID:23401587

  11. TCR+CD4-CD8- T cells in antigen-specific MHC class I-restricted T-cell responses after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Raija K; Poiret, Thomas; Ambati, Aditya; Rane, Lalit; Remberger, Mats; Omazic, Birgitta; Vudattu, Nalini K; Winiarski, Jacek; Ernberg, Ingemar; Axelsson-Robertson, Rebecca; Magalhaes, Isabelle; Castelli, Chiara; Ringden, Olle; Maeurer, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Human TCRαβ(+) CD4(-)CD8(-) double-negative (DN) T cells represent a minor subset in peripheral blood, yet are important in infectious diseases and autoimmune responses. We examined the frequency of DN T cells in 17 patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months post-aHSCT and show that these cells increase early after aHSCT and decrease with time after aHSCT. DN T cells reside in the terminally differentiated effector (CD45RA(+)CCR7(-)) T-cell population and are polyclonal, determined by T-cell receptor Vβ CDR3 analysis. Gene expression analysis of ex vivo sorted DN T cells showed a distinct set of gene expression, including interleukin-8, as compared with CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells. DN T cells contributed to MHC class I-restricted EBV-directed immune responses, defined by antigen-specific cytokine production and by detection of HLA-A*02:01-restricted EBV BMLF-1 (GLCTLVAML), LMP-2A (CLGGLLTMV), and HLA-A*24:02-restricted EBV BRLF-1 (DYCNVLNKEF) and EBNA3 (RYSIFFDY)-specific T cells. We created retroviral-transfected Jurkat cell lines with a Melan-A/MART-1-specific TCR(+) and the CD8α chain to study TCR(+) DN T cells in response to their nominal MHC class I/peptide ligand. We show that DN T cells exhibit increased TCRζ chain phosphorylation as compared with the TCR(+)CD8(+) transgenic T-cell line. DN T cells contribute to antigen-specific T-cell responses and represent an effector T-cell population that may be explored in immunotherapeutic approaches against viral infections or transformed cells.

  12. Antigen-Specific B Cells Reactivate an Effective Cytotoxic T Cell Response against Phagocytosed Salmonella through Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Jelle; Souwer, Yuri; Jorritsma, Tineke; Klaasse Bos, Hanny; ten Brinke, Anja; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S. Marieke

    2010-01-01

    Background The eradication of facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens, like Salmonella typhi, requires the concerted action of both the humoral immune response and the cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to orchestrate the cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response via cross-presentation of bacterial antigens onto MHC class I molecules. Cross-presentation of Salmonella by DCs however, is accompanied by the induction of apoptosis in the DCs. Besides antibody production, B cells are required to clear Salmonella infection for other unknown reasons. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that Salmonella-specific B cells that phagocytose Salmonella upon BCR-ligation reactivate human memory CD8+ T cells via cross-presentation yielding a Salmonella-specific cytotoxic T cell response. The reactivation of CD8+ T cells is dependent on CD4+ T cell help. Unlike the DCs, B cell-mediated cross-presentation of Salmonella does not coincide with apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance B cells form a new player in the activation of the cytotoxic effector arm of the immune response and the generation of effective adaptive immunity in Salmonella infection. PMID:20885961

  13. Integrating innate and adaptive immune cells: Mast cells as crossroads between regulatory and effector B and T cells.

    PubMed

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y; Frossi, Barbara; Mion, Francesca; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2016-05-05

    A diversity of immune mechanisms have evolved to protect normal tissues from infection, but from immune damage too. Innate cells, as well as adaptive cells, are critical contributors to the correct development of the immune response and of tissue homeostasis. There is a dynamic "cross-talk" between the innate and adaptive immunomodulatory mechanisms for an integrated control of immune damage as well as the development of the immune response. Mast cells have shown a great plasticity, modifying their behavior at different stages of immune response through interaction with effector and regulatory populations of adaptive immunity. Understanding the interplays among T effectors, regulatory T cells, B cells and regulatory B cells with mast cells will be critical in the future to assist in the development of therapeutic strategies to enhance and synergize physiological immune-modulator and -suppressor elements in the innate and adaptive immune system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. γδ T-Cells: Potential Regulators of the Post-Burn Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Schwacha, Martin G.

    2009-01-01

    Burn injury induces an immunopathological response that can contribute to the development of a systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) and subsequent multiple organ failure. While, multiple immune cells type (T-cells, macrophages, neutrophils) are involved in this response, recent evidence suggests that a unique T-cell subset, γδ T-cells are central in the response to injury. While γδ T-cells represent only a small percentage of the total T-cell population, they display specific functional characteristics that uniquely position them in the immune/inflammatory axis to influence a number of important aspects of the body’s response to burn injury. This review will focus on the potential regulator role of γδ T-cells in immunopathological response following burn injury and thereby their potential as therapeutic targets for modulation of post-burn inflammation and healing. PMID:18951718

  15. Extrinsically derived TNF is primarily responsible for limiting antiviral CD8+ T cell response magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kylie M.; Kan, Wan-Ting; Watson, Katherine A.; Liddicoat, Brian J.; Swan, Natasha G.; McQuilten, Hayley; Denton, Alice E.; Li, Jasmine; Chen, Weisan; Brown, Lorena E.; Jackson, David C.; Reading, Patrick C.; Doherty, Peter C.; Kedzierska, Katherine; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Turner, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    TNF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine produced by both lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells. As a consequence of the widespread expression of its receptors (TNFR1 and 2), TNF plays a role in many important biological processes. In the context of influenza A virus (IAV) infection, TNF has variably been implicated in mediating immunopathology as well as suppression of the immune response. Although a number of cell types are able to produce TNF, the ability of CD8+ T cells to produce TNF following viral infection is a hallmark of their effector function. As such, the regulation and role of CD8+ T cell-derived TNF following viral infection is of great interest. Here, we show that the biphasic production of TNF by CD8+ T cells following in vitro stimulation corresponds to distinct patterns of epigenetic modifications. Further, we show that a global loss of TNF during IAV infection results in an augmentation of the peripheral virus-specific CD8+ T cell response. Subsequent adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that this attenuation of the CD8+ T cell response was largely, but not exclusively, conferred by extrinsic TNF, with intrinsically-derived TNF making only modest contributions. In conclusion, TNF exerts an immunoregulatory role on CD8+ T cell responses following IAV infection, an effect that is largely mediated by extrinsically-derived TNF. PMID:28886201

  16. CD4+ T cells are not required for the induction of dengue virus-specific CD8+ T cell or antibody responses but contribute to protection after vaccination.

    PubMed

    Yauch, Lauren E; Prestwood, Tyler R; May, Monica M; Morar, Malika M; Zellweger, Raphaël M; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Shresta, Sujan

    2010-11-01

    The contribution of T cells to the host response to dengue virus (DENV) infection is not well understood. We previously demonstrated a protective role for CD8(+) T cells during primary DENV infection using a mouse-passaged DENV strain and IFN-α/βR(-/-) C57BL/6 mice, which are susceptible to DENV infection. In this study, we examine the role of CD4(+) T cells during primary DENV infection. Four I-A(b)-restricted epitopes derived from three of the nonstructural DENV proteins were identified. CD4(+) T cells expanded and were activated after DENV infection, with peak activation occurring on day 7. The DENV-specific CD4(+) T cells expressed intracellular IFN-γ, TNF, IL-2, and CD40L, and killed peptide-pulsed target cells in vivo. Surprisingly, depletion of CD4(+) T cells before DENV infection had no effect on viral loads. Consistent with this observation, CD4(+) T cell depletion did not affect the DENV-specific IgG or IgM Ab titers or their neutralizing activity, or the DENV-specific CD8(+) T cell response. However, immunization with the CD4(+) T cell epitopes before infection resulted in significantly lower viral loads. Thus, we conclude that whereas CD4(+) T cells are not required for controlling primary DENV infection, their induction by immunization can contribute to viral clearance. These findings suggest inducing anti-DENV CD4(+) T cell responses by vaccination may be beneficial.

  17. Low-affinity CD4+ T cells are major responders in the primary immune response.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ryan J; Andargachew, Rakieb; Martinez, Hunter A; Evavold, Brian D

    2016-12-15

    A robust primary immune response has been correlated with the precursor number of antigen-specific T cells, as identified using peptide MHCII tetramers. However, these tetramers identify only the highest-affinity T cells. Here we show the entire CD4+ T-cell repertoire, inclusive of low-affinity T cells missed by tetramers, using a T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling reporter and micropipette assay to quantify naive precursors and expanded populations. In vivo limiting dilution assays reveal hundreds more precursor T cells than previously thought, with higher-affinity tetramer-positive T cells, comprising only 5-30% of the total antigen-specific naive repertoire. Lower-affinity T cells maintain their predominance as the primary immune response progresses, with no enhancement of survival of T cells with high-affinity TCRs. These findings demonstrate that affinity for antigen does not control CD4+ T-cell entry into the primary immune response, as a diverse range in affinity is maintained from precursor through peak of T-cell expansion.

  18. Low-affinity CD4+ T cells are major responders in the primary immune response

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ryan J.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Martinez, Hunter A.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    A robust primary immune response has been correlated with the precursor number of antigen-specific T cells, as identified using peptide MHCII tetramers. However, these tetramers identify only the highest-affinity T cells. Here we show the entire CD4+ T-cell repertoire, inclusive of low-affinity T cells missed by tetramers, using a T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling reporter and micropipette assay to quantify naive precursors and expanded populations. In vivo limiting dilution assays reveal hundreds more precursor T cells than previously thought, with higher-affinity tetramer-positive T cells, comprising only 5–30% of the total antigen-specific naive repertoire. Lower-affinity T cells maintain their predominance as the primary immune response progresses, with no enhancement of survival of T cells with high-affinity TCRs. These findings demonstrate that affinity for antigen does not control CD4+ T-cell entry into the primary immune response, as a diverse range in affinity is maintained from precursor through peak of T-cell expansion. PMID:27976744

  19. Virulent Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Evades Adaptive Immunity by Preventing Dendritic Cells from Activating T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tobar, Jaime A.; Carreño, Leandro J.; Bueno, Susan M.; González, Pablo A.; Mora, Jorge E.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute the link between innate and adaptive immunity by directly recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in bacteria and by presenting bacterial antigens to T cells. Recognition of PAMPs renders DCs as professional antigen-presenting cells able to prime naïve T cells and initiate adaptive immunity against bacteria. Therefore, interfering with DC function would promote bacterial survival and dissemination. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that have evolved in virulent bacteria to evade activation of adaptive immunity requires the characterization of virulence factors that interfere with DC function. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the causative agent of typhoid-like disease in the mouse, can prevent antigen presentation to T cells by avoiding lysosomal degradation in DCs. Here, we show that this feature of virulent Salmonella applies in vivo to prevent activation of adaptive immunity. In addition, this attribute of virulent Salmonella requires functional expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS) and effector proteins encoded within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). In contrast to wild-type virulent Salmonella, mutant strains carrying specific deletions of SPI-2 genes encoding TTSS components or effectors proteins are targeted to lysosomes and are no longer able to prevent DCs from activating T cells in vitro or in vivo. SPI-2 mutant strains are attenuated in vivo, showing reduced tissue colonization and enhanced T-cell activation, which confers protection against a challenge with wild-type virulent Salmonella. Our data suggest that impairment of DC function by the activity of SPI-2 gene products is crucial for Salmonella pathogenesis. PMID:17057096

  20. The Transcription Factor Foxo1 Controls Central Memory CD8+ T Cell Responses to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoungjoo V.; Ouyang, Weiming; Liao, Will; Zhang, Michael Q.; Li, Ming O.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Memory T cells protect hosts from pathogen reinfection, but how these cells emerge from a pool of antigen-experienced T cells is unclear. Here we show that mice lacking the transcription factor Foxo1 in activated CD8+ T cells had defective secondary, but not primary, responses to Listeria monocytogenes infection. Compared to short-lived effector T cells, memory precursor T cells expressed higher amounts of Foxo1, which promoted their generation and maintenance. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing experiments revealed the transcription factor Tcf7 and the chemokine receptor Ccr7 as Foxo1-bound target genes, which have critical functions in central memory T cell differentiation and trafficking. These findings demonstrate that Foxo1 is selectively incorporated into the genetic program that regulates memory CD8+ T cell responses to infection. PMID:23932570

  1. Understanding delayed T-cell priming, lung recruitment, and airway luminal T-cell responses in host defense against pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shaler, Christopher R; Horvath, Carly; Lai, Rocky; Xing, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), the causative bacterium of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), is a serious global health concern. Central to M.tb effective immune avoidance is its ability to modulate the early innate inflammatory response and prevent the establishment of adaptive T-cell immunity for nearly three weeks. When compared with other intracellular bacterial lung pathogens, such as Legionella pneumophila, or even closely related mycobacterial species such as M. smegmatis, this delay is astonishing. Customarily, the alveolar macrophage (AM) acts as a sentinel, detecting and alerting surrounding cells to the presence of an invader. However, in the case of M.tb, this may be impaired, thus delaying the recruitment of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to the lung. Upon uptake by APC populations, M.tb is able to subvert and delay the processing of antigen, MHC class II loading, and the priming of effector T cell populations. This delay ultimately results in the deferred recruitment of effector T cells to not only the lung interstitium but also the airway lumen. Therefore, it is of upmost importance to dissect the mechanisms that contribute to the delayed onset of immune responses following M.tb infection. Such knowledge will help design the most effective vaccination strategies against pulmonary TB.

  2. Direct presentation regulates the magnitude of the CD8+ T cell response to cell-associated antigen through prolonged T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tatum, Angela M; Watson, Alan M; Schell, Todd D

    2010-09-01

    The magnitude and complexity of Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell responses is determined by intrinsic properties of the immune system and extrinsic factors, such as vaccination. We evaluated mechanisms that regulate the CD8(+) T cell response to two distinct determinants derived from the same protein Ag, SV40 T Ag (T Ag), following immunization of C57BL/6 mice with T Ag-transformed cells. The results show that direct presentation of T cell determinants by T Ag-transformed cells regulates the magnitude of the CD8(+) T cell response in vivo but not the immunodominance hierarchy. The immunodominance hierarchy was reversed in a dose-dependent manner by addition of excess naive T cells targeting the subdominant determinant. However, T cell competition played only a minor role in limiting T cell accumulation under physiological conditions. We found that the magnitude of the T cell response was regulated by the ability of T Ag-transformed cells to directly present the T Ag determinants. The hierarchy of the CD8(+) T cell response was maintained when Ag presentation in vivo was restricted to cross-presentation, but the presence of T Ag-transformed cells capable of direct presentation dramatically enhanced T cell accumulation at the peak of the response. This enhancement was due to a prolonged period of T cell proliferation, resulting in a delay in T cell contraction. Our findings reveal that direct presentation by nonprofessional APCs can dramatically enhance accumulation of CD8(+) T cells during the primary response, revealing a potential strategy to enhance vaccination approaches.

  3. Regulation of the T-cell response to ectromelia virus infection. I. Feedback suppression by effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Pang, T; Blanden, R V

    1976-03-01

    Spleen cells and serum from mice immunized with ectromelia virus suppressed the immune response to infectious virus when transferred intravenously into recipient mice given an immunizing virus dose. The suppression was reflected in decreased cytotoxic T-cell activity directed against H-2 compatible virus-infected target cells in the spleens of recipients. Suppression was observed when immune cells or serum were transferred 1-2 h or 1 day after immunization of recipients, but not 2 days after, and was maximal when 6-day immune spleen cells were used as suppressor cells. H-2 compatibility between donor and recipient mice was necessary for suppression to be expressed. Use of recombinant mice showed that I-region compatibility was neither sufficient nor necessary, and that D-region compatibility was sufficient. Specificity of suppression was suggested by the finding that cells and serum from mice immunized with Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium, had no suppressive activity on the antiviral response. Anti-theta treatment eliminated the ability of immune cells to suppress, and the suppressive effect was not markedly dose-dependent with respect to both cell dose and virus dose under the conditions employed. Virus levels in the spleens of recipients were significantly reduced after injection of immune cells. Adult thymectomy had no effect on the primary immune response to ectromelia virus infection, thus indicating no role for T1 cells in the suppressive mechanism. The results obtained therefore suggested that suppression in this system was due to effector T cells which triggered clearance of virus (and thus, of virus-induced antigens) necessary for the induction of precursors of effector T cells, and that this simple feed-back mechanism normally plays an important role in the regulation of the primary immune response to ectromelia infection at the level of precursor induction. The existence of other postinduction regulatory mechanisms, however, is unknown and under

  4. Regulation of the T-cell response to ectromelia virus infection. I. Feedback suppression by effector T cells

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Spleen cells and serum from mice immunized with ectromelia virus suppressed the immune response to infectious virus when transferred intravenously into recipient mice given an immunizing virus dose. The suppression was reflected in decreased cytotoxic T-cell activity directed against H-2 compatible virus-infected target cells in the spleens of recipients. Suppression was observed when immune cells or serum were transferred 1-2 h or 1 day after immunization of recipients, but not 2 days after, and was maximal when 6-day immune spleen cells were used as suppressor cells. H-2 compatibility between donor and recipient mice was necessary for suppression to be expressed. Use of recombinant mice showed that I-region compatibility was neither sufficient nor necessary, and that D-region compatibility was sufficient. Specificity of suppression was suggested by the finding that cells and serum from mice immunized with Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium, had no suppressive activity on the antiviral response. Anti- theta treatment eliminated the ability of immune cells to suppress, and the suppressive effect was not markedly dose-dependent with respect to both cell dose and virus dose under the conditions employed. Virus levels in the spleens of recipients were significantly reduced after injection of immune cells. Adult thymectomy had no effect on the primary immune response to ectromelia virus infection, thus indicating no role for T1 cells in the suppressive mechanism. The results obtained therefore suggested that suppression in this system was due to effector T cells which triggered clearance of virus (and thus, of virus-induced antigens) necessary for the induction of precursors of effector T cells, and that this simple feed-back mechanism normally plays an important role in the regulation of the primary immune response to ectromelia infection at the level of precursor induction. The existence of other postinduction regulatory mechanisms, however, is unknown and under

  5. Allogeneic T cell responses are regulated by a specific miRNA-mRNA network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaping; Tawara, Isao; Zhao, Meng; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Toubai, Tomomi; Mathewson, Nathan; Tamaki, Hiroya; Nieves, Evelyn; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Reddy, Pavan

    2013-01-01

    Donor T cells that respond to host alloantigens following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) induce graft-versus-host (GVH) responses, but their molecular landscape is not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene (mRNA) expression and fine-tune the molecular responses of T cells. We stimulated naive T cells with either allogeneic or nonspecific stimuli and used argonaute cross-linked immunoprecipitation (CLIP) with subsequent ChIP microarray analyses to profile miR responses and their direct mRNA targets. We identified a unique expression pattern of miRs and mRNAs following the allostimulation of T cells and a high correlation between the expression of the identified miRs and a reduction of their mRNA targets. miRs and mRNAs that were predicted to be differentially regulated in allogeneic T cells compared with nonspecifically stimulated T cells were validated in vitro. These analyses identified wings apart-like homolog (Wapal) and synaptojanin 1 (Synj1) as potential regulators of allogeneic T cell responses. The expression of these molecular targets in vivo was confirmed in MHC-mismatched experimental BMT. Targeted silencing of either Wapal or Synj1 prevented the development of GVH response, confirming a role for these regulators in allogeneic T cell responses. Thus, this genome-wide analysis of miRNA-mRNA interactions identifies previously unrecognized molecular regulators of T cell responses. PMID:24216511

  6. Adenovirus serotype 5 vaccine vectors trigger IL-27-dependent inhibitory CD4+ T cell responses that impair CD8+ T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Larocca, Rafael A.; Provine, Nicholas M.; Aid, Malika; Iampietro, M. Justin; Borducchi, Erica N.; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Abbink, Peter; Ng’ang’a, David; Bricault, Christine A.; Blass, Eryn; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2017-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vaccine vectors elicit robust CD8+ T cell responses, but these responses typically exhibit a partially exhausted phenotype. However, the immunologic mechanism by which Ad5 vectors induce dysfunctional CD8+ T cells has not previously been elucidated. Here we demonstrate that, following immunization of B6 mice, Ad5 vectors elicit antigen-specific IL-10+CD4+ T cells with a distinct transcriptional profile in a dose-dependent fashion. In rhesus monkeys, we similarly observed upregulated expression of IL-10 and PD-1 by CD4+ T cells following Ad5 vaccination. These cells markedly suppressed vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cell responses in vivo and IL-10 blockade increased the frequency and functionality of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells as well as improved protective efficacy against challenge with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Moreover, induction of these inhibitory IL-10+CD4+ T cells correlated with IL-27 expression and IL-27 blockade substantially improved CD4+ T cell functionality. These data highlight a role for IL-27 in the induction of inhibitory IL-10+CD4+ T cells, which suppress CD8+ T cell magnitude and function following Ad5 vector immunization. A deeper understanding of the cytokine networks and transcriptional profiles induced by vaccine vectors should lead to strategies to improve the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of viral vector-based vaccines. PMID:28239679

  7. Preserved immune functionality and high CMV-specific T-cell responses in HIV-infected individuals with poor CD4(+) T-cell immune recovery.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mora, Elisabet; García, Elisabet; Urrea, Victor; Massanella, Marta; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Clotet, Bonaventura; Blanco, Julià; Cabrera, Cecilia

    2017-09-15

    Poor CD4(+) T-cell recovery after cART has been associated with skewed T-cell maturation, inflammation and immunosenescence; however, T-cell functionality in those individuals has not been fully characterized. In the present study, we assessed T-cell function by assessing cytokine production after polyclonal, CMV and HIV stimulations of T-cells from ART-suppressed HIV-infected individuals with CD4(+) T-cell counts >350 cells/μL (immunoconcordants) or <350 cells/μL (immunodiscordants). A group of HIV-uninfected individuals were also included as controls. Since CMV co-infection significantly affected T-cell maturation and polyfunctionality, only CMV(+) individuals were analyzed. Despite their reduced and skewed CD4(+) T-cell compartment, immunodiscordant individuals showed preserved polyclonal and HIV-specific responses. However, CMV response in immunodiscordant participants was significantly different from immunoconcordant or HIV-seronegative individuals. In immunodiscordant subjects, the magnitude of IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) and IL-2(+) CD4(+) T-cells in response to CMV was higher and differently associated with the CD4(+) T-cell maturation profile., showing an increased frequency of naïve, central memory and EMRA CMV-specific CD4(+) T-cells. In conclusion, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell polyfunctionality was not reduced in immunodiscordant individuals, although heightened CMV-specific immune responses, likely related to subclinical CMV reactivations, may be contributing to the skewed T-cell maturation and the higher risk of clinical progression observed in those individuals.

  8. Frequency of beryllium-specific, central memory CD4+ T cells in blood determines proliferative response

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Andrew P.; Palmer, Brent E.; Sullivan, Andrew K.; Joslin, Fenneke G.; Wilson, Cara C.; Maier, Lisa A.; Newman, Lee S.; Kotzin, Brian L.

    2005-01-01

    Beryllium exposure can lead to the development of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells and chronic beryllium disease (CBD), which is characterized by the presence of lung granulomas and a CD4+ T cell alveolitis. Studies have documented the presence of proliferating and cytokine-secreting CD4+ T cells in blood of CBD patients after beryllium stimulation. However, some patients were noted to have cytokine-secreting CD4+ T cells in blood in the absence of beryllium-induced proliferation, and overall, the correlation between the 2 types of responses was poor. We hypothesized that the relative proportion of memory T cell subsets determined antigen-specific proliferation. In most CBD patients, the majority of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in blood expressed an effector memory T cell maturation phenotype. However, the ability of blood cells to proliferate in the presence of beryllium strongly correlated with the fraction expressing a central memory T cell phenotype. In addition, we found a direct correlation between the percentage of beryllium-specific CD4+ TEM cells in blood and T cell lymphocytosis in the lung. Together, these findings indicate that the functional capability of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is determined by the relative proportion of memory T cell subsets, which may reflect internal organ involvement. PMID:16151531

  9. Virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cell responses and long-term T-cell memory in individuals vaccinated against polio.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Rahnuma; Cannon, Martin J; Chow, Marie

    2005-05-01

    The presence of poliovirus (PV)-specific CD4(+) T cells in individuals vaccinated against polio has been shown, but CD8(+) T-cell responses have not been described. Here, we functionally characterize the CD4(+) T-cell response and show for the first time that dendritic cells and macrophages can stimulate PV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in vitro from vaccinees. Both CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells secrete gamma interferon in response to PV antigens and are cytotoxic via the perforin/granzyme B-mediated pathway. Furthermore, the T cells also recognize and kill Sabin 1 vaccine-infected targets. The macrophage-stimulated CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells most likely represent memory T cells that persist for long periods in vaccinated individuals. Thus, immunity to PV vaccination involves not only an effective neutralizing antibody titer but also long-term CD4(+) and CD8(+) cytotoxic T-cell responses.

  10. Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein is a negative regulator of the CD8 T cell response in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Tai, Albert K; Lin, Miao; Chang, Francesca; Terhorst, Cox; Huber, Brigitte T

    2005-08-15

    The primary manifestation of X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, caused by a dysfunctional adapter protein, signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein (SAP), is an excessive T cell response upon EBV infection. Using the SAP-/- mouse as a model system for the human disease, we compared the response of CD8+ T cells from wild-type (wt) and mutant mice to various stimuli. First, we observed that CD8+ T cells from SAP-/- mice proliferate more vigorously than those from wt mice upon CD3/CD28 cross-linking in vitro. Second, we analyzed the consequence of SAP deficiency on CTL effector function and homeostasis. For this purpose, SAP-/- and wt mice were infected with the murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68). At 2 wk postinfection, the level of viral-specific CTL was much higher in mutant than in wt mice, measured both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, we established that throughout 45 days of MHV-68 infection the frequency of virus-specific CD8+ T cells producing IFN-gamma was significantly higher in SAP-/- mice. Consequently, the level of latent infection by MHV-68 was considerably lower in SAP-/- mice, which indicates that SAP-/- CTL control this infection more efficiently than wt CTL. Finally, we found that the Vbeta4-specific CD8+ T cell expansion triggered by MHV-68 infection is also enhanced and prolonged in SAP-/- mice. Taken together, our data indicate that SAP functions as a negative regulator of CD8+ T cell activation.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Pek Siew; Hardy, Kristine; Peng, Kaiman; Shannon, Frances M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionomycin (I) as stimuli. We were also interested to examine the importance of new protein synthesis in regulating the expression of genes involved in T cell activation. Thus we have pre-treated mouse EL4 T cells with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, and left the cells unstimulated or stimulated with PMA/I for 4 h. We performed microarray expression profiling of these cells to correlate the gene expression with chromatin state of T cells upon T cell activation [1]. Here, we detail further information and analysis of the microarray data, which shows that T cell activation leads to differential expression of genes and inducible genes can be further classified as primary and secondary response genes based on their protein synthesis dependency. The data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE13278. PMID:26981393

  12. IL-36 signaling amplifies Th1 responses by enhancing proliferation and Th1 polarization of naive CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Solenne; Palmer, Gaby; Martin, Praxedis; Lamacchia, Céline; Strebel, Deborah; Rodriguez, Emiliana; Olleros, Maria L; Vesin, Dominique; Garcia, Irene; Ronchi, Francesca; Sallusto, Federica; Sims, John E; Gabay, Cem

    2012-10-25

    The interleukin-1 (IL-1) superfamily of cytokines comprises a set of pivotal mediators of inflammation. Among them, the action of IL-36 cytokines in immune responses has remained elusive. In a recent study, we demonstrated a direct effect of IL-36 on immune cells. Here we show that, among T cells, the IL-36 receptor is predominantly expressed on naive CD4(+) T cells and that IL-36 cytokines act directly on naive T cells by enhancing both cell proliferation and IL-2 secretion. IL-36β acts in synergy with IL-12 to promote Th1 polarization and IL-36 signaling is also involved in mediating Th1 immune responses to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin infection in vivo. Our findings point toward a critical function of IL-36 in the priming of Th1 cell responses in vitro, and in adaptive immunity in a model of mycobacterial infection in vivo.

  13. Augmenting antitumor T-cell responses to mimotope vaccination by boosting with native tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Jordan, Kimberly R; U'ren, Lance; Sprague, Jonathan; Kemmler, Charles B; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination with antigens expressed by tumors is one strategy for stimulating enhanced T-cell responses against tumors. However, these peptide vaccines rarely result in efficient expansion of tumor-specific T cells or responses that protect against tumor growth. Mimotopes, or peptide mimics of tumor antigens, elicit increased numbers of T cells that crossreact with the native tumor antigen, resulting in potent antitumor responses. Unfortunately, mimotopes may also elicit cells that do not crossreact or have low affinity for tumor antigen. We previously showed that one such mimotope of the dominant MHC class I tumor antigen of a mouse colon carcinoma cell line stimulates a tumor-specific T-cell clone and elicits antigen-specific cells in vivo, yet protects poorly against tumor growth. We hypothesized that boosting the mimotope vaccine with the native tumor antigen would focus the T-cell response elicited by the mimotope toward high affinity, tumor-specific T cells. We show that priming T cells with the mimotope, followed by a native tumor-antigen boost, improves tumor immunity compared with T cells elicited by the same prime with a mimotope boost. Our data suggest that the improved tumor immunity results from the expansion of mimotope-elicited tumor-specific T cells that have increased avidity for the tumor antigen. The enhanced T cells are phenotypically distinct and enriched for T-cell receptors previously correlated with improved antitumor immunity. These results suggest that incorporation of native antigen into clinical mimotope vaccine regimens may improve the efficacy of antitumor T-cell responses.

  14. Transamidation of wheat flour inhibits the response to gliadin of intestinal T cells in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Gianfrani, Carmen; Siciliano, Rosa A; Facchiano, Angelo M; Camarca, Alessandra; Mazzeo, Maria F; Costantini, Susan; Salvati, Virginia M; Maurano, Francesco; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Bergamo, Paolo; Rossi, Mauro

    2007-09-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by activation of HLA-DQ2/DQ8-restricted intestinal gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells. In particular, gluten becomes a better T-cell antigen following deamidation catalyzed by tissue transglutaminase. To date, the only available therapy is represented by adherence to a gluten-free diet. Here, we examined a new enzyme strategy to preventively abolish gluten activity. Enzyme modifications of the immunodominant alpha-gliadin peptide p56-68 were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and peptide binding to HLA-DQ2 was simulated by modeling studies. Wheat flour was treated with microbial transglutaminase and lysine methyl ester; gliadin was subsequently extracted, digested, and deamidated. Gliadin-specific intestinal T-cell lines (iTCLs) were generated from biopsy specimens from 12 adult patients with celiac disease and challenged in vitro with different antigen preparations. Tissue transglutaminase-mediated transamidation with lysine or lysine methyl ester of p56-68 or gliadin in alkaline conditions inhibited the interferon gamma expression in iTCLs; also, binding to DQ2 was reduced but not abolished, as suggested by in silico analysis. Lysine methyl ester was particularly effective in abrogating the activity of gliadin. Notably, a block in the response was observed when iTCLs were challenged with gliadin extracted from flour pretreated with microbial transglutaminase and lysine methyl ester. Transamidation of wheat flour with a food-grade enzyme and an appropriate amine donor can be used to block the T cell-mediated gliadin activity. Considering the crucial role of adaptive immunity in celiac disease, our findings highlight the potential of the proposed treatment to prevent cereal toxicity.

  15. Tissue adaptation of regulatory and intraepithelial CD4+ T cells controls gut inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sujino, Tomohisa; London, Mariya; Hoytema van Konijnenburg, David P.; Rendon, Tomiko; Buch, Thorsten; Silva, Hernandez M.; Lafaille, Juan J.; Reis, Bernardo S.; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in peripheral tissues (pTregs) are instrumental in limiting inflammatory responses to non-self antigens. Within the intestine, pTregs are located primarily in the lamina propria, while intraepithelial CD4+ T cells (CD4IELs), which also exhibit anti-inflammatory properties and depend on similar environmental cues, reside in the epithelium. Using intravital microscopy, we show distinct cell dynamics of intestinal Tregs and CD4IELs. Upon migration to the epithelium, Tregs lose Foxp3 and convert to CD4IELs in a microbiota-dependent fashion, an effect attributed to the loss of the transcription factor ThPOK. Finally, we demonstrate that pTregs and CD4IELs perform complementary roles in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. These results reveal intra-tissue specialization of anti-inflammatory T cells shaped by discrete niches of the intestine. PMID:27256884

  16. Loss of naive T cells and repertoire constriction predict poor response to vaccination in old primates.

    PubMed

    Cicin-Sain, Luka; Smyk-Pearson, Susan; Smyk-Paerson, Sue; Currier, Noreen; Byrd, Laura; Koudelka, Caroline; Robinson, Tammie; Swarbrick, Gwendolyn; Tackitt, Shane; Legasse, Alfred; Fischer, Miranda; Nikolich-Zugich, Dragana; Park, Byung; Hobbs, Theodore; Doane, Cynthia J; Mori, Motomi; Axthelm, Michael K; Axthelm, Michael T; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2010-06-15

    Aging is usually accompanied by diminished immune protection upon infection or vaccination. Although aging results in well-characterized changes in the T cell compartment of long-lived, outbred, and pathogen-exposed organisms, their relevance for primary Ag responses remain unclear. Therefore, it remains unclear whether and to what extent the loss of naive T cells, their partial replacement by oligoclonal memory populations, and the consequent constriction of TCR repertoire limit the Ag responses in aging primates. We show in this study that aging rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) exhibit poor CD8 T cell and B cell responses in the blood and poor CD8 responses in the lungs upon vaccination with the modified vaccinia strain Ankara. The function of APCs appeared to be maintained in aging monkeys, suggesting that the poor response was likely intrinsic to lymphocytes. We found that the loss of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the appearance of persisting T cell clonal expansions predicted poor CD8 responses in individual monkeys. There was strong correlation between early CD8 responses in the transitory CD28+ CD62L- CD8+ T cell compartment and the peak Ab titers upon boost in individual animals, as well as a correlation of both parameters of immune response to the frequency of naive CD8+ T cells in old but not in adult monkeys. Therefore, our results argue that T cell repertoire constriction and naive cell loss have prognostic value for global immune function in aging primates.

  17. THE INITIAL PHASE OF AN IMMUNE RESPONSE FUNCTIONS TO ACTIVATE REGULATORY T CELLS

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, William E.; Dooms, Hans; Thorne, Steve H.; Kuswanto, Wilson F.; Simonds, Erin F.; Krutzik, Peter O.; Nolan, Garry P.; Abbas, Abul K.

    2009-01-01

    An early reaction of CD4+ T lymphocytes to antigen is the production of cytokines, notably IL-2. In order to detect cytokine dependent responses, naive antigen-specific T cells were stimulated in vivo and the presence of phosphorylated STAT5 molecules was used to identify the cell populations responding to IL-2. Within hours of T-cell priming, IL-2-dependent STAT5 phosphorylation occurred primarily in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. In contrast, the antigen-specific T cells received STAT5 signals only after repeated antigen exposure or memory differentiation. Regulatory T cells receiving IL-2 signals proliferated and developed enhanced suppressive activity. These results indicate that one of the earliest events in a T cell response is the activation of endogenous regulatory cells, potentially to prevent autoimmunity. PMID:19542444

  18. CD4(+) T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de la Rua, Nicholas M; Samuelson, Derrick R; Charles, Tysheena P; Welsh, David A; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4(+) T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4(+) T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8(+) T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8(+) T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4(+) T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8(+) T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8(+) T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8(+) T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG.

  19. Comparison of influenza and SIV specific CD8 T cell responses in macaques.

    PubMed

    Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Reece, Jeanette C; De Rose, Robert; Stambas, John; Sullivan, Lucy; Brooks, Andrew G; Kent, Stephen J; Sexton, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Macaques are a potentially useful non-human primate model to compare memory T-cell immunity to acute virus pathogens such as influenza virus and effector T-cell responses to chronic viral pathogens such as SIV. However, immunological reagents to study influenza CD8(+) T-cell responses in the macaque model are limited. We recently developed an influenza-SIV vaccination model of pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina) and used this to study both influenza-specific and SIV-specific CD8(+) T-cells in 39 pigtail macaques expressing the common Mane-A*10(+) (Mane-A01*084) MHC-I allele. To perform comparative studies between influenza and SIV responses a common influenza nucleoprotein-specific CD8(+) T-cell response was mapped to a minimal epitope (termed RA9), MHC-restricted to Mane-A*10 and an MHC tetramer developed to study this response. Influenza-specific memory CD8(+) T-cell response maintained a highly functional profile in terms of multitude of effector molecule expression (CD107a, IFN-γ, TNF-α, MIP-1β and IL-2) and showed high avidity even in the setting of SIV infection. In contrast, within weeks following active SIV infection, SIV-specific CD8(+) effector T-cells expressed fewer cytokines/degranulation markers and had a lower avidity compared to influenza specific CD8(+) T-cells. Further, the influenza specific memory CD8 T-cell response retained stable expression of the exhaustion marker programmed death-marker-1 (PD-1) and co-stimulatory molecule CD28 following infection with SIV. This contrasted with the effector SIV-specific CD8(+) T-cells following SIV infection which expressed significantly higher amounts of PD-1 and lower amounts of CD28. Our results suggest that strategies to maintain a more functional CD8(+) T-cell response, profile may assist in controlling HIV disease.

  20. CD4+ T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    de la Rua, Nicholas M.; Samuelson, Derrick R.; Charles, Tysheena P.; Welsh, David A.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4+ T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4+ T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8+ T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8+ T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4+ T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8+ T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8+ T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ+ CD8+ T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8+ T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  1. Inhibition of altered peptide ligand-mediated antagonism of human GAD65-responsive CD4+ T cells by non-antagonizable T cells.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Masewicz, Susan A; Kochik, Sharon A; Reijonen, Helena; Nepom, Gerald T

    2004-12-01

    Altered peptide ligands derived from T cell-reactive self antigens have been shown to be protective therapeutic agents in animal models of autoimmunity. In this study we identified several altered peptide ligands derived from the type 1 diabetes-associated autoantigen human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (hGAD65) epitope that were capable of antagonizing a subset of a panel of human CD4(+) GAD65 (555-567)-responsive T cell clones derived from a diabetic individual. While no altered peptide ligand was able to antagonize all six clones in the T cell panel, a single-substituted peptide of isoleucine to methionine at position 561, which resides at the TCR contact p5 position, was able to antagonize five out of the six hGAD65-responsive clones. In a mixed T cell culture system we observed that altered peptide ligand-mediated antagonism is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the presence of non-antagonizable hGAD65 (555-567)-responsive T cells. From an analysis of the cytokines present in the mixed T cell cultures, interleukin-2 was sufficient to inhibit altered peptide ligand-induced antagonism. The inhibition of altered peptide ligand-mediated antagonism of self-antigen-responsive T cells by non-antagonizable T cells has implications in altered peptide ligand therapy where T cell antagonism is the goal.

  2. ICAM-1-dependent tuning of memory CD8 T-cell responses following acute infection.

    PubMed

    Cox, Maureen A; Barnum, Scott R; Bullard, Daniel C; Zajac, Allan J

    2013-01-22

    CD8 T-cell responses are critical for protection against intracellular pathogens and tumors. The induction and properties of these responses are governed by a series of integrated processes that rely heavily on cell-cell interactions. Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 functions to enhance the strength of antigenic stimulation, extend the duration of contact with antigen-presenting cells, and augment cytokine signals, which are all factors that influence peripheral CD8 T-cell differentiation. Although previous studies suggest that ICAM-1 is essential for establishing memory T-cell populations following peptide immunization, the roles of ICAM-1 in antiviral cellular immunity are less well understood. Here we show that, following a prototypic acute viral infection, the formation and maintenance of memory-phenotype CD127(hi), KLRG-1(lo) CD8 T cells does not require ICAM-1. Nevertheless, ICAM-1 expression on nonlymphocytes dictates the phenotypic and functional attributes of the antiviral CD8 T-cell populations that develop and promotes the gradual attrition of residual effector-like CD127(lo), KLRG-1(hi) CD8 T cells during the memory phase of the response. Although memory T cells do emerge and are maintained if ICAM-1 expression is abolished, the secondary proliferative capacity of these T cells is severely curtailed. Collectively, these studies reveal potential dual roles for ICAM-1 in both promoting the decay of effector responses and programming the sensitivity of memory CD8 T cells to secondary stimuli.

  3. CARMA1 is necessary for optimal T cell responses in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Ravisankar A; Roche, Marly I; Moon, James J; Ludwig, Thomas; Xavier, Ramnik J; Medoff, Benjamin D

    2011-12-15

    CARMA1 is a lymphocyte-specific scaffold protein necessary for T cell activation. Deletion of CARMA1 prevents the development of allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma due to a defect in naive T cell activation. However, it is unknown if CARMA1 is important for effector and memory T cell responses after the initial establishment of inflammation, findings that would be more relevant to asthma therapies targeted to CARMA1. In the current study, we sought to elucidate the role of CARMA1 in T cells that have been previously activated. Using mice in which floxed CARMA1 exons can be selectively deleted in T cells by OX40-driven Cre recombinase (OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F)), we report that CD4(+) T cells from these mice have impaired T cell reactivation responses and NF-κB signaling in vitro. Furthermore, in an in vivo recall model of allergic airway inflammation that is dependent on memory T cell function, OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) mice have attenuated eosinophilic airway inflammation, T cell activation, and Th2 cytokine production. Using MHC class II tetramers, we demonstrate that the development and maintenance of Ag-specific memory T cells is not affected in OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) mice. In addition, adoptive transfer of Th2-polarized OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells into wild-type mice induces markedly less airway inflammation in response to Ag challenge than transfer of wild-type Th2 cells. These data demonstrate a novel role for CARMA1 in effector and memory T cell responses and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting CARMA1 could help treat chronic inflammatory disorders such as asthma.

  4. Time and Antigen-Stimulation History Influence Memory CD8 T Cell Bystander Responses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Matthew D; Shan, Qiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Badovinac, Vladimir P

    2017-01-01

    Memory CD8 T cells can be activated and induced to produce cytokines and increase stores of cytolytic proteins not only in response to cognate antigen (Ag) but also in response to inflammatory cytokines (bystander responses). Importantly, bystander memory CD8 T cell functions have been shown to be dependent upon memory CD8 T cell fitness, since exhausted CD8 T cells have diminished capacity to respond to inflammatory cues. While it is known that memory CD8 T cell functional abilities, including ability to produce cytokines in response to cognate Ag, change with time after initial Ag encounter and upon multiple Ag stimulations (e.g., primary vs. tertiary CD8 T cell responses), it is unknown if bystander memory CD8 T cell responses are influenced by time or by Ag-exposure history. Here, we examined time and Ag-stimulation history-dependent alterations in virus-specific memory CD8 T cell bystander functions in response to inflammatory cytokines and unrelated bacterial infection. We found that expression of cytokine receptors and ability to produce IFN-γ following heterologous infection or incubation with inflammatory cytokines decreases with time following initial Ag encounter and increases with additional Ag encounters, suggesting that the ability to sense inflammation and respond with bystander cytokine production is dependent on age and Ag-stimulation history of memory CD8 T cells. These data shed further light on the regulation of memory CD8 T cell effector functions and have important implications for the development of vaccines designed to elicit protective memory CD8 T cells.

  5. Time and Antigen-Stimulation History Influence Memory CD8 T Cell Bystander Responses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew D.; Shan, Qiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2017-01-01

    Memory CD8 T cells can be activated and induced to produce cytokines and increase stores of cytolytic proteins not only in response to cognate antigen (Ag) but also in response to inflammatory cytokines (bystander responses). Importantly, bystander memory CD8 T cell functions have been shown to be dependent upon memory CD8 T cell fitness, since exhausted CD8 T cells have diminished capacity to respond to inflammatory cues. While it is known that memory CD8 T cell functional abilities, including ability to produce cytokines in response to cognate Ag, change with time after initial Ag encounter and upon multiple Ag stimulations (e.g., primary vs. tertiary CD8 T cell responses), it is unknown if bystander memory CD8 T cell responses are influenced by time or by Ag-exposure history. Here, we examined time and Ag-stimulation history-dependent alterations in virus-specific memory CD8 T cell bystander functions in response to inflammatory cytokines and unrelated bacterial infection. We found that expression of cytokine receptors and ability to produce IFN-γ following heterologous infection or incubation with inflammatory cytokines decreases with time following initial Ag encounter and increases with additional Ag encounters, suggesting that the ability to sense inflammation and respond with bystander cytokine production is dependent on age and Ag-stimulation history of memory CD8 T cells. These data shed further light on the regulation of memory CD8 T cell effector functions and have important implications for the development of vaccines designed to elicit protective memory CD8 T cells. PMID:28642758

  6. PRMT5-Selective Inhibitors Suppress Inflammatory T Cell Responses and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Lindsay M.; Amici, Stephanie A.; Jablonski, Kyle A.; Savardekar, Himanshu; Panfil, Amanda R.; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Wei; Peine, Kevin; Karkhanis, Vrajesh; Bachelder, Eric M.; Ainslie, Kristy M.; Green, Patrick L.; Li, Chenglong; Baiocchi, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    In the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), expansion of pathogenic, myelin-specific Th1 cell populations drives active disease; selectively targeting this process may be the basis for a new therapeutic approach. Previous studies have hinted at a role for protein arginine methylation in immune responses, including T cell–mediated autoimmunity and EAE. However, a conclusive role for the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) enzymes that catalyze these reactions has been lacking. PRMT5 is the main PRMT responsible for symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues of histones and other proteins. PRMT5 drives embryonic development and cancer, but its role in T cells, if any, has not been investigated. In this article, we show that PRMT5 is an important modulator of CD4+ T cell expansion. PRMT5 was transiently upregulated during maximal proliferation of mouse and human memory Th cells. PRMT5 expression was regulated upstream by the NF-κB pathway, and it promoted IL-2 production and proliferation. Blocking PRMT5 with novel, highly selective small molecule PRMT5 inhibitors severely blunted memory Th expansion, with preferential suppression of Th1 cells over Th2 cells. In vivo, PRMT5 blockade efficiently suppressed recall T cell responses and reduced inflammation in delayed-type hypersensitivity and clinical disease in EAE mouse models. These data implicate PRMT5 in the regulation of adaptive memory Th cell responses and suggest that PRMT5 inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic approach for T cell–mediated inflammatory disease. PMID:28087667

  7. Regulatory T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  8. Modulating numbers and phenotype of CD8+ T cells in secondary immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Thomas C.; Harty, John T.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    Prime-boost regimens are frequently used to increase the number of memory CD8+ T cells and thus the protective capacity of experimental vaccinations; however, it is currently unknown how the frequency and phenotype of primary (1°) memory CD8+ T cells impact the quantity and phenotype of secondary (2°) memory CD8+ T-cell populations. Here, we show that 2° infections of mice that received different 1° infections and/or immunizations generated similar numbers of 2° effector and memory CD8+ T cells. Remarkably, this result was independent of the numbers and phenotype of 1° memory CD8+ T cells present at the time of rechallenge. However, after adoptive transfer of low numbers of 1° memory CD8+ T cells, a linear correlation between 1° memory CD8+ T-cell input and 2° memory CD8+ T-cell numbers was observed. These data suggest that, above a very low threshold, boosting of 1° memory CD8+ T-cell populations elicits 2° immune responses of similar magnitude. Therefore, our study has important implications for the design of prime-boost regimens that aim to generate protective CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunity. PMID:20411564

  9. T-cell clones in human trichinellosis: Evidence for a mixed Th1/Th2 response.

    PubMed

    Della Bella, C; Benagiano, M; De Gennaro, M; Gomez-Morales, M A; Ludovisi, A; D'Elios, S; Luchi, S; Pozio, E; D'Elios, M M; Bruschi, F

    2017-03-01

    In humans, studies on the cellular immune response against Trichinella are scarce. Aim of this study was to characterize the cytokine profile of T cells specific for Trichinella britovi in trichinellosis patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from five patients involved in a trichinellosis outbreak caused by T. britovi, which occurred in 2013 in Tuscany (Italy). All the patients resulted positive for Trichinella-specific IgG, IgE and presented eosinophilia. T cells were investigated for their proliferation to excretory/secretory antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (TsES) and for their cytokine profile. A total of 284 CD4+ and 42 CD8+ T-cell clones were obtained from the TsES-specific T-cell lines from PBMC. All T-cell clones proliferated in response to mitogen. Of the 284 CD4+ T-cell clones generated from TsES-specific T-cell lines, 135 (47%) proliferated significantly to TsES; 26% CD8+ T-cell clones showed proliferation to TsES. In the series of the 135 TsES-specific CD4+ clones, 51% expressed a Th2 profile, 30% a Th0 and 19% Th1. In the series of the 11 TsES-specific CD8+ T-cell clones, 18% were Tc2, 45% Tc0 and 36% Tc1. In human trichinellosis, the cellular immune response is, during the chronic phase, mixed Th1/Th2.

  10. Consistency in polyclonal T-cell responses to gluten between children and adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Melinda Y; Girardin, Adam; Pizzey, Catherine; Cameron, Donald J; Watson, Katherine A; Picascia, Stefania; Auricchio, Renata; Greco, Luigi; Gianfrani, Carmen; La Gruta, Nicole L; Anderson, Robert P; Tye-Din, Jason A

    2015-11-01

    Developing antigen-specific approaches for diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease requires a detailed understanding of the specificity of T cells for gluten. The existing paradigm is that T-cell lines and clones from children differ from those of adults in the hierarchy and diversity of peptide recognition. We aimed to characterize the T-cell response to gluten in children vs adults with celiac disease. Forty-one children with biopsy-proven celiac disease (median age, 9 years old; 17 male), who had been on strict gluten-free diets for at least 3 months, were given a 3-day challenge with wheat; blood samples were collected and gluten-specific T cells were measured. We analyzed responses of T cells from these children and from 4 adults with celiac disease to a peptide library and measured T-cell receptor bias. We isolated T-cell clones that recognized dominant peptides and assessed whether gluten peptide recognition was similar between T-cell clones from children and adults. We detected gluten-specific responses by T cells from 30 of the children with celiac disease (73%). T cells from the children recognized the same peptides that were immunogenic to adults with celiac disease; deamidation of peptides increased these responses. Age and time since diagnosis did not affect the magnitude of T-cell responses to dominant peptides. T-cell clones specific for dominant α- or ω-gliadin peptides from children with celiac disease had comparable levels of reactivity to wheat, rye, and barley peptides as T-cell clones from adults with celiac disease. The α-gliadin-specific T cells from children had biases in T-cell receptor usage similar to those in adults. T cells from children with celiac disease recognize similar gluten peptides as T cells from adults with celiac disease. The findings indicate that peptide-based diagnostics and therapeutics for adults may also be used for children. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MicroRNA-155 controls CD8+ T cell responses by regulating interferon signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gracias, Donald T.; Stelekati, Erietta; Hope, Jennifer L.; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Doering, Travis; Norton, Jillian; Mueller, Yvonne M.; Fraietta, Joseph A.; Wherry, E. John; Turner, Martin; Katsikis, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    We show that microRNA-155 (miR-155) is upregulated in primary effector and effector memory CD8+ T cells but is low in naive and central memory cells. Anti-viral CD8+ T cell responses and viral clearance were impaired in miR-155 deficient (miR-155-KO) mice, and this defect was intrinsic to CD8+ T cells as miR-155-KO CD8+ T cells mounted greatly reduced primary and memory responses. Conversely, miR-155 overexpression augmented anti-viral CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. Gene expression profiling of miR-155-KO CD8+ T cells revealed increased type I interferon signaling and sensitivity. Inhibiting STAT1 or IRF7 increased miR-155-KO CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. We report a novel role for miR-155 in regulating IFN responsiveness and CD8+ T cell responses against pathogens in vivo. PMID:23603793

  12. Plasticity of γδ T Cells: Impact on the Anti-Tumor Response

    PubMed Central

    Lafont, Virginie; Sanchez, Françoise; Laprevotte, Emilie; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre; Gros, Laurent; Eliaou, Jean-François; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    The tumor immune microenvironment contributes to tumor initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Among the immune cell subsets that play a role in the tumor microenvironment, innate-like T cells that express T cell receptors composed of γ and δ chains (γδ T cells) are of particular interest. γδ T cells can contribute to the immune response against many tumor types (lymphoma, myeloma, melanoma, breast, colon, lung, ovary, and prostate cancer) directly through their cytotoxic activity and indirectly by stimulating or regulating the biological functions of other cell types required for the initiation and establishment of the anti-tumor immune response, such as dendritic cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. However, the notion that tumor-infiltrating γδ T cells are a good prognostic marker in cancer was recently challenged by studies showing that the presence of these cells in the tumor microenvironment was associated with poor prognosis in both breast and colon cancer. These findings suggest that γδ T cells may also display pro-tumor activities. Indeed, breast tumor-infiltrating γδ T cells could exert an immunosuppressive activity by negatively regulating dendritic cell maturation. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrated that signals from the microenvironment, particularly cytokines, can confer some plasticity to γδ T cells and promote their differentiation into γδ T cells with regulatory functions. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the functional plasticity of γδ T cells and its effect on their anti-tumor activities. It also discusses the putative mechanisms underlying γδ T cell expansion, differentiation, and recruitment in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25538706

  13. A20 Curtails Primary but Augments Secondary CD8+ T Cell Responses in Intracellular Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Just, Sissy; Nishanth, Gopala; Buchbinder, Jörn H.; Wang, Xu; Naumann, Michael; Lavrik, Inna; Schlüter, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-modifying enzyme A20, an important negative feedback regulator of NF-κB, impairs the expansion of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells but augments the proliferation of autoimmune CD4+ T cells. To study the T cell-specific function of A20 in bacterial infection, we infected T cell-specific A20 knockout (CD4-Cre A20fl/fl) and control mice with Listeria monocytogenes. A20-deficient pathogen-specific CD8+ T cells expanded stronger resulting in improved pathogen control at day 7 p.i. Imaging flow cytometry revealed that A20-deficient Listeria-specific CD8+ T cells underwent increased apoptosis and necroptosis resulting in reduced numbers of memory CD8+ T cells. In contrast, the primary CD4+ T cell response was A20-independent. Upon secondary infection, the increase and function of pathogen-specific CD8+ T cells, as well as pathogen control were significantly impaired in CD4-Cre A20fl/fl mice. In vitro, apoptosis and necroptosis of Listeria-specific A20-deficient CD8+ T cells were strongly induced as demonstrated by increased caspase-3/7 activity, RIPK1/RIPK3 complex formation and more morphologically apoptotic and necroptotic CD8+ T cells. In vitro, A20 limited CD95L and TNF-induced caspase3/7 activation. In conclusion, T cell-specific A20 limited the expansion but reduced apoptosis and necroptosis of Listeria-specific CD8+ T cells, resulting in an impaired pathogen control in primary but improved clearance in secondary infection. PMID:28004776

  14. Modulation of innate immune responses during human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Olière, Stéphanie; Douville, Renée; Sze, Alexandre; Belgnaoui, S Mehdi; Hiscott, John

    2011-08-01

    Infection with the Human T-cell Leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) retrovirus results in a number of diverse pathologies, including the aggressive, fatal T-cell malignancy adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and the chronic, progressive neurologic disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Worldwide, it is estimated there are 15-20 million HTLV-1-infected individuals; although the majority of HTLV-1-infected individuals remain asymptomatic carriers (AC) during their lifetime, 2-5% of AC develops either ATL or HAM/TSP, but never both. Regardless of asymptomatic status or clinical outcome, HTLV-1 carriers are at high risk of opportunistic infection. The progression to pathological HTLV-1 disease is in part attributed to the failure of the innate and adaptive immune system to control virus spread. The innate immune response against retroviral infection requires recognition of viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) dependent pathways, leading to the induction of host antiviral and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have begun to characterize the interplay between HTLV-1 infection and the innate immune response and have identified distinct gene expression profiles in patients with ATL or HAM/TSP--upregulation of growth regulatory pathways in ATL and constitutive activation of antiviral and inflammatory pathways in HAM/STP. In this review, we provide an overview of the replicative lifecycle of HTLV-1 and the distinct pathologies associated with HTLV-1 infection. We also explore the innate immune mechanisms that respond to HTLV-1 infection, the strategies used by HTLV-1 to subvert these defenses and their contribution to HTLV-1-associated diseases.

  15. A novel subset of helper T cells promotes immune responses by secreting GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Roberts, A I; Liu, C; Ren, G; Xu, G; Zhang, L; Devadas, S; Shi, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    Helper T cells are crucial for maintaining proper immune responses. Yet, they have an undefined relationship with one of the most potent immune stimulatory cytokines, granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). By depleting major cytokines during the differentiation of CD4+ T cells in vitro, we derived cells that were found to produce large amounts of GM-CSF, but little of the cytokines produced by other helper T subsets. By their secretion of GM-CSF, this novel subset of helper T cells (which we have termed ThGM cells) promoted the production of cytokines by other T-cell subtypes, including type 1 helper T cell (Th1), type 2 helper T cell (Th2), type 1 cytotoxic T cell (Tc1), type 2 cytotoxic T cell (Tc2), and naive T cells, as evidenced by the fact that antibody neutralization of GM-CSF abolished this effect. ThGM cells were found to be highly prone to activation-induced cell death (AICD). Inhibitors of TRAIL or granzymes could not block AICD in ThGM cells, whereas inhibition of FasL/Fas interaction partially rescued ThGM cells from AICD. Thus, ThGM cells are a novel subpopulation of T helper cells that produce abundant GM-CSF, exhibit exquisite susceptibility to apoptosis, and therefore play a pivotal role in the regulation of the early stages of immune responses. PMID:24076588

  16. Glatiramer acetate (Copaxone) therapy induces CD8+ T cell responses in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Karandikar, Nitin J.; Crawford, Michael P.; Yan, Xiao; Ratts, Robert B.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Ambrozak, David R.; Lovett-Racke, Amy E.; Frohman, Elliot M.; Stastny, Peter; Douek, Daniel C.; Koup, Richard A.; Racke, Michael K.

    2002-01-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone) is a random copolymer of glutamic acid, lysine, alanine, and tyrosine that is used therapeutically in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). To investigate the mechanism of the drug’s immunomodulatory effect, we used immunophenotypic approaches to characterize the precise nature of GA-induced T cell responses. We demonstrate here that healthy individuals and untreated MS patients exhibit prominent T cell proliferative responses to GA. However, these responses are different in distinct subsets of T cells. Whereas GA-induced CD4+ T cell responses are comparable in healthy individuals and MS patients, CD8+ T cell responses are significantly lower in untreated MS patients. Treatment with GA results in upregulation of these CD8+ responses with restoration to levels observed in healthy individuals. Both CD4+ and CD8+ GA-specific responses are HLA-restricted. GA therapy also induces a change in the cytokine profile of GA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. This study provides the first direct immunophenotypic evidence, to our knowledge, of GA-specific CD8+ T cell responses and their upregulation during the course of therapy, which may suggest a role for these responses in the immunomodulatory effects of the drug. PMID:11877472

  17. Dissecting memory T cell responses to TB: concerns using adoptive transfer into immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ancelet, Lindsay; Rich, Fenella J; Delahunt, Brett; Kirman, Joanna R

    2012-09-01

    Several studies have used adoptive transfer of purified T cell subsets into immunodeficient mice to determine the subset of T cells responsible for mediating protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These studies suggested that CD62L(hi) memory CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice are key for protection against tuberculosis. Importantly, we observed that transfer of naïve CD4(+) T cells into Rag1-/- recipients protected against a mycobacterial challenge as well as transfer of BCG-experienced CD4(+) T cells. We found that transfer of total CD4(+) T cells from naïve mice or enriched CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice into Rag1-/- recipients induced severe colitis by 3 weeks post cell transfer, whereas transfer of CD62L(lo)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice did not. Naïve and CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells proliferated extensively upon transfer and developed an activated effector phenotype in the lung, even in the absence of infectious challenge. The induction of colitis and systemic cytokine response induced by the transfer and subsequent activation of CD4(+) T cells from naïve mice or CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice, into immunodeficient recipients, may heighten their ability to protect against mycobacterial challenge. This raises doubts about the validity of this model to study CD4(+) T cell-mediated protection against tuberculosis.

  18. An MHC class Ib-restricted CD8+ T cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Jay, David C; Fairbanks, Jared D; He, Xiao; Jensen, Peter E

    2011-12-15

    Conventional MHC class Ia-restricted CD8(+) T cells play a dominant role in the host response to virus infections, but recent studies indicate that T cells with specificity for nonclassical MHC class Ib molecules may also participate in host defense. To investigate the potential role of class Ib molecules in anti-viral immune responses, K(b-/-)D(b-/-)CIITA(-/-) mice lacking expression of MHC class Ia and class II molecules were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). These animals have a large class Ib-selected CD8(+) T cell population and they were observed to mediate partial (but incomplete) virus clearance during acute LCMV infection as compared with K(b-/-)D(b-/-)β(2)-microglobulin(-/-) mice that lack expression of both MHC class Ia and class Ib molecules. Infection was associated with expansion of splenic CD8(+) T cells and induction of granzyme B and IFN-γ effector molecules in CD8(+) T cells. Partial virus clearance was dependent on CD8(+) cells. In vitro T cell restimulation assays demonstrated induction of a population of β(2)-microglobulin-dependent, MHC class Ib-restricted CD8(+) T cells with specificity for viral Ags and yet to be defined nonclassical MHC molecules. MHC class Ib-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses were also observed after infection of K(b-/-)D(b-/-)mice despite the low number of CD8(+) T cells in these animals. Long-term infection studies demonstrated chronic infection and gradual depletion of CD8(+) T cells in K(b-/-)D(b-/-)CIITA(-/-) mice, demonstrating that class Ia molecules are required for viral clearance. These findings demonstrate that class Ib-restricted CD8(+) T cells have the potential to participate in the host immune response to LCMV.

  19. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  20. Hepatitis C virus strategies to evade the specific-T cell response: a possible mission favoring its persistence.

    PubMed

    Quarleri, Jorge Fabián; Oubiña, José Raúl

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a small, enveloped RNA virus. The number of HCV-infected individuals worldwide is estimated to be approximately 200 million. The vast majority of HCV infections persist, with up to 80% of all cases leading to chronic hepatitis associated with liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The interaction between HCV and the host have a pivotal role in viral fitness, persistence, pathogenicity, and disease progression. The control of HCV infection requires both effective innate and adaptive immune responses. The HCV clearance during acute infection is associated with an early induction of the innate and a delayed initiation of the adaptive immune responses. However, in the vast majority of acute HCV infections, these responses are overcome and the virus persistence almost inexorably occurs. Recently, several host- and virus-related mechanisms responsible for the failure of both the innate and the adaptive immune responses have been recognized. Among the latter, the wide range of escape mutations to evade the specific-T-and B-cell responses as well as the T cell anergy and the CD8+ T cell exhaustion together with the interference with its function after prolonged virus exposure hold a pivotal role. Other HCV strategies include the modification or manipulation of molecules playing key roles in the induction of the interferon response and its induced effector proteins. In this review, we attempt to gain insights on the main T cell immune evasion strategies used by the virus in order to favor its persistence.

  1. Structural differences in lipomannans from pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria that impact CD1b-restricted T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Torrelles, Jordi B; Sieling, Peter A; Arcos, Jesús; Knaup, Rose; Bartling, Craig; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Stenger, Steffen; Modlin, Robert L; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2011-10-14

    Mannosylated molecules on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis surface are important determinants in the immunopathogenesis of tuberculosis. To date, much attention has been paid to mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan, which mediates phagocytosis and intracellular trafficking of M. tuberculosis by engaging the macrophage mannose receptor and subsequently binds to intracellular CD1b molecules for presentation to T cells. Another important mannosylated lipoglycan on the M. tuberculosis surface is lipomannan (LM). Comparative structural detail of the LMs from virulent and avirulent strains is limited as is knowledge regarding their differential capacity to be recognized by the adaptive immune response. Here, we purified LM from the avirulent M. smegmatis and the virulent M. tuberculosis H(37)R(v), performed a comparative structural biochemical analysis, and addressed their ability to stimulate CD1b-restricted T cell clones. We found that M. tuberculosis H(37)R(v) produces a large neutral LM (TB-LM); in contrast, M. smegmatis produces a smaller linear acidic LM (SmegLM) with a high succinate content. Correspondingly, TB-LM was not as efficiently presented to CD1b-restricted T cells as SmegLM. Thus, here we correlate the structure-function relationships for LMs with CD1b-restricted T cell responses and provide evidence that the structural features of TB-LM contribute to its diminished T cell responsiveness.

  2. Therapeutic targeting of regulatory T cells enhances tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses in Epstein–Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fogg, Mark; Murphy, John R.; Lorch, Jochen; Posner, Marshall; Wang, Fred

    2013-07-05

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In nasopharynx cancer, CD8+ T cells specific for EBV Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and Latent Membrane Protein 2 (LMP2) are important components of anti-tumor immunity since both are consistently expressed in NPC. We have previously shown that EBNA-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses were suppressed in NPC patients compared to healthy controls. We now find that CD8+ T cell responses specific for LMP2 are also abnormal in NPC patients, and both EBNA-1- and LMP2-specific responses are suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). EBNA-1 and LMP2-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as well as immune control of EBV-infected cells in vitro, could be restored by the depletion of Tregs and by use of a clinically approved drug targeting Tregs. Thus, in vivo modulation of Tregs may be an effective means of enhancing these anti-tumor immune responses in NPC patients. - Highlights: • Viral proteins are tumor antigens in Epstein–Barr virus associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. • CD8+ T cell responses against EBV proteins EBNA-1 and LMP2 are suppressed in NPC patients. • T regulatory cells are responsible for suppressing EBV immunity in NPC patients. • Depletion of Tregs with Ontak can rescue EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in NPC patients. • This clinically approved drug may be effective for enhancing anti-tumor immunity in NPC patients.

  3. Functional Exhaustion Limits CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Huygens, Ariane; Lecomte, Sandra; Tackoen, Marie; Olislagers, Véronique; Delmarcelle, Yves; Burny, Wivine; Van Rysselberge, Michel; Liesnard, Corinne; Larsen, Martin; Appay, Victor; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection during fetal life causes severe symptoms and is associated with prolonged viral excretion. Previous studies reported low CD4(+) T-cell responses to CMV infection in early life, contrasting with large responses of effector CD8(+) T cells. The mechanisms underlying the defective CD4(+) T-cell responses and the possible dissociation with CD8(+) T-cell responses have not been clarified. The magnitude and the quality of the fetal CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell responses to CMV infection were compared to those of adults with primary or chronic infection. In utero CMV infection induced oligoclonal expansions of fetal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes expressing a T-helper type 1 or Tc1 effector phenotype similar to that of adult CMV-specific cells. However, the effector cytokine responses and the polyfunctionality of newborn CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were markedly lower than those of adult cells. This reduced functionality was associated with a higher expression of the programmed death 1 inhibitory receptor, and blockade of this receptor increased newborn T-cell responses. Functional exhaustion limits effector CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses to CMV during fetal life. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. pMHC Multiplexing Strategy to Detect High Numbers of T Cell Responses in Parallel.

    PubMed

    Philips, Daisy; van den Braber, Marlous; Schumacher, Ton N; Kvistborg, Pia

    2017-01-01

    The development of peptide loaded major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) conjugated to fluorochromes by Davis and colleagues 20 years ago provided a highly useful tool to identify and characterize antigen-specific T cells. In this chapter we describe a multiplexing strategy that allows detection of high numbers of T cell responses in parallel.

  5. Tim-3 directly enhances CD8 T cell responses to acute Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Jacob V.; Starbeck-Miller, Gabriel; Pham, Nhat-Long L.; Traver, Geri L.; Rothman, Paul B.; Harty, John T.; Colgan, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Tim-3 is a surface molecule expressed throughout the immune system that can mediate both stimulatory and inhibitory effects. Previous studies have provided evidence that Tim-3 functions to enforce CD8 T cell exhaustion, a dysfunctional state associated with chronic stimulation. In contrast, the role of Tim-3 in the regulation of CD8 T cell responses to acute and transient stimulation remains undefined. To address this knowledge gap, we examined how Tim-3 affects CD8 T cell responses to acute Listeria monocytogenes (LM) infection. Analysis of wild-type (WT) mice infected with LM revealed that Tim-3 was transiently expressed by activated CD8 T cells and was associated primarily with acquisition of an effector phenotype. Comparison of responses to LM by WT and Tim-3 KO mice showed that the absence of Tim-3 significantly reduced the magnitudes of both primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses, which correlated with decreased IFN-γ production and degranulation by Tim-3 KO cells stimulated with peptide antigen ex vivo. To address the T cell-intrinsic role of Tim-3, we analyzed responses to LM infection by WT and Tim-3 KO TCR-transgenic CD8 T cells following adoptive transfer into a shared WT host. In this setting, the accumulation of CD8 T cells and the generation of cytokine-producing cells were significantly reduced by the lack of Tim-3, demonstrating that this molecule has a direct effect on CD8 T cell function. Combined, our results suggest that Tim-3 can mediate a stimulatory effect on CD8 T cell responses to an acute infection. PMID:24567532

  6. Prevalent CD8+ T cell response against one peptide/MHC complex in autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brad; Park, Bjung-Ju; Verdaguer, Joan; Amrani, Abdelaziz; Santamaria, Pere

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice is the result of a CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-dependent autoimmune process directed against the pancreatic beta cells. CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the initiation and progression of diabetes, but the specificity and diversity of their antigenic repertoire remain unknown. Here, we define the structure of a peptide mimotope that elicits the proliferation, cytokine secretion, differentiation, and cytotoxicity of a diabetogenic H-2Kd-restricted CD8+ T cell specificity (NY8.3) that uses a T cell receptor α (TCRα) rearrangement frequently expressed by CD8+ T cells propagated from the earliest insulitic lesions of NOD mice (Vα17-Jα42 elements, often joined by the N-region sequence M-R-D/E). Stimulation of splenic CD8+ T cells from single-chain 8.3-TCRβ-transgenic NOD mice with this mimotope leads to preferential expansion of T cells bearing an endogenously derived TCRα chain identical to the one used by their islet-associated CD8+ T cells, which is also identical to the 8.3-TCRα sequence. Cytotoxicity assays using islet-derived CD8+ T cell clones from nontransgenic NOD mice as effectors and peptide-pulsed H-2Kd-transfected RMA-S cells as targets indicate that nearly half of the CD8+ T cells recruited to islets in NOD mice specifically recognize the same peptide/H-2Kd complex. This work demonstrates that beta cell-reactive CD8+ T cells mount a prevalent response against a single peptide/MHC complex and provides one peptide ligand for CD8+ T cells in autoimmune diabetes. PMID:10430939

  7. Specific T-cell tolerance may be preceded by a primary response.

    PubMed Central

    Vidard, L; Colarusso, L J; Benacerraf, B

    1994-01-01

    We have evaluated the ability of ovalbumin to induce T-cell-specific tolerance in SJL mice. A significant decrease of interleukin 2 in lymph-node culture supernatants from tolerant mice upon antigen stimulation was seen. Oral tolerization was less effective than i.p.- or s.c.-tolerization protocols. Transfer experiments of either splenic or lymph-node T cells from tolerant mice to naive mice definitely ruled out suppression as a mechanism involved in tolerant mice. Surprisingly, we found that, before the establishment of specific T-cell tolerance to ovalbumin, T cells from mice that will display tolerance were responsive and synthesized interleukin 2 upon antigen challenge in vitro. Thus, we concluded that anergy cannot account solely for the T-cell unresponsiveness in tolerant mice. Furthermore, although we cannot rule out the hypothesis that the T-cell unresponsiveness in tolerant mice can be explained by programmed cell death of ovalbumin-specific T cells, these data led us to speculate that T-cell "refractoriness" could explain the drop of interleukin 2 production in lymph-node T-cell culture supernatant from tolerant mice. PMID:8202538

  8. Potentiating the antitumour response of CD8+ T cells by modulating cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Bai, Yibing; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Shuokai; Zheng, Xiaojun; Meng, Xiangbo; Li, Lunyi; Wang, Jing; Xu, Chenguang; Yan, Chengsong; Wang, Lijuan; Chang, Catharine C. Y.; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Zhang, Ti; Zhou, Penghui; Song, Bao-Liang; Liu, Wanli; Sun, Shao-cong; Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Bo-liang; Xu, Chenqi

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells have a central role in antitumour immunity, but their activity is suppressed in the tumour microenvironment1–4. Reactivating the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells is of great clinical interest in cancer immunotherapy. Here we report a new mechanism by which the antitumour response of mouse CD8+ T cells can be potentiated by modulating cholesterol metabolism. Inhibiting cholesterol esterification in T cells by genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of ACAT1, a key cholesterol esterification enzyme5, led to potentiated effector function and enhanced proliferation of CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells. This is due to the increase in the plasma membrane cholesterol level of CD8+ T cells, which causes enhanced T-cell receptor clustering and signalling as well as more efficient formation of the immunological synapse. ACAT1-deficient CD8+ T cells were better than wild-type CD8+ T cells at controlling melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. We used the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe, which was previously tested in clinical trials for treating atherosclerosis and showed a good human safety profile6,7, to treat melanoma in mice and observed a good antitumour effect. A combined therapy of avasimibe plus an anti-PD-1 antibody showed better efficacy than monotherapies in controlling tumour progression. ACAT1, an established target for atherosclerosis, is therefore also a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26982734

  9. Broadly targeted CD8+ T cell responses restricted by major histocompatibility complex E

    DOE PAGES

    Hansen, Scott G.; Wu, Helen L.; Burwits, Benjamin J.; ...

    2016-02-12

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-E is a highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed, nonclassical, MHC-Ib molecule with limited polymorphism primarily involved in regulation of NK cell reactivity via interaction with NKG2/CD94 receptors. We found that vaccination of rhesus macaques with Rh157.5/.4 gene-deleted rhesus Cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) vectors uniquely diverts MHC-E function to presentation of highly diverse peptide epitopes to CD8α/β+ T cells, approximately 4 distinct epitopes per 100 amino acids, in all tested protein antigens. Computational structural analysis revealed that a relatively stable, open binding groove in MHC-E attains broad peptide binding specificity by imposing a similar backbone configuration on bound peptides with fewmore » restrictions based on amino acid side chains. Since MHC-E is up-regulated on cells infected with HIV/SIV and other persistent viruses to evade NK cell activity, MHC-E-restricted CD8+ T cell responses have the potential to exploit pathogen immune evasion adaptations, a capability that might endow these unconventional responses with superior efficacy.« less

  10. Broadly targeted CD8+ T cell responses restricted by major histocompatibility complex E

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Scott G.; Wu, Helen L.; Burwits, Benjamin J.; Hughes, Colette M.; Hammond, Katherine B.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Reed, Jason S.; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Ainslie, Emily; Morrow, David W.; Ford, Julia C.; Selseth, Andrea N.; Pathak, Reesab; Malouli, Daniel; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Nelson, Jay A.; Gillespie, Geraldine M.; Walters, Lucy C.; Brackenridge, Simon; Sharpe, Hannah R.; Lopez, Cesar Augusto; Fruh, Klaus; Korber, Bette Tina; McMichael, Andrew J.; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Sacha, Jonah B.; Picker, Louis J.

    2016-02-12

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-E is a highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed, nonclassical, MHC-Ib molecule with limited polymorphism primarily involved in regulation of NK cell reactivity via interaction with NKG2/CD94 receptors. We found that vaccination of rhesus macaques with Rh157.5/.4 gene-deleted rhesus Cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) vectors uniquely diverts MHC-E function to presentation of highly diverse peptide epitopes to CD8α/β+ T cells, approximately 4 distinct epitopes per 100 amino acids, in all tested protein antigens. Computational structural analysis revealed that a relatively stable, open binding groove in MHC-E attains broad peptide binding specificity by imposing a similar backbone configuration on bound peptides with few restrictions based on amino acid side chains. Since MHC-E is up-regulated on cells infected with HIV/SIV and other persistent viruses to evade NK cell activity, MHC-E-restricted CD8+ T cell responses have the potential to exploit pathogen immune evasion adaptations, a capability that might endow these unconventional responses with superior efficacy.

  11. Compensatory T cell responses in IRG-deficient mice prevent sustained Chlamydia trachomatis infections.

    PubMed

    Coers, Jörn; Gondek, Dave C; Olive, Andrew J; Rohlfing, Amy; Taylor, Gregory A; Starnbach, Michael N

    2011-06-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. In women C. trachomatis can establish persistent genital infections that lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and sterility. In contrast to natural infections in humans, experimentally induced infections with C. trachomatis in mice are rapidly cleared. The cytokine interferon-γ (IFNγ) plays a critical role in the clearance of C. trachomatis infections in mice. Because IFNγ induces an antimicrobial defense system in mice but not in humans that is composed of a large family of Immunity Related GTPases (IRGs), we questioned whether mice deficient in IRG immunity would develop persistent infections with C. trachomatis as observed in human patients. We found that IRG-deficient Irgm1/m3((-/-)) mice transiently develop high bacterial burden post intrauterine infection, but subsequently clear the infection more efficiently than wildtype mice. We show that the delayed but highly effective clearance of intrauterine C. trachomatis infections in Irgm1/m3((-/-)) mice is dependent on an exacerbated CD4(+) T cell response. These findings indicate that the absence of the predominant murine innate effector mechanism restricting C. trachomatis growth inside epithelial cells results in a compensatory adaptive immune response, which is at least in part driven by CD4(+) T cells and prevents the establishment of a persistent infection in mice.

  12. Lenalidomide enhances myeloma-specific T-cell responses in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Isabelle; Engelhardt, Melanie; Fichtner, Sabrina; Neuber, Brigitte; Medenhoff, Sergej; Bertsch, Uta; Hillengass, Jens; Raab, Marc-Steffen; Hose, Dirk; Ho, Anthony D.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hundemer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunomodulation is an important part of lenalidomide's mode of action. We analyzed the impact of lenalidomide on T cells from patients with multiple myeloma during lenalidomide therapy in vivo and in patients with lenalidomide-refractory disease in vitro Patients enrolled in the German Speaking Myeloma Multicenter Group (GMMG) MM5 trial received a consolidation therapy with two cycles of lenalidomide after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Half of the study population continued treatment with lenalidomide maintenance therapy for 2 y, while the other patients received lenalidomide maintenance therapy until complete remission. We analyzed 58 patients with (n = 30) or without (n = 28) lenalidomide therapy and 12 patients refractory to lenalidomide with regards to their anti-myeloma-specific T-cell responses displayed by IFNγ, Granzyme B, and Perforin secretion. The immunophenotype of T-cells was investigated by flow cytometry. Significantly, more myeloma-specific T-cell responses were observed in patients during lenalidomide therapy, compared to patients without treatment. Furthermore, we found on T-cells from patients treated with lenalidomide a decreased CD45RA expression, indicating a maturated immunophenotype and a decreased expression of CD57, indicating functional T cells. An improved myeloma-specific T-cell response was observed in 6 out of 12 heavily pretreated patients (refractory to lenalidomide) after in vitro incubation with lenalidomide. Complementary to the results in vivo, lenalidomide decreased CD45RA expression on T cells in vitro. PMID:27467960

  13. Lenalidomide enhances myeloma-specific T-cell responses in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Isabelle; Engelhardt, Melanie; Fichtner, Sabrina; Neuber, Brigitte; Medenhoff, Sergej; Bertsch, Uta; Hillengass, Jens; Raab, Marc-Steffen; Hose, Dirk; Ho, Anthony D; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hundemer, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Immunomodulation is an important part of lenalidomide's mode of action. We analyzed the impact of lenalidomide on T cells from patients with multiple myeloma during lenalidomide therapy in vivo and in patients with lenalidomide-refractory disease in vitro Patients enrolled in the German Speaking Myeloma Multicenter Group (GMMG) MM5 trial received a consolidation therapy with two cycles of lenalidomide after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Half of the study population continued treatment with lenalidomide maintenance therapy for 2 y, while the other patients received lenalidomide maintenance therapy until complete remission. We analyzed 58 patients with (n = 30) or without (n = 28) lenalidomide therapy and 12 patients refractory to lenalidomide with regards to their anti-myeloma-specific T-cell responses displayed by IFNγ, Granzyme B, and Perforin secretion. The immunophenotype of T-cells was investigated by flow cytometry. Significantly, more myeloma-specific T-cell responses were observed in patients during lenalidomide therapy, compared to patients without treatment. Furthermore, we found on T-cells from patients treated with lenalidomide a decreased CD45RA expression, indicating a maturated immunophenotype and a decreased expression of CD57, indicating functional T cells. An improved myeloma-specific T-cell response was observed in 6 out of 12 heavily pretreated patients (refractory to lenalidomide) after in vitro incubation with lenalidomide. Complementary to the results in vivo, lenalidomide decreased CD45RA expression on T cells in vitro.

  14. Costimulation endows immunotherapeutic CD8 T cells with IL-36-responsiveness during aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsurutani, Naomi; Mittal, Payal; St Rose, Marie-Clare; Ngoi, Soo Mun; Svedova, Julia; Treadway, Forrest B.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard; Suárez-Ramírez, Jenny E.; Cauley, Linda S.; Adler, Adam J.; Vella, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    CD134 and CD137 primed CD8 T cells mount powerful effector responses upon recall, but even without recall these dual costimulated T cells respond to signal 3 cytokines like IL-12. We searched for alternative signal 3 receptor pathways and found the IL-1 family member IL-36R. While IL-36 alone did not stimulate effector CD8 T cells, in combination with IL-12, or more surprisingly IL-2, induced striking and rapid TCR-independent IFN-γ synthesis. To understand how signal 3 responses functioned in dual costimulated T cells we showed that IL-2 induced IL-36R gene expression in a JAK/STAT dependent manner. These data help delineate a sequential stimulation process where IL-2 conditioning must precede IL-36 for IFN-γ synthesis. Importantly, this responsive state was transient, and functioned only in effector T cells capable of aerobic glycolysis. Specifically, as the effector T cells metabolized glucose and consumed O2, they also retained potential to respond through IL-36R. This suggests that T cells use innate receptor pathways like the IL-36R-axis when programmed for aerobic glycolysis. To explore a function for IL-36R in vivo we showed that dual costimulation therapy reduced B16 melanoma tumor growth while increasing IL-36R gene expression. In sum, cytokine therapy to eliminate tumors may target effector T cells, even outside of TCR specificity, as long as the effectors are in the correct metabolic state. PMID:26573834

  15. HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection predict disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Soghoian, Damien Z.; Jessen, Heiko; Flanders, Michael; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Cutler, Sam; Pertel, Thomas; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lindqvist, Madelene; Davis, Isaiah; Lane, Kimberly; Rychert, Jenna; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Brass, Abraham L.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Streeck, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Early immunological events during acute HIV infection are thought to fundamentally influence long-term disease outcome. Whereas the contribution of HIV-specific CD8 T cell responses to early viral control is well established, the role of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses in the control of viral replication following acute infection is unknown. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4 T cells - besides their helper function - have the capacity to directly recognize and kill virally infected cells. In a longitudinal study of a cohort of individuals acutely infected with HIV, we observed that subjects able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy showed a significant expansion of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses—but not CD8 T cell responses–compared to subjects who progressed to a high viral set point (p=0.038). Strikingly, this expansion occurred prior to differences in viral load or CD4 T cell count and was characterized by robust cytolytic activity and expression of a distinct profile of perforin and granzymes at the earliest time point. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the emergence of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses at baseline was highly predictive of slower disease progression and clinical outcome (average days to CD4 T cell count <350/μl was 575 versus 306, p=0.001). These data demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses can be used during the earliest phase of HIV infection as an immunological predictor of subsequent viral set point and disease outcome. Moreover, these data suggest that expansion of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses early during acute HIV infection contributes substantially to the control of viral replication. PMID:22378925

  16. Responses of bovine WC1(+) gammadelta T cells to protein and nonprotein antigens of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael D; Kennedy, Hilary E; Smyth, Allister J; Girvin, R Martyn; Andersen, Peter; Pollock, John M

    2002-11-01

    WC1(+) gammadelta T cells of Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle are highly responsive to M. bovis sonic extract (MBSE). In mycobacterial infections of other species, gammadelta T cells have been shown to respond to protein and nonprotein antigens, but the bovine WC1(+) gammadelta T-cell antigenic targets within MBSE require further definition in terms of the dominance of protein versus nonprotein components. The present study sought to characterize the WC1(+) gammadelta T-cell antigenic targets, together with the role of interleukin-2 (IL-2), in the context of M. bovis infection. This was achieved by testing crude and defined antigens to assess protein versus nonprotein recognition by WC1(+) gammadelta T cells in comparison with CD4(+) alphabeta T cells. Both cell types proliferated strongly in response to MBSE, with CD4(+) T cells being the major producers of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). However, enzymatic digestion of the protein in MBSE removed its ability to stimulate CD4(+) T-cell responses, whereas some WC1(+) gammadelta T-cell proliferation remained. The most antigenic protein inducing proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion in WC1(+) gammadelta T-cell cultures was found to be ESAT-6, which is a potential novel diagnostic reagent and vaccine candidate. In addition, WC1(+) gammadelta T-cell proliferation was observed in response to stimulation with prenyl pyrophosphate antigens (isopentenyl pyrophosphate and monomethyl phosphate). High levels of cellular activation (CD25 expression) resulted from MBSE stimulation of WC1(+) gammadelta T cells from infected animals. A similar degree of activation was induced by IL-2 alone, but for WC1(+) gammadelta T-cell division IL-2 was found to act only as a costimulatory signal, enhancing antigen-driven responses. Overall, the data indicate that protein antigens are important stimulators of WC1(+) gammadelta T-cell proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion in M. bovis infection, with nonprotein antigens inducing significant

  17. IL-21 optimizes T cell and humoral responses in the central nervous system during viral encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Phares, Timothy W; DiSano, Krista D; Hinton, David R; Hwang, Mihyun; Zajac, Allan J; Stohlman, Stephen A; Bergmann, Cornelia C

    2013-10-15

    Acute coronavirus encephalomyelitis is controlled by T cells while humoral responses suppress virus persistence. This study defines the contribution of interleukin (IL)-21, a regulator of T and B cell function, to central nervous system (CNS) immunity. IL-21 receptor deficiency did not affect peripheral T cell activation or trafficking, but dampened granzyme B, gamma interferon and IL-10 expression by CNS T cells and reduced serum and intrathecal humoral responses. Viral control was already lost prior to humoral CNS responses, but demyelination remained comparable. These data demonstrate a critical role of IL-21 in regulating CNS immunity, sustaining viral persistence and preventing mortality. © 2013.

  18. IL-21 optimizes T cell and humoral responses in the central nervous system during viral encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Phares, Timothy W.; DiSano, Krista D.; Hinton, David R.; Hwang, Mihyun; Zajac, Allan J.; Stohlman, Stephen A.; Bergmann, Cornelia C.

    2013-01-01

    Acute coronavirus encephalomyelitis is controlled by T cells while humoral responses suppress virus persistence. This study defines the contribution of interleukin (IL)-21, a regulator of T and B cell function, to central nervous system (CNS) immunity. IL-21 receptor deficiency did not affect peripheral T cell activation or trafficking, but dampened granzyme B, gamma interferon and IL-10 expression by CNS T cells and reduced serum and intrathecal humoral responses. Viral control was already lost prior to humoral CNS responses, but demyelination remained comparable. These data demonstrate a critical role of IL-21 in regulating CNS immunity, sustaining viral persistence and preventing mortality. PMID:23992866

  19. Correlations in the T-cell response to altered peptide ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong-Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2004-10-01

    The vertebrate immune system is a wonder of modern evolution. Occasionally, however, correlations within the immune system lead to inappropriate recruitment of pre-existing T-cells against novel viral diseases. We present a random energy theory for the correlations in the naive and memory T-cell immune responses. The nonlinear susceptibility of the random energy model to structural changes captures the correlations in the immune response to mutated antigens. We show how the sequence-level diversity of the T-cell repertoire drives the dynamics of the immune response against mutated viral antigens.

  20. Immune responses to polyclonal T-cell vaccination in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Seledtsova, Galina V; Ivanova, Irina P; Shishkov, Alexey A; Seledtsov, Victor I

    2016-11-01

    The overall objective of disease management in autoimmune diseases is to suppress chronic inflammation and prevent organ damage. Therapies often revolve around five drug classes: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), anti-malarials, steroids, immunosuppressants, and bio-therapies. However, none of these is a 'cure' and each displays a potential for adverse events. In particular, while all of them suppress harmful autoimmune responses, they also impact on useful protective immune responses. T-Cell receptor (TCR) immunogenicity provides a rationale for T-cell vaccinations to induce anti-idiotypic immune responses with the purpose of down-regulating functionality of idiotype-bearing self-reactive T-cells. To explore this, in this study, 39 patients with progressive (chronic) multiple sclerosis (MS) were multiply immunized with autological polyclonal T-cell vaccines (TCVs). None of the TCV-treated patients experienced any significant side-effects during the entire follow-up period (2 years). T-Cell vaccination had no significant effects on T-cell sub-population contents in the blood of MS patients after 2 years of immunotherapy initiation. However, a substantial reduction in the frequency of CD4(+ )and CD8(+ )memory T-cells able to produce interferon (IFN)-γ following activation were noted in the blood of TCV-treated patients. Moreover, significant and sustained reduction in plasma IFNγ levels and concomitant increases in interleukin (IL)-4 levels were documented in these samples. The TCV-treated subjects, however, exhibited no significant changes in plasma IL-17 and IL-18. More importantly was a significant decline in proliferative T-cell responses to myelin antigens in the TCV-treated patients, indicating attenuation of myelin-specific T-cell activity. Collectively, the results suggest that polyclonal T-cell vaccination is safe to use, able to induce measurable, long-lasting, anti-inflammatory immune effects in patients with advanced MS.

  1. Multifunctional T-cell Analyses to Study Response and Progression in Adoptive Cell Transfer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Cheung, Ann F.; Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C.; Wu, Zhongqi; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Cochran, Alistair J.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Economou, James S.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Ribas, Antoni; Heath, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of genetically engineered T cells expressing cancer-specific T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising cancer treatment. Here, we investigate the in vivo functional activity and dynamics of the transferred cells by analyzing samples from 3 representative patients with melanoma enrolled in a clinical trial of ACT with TCR transgenic T cells targeted against the melanosomal antigen MART-1. The analyses included evaluating 19 secreted proteins from individual cells from phenotypically defined T-cell subpopulations, as well as the enumeration of T cells with TCR antigen specificity for 36 melanoma antigens. These analyses revealed the coordinated functional dynamics of the adoptively transferred, as well as endogenous, T cells, and the importance of highly functional T cells in dominating the antitumor immune response. This study highlights the need to develop approaches to maintaining antitumor T-cell functionality with the aim of increasing the long-term efficacy of TCR-engineered ACT immunotherapy. SIGNIFICANCE A longitudinal functional study of adoptively transferred TCR–engineered lymphocytes yielded revealing snapshots for understanding the changes of antitumor responses over time in ACT immunotherapy of patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:23519018

  2. Receptor Pre-Clustering and T cell Responses: Insights into Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mario; van Santen, Hisse M.; Férez, María; Alarcón, Balbino; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    T cell activation, initiated by T cell receptor (TCR) mediated recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I or II molecules (pMHC), shows exquisite specificity and sensitivity, even though the TCR–pMHC binding interaction is of low affinity. Recent experimental work suggests that TCR pre-clustering may be a mechanism via which T cells can achieve such high sensitivity. The unresolved stoichiometry of the TCR makes TCR–pMHC binding and TCR triggering, an open question. We formulate a mathematical model to characterize the pre-clustering of T cell receptors (TCRs) on the surface of T cells, motivated by the experimentally observed distribution of TCR clusters on the surface of naive and memory T cells. We extend a recently introduced stochastic criterion to compute the timescales of T cell responses, assuming that ligand-induced cross-linked TCR is the minimum signaling unit. We derive an approximate formula for the mean time to signal initiation. Our results show that pre-clustering reduces the mean activation time. However, additional mechanisms favoring the existence of clusters are required to explain the difference between naive and memory T cell responses. We discuss the biological implications of our results, and both the compatibility and complementarity of our approach with other existing mathematical models. PMID:24817867

  3. Receptor Pre-Clustering and T cell Responses: Insights into Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Castro, Mario; van Santen, Hisse M; Férez, María; Alarcón, Balbino; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    T cell activation, initiated by T cell receptor (TCR) mediated recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I or II molecules (pMHC), shows exquisite specificity and sensitivity, even though the TCR-pMHC binding interaction is of low affinity. Recent experimental work suggests that TCR pre-clustering may be a mechanism via which T cells can achieve such high sensitivity. The unresolved stoichiometry of the TCR makes TCR-pMHC binding and TCR triggering, an open question. We formulate a mathematical model to characterize the pre-clustering of T cell receptors (TCRs) on the surface of T cells, motivated by the experimentally observed distribution of TCR clusters on the surface of naive and memory T cells. We extend a recently introduced stochastic criterion to compute the timescales of T cell responses, assuming that ligand-induced cross-linked TCR is the minimum signaling unit. We derive an approximate formula for the mean time to signal initiation. Our results show that pre-clustering reduces the mean activation time. However, additional mechanisms favoring the existence of clusters are required to explain the difference between naive and memory T cell responses. We discuss the biological implications of our results, and both the compatibility and complementarity of our approach with other existing mathematical models.

  4. Diet induced obesity has an influence on intrahepatic T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Pratibha; Cebula, Marcin; Riehn, Mathias; Hillebrand, Upneet; Hauser, Hansjörg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is accompanied with systemic inflammation and pre-conditions to severe alterations in liver environment and functions. So far, it remains elusive to which extent obesity modulates immune responses during hepatotropic virus infections as well as in autoimmune hepatitis. In this study we investigated the influence of obesity on the intrahepatic immune response, in particular on the function of CD8 T cells as the crucial players in clearance of virus infected hepatocytes. We established high fat induced obesity in transgenic mouse models with hepatocyte specific expression of a model antigen (Ova). We investigated the immune response upon adoptive transfer of antigen specific T cells and in mice with continuous thymic output of antigen specific T cells, mimicking the situations upon acute infection and autoimmunity, respectively. Irrespective of the metabolic condition, adoptive T cell transfer resulted in a transient hepatitis with no obvious differences concerning the acute T cell response. In the situation of autoimmunity, we observed a transient hepatitis in lean mice, whereas an extended hepatitis with a reduced antigen clearance capacity was found in obese mice. Our results demonstrate that obesity affects T cell function and increases the severity of autoimmune hepatitis while it has no impact on the acute T cell response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Response of γδ T cells to plant-derived tannins

    PubMed Central

    Holderness, Jeff; Hedges, Jodi F.; Daughenbaugh, Katie; Kimmel, Emily; Graff, Jill; Freedman, Brett; Jutila, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Many pharmaceutical drugs are isolated from plants used in traditional medicines. Through screening plant extracts, both traditional medicines and compound libraries, new pharmaceutical drugs continue to be identified. Currently, two plant-derived agonists for γδ T cells are described. These plant-derived agonists impart innate effector functions upon distinct γδ T cell subsets. Plant tannins represent one class of γδ T cell agonist and preferentially activate the mucosal population. Mucosal γδ T cells function to modulate tissue immune responses and induce epithelium repair. Select tannins, isolated from apple peel, rapidly induce immune gene transcription in γδ T cells, leading to cytokine production and increased responsiveness to secondary signals. Activity of these tannin preparations tracks to the procyanidin fraction, with the procyanidin trimer (C1) having the most robust activity defined to date. The response to the procyanidins is evolutionarily conserved in that responses are seen with human, bovine, and murine γδ T cells. Procyanidin-induced responses described in this review likely account for the expansion of mucosal γδ T cells seen in mice and rats fed soluble extracts of tannins. Procyanidins may represent a novel approach for treatment of tissue damage, chronic infection, and autoimmune therpies. PMID:19166386

  6. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS FOR ADAPTIVE TOLERANCE AND OTHER T CELL ANERGY MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seeyoung; Schwartz, Ronald H.

    2007-01-01

    Since the original description of T cell anergy in CD4 clones from mice and humans, a number of different unresponsive states have been described, both in vivo and in vitro, that have been called anergic. While initial attempts were made to understand the similarities between the different models, it has now become clear from biochemical experiments that many of them have different molecular mechanisms underlying their unresponsiveness. In this review we will detail our own work on the in vivo model referred to as adaptive tolerance and then attempt to compare this biochemical state to the multitude of other states that have been described in the literature. PMID:17400472

  7. Predicting pathogen-specific CD8 T cell immune responses from a modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Crauste, F; Terry, E; Mercier, I Le; Mafille, J; Djebali, S; Andrieu, T; Mercier, B; Kaneko, G; Arpin, C; Marvel, J; Gandrillon, O

    2015-06-07

    The primary CD8 T cell immune response constitutes a major mechanism to fight an infection by intra-cellular pathogens. We aim at assessing whether pathogen-specific dynamical parameters of the CD8 T cell response can be identified, based on measurements of CD8 T cell counts, using a modeling approach. We generated experimental data consisting in CD8 T cell counts kinetics during the response to three different live intra-cellular pathogens: two viruses (influenza, vaccinia) injected intranasally, and one bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes) injected intravenously. All pathogens harbor the same antigen (NP68), but differ in their interaction with the host. In parallel, we developed a mathematical model describing the evolution of CD8 T cell counts and pathogen amount during an immune response. This model is characterized by 9 parameters and includes relevant feedback controls. The model outputs were compared with the three data series and an exhaustive estimation of the parameter values was performed. By focusing on the ability of the model to fit experimental data and to produce a CD8 T cell population mainly composed of memory cells at the end of the response, critical parameters were identified. We show that a small number of parameters (2-4) define the main features of the CD8 T cell immune response and are characteristic of a given pathogen. Among these parameters, two are related to the effector CD8 T cell mediated control of cell and pathogen death. The parameter associated with memory cell death is shown to play no relevant role during the main phases of the CD8 T cell response, yet it becomes essential when looking at the predictions of the model several months after the infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lamivudine treatment can restore T cell responsiveness in chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Boni, C; Bertoletti, A; Penna, A; Cavalli, A; Pilli, M; Urbani, S; Scognamiglio, P; Boehme, R; Panebianco, R; Fiaccadori, F; Ferrari, C

    1998-01-01

    High viral and/or antigen load may be an important cause of the T cell hyporesponsiveness to hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigens that is often observed in patients with chronic HBV infection. Reduction of viral and antigen load by lamivudine treatment represents an ideal model for investigating this hypothesis. HLA class II restricted T cell responses and serum levels of HBV-DNA, HBsAg, and HBeAg were studied before and during lamivudine treatment in 12 patients with hepatitis B e antigen positive chronic active hepatitis B to assess possible correlations between viral and/or antigen load and vigor of the T cell response. Cell proliferation to HBV nucleocapsid antigens and peptides and frequency of circulating HBV nucleocapsid-specific T cells were assessed to characterize CD4-mediated responses. A highly significant enhancement of the CD4-mediated response to HBV nucleocapsid antigens was already detectable in most patients 7-14 d after the start of lamivudine treatment. This effect was dramatic and persistent in 10 patients but undetectable in 2. It occurred concomitant with a rapid and marked reduction of viremia. Interestingly, lamivudine also enhanced the responses to mitogens and recall antigens, showing that its effect was not limited to HBV-specific T cells. In conclusion, an efficient antiviral T cell response can be restored by lamivudine treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis B concurrently with reduction of viremia, indicating the importance of viral load in the pathogenesis of T cell hyporesponsiveness in these patients. Since lamivudine treatment can overcome T cell hyporeactivity, combining lamivudine with treatments directed to stimulate the T cell response may represent an effective strategy to induce eradication of chronic HBV infection. PMID:9727065

  9. Cornea lymphatics drive the CD8(+) T-cell response to herpes simplex virus-1.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Hem R; Carr, Meghan M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection of the cornea induces vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A)-dependent lymphangiogenesis. However, the extent to which HSV-1-induced corneal lymphangiogenesis impacts the adaptive immune response has not been characterized. Here, we used floxed VEGF-A mice to study the importance of newly created corneal lymphatic vessels in the host adaptive immune response to infection. Whereas the mice infected with the parental virus (strain SC16) exhibited robust corneal lymphangiogenesis, mice that received the recombinant virus (SC16 ICP0-Cre) that expresses Cre recombinase under the control of infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), an HSV-1 immediate-early gene, showed a significant reduction in lymphangiogenesis. There was no difference in virus recovered from the cornea of mice infected with SC16 vs SC16 ICP0-Cre. However, viral loads were significantly elevated in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of mice with reduced corneal lymphangiogenesis. The increase in viral titer correlated with a significant loss of HSV-1-specific CD8(+) T cells that traffic to the TG of mice infected with the recombinant virus. Intrastromal delivery of size-exclusion dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran) revealed a time-dependent defect in the ability of the lymphatic vessels in SC16 ICP0-Cre-infected mice to transport soluble antigen from the cornea to the draining lymph nodes. We interpret these results to suggest that the newly created lymphatic vessels in the cornea driven by HSV-1 infection are critical in the delivery of soluble viral antigen to the draining lymph node and subsequent development of the CD8(+) T-cell response to HSV-1.

  10. Cornea Lymphatics Drive the CD8+ T Cell Response to Herpes Simplex Virus-1

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Hem R.; Carr, Meghan M.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection of the cornea induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A-dependent lymphangiogenesis. However, the extent to which HSV-1-induced corneal lymphangiogenesis impacts the adaptive immune response has not been characterized. Here, we used floxed VEGF-A mice to study the importance of newly created corneal lymphatic vessels in the host adaptive immune response to infection. Whereas the mice infected with the parental virus (strain SC16) exhibited robust corneal lymphangiogenesis, mice that received the recombinant virus (SC16 ICP0-Cre) that expresses Cre recombinase under the control of infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), an HSV-1 immediate early gene, showed a significant reduction in lymphangiogenesis. There was no difference in virus recovered from the cornea of mice infected with SC16 vs SC16 ICP0-Cre. However, viral loads were significantly elevated in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of mice with reduced corneal lymphangiogenesis. The increase in viral titer correlated with a significant loss of HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells that traffic to the TG of mice infected with the recombinant virus. Intrastromal delivery of size exclusion dye (FITC-dextran) revealed a time-dependent defect in the ability of the lymphatic vessels in SC16 ICP0-Cre infected mice to transport soluble antigen from the cornea to the draining lymph nodes. We interpret these results to suggest that the newly created lymphatic vessels in the cornea driven by HSV-1 infection are critical in the delivery of soluble viral antigen to the draining lymph node and subsequent development of the CD8+ T cell response to HSV-1. PMID:27577867

  11. CD4+ T cell-dependent and CD4+ T cell-independent cytokine-chemokine network changes in the immune responses of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kelly B; Szeto, Gregory L; Alter, Galit; Irvine, Darrell J; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2015-10-20

    A vital defect in the immune systems of HIV-infected individuals is the loss of CD4(+) T cells, resulting in impaired immune responses. We hypothesized that there were CD4(+) T cell-dependent and CD4(+) T cell-independent alterations in the immune responses of HIV-1(+) individuals. To test this, we analyzed the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) populations from HIV(+) donors, healthy donors, and healthy donors with CD4(+) T cells experimentally depleted. Multivariate analyses of 16 cytokines and chemokines at 6 and 72 hours after three stimuli (antibody-coated beads to stimulate T cells and R848 or lipopolysaccharide to stimulate innate immune cells) enabled integrative analysis of secreted profiles. Two major effects in HIV(+) PBMCs were not reproduced upon depletion of CD4(+) T cells in healthy PBMCs: (i) HIV(+) PBMCs maintained T cell-associated secreted profiles after T cell stimulation; (ii) HIV(+) PBMCs showed impaired interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion early after innate stimulation. These changes arose from hyperactive T cells and debilitated natural killer (NK) cell, respectively. Modeling and experiments showed that early IFN-γ secretion predicted later differences in secreted profiles in vitro. This effect was recapitulated in healthy PBMCs by blocking the IFN-γ receptor. Thus, we identified a critical deficiency in NK cell responses of HIV-infected individuals, independent of CD4(+) T cell depletion, which directs secreted profiles. Our findings illustrate a broad approach for identifying key disease-associated nodes in a multicellular, multivariate signaling network. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Intravaginal immunization with HPV vectors induces tissue-resident CD8+ T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Çuburu, Nicolas; Graham, Barney S.; Buck, Christopher B.; Kines, Rhonda C.; Pang, Yuk-Ying S.; Day, Patricia M.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2012-01-01

    The induction of persistent intraepithelial CD8+ T cell responses may be key to the development of vaccines against mucosally transmitted pathogens, particularly for sexually transmitted diseases. Here we investigated CD8+ T cell responses in the female mouse cervicovaginal mucosa after intravaginal immunization with human papillomavirus vectors (HPV pseudoviruses) that transiently expressed a model antigen, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) M/M2, in cervicovaginal keratinocytes. An HPV intravaginal prime/boost with different HPV serotypes induced 10-fold more cervicovaginal antigen-specific CD8+ T cells than priming alone. Antigen-specific T cell numbers decreased only 2-fold after 6 months. Most genital antigen-specific CD8+ T cells were intra- or subepithelial, expressed αE-integrin CD103, produced IFN-γ and TNF-α, and displayed in vivo cytotoxicity. Using a sphingosine-1-phosphate analog (FTY720), we found that the primed CD8+ T cells proliferated in the cervicovaginal mucosa upon HPV intravaginal boost. Intravaginal HPV prime/boost reduced cervicovaginal viral titers 1,000-fold after intravaginal challenge with vaccinia virus expressing the CD8 epitope M2. In contrast, intramuscular prime/boost with an adenovirus type 5 vector induced a higher level of systemic CD8+ T cells but failed to induce intraepithelial CD103+CD8+ T cells or protect against recombinant vaccinia vaginal challenge. Thus, HPV vectors are attractive gene-delivery platforms for inducing durable intraepithelial cervicovaginal CD8+ T cell responses by promoting local proliferation and retention of primed antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. PMID:23143305

  13. Ly6Chi monocytes regulate T cell responses in viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiangao; Chen, Huiyao; Huang, Xiaopei; Jiang, Songfu

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis remains a global health challenge despite recent progress in the development of more effective therapies. Although virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses are essential for viral clearance, it remains largely unknown what regulates T cell–mediated viral clearance. Thus, a better understanding of the regulation of anti-viral T cell immunity would be critical for the design of more effective therapies for viral hepatitis. Using a model of adenovirus-induced hepatitis, here we showed that adenoviral infection induced recruitment of Ly6Chi monocytes to the liver in a CCR2-dependent manner. These recruited Ly6Chi monocytes suppressed CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses to adenoviral infection, leading to a delay in viral clearance. In vivo depletion of Ly6Chi monocytes markedly enhanced anti-viral T cell responses and promoted viral clearance. Mechanistically, we showed that induction of iNOS and the production of NO by Ly6Chi monocytes are critical for the suppression of T cell responses. In addition, a contact-dependent mechanism mediated by PD-1 and PD-L1 interaction is also required for T cell suppression by Ly6Chi monocytes. These findings suggest a critical role for Ly6Chi monocytes in the regulation of T cell immunity in viral hepatitis and may provide new insights into development of more effective therapies for treating viral hepatitis based on targeting the immunosuppressing monocytes. PMID:27777980

  14. Dissecting the T Cell Response: Proliferation Assays vs. Cytokine Signatures by ELISPOT

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Donald D.; Milkovich, Kimberly A.; Zhang, Wenji; Rodriguez, Benigno; Yonkers, Nicole L.; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic allograft rejection is in part mediated by host T cells that recognize allogeneic antigens on transplanted tissue. One factor that determines the outcome of a T cell response is clonal size, while another is the effector quality. Studies of alloimmune predictors of transplant graft survival have most commonly focused on only one measure of the alloimmune response. Because differing qualities and frequencies of the allospecific T cell response may provide distinctly different information we analyzed the relationship between frequency of soluble antigen and allo-antigen specific memory IFN-γ secreting CD4 and CD8 T cells, their ability to secrete IL-2, and their proliferative capacity, while accounting for cognate and bystander proliferation. The results show proliferative responses primarily reflect on IL-2 production by antigen-specific T cells, and that proliferating cells in such assays entail a considerable fraction of bystander cells. On the other hand, proliferation (and IL-2 production) did not reflect on the frequency of IFN-γ producing memory cells, a finding particularly accentuated in the CD8 T cell compartment. These data provide rationale for considering both frequency and effector function of pre-transplant T cell reactivity when analyzing immune predictors of graft rejection. PMID:24710419

  15. Private specificities of CD8 T cell responses control patterns of heterologous immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Kwon; Cornberg, Markus; Wang, Xiaoting Z.; Chen, Hong D.; Selin, Liisa K.; Welsh, Raymond M.

    2005-01-01

    CD8 T cell cross-reactivity between viruses can play roles in protective heterologous immunity and damaging immunopathology. This cross-reactivity is sometimes predictable, such as between lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Pichinde virus, where cross-reactive epitopes share six out of eight amino acids. Here, however, we demonstrate more subtle and less predictable cross-reactivity between LCMV and the unrelated vaccinia virus (VV). Epitope-specific T cell receptor usage differed between individual LCMV-infected C57BL/6 mice, even though the mice had similar epitope-specific T cell hierarchies. LCMV-immune mice challenged with VV showed variations, albeit in a distinct hierarchy, in proliferative expansions of and down-regulation of IL-7Rα by T cells specific to different LCMV epitopes. T cell responses to a VV-encoded epitope that is cross-reactive with LCMV fluctuated greatly in VV-infected LCMV-immune mice. Adoptive transfers of splenocytes from individual LCMV-immune donors resulted in nearly identical VV-induced responses in each of several recipients, but responses differed depending on the donor. This indicates that the specificities of T cell responses that are not shared between individuals may influence cross-reactivity with other antigens and play roles in heterologous immunity upon encounter with another pathogen. This variability in cross-reactive T cell expansion that is unique to the individual may underlie variation in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. PMID:15710651

  16. Lipopolysaccharides with acylation defects potentiate TLR4 signaling and shape T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Anna; Ohne, Yoichiro; Degos, Clara; Gorvel, Laurent; Moriyón, Ignacio; Oh, Sangkon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are components of Gram-negative enterobacteria that cause septic shock in mammals. However, a LPS carrying hexa-acyl lipid A moieties is highly endotoxic compared to a tetra-acyl LPS and the latter has been considered as an antagonist of hexa-acyl LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. We investigated the relationship between the structure and the function of bacterial LPS in the context of human and mouse dendritic cell activation. Strikingly, LPS with acylation defects were capable of triggering a strong and early TLR4-dependent DC activation, which in turn led to the activation of the proteasome machinery dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Upon activation with tetra-acyl LPS both mouse and human dendritic cells triggered CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses and, importantly, human myeloid dendritic cells favored the induction of regulatory T cells. Altogether, our data suggest that LPS acylation controlled by pathogenic bacteria might be an important strategy to subvert adaptive immunity.

  17. CD25+ natural regulatory T cells are critical in limiting innate and adaptive immunity and resolving disease following respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Debbie C P; Harker, James A E; Tregoning, John S; Atabani, Sowsan F; Johansson, Cecilia; Schwarze, Jürgen; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2010-09-01

    Regulatory CD4(+) T cells have been shown to be important in limiting immune responses, but their role in respiratory viral infections has received little attention. Here we observed that following respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, CD4(+) Foxp3(+) CD25(+) natural regulatory T-cell numbers increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lung, mediastinal lymph nodes, and spleen. The depletion of CD25(+) natural regulatory T cells prior to RSV infection led to enhanced weight loss with delayed recovery that was surprisingly accompanied by increased numbers of activated natural killer cells in the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid on day 8 postinfection. Increased numbers of neutrophils were also detected within the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and correlated with elevated levels of myeloperoxidase as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). CD25(+) natural regulatory T-cell depletion also led to enhanced numbers of proinflammatory T cells producing IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the lung. Despite these increases in inflammatory responses and disease severity, the viral load was unaltered. This work highlights a critical role for natural regulatory T cells in regulating the adaptive and innate immune responses during the later stages of lung viral infections.

  18. Characteristics of HLA-E Restricted T-Cell Responses and Their Role in Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human HLA-E can, in addition to self-antigens, also present pathogen-derived sequences, which elicit specific T-cell responses. T-cells recognize their antigen presented by HLA-E highly specifically and have unique functional and phenotypical properties. Pathogen specific HLA-E restricted CD8+ T-cells are an interesting new player in the field of immunology. Future work should address their exact roles and relative contributions in the immune response against infectious diseases. PMID:27699181

  19. Long-lasting memory T cell responses following self-limited acute hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Penna, A; Artini, M; Cavalli, A; Levrero, M; Bertoletti, A; Pilli, M; Chisari, F V; Rehermann, B; Del Prete, G; Fiaccadori, F; Ferrari, C

    1996-01-01

    The molecular and cellular basis of long-term T cell memory against viral antigens is still largely undefined. To characterize anti-viral protection by memory T cells against non-cytopathic viruses able to cause acute self-limited and chronic infections, such as the hepatitis B virus (HBV), we studied HLA class II restricted responses against HBV structural antigens in 17 patients with acute hepatitis B, during the acute stage of infection and 2.2 to 13 yr after clinical resolution of disease. Results indicate that: (a) significant T cell proliferative responses to HBV nucleocapsid antigens were detectable in all patients during the acute phase of infection and in 14/17 also 2-13 yr after clinical resolution of disease; b) long-lasting T cell responses were sustained by CD45RO+T cells, predominantly expressing the phenotype of recently activated cells; c) limiting dilution analysis showed that in some patients the frequency of HBV-specific T cells was comparable to that observed in the acute stage of infection and, usually, higher than in patients with chronic HBV infection; d) the same amino acid sequences were recognized by T cells in the acute and recovery phases of infection; and e) HBV-DNA was detectable by nested-PCR in approximately half of the subjects. to conclusion, our results show that vigorous anti-viral T cell responses are detectable in vitro several years after clinical recovery from acute hepatitis B. Detection of minute amounts of virus in some recovered subjects suggests that long-term maintenance of an active anti-viral T cell response could be important not only for protection against reinfection but also for keeping the persisting virus under tight control. PMID:8787682

  20. TRAV7-2*02 Expressing CD8+ T Cells Are Responsible for Palladium Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yuri; Suto, Yoshiko; Ito, Koyu; Hashimoto, Wataru; Nishiya, Tadashi; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki; Takahashi, Tetsu; Ogasawara, Kouetsu

    2017-01-01

    While metallic biomaterials have led to an improvement in the quality of life, metal allergies, especially to palladium (Pd), has caused a recent increase in allergic patients. Metal allergy is known to be a T cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH); however, the pathogenic T cell subsets and the specific T cell receptor (TCR) have not been identified. Therefore, we attempted to identify the pathogenic T cells responsible for Pd allergy. We found that activating CD8+ T cells significantly increased and that the TRAV (TCRα variable) 7-2*02 chain skewed in Pd allergic mice. Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments revealed that in vitro-cultured Pd-stimulated antigen presenting cells (APCs) function as memory APCs with recipient mice developing Pd allergy and that the frequency of TRAV7-2*02 increases the same as conventional Pd allergic mice. In contrast, neither proliferation of CD8+ T cells nor increasing of TRAV7-2*02 was observed in major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I)-deficient Pd-APCs transferred to mice. Taken together, we revealed that TRAV7-2*02-expressing CD8+ T cells are the pathogenic T cells for the development of Pd allergy. We also identified the CDR3 consensus motif of pathogenic TCRs as CAAXSGSWQLIF in TRAV7-2*02/TRAJ (TCRα junction)22*01 positive cells. These results suggest that the specific TCRs represent novel targets for the development of diagnostics and treatments for metal allergy. PMID:28561797

  1. T cell responses to human platelet antigen–1a involve a unique form of indirect allorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Ida Løken; Skogen, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a pregnancy-related condition caused by maternal antibodies binding an alloantigen on fetal platelets. In most cases the alloantigen is formed by a single amino acid, integrin β3 Leu33, referred to as human platelet antigen–1a (HPA-1a). Production of anti–HPA-1a antibodies likely depends on CD4+ T cells that recognize the same alloantigen in complex with the HLA-DRA/DRB3*01:01 molecule. While this complex is well characterized, T cell recognition of it is not. Here, to examine the nature of antigen recognition by HPA-1a–specific T cells, we assayed native and synthetic variants of the integrin β3 peptide antigen for binding to DRA/DRB3*01:01-positive antigen-presenting cells and for T cell activation. We found that HPA-1a–specific T cells recognize non-allogeneic integrin β3 residues anchored to DRA/DRB3*01:01 by the allogeneic Leu33, which itself is not directly recognized by these T cells. Furthermore, these T cell responses are diverse, with different T cells depending on different residues for recognition. This represents a unique form of indirect allorecognition in which a non-allogeneic peptide sequence becomes immunogenic by stable anchoring to MHC by an allogeneic residue. PMID:27699233

  2. Antiparasitic Treatment Induces an Improved CD8(+) T Cell Response in Chronic Chagasic Patients.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Jose; Pérez-Antón, Elena; Lasso, Paola; Egui, Adriana; Roa, Nubia; Carrilero, Bartolomé; González, John M; Thomas, M Carmen; Puerta, Concepción J; López, Manuel C; Cuéllar, Adriana

    2017-04-15

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, an intracellular protozoan parasite. Chronic chagasic patients (CCPs) have dysfunctional CD8(+) T cells that are characterized by impaired cytokine production, high coexpression of inhibitory receptors, and advanced cellular differentiation. Most patients diagnosed in the chronic phase of Chagas disease already exhibit heart involvement, and there is no vaccination that protects against the disease. Antiparasitic treatment is controversial as to its indication for this stage of the disease. There is a lack of biological markers to evaluate the effectiveness of antiparasitic treatment, and little is known about the effect of the treatment on CD8(+) T cells. Thus, the aim of the current study was to analyze the early effects of antiparasitic treatment on CD8(+) T cells from CCPs with asymptomatic clinical forms of disease. To evaluate the CD8(+) T cell subsets, expression of inhibitory receptors, and functionality of T cells in CCPs, PBMCs were isolated. The results showed that treatment of CCPs with the asymptomatic form of the disease induces an increase in the frequency of CD8(+) central memory T cells and terminal effector T cells, a decrease in the coexpression of inhibitory receptors, an improved Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell response exhibited by the individual production of IFN-γ or IL-2, and a multifunctional CD8(+) T cell profile of up to four functions (IFN-γ(+)IL-2(+)Perforin(+)Granzyme B(+)). These findings suggest that, in CCPs, antiparasitic treatment improved the quality of Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell responses associated with a decrease in inhibitory receptor coexpression, which could serve as biomarkers for monitoring the effectiveness of antiparasitic treatment.

  3. Role of Mast Cells in Regulation of T Cell Responses in Experimental and Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Elieh Ali Komi, Daniel; Grauwet, Korneel

    2017-09-19

    Mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of stored or newly synthesized pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and/or immunosuppressive mediators and express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules. Mast cells finely tune activities of T cells, B cells, and regulatory cells and effectively contribute to the development of different T cell-associated responses by influencing their recruitment, activation, proliferation, and differentiation. The interaction between mast cells and T cells, with regard to cellular functionality and immune responses, can be assessed in both activating and inhibitory regulations. While Th2 cytokines, including IL-5 and IL-9, stimulate stem cell factor (SCF)-dependent proliferation of mast cells, Th1 cytokine IFN-γ suppresses SCF-mediated differentiation of mast cell progenitors. Mast cell mediators such as CCL5 have a role in the recruitment of CD8+ T cells to viral infection sites where their ability in clearance of viral reservoirs is needed. The capacity of mast cells in presenting antigens by classes I and II MHC molecules to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells respectively is considered one of the main antigen-dependent interactions of mast cells with T cells. Interestingly, Tregs recruit mast cells to different sites through secretion of IL-9, while the OX40L (expressed on mast cell)-OX40(expressed on T cell) interaction inhibits the extent of the mast cell degranulation. Recently, the capability of exosomes to carry regulatory receptors of the mast cell surface and their role in T cell activation has been investigated. Functional interplay between mast cells and T cell subsets has been suggested primarily by investigating their co-localization in inflamed tissues and involvement of mast cells in autoimmune diseases. In this review, the interactions of mast cells with T cells are reviewed in cell-to-cell, cytokine, and exosome categories.

  4. Stomatin-like protein 2 deficiency in T cells is associated with altered mitochondrial respiration and defective CD4+ T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Christie, Darah A; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Blagih, Julianna; Dunn, Stanley D; St-Pierre, Julie; Jones, Russell G; Hatch, Grant M; Madrenas, Joaquín

    2012-11-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2) is a mostly mitochondrial protein that regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function and modulates T cell activation. To determine the mechanism of action of SLP-2, we generated T cell-specific SLP-2-deficient mice. These mice had normal numbers of thymocytes and T cells in the periphery. However, conventional SLP-2-deficient T cells had a posttranscriptional defect in IL-2 production in response to TCR ligation, and this translated into reduced CD4(+) T cell responses. SLP-2 deficiency was associated with impaired cardiolipin compartmentalization in mitochondrial membranes, decreased levels of the NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) iron-sulfur protein 3, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1β subcomplex subunit 8, and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1α subcomplex subunit 9 of respiratory complex I, and decreased activity of this complex as well as of complex II plus III of the respiratory chain. In addition, SLP-2-deficient T cells showed a significant increase in uncoupled mitochondrial respiration and a greater reliance on glycolysis. Based on these results, we propose that SLP-2 organizes the mitochondrial membrane compartmentalization of cardiolipin, which is required for optimal assembly and function of respiratory chain complexes. This function, in T cells, helps to ensure proper metabolic response during activation.

  5. Immune-checkpoint proteins VISTA and PD-1 nonredundantly regulate murine T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Ying; Chen, Wenna; Putra, Juan; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Schenk, Austin D.; Miller, Halli E.; Guleria, Indira; Barth, Richard J.; Huang, Yina H.; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    V-domain immunoglobulin suppressor of T-cell activation (VISTA) is a negative immune-checkpoint protein that suppresses T-cell responses. To determine whether VISTA synergizes with another immune-checkpoint, programmed death 1 (PD-1), this study characterizes the immune responses in VISTA-deficient, PD-1-deficient (KO) mice and VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. Chronic inflammation and spontaneous activation of T cells were observed in both single KO mice, demonstrating their nonredundancy. However, the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice exhibited significantly higher levels of these phenotypes than the single KO mice. When bred onto the 2D2 T-cell receptor transgenic mice, which are predisposed to development of inflammatory autoimmune disease in the CNS, the level of disease penetrance was significantly enhanced in the double KO mice compared with in the single KO mice. Consistently, the magnitude of T-cell response toward foreign antigens was synergistically higher in the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. A combinatorial blockade using monoclonal antibodies specific for VISTA and PD-L1 achieved optimal tumor-clearing therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the nonredundant role of VISTA that is distinct from the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in controlling T-cell activation. These findings provide the rationale to concurrently target VISTA and PD-1 pathways for treating T-cell-regulated diseases such as cancer. PMID:25964334

  6. T cell Bim levels reflect responses to anti–PD-1 cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dronca, Roxana S.; Liu, Xin; Harrington, Susan M.; Chen, Lingling; Cao, Siyu; Kottschade, Lisa A.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Block, Matthew S.; Nevala, Wendy K.; Thompson, Michael A.; Mansfield, Aaron S.; Park, Sean S.; Markovic, Svetomir N.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint therapy with PD-1 blockade has emerged as an effective therapy for many advanced cancers; however, only a small fraction of patients achieve durable responses. To date, there is no validated blood-based means of predicting the response to PD-1 blockade. We report that Bim is a downstream signaling molecule of the PD-1 pathway, and its detection in T cells is significantly associated with expression of PD-1 and effector T cell markers. High levels of Bim in circulating tumor-reactive (PD-1+CD11ahiCD8+) T cells were prognostic of poor survival in patients with metastatic melanoma who did not receive anti–PD-1 therapy and were also predictive of clinical benefit in patients with metastatic melanoma who were treated with anti–PD-1 therapy. Moreover, this circulating tumor-reactive T cell population significantly decreased after successful anti–PD-1 therapy. Our study supports a crucial role of Bim in both T cell activation and apoptosis as regulated by PD-1 and PD-L1 interactions in effector CD8+ T cells. Measurement of Bim levels in circulating T cells of patients with cancer may provide a less invasive strategy to predict and monitor responses to anti–PD-1 therapy, although future prospective analyses are needed to validate its utility. PMID:27182556

  7. Immune-checkpoint proteins VISTA and PD-1 nonredundantly regulate murine T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Ying; Chen, Wenna; Putra, Juan; Suriawinata, Arief A; Schenk, Austin D; Miller, Halli E; Guleria, Indira; Barth, Richard J; Huang, Yina H; Wang, Li

    2015-05-26

    V-domain immunoglobulin suppressor of T-cell activation (VISTA) is a negative immune-checkpoint protein that suppresses T-cell responses. To determine whether VISTA synergizes with another immune-checkpoint, programmed death 1 (PD-1), this study characterizes the immune responses in VISTA-deficient, PD-1-deficient (KO) mice and VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. Chronic inflammation and spontaneous activation of T cells were observed in both single KO mice, demonstrating their nonredundancy. However, the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice exhibited significantly higher levels of these phenotypes than the single KO mice. When bred onto the 2D2 T-cell receptor transgenic mice, which are predisposed to development of inflammatory autoimmune disease in the CNS, the level of disease penetrance was significantly enhanced in the double KO mice compared with in the single KO mice. Consistently, the magnitude of T-cell response toward foreign antigens was synergistically higher in the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. A combinatorial blockade using monoclonal antibodies specific for VISTA and PD-L1 achieved optimal tumor-clearing therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the nonredundant role of VISTA that is distinct from the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in controlling T-cell activation. These findings provide the rationale to concurrently target VISTA and PD-1 pathways for treating T-cell-regulated diseases such as cancer.

  8. Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2014-02-10

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.

  9. Quantifying Susceptibility of CD4+ Stem Memory T-Cells to Infection by Laboratory Adapted and Clinical HIV-1 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs. PMID:24517971

  10. AFP-specific CD4+ Helper T-cell Responses in Healthy Donors and HCC Patients

    PubMed Central

    Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; Liu, Yang; Potter, Douglas M.; Butterfield, Lisa H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. We have investigated α-fetoprotein (AFP) as a tumor-associated antigen for HCC. We identified major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted peptide epitopes derived from AFP and studied CD8+ T-cell responses in vivo and in vitro in ongoing immunotherapy studies. Helper T cells are of critical importance in shaping the immune response; therefore, we investigated the frequency and function of AFP-specific CD4+ T cells in the general population and among HCC patients. CD4+ T-cell responses were assessed by direct ex vivo multicytokine enzyme-linked immunospot assay and by measurement of cytokine levels using a multicytokine assay. Our analysis indicates that healthy donors have very low frequencies of AFP-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, which are of TH1 type, detectable ex vivo. In contrast, these T cells were either reduced or eliminated in HCC patients at advanced stages of disease. To better activate these cells, we compared the stimulatory capacity of both AFP protein-fed and AdVhAFP-engineered dendritic cells (DC). Healthy donors have CD4+ T-cell responses, which were activated in response to AFP protein-fed DC whereas HCC patients do not demonstrate significant responses to AFP protein. AdVhAFP-transduced DC were capable of activating higher frequency TH1 CD4+ responses to AFP in both healthy donors and AFP-positive HCC patients. Importantly, CD4+ T-cell cytokine expression profiles were skewed towards interleukin-2 and interferon-γ production when activated by adenovirally engineered DC, which has therapeutic implications for vaccination efforts. PMID:17457217

  11. Ex Vivo Restimulation of Human PBMC Expands a CD3+CD4−CD8− γδ + T Cell Population That Can Confound the Evaluation of CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses to Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Sedgmen, B. J.; Papalia, L.; Wang, L.; Dyson, A. R.; McCallum, H. A.; Simson, C. M.; Pearse, M. J.; Maraskovsky, E.; Hung, D.; Eomois, P. P.; Hartel, G.; Barnden, M. J.; Rockman, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of vaccine-induced humoral and CD4+ and CD8+ cellular immune responses represents an important correlate of vaccine efficacy. Accurate and reliable assays evaluating such responses are therefore critical during the clinical development phase of vaccines. T cells play a pivotal role both in coordinating the adaptive and innate immune responses and as effectors. During the assessment of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in subjects participating in a large-scale influenza vaccine trial, we identified the expansion of an IFN-γ-producing CD3+CD4−CD8− γδ + T cell population in the peripheral blood of 90/610 (15%) healthy subjects. The appearance of CD3+CD4−CD8− γδ + T cells in the blood of subjects was transient and found to be independent of the study cohort, vaccine group, subject gender and ethnicity, and ex vivo restimulation conditions. Although the function of this population and relevance to vaccination are unclear, their inclusion in the total vaccine-specific T-cell response has the potential to confound data interpretation. It is thus recommended that when evaluating the induction of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ immune responses following vaccination, the CD3+CD4−CD8− γδ + T cells are either excluded or separately enumerated from the overall frequency determination. PMID:24066003

  12. CD8+ T cell exhaustion, suppressed gamma interferon production, and delayed memory response induced by chronic Brucella melitensis infection.

    PubMed

    Durward-Diioia, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Khan, Mike; Hall, Cherisse; Smith, Judith A; Splitter, Gary A

    2015-12-01

    Brucella melitensis is a well-adapted zoonotic pathogen considered a scourge of mankind since recorded history. In some cases, initial infection leads to chronic and reactivating brucellosis, incurring significant morbidity and economic loss. The mechanism by which B. melitensis subverts adaptive immunological memory is poorly understood. Previous work has shown that Brucella-specific CD8(+) T cells express gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and can transition to long-lived memory cells but are not polyfunctional. In this study, chronic infection of mice with B. melitensis led to CD8(+) T cell exhaustion, manifested by programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) expression and a lack of IFN-γ production. The B. melitensis-specific CD8(+) T cells that produced IFN-γ expressed less IFN-γ per cell than did CD8(+) cells from uninfected mice. Both memory precursor (CD8(+) LFA1(HI) CD127(HI) KLRG1(LO)) and long-lived memory (CD8(+) CD27(HI) CD127(HI) KLRG1(LO)) cells were identified during chronic infection. Interestingly, after adoptive transfer, mice receiving cells from chronically infected animals were able to contain infection more rapidly than recipients of cells from acutely infected or uninfected donors, although the proportions of exhausted CD8(+) T cells increased after adoptive transfer in both challenged and unchallenged recipients. CD8(+) T cells of challenged recipients initially retained the stunted IFN-γ production found prior to transfer, and cells from acutely infected mice were never seen to transition to either memory subset at all time points tested, up to 30 days post-primary infection, suggesting a delay in the generation of memory. Here we have identified defects in Brucella-responsive CD8(+) T cells that allow chronic persistence of infection.

  13. GROUP 2 INNATE LYMPHOID CELLS AND CD4+ T CELLS COOPERATE TO MEDIATE TYPE 2 IMMUNE RESPONSE IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Li Yin; Iijima, Koji; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Background Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) play important roles in innate immunity and tissue remodeling via production of various cytokines and growth factors. Group 2 ILCs (ILC2s) were recently shown to mediate the immune pathology of asthma even without adaptive immunity. However, little is known about possible interactions between ILC2s and other immune cells. We sought to investigate the capacity of ILC2s to regulate effector functions of T cells. Methods We isolated ILC2s from the lungs of naïve mice. We cultured CD4+ T cells with ILC2s in vitro and examined the functions of these cell types. The mechanisms were investigated by using blocking antibodies and cells isolated from cytokine-deficient mice. For the in vivo study, we adoptively transferred ILC2s and CD4+ T cells into Il7ra−/− mice and subsequently exposed the mice to ovalbumin and a cysteine protease. Results Lung ILC2s enhanced CD4+ T cell proliferation and promoted production of type 2 cytokines in vitro. The interaction between ILC2s and CD4+ T cells involved costimulatory molecule OX40L and cytokine IL-4, which was mainly derived from ILC2s. Adoptive transfer of both ILC2 and CD4+ T cell populations, but not each population alone, into Il7ra−/− mice resulted in induction of a robust antigen-specific type 2 cytokine response and airway inflammation. Conclusion Lung ILC2s function to promote adaptive immunity in addition to their established roles in innate immunity. This novel function of ILC2s needs to be taken into account when considering the pathophysiology of asthma and other allergic airway diseases. PMID:24939388

  14. CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion, Suppressed Gamma Interferon Production, and Delayed Memory Response Induced by Chronic Brucella melitensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Durward-Diioia, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Khan, Mike; Hall, Cherisse; Smith, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is a well-adapted zoonotic pathogen considered a scourge of mankind since recorded history. In some cases, initial infection leads to chronic and reactivating brucellosis, incurring significant morbidity and economic loss. The mechanism by which B. melitensis subverts adaptive immunological memory is poorly understood. Previous work has shown that Brucella-specific CD8+ T cells express gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and can transition to long-lived memory cells but are not polyfunctional. In this study, chronic infection of mice with B. melitensis led to CD8+ T cell exhaustion, manifested by programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) expression and a lack of IFN-γ production. The B. melitensis-specific CD8+ T cells that produced IFN-γ expressed less IFN-γ per cell than did CD8+ cells from uninfected mice. Both memory precursor (CD8+ LFA1HI CD127HI KLRG1LO) and long-lived memory (CD8+ CD27HI CD127HI KLRG1LO) cells were identified during chronic infection. Interestingly, after adoptive transfer, mice receiving cells from chronically infected animals were able to contain infection more rapidly than recipients of cells from acutely infected or uninfected donors, although the proportions of exhausted CD8+ T cells increased after adoptive transfer in both challenged and unchallenged recipients. CD8+ T cells of challenged recipients initially retained the stunted IFN-γ production found prior to transfer, and cells from acutely infected mice were never seen to transition to either memory subset at all time points tested, up to 30 days post-primary infection, suggesting a delay in the generation of memory. Here we have identified defects in Brucella-responsive CD8+ T cells that allow chronic persistence of infection. PMID:26416901

  15. Impaired T-cell responses to sphingosine-1-phosphate in HIV-1 infected lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, Joseph C.; Murphy, Patrick; Manion, Maura; Debernardo, Robert; Hardacre, Jeffrey; Ammori, John; Hardy, Gareth A.; Harding, Clifford V.; Mahabaleshwar, Ganapati H.; Jain, Mukesh K.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Brooks, Ari D.; Lewis, Sharon; Schacker, Timothy W.; Anderson, Jodi; Haddad, Elias K.; Cubas, Rafael A.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Sieg, Scott F.

    2013-01-01

    The determinants of HIV-1-associated lymphadenopathy are poorly understood. We hypothesized that lymphocytes could be sequestered in the HIV-1+ lymph node (LN) through impairments in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) responsiveness. To test this hypothesis, we developed novel assays for S1P-induced Akt phosphorylation and actin polymerization. In the HIV-1+ LN, naïve CD4 T cells and central memory CD4 and CD8 T cells had impaired Akt phosphorylation in response to S1P, whereas actin polymerization responses to S1P were impaired dramatically in all LN maturation subsets. These defects were improved with antiretroviral therapy. LN T cells expressing CD69 were unable to respond to S1P in either assay, yet impaired S1P responses were also seen in HIV-1+ LN T cells lacking CD69 expression. Microbial elements, HIV-1, and interferon α – putative drivers of HIV-1associated immune activation all tended to increase CD69 expression and reduce T-cell responses to S1P in vitro. Impairment in T-cell egress from lymph nodes through decreased S1P responsiveness may contribute to HIV-1-associated LN enlargement and to immune dysregulation in a key organ of immune homeostasis. PMID:23422746

  16. Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells regulate T-cell responses against vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Carl; Yang, Yiping; Huang, Xiaopei

    2017-04-06

    Vaccinia virus (VV) can potently activate NK- and T-cell responses, leading to efficient viral control and generation of long-lasting protective immunity. However, immune responses against viral infections are often tightly controlled to avoid collateral damage and systemic inflammation. We have previously shown that granulocytic myeloid derived suppressor cells (g-MDSCs) can suppress the NK-cell response to VV infection. It remains unknown what regulates T-cell responses to VV infection in vivo. In this study, we first showed that monocytic MDSCs (m-MDSCs), but not g-MDSCs, from VV-infected mice could directly suppress CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell activation in vitro. We then demonstrated that defective recruitment of m-MDSCs to the site of VV infection in CCR2(-/-) mice enhanced VV-specific CD8(+) T-cell response and that adoptive transfer of m-MDSCs into VV-infected mice suppressed VV-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation, leading to a delay in viral clearance. Mechanistically, we further showed that T-cell suppression by m-MDSCs is mediated by indication of iNOS and production of NO upon VV infection, and that IFN-γ is required for activation of m-MDSCs. Collectively, our results highlight a critical role for m-MDSCs in regulating T-cell responses against VV infection and may suggest potential strategies using m-MDSCs to modulate T-cell responses during viral infections. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection.

    PubMed

    Swadling, Leo; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Ansari, M Azim; Bonsall, David; Richardson, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Collier, Jane; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Von Delft, Annette; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian V S; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Eleanor

    2016-08-02

    An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA), or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3) vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut), used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy), determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression) compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells were

  18. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Swadling, Leo; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Ansari, M. Azim; Bonsall, David; Richardson, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Collier, Jane; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Von Delft, Annette; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA), or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3) vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut), used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy), determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression) compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells were

  19. T-cell responses to the trypanosome variant surface glycoprotein are not limited to hypervariable subregions.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, Taylor R; Demick, Karen P; Bangs, James D; Forest, Katrina T; Paulnock, Donna M; Mansfield, John M

    2009-01-01

    Variable subregions within the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat displayed by African trypanosomes are predicted sites for T- and B-cell recognition. Hypervariable subregion 1 (HV-1) is localized to an internal amphipathic alpha helix in VSG monomers and may have evolved due to selective pressure by host T-cell responses to epitopes within this subregion. The prediction of T-cell receptor-reactive sites and major histocompatibility complex class II binding motifs within the HV-1 subregion, coupled with the conservation of amino acid residues in other regions of the molecule sufficient to maintain secondary and tertiary VSG structure, prompted us to test the hypothesis that Th cells may preferentially recognize HV-1 subregion peptides. Thus, we examined the fine specificity of VSG-specific T-cell lines, T-cell hybridomas, and Th cells activated during infection. Our results demonstrate that T-cell epitopes are distributed throughout the N-terminal domain of VSG but are not clustered exclusively within HV-1 or other hypervariable subregions. In contrast, T-cell-reactive sites were not detected within the relatively conserved C-terminal domain of VSG. Overall, this study is the first to dissect the fine specificity of T-cell responses to the trypanosome VSG and suggests that evolution of a conserved HV-1 region may be unrelated to selective pressures exerted by host T-cell responses. This study also demonstrates that T cells do not recognize the relatively invariant C-terminal region of the VSG molecule during infection, suggesting that it could serve as a potential subunit vaccine to provide variant cross-specific immunity for African trypanosomiasis.

  20. Epitope specific T-cell responses against influenza A in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Savic, Miloje; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Kim, Yohan; Tunheim, Gro; Cox, Rebecca J; Oftung, Fredrik; Peters, Bjoern; Mjaaland, Siri

    2016-02-01

    Pre-existing human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity may be a useful correlate of protection against severe influenza disease. Identification and evaluation of common epitopes recognized by T cells with broad cross-reactivity is therefore important to guide universal influenza vaccine development, and to monitor immunological preparedness against pandemics. We have retrieved an optimal combination of MHC class I and class II restricted epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database (www.iedb.org), by defining a fitness score function depending on prevalence, sequence conservancy and HLA super-type coverage. Optimized libraries of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes were selected from influenza antigens commonly present in seasonal and pandemic influenza strains from 1934 to 2009. These epitope pools were used to characterize human T-cell responses in healthy donors using interferon-γ ELISPOT assays. Upon stimulation, significant CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were induced, primarily recognizing epitopes from the conserved viral core proteins. Furthermore, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were phenotypically characterized regarding functionality, cytotoxic potential and memory phenotype using flow cytometry. Optimized sets of T-cell peptide epitopes may be a useful tool to monitor the efficacy of clinical trials, the immune status of a population to predict immunological preparedness against pandemics, as well as being candidates for universal influenza vaccines.

  1. Lower Affinity T Cells are Critical Components and Active Participants of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ryan J.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic and biophysical parameters of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide:MHC (pMHC) interaction define intrinsic factors required for T cell activation and differentiation. Although receptor ligand kinetics are somewhat cumbersome to assess experimentally, TCR:pMHC affinity has been shown to predict peripheral T cell functionality and potential for forming memory. Multimeric forms of pMHC monomers have often been used to provide an indirect readout of higher affinity T cells due to their availability and ease of use while allowing simultaneous definition of other functional and phenotypic characteristics. However, multimeric pMHC reagents have introduced a bias that underestimates the lower affinity components contained in the highly diverse TCR repertoires of all polyclonal T cell responses. Advances in the identification of lower affinity cells have led to the examination of these cells and their contribution to the immune response. In this review, we discuss the identification of high- vs. low-affinity T cells as well as their attributed signaling and functional differences. Lastly, mechanisms are discussed that maintain a diverse range of low- and high-affinity T cells. PMID:26441973

  2. Dynamic gene expression response to altered gravity in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Cora S; Hauschild, Swantje; Huge, Andreas; Tauber, Svantje; Lauber, Beatrice A; Polzer, Jennifer; Paulsen, Katrin; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Schmitz, Burkhard; Schütte, Andreas; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver

    2017-07-12

    We investigated the dynamics of immediate and initial gene expression response to different gravitational environments in human Jurkat T lymphocytic cells and compared expression profiles to identify potential gravity-regulated genes and adaptation processes. We used the Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 containing 44,699 protein coding genes and 22,829 non-protein coding genes and performed the experiments during a parabolic flight and a suborbital ballistic rocket mission to cross-validate gravity-regulated gene expression through independent research platforms and different sets of control experiments to exclude other factors than alteration of gravity. We found that gene expression in human T cells rapidly responded to altered gravity in the time frame of 20 s and 5 min. The initial response to microgravity involved mostly regulatory RNAs. We identified three gravity-regulated genes which could be cross-validated in both completely independent experiment missions: ATP6V1A/D, a vacuolar H + -ATPase (V-ATPase) responsible for acidification during bone resorption, IGHD3-3/IGHD3-10, diversity genes of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus participating in V(D)J recombination, and LINC00837, a long intergenic non-protein coding RNA. Due to the extensive and rapid alteration of gene expression associated with regulatory RNAs, we conclude that human cells are equipped with a robust and efficient adaptation potential when challenged with altered gravitational environments.

  3. NKp46+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Dampen Vaginal CD8 T Cell Responses following Local Immunization with a Cholera Toxin-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Luci, Carmelo; Bekri, Selma; Bihl, Franck; Pini, Jonathan; Bourdely, Pierre; Nouhen, Kelly; Malgogne, Angélique; Walzer, Thierry; Braud, Véronique M.; Anjuère, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune cells work in concert to generate efficient protection at mucosal surface. Vaginal mucosa is an epithelial tissue that contains innate and adaptive immune effector cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that vaginal administration of Cholera toxin -based vaccines generate antigen-specific CD8 T cells through the stimulation of local dendritic cells (DC). Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a group of lymphocytes localized in epithelial tissues that have important immune functions against pathogens and in tissue homeostasis. Their contribution to vaccine-induced mucosal T cell responses is an important issue for the design of protective vaccines. We report here that the vaginal mucosa contains a heterogeneous population of NKp46+ ILC that includes conventional NK cells and ILC1-like cells. We show that vaginal NKp46+ ILC dampen vaccine-induced CD8 T cell responses generated after local immunization. Indeed, in vivo depletion of NKp46+ ILC with anti-NK1.1 antibody or NKG2D blockade increases the magnitude of vaginal OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, such treatments also increase the number of DC in the vagina. NKG2D ligands being expressed by vaginal DC but not by CD8 T cells, these results support that NKp46+ ILC limit mucosal CD8 T cell responses indirectly through the NKG2D-dependent elimination of vaginal DC. Our data reveal an unappreciated role of NKp46+ ILC in the regulation of mucosal CD8 T cell responses. PMID:26630176

  4. NKG2D+ IFN-γ+ CD8+ T Cells Are Responsible for Palladium Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Mitsuko; Nakayama, Masafumi; Aoshima, Yusuke; Nakamura, Kyohei; Ono, Mizuho; Nishiya, Tadashi; Nakamura, Syou; Takeda, Yuri; Dobashi, Akira; Takahashi, Akiko; Endo, Misato; Ito, Akiyo; Ueda, Kyosuke; Sato, Naoki; Higuchi, Shigehito; Kondo, Takeru; Hashimoto, Suguru; Watanabe, Masamichi; Watanabe, Makoto; Takahashi, Tetsu; Sasaki, Keiichi; Nakamura, Masanori; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Narushima, Takayuki; Suzuki, Ryuji; Ogasawara, Kouetsu

    2014-01-01

    Nickel, cobalt, and chromium are well known to be causal agents of allergic contact dermatitis. Palladium (Pd) can also cause allergic disease and exposure results from wide use of this metal in dental restorations and jewelry. Metal allergy is categorized as a delayed-type hypersensitivity, and metal-responsive T cell clones have been isolated from allergic patients. However, compared to nickel, little is known about the pathology of allergic disease mediated by Pd, and pathogenic T cells are poorly understood. To identify the pathogenic T cells that are responsible for onset of Pd allergy, we enriched metal-responsive lymphocytes by sequential adoptive transfer of involved lymph node cells. Here we show that sequential adoptive transfer gradually increased the incidence and the intensity of Pd allergy, and CD8+ T cells are responsible for the disease as CD8+ T cell-depleted mice and β2-microglobulin-deficient mice did not develop Pd allergy. In addition, we found that draining lymph node cells skewed toward CD8+ T cells in response to Pd challenge in 8th adoptive transferred recipient mice. The CD8+ T cells expressed NKG2D, a costimulatory molecule involved in the production of IFN-γ. NKG2D ligand was also induced in Pd-injected tissues. Furthermore, both NKG2D ligand-transgenic mice, where NKG2D is downmodulated, and IFN-γ-deficient mice showed impaired Pd allergy. Taken together, these results indicate that IFN-γ-producing NKG2D+ CD8+ T cells are responsible for Pd allergy and suggest that NKG2D is a potential therapeutic target for treatment of metal allergy. PMID:24533050

  5. Perturbations in B cell responsiveness to CD4+ T cell help in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Moir, Susan; Ogwaro, Kisani M.; Malaspina, Angela; Vasquez, Joshua; Donoghue, Eileen T.; Hallahan, Claire W.; Liu, Shuying; Ehler, Linda A.; Planta, Marie A.; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran; Chun, Tae-Wook; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection induces a wide array of B cell dysfunctions. We have characterized the effect of plasma viremia on the responsiveness of B cells to CD4+ T cell help in HIV-infected patients. In HIV-negative donors, B cell proliferation correlated with CD154 expression on activated CD4+ T cells and with the availability of IL-2, whereas in HIV-infected viremic patients, reduced B cell proliferation was observed despite normal CD154 expression on activated CD4+ T cells. Reduced triggering of B cells by activated CD4+ T cells was clearly observed in HIV-infected viremic patients compared with aviremic patients with comparable CD4+ T cell counts, and a dramatic improvement in B cell function was observed in patients whose plasma viremia was controlled by effective antiretroviral therapy. The degree of B cell dysfunction in viremic patients correlated strongly with the inability of B cells to express CD25 in response to activated CD4+ T cells, resulting in an inability to mount a normal proliferative response to IL-2. Similar defects in responsiveness to IL-2 were observed in the B cells of HIV-infected viremic patients in the context of B cell receptor stimulation. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with ineffective humoral responses in HIV disease. PMID:12730375

  6. Reperfusion injury intensifies the adaptive human T cell alloresponse in a human-mouse chimeric artery model.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tai; Fogal, Birgit; Hao, Zhengrong; Tobiasova, Zuzana; Wang, Chen; Rao, Deepak A; Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy C; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Bradley, John R; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Sessa, William C; Tellides, George; Pober, Jordan S

    2012-02-01

    Perioperative nonimmune injuries to an allograft can decrease graft survival. We have developed a model for studying this process using human materials. Human artery segments were transplanted as infrarenal aortic interposition grafts into an immunodeficient mouse host, allowed to "heal in" for 30 days, and then retransplanted into a second mouse host. To induce a reperfusion injury, the healed-in artery segments were incubated for 3 hours under hypoxic conditions ex vivo before retransplantation. To induce immunologic rejection, the animals receiving the retransplanted artery segment were adoptively transferred with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or purified T cells from a donor allogeneic to the artery 1 week before surgery. To compare rejection of injured versus healthy tissues, these manipulations were combined. Results were analyzed ex vivo by histology, morphometry, immunohistochemistry, and mRNA quantitation or in vivo by ultrasound. Our results showed that reperfusion injury, which otherwise heals with minimal sequelae, intensifies the degree of allogeneic T cell-mediated injury to human artery segments. We developed a new human-mouse chimeric model demonstrating interactions of reperfusion injury and alloimmunity using human cells and tissues that may be adapted to study other forms of nonimmune injury and other types of adaptive immune responses.

  7. Immune response of human propagated gammadelta-T-cells to neuroblastoma recommend the Vdelta1+ subset for gammadelta-T-cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schilbach, Karin; Frommer, Klaus; Meier, Sybille; Handgretinger, Rupert; Eyrich, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Human peripheral gammadelta-T-cells are able to induce cytolysis of neuroblastoma (Nb) tumor cells. Besides innate effector functions against infected cells and tumors, gammadelta-T-cells are involved in T-helper 1/T-helper 2 (TH1/TH2) differentiation of alphabeta-T-cells. However, as different gammadelta-T-cell subsets vary considerably in their functional properties, the aim of the present study was to define repertoires of cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic factors of in vitro expanded Vdelta1+ and Vdelta2+ T cells in response to Nb. After short-term culture, both subsets released TH1 [interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, TNF-beta)] and TH2 cytokines (IL-4, -5, -6, -10, -13, Vdelta1 also transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, chemokines (I-309, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1-3, regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), ILs (IL-1, -8, -15), cytokines (leptin) as well as angiogenic growth factors [angiogenin (ANG), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I]. These molecules were expressed at higher levels in Vdelta2+ than Vdelta1+ T cells. Nb challenge changed protein expression. TH2 cytokine and IFN-gamma release was blocked in both gammadelta-T-cell subsets. In Vdelta2 gammadelta-T-cells, TH1 cytokines were down-regulated and tumor growth-promoting factors (ANG, VEGF, EGF, and IGF-I) were strongly up-regulated. In contrast, Vdelta1+ gammadelta-T-cells stopped the release of tumor-supportive factors and tolerogenic TGF-beta, and strongly up-regulated TNF-alpha, TNF-beta, MCP-1 and -2 and maintained their IL-2 production. In summary, our data show that after being challenged with Nb cells, propagated Vdelta1+ rather than Vdelta2+ T cells support antitumor responses by secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, in contrast to other cell types, Vdelta1+ T cells do not sustain a growth-promoting or tolerogenic

  8. Recovery from severe H7N9 disease is associated with diverse response mechanisms dominated by CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongfang; Wan, Yanmin; Qiu, Chenli; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio; Zhu, Zhaoqin; Loh, Liyen; Tian, Di; Ren, Yanqin; Hu, Yunwen; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Thomas, Paul G.; Inouye, Michael; Doherty, Peter C.; Kedzierska, Katherine; Xu, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    The avian origin A/H7N9 influenza virus causes high admission rates (>99%) and mortality (>30%), with ultimately favourable outcomes ranging from rapid recovery to prolonged hospitalization. Using a multicolour assay for monitoring adaptive and innate immunity, here we dissect the kinetic emergence of different effector mechanisms across the spectrum of H7N9 disease and recovery. We find that a diversity of response mechanisms contribute to resolution and survival. Patients discharged within 2–3 weeks have early prominent H7N9-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, while individuals with prolonged hospital stays have late recruitment of CD8+/CD4+ T cells and antibodies simultaneously (recovery by week 4), augmented even later by prominent NK cell responses (recovery >30 days). In contrast, those who succumbed have minimal influenza-specific immunity and little evidence of T-cell activation. Our study illustrates the importance of robust CD8+ T-cell memory for protection against severe influenza disease caused by newly emerging influenza A viruses. PMID:25967273

  9. The effect of nicotine on murine CD4 T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Petro, T M

    1996-01-01

    T cells were exposed to various concentrations of nicotine or smokeless tobacco extract (STE) during in vitro immune responses in order to examine effects upon expression of T cell costimulatory counter-receptors, CD28 and CTLA-4, and cytokine production. Splenic mononuclear cells (SPM) were exposed to 1:10(2) to 1:10(3) dilutions of STE or 1-100 micrograms/ml nicotine during 48 and 72 h of stimulation with anti-CD3. Expression of CD28 and CTLA-4 was evaluated with flow cytometry and production and expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-gamma were evaluated using ELISA and RT-PCR. The data here indicate that the percentage of CD4+ T cells expressing CD28 declined while percentage and intensity of CTLA-4 expression increased with exposure to a 1:10(2) dilution of STE during the T cell response. Exposure to nicotine decreased the percentage of CD4+ T cells expressing both CD28 and CTLA-4 and decreased the intensity of CD28 expression. Responding T cells exposed to nicotine produced significantly less Th1 cytokines, IL-2 and IFN-gamma, but significantly more Th2 cytokines, IL-4 and IL-10. Cytokine specific mRNA expression was only slightly affected by the exposure to nicotine. Thus, exposure of T cells to physiological concentrations of STE or nicotine can alter the T cell expression of CD28 and CTLA-4, and the CD4 T cell cytokine expression pattern.

  10. Characterization of Human CD8 T Cell Responses in Dengue Virus-Infected Patients from India.

    PubMed

    Chandele, Anmol; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Gunisetty, Sivaram; Singla, Mohit; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Akondy, Rama S; Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Nayak, Kaustuv; Reddy, Elluri Seetharami; Kalam, Haroon; Kumar, Dhiraj; Verma, Anil; Panda, HareKrushna; Wang, Siyu; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, Sushil; Ahmed, Rafi; Murali-Krishna, Kaja

    2016-12-15

    Epidemiological studies suggest that India has the largest number of dengue virus infection cases worldwide. However, there is minimal information about the immunological responses in these patients. CD8 T cells are important in dengue, because they have been implicated in both protection and immunopathology. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of HLA-DR(+) CD38(+) and HLA-DR(-) CD38(+) effector CD8 T cell subsets in dengue patients from India and Thailand. Both CD8 T cell subsets expanded and expressed markers indicative of antigen-driven proliferation, tissue homing, and cytotoxic effector functions, with the HLA-DR(+) CD38(+) subset being the most striking in these effector qualities. The breadth of the dengue-specific CD8 T cell response was diverse, with NS3-specific cells being the most dominant. Interestingly, only a small fraction of these activated effector CD8 T cells produced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) when stimulated with dengue virus peptide pools. Transcriptomics revealed downregulation of key molecules involved in T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Consistent with this, the majority of these CD8 T cells remained IFN-γ unresponsive even after TCR-dependent polyclonal stimulation (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28) but produced IFN-γ by TCR-independent polyclonal stimulation (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA] plus ionomycin). Thus, the vast majority of these proliferating, highly differentiated effector CD8 T cells probably acquire TCR refractoriness at the time the patient is experiencing febrile illness that leads to IFN-γ unresponsiveness. Our studies open novel avenues for understanding the mechanisms that fine-tune the balance between CD8 T cell-mediated protective versus pathological effects in dengue.

  11. Dynamics of the Cytotoxic T Cell Response to a Model of Acute Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, William S.; Emerson, Ryan O.; Lindau, Paul; Vignali, Marissa; Snyder, Thomas M.; Desmarais, Cindy; Sanders, Catherine; Utsugi, Heidi; Warren, Edus H.; McElrath, Juliana; Makar, Karen W.; Wald, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A detailed characterization of the dynamics and breadth of the immune response to an acute viral infection, as well as the determinants of recruitment to immunological memory, can greatly contribute to our basic understanding of the mechanics of the human immune system and can ultimately guide the design of effective vaccines. In addition to neutralizing antibodies, T cells have been shown to be critical for the effective resolution of acute viral infections. We report the first in-depth analysis of the dynamics of the CD8+ T cell repertoire at the level of individual T cell clonal lineages upon vaccination of human volunteers with a single dose of YF-17D. This live attenuated yellow fever virus vaccine yields sterile, long-term immunity and has been previously used as a model to understand the immune response to a controlled acute viral infection. We identified and enumerated unique CD8+ T cell clones specifically induced by this vaccine through a combined experimental and statistical approach that included high-throughput sequencing of the CDR3 variable region of the T cell receptor β-chain and an algorithm that detected significantly expanded T cell clones. This allowed us to establish that (i) on average, ∼2,000 CD8+ T cell clones were induced by YF-17D, (ii) 5 to 6% of the responding clones were recruited to long-term memory 3 months postvaccination, (iii) the most highly expanded effector clones were preferentially recruited to the memory compartment, and (iv) a fraction of the YF-17D-induced clones could be identified from peripheral blood lymphocytes solely by measuring clonal expansion. IMPORTANCE The exhaustive investigation of pathogen-induced effector T cells is essential to accurately quantify the dynamics of the human immune response. The yellow fever vaccine (YFV) has been broadly used as a model to understand how a controlled, self-resolving acute viral infection induces an effective and long-term protective immune response. Here, we

  12. T-cell responses associated with neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: isolation of HPA-1a-specific, HLA-DRB3*0101-restricted CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Mette Kjaer; Skogen, Bjørn; Stuge, Tor B

    2009-04-16

    T-cell responses have been implicated in the development of HPA-1a-induced neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). However, HPA-1a-specific T cells have neither been isolated nor characterized. Here, we aimed to determine whether HPA-1a-specific T cells could be isolated from HPA-1a-immunized women. In the present study, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from an HPA-1a-alloimmunized woman were cultured for weeks in the presence of HPA-1a peptide, labeled with CFSE, and assayed for antigen-specific proliferation. Individual proliferating cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and expanded in culture. Antigen specificity and HLA restriction were determined by cytokine secretion (enzyme-linked immunospot [ELISPOT]) and proliferation assays. Several CD3(+)CD4(+) T-cell clones were isolated that proliferated and secreted cytokines in response to HPA-1a peptide. Two of these clones have been established in long-term culture in our laboratory. Both of these recognize synthetic as well as naturally processed HPA-1a antigen, and the recognition is restricted by the MHC molecule HLA-DRB3*0101 that is strongly associated with NAIT. These HPA-1a-specific T-cell clones represent unambiguous evidence for the association of T-cell responses with NAIT, and they will serve as unique tools to elucidate the cellular immune response that may result in NAIT.

  13. Optimized DNA Vaccines to Specifically Induce Therapeutic CD8 T Cell Responses Against Autochthonous Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Il; Niu, Guilian; Bradley, Norma; Celis, Esteban

    2008-01-01

    Vaccines capable of inducing CD8 T cell responses to antigens expressed by tumor cells are considered as attractive choices for the treatment and prevention of malignant diseases. Our group has previously reported that immunization with synthetic peptide corresponding to a CD8 T cell epitope derived from the rat neu oncogene administered together with a Toll-like receptor agonist as adjuvant, induced immune responses that translated into prophylactic and therapeutic benefit against autochthonous tumors in an animal model of breast cancer (BALB-neuT mice). DNA-based vaccines offer some advantages over peptide vaccines, such as the possibility of including multiple CD8 T cell epitopes in a single construct. Thus, we have evaluated the use of DNA vaccination for its ability to generate effective CD8 T cell responses against breast tumors expressing the rat neu oncogene. The results show that as with peptide vaccination, DNA-based vaccines were very effective in stimulating tumor-reactive CD8 T cell responses. Moreover, vaccination with modified DNA plasmids resulted in significant anti-tumor effects that were mediated by CD8 T cells without the requirement of generating antibodies to the product of rat neu. These results bear importance for the design of DNA vaccines for the treatment and prevention of cancer. PMID:18253731

  14. Abortive activation of CD4 T cell responses during competitive priming in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Jason M.; Chaves, Francisco A.; Sant, Andrea J.

    2009-01-01

    Immunodominance refers to the highly selective peptide reactivity of T cells during an immune response. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that persistence of peptide:class II complexes is one key parameter that selects the final specificity of CD4 T cells. We found that low-stability peptide:class II complexes support the initial priming and expansion of CD4 T cells, but the expansion becomes strikingly aborted in the presence of competitive T cell responses to unrelated peptides. Our experiments revealed that for inhibition to occur, the competitive responses must be initiated by the same antigen presenting cell, and it is not because of competition for MHC binding. These studies not only provide an insight into the events that regulate competitive CD4 T cell priming in vivo, but also provide a previously undescribed conceptual framework to understand the parameters that select the final specificity of the T cell repertoire during pathogen or vaccine-induced immune responses. PMID:19423666

  15. Dendritic cell-derived IL-15 controls the induction of CD8 T cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Rückert, René; Brandt, Katja; Bulanova, Elena; Mirghomizadeh, Farhad; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-12-01

    The development and the differentiation of CD8(+) T cells are dependent on IL-15. Here, we have studied the source and mechanism of how IL-15 modulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated Th1 immune responses by employing two delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) models. IL-15-deficient (IL-15(-/-)) mice or mice treated with soluble IL-15Ralpha as an IL-15 antagonist showed significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent DTH responses, while activation of CD4(+) T cell and B cell functions remained unaffected. Injection of antigen-labeled dendritic cells (DC) from IL-15(+/+), IL-15(-/-) or IL-15Ralpha(-/-) mice revealed that DC-derived IL-15 is an absolute requirement for the initiation of DTH response. The re-establishment of the interaction of IL-15 with the IL-15Ralpha by incubating IL-15(-/-) DC with IL-15 completely restored the capacity to prime T cells for DTH induction in vivo. Moreover, IL-15 also enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by DC and triggered in vitro CD8(+) T cell proliferation and IL-2 release. Taken together, the data suggest that an autocrine IL-15/IL-15Ralpha signaling loop in DC is essential for inducing CD8(+)-dependent Th1 immune responses in mice. Therefore, targeted manipulation of this loop promises to be an effective, novel strategy for therapeutic modulation of clinically relevant DTH reactions.

  16. Characterization of γδ T Cells from Zebrafish Provides Insights into Their Important Role in Adaptive Humoral Immunity.

    PubMed

    Wan, Feng; Hu, Chong-Bin; Ma, Jun-Xia; Gao, Ke; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    γδ T cells represent an evolutionarily primitive T cell subset characterized by distinct T cell receptors (TCRs) and innate and adaptive immune functions. However, the presence of this T cell subset in ancient vertebrates remains unclear. In this study, γδ T cells from a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model were subjected to molecular and cellular characterizations. The constant regions of zebrafish TCR-γ (DrTRGC) and δ (DrTRDC) were initially identified. Zebrafish γδ T cells accounted for 7.7-20.5% of the total lymphocytes in spleen, head kidney, peripheral blood, skin, gill, and intestine tissues. They possess typical morphological features of lymphocytes with a surface phenotype of γ(+)δ(+)CD4(-)CD8(+). Zebrafish γδ T cells functionally showed a potent phagocytic ability to both soluble and particulate antigens. They can also act as an antigen-presenting cell to initiate antigen (KLH)-specific CD4(+) TKLH cell activation and to induce B cell proliferation and IgM production. Particularly, zebrafish γδ T cells also play a critical role in antigen-specific IgZ production in intestinal mucus. These findings demonstrated that γδ T cells had been originated as early as teleost fish, which providing valuable insights into the evolutionary history of T cell subset. It is anticipated that this study would be used as a guide to develop a zebrafish model for the cross-species investigation of γδ T cell biology.

  17. Characterization of γδ T Cells from Zebrafish Provides Insights into Their Important Role in Adaptive Humoral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Feng; Hu, Chong-bin; Ma, Jun-xia; Gao, Ke; Xiang, Li-xin; Shao, Jian-zhong

    2017-01-01

    γδ T cells represent an evolutionarily primitive T cell subset characterized by distinct T cell receptors (TCRs) and innate and adaptive immune functions. However, the presence of this T cell subset in ancient vertebrates remains unclear. In this study, γδ T cells from a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model were subjected to molecular and cellular characterizations. The constant regions of zebrafish TCR-γ (DrTRGC) and δ (DrTRDC) were initially identified. Zebrafish γδ T cells accounted for 7.7–20.5% of the total lymphocytes in spleen, head kidney, peripheral blood, skin, gill, and intestine tissues. They possess typical morphological features of lymphocytes with a surface phenotype of γ+δ+CD4−CD8+. Zebrafish γδ T cells functionally showed a potent phagocytic ability to both soluble and particulate antigens. They can also act as an antigen-presenting cell to initiate antigen (KLH)-specific CD4+ TKLH cell activation and to induce B cell proliferation and IgM production. Particularly, zebrafish γδ T cells also play a critical role in antigen-specific IgZ production in intestinal mucus. These findings demonstrated that γδ T cells had been originated as early as teleost fish, which providing valuable insights into the evolutionary history of T cell subset. It is anticipated that this study would be used as a guide to develop a zebrafish model for the cross-species investigation of γδ T cell biology. PMID:28119690

  18. AMPK-dependent and independent effects of AICAR and compound C on T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Rao, Enyu; Zhang, Yuwen; Li, Qiang; Hao, Jiaqing; Egilmez, Nejat K; Suttles, Jill; Li, Bing

    2016-06-07

    As a master metabolic sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is involved in different fundamental cellular processes. Regulation of AMPK activity either by agonists (e.g., AICAR) or by antagonists (e.g., Compound C) has been widely employed to study the physiological functions of AMPK. However, mounting evidence indicates AMPK-independent effects for these chemicals and how they regulate immune cell functions remains largely unknown. Herein, using T cells from AMPK conditional knockout mice and their wild type littermates, we demonstrate that AICAR and Compound C can, indeed, activate or inhibit AMPK activity in T cells, respectively. Specifically, AICAR inhibits, but Compound C promotes, Ca2+-induced T cell death in an AMPK-dependent manner. In contrast, our data also demonstrate that AICAR and Compound C inhibit T cell activation and cytokine production in an AMPK-independent manner. Moreover, we find that the AMPK-independent activity of AICAR and Compound Cis mediated via the mTOR signaling pathway in activated T cells. Our results not only reveal the critical role of AMPK in regulating T cell survival and function, but also demonstrate AMPK-dependent and independent rolesof AICAR/Compound C in regulating T cell responses, thus suggesting a context-dependent effect of these "AMPK regulators".

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Directs Immunofocusing of CD8+ T Cell Responses Despite Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, Joshua S.; Shin, Daniel; Volman, Mattijs; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Fortune, Sarah M.; Behar, Samuel M.

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines that elicit T cell responses try to mimic protective memory T cell immunity after infection by increasing the frequency of Ag-specific T cells in the immune repertoire. However, the factors that determine immunodominance during infection and after vaccination and the relation between immunodominance and protection are incompletely understood. We previously identified TB10.4(20–28) as an immunodominant epitope recognized by H2-Kd–restricted CD8+ T cells after M. tuberculosis infection. Here we report a second epitope, EspA(150–158), that is recognized by a substantial number of pulmonary CD8+ T cells. The relative abundance of these T cells in the naive repertoire only partially predicts their relative frequency after M. tuberculosis infection. Furthermore, although vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing these epitopes changes their relative immunodominance in the preinfection T cell repertoire, this change is transient after challenge with M. tuberculosis. We speculate that factors intrinsic to the chronic nature of M. tuberculosis infection establishes the hierarchy of immunodominance and may explain the failure of some vaccines to provide protection. PMID:21178003

  20. Functional Signatures of Human CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prezzemolo, Teresa; Guggino, Giuliana; La Manna, Marco Pio; Di Liberto, Diana; Dieli, Francesco; Caccamo, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    With 1.4 million deaths and 8.7 million new cases in 2011, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health care problem and together with HIV and Malaria represents one of the three infectious diseases world-wide. Control of the global TB epidemic has been impaired by the lack of an effective vaccine, by the emergence of drug-resistant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and by the lack of sensitive and rapid diagnostics. It is estimated, by epidemiological reports, that one third of the world's population is latently infected with Mtb, but the majority of infected individuals develop long-lived protective immunity, which controls and contains Mtb in a T cell-dependent manner. Development of TB disease results from interactions among the environment, the host, and the pathogen, and known risk factors include HIV co-infection, immunodeficiency, diabetes mellitus, overcrowding, malnutrition, and general poverty; therefore, an effective T cell response determines whether the infection resolves or develops into clinically evident disease. Consequently, there is great interest in determining which T cells subsets mediate anti-mycobacterial immunity, delineating their effector functions. On the other hand, many aspects remain unsolved in understanding why some individuals are protected from Mtb infection while others go on to develop disease. Several studies have demonstrated that CD4(+) T cells are involved in protection against Mtb, as supported by the evidence that CD4(+) T cell depletion is responsible for Mtb reactivation in HIV-infected individuals. There are many subsets of CD4(+) T cells, such as T-helper 1 (Th1), Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Tregs), and all these subsets co-operate or interfere with each other to control infection; the dominant subset may differ between active and latent Mtb infection cases. Mtb-specific-CD4(+) Th1 cell response is considered to have a protective role for the ability to produce cytokines such as IFN-γ or TNF-α that

  1. Mature T cell responses are controlled by microRNA-142

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaping; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine; Mathewson, Nathan; Wang, Ying; McEachin, Richard; Liu, Chen; Toubai, Tomomi; Wu, Julia; Rossi, Corinne; Braun, Thomas; Saunders, Thomas; Reddy, Pavan

    2015-01-01

    T cell proliferation is critical for immune responses; however, the molecular mechanisms that mediate the proliferative response are poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate various molecular processes, including development and function of the immune system. Here, utilizing multiple complementary genetic and molecular approaches, we investigated the contribution of a hematopoietic-specific miR, miR-142, in regulating T cell responses. T cell development was not affected in animals with a targeted deletion of Mir142; however, T cell proliferation was markedly reduced following stimulation both in vitro and in multiple murine models of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). miR-142–deficient T cells demonstrated substantial cell-cycling defects, and microarray and bioinformatics analyses revealed upregulation of genes involved in cell cycling. Moreover, 2 predicted miR-142 target genes, the atypical E2F transcription factors E2f7 and E2f8, were most highly upregulated in miR-142–deficient cells. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat interference–mediated (CRISPRi-mediated) silencing of E2F7 and E2F8 in miR-142–deficient T cells ameliorated cell-cycling defects and reduced GVHD, and overexpression of these factors in WT T cells inhibited the proliferative response. Together, these results identify a link between hematopoietic-specific miR-142 and atypical E2F transcription factors in the regulation of mature T cell cycling and suggest that targeting this interaction may be relevant for mitigating GVHD. PMID:26098216

  2. Invariant NKT Cells Regulate the CD8 T Cell Response during Theiler's Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Lennart T.; Mas, Magali; Beaudoin, Lucie; Bauer, Jan; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Lehuen, Agnès; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Liblau, Roland S.

    2014-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are innate lymphocytes with a broad tissue distribution. Here we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the central nervous system (CNS) in the absence of inflammation. Their presence in the CNS dramatically augments following inoculation of C57Bl/6 mice with the neurotropic Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). At the peak of inflammation the cellular infiltrate comprises 45 000 iNKT cells for 1 250 CD8 T cells specific for the immunodominant TMEV epitope. To study the interaction between these two T cell subsets, we infected both iNKT cell deficient Jα18-/- mice and iNKT cell enriched Vα14 transgenic mice with TMEV. The CD8 T cell response readily cleared TMEV infection in the iNKT cell deficient mice. However, in the iNKT cell enriched mice TMEV infection persisted and was associated with significant mortality. This was caused by the inhibition of the CD8 T cell response in the cervical lymph nodes and spleen after T cell priming. Taken together we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the CNS in the absence of inflammation and that their enrichment is associated with the inhibition of the anti-viral CD8 T cell response and an augmented mortality during acute encephalomyelitis. PMID:24498175

  3. Cannabidiol (CBD) induces functional Tregs in response to low-level T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Saphala; Stokes, John V; Park, Nogi; Seo, Keun Seok; Kaplan, Barbara L F

    2017-02-01

    Many effects of the non-psychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), have been described in immune responses induced by strong immunological stimuli. It has also been shown that CBD enhances IL-2 production in response to low-level T cell stimulation. Since IL-2, in combination with TGF-β1, are critical for Treg induction, we hypothesized that CBD would induce CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) Tregs in response to low-level stimulation. Low-level T cell stimulation conditions were established based on minimal CD25 expression in CD4(+) cells using suboptimal PMA/Io (4nM/0.05μM, S/o), ultrasuboptimal PMA/Io (1nM/0.0125μM, Us/o) or soluble anti-CD3/28 (400-800ng each, s3/28). CBD increased CD25(+)FOXP3(+) cells from CD4(+), CD4(+)CD25(+), and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, as well as in CD4(+) T cells derived from FOXP3-GFP mice. Most importantly, the Us/o+CBD-induced CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs robustly suppressed responder T cell proliferation, demonstrating that the mechanism by which CBD is immunosuppressive under low-level T cell stimulation involves induction of functional Tregs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Braking bad: novel mechanisms of CTLA-4 inhibition of T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Krummey, S M; Ford, M L

    2014-12-01

    The coinhibitory receptor cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) is a master regulator of T cell responses and its function is critical in models of transplant tolerance. The CD28/CTLA-4 pathway is also an important therapeutic target, as the costimulation blocker belatacept was recently approved for use following renal transplantation. While the traditional model of CTLA-4 coinhibition focuses on its ability to directly counteract CD28 costimulation, recently this paradigm has significantly broadened. Recent work has uncovered the ability of CTLA-4 to act as a cell-extrinsic coinhibitory molecule on CD4(+) T cell effectors. While it has been appreciated that CTLA-4 is required for FoxP3(+) regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression, current studies have elucidated important differences in the function of CTLA-4 on Tregs compared to effectors. CTLA-4 expression patterns also differ by T cell subset, with Th17 cells expressing significantly higher levels of CTLA-4. Thus, in contrast to the traditional model of CTLA-4 as a negative receptor to counter CD28 costimulation, recent work has begun to define CTLA-4 as a global regulator of T cell responses with subset-specific functions. Future studies must continue to uncover the molecular mechanisms that govern CTLA-4 function. These novel findings have implications for novel strategies to maximize the regulatory potential of CTLA-4 during allogeneic T cell responses.

  5. Salmonella impairs CD8 T cell response through PD-1: PD-L axis.

    PubMed

    López-Medina, Marcela; Carrillo-Martín, Ismael; Leyva-Rangel, Jessica; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-12-01

    We have shown that Salmonella remains for a long period of time within B cells, plasma cells, and bone marrow B cell precursors, which might allow persistence and dissemination of infection. Nonetheless, how infected cells evade CD8 T cell response has not been characterized. Evidence indicates that some pathogens exploit the PD-1: PD-L (PD-L1 and PD-L2) interaction to inhibit CD8 T cells response to contribute the chronicity of the infection. To determine whether the PD-1: PD-L axis plays a role during Salmonella infection; we evaluated PD-1 expression in antigen-specific CD8 T cells and PD-1 ligands in Salmonella-infected cells. Our results show that infected B cells and macrophages express continuously co-stimulatory (CD40, CD80, and CD86) and inhibitory molecules (PD-L1 and PD-L2) in early and late stages of chronic Salmonella infection, while antigen-specific CD8 T cells express in a sustained manner PD-1 in the late stages of infection. Blocking this axis restores the ability of the CD8 T cells to proliferate and eliminate primary infected APCs. Therefore, a continuous PD-1: PDL interaction might be a mechanism employed by Salmonella to negatively regulate Salmonella-specific CD8 T cell cytotoxic response in order to remain within the host for a long period of time.

  6. Long-Lived CD4+IFN-γ+ T Cells rather than Short-Lived CD4+IFN-γ+IL-10+ T Cells Initiate Rapid IL-10 Production To Suppress Anamnestic T Cell Responses during Secondary Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Mendez, Ana; Inkson, Colette A.; Shaw, Tovah N.; Strangward, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells that produce IFN-γ are the source of host-protective IL-10 during primary infection with a number of different pathogens, including Plasmodium spp. The fate of these CD4+IFN-γ+IL-10+ T cells following clearance of primary infection and their subsequent influence on the course of repeated infections is, however, presently unknown. In this study, utilizing IFN-γ–yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and IL-10–GFP dual reporter mice, we show that primary malaria infection–induced CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cells have limited memory potential, do not stably express IL-10, and are disproportionately lost from the Ag-experienced CD4+ T cell memory population during the maintenance phase postinfection. CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cells generally exhibited a short-lived effector rather than effector memory T cell phenotype postinfection and expressed high levels of PD-1, Lag-3, and TIGIT, indicative of cellular exhaustion. Consistently, the surviving CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cell–derived cells were unresponsive and failed to proliferate during the early phase of secondary infection. In contrast, CD4+YFP+GFP− T cell–derived cells expanded rapidly and upregulated IL-10 expression during secondary infection. Correspondingly, CD4+ T cells were the major producers within an accelerated and amplified IL-10 response during the early stage of secondary malaria infection. Notably, IL-10 exerted quantitatively stronger regulatory effects on innate and CD4+ T cell responses during primary and secondary infections, respectively. The results in this study significantly improve our understanding of the durability of IL-10–producing CD4+ T cells postinfection and provide information on how IL-10 may contribute to optimized parasite control and prevention of immune-mediated pathology during repeated malaria infections. PMID:27630165

  7. The use of fluorescent target arrays for assessment of T cell responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Quah, Benjamin J C; Wijesundara, Danushka K; Ranasinghe, Charani; Parish, Christopher R

    2014-06-19

    The ability to monitor T cell responses in vivo is important for the development of our understanding of the immune response and the design of immunotherapies. Here we describe the use of fluorescent target array (FTA) technology, which utilizes vital dyes such as carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE), violet laser excitable dyes (CellTrace Violet: CTV) and red laser excitable dyes (Cell Proliferation Dye eFluor 670: CPD) to combinatorially label mouse lymphocytes into > 250 discernable fluorescent cell clusters. Cell clusters within these FTAs can be pulsed with major histocompatibility (MHC) class-I and MHC class-II binding peptides and thereby act as target cells for CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, respectively. These FTA cells remain viable and fully functional, and can therefore be administered into mice to allow assessment of CD8(+) T cell-mediated killing of FTA target cells and CD4(+) T cell-meditated help of FTA B cell target cells in real time in vivo by flow cytometry. Since > 250 target cells can be assessed at once, the technique allows the monitoring of T cell responses against several antigen epitopes at several concentrations and in multiple replicates. As such, the technique can measure T cell responses at both a quantitative (e.g. the cumulative magnitude of the response) and a qualitative (e.g. functional avidity and epitope-cross reactivity of the response) level. Herein, we describe how these FTAs are constructed and give an example of how they can be applied to assess T cell responses induced by a recombinant pox virus vaccine.

  8. Cross-genotype-specific T-cell responses in acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection.

    PubMed

    Gisa, A; Suneetha, P V; Behrendt, P; Pischke, S; Bremer, B; Falk, C S; Manns, M P; Cornberg, M; Wedemeyer, H; Kraft, A R M

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E is an inflammatory liver disease caused by infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV). In tropical regions, HEV is highly endemic and predominantly mediated by HEV genotypes 1 and 2 with >3 million symptomatic cases per year and around 70 000 deaths. In Europe and America, the zoonotic HEV genotypes 3 and 4 have been reported with continues increasing new infections per year. So far, little is known about T-cell responses during acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Therefore, we did a comprehensive study investigating HEV-specific T-cell responses using genotypes 3- and 1-specific overlapping peptides. Additional cytokines and chemokines were measured in the plasma. In four patients, longitudinal studies were performed. Broad functional HEV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were detectable in patients acutely infected with HEV genotype 3. Elevated of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels during acute HEV infection correlated with ALT levels. Memory HEV-specific T-cell responses were detectable up to >1.5 years upon infection. Importantly, cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses (between genotypes 1 and 3) were measurable in all investigated patients. In conclusion, we could show for the first time HEV-specific T-cell responses during and after acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Our data of cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses might suggest a potential role in cross-genotype-specific protection between HEV genotypes 1 and 3. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Reduced frequency of memory T cells and increased Th17 responses in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marín, Nancy D; París, Sara C; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F

    2012-10-01

    Phenotypic and functional alterations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis T cell subsets have been reported in patients with active tuberculosis. A better understanding of these alterations will increase the knowledge about immunopathogenesis and also may contribute to the development of new diagnostics and prophylactic strategies. Here, the ex vivo phenotype of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and the frequency and phenotype of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing cells elicited in short-term and long-term cultures following CFP-10 and purified protein derivative (PPD) stimulation were determined in noninfected persons (non-TBi), latently infected persons (LTBi), and patients with active tuberculosis (ATB). Phenotypic characterization of T cells was done based on the expression of CD45RO and CD27. Results show that ATB had a reduced frequency of circulating CD4(+) CD45RO(+) CD27(+) T cells and an increased frequency of CD4(+) CD45RO(-) CD27(+) T cells. ATB also had a higher frequency of circulating IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells than did LTBi after PPD stimulation, whereas LTBi had more IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells than did non-TBi. The phenotype of IFN-γ-producing cells at 24 h differs from the phenotype of IL-17-producing cells with no differences between LTBi and ATB. At 144 h, IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing cells were mainly CD45RO(+) CD27(+) T cells and they were more frequent in ATB. These results suggest that M. tuberculosis infection induces alterations in T cells which interfere with an adequate specific immune response.

  10. Reduced Frequency of Memory T Cells and Increased Th17 Responses in Patients with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Nancy D.; París, Sara C.; Rojas, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic and functional alterations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis T cell subsets have been reported in patients with active tuberculosis. A better understanding of these alterations will increase the knowledge about immunopathogenesis and also may contribute to the development of new diagnostics and prophylactic strategies. Here, the ex vivo phenotype of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the frequency and phenotype of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing cells elicited in short-term and long-term cultures following CFP-10 and purified protein derivative (PPD) stimulation were determined in noninfected persons (non-TBi), latently infected persons (LTBi), and patients with active tuberculosis (ATB). Phenotypic characterization of T cells was done based on the expression of CD45RO and CD27. Results show that ATB had a reduced frequency of circulating CD4+ CD45RO+ CD27+ T cells and an increased frequency of CD4+ CD45RO− CD27+ T cells. ATB also had a higher frequency of circulating IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells than did LTBi after PPD stimulation, whereas LTBi had more IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells than did non-TBi. The phenotype of IFN-γ-producing cells at 24 h differs from the phenotype of IL-17-producing cells with no differences between LTBi and ATB. At 144 h, IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing cells were mainly CD45RO+ CD27+ T cells and they were more frequent in ATB. These results suggest that M. tuberculosis infection induces alterations in T cells which interfere with an adequate specific immune response. PMID:22914361

  11. Accumulation of Splice Variants and Transcripts in Response to PI3K Inhibition in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Alice; Mofolo, Boitumelo; Avota, Elita; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle; Meintjes, Ayton; Mulder, Nicola; Kneitz, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Background Measles virus (MV) causes T cell suppression by interference with phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) activation. We previously found that this interference affected the activity of splice regulatory proteins and a T cell inhibitory protein isoform was produced from an alternatively spliced pre-mRNA. Hypothesis Differentially regulated and alternatively splice variant transcripts accumulating in response to PI3K abrogation in T cells potentially encode proteins involved in T cell silencing. Methods To test this hypothesis at the cellular level, we performed a Human Exon 1.0 ST Array on RNAs isolated from T cells stimulated only or stimulated after PI3K inhibition. We developed a simple algorithm based on a splicing index to detect genes that undergo alternative splicing (AS) or are differentially regulated (RG) upon T cell suppression. Results Applying our algorithm to the data, 9% of the genes were assigned as AS, while only 3% were attributed to RG. Though there are overlaps, AS and RG genes differed with regard to functional regulation, and were found to be enriched in different functional groups. AS genes targeted extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction and focal adhesion pathways, while RG genes were mainly enriched in cytokine-receptor interaction and Jak-STAT. When combined, AS/RG dependent alterations targeted pathways essential for T cell receptor signaling, cytoskeletal dynamics and cell cycle entry. Conclusions PI3K abrogation interferes with key T cell activation processes through both differential expression and alternative splicing, which together actively contribute to T cell suppression. PMID:23383294

  12. Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench modulates human T-cell cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fabiana N; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Lin, Hong; Lau, Clara B S; Kennelly, Edward J; Cassileth, Barrie R; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2014-03-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the composition of a neutral and weakly acidic water-soluble extract from Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EchNWA) previously shown to modify murine influenza infection, and to assess immunomodulatory effects on human T-cells. EchNWA extract from fresh aerial parts was extracted with water, ethanolic precipitation, and size-exclusion chromatography. The chemical profile of EchNWA was characterized by chromatography (size-exclusion, HPLC, GC-MS), and small molecule fingerprint analysis performed by HPLC-PDA. Jurkat T-cells at high and low cell density were pretreated or not with doses of EchNWA, followed by activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin (PMA+I). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon gamma (IFNg) cytokine secretions were measured by multi-cytokine luminex technology. Results showed that EchNWA contains 80% polysaccharides, predominantly a 10kDa entity; phenolic compounds, cynarin, cichoric and caftaric acids, but no detectable alkylamides. Cytokine production required stimulation and was lower after PMA+I activation in high-density compared to low-density conditions. EchNWA mediated a strong dose-dependent enhancement of high-density T-cell production of IL-2 and IFNg response to PMA+I. EchNWA alone did not stimulate T-cells. EchNWA enhanced mean fluorescence intensity of IL-2 in Jurkat T-cells activated by PMA+1 or ionomycin alone. Conversely EchNWA mediated modest but significant suppression of IFNg response and reduced the percentage of CD25+ T-cells under low-density conditions. Conclusions are that EchNWA polysaccharides, but not phenolic compounds have dose-related adjuvant effects on human T-cell cytokine responses characterized by enhancing and suppressive effects that are regulated by T-cell density.

  13. Evolution of MHC-based technologies used for detection of antigen-responsive T cells.

    PubMed

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2017-03-17

    T cell-mediated recognition of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) class I and II molecules is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens and cancer, as well as for stimulation and maintenance of efficient cytotoxic responses. Such interactions may also play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Novel insights into this mechanism are crucial to understanding disease development and establishing new treatment strategies. MHC multimers have been used for detection of antigen-responsive T cells since the first report by Altman et al. showed that tetramerization of pMHC class I molecules provided sufficient stability to T cell receptor (TCR)-pMHC interactions, allowing detection of MHC multimer-binding T cells using flow cytometry. Since this breakthrough the scientific community has aimed for expanding the capacity of MHC multimer-based detection technologies to facilitate large-scale epitope discovery and immune monitoring in limited biological material. Screening of T cell specificity using large libraries of pMHC molecules is suitable for analyses of T cell recognition potentially at genome-wide levels rather than analyses restricted to a selection of model antigens. Such strategies provide novel insights into the immune specificities involved in disease development and response to immunotherapy, and extend fundamental knowledge related to T cell recognition patterns and cross-recognition by TCRs. MHC multimer-based technologies have now evolved from detection of 1-2 different T cell specificities per cell sample, to include more than 1000 evaluable pMHC molecules using novel technologies. Here, we provide an overview of MHC multimer-based detection technologies developed over two decades, focusing primarily on MHC class I interactions.

  14. Antibody-Independent Function of Human B Cells Contributes to Antifungal T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Li, Hulun; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Prat, Alexandre; Bar-Or, Amit

    2017-04-15

    Fungal infections (e.g., Candida albicans) can manifest as serious medical illnesses, especially in the elderly and immune-compromised hosts. T cells are important for Candida control. Whether and how B cells are involved in antifungal immunity has been less clear. Although patients with agammaglobulinemia exhibit normal antifungal immunity, increased fungal infections are reported following B cell-depleting therapy, together pointing to Ab-independent roles of B cells in controlling such infections. To test how human B cells may contribute to fungal-associated human T cell responses, we developed a novel Ag-specific human T cell/B cell in vitro coculture system and found that human B cells could induce C. albicans-associated, MHC class II-restricted responses of naive T cells. Activated B cells significantly enhanced C. albicans-mediated Th1 and Th17 T cell responses, which were both strongly induced by CD80/CD86 costimulation. IL-6(+)GM-CSF(+) B cells were the major responding B cell subpopulation to C. albicans and provided efficient costimulatory signals to the T cells. In vivo B cell depletion in humans resulted in reduced C. albicans-associated T responses. Of note, the decreased Th17, but not Th1, responses could be reversed by soluble factors from B cells prior to depletion, in an IL-6-dependent manner. Taken together, our results implicate an Ab-independent cytokine-defined B cell role in human antifungal T cell responses. These findings may be particularly relevant given the prospects of chronic B cell depletion therapy use in lymphoma and autoimmune disease, as patients age and are exposed to serial combination therapies.

  15. IDO2 Modulates T Cell-Dependent Autoimmune Responses through a B Cell-Intrinsic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Lauren M F; DuHadaway, James B; Grabler, Samantha; Prendergast, George C; Muller, Alexander J; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Mechanistic insight into how adaptive immune responses are modified along the self-nonself continuum may offer more effective opportunities to treat autoimmune disease, cancer, and other sterile inflammatory disorders. Recent genetic studies in the KRN mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate that the immunomodulatory molecule IDO2 modifies responses to self-antigens; however, the mechanisms involved are obscure. In this study, we show that IDO2 exerts a critical function in B cells to support the generation of autoimmunity. In experiments with IDO2-deficient mice, adoptive transplant experiments demonstrated that IDO2 expression in B cells was both necessary and sufficient to support robust arthritis development. IDO2 function in B cells was contingent on a cognate, Ag-specific interaction to exert its immunomodulatory effects on arthritis development. We confirmed a similar requirement in an established model of contact hypersensitivity, in which IDO2-expressing B cells are required for a robust inflammatory response. Mechanistic investigations showed that IDO2-deficient B cells lacked the ability to upregulate the costimulatory marker CD40, suggesting IDO2 acts at the T-B cell interface to modulate the potency of T cell help needed to promote autoantibody production. Overall, our findings revealed that IDO2 expression by B cells modulates autoimmune responses by supporting the cross talk between autoreactive T and B cells.

  16. Influence of adenovirus and MVA vaccines on the breadth and hierarchy of T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Rollier, Christine S; Hill, Adrian V S; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo

    2016-08-31

    Viral-vectored vaccines are in clinical development for several infectious diseases where T-cell responses can mediate protection, and responses to sub-dominant epitopes is needed. Little is known about the influence of MVA or adenoviral vectors on the hierarchy of the dominant and sub-dominant T-cell epitopes. We investigated this aspect in mice using a malaria immunogen. Our results demonstrate that the T-cell hierarchy is influenced by the timing of analysis, rather than by the vector after a single immunization, with hierarchy changing over time. Repeated homologous immunization reduced the breadth of responses, while heterologous prime-boost induced the strongest response to the dominant epitope, albeit with only modest response to the sub-dominant epitopes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Regional variation in the correlation of antibody and T-cell responses to Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Martin, Diana L; Marks, Morgan; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Gilman, Robert H; Goodhew, Brook; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Halperin, Anthony; Sanchez, Gerardo; Verastegui, Manuela; Escalante, Patricia; Naquira, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z; Bern, Caryn

    2014-06-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Central and South America. Geographic variations in the sensitivity of serologic diagnostic assays to T. cruzi may reflect differences in T. cruzi exposure. We measured parasite-specific T-cell responses among seropositive individuals in two populations from South America with widely varying antibody titers against T. cruzi. Antibody titers among seropositive individuals were significantly lower in Arequipa, Peru compared with Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Similarly, the proportion of seropositive individuals with positive T-cell responses was lower in Peru than Bolivia, resulting in overall lower frequencies of interferon-γ (IFNγ)-secreting cells from Peruvian samples. However, the magnitude of the IFNγ response was similar among the IFNγ responders in both locations. These data indicate that immunological discrepancies based on geographic region are reflected in T-cell responses as well as antibody responses.

  18. Regional Variation in the Correlation of Antibody and T-Cell Responses to Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Diana L.; Marks, Morgan; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Gilman, Robert H.; Goodhew, Brook; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Halperin, Anthony; Sanchez, Gerardo; Verastegui, Manuela; Escalante, Patricia; Naquira, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z.; Bern, Caryn

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Central and South America. Geographic variations in the sensitivity of serologic diagnostic assays to T. cruzi may reflect differences in T. cruzi exposure. We measured parasite-specific T-cell responses among seropositive individuals in two populations from South America with widely varying antibody titers against T. cruzi. Antibody titers among seropositive individuals were significantly lower in Arequipa, Peru compared with Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Similarly, the proportion of seropositive individuals with positive T-cell responses was lower in Peru than Bolivia, resulting in overall lower frequencies of interferon-γ (IFNγ)-secreting cells from Peruvian samples. However, the magnitude of the IFNγ response was similar among the IFNγ responders in both locations. These data indicate that immunological discrepancies based on geographic region are reflected in T-cell responses as well as antibody responses. PMID:24710614

  19. Longitudinal changes in CD4(+) T-cell memory responses induced by BCG vaccination of newborns.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andreia P; Kwong Chung, Cheong K C; Choice, Terry; Hughes, E Jane; Jacobs, Gail; van Rensburg, Esme Janse; Khomba, Gloria; de Kock, Marwou; Lerumo, Lesedi; Makhethe, Lebohang; Maneli, Mbulelo H; Pienaar, Bernadette; Smit, Erica; Tena-Coki, Nontobeko G; van Wyk, Leandre; Boom, W Henry; Kaplan, Gilla; Scriba, Thomas J; Hanekom, Willem A

    2013-04-01

    Improved vaccination strategies against tuberculosis are needed, such as approaches to boost immunity induced by the current vaccine, BCG. Design of these strategies has been hampered by a lack of knowledge of the kinetics of the human host response induced by neonatal BCG vaccination. Furthermore, the functional and phenotypic attributes of BCG-induced long-lived memory T-cell responses remain unclear. We assessed the longitudinal CD4 T-cell response following BCG vaccination of human newborns. The kinetics, function, and phenotype of these cells were measured using flow cytometric whole-blood assays. We showed that the BCG-specific CD4 T-cell response peaked 6-10 weeks after vaccination and gradually waned over the first year of life. Highly activated T-helper 1 cells, predominantly expressing interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and/or interleukin 2, were present at the peak response. Following contraction, BCG-specific CD4 T cells expressed high levels of Bcl-2 and displayed a predominant CD45RACCR7 central memory phenotype. However, cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression by these cells was more characteristic of effector memory cells. Our findings suggest that boosting of BCG-primed CD4 T cells with heterologous tuberculosis vaccines may be best after 14 weeks of age, once an established memory response has developed.

  20. Longitudinal Changes in CD4+ T-Cell Memory Responses Induced by BCG Vaccination of Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Andreia P.; Kwong Chung, Cheong K. C.; Choice, Terry; Hughes, E. Jane; Jacobs, Gail; van Rensburg, Esme Janse; Khomba, Gloria; de Kock, Marwou; Lerumo, Lesedi; Makhethe, Lebohang; Maneli, Mbulelo H.; Pienaar, Bernadette; Smit, Erica; Tena-Coki, Nontobeko G.; van Wyk, Leandre; Boom, W. Henry; Kaplan, Gilla; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hanekom, Willem A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Improved vaccination strategies against tuberculosis are needed, such as approaches to boost immunity induced by the current vaccine, BCG. Design of these strategies has been hampered by a lack of knowledge of the kinetics of the human host response induced by neonatal BCG vaccination. Furthermore, the functional and phenotypic attributes of BCG-induced long-lived memory T-cell responses remain unclear. Methods. We assessed the longitudinal CD4+ T-cell response following BCG vaccination of human newborns. The kinetics, function, and phenotype of these cells were measured using flow cytometric whole-blood assays. Results. We showed that the BCG-specific CD4+ T-cell response peaked 6–10 weeks after vaccination and gradually waned over the first year of life. Highly activated T-helper 1 cells, predominantly expressing interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and/or interleukin 2, were present at the peak response. Following contraction, BCG-specific CD4+ T cells expressed high levels of Bcl-2 and displayed a predominant CD45RA–CCR7+ central memory phenotype. However, cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression by these cells was more characteristic of effector memory cells. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that boosting of BCG-primed CD4+ T cells with heterologous tuberculosis vaccines may be best after 14 weeks of age, once an established memory response has developed. PMID:23293360

  1. Tailored Immune Responses: Novel Effector Helper T Cell Subsets in Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Ervin E.; Comerford, Iain; Fenix, Kevin A.; Bastow, Cameron R.; Gregor, Carly E.; McKenzie, Duncan R.; McColl, Shaun R.

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of naïve CD4+ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct “cytokine signatures,” is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the TH1/TH2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered. PMID:24586147

  2. Tissue damage-associated "danger signals" influence T-cell responses that promote the progression of preneoplasia to cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Zha, Jikun; Wang, Yamin; Liu, Wenhua; Yang, Xuanming; Yu, Ping

    2013-01-15

    T-cell responses may be shaped by sterile "danger signals" that are constituted by damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP). However, whether and what type of adaptive immune responses are triggered in vivo by DAMPs induced by tumor progression are not well characterized. In this study, we report that the production of HMGB1, an established DAMP released by dying cells, was critical for tumor progression in an established mouse model of prostate cancer. HMGB1 was required for the activation and intratumoral accumulation of T cells that expressed cytokine lymphotoxinα(1)β(2) (LT) on their surface. Intriguingly, these tumor-activated T cells recruited macrophages to the lesion and were essential to promote the preneoplasia to invasive carcinoma in an LTβ receptor (LTβR)-dependent manner. Taken together, our findings suggest that the release of HMGB1 as an endogenous danger signal is important for priming an adaptive immune response that promotes malignant progression, with implications for cancer prevention and therapy.

  3. Rapid CD4+ T-cell responses to bacterial flagellin require dendritic cell expression of Syk and CARD9

    PubMed Central

    Atif, Shaikh M; Lee, Seung-Joo; Li, Lin-Xi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Gorjestani, Sara; Lin, Xin; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can recognize microbial patterns and utilize adaptor molecules, such as-MyD88 or (TRIF TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β), to initiate downstream signaling that ultimately affects the initiation of adaptive immunity. In addition to this inflammatory role, TLR5 expression on dendritic cells can favor antigen presentation of flagellin peptides and thus increase the sensitivity of flagellin-specific T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Here, we examined the role of alternative signaling pathways that might regulate flagellin antigen presentation in addition to MyD88. These studies suggest a requirement for spleen tyrosine kinase, a noncanonical TLR-signaling adaptor molecule, and its downstream molecule CARD9 in regulating the sensitivity of flagellin-specific CD4+ T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Thus, a previously unappreciated signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating the dominance of flagellin-specific T-cell responses. PMID:25430631

  4. Differences in T-cell responses between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium africanum-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tientcheu, Leopold D; Sutherland, Jayne S; de Jong, Bouke C; Kampmann, Beate; Jafali, James; Adetifa, Ifedayo M; Antonio, Martin; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ota, Martin O

    2014-05-01

    In The Gambia, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Mycobacterium africanum (Maf) are major causes of tuberculosis (TB). Maf is more likely to cause TB in immune suppressed individuals, implying differences in virulence. Despite this, few studies have assessed the underlying immunity to the two pathogens in human. In this study, we analyzed T-cell responses from 19 Maf- and 29 Mtb-infected HIV-negative patients before and after TB chemotherapy following overnight stimulation of whole blood with TB-specific antigens. Before treatment, percentages of early secreted antigenic target-6(ESAT-6)/culture filtrate protein-10(CFP-10) and purified protein derivative-specific single-TNF-α-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were significantly higher while single-IL-2-producing T cells were significantly lower in Maf- compared with Mtb-infected patients. Purified protein derivative-specific polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells frequencies were significantly higher before than after treatment, but there was no difference between the groups at both time points. Furthermore, the proportion of CD3(+) CD11b(+) T cells was similar in both groups pretreatment, but was significantly lower with higher TNF-α, IL-2, and IFN-γ production in Mtb- compared with that of Maf-infected patients posttreatment. Our data provide evidence of differences in T-cell responses to two mycobacterial strains with differing virulence, providing some insight into TB pathogenesis with different Mtb strains that could be prospectively explored as biomarkers for TB protection or susceptibility.

  5. Multiple T-cell responses are associated with better control of acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianping; Zhao, Yan; Peng, Yanchun; Han, Zhen; Liu, Guihai; Qin, Ling; Liu, Sai; Sun, Huanhuan; Wu, Hao; Dong, Tao; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses play pivotal roles in controlling the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but the correlation between CTL responses and the progression of HIV-1 infection are controversial on account of HIV immune escape mutations driven by CTL pressure were reported. The acute HIV-1-infected patients from Beijing were incorporated into our study to investigate the effects of CTL response on the progression of HIV-1 infection. A longitudinal study was performed on acute HIV-1-infected patients to clarify the kinetic of T-cell responses, the dynamic of escape mutations, as well as the correlation between effective T-cell response and the progression of HIV infection. Seven human leukocyte antigen-B51+ (HLA-B51+) individuals were screened from 105 acute HIV-1 infectors. The detailed kinetic of HLA-B51-restricted CTL responses was described through blood sampling time points including seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection in the 7 HLA-B51+ individuals, by using 16 known HLA-B51 restricted epitopes. Pol743–751 (LPPVVAKEI, LI9), Pol283–289 (TAFTIPSI, TI8), and Gag327–3459 (NANPDCKTI, NI9) were identified as 3 dominant epitopes, and ranked as starting with LI9, followed by TI8 and NI9 in the ability to induce T-cell responses. The dynamics of escape mutations in the 3 epitopes were also found with the same order as T-cell response, by using sequencing for viral clones on blood sampling at seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection. We use solid evidence to demonstrate the correlation between T-cell response and HIV-1 mutation, and postulate that multiple T-cell responses might benefit the control of HIV-1 infection, especially in acute infection phase. PMID:27472741

  6. Characterisation of CD154+ T cells following ex vivo allergen stimulation illustrates distinct T cell responses to seasonal and perennial allergens in allergic and non-allergic individuals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergic sensitisation has been ascribed to a dysregulated relationship between allergen-specific Th1, Th2 and regulatory T cells. We sought to utilise our short-term CD154 detection method to further analyse the relationship between these T cell subsets and investigate differences between seasonal and perennial allergens. Using peripheral blood samples from grass-allergic, cat-allergic and healthy non-atopic subjects, we compared the frequencies and phenotype of CD154-positive T helper cells following stimulation with seasonal (grass) and perennial (cat dander) allergens. Results We identified a higher frequency of CD154+ T cells in grass-allergic individuals compared to healthy controls; this difference was not evident following stimulation with cat allergen. Activated Th1, Th2 and Tr1-like cells, that co-express IFNγ, IL4 and IL10, respectively, were identified in varying proportions in grass-allergic, cat-allergic and non-allergic individuals. We confirmed a close correlation between Th1, Th2 and Tr1-like cell frequency in non-allergic volunteers, such that the three parameters increased together to maintain a low Th2: Th1 ratio. This relationship was dysregulated in grass-allergic individuals with no correlation between the T cell subsets and a higher Th2: Th1 ratio. We confirmed previous reports of a late-differentiated T cell phenotype in response to seasonal allergens compared to early-differentiated T cell responses to perennial allergens. Conclusions The findings confirm our existing work illustrating an important balance between Th1, Th2 and Tr1-like responses to allergens in health, where Th2 responses are frequently observed, but balanced by Th1 and regulatory responses. We confirm previous tetramer-based reports of phenotypic differences in T cells responding to seasonal and perennial allergens. PMID:24188324

  7. Age-associated Epstein–Barr virus-specific T cell responses in seropositive healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas Sierra, D; Vélez Colmenares, G; Orfao de Matos, A; Fiorentino Gómez, S; Quijano Gómez, S M

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is present in 95% of the world's adult population. The immune response participates in immune vigilance and persistent infection control, and this condition is maintained by both a good quality (functionality) and quantity of specific T cells throughout life. In the present study, we evaluated EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte responses in seropositive healthy individuals younger and older than 50 years of age. The assessment comprised the frequency, phenotype, functionality and clonotypic distribution of T lymphocytes. We found that in both age groups a similar EBV-specific T cell response was found, with overlapping numbers of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α+ T lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+) within the memory and effector cell compartments, in addition to monofunctional and multi-functional T cells producing interleukin (IL)-2 and/or interferon (IFN)-γ. However, individuals aged more than 50 years showed significantly higher frequencies of IL-2-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes in association with greater production of soluble IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 than subjects younger than 50 years. A polyclonal T cell receptor (TCR)-variable beta region (Vβ) repertoire exists in both age groups under basal conditions and in response to EBV; the major TCR families found in TNF-α+/CD4+ T lymphocytes were Vβ1, Vβ2, Vβ17 and Vβ22 in both age groups, and the major TCR family in TNF-α+/CD8+ T cells was Vβ13·1 for individuals younger than 50 years and Vβ9 for individuals aged more than 50 years. Our findings suggest that the EBV-specific T cell response (using a polyclonal stimulation model) is distributed throughout several T cell differentiation compartments in an age-independent manner and includes both monofunctional and multi-functional T lymphocytes. PMID:24666437

  8. Analysis of T cell responses to the autoantigen in Goodpasture's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Derry, C J; Ross, C N; Lombardi, G; Mason, P D; Rees, A J; Lechler, R I; Pusey, C D

    1995-01-01

    Goodpasture's disease is a rare form of glomerulonephritis characterized by the production of autoantibodies to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). In order to understand the development of autoimmunity to the GBM, it is important to examine mechanisms underlying T cell responses to the autoantigen. A MoAb P1, with the same specificity as patients' autoantibodies, was used to affinity-purify the antigen from collagenase-digested human GBM. This material was enriched in the NC1 domain of the alpha 3 chain of type IV collagen (alpha 3(IV)NC1), known to be the principal target of anti-GBM antibodies, but also contained lower quantities of alpha 4(IV)NC1. In proliferation assays, T cells from 11/14 patients with Goodpasture's disease showed significant responses (SI > or = 2.0) to affinity-purified human GBM. Peak responses were demonstrated at 7 or 10 days at antigen concentrations of 10-30 micrograms/ml. As in other autoimmune disorders, the presence of autoantigen-reactive T cells was also demonstrated in 5/10 healthy volunteers. Tissue typing revealed that all patients possessed HLA-DR2 and/or -DR4 alleles, while normal individuals whose T cells responded possessed DR2 and/or DR7 alleles. The specificity of the T cell response in Goodpasture's disease was further investigated using monomeric components of human GBM purified by gel filtration and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two antigenic monomer pools were obtained, which were shown by amino-terminal sequence analysis to contain alpha 3(IV)NC1 and alpha 4(IV)NC1, respectively. In all patients tested, significant T cell proliferation was observed in response to one or both of these alpha (IV)NC1 domains. These results demonstrate that patients with Goodpasture's disease possess T cells reactive with autoantigens known to be recognized by anti-GBM antibodies. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7743665

  9. Therapeutic targeting of regulatory T cells enhances tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses in Epstein–Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Mark; Murphy, John R.; Lorch, Jochen; Posner, Marshall; Wang, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In nasopharynx cancer, CD8+ T cells specific for EBV Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and Latent Membrane Protein 2 (LMP2) are important components of anti-tumor immunity since both are consistently expressed in NPC. We have previously shown that EBNA-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses were suppressed in NPC patients compared to healthy controls. We now find that CD8+ T cell responses specific for LMP2 are also abnormal in NPC patients, and both EBNA-1- and LMP2-specific responses are suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). EBNA-1 and LMP2-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as well as immune control of EBV-infected cells in vitro, could be restored by the depletion of Tregs and by use of a clinically approved drug targeting Tregs. Thus, in vivo modulation of Tregs may be an effective means of enhancing these anti-tumor immune responses in NPC patients. PMID:23601786

  10. Maximal T cell-mediated antitumor responses rely upon CCR5 expression in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    González-Martín, Alicia; Gómez, Lucio; Lustgarten, Joseph; Mira, Emilia; Mañes, Santos

    2011-08-15

    Immune responses against cancer rely upon leukocyte trafficking patterns that are coordinated by chemokines. CCR5, the receptor for chemotactic chemokines MIP1alpha, MIP1beta, and RANTES (CCL3, CCL4, CCL5), exerts major regulatory effects on CD4(+)- and CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity. Although CCR5 and its ligands participate in the response to various pathogens, its relevance to tumoral immune control has been debated. Here, we report that CCR5 has a specific, ligand-dependent role in optimizing antitumor responses. In adoptive transfer studies, efficient tumor rejection required CCR5 expression by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. CCR5 activation in CD4(+) cells resulted in CD40L upregulation, leading to full maturation of antigen-presenting cells and enhanced CD8(+) T-cell crosspriming and tumor infiltration. CCR5 reduced chemical-induced fibrosarcoma incidence and growth, but did not affect the onset or progression of spontaneous breast cancers in tolerogenic Tg(MMTV-neu) mice. However, CCR5 was required for TLR9-mediated reactivation of antineu responses in these mice. Our results indicate that CCR5 boosts T-cell responses to tumors by modulating helper-dependent CD8(+) T-cell activation.

  11. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Fischer, William; Wallstrom, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  12. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zipfel, P.F.; Siebenlist, U. ); Irving, S.G.; Kelly, K. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cylcosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action.

  13. Adaptive Memory of Human NK-like CD8+ T-Cells to Aging, and Viral and Tumor Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Pita-López, María Luisa; Pera, Alejandra; Solana, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK)-like CD8+ T-cells are singular T-cells that express both T and NK cell markers such as CD56; their frequencies depend on their differentiation and activation during their lifetime. There is evidence of the presence of these innate CD8+ T-cells in the human umbilical cord, highlighting the necessity of investigating whether the NK-like CD8+ T-cells arise in the early stages of life (gestation). Based on the presence of cell surface markers, these cells have also been referred to as CD8+KIR+ T-cells, innate CD8+ T-cells, CD8+CD28−KIR+ T-cells or NKT-like CD8+CD56+ cells. However, the functional and co-signaling significance of these NK cell receptors on NK-like CD8+ T-cells is less clear. Also, the diverse array of costimulatory and co-inhibitory receptors are spatially and temporally regulated and may have distinct overlapping functions on NK-like CD8+ T-cell priming, activation, differentiation, and memory responses associated with different cell phenotypes. Currently, there is no consensus regarding the functional properties and phenotypic characterization of human NK-like CD8+ T-cells. Environmental factors, such as aging, autoimmunity, inflammation, viral antigen re-exposure, or the presence of persistent tumor antigens have been shown to allow differentiation (“adaptation”) of the NK-like CD8+ T-cells; the elucidation of this differentiation process and a greater understanding of the characteristics of these cells could be important for their eventual in potential therapeutic applications aimed at improving protective immunity. This review will attempt to elucidate an understanding of the characteristics of these cells with the goal toward their eventual use in potential therapeutic applications aimed at improving protective immunity. PMID:28066426

  14. Polyfunctional HCV-specific T-cell responses are associated with effective control of HCV replication.

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Donatella; Comte, Denis; Cavassini, Matthias; Giostra, Emiliano; Bühler, Leo; Perruchoud, Monika; Heim, Markus H; Battegay, Manuel; Genné, Daniel; Mulhaupt, Beat; Malinverni, Raffaele; Oneta, Carl; Bernasconi, Enos; Monnat, Martine; Cerny, Andreas; Chuard, Christian; Borovicka, Jan; Mentha, Gilles; Pascual, Manuel; Gonvers, Jean-Jacques; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Dutoit, Valérie

    2008-10-01

    HCV infection has a severe course of disease in HIV/HCV co-infection and in liver transplant recipients. However, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we evaluated functional profiles of HCV-specific T-cell responses in 86 HCV mono-infected patients, 48 HIV/HCV co-infected patients and 42 liver transplant recipients. IFN-gamma and IL-2 production and ability of CD4 and CD8 T cells to proliferate were assessed after stimulation with HCV-derived peptides. We observed that HCV-specific T-cell responses were polyfunctional in HCV mono-infected patients, with presence of proliferating single IL-2-, dual IL-2/IFN-gamma and single IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ and dual IL-2/IFN-gamma and single IFN-gamma-producing CD8+ cells. In contrast, HCV-specific T-cell responses had an effector profile in HIV/HCV co-infected individuals and liver transplant recipients with absence of single IL-2-producing HCV-specific CD4+ and dual IL-2/IFN-gamma-producing CD8+ T cells. In addition, HCV-specific proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was severely impaired in HIV/HCV co-infected patients and liver transplant recipients. Importantly, "only effector" T-cell responses were associated with significantly higher HCV viral load and more severe liver fibrosis scores. Therefore, the present results suggest that immune-based mechanisms may contribute to explain the accelerated course of HCV infection in conditions of HIV-1 co-infection and liver transplantation.

  15. Characterization of CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses in MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, JS; Guidon, A; Sparks, S; Osborne, R; Juel, VC; Massey, JM; Sanders, DB; Weinhold, KJ; Guptill, JT

    2014-01-01

    Muscle specific tyrosine kinase myasthenia gravis (MuSK MG) is a form of autoimmune MG that predominantly affects women and has unique clinical features, including prominent bulbar weakness, muscle atrophy, and excellent response to therapeutic plasma exchange. Patients with MuSK MG have predominantly IgG4 autoantibodies directed against MuSK on the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Lymphocyte functionality has not been reported in this condition. The goal of this study was to characterize T-cell responses in patients with MuSK MG. Intracellular production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-17, and IL-21 by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells was measured by polychromatic flow cytometry in peripheral blood samples from 11 Musk MG patients and 10 healthy controls. Only one MuSK MG patient was not receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) were also included in our analysis to determine if changes in T cell function were due to altered Treg frequencies. CD8+ T-cells from MuSK MG patients had higher frequencies of polyfunctional responses than controls, and CD4+ T-cells had higher IL-2, TNF-alpha, and IL-17. MuSK MG patients had a higher percentage of CD4+ T-cells producing combinations of IFN-gamma/IL-2/TNF-gamma, TNF-alpha/IL-2, and IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha. Interestingly, Treg numbers and CD39 expression were not different from control values. MuSK MG patients had increased frequencies of Th1 and Th17 cytokines and were primed for polyfunctional proinflammatory responses that cannot be explained by a defect in Treg function or number. PMID:24378287

  16. Characterization of CD4 and CD8 T cell responses in MuSK myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Yi, J S; Guidon, A; Sparks, S; Osborne, R; Juel, V C; Massey, J M; Sanders, D B; Weinhold, K J; Guptill, J T

    2014-08-01

    Muscle specific tyrosine kinase myasthenia gravis (MuSK MG) is a form of autoimmune MG that predominantly affects women and has unique clinical features, including prominent bulbar weakness, muscle atrophy, and excellent response to therapeutic plasma exchange. Patients with MuSK MG have predominantly IgG4 autoantibodies directed against MuSK on the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Lymphocyte functionality has not been reported in this condition. The goal of this study was to characterize T cell responses in patients with MuSK MG. Intracellular production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-17, and IL-21 by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was measured by polychromatic flow cytometry in peripheral blood samples from 11 Musk MG patients and 10 healthy controls. Only one MuSK MG patient was not receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Regulatory T cells (Treg) were also included in our analysis to determine if changes in T cell function were due to altered Treg frequencies. CD8+ T cells from MuSK MG patients had higher frequencies of polyfunctional responses than controls, and CD4+ T cells had higher IL-2, TNF-alpha, and IL-17. MuSK MG patients had a higher percentage of CD4+ T cells producing combinations of IFN-gamma/IL-2/TNF-gamma, TNF-alpha/IL-2, and IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha. Interestingly, Treg numbers and CD39 expression were not different from control values. MuSK MG patients had increased frequencies of Th1 and Th17 cytokines and were primed for polyfunctional proinflammatory responses that cannot be explained by a defect in CD39 expression or Treg number.

  17. Antibody responses to glycolipid-borne carbohydrates require CD4+ T cells but not CD1 or NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Dale; Vaughan, Hilary A; Milland, Julie; Miland, Julie; Dodge, Natalie; Mouhtouris, Effie; Smyth, Mark J; Godfrey, Dale I; Sandrin, Mauro S

    2011-05-01

    Naturally occurring anti-carbohydrate antibodies play a major role in both the innate and adaptive immune responses. To elicit an anti-carbohydrate immune response, glycoproteins can be processed to glycopeptides and presented by the classical antigen-presenting molecules, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I and II. In contrast, much less is known about the mechanism(s) for anti-carbohydrate responses to glycolipids, although it is generally considered that the CD1 family of cell surface proteins presents glycolipids to T cells or natural killer T (NKT) cells. Using model carbohydrate systems (isogloboside 3 and B blood group antigen), we examined the anti-carbohydrate response on glycolipids using both antibody neutralisation and knockout mouse-based experiments. These studies showed that CD4(+) T cells were required to generate antibodies to the carbohydrates expressed on glycolipids, and unexpectedly, these antibody responses were CD1d and NKT cell independent. They also did not require peptide help. These data provide new insight into glycolipid antigen recognition by the immune system and indicate the existence of a previously unrecognised population of glycolipid antigen-specific, CD1-independent, CD4(+) T cells.

  18. Memory T cell responses targeting the SARS coronavirus persist up to 11 years post-infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Chia, Adeline; Tan, Anthony T; Jadi, Ramesh S; Leong, Hoe Nam; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-04-12

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious infectious disease which first emerged in late 2002, caused by a then novel human coronavirus, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The virus is believed to have originated from bats and transmitted to human through intermediate animals such as civet cats. The re-emergence of SARS-CoV remains a valid concern due to the continual persistence of zoonotic SARS-CoVs and SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs) in bat reservoirs. In this study, the screening for the presence of SARS-specific T cells in a cohort of three SARS-recovered individuals at 9 and 11 years post-infection was carried out, and all memory T cell responses detected target the SARS-CoV structural proteins. Two CD8(+) T cell responses targeting the SARS-CoV membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins were characterized by determining their HLA restriction and minimal T cell epitope regions. Furthermore, these responses were found to persist up to 11 years post-infection. An absence of cross-reactivity of these CD8(+) T cell responses against the newly-emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was also demonstrated. The knowledge of the persistence of SARS-specific celullar immunity targeting the viral structural proteins in SARS-recovered individuals is important in the design and development of SARS vaccines, which are currently unavailable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Control of the Specificity of CD4 T Cell Responses: Thresholds, Breakpoints, and Ceilings

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Andrea J.; Chaves, Francisco A.; Leddon, Scott A.; Tung, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for over 25 years that CD4 T cell responses are restricted to a finite number of peptide epitopes within pathogens or protein vaccines. These selected peptide epitopes are termed “immunodominant.” Other peptides within the antigen that can bind to host MHC molecules and recruit CD4 T cells as single peptides are termed “cryptic” because they fail to induce responses when expressed in complex proteins or when in competition with other peptides during the immune response. In the last decade, our laboratory has evaluated the mechanisms that underlie the preferential specificity of CD4 T cells and have discovered that both intracellular events within antigen presenting cells, particular selective DM editing, and intercellular regulatory pathways, involving IFN-γ, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and regulatory T cells, play a role in selecting the final peptide specificity of CD4 T cells. In this review, we summarize our findings, discuss the implications of this work on responses to pathogens and vaccines and speculate on the logic of these regulatory events. PMID:24167504

  20. Comparative analysis of transcriptional profiling of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells identifies novel immune response players in T-Cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Windgassen, Dirk; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2008-01-01

    Background T-cell activation is an essential step of the immune response and relies on the tightly controlled orchestration of hundreds of genes/proteins, yet the cellular and molecular events underlying this complex process are not fully understood, especially at the genome-scale. Significantly, a comparative genome-scale transcriptional analysis of two T-cell subsets (CD4+ and CD8+) against each other and against the naturally mixed population (CD3+ cells) remains unexplored. Results Comparison of the microarray-based gene expression patterns between CD3+ T cells, and the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets revealed largely conserved, but not identical, transcriptional patterns. We employed a Gene-Ontology-driven transcriptional analysis coupled with protein abundance assays in order to identify novel T-cell activation genes and cell-type-specific genes associated with the immune response. We identified potential genes involved in the communication between the two subsets (including IL23A, NR4A2, CD83, PSMB2, -8, MIF, IFI16, TNFAIP1, POU2AF1, and OTUB1) and would-be effector-function-specific genes (XCL2, SLAMF7, TNFSF4, -5, -9, CSF3, CD48 and CD244). Chemokines induced during T-cell activation, but not previously identified in T cells, include CCL20, CXCL9, -10, -11 (in all three populations), and XCL2 (preferentially in CD8+ T cells). Increased expression of other unexpected cytokines (GPI, OSM and MIF) suggests their involvement in T-cell activation with their functions yet to be examined. Differential expression of many receptors, not previously reported in the context of T-cell activation, including CCR5, CCR7, IL1R2, IL1RAP, IL6R, TNFRSF25 and TNFRSF1A, suggests their role in this immune process. Several receptors involved in TCR activation (CD3D, CD3G, TRAT1, ITGAL, ITGB1, ITGB2, CD8A and B (CD8+ T-cell specific) along with LCK, ZAP70 and TYROBP were synchronously downregulated. Members of cell-surface receptors (HLA-Ds and KLRs), none previously identified in the

  1. Comparative analysis of transcriptional profiling of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells identifies novel immune response players in T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Windgassen, Dirk; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2008-05-16

    T-cell activation is an essential step of the immune response and relies on the tightly controlled orchestration of hundreds of genes/proteins, yet the cellular and molecular events underlying this complex process are not fully understood, especially at the genome-scale. Significantly, a comparative genome-scale transcriptional analysis of two T-cell subsets (CD4+ and CD8+) against each other and against the naturally mixed population (CD3+ cells) remains unexplored. Comparison of the microarray-based gene expression patterns between CD3+ T cells, and the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets revealed largely conserved, but not identical, transcriptional patterns. We employed a Gene-Ontology-driven transcriptional analysis coupled with protein abundance assays in order to identify novel T-cell activation genes and cell-type-specific genes associated with the immune response. We identified potential genes involved in the communication between the two subsets (including IL23A, NR4A2, CD83, PSMB2, -8, MIF, IFI16, TNFAIP1, POU2AF1, and OTUB1) and would-be effector-function-specific genes (XCL2, SLAMF7, TNFSF4, -5, -9, CSF3, CD48 and CD244). Chemokines induced during T-cell activation, but not previously identified in T cells, include CCL20, CXCL9, -10, -11 (in all three populations), and XCL2 (preferentially in CD8+ T cells). Increased expression of other unexpected cytokines (GPI, OSM and MIF) suggests their involvement in T-cell activation with their functions yet to be examined. Differential expression of many receptors, not previously reported in the context of T-cell activation, including CCR5, CCR7, IL1R2, IL1RAP, IL6R, TNFRSF25 and TNFRSF1A, suggests their role in this immune process. Several receptors involved in TCR activation (CD3D, CD3G, TRAT1, ITGAL, ITGB1, ITGB2, CD8A and B (CD8+ T-cell specific) along with LCK, ZAP70 and TYROBP were synchronously downregulated. Members of cell-surface receptors (HLA-Ds and KLRs), none previously identified in the context of T-cell

  2. Specific V beta T cell subsets mediate the immediate hypersensitivity response to ragweed allergen.

    PubMed

    Renz, H; Saloga, J; Bradley, K L; Loader, J E; Greenstein, J L; Larsen, G; Gelfand, E W

    1993-08-15

    T and B cell responses after sensitization to ragweed (RW) were examined in a mouse model in which BALB/c mice were exposed to the allergen by ultrasonic nebulization. Sensitization resulted in the stimulation of an IgE anti-RW response and was paralleled by a rise in IgG1 anti-RW titers. Skin testing for immediate cutaneous hypersensitivity revealed the presence of allergic type I reactions to RW. Sensitization to RW in this way was also associated with the development of increased airways responsiveness as determined by electrical field stimulation of preparations of tracheal smooth muscle. Histologic examination of the airways and the lung indicated the presence of a mononuclear cell infiltrate in the mucosa and submucosa of the airways that was accompanied by an enlargement of local draining lymph nodes of the airways and the lung. T cell populations were analyzed for the frequency of V beta-expressing T cells. Such analysis indicated that RW sensitization stimulated the expression of V beta 8.1+, V beta 8.2+, and V beta 13+ T cells in the local lymphoid tissue and of V beta 8.1+, V beta 8.2+, V beta 8.3+, V beta 9+ and V beta 14+ T cells in the spleen. Co-culture of these T cell populations with RW-primed B cells indicated that in the presence of RW, V beta 8.2 T cells stimulated IgE and IgG1 production, whereas the other T cell populations showed a different stimulation profile for Ig isotypes and IgG subclasses. The transfer of V beta 8.2 T cells from sensitized but not from nonsensitized control mice stimulated an allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 response and increased airways responsiveness in naive recipients. These data provide additional support for the pivotal role of specific V beta-expressing T cell subpopulations in the stimulation of IgE/IgG1 production and increased airways responsiveness.

  3. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Shorter, Shayla K; Schnell, Frederick J; McMaster, Sean R; Pinelli, David F; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant.

  4. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Shayla K.; Schnell, Frederick J.; McMaster, Sean R.; Pinelli, David F.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant. PMID:26915099

  5. Complement modulation of T cell immune responses during homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Elizabeth V; Tenner, Andrea J

    2014-11-01

    The complement system is an ancient and critical effector mechanism of the innate immune system as it senses, kills, and clears infectious and/or dangerous particles and alerts the immune system to the presence of the infection and/or danger. Interestingly, an increasing number of reports have demonstrated a clear role for complement in the adaptive immune system as well. Of note, a number of recent studies have identified previously unknown roles for complement proteins, receptors, and regulators in T cell function. Here, we will review recent data demonstrating the influence of complement proteins C1q, C3b/iC3b, C3a (and C3aR), and C5a (and C5aR) and complement regulators DAF (CD55) and CD46 (MCP) on T cell function during homeostasis and disease. Although new concepts are beginning to emerge in the field of complement regulation of T cell function, future experiments should focus on whether complement is interacting directly with the T cell or is having an indirect effect on T cell function via APCs, the cytokine milieu, or downstream complement activation products. Importantly, the identification of the pivotal molecular pathways in the human systems will be beneficial in the translation of concepts derived from model systems to therapeutic targeting for treatment of human disorders.

  6. Rituximab Therapy Reduces Organ-Specific T Cell Responses and Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Nancy L.; Cravens, Petra; Hussain, Rehana; Harp, Christopher T.; Cummings, Matthew; de Pilar Martin, Maria; Ben, Li-Hong; Do, Julie; Lyons, Jeri-Anne; Lovette-Racke, Amy; Cross, Anne H.; Racke, Michael K.; Stüve, Olaf; Shlomchik, Mark; Eagar, Todd N.

    2011-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have established B cell depletion by the anti-CD20 chimeric antibody Rituximab as a beneficial therapy for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). The impact of Rituximab on T cell responses remains largely unexplored. In the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS in mice that express human CD20, Rituximab administration rapidly depleted peripheral B cells and strongly reduced EAE severity. B cell depletion was also associated with diminished Delayed Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) and a reduction in T cell proliferation and IL-17 production during recall immune response experiments. While Rituximab is not considered a broad immunosuppressant, our results indicate a role for B cells as a therapeutic cellular target in regulating encephalitogenic T cell responses in specific tissues. PMID:21359213

  7. Self-recognition specificity expressed by T cells from nude mice. Absence of detectable Ia-restricted T cells in nude mice that do exhibit self-K/D-restricted T cell responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kruisbeek, A.M.; Davis, M.L.; Matis, L.A.; Longo, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    The presence in athymic nude mice of precursor T cells with self-recognition specificity for either H-2 K/D or H-2 I region determinants was investigated. Chimeras were constructed of lethally irradiated parental mice receiving a mixture of F1 nude mouse (6-8 wk old) spleen and bone marrow cells. The donor inoculum was deliberately not subjected to any T cell depletion procedure, so that any potential major histocompatibility complex-committed precursor T cells were allowed to differentiate and expand in the normal parental recipients. 3 mo after reconstitution, the chimeras were immunized with several protein antigens in complete Freund's adjuvant in the footpads and their purified draining lymph node T cells tested 10 d later for ability to recognize antigen on antigen-presenting cells of either parental haplotype. Also, their spleen and lymph node cells were tested for ability to generate a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. It was demonstrated that T cell proliferative responses of these F1(nude)----parent chimeras were restricted solely to recognizing parental host I region determinants as self and expressed the Ir gene phenotype of the host. In contrast, CTL responses could be generated (in the presence of interleukin 2) to TNP-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. Thus these results indicate that nude mice which do have CTL with self-specificity for K/D region determinants lack proliferating T cells with self-specificity for I region determinants. These results provide evidence for the concepts that development of the I region-restricted T cell repertoire is strictly an intrathymically determined event and that young nude mice lack the unique thymic elements responsible for edu

  8. The humoral response in TCR alpha-/- mice. Can gammadelta-T cells support the humoral immune response?

    PubMed

    Lindroth, K; Troye-Blomberg, M; Singh, M; Dieli, F; Ivanyi, J; Fernández, C

    2002-03-01

    An optimal humoral response requires T-cell help; however, it has been questioned if this help comes exclusively from alphabeta-T cells or whether gammadelta-T cells also contribute. We have attempted to answer this question by studying the humoral response in T-cell receptor alpha-chain knockout (alpha-/-) mice, which lack the alphabetaT cell subset. Two model antigens were used to characterize the response: the thymus-independent (TI) antigen native dextran B512 (Dx), and the thymus-dependent (TD) antigen heat shock protein (HSP65) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When challenged with Dx, the alpha-/- mice elicited a strong antibody response and formed rudimentary germinal centres (GCs), a T-cell dependent reaction. In contrast, the humoral response to HSP65 was poor. However, alpha-/- mice became primed when challenged with HSP65, because when supplemented with wild-type thymocytes, the antigen-primed animals were able to mount a stronger response than the nonprimed ones when challenged with HSP65. A crucial step seems to be the collaboration between gammadeltaT cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), as splenocytes from alpha-/- mice were able to respond to HSP65 in an environment containing primed-APCs. Based on these results, we propose a model for B-cell activation in the alpha-/- mice.

  9. Bovine central memory T cells are highly proliferative in response to bovine tuberculosis infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell (Tcm) responses in both humans and cattle. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses correlate with protection. In other species, Tcm’s pose low activation threshold and a...

  10. Bovine central memory T cells are highly proliferative in response to bovine tuberculosis infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells are used as a correlate of T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in both humans and cattle. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays are a correlate of protection. Recent...

  11. Effector and memory T cell subsets in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are used to access T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in both cattle and humans. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT response correlates with protection; how...

  12. Effector and memory T cell subsets in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-term (i.e., 14d) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays of PBMC are used as a correlate of T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in cattle and humans. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited Tcm responses correlate with protection against experimental Mycobacterium bovis infection. The objective ...

  13. Suppression by thimerosal of ex-vivo CD4+ T cell response to influenza vaccine and induction of apoptosis in primary memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Loison, Emily; Poirier-Beaudouin, Béatrice; Seffer, Valérie; Paoletti, Audrey; Abitbol, Vered; Tartour, Eric; Launay, Odile; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Thimerosal is a preservative used widely in vaccine formulations to prevent bacterial and fungal contamination in multidose vials of vaccine. Thimerosal was included in the multidose non-adjuvanted pandemic 2009 H1N1 vaccine Panenza. In the context of the analysis of the ex-vivo T cell responses directed against influenza vaccine, we discovered the in vitro toxicity Panenza, due to its content in thimerosal. Because thimerosal may skew the immune response to vaccines, we investigated in detail the ex-vivo effects of thimerosal on the fate and functions of T cells in response to TCR ligation. We report that ex-vivo exposure of quiescent or TCR-activated primary human T cells to thimerosal induced a dose-dependent apoptotic cell death associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, generation of reactive oxygen species, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and caspase-3 activation. Moreover, exposure to non-toxic concentrations of thimerosal induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase of TCR-activated T cells, and inhibition of the release of proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN gamma, IL-1 beta, TNF alpha, IL-2, as well as the chemokine MCP1. No shift towards Th2 or Th17 cells was detected. Overall these results underline the proapoptotic effect of thimerosal on primary human lymphocytes at concentrations 100 times less to those contained in the multidose vaccine, and they reveal the inhibitory effect of this preservative on T-cell proliferation and functions at nanomolar concentrations.

  14. Regulatory effect of monocytes on T cell proliferative responses to oral microbial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Stashenko, P

    1982-01-01

    Mononuclear cell preparations isolated by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation from human peripheral blood were found to vary considerably in the number of monocytes they contained (mean, 20.3%; range, 13 to 33%). The regulatory role of monocytes in T cell proliferative responses to sonic extracts of a panel of oral microorganisms was therefore investigated. T cells were fractionated by anti-immunoglobulin chromatography and depleted of monocytes by treatment with a monoclonal anti-human Ia-like (DR locus antigen) antibody and complement. Purified populations of monocytes were obtained by extensive adherence procedures. The resultant cell populations were greater than 95% pure, as judged by indirect immunofluorescence on a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Monocyte-depleted T cells failed to respond by proliferation to the nonoral antigen tetanus toxoid, as well as to any oral microorganism, but retained responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin. Readdition of monocytes in final concentrations of from 5 to 15% resulted in the restoration of maximal T cell proliferation. Monocytes in greater numbers suppressed T cell responses to all sonic extracts tested. PMID:6984019

  15. CD4+ T-Cell Profiles and Peripheral Blood Ex-Vivo Responses to T-Cell Directed Stimulation Delineate COPD Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Mustimbo E P; Higgs, Brandon W; Brohawn, Philip; Pilataxi, Fernanda; Guo, Xiang; Kuziora, Michael; Bowler, Russell P; White, Wendy I

    2015-08-23

    The heterogeneous clinical phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) challenge successful drug development. To identify COPD subgroups beyond clinical phenotypes, we interrogated blood immune cell profiles and ex-vivo responses of current and former smokers, with or without COPD, in the longitudinal COPD Genetic Epidemiology study (COPDGene) cohort. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and monocytes were profiled by flow cytometry. Microarray analysis was performed on the RNA from the aforementioned isolated cells. T-cell directed whole blood ex-vivo stimulation was used to assess functional responses. Blood CD4+ T-cell transcript analysis distinguished patients with COPD from control smokers and also enriched for a subset of patients with COPD that had a history of exacerbations of the disease. Analogous analyses of CD8+ T cells and monocytes failed to discriminate patients with COPD from the control population. Patients with COPD had a diminished cytokine response, compared to control smokers, characterized by low levels of granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulation factor (GM-CSF), interferon gamma (IFN-ɣ), interleukin one-alpha (IL-1α), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-beta (TNF-β) secreted in response to T-cell directed ex-vivo stimulation. This cytokine response associated with baseline disease severity (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]% predicted), rapidly declining lung function, and emphysema. Our observations indicate that COPD phenotypes can be further differentiated based on blood CD4+ T-cell profiles and resultant immune responses, suggesting a role for these cells in COPD pathophysiology.

  16. Stronger hepatitis C virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in HIV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Barrett, L; Gallant, M; Howley, C; Ian Bowmer, M; Hirsch, G; Peltekian, K; Grant, M

    2011-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a widespread chronic infection that shares routes of transmission with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Thus, coinfection with these viruses is a relatively common and growing problem. In general, liver disease develops over years with HIV coinfection, when compared to decades in HCV monoinfection. The role of the immune system in the accelerated pathogenesis of liver disease in HIV/HCV coinfection is not clear. In this study, we compared the frequency, magnitude, breadth and specificity of peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses between HCV-monoinfected and HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals and between HIV/HCV-coinfected subgroups distinguished by anti-HCV antibody and HCV RNA status. While HIV coinfection tended to reduce the frequency and breadth of anti-HCV CD8+ T-cell responses in general, responses that were present were substantially stronger than in monoinfection. In all groups, HCV-specific CD4+ T-cell responses were rare and weak, independent of either nadir or concurrent CD4+ T-cell counts of HIV-infected individuals. Subgroup analysis demonstrated restricted breadth of CD8+ HCV-specific T-cell responses and lower B-cell counts in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals without anti-HCV antibodies. The greatest difference between HIV/HCV-coinfected and HCV-monoinfected groups was substantially stronger HCV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the HIV-coinfected group, which may relate to accelerated liver disease in this setting.

  17. Cell-mediated responses of immunized vervet monkeys to defined Leishmania T-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Curry, A J; Jardim, A; Olobo, J O; Olafson, R W

    1994-01-01

    A population of vervet monkeys was immunized with killed parasites and infected with Leishmania major promastigotes either by needle or by infected-fly bite. The responses of recovered monkeys to mitogens, killed parasites, and molecularly defined T-cell epitopes were then compared with those of control animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both naive and recovered animals proliferated strongly in response to both B- and T-cell mitogens, although the responses of the recovered animals were less strong than those of the naive animals. Cells from recovered vervets, but not those from naive vervets, also proliferated in response to parasite antigens and synthetic T-cell epitopes. Likewise, cells from recovered animals released gamma interferon and either interleukin 2 (IL-2) or IL-4 into culture media in response to both of the above-mentioned antigens, whereas cells from control animals did not. The fact that no IL-5 could be measured following parasite antigen or synthetic T-cell epitope stimulation of PBMC suggested that cells proliferating in response to these molecules belonged to the Th1 subset. Phenotypic analysis of the PBMC showed a marked increase in T-cell but not B-cell populations in recovered animals. Among this population was an increased number of CD45R0+ memory cells. The data from this study are in keeping with the earlier finding that vervet monkeys provide an excellent model system for leishmaniasis. Further, these data support the contention that synthetic T-cell epitopes are prime candidates for molecularly defined Leishmania vaccines. PMID:7513306

  18. Metal-specific CD4+ T-cell responses induced by beryllium exposure in HLA-DP2 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Falta, M T; Tinega, A N; Mack, D G; Bowerman, N A; Crawford, F; Kappler, J W; Pinilla, C; Fontenot, A P

    2016-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disorder that is associated with the accumulation of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4(+) T cells into the lung. Genetic susceptibility is linked to HLA-DPB1 alleles that possess a glutamic acid at position 69 (βGlu69), and HLA-DPB1*02:01 is the most prevalent βGlu69-containing allele. Using HLA-DP2 transgenic (Tg) mice, we developed a model of CBD that replicates the major features of the human disease. Here we characterized the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of Be-responsive CD4(+) T cells derived from the lungs of Be oxide-exposed HLA-DP2 Tg mice. The majority of Be-specific T-cell hybridomas expressed TCR Vβ6, and a subset of these hybridomas expressed identical or nearly identical β-chains that were paired with different α-chains. We delineated mimotopes that bind to HLA-DP2 and form a complex recognized by Be-specific CD4(+) T cells in the absence of Be. These Be-independent peptides possess an arginine at p5 and a tryptophan at p7 that surround the Be-binding site within the HLA-DP2 acidic pocket and likely induce charge and conformational changes that mimic those induced by the Be(2+) cation. Collectively, these data highlight the interplay between peptides and Be in the generation of an adaptive immune response in metal-induced hypersensitivity.

  19. Metal-specific CD4+ T cell responses induced by beryllium exposure in HLA-DP2 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Falta, Michael T.; Tinega, Alex N.; Mack, Douglas G.; Bowerman, Natalie A.; Crawford, Frances; Kappler, John W.; Pinilla, Clemencia; Fontenot, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disorder that is associated with the accumulation of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung. Genetic susceptibility is linked to HLA-DPB1 alleles that possess a glutamic acid at position 69 (βGlu69), and HLA-DPB1*02:01 is the most prevalent βGlu69-containing allele. Using HLA-DP2 transgenic (Tg) mice, we developed a model of CBD that replicates the major features of the human disease. Here, we characterized the T cell receptor repertoire of Be-responsive CD4+ T cells derived from the lungs of Be oxide-exposed HLA-DP2 Tg mice. The majority of Be-specific T cell hybridomas expressed TCR Vβ6, and a subset of these hybridomas expressed identical or nearly identical β-chains that were paired with different α-chains. We delineated mimotopes that bind to HLA-DP2 and form a complex recognized by Be-specific CD4+ T cells in the absence of Be. These Be-independent peptides possess an arginine at p5 and a tryptophan at p7 that surround the Be-binding site within the HLA-DP2 acidic pocket and likely induce charge and conformational changes that mimic those induced by the Be2+ cation. Collectively, these data highlight the interplay between peptides and Be in the generation of an adaptive immune response in metal-induced hypersensitivity. PMID:26129650

  20. mTOR Promotes Antiviral Humoral Immunity by Differentially Regulating CD4 Helper T Cell and B Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lilin; Lee, Junghwa; Xu, Lifan; Mohammed, Ata-Ur-Rasheed; Li, Weiyan; Hale, J Scott; Tan, Wendy G; Wu, Tuoqi; Davis, Carl W; Ahmed, Rafi; Araki, Koichi

    2017-02-15

    mTOR has important roles in regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity, but whether and how mTOR modulates humoral immune responses have yet to be fully understood. To address this issue, we examined the effects of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, on B cell and CD4 T cell responses during acute infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Rapamycin treatment resulted in suppression of virus-specific B cell responses by inhibiting proliferation of germinal center (GC) B cells. In contrast, the number of memory CD4 T cells was increased in rapamycin-treated mice. However, the drug treatment caused a striking bias of CD4 T cell differentiation into Th1 cells and substantially impaired formation of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, which are essential for humoral immunity. Further experiments in which mTOR signaling was modulated by RNA interference (RNAi) revealed that B cells were the primary target cells of rapamycin for the impaired humoral immunity and that reduced Tfh formation in rapamycin-treated mice was due to lower GC B cell responses that are essential for Tfh generation. Additionally, we found that rapamycin had minimal effects on B cell responses activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which stimulates B cells in an antigen-independent manner, suggesting that rapamycin specifically inhibits B cell responses induced by B cell receptor stimulation with antigen. Together, these findings demonstrate that mTOR signals play an essential role in antigen-specific humoral immune responses by differentially regulating B cell and CD4 T cell responses during acute viral infection and that rapamycin treatment alters the interplay of immune cell subsets involved in antiviral humoral immunity. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase involved in a variety of cellular activities. Although its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, is currently used as an immunosuppressive drug in transplant patients, it has been reported that rapamycin can also stimulate pathogen

  1. Polymer-based synthetic dendritic cells for tailoring robust and multifunctional T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Subhra; Hammink, Roel; Tel, Jurjen; Eksteen-Akeroyd, Zaskia H; Rowan, Alan E; Blank, Kerstin; Figdor, Carl G

    2015-02-20

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in T cell activation. Recent efforts in cancer immunotherapy have been directed at the development of artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) loaded with tumor antigens. These aAPCs are designed to mimic DCs with the goal of triggering an efficient and specific T cell response directed against the tumor. We have designed a novel synthetic dendritic cell (sDC) that possesses the essential features of natural DCs. Our sDC is based on a semiflexible poly(isocyano peptide) polymer and carries anti-CD3 antibodies (αCD3) for triggering the T cell receptor/CD3 complex as well as anti-CD28 antibodies (αCD28) as a co-stimulatory signal. Multiple copies of both antibodies facilitate multivalent binding similar to natural DCs. The high mobility of these polymer-bound antibodies, reminiscent of protein motility in a natural plasma membrane, enables receptor rearrangements to occur during T cell activation. We show that our bifunctional αCD3/αCD28-sDC triggers T cell activation at significantly lower antibody concentrations than freely soluble antibodies. This superior performance is further demonstrated in comparison to a mixture of monofunctional αCD3-sDC and αCD28-sDC. The presence of both antibodies on the same polymer not only reduces the threshold for T cell activation but, more importantly, critically shapes the specificity of the T cell response. αCD3/αCD28-sDC is a far more efficient activator of multifunctional killer cells. These findings demonstrate the potential of multifunctional polymers for mimicking natural DCs, paving the way for their exploitation in immunotherapeutic strategies.

  2. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G.; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3+ T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  3. Early Gag Immunodominance of the HIV-Specific T-Cell Response during Acute/Early Infection Is Associated with Higher CD8+ T-Cell Antiviral Activity and Correlates with Preservation of the CD4+ T-Cell Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglione, Yanina; Falivene, Juliana; Socias, María Eugenia; Laufer, Natalia; Coloccini, Romina Soledad; Rodriguez, Ana María; Ruiz, María Julia; Pando, María Ángeles; Giavedoni, Luis David; Cahn, Pedro; Sued, Omar; Salomon, Horacio; Gherardi, María Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The important role of the CD8+ T-cell response on HIV control is well established. Moreover, the acute phase of infection represents a proper scenario to delineate the antiviral cellular functions that best correlate with control. Here, multiple functional aspects (specificity, ex vivo viral inhibitory activity [VIA] and polyfunctionality) of the HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell subset arising early after infection, and their association with disease progression markers, were examined. Blood samples from 44 subjects recruited within 6 months from infection (primary HIV infection [PHI] group), 16 chronically infected subjects, 11 elite controllers (EC), and 10 healthy donors were obtained. Results indicated that, although Nef dominated the anti-HIV response during acute/early infection, a higher proportion of early anti-Gag T cells correlated with delayed progression. Polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8+ T cells were detected at early time points but did not associate with virus control. Conversely, higher CD4+ T-cell set points were observed in PHI subjects with higher HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell VIA at baseline. Importantly, VIA levels correlated with the magnitude of the anti-Gag cellular response. The advantage of Gag-specific cells may result from their enhanced ability to mediate lysis of infected cells (evidenced by a higher capacity to degranulate and to mediate VIA) and to simultaneously produce IFN-γ. Finally, Gag immunodominance was associated with elevated plasma levels of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β). All together, this study underscores the importance of CD8+ T-cell specificity in the improved control of disease progression, which was related to the capacity of Gag-specific cells to mediate both lytic and nonlytic antiviral mechanisms at early time points postinfection. PMID:23616666

  4. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4+ T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4+ effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4+ EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4+ EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. PMID:26376930

  5. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Saghaug, Christina Skår; Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2015-09-16

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4(+) T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4(+) effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4(+) EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4(+) EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Multiplexed Nanoplasmonic Temporal Profiling of T-Cell Response under Immunomodulatory Agent Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs—agents regulating the immune response—are commonly used for treating immune system disorders and minimizing graft versus host disease in persons receiving organ transplants. At the cellular level, immunosuppressant drugs are used to inhibit pro-inflammatory or tissue-damaging responses of cells. However, few studies have so far precisely characterized the cellular-level effect of immunomodulatory treatment. The primary challenge arises due to the rapid and transient nature of T-cell immune responses to such treatment. T-cell responses involve a highly interactive network of different types of cytokines, which makes precise monitoring of drug-modulated T-cell response difficult. Here, we present a nanoplasmonic biosensing approach to quantitatively characterize cytokine secretion behaviors of T cells with a fine time-resolution (every 10 min) that are altered by an immunosuppressive drug used in the treatment of T-cell-mediated diseases. With a microfluidic platform integrating antibody-conjugated gold nanorod (AuNR) arrays, the technique enables simultaneous multi-time-point measurements of pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines secreted by T cells. The integrated nanoplasmonic biosensors achieve precise measurements with low operating sample volume (1 μL), short assay time (∼30 min), heightened sensitivity (∼20–30 pg/mL), and negligible sensor crosstalk. Data obtained from the multicytokine secretion profiles with high practicality resulting from all of these sensing capabilities provide a comprehensive picture of the time-varying cellular functional state during pharmacologic immunosuppression. The capability to monitor cellular functional response demonstrated in this study has great potential to ultimately permit personalized immunomodulatory treatment. PMID:27478873

  7. Norovirus-Specific Memory T Cell Responses in Adult Human Donors

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Maria; Tamminen, Kirsi; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in people of all ages worldwide. NoV-specific serum antibodies which block the binding of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) to the cell receptors have been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, only a few publications are available on the NoV capsid VP1 protein-specific T cell responses in humans naturally infected with the virus. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of eight healthy adult human donors previously exposed to NoV were stimulated with purified VLPs derived from NoV GII.4-1999, GII.4-2012 (Sydney), and GI.3, and IFN-γ production was measured by an ELISPOT assay. In addition, 76 overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire 539-amino acid sequence of GII.4 VP1 were pooled into two-dimensional matrices and used to identify putative T cell epitopes. Seven of the eight subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the peptides and five subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the VLPs of the same origin. In general, stronger T cell responses were induced with the peptides in each donor compared to the VLPs. A CD8+ T cell epitope in the shell domain of the VP1 (134SPSQVTMFPHIIVDVRQL151) was identified in two subjects, both having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A∗02:01 allele. To our knowledge, this is the first report using synthetic peptides to study NoV-specific T cell responses in human subjects and identify T cell epitopes. PMID:27752254

  8. Adoptive transfer of tracer alloreactive CD4+ TCR-transgenic T cells alters the endogenous immune response to an allograft

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle L.; Chen, Jianjun; Daniels, Melvin D.; McKeague, Matthew G.; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Chong, Anita S.; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) T cells are often used as tracer populations of antigen-specific responses to extrapolate findings to endogenous T cells. The extent to which TCR-Tg T cells behave purely as tracer cells or modify the endogenous immune response is not clear. To test the impact of TCR-Tg T cell transfer on endogenous alloimmunity, recipient mice were seeded with CD4+ or CD8+ TCR-Tg or polyclonal T cells at the time of cardiac allograft transplantation. Only CD4+ TCR-Tg T cells accelerated rejection, and unexpectedly led to a dose-dependent decrease in both transferred and endogenous T cells infiltrating the graft. In contrast, recipients of CD4+ TCR-Tg cell exhibited enhanced endogenous donor-specific CD8+ T-cell activation in the spleen and accelerated alloantibody production. Introduction of CD4+ TCR-Tg T cells also perturbed the intra-graft accumulation of innate cell populations. Thus, transferred CD4+ TCR-Tg T cells alter many aspects of endogenous alloimmunity, suggesting that caution should be used when interpreting experiments utilizing these adoptively-transferred cells, as the overall nature of allograft rejection may be altered. These results may also have implications for adoptive CD4+ T cell immunotherapy in tumor and infectious clinical settings as cell infusion may have additional effects on natural immune responses. PMID:27063351

  9. Adoptive transfer of tracer alloreactive CD4(+) TCR-transgenic T cells alters the endogenous immune response to an allograft.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle L; Chen, Jianjun; Daniels, Melvin D; McKeague, Matthew G; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-04-11

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) T cells are often used as tracer populations of antigen-specific responses to extrapolate findings to endogenous T cells. The extent to which TCR-Tg T cells behave purely as tracer cells or modify the endogenous immune response is not clear. To test the impact of TCR-Tg T cell transfer on endogenous alloimmunity, recipient mice were seeded with CD4(+) or CD8(+) TCR-Tg or polyclonal T cells at the time of cardiac allograft transplantation. Only CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells accelerated rejection, and unexpectedly led to a dose-dependent decrease in both transferred and endogenous T cells infiltrating the graft. In contrast, recipients of CD4(+) TCR-Tg cell exhibited enhanced endogenous donor-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation in the spleen and accelerated alloantibody production. Introduction of CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells also perturbed the intra-graft accumulation of innate cell populations. Thus, transferred CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells alter many aspects of endogenous alloimmunity, suggesting that caution should be used when interpreting experiments utilizing these adoptively-transferred cells, as the overall nature of allograft rejection may be altered. These results may also have implications for adoptive CD4(+) T cell immunotherapy in tumor and infectious clinical settings as cell infusion may have additional effects on natural immune responses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. New differentiation pathway for double-negative regulatory T cells that regulates the magnitude of immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong; Yang, Wei; Degauque, Nicolas; Tian, Yan; Mikita, Allison

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that in peripheral lymphoid tissues of normal mice and healthy humans, 1% to 5% of αβ T-cell receptor–positive (TCR+) T cells are CD4−CD8− (double-negative [DN]) T cells, capable of down-regulating immune responses. However, the origin and developmental pathway of DN T cells is still not clear. In this study, by monitoring CD4 expression during T-cell proliferation and differentiation, we identified a new differentiation pathway for the conversion of CD4+ T cells to DN regulatory T cells. We showed that the converted DN T cells retained a stable phenotype after restimulation and that furthermore, the disappearance of cell-surface CD4 molecules on converted DN T cells was a result of CD4 gene silencing. The converted DN T cells were resistant to activation-induced cell death (AICD) and expressed a unique set of cell-surface markers and gene profiles. These cells were highly potent in suppressing alloimmune responses both in vitro and in vivo in an antigen-specific manner. Perforin was highly expressed by the converted DN regulatory T cells and played a role in DN T-cell–mediated suppression. Our findings thus identify a new differentiation pathway for DN regulatory T cells and uncover a new intrinsic homeostatic mechanism that regulates the magnitude of immune responses. This pathway provides a novel, cell-based, therapeutic approach for preventing allograft rejection. PMID:17197428

  11. T-cell modulatory properties of CD5 and its role in antitumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Tabbekh, Mouna; Mokrani-Hammani, M’Barka; Bismuth, Georges; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2013-01-01

    The destruction of tumor cells by the immune system is under the control of positive and negative receptors that tightly regulate T-cell effector functions. The T-cell receptor (TCR) inhibitory molecule CD5 critically contributes to the regulation of antitumor immune responses. Indeed, the modulation of CD5 within the tumor microenvironment corresponds to a strategy adopted by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) to optimize their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions. In this review, we provide insights into the immunobiology of CD5 and its role in regulating antitumor CD8 T-cell responses, and suggest the possibility of targeting CD5 to improve the efficacy of current immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. PMID:23483035

  12. The CD8 T-cell response during tolerance induction in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yik Chun; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Bowen, David G; Bertolino, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Both experimental and clinical studies have shown that the liver possesses unique tolerogenic properties. Liver allografts can be spontaneously accepted across complete major histocompatibility mismatch in some animal models. In addition, some liver transplant patients can be successfully withdrawn from immunosuppressive medications, developing ‘operational tolerance'. Multiple mechanisms have been shown to be involved in inducing and maintaining alloimmune tolerance associated with liver transplantation. Here, we focus on CD8 T-cell tolerance in this setting. We first discuss how alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell responses are generated against allografts, before reviewing how the liver parenchyma, donor passenger leucocytes and the host immune system function together to attenuate alloreactive CD8 T-cell responses to promote the long-term survival of liver transplants. PMID:27867515

  13. Triggering of toll-like receptor signaling pathways in T cells contributes to the anti-tumor efficacy of T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed Labib

    2011-06-30

    Traditionally, expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) has been associated with innate immune cells in particular professional antigen presenting cells and natural killer cells. This led to the concept that the adjuvant effects of ligation of TLR in a host occur mainly in innate immune cells. However, this concept has been challenged by recent studies including ours demonstrating that T cells express appreciated levels of different TLRs, which can serve as costimulatory co-receptors during polyclonal and antigen-specific stimulation of T cells. Because T cells express low levels of TLRs as compared to innate immune cells, increasing the expression levels of TLRs in T cells can significantly maximize their responses to the costimulatory effects of TLR ligation. This review article focuses on the potential role of TLR expression in T cells in their responses to vaccination regimen containing TLR agonists and how it can be modulated to optimize anti-tumor immunity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Otud7b facilitates T cell activation and inflammatory responses by regulating Zap70 ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Yichuan; Jin, Jin; Chang, Jae-Hoon; Zou, Qiang; Xie, Xiaoping; Cheng, Xuhong; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-03-07

    Signal transduction from the T cell receptor (TCR) is crucial for T cell-mediated immune responses and, when deregulated, also contributes to the development of autoimmunity. How TCR signaling is regulated is incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism in which the deubiquitinase Otud7b has a crucial role in facilitating TCR signaling. Upon TCR ligation, Otud7b is rapidly recruited to the tyrosine kinase Zap70, a central mediator of TCR-proximal signaling. Otud7b deficiency attenuates the activation of Zap70 and its downstream pathways and impairs T cell activation and differentiation, rendering mice refractory to T cell-mediated autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Otud7b facilitated Zap70 activation by deubiquitinating Zap70, thus preventing the association of Zap70 with the negative-regulatory phosphatases Sts1 and Sts2. These findings establish Otud7b as a positive regulator of TCR-proximal signaling and T cell activation, highlighting the importance of deubiquitination in regulating Zap70 function. © 2016 Sun et al.

  15. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  16. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-08-12

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  17. Continuum Model of T-cell Avidity: Understanding Autoreactive and Regulatory T-Cell Responses in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi-Douraki, Majid; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Khadra, Anmar

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that results from the destruction of insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, leading to abolition of insulin secretion and onset of diabetes. Cytotoxic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, activated by antigen presenting cells (APCs), are both implicated in disease onset and progression. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), on the other hand, play a leading role in regulating immunological tolerance and resistant homeostasis in T1D by supressing effector T cells (Teffs). Recent data indicates that after activation, conventional Teffs transiently produce interleukin IL-2, a cytokine that acts as a growth factor for both Teffs and Tregs. Tregs suppress Teffs through IL-2 deprivation, competition and Teff conversion into inducible Tregs (iTregs). To investigate the interactions of these components during T1D progression, a mathematical model of T-cell dynamics is developed as a predictor of β-cell loss, with the underlying hypothesis that avidity of Teffs and Tregs, i.e., the binding affinity of T-cell receptors to peptide-major histocompatibility complexes on host cells, is continuum. The model is used to infer a set of criteria that determines susceptibility to T1D in high risk (HR) subjects. Our findings show that diabetes onset is guided by the absence of Treg-to-Teff dominance at specific high avidities rather than over the whole range of avidity, and that the lack of overall dominance of Teffs-to-Tregs over time is the underlying cause of the “honeymoon period”, the remission phase observed in some T1D patients. The model also suggests that competition between Teffs and Tregs is more effective than Teff-induction into iTregs in suppressing Teffs, and that a prolonged full width at half maximum of IL-2 release is a necessary condition for curbing disease onset. Finally, the model provides a rationale for observing rapid and slow progressors of T1D based on modest heterogeneity in the kinetic parameters. PMID:26271890

  18. Lack of variant specific CD8+ T-cell response against mutant and pre-existing variants leads to outgrowth of particular clones in acute hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CTL escape mutations have been described during acute hepatitis C in patients who developed chronic disease later on. Our aim was to investigate the mutual relationship between HCV specific CD8+ T cells and evolution of the viral sequence during early acute HCV infection. Results We sequenced multiple clones of NS3 1406 epitope in 4 HLA-A*02 patients with acute hepatitis C genotype 1b infection. Pentamers specific for the variants were used to monitor the corresponding CD8+ T cell response. We observed outgrowth of mutations, which induced only a weak and thus potentially insufficient CD8+ T cell response. In one patient we observed outgrowth of variant epitopes with similarities to a different genotype rather than de novo mutations most probably due to a lack of responsiveness to these likely pre-existing variants. We could show that in acute hepatitis C CTL escape mutations occur much earlier than demonstrated in previous studies. Conclusions The adaption of the virus to a new host is characterized by a high and rapid variability in epitopes under CD8+ T cell immune pressure. This adaption takes place during the very early phase of acute infection and strikingly some sequences were reduced below the limit of detection at some time points but were detected at high frequency again at later time points. Independent of the observed variability, HCV-specific CD8+ T cell responses decline and no adaption to different or new antigens during the course of infection could be detected. PMID:24073713

  19. Hibernation is associated with depression of T-cell independent humoral immune responses in the 13-lined ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Hjalmar R; Henning, Robert H; Kroese, Frans G M; Carey, Hannah V

    2013-03-01

    Mammalian hibernation consists of periods of low metabolism and body temperature (torpor), interspersed by euthermic arousal periods. The function of both the innate and adaptive immune system is suppressed during hibernation. In this study, we analyzed the humoral adaptive immune response to a T-cell independent (TI-2) and a T-cell dependent (TD) antigen. Thirteen-lined ground squirrels were immunized in summer or during hibernation with either a TI-2 or TD antigen on day 0 and day 14. Blood was drawn on day 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Both types of antigens induced a significant rise in antibody titer in summer animals. Much to our surprise, however, only immunization with the TD antigen, and not with the TI-2 antigen induced a humoral response in hibernators. Flow cytometric analysis of CD4 (helper T-lymphocytes), CD8 (cytotoxic T-lymphocytes) and CD45RA (B-lymphocytes) in blood, spleen and lymph nodes ruled out massive apoptosis as explanation of the absent TI humoral response during hibernation. Rather, reduced TI-2 stimulation of B-lymphocytes, possibly due to lowered serum complement during torpor, may explain the reduced antibody production in response to a TI-2 antigen. These results demonstrate that hibernation diminishes the capacity to induce a TI-2 humoral immune response, while the capacity to induce a humoral response to a TD antigen is maintained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of T Cell Responses during Active Varicella-Zoster Virus Reactivation in Human Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Steain, Megan; Sutherland, Jeremy P.; Rodriguez, Michael; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Slobedman, Barry

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is responsible for both varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). During varicella, the virus establishes latency within the sensory ganglia and can reactivate to cause herpes zoster, but the immune responses that occur in ganglia during herpes zoster have not previously been defined. We examined ganglia obtained from individuals who, at the time of death, had active herpes zoster. Ganglia innervating the site of the cutaneous herpes zoster rash showed evidence of necrosis, secondary to vasculitis, or localized hemorrhage. Despite this, there was limited evidence of VZV antigen expression, although a large inflammatory infiltrate was observed. Characterization of the infiltrating T cells showed a large number of infiltrating CD4+ T cells and cytolytic CD8+ T cells. Many of the infiltrating T cells were closely associated with neurons within the reactivated ganglia, yet there was little evidence of T cell-induced neuronal apoptosis. Notably, an upregulation in the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II molecules was observed on satellite glial cells, implying these cells play an active role in directing the immune response during herpes zoster. This is the first detailed characterization of the interaction between T cells and neuronal cells within ganglia obtained from patients suffering herpes zoster at the time of death and provides evidence that CD4+ and cytolytic CD8+ T cell responses play an important role in controlling VZV replication in ganglia during active herpes zoster. IMPORTANCE VZV is responsible for both varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). During varicella, the virus establishes a life-long dormant infection within the sensory ganglia and can reawaken to cause herpes zoster, but the immune responses that occur in ganglia during herpes zoster have not previously been defined. We examined ganglia obtained from individuals who, at the time of death, had

  1. Re-adapting T cells for cancer therapy: from mouse models to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Schmitt, Thomas M; Chapuis, Aude G; Hingorani, Sunil R; Greenberg, Philip D

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy involves the isolation, expansion, and reinfusion of T lymphocytes with a defined specificity and function as a means to eradicate cancer. Our research has focused on specifying the requirements for tumor eradication with antigen-specific T cells and T cells transduced to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) in mouse models and then translating these strategies to clinical trials. Our design of T-cell-based therapy for cancer has reflected efforts to identify the obstacles that limit sustained effector T-cell activity in mice and humans, design approaches to enhance T-cell persistence, develop methods to increase TCR affinity/T-cell functional avidity, and pursue strategies to overcome tolerance and immunosuppression. With the advent of genetic engineering, a highly functional population of T cells can now be rapidly generated and tailored for the targeted malignancy. Preclinical studies in faithful and informative mouse models, in concert with knowledge gained from analyses of successes and limitations in clinical trials, are shaping how we continue to develop, refine, and broaden the applicability of this approach for cancer therapy.

  2. Re-adapting T cells for cancer therapy: from mouse models to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Schmitt, Thomas M.; Chapuis, Aude G.; Hingorani, Sunil R.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Adoptive T-cell therapy involves the isolation, expansion and reinfusion of T lymphocytes with a defined specificity and function as a means to eradicate cancer. Our research has focused on specifying the requirements for tumor eradication with antigen-specific T cells and T cells transduced to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) in mouse models and then translating these strategies to clinical trials. Our design of T-cell-based therapy for cancer has reflected efforts to identify the obstacles that limit sustained effector T-cell activity in mice and humans, design approaches to enhance T-cell persistence, develop methods to increase TCR affinity/T-cell functional avidity, and pursue strategies to overcome tolerance and immunosuppression. With the advent of genetic engineering, a highly functional population of T cells can now be rapidly generated and tailored for the targeted malignancy. Preclinical studies in faithful and informative mouse models, in concert with knowledge gained from analyses of successes and limitations in clinical trials, are shaping how we continue to develop, refine, and broaden the applicability of this approach for cancer therapy. PMID:24329795

  3. The tortoise and the hare: slowly evolving T-cell responses take hastily evolving KIR

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits

    2010-01-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) locus comprises a variable and rapidly evolving set of genes encoding multiple inhibitory and activating receptors. The activating receptors recently evolved from the inhibitory receptors and both bind HLA class I and probably also class I-like structures induced by viral infection. Although generally considered natural killer (NK) cell receptors, KIR are also expressed by a large fraction of effector memory T cells, which slowly accumulate during human life. These effector memory cells are functionally similar to NK cells, as they are immediate effector cells that are cytotoxic and produce IFN-γ. However, different rules apply to NK and T cells with respect to KIR expression and function. For example, KIR tend to modulate signals driven by the T-cell receptor (TCR) rather than to act independently, and use different signal transduction pathways to modulate only a subset of effector functions. The most important difference may lie in the rules governing tolerance: while NK cells with activating KIR binding self-HLA are hyporesponsive, the same is unlikely to apply to T cells. We argue that the expression of activating KIR on virus-specific T cells carrying TCR that weakly cross-react with autoantigens can unleash the autoreactive potential of these cells. This may be the case in rheumatoid arthritis, where cytomegalovirus-specific KIR2DS2+ T cells might cause vasculitis. Thus, the rapid evolution of activating KIR may have allowed for efficient NK-cell control of viruses, but may also have increased the risk that slowly evolving T-cell responses to persistent pathogens derail into autoimmunity. PMID:20722764

  4. Discriminating protective from non-protective Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Katherine L.; Pewe, Lecia L.; Kurup, Samarchith P.; Harty, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research, malaria remains a global health crisis. Current subunit vaccine approaches do not provide efficient long-term, sterilizing immunity against Plasmodium infections in humans. Conversely, whole parasite vaccinations with their larger array of target antigens have conferred long lasting sterilizing protection to humans. Similar studies in rodent models of malaria reveal that CD8+ T cells play a critical role in liver-stage immunity after whole parasite vaccination. However, it is unknown whether all CD8+ T cell specificities elicited by whole parasite vaccination contribute to protection, an issue of great relevance for enhanced subunit vaccination. Here we show that robust CD8+ T cell responses of similar phenotype are mounted following prime-boost immunization against Plasmodium berghei GAP5041-48, S20318-325, TRAP130-138 or CSP252-260 protein-derived epitopes in mice, but only CSP252-260- and TRAP130-138-specific CD8+ T cells provide sterilizing immunity and reduce liver parasite burden following sporozoite challenge. Further, CD8+ T cells specific to sporozoite surface-expressed CSP and TRAP proteins, but not the intracellular GAP50 and S20 proteins, are efficiently recognized by sporozoite-infected hepatocytes in vitro. These results suggest that 1) protection-relevant antigenic targets, regardless of their immunogenic potential, must be efficiently presented by infected hepatocytes for CD8+ T cells to eliminate liver-stage Plasmodium infection and 2) proteins expressed on the surface of sporozoites may be good target antigens for protective CD8+ T cells. PMID:27084099

  5. Aberrantly Expressed Long Non-Coding RNAs In CD8(+) T Cells Response to Active Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yurong; Gao, Kunshan; Tao, Enxue; Li, Ruifang; Yi, Zhengjun

    2017-04-19

    Dysregulated expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) has been demonstrated as being implicated in a variety of human diseases. In the study we aimed to determine lncRNA profile in CD8(+) T cells response to active tuberculosis (TB). We examined the lncRNA expression by microarray in circulating CD8(+) T cells isolated from patients with active TB and healthy controls. Change predictions to analysis was used to address functional roles of the deregulated mRNAs. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to validate the microarray result. In total, 328 lncRNAs and 356 mRNAs were differentially expressed in TB CD8(+) T cells. Upregulated mRNAs were mainly enriched in cAMP signaling pathway, calcium signaling pathway, and TGF-beta signaling pathway, while downregulated mRNAs were enriched in antigen processing and presentation and natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity in TB CD8(+) T cells. Interestingly, we found that heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) was decreased in active TB CD8(+) T cells, while its nearby lincRNA XLOC_014219 was upregulated. Subsequent RT-qPCR results confirmed the changes. This is the first research addressing lncRNA expression profiles in active TB CD8(+) T cells. The aberrantly expressed lncRNAs observed in the study may provide clues to the dysfunction of CD8(+) T cells and so to the pathophysiological properties of active TB. Further studies should focus on the function of lncRNAs involved in active TB. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-10, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Synovial fluid antigen-presenting cells unmask peripheral blood T cell responses to bacterial antigens in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Life, P F; Viner, N J; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1990-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that synovial fluid (SF) mononuclear cells (MC) from patients with both reactive arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides proliferate in vitro in response to bacteria clinically associated with the triggering of reactive arthritis. In all cases, such SFMC responses are greater than the corresponding peripheral blood (PB) MC responses, often markedly so, and the mechanism for this is unclear. We have investigated this phenomenon by comparing the relative abilities of irradiated non-T cells derived from PB and SF to support autologous T cell responses to ReA-associated bacteria. Seven patients whose SFMC had been shown previously to respond to bacteria were studied. We demonstrate antigen-specific responses of PB T cells to bacteria in the presence of SF non-T cells which are in marked contrast to the minimal responses of either unfractionated PBMC or PB T cells reconstituted with PB non-T cells. We also show that PB, but not SF T cells respond strongly to autologous SF non-T cells in the absence of antigen or mitogen. These findings demonstrate that SF antigen-presenting cells (APC) are potent activators of PB T cells. We conclude that the contrasting responses of SFMC and PBMC to bacterial antigens may be accounted for at least in part by an enhanced ability of SF APC to support T cell proliferative responses. PMID:2311298

  7. A Threshold Level of Intratumor CD8+ T-cell PD1 Expression Dictates Therapeutic Response to Anti-PD1.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Young, Arabella; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Enot, David; Zitvogel, Laurence; Smyth, Mark J

    2015-09-15

    Despite successes, thus far, a significant proportion of the patients treated with anti-PD1 antibodies have failed to respond. We use mouse tumor models of anti-PD1 sensitivity and resistance and flow cytometry to assess tumor-infiltrating immune cells immediately after therapy. We demonstrate that the expression levels of T-cell PD1 (PD1(lo)), myeloid, and T-cell PDL1 (PDL1(hi)) in the tumor microenvironment inversely correlate and dictate the efficacy of anti-PD1 mAb and function of intratumor CD8(+) T cells. In sensitive tumors, we reveal a threshold for PD1 downregulation on tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells below which the release of adaptive immune resistance is achieved. In contrast, PD1(hi) T cells in resistant tumors fail to be rescued by anti-PD1 therapy and remain dysfunctional unless intratumor PDL1(lo) immune cells are targeted. Intratumor Tregs are partly responsible for the development of anti-PD1-resistant tumors and PD1(hi) CD8(+) T cells. Our analyses provide a framework to interrogate intratumor CD8(+) T-cell PD1 and immune PDL1 levels and response in human cancer.

  8. Gene Deletions in Mycobacterium bovis BCG Stimulate Increased CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Panas, Michael W.; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; White, KeriAnn; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Shields, Shana T.; Moy, Brian T.; Lee, Sunhee; Schmitz, Joern E.; Jacobs, William R.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Haynes, Barton F.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteria, the etiological agents of tuberculosis and leprosy, have coevolved with mammals for millions of years and have numerous ways of suppressing their host's immune response. It has been suggested that mycobacteria may contain genes that reduce the host's ability to elicit CD8+ T cell responses. We screened 3,290 mutant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) strains to identify genes that decrease major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation of mycobacterium-encoded epitope peptides. Through our analysis, we identified 16 mutant BCG strains that generated increased transgene product-specific CD8+ T cell responses. The genes disrupted in these mutant strains had disparate predicted functions. Reconstruction of strains via targeted deletion of genes identified in the screen recapitulated the enhanced immunogenicity phenotype of the original mutant strains. When we introduced the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag gene into several of these novel BCG strains, we observed enhanced SIV Gag-specific CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. This study demonstrates that mycobacteria carry numerous genes that act to dampen CD8+ T cell responses and suggests that genetic modification of these genes may generate a novel group of recombinant BCG strains capable of serving as more effective and immunogenic vaccine vectors. PMID:25287928

  9. Impaired in vitro T-cell responses in patients with community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bay, M L; Mahuad, R D; Urízar, L A; Morini, J C; Bottassol, O A

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the status of the cellular immune response of patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP), 8 CAP cases were studied for their in vitro T-cell responses to concanavalin A (Con A), tuberculin, and candidin, as well as levels of major T-cell populations in peripheral blood. Assessment on admission revealed that CAP patients had significantly decreased responses to both antigen and mitogen driven lymphocyte proliferation when compared to age and sex matched controls. Studies performed upon 1 week of antibiotic treatment made evident, in turn, that clinical improvement was accompanied by a reestablishment of the in vitro responses to tuberculin and candidin, whereas the lymphoproliferation induced by Con A remained decreased as in its first evaluation. Data from admission and day 7 of treatment showed no significant differences as to the levels of peripheral T-cell subsets when compared to those of healthy controls. Our results indicate that CAP coincides with reduced in vitro T-cell responses to antigen and mitogen stimulation.

  10. Defective response of CD4+ T cells to retinoic acid and TGFβ in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CD25+ FOXP3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are induced by transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and further expanded by retinoic acid (RA). We have previously shown that this process was defective in T cells from lupus-prone mice expressing the novel isoform of the Pbx1 gene, Pbx1-d. This study tested the hypothesis that CD4+ T cells from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients exhibited similar defects in Treg induction in response to TGFβ and RA, and that PBX1-d expression is associated with this defect. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from 142 SLE patients and 83 healthy controls (HCs). The frequency of total, memory and naïve CD4+ T cells was measured by flow cytometry on fresh cells. PBX1 isoform expression in purified CD4+ T cells was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PBMCs were stimulated for three days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 in the presence or absence of TGFβ and RA. The expression of CD25 and FOXP3 on CD4+ T cells was then determined by flow cytometry. In vitro suppression assays were performed with sorted CD25+ and CD25- FOXP3+ T cells. CD4+ T cell subsets or their expansion were compared between patients and HCs with two-tailed Mann-Whitney tests and correlations between the frequencies of two subsets were tested with Spearman tests. Results The percentage of CD25- FOXP3+ CD4+ (CD25- Tregs) T cells was greater in SLE patients than in HCs, but these cells, contrary to their matched CD25+ counterparts, did not show a suppressive activity. RA-expansion of TGFβ-induced CD25+ Tregs was significantly lower in SLE patients than in HCs, although SLE Tregs expanded significantly more than HCs in response to either RA or TGFβ alone. Defective responses were also observed for the SLE CD25- Tregs and CD25+ FOXP3- activated CD4+ T cells as compared to controls. PBX1-d expression did not affect Treg induction, but it significantly reduced the expansion of CD25- Tregs

  11. CD4 T Cells Mediate Both Positive and Negative Regulation of the Immune Response to HIV Infection: Complex Role of T Follicular Helper Cells and Regulatory T Cells in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Xu, Yin; Zaunders, John

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection results in chronic activation of cells in lymphoid tissue, including T cells, B-cells, and myeloid lineage cells. The resulting characteristic hyperplasia is an amalgam of proliferating host immune cells in the adaptive response, increased concentrations of innate response mediators due to viral and bacterial products, and homeostatic responses to inflammation. While it is generally thought that CD4 T cells are greatly depleted, in fact, two types of CD4 T cells appear to be increased, namely, regulatory T cells (Tregs) and T follicular helper cells (Tfh). These cells have opposing roles, but may both be important in the pathogenic process. Whether Tregs are failing in their role to limit lymphocyte activation is unclear, but there is no doubt now that Tfh are associated with B-cell hyperplasia and increased germinal center activity. Antiretroviral therapy may reduce the lymphocyte activation, but not completely, and therefore, there is a need for interventions that selectively enhance normal CD4 function without exacerbating Tfh, B-cell, or Treg dysfunction. PMID:25610441

  12. The HIV-1 antisense protein (ASP) induces CD8 T cell responses during chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Bet, Anne; Maze, Emmanuel Atangana; Bansal, Anju; Sterrett, Sarah; Gross, Antoine; Graff-Dubois, Stéphanie; Samri, Assia; Guihot, Amélie; Katlama, Christine; Theodorou, Ioannis; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Moris, Arnaud; Goepfert, Paul A; Cardinaud, Sylvain

    2015-02-10

    CD8+ T cells recognize HIV-1 epitopes translated from a gene's primary reading frame (F1) and any one of its five alternative reading frames (ARFs) in the forward (F2, F3) or reverse (R1-3) directions. The 3' end of HIV-1's proviral coding strand contains a conserved sequence that is directly overlapping but antiparallel to the env gene (ARF R2) and encodes for a putative antisense HIV-1 protein called ASP. ASP expression has been demonstrated in vitro using HIV-transfected cell lines or infected cells. Although antibodies to ASP were previously detected in patient sera, T cell recognition of ASP-derived epitopes has not been evaluated. We therefore investigated the ex vivo and in vitro induction of ASP-specific T cell responses as a measure of immune recognition and protein expression during HIV-1 infection. A panel of overlapping peptides was initially designed from the full-length ASP sequence to perform a global assessment of T cell responses. Recognition of ASP-derived antigens was evaluated in an IFN-γELISpot assay using PBMCs from HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative individuals. Eight of 25 patients had positive responses to ASP antigens and none of the seronegative donors responded. As a complimentary approach, a second set of antigens was designed using HLA-I binding motifs and affinities. Two ASP-derived peptides with high predicted binding affinities for HLA-A*02 (ASP-YL9) and HLA-B*07 (ASP-TL10) were tested using PBMCs from HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative individuals who expressed the matching HLA-I-restricting allele. We found that HLA-I-restricted ASP peptides were only recognized by CD8+ T cells from patients with the relevant HLA-I and did not induce responses in any of the seronegative donors or patients who do not express the restrictive HLA alleles. Further, ASP-YL9-specific CD8+ T cells had functional profiles that were similar to a previously described HLA-A*02-restricted epitope (Gag-SL9). Specific recognition of ASP-YL9 by CD8+ T cells

  13. Adaptive immune cells temper initial innate responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Dong; Zhao, Jie; Auh, Sogyong; Yang, Xuanming; Du, Peishuang; Tang, Hong; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2007-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved microbial structures called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Signaling from TLRs leads to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules for better priming of T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells. Lymphocyte-deficient hosts often die of acute infection, presumably owing to their lack of an adaptive immune response to effectively clear pathogens. However, we show here that an unleashed innate immune response due to the absence of residential T cells can also be a direct cause of death. Viral infection or administration of poly(I:C), a ligand for TLR3, led to cytokine storm in T-cell- or lymphocyte-deficient mice in a fashion dependent on NK cells and tumor necrosis factor. We have further shown, through the depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in wild-type mice and the transfer of T lymphocytes into Rag-1-deficient mice, respectively, that T cells are both necessary and sufficient to temper the early innate response. In addition to the effects of natural regulatory T cells, close contact of resting CD4+CD25-Foxp3- or CD8+ T cells with innate cells could also suppress the cytokine surge by various innate cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Therefore, adaptive immune cells have an unexpected role in tempering initial innate responses.

  14. Adaptive immune cells temper initial innate responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Dong; Zhao, Jie; Auh, Sogyong; Yang, Xuanming; Du, Peishuang; Tang, Hong; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved microbial structures called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Signaling from TLRs leads to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules for better priming of T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells1–4. Lymphocytedeficient hosts often die of acute infection, presumably owing to their lack of an adaptive immune response to effectively clear pathogens. However, we show here that an unleashed innate immune response due to the absence of residential T cells can also be a direct cause of death. Viral infection or administration of poly(I:C), a ligand for TLR3, led to cytokine storm in T-cell- or lymphocyte-deficient mice in a fashion dependent on NK cells and tumor necrosis factor. We have further shown, through the depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in wild-type mice and the transfer of T lymphocytes into Rag-1–deficient mice, respectively, that T cells are both necessary and sufficient to temper the early innate response. In addition to the effects of natural regulatory T cells, close contact of resting CD4+CD25−Foxp3− or CD8+ T cells with innate cells could also suppress the cytokine surge by various innate cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Therefore, adaptive immune cells have an unexpected role in tempering initial innate responses. PMID:17891146

  15. Platelet-derived growth factor is a potent biologic response modifier of T cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Freshly isolated lymph node (LN) cells cultured in serum-containing medium were restricted to produce primarily interleukin 2 (IL-2) subsequent to T cell activation. Only minimal amounts of IL-4, IL-5, or interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) were produced under these conditions. Similar populations of LN cells cultured in serum-free medium were able to produce a variety of lymphokines after T cell activation, with the relative quantities of each species being dependent upon the lymphoid organ source of the lymphocytes. A similar relationship in the patterns of lymphokines produced by activated T cell hybridomas maintained under serum-free conditions was also observed, whereas activation in serum- supplemented media resulted in a predominant restriction to the secretion of IL-2. Additional studies determined that the entity in serum responsible for restricting T cell function in vitro was platelet- derived growth factor (PDGF). The PDGF-BB isoform was established to be the most active in the regulation of T cell function, enhancing IL-2 while depressing the production of IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma at concentrations below 1 ng/ml. PDGF-AB was also found to be quite active, however, this isoform of PDGF was incapable of influencing IFN- gamma production at the concentrations tested. PDGF-AA was very weakly active. It therefore appears that PDGF, acting primarily through a beta receptor subunit (either alpha/beta- or beta/beta-type receptors) is able to influence profoundly the behavior of T cells, with some of its modulatory effects exhibiting isoform specificity. This is reflected by an enhancement in the production of IL-2, while simultaneously depressing the secretion of IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma (PDGF-BB only) after T cell activation. Kinetic studies, where cell supernatants were analyzed both 24 and 48 h after T cell activation, suggested that "desensitization" to PDGF influences can occur naturally in vitro. Those species of lymphokines that were inhibited by PDGF over

  16. A Numerically Subdominant CD8 T Cell Response to Matrix Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Controls Infection with Limited Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Haddad, Elias K.; Marceau, Joshua; Morabito, Kaitlyn M.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    CD8 T cells are involved in pathogen clearance and infection-induced pathology in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Studying bulk responses masks the contribution of individual CD8 T cell subsets to protective immunity and immunopathology. In particular, the roles of subdominant responses that are potentially beneficial to the host are rarely appreciated when the focus is on magnitude instead of quality of response. Here, by evaluating CD8 T cell responses in CB6F1 hybrid mice, in which multiple epitopes are recognized, we found that a numerically subdominant CD8 T cell response against DbM187 epitope of the virus matrix protein expressed high avidity TCR and enhanced signaling pathways associated with CD8 T cell effector functions. Each DbM187 T effector cell lysed more infected targets on a per cell basis than the numerically dominant KdM282 T cells, and controlled virus replication more efficiently with less pulmonary inflammation and illness than the previously well-characterized KdM282 T cell response. Our data suggest that the clinical outcome of viral infections is determined by the integrated functional properties of a variety of responding CD8 T cells, and that the highest magnitude response may not necessarily be the best in terms of benefit to the host. Understanding how to induce highly efficient and functional T cells would inform strategies for designing vaccines intended to provide T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:26943673

  17. Visualizing Chemokine-Dependent T Cell Activation and Migration in Response to Central Nervous System Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Monica J.; Wilson, Emma H.

    2014-01-01

    In response to central nervous system (CNS) injury and infection, astrocytes, neurons, and CNS vasculature express several chemokines, including CCL21. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), western blot, and immunohistochemical methods can quantify mRNA and protein expression. However, these methods do not quantify chemokine bioavailability and bioactivity, variables modified by many environ mental factors including composition of extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we illustrate how two-photon microscopy and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE or CFDA SE) labeling of T cells coupled with flow cytometry can be used as tools to assess chemokine-mediated regulation of T cell proliferation, activation, and migration. PMID:23625499

  18. Characterization of Human CD8 T Cell Responses in Dengue Virus-Infected Patients from India

    PubMed Central

    Chandele, Anmol; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Gunisetty, Sivaram; Singla, Mohit; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Akondy, Rama S.; Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Nayak, Kaustuv; Reddy, Elluri Seetharami; Kalam, Haroon; Kumar, Dhiraj; Verma, Anil; Panda, HareKrushna; Wang, Siyu; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, Sushil; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidemiological studies suggest that India has the largest number of dengue virus infection cases worldwide. However, there is minimal information about the immunological responses in these patients. CD8 T cells are important in dengue, because they have been implicated in both protection and immunopathology. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of HLA-DR+ CD38+ and HLA-DR− CD38+ effector CD8 T cell subsets in dengue patients from India and Thailand. Both CD8 T cell subsets expanded and expressed markers indicative of antigen-driven proliferation, tissue homing, and cytotoxic effector functions, with the HLA-DR+ CD38+ subset being the most striking in these effector qualities. The breadth of the dengue-specific CD8 T cell response was diverse, with NS3-specific cells being the most dominant. Interestingly, only a small fraction of these activated effector CD8 T cells produced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) when stimulated with dengue virus peptide pools. Transcriptomics revealed downregulation of key molecules involved in T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Consistent with this, the majority of these CD8 T cells remained IFN-γ unresponsive even after TCR-dependent polyclonal stimulation (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28) but produced IFN-γ by TCR-independent polyclonal stimulation (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA] plus ionomycin). Thus, the vast majority of these proliferating, highly differentiated effector CD8 T cells probably acquire TCR refractoriness at the time the patient is experiencing febrile illness that leads to IFN-γ unresponsiveness. Our studies open novel avenues for understanding the mechanisms that fine-tune the balance between CD8 T cell-mediated protective versus pathological effects in dengue. IMPORTANCE Dengue is becoming a global public health concern. Although CD8 T cells have been implicated both in protection and in the cytokine-mediated immunopathology of dengue, how the balance is maintained between these opposing functions remains

  19. RIG-I Signaling Is Critical for Efficient Polyfunctional T Cell Responses during Influenza Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Suryawanshi, Amol; Tundup, Smanla; Perez, Jasmine T; Schmolke, Mirco; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Manicassamy, Balaji

    2016-07-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) is an innate RNA sensor that recognizes the influenza A virus (IAV) RNA genome and activates antiviral host responses. Here, we demonstrate that RIG-I signaling plays a crucial role in restricting IAV tropism and regulating host immune responses. Mice deficient in the RIG-I-MAVS pathway show defects in migratory dendritic cell (DC) activation, viral antigen presentation, and priming of CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses during IAV infection. These defects result in decreased frequency of polyfunctional effector T cells and lowered protection against heterologous IAV challenge. In addition, our data show that RIG-I activation is essential for protecting epithelial cells and hematopoietic cells from IAV infection. These diverse effects of RIG-I signaling are likely imparted by the actions of type I interferon (IFN), as addition of exogenous type I IFN is sufficient to overcome the defects in antigen presentation by RIG-I deficient BMDC. Moreover, the in vivo T cell defects in RIG-I deficient mice can be overcome by the activation of MDA5 -MAVS via poly I:C treatment. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that RIG-I signaling through MAVS is critical for determining the quality of polyfunctional T cell responses against IAV and for providing protection against subsequent infection from heterologous or novel pandemic IAV strains.

  20. T-cell invigoration to tumour burden ratio associated with anti-PD-1 response

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alexander C.; Postow, Michael A.; Orlowski, Robert J.; Mick, Rosemarie; Bengsch, Bertram; Manne, Sasikanth; Xu, Wei; Harmon, Shannon; Giles, Josephine R.; Wenz, Brandon; Adamow, Matthew; Kuk, Deborah; Panageas, Katherine S.; Carrera, Cristina; Wong, Phillip; Quagliarello, Felix; Wubbenhorst, Bradley; D’Andrea, Kurt; Pauken, Kristen E.; Herati, Ramin S.; Staupe, Ryan P.; Schenkel, Jason M.; McGettigan, Suzanne; Kothari, Shawn; George, Sangeeth M.; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Xu, Xiaowei; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Wherry, E. John

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success of monotherapies based on blockade of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) in human melanoma, most patients do not experience durable clinical benefit. Pre-existing T-cell infiltration and/or the presence of PD-L1 in tumours may be used as indicators of clinical response; however, blood-based profiling to understand the mechanisms of PD-1 blockade has not been widely explored. Here we use immune profiling of peripheral blood from patients with stage IV melanoma before and after treatment with the PD-1-targeting antibody pembrolizumab and identify pharmacodynamic changes in circulating exhausted-phenotype CD8 T cells (Tex cells). Most of the patients demonstrated an immunological response to pembrolizumab. Clinical failure in many patients was not solely due to an inability to induce immune reinvigoration, but rather resulted from an imbalance between T-cell reinvigoration and tumour burden. The magnitude of reinvigoration of circulating Tex cells determined in relation to pretreatment tumour burden correlated with clinical response. By focused profiling of a mechanistically relevant circulating T-cell subpopulation calibrated to pretreatment disease burden, we identify a clinically accessible potential on-treatment predictor of response to PD-1 blockade. PMID:28397821

  1. RIG-I Signaling Is Critical for Efficient Polyfunctional T Cell Responses during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Suryawanshi, Amol; Tundup, Smanla; Perez, Jasmine T.; Schmolke, Mirco; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Manicassamy, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) is an innate RNA sensor that recognizes the influenza A virus (IAV) RNA genome and activates antiviral host responses. Here, we demonstrate that RIG-I signaling plays a crucial role in restricting IAV tropism and regulating host immune responses. Mice deficient in the RIG-I-MAVS pathway show defects in migratory dendritic cell (DC) activation, viral antigen presentation, and priming of CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses during IAV infection. These defects result in decreased frequency of polyfunctional effector T cells and lowered protection against heterologous IAV challenge. In addition, our data show that RIG-I activation is essential for protecting epithelial cells and hematopoietic cells from IAV infection. These diverse effects of RIG-I signaling are likely imparted by the actions of type I interferon (IFN), as addition of exogenous type I IFN is sufficient to overcome the defects in antigen presentation by RIG-I deficient BMDC. Moreover, the in vivo T cell defects in RIG-I deficient mice can be overcome by the activation of MDA5 –MAVS via poly I:C treatment. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that RIG-I signaling through MAVS is critical for determining the quality of polyfunctional T cell responses against IAV and for providing protection against subsequent infection from heterologous or novel pandemic IAV strains. PMID:27438481

  2. miR-146a controls the resolution of T cell responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Boldin, Mark P.; Yu, Yang; Liu, Claret Siyuan; Ea, Chee-Kwee; Ramakrishnan, Parameswaran; Taganov, Konstantin D.; Zhao, Jimmy L.

    2012-01-01

    T cell responses in mammals must be tightly regulated to both provide effective immune protection and avoid inflammation-induced pathology. NF-κB activation is a key signaling event induced by T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. Dysregulation of NF-κB is associated with T cell–mediated inflammatory diseases and malignancies, highlighting the importance of negative feedback control of TCR-induced NF-κB activity. In this study we show that in mice, T cells lacking miR-146a are hyperactive in both acute antigenic responses and chronic inflammatory autoimmune responses. TCR-driven NF-κB activation up-regulates the expression of miR-146a, which in turn down-regulates NF-κB activity, at least partly through repressing the NF-κB signaling transducers TRAF6 and IRAK1. Thus, our results identify miR-146a as an important new member of the negative feedback loop that controls TCR signaling to NF-κB. Our findings also add microRNA to the list of regulators that control the resolution of T cell responses. PMID:22891274

  3. Polyfunctional CD4 T cells in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB and HIV. However, the assessment of this response in bovine infections was not fe...

  4. T cell responses in hepatitis C virus infection: historical overview and goals for future research.

    PubMed

    Holz, Lauren; Rehermann, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific T cells are key factors in the outcome of acute HCV infection and in protective immunity. This review recapitulates the steps that immunologists have taken in the past 25years to dissect the role of T cell responses in HCV infection. It describes technical as well as disease-specific challenges that were caused by the inapparent onset of acute HCV infection, the difficulty to identify subjects who spontaneously clear HCV infection, the low frequency of HCV-specific T cells in the blood of chronically infected patients, and the lack of small animal models with intact immune systems to study virus-host interaction. The review provides a historical perspective on techniques and key findings, and identifies areas for future research.

  5. Armc5 deletion causes developmental defects and compromises T-cell immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Lao, Linjiang; Mao, Jianning; Jin, Wei; Luo, Hongyu; Charpentier, Tania; Qi, Shijie; Peng, Junzheng; Hu, Bing; Marcinkiewicz, Mieczyslaw Martin; Lamarre, Alain; Wu, Jiangping

    2017-01-01

    Armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5) is a cytosolic protein with no enzymatic activities. Little is known about its function and mechanisms of action, except that gene mutations are associated with risks of primary macronodular adrenal gland hyperplasia. Here we map Armc5 expression by in situ hybridization, and generate Armc5 knockout mice, which are small in body size. Armc5 knockout mice have compromised T-cell proliferation and differentiation into Th1 and Th17 cells, increased T-cell apoptosis, reduced severity of experimental autoimmune encephalitis, and defective immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. These mice also develop adrenal gland hyperplasia in old age. Yeast 2-hybrid assays identify 16 ARMC5-binding partners. Together these data indicate that ARMC5 is crucial in fetal development, T-cell function and adrenal gland growth homeostasis, and that the functions of ARMC5 probably depend on interaction with multiple signalling pathways. PMID:28169274

  6. Regulatory T-cell-mediated attenuation of T-cell responses to the NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX vaccine in patients with advanced malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nicholaou, Theo; Ebert, Lisa M; Davis, Ian D; McArthur, Grant A; Jackson, Heather; Dimopoulos, Nektaria; Tan, Bee; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Miloradovic, Lena; Hopkins, Wendie; Pan, Linda; Venhaus, Ralph; Hoffman, Eric W; Chen, Weisan; Cebon, Jonathan

    2009-03-15

    NY-ESO-1 is a highly immunogenic antigen expressed in a variety of malignancies, making it an excellent target for cancer vaccination. We recently developed a vaccine consisting of full-length recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein formulated with ISCOMATRIX adjuvant, which generated strong humoral and T-cell-mediated immune responses and seemed to reduce the risk of disease relapse in patients with fully resected melanoma. This study examines the clinical and immunologic efficacy of the same vaccine in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, circulating NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and proportions of regulatory T cells (Treg) were assessed in patients. In contrast to patients with minimal residual disease, advanced melanoma patients showed no clinical responses to vaccination. Although strong antibody responses were mounted, the generation of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses was significantly impaired. The proportion of patients with circulating NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells was also reduced, and although many patients had CD8(+) T cells specific to a broad range of NY-ESO-1 epitopes, the majority of these responses were preexisting. Tregs were enumerated in the blood by flow cytometric detection of cells with a CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) and CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) phenotype. Patients with advanced melanoma had a significantly higher proportion of circulating Treg compared with those with minimal residual disease. Our results point to a tumor-induced systemic immune suppression, showing a clear association between the stage of melanoma progression, the number of Treg in the blood, and the clinical and immunologic efficacy of the NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX cancer vaccine.

  7. Mathematical modeling on T-cell mediated adaptive immunity in primary dengue infections.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Sourav Kumar; Dong, Yueping; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2017-09-21

    At present, dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease in the world, and the global dengue incidence is increasing day by day due to climate changing. Here, we present a mathematical model of dengue viruses (DENVs) dynamics in micro-environment (cellular level) consisting of healthy cells, infected cells, virus particles and T-cell mediated adaptive immunity. We have considered the explicit role of cytokines and antibody in our model. We find that the virus load goes down to zero within 6 days as it is common for DENV infection. From our analysis, we have identified the important model parameters and done the numerical simulation with respect to such important parameters. We have shown that the cytokine mediated virus clearance plays a very important role in dengue dynamics. It can change the dynamical behavior of the system and causes essential extinction of the virus. Finally, we have incorporated the antiviral treatment for dengue in our model and shown that the basic reproduction number is directly proportional to the antiviral treatment effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Similar Responses of Intestinal T Cells From Untreated Children and Adults With Celiac Disease to Deamidated Gluten Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Ráki, Melinda; Dahal-Koirala, Shiva; Yu, Hao; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R; Gyimesi, Judit; Castillejo, Gemma; Jahnsen, Jørgen; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-09-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic small intestinal inflammatory disorder mediated by an immune response to gluten peptides in genetically susceptible individuals. Celiac disease is often diagnosed in early childhood, but some patients receive a diagnosis late in life. It is uncertain whether pediatric celiac disease is distinct from adult celiac disease. It has been proposed that gluten-reactive T cells in children recognize deamidated and native gluten epitopes, whereas T cells from adults only recognize deamidated gluten peptides. We studied the repertoire of gluten epitopes recognized by T cells from children and adults. We examined T-cell responses against gluten by generating T-cell lines and T-cell clones from intestinal biopsies of adults and children and tested proliferative response to various gluten peptides. We analyzed T cells from 14 children (2-5 years old) at high risk for celiac disease who were followed for celiac disease development. We also analyzed T cells from 6 adults (26-55 years old) with untreated celiac disease. All children and adults were positive for HLA-DQ2.5. Biopsies were incubated with gluten digested with chymotrypsin (modified or unmodified by the enzyme transglutaminase 2) or the peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin (in native and deamidated forms) before T-cell collection. Levels of T-cell responses were higher to deamidated gluten than to native gluten in children and adults. T cells from children and adults each reacted to multiple gluten epitopes. Several T-cell clones were cross-reactive, especially clones that recognized epitopes from γ-and ω-gliadin. About half of the generated T-cell clones from children and adults reacted to unknown epitopes. T-cell responses to different gluten peptides appear to be similar between adults and children at the time of diagnosis of celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CD8+ T-Cell Responses in Hepatitis B and C: The (HLA-) A, B, and C of Hepatitis B and C.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Katja; Luxenburger, Hendrik; Kiraithe, Muthamia M; Thimme, Robert; Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph

    Approximately 500 million people are chronically infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide and are thus at high risk of progressive liver disease, leading to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and ultimately hepatocellular cancer. Virus-specific CD8+ T-cells play a major role in viral clearance in >90% of adult patients who clear HBV and in approximately 30% of patients who clear HCV in acute infection. However, several mechanisms contribute to the failure of the adaptive CD8+ T-cell response in those patients who progress to chronic infection. These include viral mutations leading to escape from the