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Sample records for adaptive testing mat

  1. Metropolitan Achievement Tests (MAT6) Reading Diagnostic Tests (Test Review).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canney, George

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the Reading Diagnostic Tests which form part of the battery of survey and diagnostic Metropolitan Achievement Tests. Finds the tests to be an impressive tool for diagnosing the reading strengths and weaknesses of elementary and junior high students. (RS)

  2. Multidimensional Adaptive Testing in Educational and Psychological Measurement: Current State and Future Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Andreas; Seitz, Nicki-Nils

    2009-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of multidimensional adaptive testing (MAT) and evaluates its applicability in educational and psychological testing. The approach of Segall (1996) is described as a general framework for MAT. The main advantage of MAT is its capability to increase measurement efficiency. In simulation studies conceptualizing situations…

  3. The Architecture of Iron Microbial Mats Reflects the Adaptation of Chemolithotrophic Iron Oxidation in Freshwater and Marine Environments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Clara S.; McAllister, Sean M.; Leavitt, Anna H.; Glazer, Brian T.; Krepski, Sean T.; Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Microbes form mats with architectures that promote efficient metabolism within a particular physicochemical environment, thus studying mat structure helps us understand ecophysiology. Despite much research on chemolithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria, Fe mat architecture has not been visualized because these delicate structures are easily disrupted. There are striking similarities between the biominerals that comprise freshwater and marine Fe mats, made by Beta- and Zetaproteobacteria, respectively. If these biominerals are assembled into mat structures with similar functional morphology, this would suggest that mat architecture is adapted to serve roles specific to Fe oxidation. To evaluate this, we combined light, confocal, and scanning electron microscopy of intact Fe microbial mats with experiments on sheath formation in culture, in order to understand mat developmental history and subsequently evaluate the connection between Fe oxidation and mat morphology. We sampled a freshwater sheath mat from Maine and marine stalk and sheath mats from Loihi Seamount hydrothermal vents, Hawaii. Mat morphology correlated to niche: stalks formed in steeper O2 gradients while sheaths were associated with low to undetectable O2 gradients. Fe-biomineralized filaments, twisted stalks or hollow sheaths, formed the highly porous framework of each mat. The mat-formers are keystone species, with nascent marine stalk-rich mats comprised of novel and uncommon Zetaproteobacteria. For all mats, filaments were locally highly parallel with similar morphologies, indicating that cells were synchronously tracking a chemical or physical cue. In the freshwater mat, cells inhabited sheath ends at the growing edge of the mat. Correspondingly, time lapse culture imaging showed that sheaths are made like stalks, with cells rapidly leaving behind an Fe oxide filament. The distinctive architecture common to all observed Fe mats appears to serve specific functions related to chemolithotrophic Fe

  4. The Architecture of Iron Microbial Mats Reflects the Adaptation of Chemolithotrophic Iron Oxidation in Freshwater and Marine Environments.

    PubMed

    Chan, Clara S; McAllister, Sean M; Leavitt, Anna H; Glazer, Brian T; Krepski, Sean T; Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Microbes form mats with architectures that promote efficient metabolism within a particular physicochemical environment, thus studying mat structure helps us understand ecophysiology. Despite much research on chemolithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria, Fe mat architecture has not been visualized because these delicate structures are easily disrupted. There are striking similarities between the biominerals that comprise freshwater and marine Fe mats, made by Beta- and Zetaproteobacteria, respectively. If these biominerals are assembled into mat structures with similar functional morphology, this would suggest that mat architecture is adapted to serve roles specific to Fe oxidation. To evaluate this, we combined light, confocal, and scanning electron microscopy of intact Fe microbial mats with experiments on sheath formation in culture, in order to understand mat developmental history and subsequently evaluate the connection between Fe oxidation and mat morphology. We sampled a freshwater sheath mat from Maine and marine stalk and sheath mats from Loihi Seamount hydrothermal vents, Hawaii. Mat morphology correlated to niche: stalks formed in steeper O2 gradients while sheaths were associated with low to undetectable O2 gradients. Fe-biomineralized filaments, twisted stalks or hollow sheaths, formed the highly porous framework of each mat. The mat-formers are keystone species, with nascent marine stalk-rich mats comprised of novel and uncommon Zetaproteobacteria. For all mats, filaments were locally highly parallel with similar morphologies, indicating that cells were synchronously tracking a chemical or physical cue. In the freshwater mat, cells inhabited sheath ends at the growing edge of the mat. Correspondingly, time lapse culture imaging showed that sheaths are made like stalks, with cells rapidly leaving behind an Fe oxide filament. The distinctive architecture common to all observed Fe mats appears to serve specific functions related to chemolithotrophic Fe

  5. 75 FR 55360 - In the Matter of Mattingly Testing Services, Inc. Molt, MT; Order Revoking License (Effective...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 030-20836, NRC-2009-0119, License No. 25-21479-01, EA-10- 100] In the Matter of Mattingly Testing Services, Inc. Molt, MT; Order Revoking License (Effective Immediately) I Mattingly Testing Services, Inc., (Mattingly or licensee) is...

  6. Leak test adapter for containers

    DOEpatents

    Hallett, Brian H.; Hartley, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

  7. Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) flight-flutter test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    The highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) vehicle was evaluated in a joint NASA and Air Force flight test program. The HiMAT vehicle is a remotely piloted research vehicle. Its design incorporates the use of advanced composite materials in the wings, and canards for aeroelastic tailoring. A flight-flutter test program was conducted to clear a sufficient flight envelope to allow for performance, stability and control, and loads testing. Testing was accomplished with and without flight control-surface dampers. Flutter clearance of the vehicle indicated satisfactory damping and damping trends for the structural modes of the HiMAT vehicle. The data presented include frequency and damping plotted as a function of Mach number.

  8. Temperature Adaptations in the Terminal Processes of Anaerobic Decomposition of Yellowstone National Park and Icelandic Hot Spring Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Sandbeck, Kenneth A.; Ward, David M.

    1982-01-01

    The optimum temperatures for methanogenesis in microbial mats of four neutral to alkaline, low-sulfate hot springs in Yellowstone National Park were between 50 and 60°C, which was 13 to 23°C lower than the upper temperature for mat development. Significant methanogenesis at 65°C was only observed in one of the springs. Methane production in samples collected at a 51 or 62°C site in Octopus Spring was increased by incubation at higher temperatures and was maximal at 70°C. Strains of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum were isolated from 50, 55, 60, and 65°C sites in Octopus Spring at the temperatures of the collection sites. The optimum temperature for growth and methanogenesis of each isolate was 65°C. Similar results were found for the potential rate of sulfate reduction in an Icelandic hot spring microbial mat in which sulfate reduction dominated methane production as a terminal process in anaerobic decomposition. The potential rate of sulfate reduction along the thermal gradient of the mat was greatest at 50°C, but incubation at 60°C of the samples obtained at 50°C increased the rate. Adaptation to different mat temperatures, common among various microorganisms and processes in the mats, did not appear to occur in the processes and microorganisms which terminate the anaerobic food chain. Other factors must explain why the maximal rates of these processes are restricted to moderate temperatures of the mat ecosystem. PMID:16346109

  9. Photosynthetic action spectra and adaptation to spectral light distribution in a benthic cyanobacterial mat.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, B B; Cohen, Y; Des Marais, D J

    1987-01-01

    We studied adaptation to spectral light distribution in undisturbed benthic communities of cyanobacterial mats growing in hypersaline ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico. Microscale measurements of oxygen photosynthesis and action spectra were performed with microelectrodes; spectral radiance was measured with fiber-optic microprobes. The spatial resolution of all measurements was 0.1 mm, and the spectral resolution was 10 to 15 nm. Light attenuation spectra showed absorption predominantly by chlorophyll a (Chl a) (430 and 670 nm), phycocyanin (620 nm), and carotenoids (440 to 500 nm). Blue light (450 nm) was attenuated 10-fold more strongly than red light (600 nm). The action spectra of the surface film of diatoms accordingly showed activity over the whole spectrum, with maxima for Chl a and carotenoids. The underlying dense Microcoleus population showed almost exclusively activity dependent upon light harvesting by phycobilins at 550 to 660 nm. Maximum activity was at 580 and 650 nm, indicating absorption by phycoerythrin and phycocyanin as well as by allophycocyanin. Very little Chl a-dependent activity could be detected in the cyanobacterial action spectrum, even with additional 600-nm light to excite photosystem II. The depth distribution of photosynthesis showed detectable activity down to a depth of 0.8 to 2.5 mm, where the downwelling radiant flux at 600 nm was reduced to 0.2 to 0.6% of the surface flux. PMID:11536572

  10. Photosynthetic action spectra and adaptation to spectral light distribution in a benthic cyanobacterial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, B. B.; Cohen, Y.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    We studied adaptation to spectral light distribution in undisturbed benthic communities of cyanobacterial mats growing in hypersaline ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico. Microscale measurements of oxygen photosynthesis and action spectra were performed with microelectrodes; spectral radiance was measured with fiber-optic microprobes. The spatial resolution of all measurements was 0.1 mm, and the spectral resolution was 10 to 15 nm. Light attenuation spectra showed absorption predominantly by chlorophyll a (Chl a) (430 and 670 nm), phycocyanin (620 nm), and carotenoids (440 to 500 nm). Blue light (450 nm) was attenuated 10-fold more strongly than red light (600 nm). The action spectra of the surface film of diatoms accordingly showed activity over the whole spectrum, with maxima for Chl a and carotenoids. The underlying dense Microcoleus population showed almost exclusively activity dependent upon light harvesting by phycobilins at 550 to 660 nm. Maximum activity was at 580 and 650 nm, indicating absorption by phycoerythrin and phycocyanin as well as by allophycocyanin. Very little Chl a-dependent activity could be detected in the cyanobacterial action spectrum, even with additional 600-nm light to excite photosystem II. The depth distribution of photosynthesis showed detectable activity down to a depth of 0.8 to 2.5 mm, where the downwelling radiant flux at 600 nm was reduced to 0.2 to 0.6% of the surface flux.

  11. Is the microagglutination test (MAT) good for predicting the infecting serogroup for leptospirosis in Brazil?

    PubMed

    Blanco, Roberta Morozetti; dos Santos, Luis Fernando; Galloway, Renee Lynn; Romero, Eliete Caló

    2016-02-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infection caused by pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira spp. Knowledge of the prevalent serovars and their maintenance hosts is essential to understand the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of serology by the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) to predict the serogroups compared with results of identification of leptospires in São Paulo, Brazil. MAT correctly assigned the serogroup of the infecting isolate in 49/52 cases (94.23%). The serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae was the predominant serogroup (88.46%). This study showed the usefulness of the MAT to correctly identify the infecting serogroup with a good overall agreement between the serologically-identified infecting serogroup and by identification of the isolate and can be used in epidemiological surveys in São Paulo. However, it should be complemented by the identification of Leptospira isolates. PMID:26851592

  12. Applying Adaptive Variables in Computerised Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triantafillou, Evangelos; Georgiadou, Elissavet; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2007-01-01

    Current research in computerised adaptive testing (CAT) focuses on applications, in small and large scale, that address self assessment, training, employment, teacher professional development for schools, industry, military, assessment of non-cognitive skills, etc. Dynamic item generation tools and automated scoring of complex, constructed…

  13. Multiarray on a test strip (MATS): rapid multiplex immunodetection of priority potato pathogens.

    PubMed

    Safenkova, Irina V; Pankratova, Galina K; Zaitsev, Ilya A; Varitsev, Yuri A; Vengerov, Yuri Y; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2016-09-01

    Multiarray on a test strip (MATS) was developed for the detection of eight important potato pathogens. The proposed assay combines the rapidity of immunochromatography with the high throughput of array techniques. The test zone of the immunochromatographic strip comprises ordered rows of spots containing antibodies specific for different potato pathogens. The assay benefits from the simplicity of immunochromatography; colored immune complexes form at the corresponding spots within the test zone. The presence and intensity of the coloration are used for identification of the target pathogens. The MATS was applied to the simultaneous detection of eight priority potato pathogens, characterized by the following limits of detection: 1 ng/mL for potato virus X and the ordinary type of potato virus Y, 10 ng/mL for potato virus M, 20 ng/mL for potato leaf roll virus, 40 ng/mL for necrotic-type potato virus Y, 100 ng/mL for potato virus S, 300 ng/mL for potato virus A, and 10(4) cells/mL for Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. Analysis time was 15 min. The observed sensitivity of the MATS was comparable to the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The developed technique was tested on potato leaf extracts, and its efficiency for on-site control of the pathogens was confirmed in 100 % by commercial LFIA test strips. Graphical abstract Location of binding zones in the developed multiarray on a test strip (MATS) for simultaneous detection of eight pathogens. PMID:27007732

  14. Flight control systems development and flight test experience with the HiMAT research vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Robert W.; Earls, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    Two highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted vehicles were flown a total of 26 flights. These subscale vehicles were of advanced aerodynamic configuration with advanced technology concepts such as composite and metallic structures, digital integrated propulsion control, and ground (primary) and airborne (backup) relaxed static stability, digital fly-by-wire control systems. Extensive systems development, checkout, and flight qualification were required to conduct the flight test program. The design maneuver goal was to achieve a sustained 8-g turn at Mach 0.9 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. This goal was achieved, along with the acquisition of high-quality flight data at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers. Control systems were modified in a variety of ways using the flight-determined aerodynamic characteristics. The HiMAT program was successfully completed with approximately 11 hours of total flight time.

  15. 3. Guidelines for efficacy testing of household insecticide products - Mosquito coils, vaporizer mats, liquid vaporizers, ambient emanators and aerosols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This document provides specific and standardized procedures and criteria for efficacy testing and evaluation of specific household insecticide products intended for indoor use against mosquitoes, namely, mosquito coils, vaporizer mats, liquid vaporizers, ambient emanators and aerosols....

  16. Applicability of the Monocyte Activation Test (MAT) for hyperimmune sera in the routine of the quality control laboratory: Comparison with the Rabbit Pyrogen Test (RPT).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cristiane Caldeira; Presgrave, Octavio Augusto França; Hartung, Thomas; de Moraes, Aurea Maria Lage; Delgado, Isabella Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Pyrogen tests are safety assays performed during the routine quality control of injectable products required by regulatory agencies. Currently, there are three available testing possibilities: 1) the Rabbit Pyrogen Test (RPT); 2) the Bacterial Endotoxin Test (BET); and 3) test systems using human whole-blood or monocytes, termed Monocyte Activation Test (MAT). Although BET is often considered as a replacement for the animal test, it is unable to detect pyrogens other than endotoxin. MAT is based on the human fever reaction and thus, most closely reflects the human response. The aim of this study was to conduct a parallel comparison of the RPT and MAT for hyperimmune sera (HS) batches analyzed during the routine of a quality control laboratory. MAT was performed in the same 43 batches of HS previously tested using RPT. The results showed that MAT presented 100% sensitivity and approximately 85% specificity as compared to RPT, i.e., no false-negative results were obtained. Few suspicious samples, which were negative in the RPT after retesting, provided divergent positive results suggesting a lower limit of detection of MAT. MAT is thus able to detect contaminants in biological products such as HS batches. PMID:26688320

  17. An Authoring Environment for Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Eduardo; Conejo, Ricardo; Garcia-Hervas; Emilio

    2005-01-01

    SIETTE is a web-based adaptive testing system. It implements Computerized Adaptive Tests. These tests are tailor-made, theory-based tests, where questions shown to students, finalization of the test, and student knowledge estimation is accomplished adaptively. To construct these tests, SIETTE has an authoring environment comprising a suite of…

  18. Diagnostic Classification Models and Multidimensional Adaptive Testing: A Commentary on Rupp and Templin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Andreas; Carstensen, Claus H.

    2009-01-01

    On a general level, the objective of diagnostic classifications models (DCMs) lies in a classification of individuals regarding multiple latent skills. In this article, the authors show that this objective can be achieved by multidimensional adaptive testing (MAT) as well. The authors discuss whether or not the restricted applicability of DCMs can…

  19. Testing the utility of matK and ITS DNA regions for discrimination of Allium species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the genus Allium L. has been mainly based on the nucleotide sequences of ITS region. In 2009 matK and rbcL were accepted as a two-locus DNA barcode to classify plant species by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) Plant Working Group. MatK region has been ...

  20. Efficacy of serum samples stored on filter paper for the detection of antibody to Leptospira spp. by microagglutination test (MAT).

    PubMed

    Blanco, R M; Romero, E C

    2012-12-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the microagglutination test (MAT) results in serum samples dried on filter paper and stored at different temperatures during 1day, 7days, 30days and 1year to determine the stability of sera antibody against leptospires. Serum samples collected onto filter paper for the detection of leptospires antibody was compared with MAT in a study of 300 serum samples from patients with suspected leptospirosis. Among 300 fresh serum samples analyzed by MAT 156 (52%) were positive and 144 (48%) negative. All the negative fresh serum samples were negative when dried on filter paper (specificity 100%). The sensitivity of MAT performed on dried serum samples was 100%. Storage on filter paper at room temperature and at 4°C for 1 and 7days did not affect the MAT titers. For up to 7days, 98.72% of dried serum samples had titers identical to those of the corresponding serum samples, and 1.18% of dried serum samples showed 1 dilution of difference. After a storage period of one month a prozone phenomenon was observed. After a storage period of one year all serum samples were negative. Serum samples collected onto filter paper are a convenient source of antibodies for serological diagnosis and epidemiological surveys. PMID:22960422

  1. Distribution of cold adaptation proteins in microbial mats in Lake Joyce, Antarctica: Analysis of metagenomic data by using two bioinformatics tools.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyunmin; Hakim, Joseph A; Fisher, Phillip R E; Grueneberg, Alexander; Andersen, Dale T; Bej, Asim K

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the distribution and abundance of cold-adaptation proteins in microbial mat communities in the perennially ice-covered Lake Joyce, located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. We have used MG-RAST and R code bioinformatics tools on Illumina HiSeq2000 shotgun metagenomic data and compared the filtering efficacy of these two methods on cold-adaptation proteins. Overall, the abundance of cold-shock DEAD-box protein A (CSDA), antifreeze proteins (AFPs), fatty acid desaturase (FAD), trehalose synthase (TS), and cold-shock family of proteins (CSPs) were present in all mat samples at high, moderate, or low levels, whereas the ice nucleation protein (INP) was present only in the ice and bulbous mat samples at insignificant levels. Considering the near homogeneous temperature profile of Lake Joyce (0.08-0.29 °C), the distribution and abundance of these proteins across various mat samples predictively correlated with known functional attributes necessary for microbial communities to thrive in this ecosystem. The comparison of the MG-RAST and the R code methods showed dissimilar occurrences of the cold-adaptation protein sequences, though with insignificant ANOSIM (R = 0.357; p-value = 0.012), ADONIS (R(2) = 0.274; p-value = 0.03) and STAMP (p-values = 0.521-0.984) statistical analyses. Furthermore, filtering targeted sequences using the R code accounted for taxonomic groups by avoiding sequence redundancies, whereas the MG-RAST provided total counts resulting in a higher sequence output. The results from this study revealed for the first time the distribution of cold-adaptation proteins in six different types of microbial mats in Lake Joyce, while suggesting a simpler and more manageable user-defined method of R code, as compared to a web-based MG-RAST pipeline. PMID:26578243

  2. Equating Scores from Adaptive to Linear Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    Two local methods for observed-score equating are applied to the problem of equating an adaptive test to a linear test. In an empirical study, the methods were evaluated against a method based on the test characteristic function (TCF) of the linear test and traditional equipercentile equating applied to the ability estimates on the adaptive test…

  3. Rotationally Adaptive Flight Test Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Ron

    1999-01-01

    Research on a new design of flutter exciter vane using adaptive materials was conducted. This novel design is based on all-moving aerodynamic surface technology and consists of a structurally stiff main spar, a series of piezoelectric actuator elements and an aerodynamic shell which is pivoted around the main spar. The work was built upon the current missile-type all-moving surface designs and change them so they are better suited for flutter excitation through the transonic flight regime. The first portion of research will be centered on aerodynamic and structural modeling of the system. USAF DatCom and vortex lattice codes was used to capture the fundamental aerodynamics of the vane. Finite element codes and laminated plate theory and virtual work analyses will be used to structurally model the aerodynamic vane and wing tip. Following the basic modeling, a flutter test vane was designed. Each component within the structure was designed to meet the design loads. After the design loads are met, then the deflections will be maximized and the internal structure will be laid out. In addition to the structure, a basic electrical control network will be designed which will be capable of driving a scaled exciter vane. The third and final stage of main investigation involved the fabrication of a 1/4 scale vane. This scaled vane was used to verify kinematics and structural mechanics theories on all-moving actuation. Following assembly, a series of bench tests was conducted to determine frequency response, electrical characteristics, mechanical and kinematic properties. Test results indicate peak-to-peak deflections of 1.1 deg with a corner frequency of just over 130 Hz.

  4. The Computerized Adaptive Testing System Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, James R.; Sympson, J. B.

    The Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) project is a joint Armed Services coordinated effort to develop and evaluate a system for automated, adaptive administration of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). The CAT is a system for administering personnel tests that differs from conventional test administration in two major…

  5. Computerized Adaptive Mastery Tests as Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expert systems and computerized adaptive tests describes two versions of EXSPRT, a new approach that combines uncertain inference in expert systems with sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) stopping rules. Results of two studies comparing EXSPRT to adaptive mastery testing based on item response theory and SPRT approaches are…

  6. Flow-induced Development of Unicellular Cyanobacterial Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Tice, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial mats/biofilms are abundant microbial growth structures throughout the history of life on Earth. Understanding the mechanisms for their morphogenesis and interactions with physical sedimentary forces are important topics that allow deeper understanding of related records. When subjected to hydrodynamic influences, mats are known to vary in morphology and structure in response to fluid shear, yet mechanistically, the underlying cellular architecture due to interactions with flow remain unexplained. Moreover, mats are found to emerge larger scale roughness elements and modified cohesive strength growing under flow. It is a mystery how and why these mat-community-level features are linked in association with modified boundary layers at the mats surface. We examined unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in a circular flow bioreactor designed to maintain a fixed set of hydrodynamic conditions. The use of monoculture strains and unidirectional currents, while not replicating natural mat systems (almost certainly multi-species and often multi-directional currents under complex wind or tidal wave actions), helps to simplify these systems and allows for specific testing of hypotheses regarding how mats evolve distinctive morphologies induced by flow. The unique design of the reactor also makes measurements such as critical erosional shear stress of the mats possible, in addition to microscopic, macroscopic imaging and weeks of continuous mats growth monitoring. We report the finding that linear chains, filament-like cell groups were present from unicellular cyanobacterial mats growing under flow (~1-5 cm/s) and these structures are organized within ~1-3mm size streamers and ~0.5-1mm size nodular macrostructures. Ultra-small, sub-micron thick EPS strings are observed under TEM and are likely the cohesive architectural elements in mats across different fluid regimes. Mat cohesion generally grows with and adapts to increasing flow shear stress within

  7. Test Information Targeting Strategies for Adaptive Multistage Testing Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.; Burgin, William

    Adaptive multistage testlet (MST) designs appear to be gaining popularity for many large-scale computer-based testing programs. These adaptive MST designs use a modularized configuration of preconstructed testlets and embedded score-routing schemes to prepackage different forms of an adaptive test. The conditional information targeting (CIT)…

  8. Flight Test Approach to Adaptive Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlock, Kate Maureen; Less, James L.; Larson, David Nils

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center completed flight testing of adaptive controls research on a full-scale F-18 testbed. The validation of adaptive controls has the potential to enhance safety in the presence of adverse conditions such as structural damage or control surface failures. This paper describes the research interface architecture, risk mitigations, flight test approach and lessons learned of adaptive controls research.

  9. Testing the Reliability and Sensitivity of Foraminiferal Transfer Functions Based on the Modern Analog Technique (MAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lac, D.; Cullen, J. L.; Martin, A.

    2004-05-01

    Quantitative estimates of past sea-surface temperatures (SST's) based on surface sediment calibration data sets of planktic foraminifers and modern SST's have been widely used in the interpretation and modeling of past climates. One widely used approach, The Modern Analog Techniques (MAT) relies on comparing a downcore sample to the Brown University modern Global Data Base of 1265 seabed samples and choosing either the10 or 5 most similar modern samples using the squared-chord distance similarity metric. The SST's above the best modern analogs are then averaged to produce the downcore SST estimate. We have chosen a set of 8 modern sea-bed samples from the Global Data Base with a wide range of foraminiferal compositions; 3 from the Pacific, 3 from the Atlantic, and 2 from the Indian Ocean and have generated duplicate foraminiferal census counts from sets of 5-6 random splits from each of our 8 samples so that we can: 1. compare the degree of similarity between duplicate samples so that we can evaluate the differences in dissimilarity values that can be attributed to counting error and begin to better understand the sensitivity of the chosen dissimilarity measures to ecologically produced differences in foraminiferal composition, 2. evaluate differences in how the duplicate samples choose analogs from the Global Data Base, and 3. test the sensitivity of the MAT's ability to accurately and precisely predict SST's using analogs from the Global Data Base for each set of duplicate samples. Comparison of the dissimilarity coefficients within each set of duplicate samples produces maximum dissimilarity values that range from 0.03 to 0.14. Both mean and maximum dissimilarities are greatest in sample sets from the low latitudes. The 5 best analogs chosen from the Global Data Base for samples within each set of duplicates generate average dissimilarities that range from 0.01 to 0.04. However, between a total of 8 and 12 different modern analogs were needed to find the 5 best

  10. Test Anxiety, Computer-Adaptive Testing and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Nicole Makas

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the current findings and issues regarding the role of computer-adaptive testing in test anxiety. The computer-adaptive test (CAT) proposed by one of the Common Core consortia brings these issues to the forefront. Research has long indicated that test anxiety impairs student performance. More recent research indicates that…

  11. A Predictive Analysis Approach to Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirisci, Levent; Hsu, Tse-Chi

    The predictive analysis approach to adaptive testing originated in the idea of statistical predictive analysis suggested by J. Aitchison and I.R. Dunsmore (1975). The adaptive testing model proposed is based on parameter-free predictive distribution. Aitchison and Dunsmore define statistical prediction analysis as the use of data obtained from an…

  12. Computerized Adaptive Testing under Nonparametric IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xueli; Douglas, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Nonparametric item response models have been developed as alternatives to the relatively inflexible parametric item response models. An open question is whether it is possible and practical to administer computerized adaptive testing with nonparametric models. This paper explores the possibility of computerized adaptive testing when using…

  13. Hypothetical Use of Multidimensional Adaptive Testing for the Assessment of Student Achievement in the Programme for International Student Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Andreas; Seitz, Nicki-Nils

    2011-01-01

    The usefulness of multidimensional adaptive testing (MAT) for the assessment of student literacy in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) was examined within a real data simulation study. The responses of N = 14,624 students who participated in the PISA assessments of the years 2000, 2003, and 2006 in Germany were used to…

  14. The Research on Computerized Adaptive Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peng; Cong, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, computerized adaptive testing is becoming the focus of the field of modern educational evaluation. In this form of the test, the response relationship between the examinee with the item by IRT modelling, then use the computer to estimates the ability level of the examinees and real-time select item. Computerized adaptive test development process were reviewed in the paper, and discuss the latest research results and pointed out that the current problems and future trends.

  15. Evaluating Content Alignment in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Steven L.; Kingsbury, G. Gage; Webb, Norman L.

    2015-01-01

    The alignment between a test and the content domain it measures represents key evidence for the validation of test score inferences. Although procedures have been developed for evaluating the content alignment of linear tests, these procedures are not readily applicable to computerized adaptive tests (CATs), which require large item pools and do…

  16. Graphical Models and Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Russell G.; Mislevy, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Considers computerized adaptive testing from the perspective of graphical modeling (GM). GM provides methods for making inferences about multifaceted skills and knowledge and for extracting data from complex performances. Provides examples from language-proficiency assessment. (SLD)

  17. Adaptive structures - Test hardware and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James L.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Kuo, Chin-Po

    1990-01-01

    The facilities and procedures used at JPL to test adaptive structures such as the large deployable reflector (LDR) are described and preliminary results are reported. The applications of adaptive structures in future NASA missions are outlined, and the techniques which are employed to modify damping, stiffness, and isolation characteristics, as well as geometric changes, are listed. The development of adaptive structures is shown to be effective as a result of new actuators and sensors, and examples are listed for categories such as fiber optics, shape-memory materials, piezoelectrics, and electrorheological fluids. Some ground test results are described for laboratory truss structures and truss test beds, which are shown to be efficient and easy to assemble in space. Adaptive structures are shown to be important for precision space structures such as the LDR, and can alleviate ground test requirements.

  18. Bayesian Item Selection in Constrained Adaptive Testing Using Shadow Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2010-01-01

    Application of Bayesian item selection criteria in computerized adaptive testing might result in improvement of bias and MSE of the ability estimates. The question remains how to apply Bayesian item selection criteria in the context of constrained adaptive testing, where large numbers of specifications have to be taken into account in the item…

  19. Adaptive wall testing sections (AWTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture starts with conventional techniques of minimizing wall interference and explains the principle of wall streamlining. The history of AWTS development is highlighted, along with the benefits of wall streamlining, including minimized boundary interference, increased model size, reduced tunnel drive power, noise, and volume, as well as multiple flow field simulations to be performed using one test section. AWTS-associated problems coming from the need to adjust the test-section boundaries for each test condition are assessed, along with the requirements of a boundary-adjustment strategy. Examples of two- and three-dimensional test sections are presented, and attention is focused on residual interference and the effects of compressibility and model lift on flexible-wall contours.

  20. An Introduction to the Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Jian-quan; Miao, Dan-min; Zhu, Xia; Gong, Jing-jing

    2007-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has unsurpassable advantages over traditional testing. It has become the mainstream in large scale examinations in modern society. This paper gives a brief introduction to CAT including differences between traditional testing and CAT, the principles of CAT, psychometric theory and computer algorithms of CAT, the…

  1. Predictive Control of Speededness in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2009-01-01

    An adaptive testing method is presented that controls the speededness of a test using predictions of the test takers' response times on the candidate items in the pool. Two different types of predictions are investigated: posterior predictions given the actual response times on the items already administered and posterior predictions that use the…

  2. Individual Differences in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, JinGyu

    Research on the major computerized adaptive testing (CAT) strategies is reviewed, and some findings are reported that examine effects of examinee demographic and psychological characteristics on CAT strategies. In fixed branching strategies, all examinees respond to a common routing test, the score of which is used to assign examinees to a…

  3. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Developed a multilevel item response (IRT) model that allows for differences between the distributions of item parameters of families of item clones. Results from simulation studies based on an item pool from the Law School Admission Test illustrate the accuracy of the item pool calibration and adaptive testing procedures based on the model. (SLD)

  4. A Guide to Computer Adaptive Testing Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Some brand names are used generically to describe an entire class of products that perform the same function. "Kleenex," "Xerox," "Thermos," and "Band-Aid" are good examples. The term "computerized adaptive testing" (CAT) is similar in that it is often applied uniformly across a diverse family of testing methods. Although the various members of…

  5. Testing HyDE on ADAPT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The IVHM Project in the Aviation Safety Program has funded research in electrical power system (EPS) health management. This problem domain contains both discrete and continuous behavior, and thus is directly relevant for the hybrid diagnostic tool HyDE. In FY2007 work was performed to expand the HyDE diagnosis model of the ADAPT system. The work completed resulted in a HyDE model with the capability to diagnose five times the number of ADAPT components previously tested. The expanded diagnosis model passed a corresponding set of new ADAPT fault injection scenario tests with no incorrect faults reported. The time required for the HyDE diagnostic system to isolate the fault varied widely between tests; this variance was reduced by tuning HyDE input parameters. These results and other diagnostic design trade-offs are discussed. Finally, possible future improvements for both the HyDE diagnostic model and HyDE itself are presented.

  6. Wright Brothers Lectureship in Aeronautics: Experience with HiMAT remotely piloted research vehicle - An alternate flight test approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deets, D. A.; Brown, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    The highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) program explored the various and complex interactions of advanced technologies, such as aeroelastic tailoring, close-coupled canard, and relaxed static stability. A 0.44-subscale remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) of a hypothetical fighter airplane was designed and flight-tested to determine the effects of these interactions and to define the design techniques appropriate for advanced fighter technologies. Flexibility and high maneuverability were provided by flight control laws implemented in ground-based computers and telemetered to the vehicle control system during flight tests. The high quality of the flight-measured data and their close correlation with the analytical design modeling proved that the RPRV is a viable and cost-effective tool for developing aerodynamic, structure, and control law requirements for highly maneuverable fighter airplanes of the future.

  7. Adaptive sequential testing for multiple comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping; Liu, Lingyun; Mehta, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Markov process theory-based adaptive sequential testing procedure for multiple comparisons. The procedure can be used for confirmative trials involving multi-comparisons, including dose selection or population enrichment. Dose or subpopulation selection and sample size modification can be made at any interim analysis. Type I error control is exact. PMID:24926848

  8. Some Practical Examples of Computer-Adaptive Sequential Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.; Nungester, Ronald J.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an integrated approach to test development and administration called computer-adaptive sequential testing (CAST). CAST incorporates adaptive testing methods with automated test assembly. Describes the CAST framework and demonstrates several applications using a medical-licensure example. (SLD)

  9. Constraining Item Exposure in Computerized Adaptive Testing with Shadow Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2004-01-01

    Item-exposure control in computerized adaptive testing is implemented by imposing item-ineligibility constraints on the assembly process of the shadow tests. The method resembles Sympson and Hetter's (1985) method of item-exposure control in that the decisions to impose the constraints are probabilistic. The method does not, however, require…

  10. Adaptive flutter suppression, analysis and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. H.; Hwang, C.; Joshi, D. S.; Harvey, C. A.; Huttsell, L. T.; Farmer, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of adaptive control have been applied to suppress a potentially violent flutter condition of a half-span model of a lightweight figher aircraft. This marked the confluence of several technologies with active flutter suppression, digital control and adaptive control theory the primary contributors. The control algorithm was required to adapt both to slowly varying changes, corresponding to changes in the flight condition or fuel loading and to rapid changes, corresponding to a store release or the transition from a stable to an unstable flight condition. The development of the adaptive control methods was followed by a simulation and checkout of the complete system and a wind tunnel demonstration. As part of the test, a store was released from the model wing tip, transforming the model abruptly from a stable configuration to a violent flutter condition. The adaptive algorithm recognized the unstable nature of the resulting configuration and implemented a stabilizing control law in a fraction of a second. The algorithm was also shown to provide system stability over a range of wind tunnel Mach numbers and dynamic pressures.

  11. The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility under Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jerome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-François; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Abad, Jose; Fischer, Gert; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko

    2013-12-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility project has received most of its subsystems in Garching and the ESO Integration Hall has become the central operation location for the next phase of the project. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM will now undergo a series of tests on ASSIST to qualify its optical performance which launches the System Test Phase of the AOF. The tests will validate the AO modules operation with the DSM: first the GRAAL adaptive optics module for Hawk-I in natural guide star AO mode on-axis and then its Ground Layer AO mode. This will be followed by the GALACSI (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and then the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO). We will report on the status of the subsystems at the time of the conference but also on the performance of the delivered ASSIST test bench, the DSM and the 20 Watt Sodium fiber Laser pre-production unit which has validated all specifications before final manufacturing of the serial units. We will also present some considerations and tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

  12. Leptospirosis in Kuala Lumpur and the comparative evaluation of two rapid commercial diagnostic kits against the MAT test for the detection of antibodies to leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, W Y; Soo, E H; Gopalakrishnan, V; Devi, S

    2000-08-01

    The aim of the study was to look into the epidemiology of serodiagnosed cases of leptospirosis at the University Hospital and compare two commercial ELISA Assays to the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). Demographic data for all serodiagnosed cases for the years 1991-1997 were collected. From this data, 104 sera (n = 104) were selected as samples for comparative evaluation of the commercial ELISAs (INDX Dip-S-Ticks and PanBio ELISA) to the MAT test. Thirty two (n = 32) negative control sera were selected from serodiagnosed cases of other differential diagnosis of leptospira infection. The MAT test is a standard test that detects agglutination antibodies to leptospira biflexa, while the INDX Dip-S-Ticks is an ELISA dot test assaying for total anti-leptospira antibodies. The PanBio ELISA is a colorometric assay in test well strips to detect anti-leptospira IgM. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of tests were calculated at a MAT cut-off value of 1:320. Demographic data showed that leptospirosis peaks during March-May and Aug-Nov coinciding with the inter-monsoon period with more men being infected than women and more adults than children. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of test for the INDX Dip-S-Ticks were 83.3%, 93.8% and 87.5% while the values for the PanBio ELISA were 54.2%, 96.9% and 71.3%. The suboptimal PanBio result could be related to the blocking effect of high IgG titres or could be related to the diagnostic MAT cut-off values used in this study. The data hence reflects a pattern of transmission that is related to "wet" occupational risk factors. The commercial assays evaluated, are easier to perform but interpretation of results should be based on level of endemicity. The INDX Dip-S-Ticks allows this flexibility and is a practical alternative to the MAT test. PMID:11256343

  13. Adaptive Random Testing with Combinatorial Input Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Random testing (RT) is a fundamental testing technique to assess software reliability, by simply selecting test cases in a random manner from the whole input domain. As an enhancement of RT, adaptive random testing (ART) has better failure-detection capability and has been widely applied in different scenarios, such as numerical programs, some object-oriented programs, and mobile applications. However, not much work has been done on the effectiveness of ART for the programs with combinatorial input domain (i.e., the set of categorical data). To extend the ideas to the testing for combinatorial input domain, we have adopted different similarity measures that are widely used for categorical data in data mining and have proposed two similarity measures based on interaction coverage. Then, we propose a new version named ART-CID as an extension of ART in combinatorial input domain, which selects an element from categorical data as the next test case such that it has the lowest similarity against already generated test cases. Experimental results show that ART-CID generally performs better than RT, with respect to different evaluation metrics. PMID:24772036

  14. An adaptive association test for microbiome data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chong; Chen, Jun; Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in investigating how the compositions of microbial communities are associated with human health and disease. Although existing methods have identified many associations, a proper choice of a phylogenetic distance is critical for the power of these methods. To assess an overall association between the composition of a microbial community and an outcome of interest, we present a novel multivariate testing method called aMiSPU, that is joint and highly adaptive over all observed taxa and thus high powered across various scenarios, alleviating the issue with the choice of a phylogenetic distance. Our simulations and real-data analyses demonstrated that the aMiSPU test was often more powerful than several competing methods while correctly controlling type I error rates. The R package MiSPU is available at https://github.com/ChongWu-Biostat/MiSPU and CRAN. PMID:27198579

  15. "catR": An R Package for Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is an active current research field in psychometrics and educational measurement. However, there is very little software available to handle such adaptive tasks. The R package "catR" was developed to perform adaptive testing with as much flexibility as possible, in an attempt to provide a developmental and…

  16. Fabrication Of Ceramic Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Process to make mats of fine zirconia filaments proposed. Ceramic mats formed by sintering mats of partially dried filaments extruded from slurry of ceramic powder, binder, and solvent. Mats of fine zirconia fibers easier to ball-mill than commercially available zirconia powder.

  17. Implementing the Computer-Adaptive Sequential Testing (CAST) Framework To Mass Produce High Quality Computer-Adaptive and Mastery Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.

    Computerized testing has created new challenges for the production and administration of test forms. This paper describes a multi-stage, testlet-based framework for test design, assembly, and administration called computer-adaptive sequential testing (CAST). CAST is a structured testing approach that is amenable to both adaptive and mastery…

  18. Archean Microbial Mat Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Michael M.; Thornton, Daniel C. O.; Pope, Michael C.; Olszewski, Thomas D.; Gong, Jian

    2011-05-01

    Much of the Archean record of microbial communities consists of fossil mats and stromatolites. Critical physical emergent properties governing the evolution of large-scale (centimeters to meters) topographic relief on the mat landscape are (a) mat surface roughness relative to the laminar sublayer and (b) cohesion. These properties can be estimated for fossil samples under many circumstances. A preliminary analysis of Archean mat cohesion suggests that mats growing in shallow marine environments from throughout this time had cohesions similar to those of modern shallow marine mats. There may have been a significant increase in mat strength at the end of the Archean.

  19. Effects of mat characteristics on plantar pressure patterns and perceived mat properties during landing in gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Morey-Klapsing, Gaspar; Perez-Turpin, Jose Antonio; Cortell-Tormo, Juan Manuel; van den Tillaar, Roland

    2010-11-01

    Shock absorption and stability during landings is provided by both, gymnast ability and mat properties. The aims of this study were to determine the influence of different mat constructions on their energy absorption and stability capabilities, and to analyse how these properties affect gymnast's plantar pressures as well as subjective mat perception during landing. Six mats were tested using a standard mechanical drop test. In addition, plantar pressures and subjective perception during landing were obtained from 15 expert gymnasts. The different mats influenced plantar pressures and gymnasts' subjective perception during landing of gymnasts. Significant correlations between plantar pressures at the medial metatarsal and lateral metatarsal zones of the gymnasts' feet with the different shock absorption characteristics of the mats were found. However, subjective perception tests were not able to discriminate mat functionality between the six mats as no significant correlations between the mechanical mat properties with the subjective perception of these properties were found. This study demonstrated that plantar pressures are a useful tool for discriminating different landing mats. Using similar approaches, ideally including kinematics as well, could help us in our understanding about the influences of different mats upon gymnast-mat interaction. PMID:21309299

  20. The Effects of Feedback in Computerized Adaptive and Self-Adapted Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roos, Linda L.; And Others

    Computerized adaptive (CA) testing uses an algorithm to match examinee ability to item difficulty, while self-adapted (SA) testing allows the examinee to choose the difficulty of his or her items. Research comparing SA and CA testing has shown that examinees experience lower anxiety and improved performance with SA testing. All previous research…

  1. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 2. Synechococcus strains representative of putative ecotypes inhabiting different depths in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat exhibit different adaptive and acclimative responses to light.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Shane; Olsen, Millie T; Schaible, George A; Becraft, Eric D; Shen, Gaozhong; Klapper, Isaac; Bryant, Donald A; Ward, David M

    2015-01-01

    Closely related strains of thermophilic Synechococcus were cultivated from the microbial mats found in the effluent channels of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YNP). These strains have identical or nearly identical 16S rRNA sequences but are representative of separate, predicted putative ecotype (PE) populations, which were identified by using the more highly resolving psaA locus and which predominate at different vertical positions within the 1-mm-thick upper-green layer of the mat. Pyrosequencing confirmed that each strain contained a single, predominant psaA genotype. Strains differed in growth rate as a function of irradiance. A strain with a psaA genotype corresponding to a predicted PE that predominates near the mat surface grew fastest at high irradiances, whereas strains with psaA genotypes representative of predominant subsurface populations grew faster at low irradiance and exhibited greater sensitivity to abrupt shifts to high light. The high-light-adapted and low-light-adapted strains also exhibited differences in pigment content and the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus (photosystem ratio) when grown under different light intensities. Cells representative of the different strains had similar morphologies under low-light conditions, but under high-light conditions, cells of low-light-adapted strains became elongated and formed short chains of cells. Collectively, the results presented here are consistent with the hypothesis that closely related, but distinct, ecological species of Synechococcus occupy different light niches in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat and acclimate differently to changing light environments. PMID:26175719

  2. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 2. Synechococcus strains representative of putative ecotypes inhabiting different depths in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat exhibit different adaptive and acclimative responses to light

    PubMed Central

    Nowack, Shane; Olsen, Millie T.; Schaible, George A.; Becraft, Eric D.; Shen, Gaozhong; Klapper, Isaac; Bryant, Donald A.; Ward, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Closely related strains of thermophilic Synechococcus were cultivated from the microbial mats found in the effluent channels of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YNP). These strains have identical or nearly identical 16S rRNA sequences but are representative of separate, predicted putative ecotype (PE) populations, which were identified by using the more highly resolving psaA locus and which predominate at different vertical positions within the 1-mm-thick upper-green layer of the mat. Pyrosequencing confirmed that each strain contained a single, predominant psaA genotype. Strains differed in growth rate as a function of irradiance. A strain with a psaA genotype corresponding to a predicted PE that predominates near the mat surface grew fastest at high irradiances, whereas strains with psaA genotypes representative of predominant subsurface populations grew faster at low irradiance and exhibited greater sensitivity to abrupt shifts to high light. The high-light-adapted and low-light-adapted strains also exhibited differences in pigment content and the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus (photosystem ratio) when grown under different light intensities. Cells representative of the different strains had similar morphologies under low-light conditions, but under high-light conditions, cells of low-light-adapted strains became elongated and formed short chains of cells. Collectively, the results presented here are consistent with the hypothesis that closely related, but distinct, ecological species of Synechococcus occupy different light niches in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat and acclimate differently to changing light environments. PMID:26175719

  3. The Development and Evaluation of a Computerized Adaptive Testing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de-la-Torre, Roberto; Vispoel, Walter P.

    The development and preliminary evaluation of the Computerized Adaptive Testing System (CATSYS), a new testing package for IBM-compatible microcomputers, are described. CATSYS can be used to administer and score operational adaptive tests or to conduct on-line computer simulation studies. The package incorporates several innovative features,…

  4. Multidimensional Adaptive Testing with Optimal Design Criteria for Item Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Joris; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2009-01-01

    Several criteria from the optimal design literature are examined for use with item selection in multidimensional adaptive testing. In particular, it is examined what criteria are appropriate for adaptive testing in which all abilities are intentional, some should be considered as a nuisance, or the interest is in the testing of a composite of the…

  5. Mat2exo

    2012-09-11

    MAT2EXO is a program which translates mesh data from Matlab mat-file format to Exodus II format. This tool is the inverse of the commonly used tool exo2mat which translates Exodus II data to the Matlab mat-file format. These tools provide a means for preprocessing an Exodus II model file or postprocessing an Exodus II results file using Matlab

  6. A Computerized Adaptive Edition of the Differential Aptitude Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, James R.

    An overview of the development of a computerized version of the Differential Aptitude Tests (DAT) is presented. It describes the previously existing printed version of the DAT, design of the computerized adaptive edition, calibration of the test items for use in the computerized version, and two field studies that compared the Adaptive and…

  7. Constructing Rotating Item Pools for Constrained Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Adelaide; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2004-01-01

    Preventing items in adaptive testing from being over- or underexposed is one of the main problems in computerized adaptive testing. Though the problem of overexposed items can be solved using a probabilistic item-exposure control method, such methods are unable to deal with the problem of underexposed items. Using a system of rotating item pools,…

  8. MCATL: A Language for Authoring Computerized Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, C. David

    The specification of a computerized adaptive test, like the specification of computer-assisted instruction, is easier and can be done by personnel who are not proficient in computer programming if an authoring language is provided. The Minnesota Computerized Adaptive Testing Language (MCATL) is an authoring language specifically designed for…

  9. Computerized Adaptive Personality Testing: A Review and Illustration With the MMPI-2 Computerized Adaptive Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbey, Johnathan D.; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.

    2007-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing in personality assessment can improve efficiency by significantly reducing the number of items administered to answer an assessment question. Two approaches have been explored for adaptive testing in computerized personality assessment: item response theory and the countdown method. In this article, the authors…

  10. Evaluating the Content Validity of Multistage-Adaptive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crotts, Katrina; Sireci, Stephen G.; Zenisky, April

    2012-01-01

    Validity evidence based on test content is important for educational tests to demonstrate the degree to which they fulfill their purposes. Most content validity studies involve subject matter experts (SMEs) who rate items that comprise a test form. In computerized-adaptive testing, examinees take different sets of items and test "forms" do not…

  11. A Comparison of Testlet-Based Test Designs for Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnipke, Deborah L.; Reese, Lynda M.

    Two-stage and multistage test designs provide a way of roughly adapting item difficulty to test-taker ability. All test takers take a parallel stage-one test, and, based on their scores, they are routed to tests of different difficulty levels in subsequent stages. These designs provide some of the benefits of standard computerized adaptive testing…

  12. Computerized Adaptive Testing, Anxiety Levels, and Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritts, Barbara E.; Marszalek, Jacob M.

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the amount of test anxiety experienced on a computerized adaptive test (CAT) to a paper-and-pencil test (P&P), as well as the state test anxiety experienced between males and females. Ninety-four middle school CAT examinees were compared to 65 middle school P&P examinees on their responses to the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory…

  13. An Automatic Online Calibration Design in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makransky, Guido; Glas, Cees A. W.

    2010-01-01

    An accurately calibrated item bank is essential for a valid computerized adaptive test. However, in some settings, such as occupational testing, there is limited access to test takers for calibration. As a result of the limited access to possible test takers, collecting data to accurately calibrate an item bank in an occupational setting is…

  14. Modern Sequential Analysis and Its Applications to Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartroff, Jay; Finkelman, Matthew; Lai, Tze Leung

    2008-01-01

    After a brief review of recent advances in sequential analysis involving sequential generalized likelihood ratio tests, we discuss their use in psychometric testing and extend the asymptotic optimality theory of these sequential tests to the case of sequentially generated experiments, of particular interest in computerized adaptive testing. We…

  15. Turkish Adaptation of Test of Pretended Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Aydan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of present research is to conduct validity and reliability analysis of the verbal section of Test of Pretended Play that will measure pretended play behaviors of pre-school age children (3-6 years of age). Test of Pretended Play was first developed by Vicky Lewis and Jill Boucher in 1997. This test aimed to measure pretended play…

  16. Application of Sequential Interval Estimation to Adaptive Mastery Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yuan-chin Ivan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we apply sequential one-sided confidence interval estimation procedures with beta-protection to adaptive mastery testing. The procedures of fixed-width and fixed proportional accuracy confidence interval estimation can be viewed as extensions of one-sided confidence interval procedures. It can be shown that the adaptive mastery…

  17. A Sharing Item Response Theory Model for Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2004-01-01

    A new sharing item response theory (SIRT) model is presented that explicitly models the effects of sharing item content between informants and test takers. This model is used to construct adaptive item selection and scoring rules that provide increased precision and reduced score gains in instances where sharing occurs. The adaptive item selection…

  18. Computerized-Adaptive and Self-Adapted Music-Listening Tests: Psychometric Features and Motivational Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vispoel, Walter P.; Coffman, Don D.

    1994-01-01

    Computerized-adaptive (CAT) and self-adapted (SAT) music listening tests were compared for efficiency, reliability, validity, and motivational benefits with 53 junior high school students. Results demonstrate trade-offs, with greater potential motivational benefits for SAT and greater efficiency for CAT. SAT elicited more favorable responses from…

  19. Balancing Flexible Constraints and Measurement Precision in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Eric L.; Galindo, Jennifer L.; Dodd, Barbara G.

    2012-01-01

    Managing test specifications--both multiple nonstatistical constraints and flexibly defined constraints--has become an important part of designing item selection procedures for computerized adaptive tests (CATs) in achievement testing. This study compared the effectiveness of three procedures: constrained CAT, flexible modified constrained CAT,…

  20. Cross-Validation of the Computerized Adaptive Screening Test (CAST).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pliske, Rebecca M.; And Others

    The Computerized Adaptive Screening Test (CAST) was developed to provide an estimate at recruiting stations of prospects' Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) scores. The CAST was designed to replace the paper-and-pencil Enlistment Screening Test (EST). The initial validation study of CAST indicated that CAST predicts AFQT at least as accurately…

  1. Adaptation of a-Stratified Method in Variable Length Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, Jian-Bing; Chang, Hua-Hua; Hau, Kit-Tai

    Test security has often been a problem in computerized adaptive testing (CAT) because the traditional wisdom of item selection overly exposes high discrimination items. The a-stratified (STR) design advocated by H. Chang and his collaborators, which uses items of less discrimination in earlier stages of testing, has been shown to be very…

  2. A Computer-Adaptive Vocabulary Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, Maria Teresa Lopez-Mezquita

    2009-01-01

    Lexical competence is considered to be an essential step in the development and consolidation of a student's linguistic ability, and thus the reliable assessment of such competence turns out to be a fundamental aspect in this process. The design and construction of vocabulary tests has become an area of special interest, as it may provide teachers…

  3. Automation of assertion testing - Grid and adaptive techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Assertions can be used to automate the process of testing software. Two methods for automating the generation of input test data are described in this paper. One method selects the input values of variables at regular intervals in a 'grid'. The other, adaptive testing, uses assertion violations as a measure of errors detected and generates new test cases based on test results. The important features of assertion testing are that: it can be used throughout the entire testing cycle; it provides automatic notification of error conditions; and it can be used with automatic input generation techniques which eliminate the subjectivity in choosing test data.

  4. In-situ Curing Strain Monitoring of a Flat Plate Residual Stress Specimen Using a Chopped Stand Mat Glass/Epoxy Composite as Test Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Skordos, A.; James, S.; Correia, R. G.; Jensen, M.

    2015-12-01

    The curing stresses in a newly proposed bi-axial residual stress testing configuration are studied using a chopped strand mat glass/epoxy specimen. In-situ monitoring of the curing is conducted using dielectric and fibre Bragg grating sensors. It is confirmed that a bi-axial residual stress state can be introduced in the specimens during curing and a quantification of its magnitude is presented. An alternative decomposition method used for converting the dielectric signal into a material state variable is proposed and good agreement with models found in the literature is obtained. From the cure cycles chosen it is suggested that any stress build up in the un-vitrified state is relaxed immediately and only stress build up in the vitrified state contributes to the residual stress state in the specimen.

  5. Oral adaptation of the Trail Making Test: A practical review.

    PubMed

    Kaemmerer, Tobias; Riordan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most widely used measures in clinical neuropsychology, the Trail Making Test is highly reliant on intact vision and motor functioning. Given that these capacities are often compromised in patients requiring neuropsychological evaluation, various authors have proposed methods for adapting the Trail Making Test for oral administration. To date, a number of administration and score transformation methods have been proposed. We reviewed the existing literature on oral adaptation of the Trail Making Test in order to provide recommendations for practicing clinicians wishing to use the measure, and to highlight directions for future research. PMID:27218477

  6. An adaptive interferometer for optical testing .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariani, G.; Colella, L.; Bertarelli, C.; Aliverti, M.; Riva, M.; Bianco, A.

    Interferometry is a well-established technique to test optical elements. However, its use is challenging in the case of free-form and aspheric elements, due to the lack of the reference optics. The proposed idea concerns the development of a versatile interferometer, where its reference arm is equipped with a reprogrammable Computer Generated Hologram. This principle takes advantage from our study on photochromic materials for optical applications, which shows a strong and reversible modulation of transparency in the visible region. The encoding of the desired hologram can be done off-line, or directly into the interferometer, and different patterns may be realized sequentially after the erasing of the previous hologram. We report on the present state of the research and on the future perspectives. skip=5pt

  7. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  8. Deriving Stopping Rules for Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Boughton, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    Multidimensional computerized adaptive testing (MCAT) is able to provide a vector of ability estimates for each examinee, which could be used to provide a more informative profile of an examinee's performance. The current literature on MCAT focuses on the fixed-length tests, which can generate less accurate results for those examinees whose…

  9. When Cognitive Diagnosis Meets Computerized Adaptive Testing: CD-CAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is a mode of testing which enables more efficient and accurate recovery of one or more latent traits. Traditionally, CAT is built upon Item Response Theory (IRT) models that assume unidimensionality. However, the problem of how to build CAT upon latent class models (LCM) has not been investigated until recently,…

  10. Computerized Adaptive Testing: From Inquiry to Operation [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    This book documents the research, development, and implementation efforts that allowed the U.S. Department of Defense to initiate the Computerized Adaptive Testing Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery Program for enlistment testing. Traces the history of this program over 30 years. (SLD)

  11. A Conditional Exposure Control Method for Multidimensional Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelman, Matthew; Nering, Michael L.; Roussos, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    In computerized adaptive testing (CAT), ensuring the security of test items is a crucial practical consideration. A common approach to reducing item theft is to define maximum item exposure rates, i.e., to limit the proportion of examinees to whom a given item can be administered. Numerous methods for controlling exposure rates have been proposed…

  12. An Adaptive Testing System for Supporting Versatile Educational Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yueh-Min; Lin, Yen-Ting; Cheng, Shu-Chen

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid growth of computer and mobile technology, it is a challenge to integrate computer based test (CBT) with mobile learning (m-learning) especially for formative assessment and self-assessment. In terms of self-assessment, computer adaptive test (CAT) is a proper way to enable students to evaluate themselves. In CAT, students are…

  13. Microcomputer Network for Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT): Program Listing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quan, Baldwin; And Others

    This program listing is a supplement to the Microcomputer Network for Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). The driver textfile program allows access to major subprograms of the CAT project. The test administration textfile program gives examinees a prescribed set of subtests. The parameter management textfile program establishes a file containing…

  14. Test Translation and Adaptation in Public Education in the USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses theoretical and practical issues pertaining to translation or adaptation of educational assessments in the United States. These include the role of language proficiency and academic background in performance on standards-based achievement tests in different languages, factors affecting the decision to translate tests in different…

  15. Mutual Information Item Selection in Adaptive Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    A general approach for item selection in adaptive multiple-category classification tests is provided. The approach uses mutual information (MI), a special case of the Kullback-Leibler distance, or relative entropy. MI works efficiently with the sequential probability ratio test and alleviates the difficulties encountered with using other local-…

  16. Proceedings of the 1977 Computerized Adaptive Testing Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J., Ed.

    The 27 papers in this collection (26 of which were presented at the conference) are organized according to the eight topical sessions: (1) Improving Ability Measurement Using Different Item Formats, (2) Alternative Models for Adaptive Testing, (3) Psychological and Subgroup Effects, (4) Performance Testing by Interactive Simulation, (5)…

  17. Ground test validation of large precision structure through adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.

    1992-01-01

    Without novel ground validation test (GVT) approaches for such space structures as those contemplated for an orbiting optical interferometer, this and other NASA missions will be stillborn. One such approach may involve the integration of adaptive structures concepts into initial structural designs, in order to accommodate GVT, as well as to allow for redundancy and enhance mission reliability. Adaptive structures are noted to intrinsically relax GVT requirements.

  18. Estimating Skin Cancer Risk: Evaluating Mobile Computer-Adaptive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Djaja, Ngadiman; Janda, Monika; Olsen, Catherine M; Whiteman, David C

    2016-01-01

    Background Response burden is a major detriment to questionnaire completion rates. Computer adaptive testing may offer advantages over non-adaptive testing, including reduction of numbers of items required for precise measurement. Objective Our aim was to compare the efficiency of non-adaptive (NAT) and computer adaptive testing (CAT) facilitated by Partial Credit Model (PCM)-derived calibration to estimate skin cancer risk. Methods We used a random sample from a population-based Australian cohort study of skin cancer risk (N=43,794). All 30 items of the skin cancer risk scale were calibrated with the Rasch PCM. A total of 1000 cases generated following a normal distribution (mean [SD] 0 [1]) were simulated using three Rasch models with three fixed-item (dichotomous, rating scale, and partial credit) scenarios, respectively. We calculated the comparative efficiency and precision of CAT and NAT (shortening of questionnaire length and the count difference number ratio less than 5% using independent t tests). Results We found that use of CAT led to smaller person standard error of the estimated measure than NAT, with substantially higher efficiency but no loss of precision, reducing response burden by 48%, 66%, and 66% for dichotomous, Rating Scale Model, and PCM models, respectively. Conclusions CAT-based administrations of the skin cancer risk scale could substantially reduce participant burden without compromising measurement precision. A mobile computer adaptive test was developed to help people efficiently assess their skin cancer risk. PMID:26800642

  19. Polytomous Adaptive Classification Testing: Effects of Item Pool Size, Test Termination Criterion, and Number of Cutscores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnambs, Timo; Batinic, Bernad

    2011-01-01

    Computer-adaptive classification tests focus on classifying respondents in different proficiency groups (e.g., for pass/fail decisions). To date, adaptive classification testing has been dominated by research on dichotomous response formats and classifications in two groups. This article extends this line of research to polytomous classification…

  20. Use of adaptive walls in 2D tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archambaud, J. P.; Chevallier, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    A new method for computing the wall effects gives precise answers to some questions arising in adaptive wall concept applications: length of adapted regions, fairings with up and downstream regions, residual misadjustments effects, reference conditions. The acceleration of the iterative process convergence and the development of an efficient technology used in CERT T2 wind tunnels give in a single run the required test conditions. Samples taken from CAST 7 tests demonstrate the efficiency of the whole process to obtain significant results with considerations of tridimensional case extension.

  1. HIDEC F-15 adaptive engine control system flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, James W.

    1987-01-01

    NASA-Ames' Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) flight test program aims to develop fully integrated airframe, propulsion, and flight control systems. The HIDEC F-15 adaptive engine control system flight test program has demonstrated that significant performance improvements are obtainable through the retention of stall-free engine operation throughout the aircraft flight and maneuver envelopes. The greatest thrust increase was projected for the medium-to-high altitude flight regime at subsonic speed which is of such importance to air combat. Adaptive engine control systems such as the HIDEC F-15's can be used to upgrade the performance of existing aircraft without resort to expensive reengining programs.

  2. Extruder Operator (plastics mat.) 6-51.468--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  3. The Influence of Examinee Test-Taking Motivation in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, JinGyu; McLean, James E.

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of test motivation on estimated ability, test anxiety, and attitudes toward computerized adaptive testing (CAT). Korean college students (n=208) were given the Math Aptitude Test, Math Self-Concept Scale, Math Test Anxiety Scale, Computer Competence Instrument, Computer Anxiety Scale, and…

  4. The Nominal Response Model in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Ayala, R. J.

    One important and promising application of item response theory (IRT) is computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The implementation of a nominal response model-based CAT (NRCAT) was studied. Item pool characteristics for the NRCAT as well as the comparative performance of the NRCAT and a CAT based on the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model were…

  5. Computerized Adaptive Testing System Design: Preliminary Design Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croll, Paul R.

    A functional design model for a computerized adaptive testing (CAT) system was developed and presented through a series of hierarchy plus input-process-output (HIPO) diagrams. System functions were translated into system structure: specifically, into 34 software components. Implementation of the design in a physical system was addressed through…

  6. Multiple Maximum Exposure Rates in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramon Barrada, Juan; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Olea, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing is subject to security problems, as the item bank content remains operative over long periods and administration time is flexible for examinees. Spreading the content of a part of the item bank could lead to an overestimation of the examinees' trait level. The most common way of reducing this risk is to impose a…

  7. Brazilian Adaptation of the Woodcock-Johnson III Cognitive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Solange Muglia; Nunes, Carlos Sancineto; Schelini, Patricia Waltz; Pasian, Sonia Regina; Homsi, Silvia Vertoni; Moretti, Lucia; Anache, Alexandra Ayach

    2010-01-01

    An adaptation of the standard battery of Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-III) for Brazilian children and youth was investigated. The sample was composed of 1094 students (54 percent girls), ages 7-17, living in Sao Paulo state (91 percent). Items from Brazilian school books as well as from the WJ-III Spanish version…

  8. A Monte Carlo Approach for Adaptive Testing with Content Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.; Armstrong, Ronald D.; Weissman, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a new algorithm for computerized adaptive testing (CAT) when content constraints are present. The algorithm is based on shadow CAT methodology to meet content constraints but applies Monte Carlo methods and provides the following advantages over shadow CAT: (a) lower maximum item exposure rates, (b) higher utilization of the…

  9. A Framework for the Development of Computerized Adaptive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.; Weiss, David J.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial amount of research has been conducted over the past 40 years on technical aspects of computerized adaptive testing (CAT), such as item selection algorithms, item exposure controls, and termination criteria. However, there is little literature providing practical guidance on the development of a CAT. This paper seeks to collate some…

  10. 21. DREDGING POND USED TO TEST THE ADAPTABILITY OF JET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DREDGING POND USED TO TEST THE ADAPTABILITY OF JET PUMPS FOR PUMPING SAND, AND WEAR RATES OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF DREDGING PIPE. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  11. Computer Adaptive Testing for Small Scale Programs and Instructional Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.; Guo, Fanmin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates measurement decision theory (MDT) as an underlying model for computer adaptive testing when the goal is to classify examinees into one of a finite number of groups. The first analysis compares MDT with a popular item response theory model and finds little difference in terms of the percentage of correct classifications. The…

  12. Multistage Computerized Adaptive Testing with Uniform Item Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Michael C.; Flora, David B.; Thissen, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a computerized adaptive test (CAT) based on the uniform item exposure multi-form structure (uMFS). The uMFS is a specialization of the multi-form structure (MFS) idea described by Armstrong, Jones, Berliner, and Pashley (1998). In an MFS CAT, the examinee first responds to a small fixed block of items. The items comprising…

  13. Adapter assembly prevents damage to tubing during high pressure tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinett, L. L.

    1965-01-01

    Portable adapter assembly prevents damage to tubing and injury to personnel when pressurizing a system or during high pressure tests. The assembly is capable of withstanding high pressure. It is securely attached to the tubing stub end and may be removed without brazing, cutting or cleaning the tube.

  14. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Multiple-Form Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald D.; Jones, Douglas H.; Koppel, Nicole B.; Pashley, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    A multiple-form structure (MFS) is an ordered collection or network of testlets (i.e., sets of items). An examinee's progression through the network of testlets is dictated by the correctness of an examinee's answers, thereby adapting the test to his or her trait level. The collection of paths through the network yields the set of all possible…

  15. Using Response Times for Item Selection in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Response times on items can be used to improve item selection in adaptive testing provided that a probabilistic model for their distribution is available. In this research, the author used a hierarchical modeling framework with separate first-level models for the responses and response times and a second-level model for the distribution of the…

  16. Application of the Bifactor Model to Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Dong Gi

    2011-01-01

    Most computerized adaptive tests (CAT) have been studied under the framework of unidimensional item response theory. However, many psychological variables are multidimensional and might benefit from using a multidimensional approach to CAT. In addition, a number of psychological variables (e.g., quality of life, depression) can be conceptualized…

  17. ProMat

    2008-06-12

    ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code

  18. The effects of mats on back and leg fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Stuart-Buttle, C; Marras, W S

    1994-02-01

    Prolonged standing is common in many industrial workplaces. It is also quite common for workers to complain of discomfort in the back and legs as a result of prolonged standing. Mats are often provided for the worker to relieve this fatigue. However, there is no quantitative evidence that these mats relieve leg and back fatigue. Five subjects were asked to stand on a concrete surface and two mat surfaces for prolonged periods of time. Spectral electromyographic analyses indicated that mats reduced localized muscle fatigue in the erector spinae muscle only. Furthermore, this fatigue reduction occurred only with the more compressible of the two mats tested. These results imply that localized muscular fatigue in the leg may not be relieved with 'anti-fatigue' mats, and some of these mats only benefit the back. PMID:15676945

  19. A Procedure for Controlling General Test Overlap in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shu-Ying

    2010-01-01

    To date, exposure control procedures that are designed to control test overlap in computerized adaptive tests (CATs) are based on the assumption of item sharing between pairs of examinees. However, in practice, examinees may obtain test information from more than one previous test taker. This larger scope of information sharing needs to be…

  20. High-resolution adaptive optics test bed for vision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, Scott C.; Thompson, Charles A.; Olivier, Scot S.; Bauman, Brian J.; Flath, Laurence M.; Silva, Dennis A.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Barnes, Thomas B.; Werner, John S.

    2002-02-01

    We discuss the design and implementation of a low-cost, high-resolution adaptive optics test-bed for vision research. It is well known that high-order aberrations in the human eye reduce optical resolution and limit visual acuity. However, the effects of aberration-free eyesight on vision are only now beginning to be studied using adaptive optics to sense and correct the aberrations in the eye. We are developing a high-resolution adaptive optics system for this purpose using a Hamamatsu Parallel Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator. Phase-wrapping is used to extend the effective stroke of the device, and the wavefront sensing and wavefront correction are done at different wavelengths. Issues associated with these techniques will be discussed.

  1. Computerized Adaptive Diagnosis and Testing of Mental Health Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Robert D; Weiss, David J; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David

    2016-03-28

    In this review we explore recent developments in computerized adaptive diagnostic screening and computerized adaptive testing for the presence and severity of mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, and mania. The statistical methodology is unique in that it is based on multidimensional item response theory (severity) and random forests (diagnosis) instead of traditional mental health measurement based on classical test theory (a simple total score) or unidimensional item response theory. We show that the information contained in large item banks consisting of hundreds of symptom items can be efficiently calibrated using multidimensional item response theory, and the information contained in these large item banks can be precisely extracted using adaptive administration of a small set of items for each individual. In terms of diagnosis, computerized adaptive diagnostic screening can accurately track an hour-long face-to-face clinician diagnostic interview for major depressive disorder (as an example) in less than a minute using an average of four questions with unprecedented high sensitivity and specificity. Directions for future research and applications are discussed. PMID:26651865

  2. Development and Simulation Testing of a Computerized Adaptive Version of the Philadelphia Naming Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hula, William D.; Kellough, Stacey; Fergadiotis, Gerasimos

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized adaptive test (CAT) version of the Philadelphia Naming Test (PNT; Roach, Schwartz, Martin, Grewal, & Brecher, 1996), to reduce test length while maximizing measurement precision. This article is a direct extension of a companion article (Fergadiotis, Kellough, & Hula, 2015),…

  3. A Multiple Objective Test Assembly Approach for Exposure Control Problems in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Verschoor, Angela J.; Eggen, Theo J. H. M.

    2010-01-01

    Overexposure and underexposure of items in the bank are serious problems in operational computerized adaptive testing (CAT) systems. These exposure problems might result in item compromise, or point at a waste of investments. The exposure control problem can be viewed as a test assembly problem with multiple objectives. Information in the test has…

  4. A Computerized Implementation of a Flexilevel Test and Its Comparison with a Bayesian Computerized Adaptive Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAyala, R. J.; Koch, William R.

    A computerized flexilevel test was implemented and its ability estimates were compared with those of a Bayesian estimation based computerized adaptive test (CAT) as well as with known true ability estimates. Results showed that when the flexilevel test was terminated according to Lord's criterion, its ability estimates were highly and…

  5. Bayesian Decision Theory for Multi-Category Adaptive Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinagi, Catherine C.; Kaburlasos, Vassilis G.

    2008-09-01

    This work presents a method for item selection in adaptive tests based on Bayesian Decision Theory (BDT). Multiple categories of examinee's competence level are assumed. The method determines the probability an examinee belongs to each category using Bayesian statistics. Before starting a test, prior probabilities of an examinee are assumed. Then, each time an examinee responds to a single item, a new competence level is estimated "a-posteriori" using item response and prior probabilities values. A customized focus-of-attention vector of probabilities is estimated, which is used to draw the next item from the Item Bank. The latter vector considers both Personalized Cost and content balancing percentages of items.

  6. Micro-hybrid electric vehicle application of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries in absorbent glass mat technology: Testing a partial-state-of-charge operation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Hockgeiger, E.

    The BMW Group has launched two micro-hybrid functions in high volume models in order to contribute to reduction of fuel consumption in modern passenger cars. Both the brake energy regeneration (BER) and the auto-start-stop function (ASSF) are based on the conventional 14 V vehicle electrical system and current series components with only little modifications. An intelligent control algorithm of the alternator enables recuperative charging in braking and coasting phases, known as BER. By switching off the internal combustion engine at a vehicle standstill the idling fuel consumption is effectively reduced by ASSF. By reason of economy and package a lead-acid battery is used as electrochemical energy storage device. The BMW Group assembles valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries in absorbent glass mat (AGM) technology in the micro-hybrid electrical power system since special challenges arise for the batteries. By field data analysis a lower average state-of-charge (SOC) due to partial state-of-charge (PSOC) operation and a higher cycling rate due to BER and ASSF are confirmed in this article. Similar to a design of experiment (DOE) like method we present a long-term lab investigation. Two types of 90 Ah VRLA AGM batteries are operated with a test bench profile that simulates the micro-hybrid vehicle electrical system under varying conditions. The main attention of this lab testing is focused on capacity loss and charge acceptance over cycle life. These effects are put into context with periodically refresh charging the batteries in order to prevent accelerated battery aging due to hard sulfation. We demonstrate the positive effect of refresh chargings concerning preservation of battery charge acceptance. Furthermore, we observe moderate capacity loss over 90 full cycles both at 25 °C and at 3 °C battery temperature.

  7. Adaptation to Room Acoustics Using the Modified Rhyme Test

    PubMed Central

    Brandewie, Eugene; Zahorik, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    The negative effect of reverberant sound energy on speech intelligibility is well documented. Recently, however, prior exposure to room acoustics has been shown to increase intelligibility for a number of listeners in simulated room environments. This room adaptation effect, a possible extension of dynamic echo suppression, has been shown to be specific to reverberant rooms and requires binaural input. Because this effect has been demonstrated only using the Coordinated Response Measure (CRM) corpus it is important to determine whether the increase in intelligibility scores reported previously was due to the specific nature of the CRM task. Here we demonstrate a comparable room-acoustic effect using the Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) corpus in multiple room environments. The results are consistent with the idea that the room adaptation effect may be a natural phenomenon of listening in reverberant environments. PMID:23437415

  8. Biogeochemistry of Microbial Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenizi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines the rates of processes that shape Earth's environment, define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred, and create biosignatures in sediments and atmospheres. In cyanobacterial mats, oxygenic photosynthesis provides energy, organic substrates and oxygen to the ecosystem. Incident light changes with depth in the mat, both in intensity and spectral composition, and counteracting gradients of oxygen and sulfide shape the chemical microenvironment. A combination of benefits and hazards of light, oxygen and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Microliters produce hydrogen, small organic acids, nitrogen and sulfur species. Such compounds fuel a flow of energy and electrons in these ecosystems and thus shape interactions between groups of microorganisms. Coordinated observations of population distribution, abundance, and activity for an entire community are making fundamental questions in ecology accessible. These questions address those factors that sustain the remarkable diversity of microorganisms that are now being revealed by molecular techniques. These questions also target the processes that shape the various kinds of biosignatures that we will seek, both in ancient rocks from Earth and Mars, and in atmospheres of distant planets beyond our Solar System.

  9. Practical Considerations about Expected A Posteriori Estimation in Adaptive Testing: Adaptive A Priori, Adaptive Correction for Bias, and Adaptive Integration Interval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiche, Gilles; Blais, Jean-Guy

    In a computerized adaptive test (CAT), it would be desirable to obtain an acceptable precision of the proficiency level estimate using an optimal number of items. Decreasing the number of items is accompanied, however, by a certain degree of bias when the true proficiency level differs significantly from the a priori estimate. G. Raiche (2000) has…

  10. Testing the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph on the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Soummer, Rémi; Dillon, Daren; Macintosh, Bruce; Gavel, Donald; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand

    2011-10-01

    We present testbed results of the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph (APLC) at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics (LAO). These results are part of the validation and tests of the coronagraph and of the Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The apodizer component is manufactured with a halftone technique using black chrome microdots on glass. Testing this APLC (like any other coronagraph) requires extremely good wavefront correction, which is obtained to the 1 nm rms level using the microelectricalmechanical systems (MEMS) technology, on the ExAO visible testbed of the LAO at the University of Santa Cruz. We used an APLC coronagraph without central obstruction, both with a reference super-polished flat mirror and with the MEMS to obtain one of the first images of a dark zone in a coronagraphic image with classical adaptive optics using a MEMS deformable mirror (without involving dark hole algorithms). This was done as a complementary test to the GPI coronagraph testbed at American Museum of Natural History, which studied the coronagraph itself without wavefront correction. Because we needed a full aperture, the coronagraph design is very different from the GPI design. We also tested a coronagraph with central obstruction similar to that of GPI. We investigated the performance of the APLC coronagraph and more particularly the effect of the apodizer profile accuracy on the contrast. Finally, we compared the resulting contrast to predictions made with a wavefront propagation model of the testbed to understand the effects of phase and amplitude errors on the final contrast.

  11. TESTING THE APODIZED PUPIL LYOT CORONAGRAPH ON THE LABORATORY FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS EXTREME ADAPTIVE OPTICS TESTBED

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Donald; Macintosh, Bruce; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand E-mail: dillon@ucolick.org E-mail: soummer@stsci.edu E-mail: anand@amnh.org

    2011-10-15

    We present testbed results of the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph (APLC) at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics (LAO). These results are part of the validation and tests of the coronagraph and of the Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The apodizer component is manufactured with a halftone technique using black chrome microdots on glass. Testing this APLC (like any other coronagraph) requires extremely good wavefront correction, which is obtained to the 1 nm rms level using the microelectricalmechanical systems (MEMS) technology, on the ExAO visible testbed of the LAO at the University of Santa Cruz. We used an APLC coronagraph without central obstruction, both with a reference super-polished flat mirror and with the MEMS to obtain one of the first images of a dark zone in a coronagraphic image with classical adaptive optics using a MEMS deformable mirror (without involving dark hole algorithms). This was done as a complementary test to the GPI coronagraph testbed at American Museum of Natural History, which studied the coronagraph itself without wavefront correction. Because we needed a full aperture, the coronagraph design is very different from the GPI design. We also tested a coronagraph with central obstruction similar to that of GPI. We investigated the performance of the APLC coronagraph and more particularly the effect of the apodizer profile accuracy on the contrast. Finally, we compared the resulting contrast to predictions made with a wavefront propagation model of the testbed to understand the effects of phase and amplitude errors on the final contrast.

  12. The Selection of Test Items for Decision Making with a Computer Adaptive Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spray, Judith A.; Reckase, Mark D.

    The issue of test-item selection in support of decision making in adaptive testing is considered. The number of items needed to make a decision is compared for two approaches: selecting items from an item pool that are most informative at the decision point or selecting items that are most informative at the examinee's ability level. The first…

  13. Constraining Item Exposure in Computerized Adaptive Testing with Shadow Tests. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    Item-exposure control in computerized adaptive testing is implemented by imposing item-ineligibility constraints on the assembly process of the shadow tests. The method resembles J. Sympson and R. Hetter's (1985) method of item-exposure control in that the decisions to impose the constraints are probabilistic. However, the method does not require…

  14. Modeling Student Test-Taking Motivation in the Context of an Adaptive Achievement Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Steven L.; Kingsbury, G. Gage

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the utility of response time-based analyses in understanding the behavior of unmotivated test takers. For the data from an adaptive achievement test, patterns of observed rapid-guessing behavior and item response accuracy were compared to the behavior expected under several types of models that have been proposed to represent…

  15. Assembling a Computerized Adaptive Testing Item Pool as a Set of Linear Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Ariel, Adelaide; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Test-item writing efforts typically results in item pools with an undesirable correlational structure between the content attributes of the items and their statistical information. If such pools are used in computerized adaptive testing (CAT), the algorithm may be forced to select items with less than optimal information, that violate the content…

  16. Adaptive Testing with Equated Number-Correct Scoring. Research Report 99-02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    A constrained computerized adaptive testing (CAT) algorithm is presented that automatically equates the number-correct scores on adaptive tests. The algorithm can be used to equate number-correct scores across different administrations of the same adaptive test as well as to an external reference test. The constraints are derived from a set of…

  17. Igniter adapter-to-igniter chamber deflection test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Testing was performed to determine the maximum RSRM igniter adapter-to-igniter chamber joint deflection at the crown of the inner joint primary seal. The deflection data was gathered to support igniter inner joint gasket resiliency predictions which led to launch commit criteria temperature determinations. The proximity (deflection) gage holes for the first test (Test No. 1) were incorrectly located; therefore, the test was declared a non-test. Prior to Test No. 2, test article configuration was modified with the correct proximity gage locations. Deflection data were successfully acquired during Test No. 2. However, the proximity gage deflection measurements were adversely affected by temperature increases. Deflections measured after the temperature rise at the proximity gages were considered unreliable. An analysis was performed to predict the maximum deflections based on the reliable data measured before the detectable temperature rise. Deflections to the primary seal crown location were adjusted to correspond to the time of maximum expected operating pressure (2,159 psi) to account for proximity gage bias, and to account for maximum attach and special bolt relaxation. The maximum joint deflection for the igniter inner joint at the crown of the primary seal, accounting for all significant correction factors, was 0.0031 in. (3.1 mil). Since the predicted (0.003 in.) and tested maximum deflection values were sufficiently close, the launch commit criteria was not changed as a result of this test. Data from this test should be used to determine if the igniter inner joint gasket seals are capable of maintaining sealing capability at a joint displacement of (1.4) x (0.0031 in.) = 0.00434 inches. Additional testing should be performed to increase the database on igniter deflections and address launch commit criteria temperatures.

  18. Development of a Computerized Adaptive Test for Schizotypy Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Menéndez, Luis Fernando; Paino, Mercedes; Lemos-Giráldez, Serafín; Muñiz, José

    2013-01-01

    Background Schizotypal traits in adolescents from the general population represent the behavioral expression of liability for psychotic disorders. Schizotypy assessment in this sector of population has advanced considerably in the last few years; however, it is necessary to incorporate recent advances in psychological and educational measurement. Objective The main goal of this study was to develop a Computerized Adaptive Test (CAT) to evaluate schizotypy through “The Oviedo Questionnaire for Schizotypy Assessment” (ESQUIZO-Q), in non-clinical adolescents. Methods The final sample consisted of 3,056 participants, 1,469 males, with a mean age of 15.9 years (SD = 1.2). Results The results indicated that the ESQUIZO-Q scores presented adequate psychometric properties under both Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory. The Information Function estimated using the Gradual Response Model indicated that the item pool effectively assesses schizotypy at the high end of the latent trait. The correlation between the CAT total scores and the paper-and-pencil test was 0.92. The mean number of presented items in the CAT with the standard error fixed at ≤0.30 was of 34 items. Conclusion The CAT showed adequate psychometric properties for schizotypy assessment in the general adolescent population. The ESQUIZO-Q adaptive version could be used as a screening method for the detection of adolescents at risk for psychosis in both educational and mental health settings. PMID:24019907

  19. Reading Test-Sentence Comprehension: An Adapted Version of Lobrot's Lecture 3 Test for Brazilian Portuguese.

    PubMed

    de Araújo Vilhena, Douglas; Sucena, Ana; Castro, São Luís; Pinheiro, Ângela Maria Vieira

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to analyse the linguistic structure of the Lobrot's Lecture 3 (L3) reading test and to describe the procedure for its adaptation to a Brazilian cultural-linguistic context. The resulting adapted version is called the Reading Test-Sentence Comprehension [Teste de Leitura: Compreensão de Sentenças (TELCS)] and was developed using the European Portuguese adaptation of L3 as a reference. The present study was conducted in seven steps: (1) classification of the response alternatives of L3 test; (2) adaptation of the original sentences into Brazilian Portuguese; (3) back-translation; (4) adaptation of the distractors from TELCS; (5) configuration of TELCS; (6) pilot study; and (7) validation and standardization. In comparison with L3, TELCS included new linguistic and structural variables, such as frequency of occurrence of the distractors, gender neutrality and position of the target words. The instrument can be used for a collective screening or individual clinical administration purposes to evaluate the reading ability of second-to-fifth-grade and 7-to-11-year-old students. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26767907

  20. Multistage Adaptive Testing for a Large-Scale Classification Test: Design, Heuristic Assembly, and Comparison with Other Testing Modes. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (6)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Yi; Nozawa, Yuki; Gao, Xiaohong; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Multistage adaptive tests (MSTs) have gained increasing popularity in recent years. MST is a balanced compromise between linear test forms (i.e., paper-and-pencil testing and computer-based testing) and traditional item-level computer-adaptive testing (CAT). It combines the advantages of both. On one hand, MST is adaptive (and therefore more…

  1. MatMRI and MatHIFU: Matlab{trade mark, serif} toolboxes for real-time monitoring and control of MR-HIFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Tony; Mougenot, Charles; Kivinen, Jon; Pichardo, Samuel

    2012-11-01

    Background. Availability of open tools is a key feature to facilitate the development of pre-clinical research of Magnetic Resonance-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MR-HIFU). MatMRI is a toolbox that allows direct communication with a Philips{trade mark, serif} MRI scanner in a Matlab{trade mark, serif} environment, which is well-known in many laboratories. MatMRI performs real-time acquisition of magnitude and phase images that can be processed to estimate changes of temperature. Available functionality of MatMRI includes acquisition of individual slices and volumetric data. Analogously to MatMRI, MatHIFU is a toolbox for the control of the Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system. MatHIFU allows the execution of user-defined treatment protocols such as thermal ablation, hyperthermia or drug delivery. MatMRI and MatHIFU can be used independently or in combination. Methods. MatMRI was based on the official tool for MRI data-dumping made by Philips Healthcare. Multi-threading capabilities were added to maximize real-time processing performance. Basic use of MatMRI involves four basic steps: initiate communication, subscribe to MRI data, query for new images and unsubscribe. If required, MatMRI can also pause/resume the scanning and update on real-time the location and orientation of the images. MatHIFU performs the execution of sonication protocols and allows real-time monitoring. Basic use of MatHIFU requires also four steps: preparation of sonication protocol, initiate communication, execute sonication protocol and monitor the state of execution. Results. MatMRI was integrated into existing software used to control a table designed for animal experimentation (FUS Instruments, Canada). The integration in the existing software was seamless and delivered real-time estimation of changes of temperature in a mouse model. Using MatHIFU and MatMRI, a complete new interface to control the Sonalleve system was developed to perform in vivo experiments allowing adapted

  2. Microbial mats and the early evolution of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Microbial mats have descended from perhaps the oldest and most widespread biological communities known. Mats harbor microbes that are crucial for studies of bacterial phylogeny and physiology. They illustrate how several oxygen-sensitive biochemical processes have adapted to oxygen, and they show how life adapted to dry land long before the rise of plants. The search for the earliest grazing protists and metazoa in stromatolites is aided by observations of mats: in them, organic compounds characteristic of ancient photosynthetic protists can be identified. Recent mat studies suggest that the 13C/12C increase observed over geological time in stromatolitic organic matter was driven at least in part by a long-term decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  3. Nondestructive characterization of ductile cast iron by magnetic adaptive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Tomáš, I.; Takagi, T.

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports correlation of magnetic descriptors with Brinell hardness and conductivity of ductile cast iron, aiming to develop a novel nondestructive method by magnetic adaptive testing. Four series of cast iron staircase-shaped samples were investigated by this method, where different cooling rates of samples during casting resulted in different structures of each sample. The flat samples were magnetized by an attached yoke, and sensitive descriptors were obtained from a proper evaluation, based on the measurements of series of magnetic minor hysteresis loops, without magnetic saturation of the samples. Results of the nondestructive magnetic tests were compared with destructive mechanical measurements of Brinell hardness and conductivity and good correlation was found between them.

  4. Design of the Dual Conjugate Adaptive Optics Test-bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, Inna; Bell, K.; Crampton, D.; Fitzsimmons, J.; Herriot, Glen; Jolissaint, Laurent; Lee, B.; Richardson, H.; van der Kamp, D.; Veran, Jean-Pierre

    In this paper, we describe the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics laboratory test-bed presently under construction at the University of Victoria, Canada. The test-bench will be used to support research in the performance of multi-conjugate adaptive optics, turbulence simulators, laser guide stars and miniaturizing adaptive optics. The main components of the test-bed include two micro-machined deformable mirrors, a tip-tilt mirror, four wavefront sensors, a source simulator, a dual-layer turbulence simulator, as well as computational and control hardware. The paper will describe in detail the opto-mechanical design of the adaptive optics module, the design of the hot-air turbulence generator and the configuration chosen for the source simulator. Below, we present a summary of these aspects of the bench. The optical and mechanical design of the test-bed has been largely driven by the particular choice of the deformable mirrors. These are continuous micro-machined mirrors manufactured by Boston Micromachines Corporation. They have a clear aperture of 3.3 mm and are deformed with 140 actuators arranged in a square grid. Although the mirrors have an open-loop bandwidth of 6.6 KHz, their shape can be updated at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. In our optical design, the mirrors are conjugated at 0km and 10 km in the atmosphere. A planar optical layout was achieved by using four off-axis paraboloids and several folding mirrors. These optics will be mounted on two solid blocks which can be aligned with respect to each other. The wavefront path design accommodates 3 monochromatic guide stars that can be placed at either 90 km or at infinity. The design relies on the natural separation of the beam into 3 parts because of differences in locations of the guide stars in the field of view. In total four wavefront sensors will be procured from Adaptive Optics Associates (AOA) or built in-house: three for the guide stars and the fourth to collect data from the science source output in

  5. Identifying Differential Item Functioning in Multi-Stage Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Li, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of CATSIB (Computer Adaptive Testing-Simultaneous Item Bias Test) for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) when items in the matching and studied subtest are administered adaptively in the context of a realistic multi-stage adaptive test (MST). MST was simulated using a 4-item…

  6. ESO adaptive optics facility progress and first laboratory test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jérome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-Francois; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Haguenauer, Pierre; Abad, Jose A.; Fischer, Gerhard; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Reyes Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan M.; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Ernstberger, Bernhard; Friedenauer, Axel

    2014-07-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility project is completing the integration of its systems at ESO Headquarters in Garching. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM has undergone a series of tests on ASSIST in 2013 which have validated its optical performance and launched the System Test Phase of the AOF. This has been followed by the performance evaluation of the GRAAL natural guide star mode on-axis and will continue in 2014 with its Ground Layer AO mode. The GALACSI module (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO) will then be tested. The AOF has also taken delivery of the second scientific thin shell mirror and the first 22 Watt Sodium laser Unit. We will report on the system tests status, the performances evaluated on the ASSIST bench and advancement of the 4Laser Guide Star Facility. We will also present the near future plans for commissioning on the telescope and some considerations on tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

  7. Swi6, a Gene Required for Mating-Type Switching, Prohibits Meiotic Recombination in the Mat2-Mat3 ``cold Spot'' of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Klar, AJS.; Bonaduce, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    Mitotic interconversion of the mating-type locus (mat1) of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is initiated by a double-strand break at mat1. The mat2 and mat3 loci act as nonrandom donors of genetic information for mat1 switching such that switches occur primarily (or only) to the opposite mat1 allele. Location of the mat1 ``hot spot'' for transposition should be contrasted with the ``cold spot'' of meiotic recombination located within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval. That is, meiotic interchromosomal recombination in mat2, mat3 and the intervening 15-kilobase region does not occur at all. swi2 and swi6 switching-deficient mutants possess the normal level of double-strand break at mat1, yet they fail to switch efficiently. By testing for meiotic recombination in the cold spot, we found the usual lack of recombination in a swi2 mutant but a significant level of recombination in a swi6 mutant. Therefore, the swi6 gene function is required to keep the donor loci inert for interchromosomal recombination. This finding, combined with the additional result that switching primarily occurs intrachromosomally, suggests that the donor loci are made accessible for switching by folding them onto mat1, thus causing the cold spot of recombination. PMID:1783290

  8. Investigation of VEGGIE Root Mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbiah, Arun M.

    2013-01-01

    VEGGIE is a plant growth facility that utilizes the phenomenon of capillary action as its primary watering system. A cloth made of Meta Aramid fiber, known as Nomex is used to wick water up from a reservoir to the bottom of the plants roots. This root mat system is intended to be low maintenance with no moving parts and requires minimal crew interface time. Unfortunately, the water wicking rates are inconsistent throughout the plant life cycle, thus causing plants to die. Over-wicking of water occurs toward the beginning of the cycle, while under-wicking occurs toward the middle. This inconsistency of wicking has become a major issue, drastically inhibiting plant growth. The primary objective is to determine the root cause of the inconsistent wicking through experimental testing. Suspect causes for the capillary water column to break include: a vacuum effect due to a negative pressure gradient in the water reservoir, contamination of material due to minerals in water and back wash from plant fertilizer, induced air bubbles while using syringe refill method, and material limitations of Nomex's ability to absorb and retain water. Experimental testing will be conducted to systematically determine the cause of under and over-wicking. Pressure gages will be used to determine pressure drop during the course of the plant life cycle and during the water refill process. A debubbler device will be connected to a root mat in order to equalize pressure inside the reservoir. Moisture and evaporation tests will simultaneously be implemented to observe moisture content and wicking rates over the course of a plant cycle. Water retention tests will be performed using strips of Nomex to determine materials wicking rates, porosity, and absorptivity. Through these experimental tests, we will have a better understanding of material properties of Nomex, as well as determine the root cause of water column breakage. With consistent test results, a forward plan can be achieved to resolve

  9. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that "there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies" to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only

  10. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that “there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies” to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not

  11. Failing Tests: Commentary on "Adapting Educational Measurement to the Demands of Test-Based Accountability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thissen, David

    2015-01-01

    In "Adapting Educational Measurement to the Demands of Test-Based Accountability" Koretz takes the time-honored engineering approach to educational measurement, identifying specific problems with current practice and proposing minimal modifications of the system to alleviate those problems. In response to that article, David Thissen…

  12. Mutual Information Item Selection Method in Cognitive Diagnostic Computerized Adaptive Testing with Short Test Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive diagnostic computerized adaptive testing (CD-CAT) purports to combine the strengths of both CAT and cognitive diagnosis. Cognitive diagnosis models aim at classifying examinees into the correct mastery profile group so as to pinpoint the strengths and weakness of each examinee whereas CAT algorithms choose items to determine those…

  13. Influence of Fallible Item Parameters on Test Information During Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, C. Douglas; McBride, James R.

    Computer simulation was used to assess the effects of item parameter estimation errors on different item selection strategies used in adaptive and conventional testing. To determine whether these effects reduced the advantages of certain optimal item selection strategies, simulations were repeated in the presence and absence of item parameter…

  14. Hypnotizability and Performance on a Prism Adaptation Test.

    PubMed

    Menzocchi, Manuel; Mecacci, Giulio; Zeppi, Andrea; Carli, Giancarlo; Santarcangelo, Enrica L

    2015-12-01

    The susceptibility to hypnosis, which can be measured by scales, is not merely a cognitive trait. In fact, it is associated with a number of physiological correlates in the ordinary state of consciousness and in the absence of suggestions. The hypnotizability-related differences observed in sensorimotor integration suggested a major role of the cerebellum in the peculiar performance of healthy subjects with high scores of hypnotic susceptibility (highs). In order to provide behavioral evidence of this hypothesis, we submitted 20 highs and 21 low hypnotizable participants (lows) to the classical cerebellar Prism Adaptation Test (PAT). We found that the highs' performance was significantly less accurate and more variable than the lows' one, even though the two groups shared the same characteristics of adaptation to prismatic lenses. Although further studies are required to interpret these findings, they could account for earlier reports of hypnotizability-related differences in postural control and blink rate, as they indicate that hypnotizability influences the cerebellar control of sensorimotor integration. PMID:25913127

  15. Computerized Adaptive Testing Simulations Using Real Test Taker Responses. Law School Admission Council Computerized Testing Report. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xiang Bo; Pan, WeiQin; Harris, Vincent

    A considerable amount of data on computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has been conducted using simulated data. However, most researchers would agree that simulations may not fully reflect the reality of examinee performance on a test. This study used maximum likelihood procedures to investigate the accuracy and efficiency of examinee ability…

  16. Test Anxiety and Test Performance: Comparing Paper-based and Computer-Adaptive Versions of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Donald E.

    2001-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that the introduction of computer-adaptive testing may help to alleviate test anxiety and diminish the relationship between test anxiety and test performance. Compares a sample of Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test takers who took the computer-adaptive version of the test with another sample who took the…

  17. Design, realization and structural testing of a compliant adaptable wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, G.; Quack, M.; Arrieta, A. F.; Morari, M.; Ermanni, P.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the design, optimization, realization and testing of a novel wing morphing concept, based on distributed compliance structures, and actuated by piezoelectric elements. The adaptive wing features ribs with a selectively compliant inner structure, numerically optimized to achieve aerodynamically efficient shape changes while simultaneously withstanding aeroelastic loads. The static and dynamic aeroelastic behavior of the wing, and the effect of activating the actuators, is assessed by means of coupled 3D aerodynamic and structural simulations. To demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed morphing concept and optimization procedure, the wings of a model airplane are designed and manufactured according to the presented approach. The goal is to replace conventional ailerons, thus to achieve controllability in roll purely by morphing. The mechanical properties of the manufactured components are characterized experimentally, and used to create a refined and correlated finite element model. The overall stiffness, strength, and actuation capabilities are experimentally tested and successfully compared with the numerical prediction. To counteract the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the piezoelectric actuators, a closed-loop controller is implemented, and its capability of accurately achieving the desired shape adaptation is evaluated experimentally. Using the correlated finite element model, the aeroelastic behavior of the manufactured wing is simulated, showing that the morphing concept can provide sufficient roll authority to allow controllability of the flight. The additional degrees of freedom offered by morphing can be also used to vary the plane lift coefficient, similarly to conventional flaps. The efficiency improvements offered by this technique are evaluated numerically, and compared to the performance of a rigid wing.

  18. Applying well flow adapted filtering to transient pumping tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Alraune; Attinger, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    Transient pumping tests are often used to estimate porous medium characteristics like hydraulic conductivity and storativity. The interpretation of pumping test drawdowns is based on methods which are normally developed under the assumption of homogeneous porous media. However aquifer heterogeneity strongly impacts on well flow pattern, in particular in the vicinity of the pumping well. The purpose of this work is to present a method to interpret drawdowns of transient pumping tests in heterogeneous porous media. With this method we are able to describe the effects that statistical quantities like variance and correlation length have on pumping test drawdowns. Furthermore it allows inferring on the statistical parameters of aquifer heterogeneity from drawdown data by invers estimation, which is not possible using methods for homogeneous media like Theis' solution. The method is based on a representative description of hydraulic conductivity for radial flow regimes. It is derived from a well flow adapted filtering procedure (Coarse Graining), where the heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity is assumed to be log-normal distributed with a Gaussian correlation structure. applying the up scaled hydraulic conductivity to the groundwater flow equation results in a hydraulic head which depends on the statistical parameters of the porous medium. It describes the drawdown of a transient pumping test in heterogeneous media. We used an ensemble of transient pumping test simulations to verify the up scaled drawdown solution. We generated transient pumping tests in heterogeneous media for various values of the statistical parameters variance and correlation length and evaluated their impact on the drawdown behavior as well as on the temporal evolution. We further examined the impact of several aspects like the location of an observation well or the local conductivity at the pumping well on the drawdown behavior. This work can be understood as an expansion of the work of Zech et

  19. Adaptive structures to enable ground test validation of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James F.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Kuo, Chin-Po

    1990-01-01

    The use of analytical models and ground-based experimental validation of precision space structures is addressed. The application of adaptive structures to such validation of precision space structures is addressed, with the focus on adaptive truss structures.

  20. Comparing Methods of Assessing Differential Item Functioning in a Computerized Adaptive Testing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Pui-Wa; Chen, Shu-Ying; Yu, Lan

    2006-01-01

    Mantel-Haenszel and SIBTEST, which have known difficulty in detecting non-unidirectional differential item functioning (DIF), have been adapted with some success for computerized adaptive testing (CAT). This study adapts logistic regression (LR) and the item-response-theory-likelihood-ratio test (IRT-LRT), capable of detecting both unidirectional…

  1. Variable-Length Computerized Adaptive Testing: Adaptation of the A-Stratified Strategy in Item Selection with Content Balancing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huo, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Variable-length computerized adaptive testing (CAT) can provide examinees with tailored test lengths. With the fixed standard error of measurement ("SEM") termination rule, variable-length CAT can achieve predetermined measurement precision by using relatively shorter tests compared to fixed-length CAT. To explore the application of…

  2. Psychological Effects of Immediate Knowledge of Results and Adaptive Ability Testing. Research Report 76-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Nancy E.; Weiss, David J.

    The effects of providing immediate knowledge of results (KR) and adaptive testing on test anxiety and test-taking motivation were investigated. Also studied was the accuracy of student perceptions of the difficulty of adaptive and conventional tests administered with or without immediate knowledge of results. Testees were 350 college students…

  3. On the Issue of Item Selection in Computerized Adaptive Testing with Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2016-01-01

    Many standardized tests are now administered via computer rather than paper-and-pencil format. The computer-based delivery mode brings with it certain advantages. One advantage is the ability to adapt the difficulty level of the test to the ability level of the test taker in what has been termed computerized adaptive testing (CAT). A second…

  4. A Modular Sensorized Mat for Monitoring Infant Posture

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Marco; Cecchi, Francesca; Bonaccorso, Filippo; Branciforte, Marco; Dario, Paolo; Vitiello, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel sensorized mat for monitoring infant's posture through the measure of pressure maps. The pressure-sensitive mat is based on an optoelectronic technology developed in the last few years at Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna: a soft silicone skin cover, which constitutes the mat, participates in the transduction principle and provides the mat with compliance. The device has a modular structure (with a minimum of one and a maximum of six sub-modules, and a total surface area of about 1 m2) that enables dimensional adaptation of the pressure-sensitive area to different specific applications. The system consists of on-board electronics for data collection, pre-elaboration, and transmission to a remote computing unit for analysis and posture classification. In this work we present a complete description of the sensing apparatus along with its experimental characterization and validation with five healthy infants. PMID:24385029

  5. Development of a Computerized Adaptive Test for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Robert D.; Weiss, David J.; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Frank, Ellen; Moore, Tara; Kim, Jong Bae; Kupfer, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Context Unlike other areas of medicine, psychiatry is almost entirely dependent on patient report to assess the presence and severity of disease; therefore, it is particularly crucial that we find both more accurate and efficient means of obtaining that report. Objective To develop a computerized adaptive test (CAT) for depression, called the Computerized Adaptive Test–Depression Inventory (CAT-DI), that decreases patient and clinician burden and increases measurement precision. Design Case-control study. Setting A psychiatric clinic and community mental health center. Participants A total of 1614 individuals with and without minor and major depression were recruited for study. Main Outcome Measures The focus of this study was the development of the CAT-DI. The 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Patient Health Questionnaire 9, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale were used to study the convergent validity of the new measure, and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV was used to obtain diagnostic classifications of minor and major depressive disorder. Results A mean of 12 items per study participant was required to achieve a 0.3 SE in the depression severity estimate and maintain a correlation of r=0.95 with the total 389-item test score. Using empirically derived thresholds based on a mixture of normal distributions, we found a sensitivity of 0.92 and a specificity of 0.88 for the classification of major depressive disorder in a sample consisting of depressed patients and healthy controls. Correlations on the order of r=0.8 were found with the other clinician and self-rating scale scores. The CAT-DI provided excellent discrimination throughout the entire depressive severity continuum (minor and major depression), whereas the traditional scales did so primarily at the extremes (eg, major depression). Conclusions Traditional measurement fixes the number of items administered and allows measurement uncertainty to vary. In

  6. Elastic-plastic behavior of non-woven fibrous mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Meredith N.; Pai, Chia-Ling; Rutledge, Gregory C.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2012-02-01

    Electrospinning is a novel method for creating non-woven polymer mats that have high surface area and high porosity. These attributes make them ideal candidates for multifunctional composites. Understanding the mechanical properties as a function of fiber properties and mat microstructure can aid in designing these composites. Further, a constitutive model which captures the membrane stress-strain behavior as a function of fiber properties and the geometry of the fibrous network would be a powerful design tool. Here, mats electrospun from amorphous polyamide are used as a model system. The elastic-plastic behavior of single fibers are obtained in tensile tests. Uniaxial monotonic and cyclic tensile tests are conducted on non-woven mats. The mat exhibits elastic-plastic stress-strain behavior. The transverse strain behavior provides important complementary data, showing a negligible initial Poisson's ratio followed by a transverse:axial strain ratio greater than -1:1 after an axial strain of 0.02. A triangulated framework has been developed to emulate the fibrous network structure of the mat. The micromechanically based model incorporates the elastic-plastic behavior of single fibers into a macroscopic membrane model of the mat. This representative volume element based model is shown to capture the uniaxial elastic-plastic response of the mat under monotonic and cyclic loading. The initial modulus and yield stress of the mat are governed by the fiber properties, the network geometry, and the network density. The transverse strain behavior is linked to discrete deformation mechanisms of the fibrous mat structure including fiber alignment, fiber bending, and network consolidation. The model is further validated in comparison to experiments under different constrained axial loading conditions and found to capture the constraint effect on stiffness, yield, post-yield hardening, and post-yield transverse strain behavior. Due to the direct connection between

  7. A New Online Calibration Method for Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Wang, Chun

    2016-09-01

    Multidimensional-Method A (M-Method A) has been proposed as an efficient and effective online calibration method for multidimensional computerized adaptive testing (MCAT) (Chen & Xin, Paper presented at the 78th Meeting of the Psychometric Society, Arnhem, The Netherlands, 2013). However, a key assumption of M-Method A is that it treats person parameter estimates as their true values, thus this method might yield erroneous item calibration when person parameter estimates contain non-ignorable measurement errors. To improve the performance of M-Method A, this paper proposes a new MCAT online calibration method, namely, the full functional MLE-M-Method A (FFMLE-M-Method A). This new method combines the full functional MLE (Jones & Jin in Psychometrika 59:59-75, 1994; Stefanski & Carroll in Annals of Statistics 13:1335-1351, 1985) with the original M-Method A in an effort to correct for the estimation error of ability vector that might otherwise adversely affect the precision of item calibration. Two correction schemes are also proposed when implementing the new method. A simulation study was conducted to show that the new method generated more accurate item parameter estimation than the original M-Method A in almost all conditions. PMID:26608960

  8. Compositions of constructed microbial mats

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Judith A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    1999-01-01

    Compositions and methods of use of constructed microbial mats, comprising cyanobacteria and purple autotrophic bacteria and an organic nutrient source, in a laminated structure, are described. The constructed microbial mat is used for bioremediation of different individual contaminants and for mixed or multiple contaminants, and for production of beneficial compositions and molecules.

  9. M.A.T. Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    A proposal is presented for developing a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program at California State University, Bakersfield. The criteria for a MAT program are examined by outlining existing programs at: (1) Harvard Graduate School; (2) University of California, Berkeley; (3) Portland State University; (4) Stanford University; (5) University of…

  10. MueMat Multicrid Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-23

    MueMat is intended for the research and development of multigrid algorithms used in the solution of sparse linear systems arising from systems of partial differential equations. The software can generate example linear systems and provides short programs to demonstrate the various interfaces for creating, accessing, and applying the solvers. MueMat currently includes two types of algebraic multigrid methods and many commonly used smoothers. However, the software is intended to be extensible, and new methods can be incorporated easily. MueMat also allows for advanced usage, such as combining multiple methods and segregated solves. The library supports point and block access to matrix data. MueMat has been designed for use within the programming environment of the Mathworks program MATLAB®. All algorithms and methods in MueMat have been or will be published in the open scientific literature.

  11. MueMat Multicrid Toolbox

    2010-11-23

    MueMat is intended for the research and development of multigrid algorithms used in the solution of sparse linear systems arising from systems of partial differential equations. The software can generate example linear systems and provides short programs to demonstrate the various interfaces for creating, accessing, and applying the solvers. MueMat currently includes two types of algebraic multigrid methods and many commonly used smoothers. However, the software is intended to be extensible, and new methods canmore » be incorporated easily. MueMat also allows for advanced usage, such as combining multiple methods and segregated solves. The library supports point and block access to matrix data. MueMat has been designed for use within the programming environment of the Mathworks program MATLAB®. All algorithms and methods in MueMat have been or will be published in the open scientific literature.« less

  12. What We Can Do with Computerized Adaptive Testing...and What We Cannot Do!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurier, Michel

    Computerized adaptive testing for language teaching and learning takes advantage of two properties of the computer: its number-crunching and multiple-branching capabilities. Adaptive testing has also been called tailored testing because it aims at presenting items that suit the student's competence and that are informative, using an item bank and…

  13. Evaluating Knowledge Structure-Based Adaptive Testing Algorithms and System Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Huey-Min; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Yang, Jinn-Min

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many computerized test systems have been developed for diagnosing students' learning profiles. Nevertheless, it remains a challenging issue to find an adaptive testing algorithm to both shorten testing time and precisely diagnose the knowledge status of students. In order to find a suitable algorithm, four adaptive testing…

  14. Web-Based Adaptive Testing System (WATS) for Classifying Students Academic Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaemu; Park, Sanghoon; Kim, Kwangho

    2012-01-01

    Computer Adaptive Testing (CAT) has been highlighted as a promising assessment method to fulfill two testing purposes: estimating student academic ability and classifying student academic level. In this paper, assessment for we introduced the Web-based Adaptive Testing System (WATS) developed to support a cost effective assessment for classifying…

  15. An Investigation on Computer-Adaptive Multistage Testing Panels for Multidimensional Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xinrui

    2013-01-01

    The computer-adaptive multistage testing (ca-MST) has been developed as an alternative to computerized adaptive testing (CAT), and been increasingly adopted in large-scale assessments. Current research and practice only focus on ca-MST panels for credentialing purposes. The ca-MST test mode, therefore, is designed to gauge a single scale. The…

  16. USING AN ADAPTER TO PERFORM THE CHALFANT-STYLE CONTAINMENT VESSEL PERIODIC MAINTENANCE LEAK RATE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Trapp, D.

    2011-06-03

    Recently the Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems (PT&PS) organization at the Savannah River National Laboratory was asked to develop an adapter for performing the leak-rate test of a Chalfant-style containment vessel. The PT&PS organization collaborated with designers at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant to develop the adapter currently in use for performing the leak-rate testing on the containment vessels. This paper will give the history of leak-rate testing of the Chalfant-style containment vessels, discuss the design concept for the adapter, give an overview of the design, and will present results of the testing done using the adapter.

  17. Effects of Informed Item Selection on Test Performance and Anxiety for Examinees Administered a Self-Adapted Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plake, Barbara S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    No significant differences in performance on a self-adapted test or anxiety were found for college students (n=218) taking a self-adapted test who selected item difficulty without any prior information, inspected an item before selecting, or answered a typical item and received performance feedback. (SLD)

  18. Development and Evaluation of a Confidence-Weighting Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Yung-Chin; Ho, Rong-Guey; Chen, Li-Ju; Chou, Kun-Yi; Chen, Yan-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the efficiency, precision, and validity of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) could be improved by assessing confidence differences in knowledge that examinees possessed. We proposed a novel polytomous CAT model called the confidence-weighting computerized adaptive testing (CWCAT), which combined a…

  19. MatMRI and MatHIFU: software toolboxes for real-time monitoring and control of MR-guided HIFU

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    -mimicking heating phantom. Conclusions MatMRI and MatHIFU leverage existing MRI and MR-HIFU clinical platforms to facilitate pre-clinical research. MatMRI substantially simplifies the real-time acquisition and processing of MR data. MatHIFU facilitates the testing and characterization of new therapy applications using the Philips Sonalleve clinical MR-HIFU system. Under coordination with Philips Healthcare, both MatMRI and MatHIFU are intended to be freely available as open-source software packages to other research groups. PMID:25512856

  20. Electrospun chitosan-based nanofiber mats loaded with Garcinia mangostana extracts.

    PubMed

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Sukma, Monrudee; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2013-08-16

    The aim of this study was to prepare electrospun chitosan-based nanofiber mats and to incorporate the fruit hull of Garcinia mangostana (GM) extracts into the mats. Chitosan-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid/polyvinyl alcohol (CS-EDTA/PVA) was selected as the polymers. The GM extracts with 1, 2 and 3 wt% α-mangostin were incorporated into the CS-EDTA/PVA solution and electrospun to obtain nanofibers. The morphology and diameters of the mats were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical and swelling properties were investigated. The amount of GM extracts was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The antioxidative activity, antibacterial activity, extract release and stability of the mats were evaluated. In vivo wound healing tests were also performed in Wistar rats. The results indicated that the diameters of the fibers were on the nanoscale and that no crystals of the extract were observed in the mats at any concentration. The mats provided suitable tensile strength and swelling properties. All of the mats exhibited antioxidant and antibacterial activity. During the wound healing test, the mats accelerated the rate of healing when compared to the control (gauze-covered). The mats maintained 90% of their content of α-mangostin for 3 months. In conclusion, the chitosan-based nanofiber mats loaded with GM extracts were successfully prepared using the electrospinning method. These nanofiber mats loaded with GM extracts may provide a good alternative for accelerating wound healing. PMID:23680732

  1. Comparison and Equating of Paper-Administered, Computer-Administered and Computerized Adaptive Tests of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, James B.; And Others

    Student achievement test scores were compared and equated, using three different testing methods: paper-administered, computer-administered, and computerized adaptive testing. The tests were developed from third and sixth grade mathematics item banks of the California Assessment Program. The paper and the computer-administered tests were identical…

  2. Item Pocket Method to Allow Response Review and Change in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2013-01-01

    Most computerized adaptive testing (CAT) programs do not allow test takers to review and change their responses because it could seriously deteriorate the efficiency of measurement and make tests vulnerable to manipulative test-taking strategies. Several modified testing methods have been developed that provide restricted review options while…

  3. Applications of Adaptive Testing in Measuring Achievement and Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bejar, Issac I.

    The concept of testing for partial knowledge is considered with the concept of tailored testing. Following the special usage of latent trait theory, the word valdity is used to mean the correlation of a test with the construct the test measures. The concept of a method factor in the test is also considered as a part of the validity. The possible…

  4. Manganese Influences Carbonate Precipitation in a Laminated Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krusor, M.; Grim, S. L.; Wilmeth, D.; Johnson, H.; Berelson, W.; Stevenson, B. S.; Stamps, B. W.; Corsetti, F. A.; Spear, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Investigating mineralization within modern microbial mats informs our interpretation of ancient microbialites and the mineralization process. Microbial mats in Little Hot Creek (LHC), California contain 4 distinct layers with different microbiota. Each layer of the mat is supersaturated with regard to calcium carbonate (CaCO3), which increases with depth. Total organic carbon decreases with depth through the mat. We used 13C-labeled bicarbonate incubations of each mat layer to calculate growth rates of organic carbon and CaCO3 within the mat. Incubations were also amended with Mn or Mg to test their effect on rates of CaCO3 and organic carbon formation. The Mn-amended top layer increased CaCO3 precipitation and organic carbon growth. Mn increased organic carbon production in the lowest layer to a lesser extent, but not growth of CaCO3. Mn addition had no effect on growth rates in the two intervening layers. Mg amendment stimulated only organic carbon formation in the top layer, with little to no effect on the lower layers or overall CaCO3 formation. We attribute the elevated CaCO3 precipitation noted after Mn addition to increased oxygenic photosynthetic activity. Oxygenic photosynthesis requires Mn as an enzyme cofactor and promotes carbonate precipitation. We propose that the phototrophic community was responsible for most of the CaCO3 precipitation in the upper layer. Phototrophs gradually moved upwards for optimal access to sunlight, and as the mat grew, "tenant" microorganisms inhabited the lower carbonate layers while the "builders" remained on top. The relatively constant percentages of inorganic carbon below the top layer combined with observed minimal CaCO3 precipitation under laboratory conditions suggest that additional research into potential metabolisms that impact carbonate formation would be informative. These results improve our understanding of the linkages between microbial metabolisms, carbonate precipitation in microbial mats, and the potential

  5. Monitoring Survival and Preservation of Recent Cyanobacterial Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Elizabeth; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Camargo, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    Through geobiological evolution cyanobacterial mats have played a fundamental role through the development of early microbial carbonate ecosystems and through the sustainment of major biogeochemical cycling in the biosphere; nonetheless their sedimentary record is relatively modest in comparison with their biological impact; this apparent under-representation in the fossil record may be due to their intrinsic poor preservation potential but also to our inability to recognize some subtle microbial signatures. Modern studies on cyanobacterial mats involve high-tech molecular approaches to identify, analyze and even quantify the genetic diversity of ancient and modern microbial mats, yet the physical changes of mats, their survival and preservation potential, remain almost unknown and experimentally poorly explored. If we are going to succeed in the astrobiological quest for traces of life we should develop integrated methods and diagnostic features to address biosignatures at both, the phenotypic and genotypic levels when possible. The correct recognition and interpretation of biosignatures in this emerging field needs, aside these fine molecular tools, plain experimental approaches to test microbial resistance, survival and preservation potential of microbial mats after exposure to diagenetic changes. In this work we study some effects on fresh slices of cyanobacterial mats and cultures of specific external simulated agents that normally occur during diagenesis such as dehydratation, heat, abrasion or pressure among others. Samples from different cyanobacterial communities associated to carbonates collected from different rivers and falls around Mexico were subjected to same lab procedures. Physical and textural changes were monitored through microscopic analysis where cell integrity and mat cohesiveness were analyzed before and after treatment. Preliminary results show that mats enriched in halite and clay sediments were preferentially preserved; however those mats

  6. Testing the equality of students' performance using Alexander-Govern test with adaptive trimmed means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Suhaida; Yahaya, Sharipah Soaad Syed; Yusof, Zahayu Md

    2014-06-01

    Analyzing the equality of independent group has to be done with caution. The classical approaches such as ttest for two groups and analysis of variance (ANOVA) for more than two groups always are favorable selection by researchers. However, sometime these methods were abused by the presence of nonnormality or variance heterogeneity or both. It is known that ANOVA is restricted to the assumptions of normality and homogeneity of variance. In real life data, sometimes these requirements are hard to attain. The Alexander-Govern test with adaptive trimmed mean (AG_atm) is one approach that can be chosen as alternative to the classical tests when their assumptions are violated. In this paper, the performances of AG_atm were compared to the original AG test and ANOVA using simulated and real life data. The simulation study proved that the AG_atm performs better than the original AG test and the classical test. For real life data, student's performance in decision analysis course, measured by final examination score was chosen. Based on the exploratory data analysis, this data found to have problem of nonnormality.

  7. Fast releasing oral electrospun PVP/CD nanofiber mats of taste-masked meloxicam.

    PubMed

    Samprasit, Wipada; Akkaramongkolporn, Prasert; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-06-20

    Fast release and taste masking of meloxicam (MX)-loaded polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/cyclodextrin (CD) nanofiber mats were developed using an electrospinning process. CDs were blended to improve the stability of the mats. The morphology and diameter of the mats were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM); physical and mechanical properties were also studied. The MX content, disintegration time, MX release and cytotoxicity of the mats were investigated. In vivo studies were also performed in healthy human volunteers. The results indicated that the mats were successfully prepared with fiber in the nanometer range. MX was well incorporated into the mats, with an amorphous form. The mats showed suitable tensile strength. CDs improved the physical stability by their cage-like supramolecular structure to protect from humidity and moisture, and create bead free nanofiber mats. The nanofiber mats with CDs were physically stable without any hygroscopicity and fusion. A fast disintegration and release of MX was achieved. Moreover, this mat released MX faster than the MX powder and commercial tablets. The cytotoxicity test revealed that mats were safe for a 5-min incubation. The disintegration studies indicated that in vivo disintegration agreed with the in vitro studies; the mat rapidly disintegrated in the mouth. The less bitter of MX was occurred in the mats that incorporated CD, menthol and aspartame. In addition, this mat was physical stable for 6 months. The results suggest that these mats may be a good candidate for fast dissolving drug delivery systems of bitter drugs to increase the palatability of dosage forms. PMID:25899284

  8. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  9. Adapting the Bilingual Aphasia Test to Rarotongan (Cook Islands Maori): Linguistic and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Amberber, Amanda Miller

    2011-06-01

    This article describes the adaptation of the Bilingual Aphasia Test (BAT) to the Rarotongan dialect of Cook Islands Maori, a Polynesian language spoken in the Cook Islands and expatriate communities. A brief linguistic sketch of Rarotongan is presented. As Rarotongan is characterised by a complex pronominal system, 'a' versus 'o' possession and optional topicalisation and focus constructions, particular issues arose in obtaining a rigorous adaptation of the BAT. Methods for ensuring effective adaptation across contrastive language pairs and sociocultural aspects of adapting the BAT to Rarotongan are discussed. Obtaining adaptations from several proficient bilingual consultants, comparing versions and group discussion to resolve discrepancies were used for this adaptation and are recommended. It is asserted that every individual has the right to receive accurate, detailed language assessment in each of their languages, irrespective of the languages spoken in the wider community. Further adaptations of the BAT will assist this to be achieved. PMID:21631310

  10. Capillography of Mats of Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noca, Flavio; Sansom, Elijah; Zhou, Jijie; Gharib, Mory

    2008-01-01

    Capillography (from the Latin capillus, 'hair', and the Greek graphein, to write ) is a recently conceived technique for forming mats of nanofibers into useful patterns. The concept was inspired by experiments on carpetlike mats of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Capillography may have the potential to be a less-expensive, less-time-consuming alternative to electron-beam lithography as a means of nanoscale patterning for the fabrication of small devices and instruments. In capillography, one exploits the lateral capillary forces exerted on small objects that pierce the surface of a liquid. If the small objects are identical, then the forces are always attractive. Two examples of the effects of such forces are the agglomeration of small particles floating on the surface of a pond and the drawing together of hairs of a wet paintbrush upon removal of the brush from water. Because nanoscale objects brought into contact remain stuck together indefinitely due to Van der Waals forces, patterns formed by capillography remain even upon removal of the liquid. For the experiments on the mats of carbon nanotubes, a surfactant solution capable of wetting carbon nanotubes (which are ultra-hydrophobic) was prepared. The mats were wetted with the solution, then dried. Once the mats were dry, it was found that the nanotubes had become ordered into various patterns, including nestlike indentations, trenches, and various combinations thereof. It may be possible to exploit such ordering effects through controlled wetting and drying of designated portions of mats of carbon nanotubes (and, perhaps, mats of nanofibers of other materials) to obtain patterns similar to those heretofore formed by use of electron-beam lithography. For making patterns that include nestlike indentations, it has been conjectured that it could be possible to control the nesting processes by use of electrostatic fields. Further research is needed to understand the physics of the patterning processes in order to

  11. Microcomputer Network for Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). [Final Report, FY81-83].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quan, Baldwin; And Others

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) offers the opportunity to replace paper-and-pencil aptitude tests such as the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery with shorter, more accurate, and more secure computer-administered tests. Its potential advantages need to be verified by experimental administration of automated tests to military recruit…

  12. A Validity Comparison of Adaptive and Conventional Strategies for Mastery Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, G. Gage; Weiss, David J.

    Conventional mastery tests designed to make optimal mastery classifications were compared with fixed-length and variable-length adaptive mastery tests. Comparisons between the testing procedures were made across five content areas in an introductory biology course from tests administered to volunteers. The criterion was the student's standing in…

  13. A Comparison of Item-Selection Methods for Adaptive Tests with Content Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2005-01-01

    In test assembly, a fundamental difference exists between algorithms that select a test sequentially or simultaneously. Sequential assembly allows us to optimize an objective function at the examinee's ability estimate, such as the test information function in computerized adaptive testing. But it leads to the non-trivial problem of how to realize…

  14. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Scholastic Aptitude Test Program Used for Grade 9 Students under Different Reviewing Test Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khunkrai, Naruemon; Sawangboon, Tatsirin; Ketchatturat, Jatuphum

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study the accurate prediction of comparing test information and evaluation result by multidimensional computerized adaptive scholastic aptitude test program used for grade 9 students under different reviewing test conditions. Grade 9 students of the Secondary Educational Service Area Office in the North-east of…

  15. Design of a Microcomputer-Based Adaptive Testing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, C. David

    This paper explores the feasibility of developing a single-user microcomputer-based testing system. Testing literature was surveyed to discover types of test items that might be used in the system and to compile a list of strategies that such a system might use. Potential users were surveyed. Several were interviewed, and a questionnaire was…

  16. Adapting the Critical Thinking Assessment Test for Palestinian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basha, Sami; Drane, Denise; Light, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Critical thinking is a key learning outcome for Palestinian students. However, there are no validated critical thinking tests in Arabic. Suitability of the US developed Critical Thinking Assessment Test (CAT) for use in Palestine was assessed. The test was piloted with university students in English (n = 30) and 4 questions were piloted in Arabic…

  17. Using Out-of-Level Items in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Hua; Lin, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-level testing refers to the practice of assessing a student with a test that is intended for students at a higher or lower grade level. Although the appropriateness of out-of-level testing for accountability purposes has been questioned by educators and policymakers, incorporating out-of-level items in formative assessments for accurate…

  18. A Strategy for Controlling Item Exposure in Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Ip, Edward H.; Fuh, Cheng-Der

    2008-01-01

    Although computerized adaptive tests have enjoyed tremendous growth, solutions for important problems remain unavailable. One problem is the control of item exposure rate. Because adaptive algorithms are designed to select optimal items, they choose items with high discriminating power. Thus, these items are selected more often than others,…

  19. L(sub 1) Adaptive Control Design for NASA AirSTAR Flight Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Cao, Chengyu; Hovakimyan, Naira; Zou, Xiaotian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a new L(sub 1) adaptive control architecture that directly compensates for matched as well as unmatched system uncertainty. To evaluate the L(sub 1) adaptive controller, we take advantage of the flexible research environment with rapid prototyping and testing of control laws in the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at the NASA Langley Research Center. We apply the L(sub 1) adaptive control laws to the subscale turbine powered Generic Transport Model. The presented results are from a full nonlinear simulation of the Generic Transport Model and some preliminary pilot evaluations of the L(sub 1) adaptive control law.

  20. A field operational test on valve-regulated lead-acid absorbent-glass-mat batteries in micro-hybrid electric vehicles. Part II. Results based on multiple regression analysis and tear-down analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Karspeck, T.; Ott, C.; Weirather-Koestner, D.; Stoermer, A. O.

    2011-03-01

    In the first part of this work [1] a field operational test (FOT) on micro-HEVs (hybrid electric vehicles) and conventional vehicles was introduced. Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries in absorbent glass mat (AGM) technology and flooded batteries were applied. The FOT data were analyzed by kernel density estimation. In this publication multiple regression analysis is applied to the same data. Square regression models without interdependencies are used. Hereby, capacity loss serves as dependent parameter and several battery-related and vehicle-related parameters as independent variables. Battery temperature is found to be the most critical parameter. It is proven that flooded batteries operated in the conventional power system (CPS) degrade faster than VRLA-AGM batteries in the micro-hybrid power system (MHPS). A smaller number of FOT batteries were applied in a vehicle-assigned test design where the test battery is repeatedly mounted in a unique test vehicle. Thus, vehicle category and specific driving profiles can be taken into account in multiple regression. Both parameters have only secondary influence on battery degradation, instead, extended vehicle rest time linked to low mileage performance is more serious. A tear-down analysis was accomplished for selected VRLA-AGM batteries operated in the MHPS. Clear indications are found that pSoC-operation with periodically fully charging the battery (refresh charging) does not result in sulphation of the negative electrode. Instead, the batteries show corrosion of the positive grids and weak adhesion of the positive active mass.

  1. Some Tests For Adaptative Observations In Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quélo, D.; Michelangeli, P.-A.; Sportisse, B.

    Air pollution forecast requires the coupling of models with data through data assimi- lation. A key question is related to the choice of observations (apart from technical require- ments). One wants to choose in a judicious way the species to observe, in which loca- tions and at which moments. The appropriate strategies are related to the techniques of "targeting" and "adaptative observations". We will investigate these techniques on a simplified model. The first part reports the influence of the slow-fast behaviour of atmospheric chem- istry. The second part presents the use of singular vectors and second-order adjoint techniques in order to determine the "optimal" choice of observations. This project is led in the framework of the INRIA Cooperative Research Action CO- MODE (COupling MOdels and Data in Environment).

  2. Phylogenetic group-associated differences in regulation of the common colonization factor Mat fimbria in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Timo A; Bauchart, Philippe; Kukkonen, Maini; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Korhonen, Timo K; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita

    2013-03-01

    Heterogeneity of cell population is a key component behind the evolutionary success of Escherichia coli. The heterogeneity supports species adaptation and mainly results from lateral gene transfer. Adaptation may also involve genomic alterations that affect regulation of conserved genes. Here we analysed regulation of the mat (or ecp) genes that encode a conserved fimbrial adhesin of E. coli. We found that the differential and temperature-sensitive expression control of the mat operon is dependent on mat promoter polymorphism and closely linked to phylogenetic grouping of E. coli. In the mat promoter lineage favouring fimbriae expression, the mat operon-encoded regulator MatA forms a positive feedback loop that overcomes the repression by H-NS and stabilizes the fimbrillin mRNA under low growth temperature, acidic pH or elevated levels of acetate. The study exemplifies phylogenetic group-associated expression of a highly common surface organelle in E. coli. PMID:23347101

  3. Flight test experience with an adaptive control system using a maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, G.; Stein, G.; Powers, B.

    1979-01-01

    The flight test performance of an adaptive control system for the F-8 DFBW aircraft is summarized. The adaptive system is based on explicit identification of surface effectiveness parameters which are used for gain scheduling in a command augmentation system. Performance of this control law under various design parameter variations is presented. These include variations in test signal level, sample rate, and identification channel structure. Flight performance closely matches analysis and simulation predictions from previous references.

  4. Computerized Adaptive Testing: The State of the Art in Assessment at Three Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    League for Innovation in the Community Coll., Laguna Hills, CA.

    A description is provided of the experiences of three community colleges in implementing computerized adaptive testing to assess the entry-level skills of students. Chapter 1 provides background information on the project, which utilized The College Board's Computerized Placement Tests (CPT's), a battery of untimed, individualized tests of reading…

  5. Adaptation of a Vocabulary Test from British Sign Language to American Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Wolfgang; Roy, Penny; Morgan, Gary

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the adaptation process of a vocabulary knowledge test for British Sign Language (BSL) into American Sign Language (ASL) and presents results from the first round of pilot testing with 20 deaf native ASL signers. The web-based test assesses the strength of deaf children's vocabulary knowledge by means of different mappings of…

  6. The Influence of Item Calibration Error on Variable-Length Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Jeffrey M.; Cheng, Ying; Yuan, Ke-Hai; Diao, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Variable-length computerized adaptive testing (VL-CAT) allows both items and test length to be "tailored" to examinees, thereby achieving the measurement goal (e.g., scoring precision or classification) with as few items as possible. Several popular test termination rules depend on the standard error of the ability estimate, which in turn depends…

  7. An Efficiency Balanced Information Criterion for Item Selection in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2012-01-01

    Successful administration of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) programs in educational settings requires that test security and item exposure control issues be taken seriously. Developing an item selection algorithm that strikes the right balance between test precision and level of item pool utilization is the key to successful implementation…

  8. Adaptive and Qualitative Changes in Encoding Strategy with Experience: Evidence from the Test-Expectancy Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Jason R.; Benjamin, Aaron S.

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments demonstrated learners' abilities to adaptively and qualitatively accommodate their encoding strategies to the demands of an upcoming test. Stimuli were word pairs. In Experiment 1, test expectancy was induced for either cued recall (of targets given cues) or free recall (of targets only) across 4 study-test cycles of the same…

  9. Hybrid Computerized Adaptive Testing: From Group Sequential Design to Fully Sequential Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shiyu; Lin, Haiyan; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage testing (MST) have become two of the most popular modes in large-scale computer-based sequential testing. Though most designs of CAT and MST exhibit strength and weakness in recent large-scale implementations, there is no simple answer to the question of which design is better because different…

  10. EXSPRT: An Expert Systems Approach to Computer-Based Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    Expert systems can be used to aid decision making. A computerized adaptive test (CAT) is one kind of expert system, although it is not commonly recognized as such. A new approach, termed EXSPRT, was devised that combines expert systems reasoning and sequential probability ratio test stopping rules. EXSPRT-R uses random selection of test items,…

  11. Accelerated Desensitization and Adaptive Attitudes Interventions and Test Gains with Academic Probation Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Richard; Holt, Bruce; Hunter, Lori

    2005-01-01

    The study evaluates the test-gain benefits of an accelerated desensitization and adaptive attitudes intervention for test-anxious students. College students were screened for high test anxiety. Twenty anxious students, half of them on academic probation, were assigned to an Intervention or to a minimal treatment Control group. The Intervention was…

  12. Using adaptive structures to enable future missions by relaxing ground test requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James L.; Chen, G.-S.

    1991-01-01

    Future NASA missions will require large space structures that must maintain accurate surface tolerances for up to 20 years; most flight programs require a ground test verification of the hardware. Because of the influence of gravity, the current state-of-the-art ground test technology cannot accurately determine whether the hardware complies with the requirements. The incorporation of adaptive structures into the spacecraft will enable a relaxation of the ground test requirements necessary to validate the hardware for flight. This paper describes the challenges in testing large precision structures, adaptive structures, the data establishing the current state of the art in ground testing, and the utilization of adaptive structures to alleviate the ground test requirements.

  13. Test techniques: A survey paper on cryogenic tunnels, adaptive wall test sections, and magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.; Dress, David A.; Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to get good experimental data in wind tunnels is often compromised by things seemingly beyond our control. Inadequate Reynolds number, wall interference, and support interference are three of the major problems in wind tunnel testing. Techniques for solving these problems are available. Cryogenic wind tunnels solve the problem of low Reynolds number. Adaptive wall test sections can go a long way toward eliminating wall interference. A magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) completely eliminates support interference. Cryogenic tunnels, adaptive wall test sections, and MSBS are surveyed. A brief historical overview is given and the present state of development and application in each area is described.

  14. Increasing Testing Efficiency through the Development of an IT-Based Adaptive Testing Tool for Competency Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinhans, Janne; Schumann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper investigates the potential of computerized adaptive testing for CMs to reduce test time. In the context of education and training, competency measurement (CM) is a central challenge in competency management. For complex CMs, a compromise must be addressed between the time available and the quality of the measurements.…

  15. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  16. Testing Adaptive Toolbox Models: A Bayesian Hierarchical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jorg; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Many theories of human cognition postulate that people are equipped with a repertoire of strategies to solve the tasks they face. This theoretical framework of a cognitive toolbox provides a plausible account of intra- and interindividual differences in human behavior. Unfortunately, it is often unclear how to rigorously test the toolbox…

  17. Investigating Item Exposure Control Methods in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Nagihan Boztunc; Dogan, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of item exposure control methods on measurement precision and on test security under various item selection methods and item pool characteristics. In this study, the Randomesque (with item group sizes of 5 and 10), Sympson-Hetter, and Fade-Away methods were used as item exposure control methods. Moreover,…

  18. ON TEACHING ARCELLANA'S "THE MATS".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ANDERSON, TOMMY R.

    FRANCISCO ARCELLANA'S "THE MATS," LIKE ANY WELL-CONSTRUCTED SHORT STORY, CAN SERVE AS AN IMPORTANT TEACHING DEVICE IN GUIDING STUDENTS, ESPECIALLY THOSE LEARNING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE, TO READ WITH UNDERSTANDING AND APPRECIATION, THE TECHNIQUES OF CONVERTING VERBALS BACK INTO VERBS, REPLACING ALL PRONOUNS WITH THEIR ANTECEDENTS IN PARALLEL…

  19. Sparse Coding for Alpha Matting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jubin; Varnousfaderani, Ehsan Shahrian; Cholakkal, Hisham; Rajan, Deepu

    2016-07-01

    Existing color sampling based alpha matting methods use the compositing equation to estimate alpha at a pixel from pairs of foreground (F) and background (B) samples. The quality of the matte depends on the selected (F,B) pairs. In this paper, the matting problem is reinterpreted as a sparse coding of pixel features, wherein the sum of the codes gives the estimate of the alpha matte from a set of unpaired F and B samples. A non-parametric probabilistic segmentation provides a certainty measure on the pixel belonging to foreground or background, based on which a dictionary is formed for use in sparse coding. By removing the restriction to conform to (F,B) pairs, this method allows for better alpha estimation from multiple F and B samples. The same framework is extended to videos, where the requirement of temporal coherence is handled effectively. Here, the dictionary is formed by samples from multiple frames. A multi-frame graph model, as opposed to a single image as for image matting, is proposed that can be solved efficiently in closed form. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations on a benchmark dataset are provided to show that the proposed method outperforms current state-of-the-art in image and video matting.

  20. Sample Size Reassessment and Hypothesis Testing in Adaptive Survival Trials.

    PubMed

    Magirr, Dominic; Jaki, Thomas; Koenig, Franz; Posch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mid-study design modifications are becoming increasingly accepted in confirmatory clinical trials, so long as appropriate methods are applied such that error rates are controlled. It is therefore unfortunate that the important case of time-to-event endpoints is not easily handled by the standard theory. We analyze current methods that allow design modifications to be based on the full interim data, i.e., not only the observed event times but also secondary endpoint and safety data from patients who are yet to have an event. We show that the final test statistic may ignore a substantial subset of the observed event times. An alternative test incorporating all event times is found, where a conservative assumption must be made in order to guarantee type I error control. We examine the power of this approach using the example of a clinical trial comparing two cancer therapies. PMID:26863139

  1. Sample Size Reassessment and Hypothesis Testing in Adaptive Survival Trials

    PubMed Central

    Magirr, Dominic; Jaki, Thomas; Koenig, Franz; Posch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mid-study design modifications are becoming increasingly accepted in confirmatory clinical trials, so long as appropriate methods are applied such that error rates are controlled. It is therefore unfortunate that the important case of time-to-event endpoints is not easily handled by the standard theory. We analyze current methods that allow design modifications to be based on the full interim data, i.e., not only the observed event times but also secondary endpoint and safety data from patients who are yet to have an event. We show that the final test statistic may ignore a substantial subset of the observed event times. An alternative test incorporating all event times is found, where a conservative assumption must be made in order to guarantee type I error control. We examine the power of this approach using the example of a clinical trial comparing two cancer therapies. PMID:26863139

  2. Traveling with Cognitive Tests: Testing the Validity of a KABC-II Adaptation in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malda, Maike; van de Vijver, Fons J. R.; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Transler, Catherine; Sukumar, Prathima

    2010-01-01

    The authors evaluated the adequacy of an extensive adaptation of the American Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, second edition (KABC-II), for 6- to 10-year-old Kannada-speaking children of low socioeconomic status in Bangalore, South India. The adapted KABC-II was administered to 598 children. Subtests showed high reliabilities, the…

  3. Adaptive SAR ATR problem set (AdaptSAPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Angela R.; Fitzgerald, Donna; Ross, Timothy D.

    2004-09-01

    A strong and growing interest in systems that adapt to changing circumstances was evident in panel discussions at the "Algorithms for SAR Imagery" Conference of the AeroSense Symposium in April 2003, with DARPA, Air Force, industry and academia participation. As a result, Conference Co-Chair Mr. Ed Zelnio suggested producing a dynamic model to create problem sets suitable for adaptive system research and development. Such a problem set provides a framework for the overall problem, including organization of operating conditions, performance measures and specific test cases. It is hoped that this AdaptSAPS framework will help provide the community with a more concrete base for discussing adaptation in SAR imagery exploitation. AdaptSAPS Version 1.0 was produced by the AFRL COMPASE and SDMS organizations and posted on 5 August 2003. AdaptSAPS consists of over a dozen MatLab programs that allow the user to create "missions" with SAR data of varying complexities and then present that test data one image at a time, first as unexploited imagery and then later with the exploitation results that an ATR could use for adaptation in an operational environment. AdaptSAPS keeps track of performance results and reports performance measures. This paper describes AdaptSAPS - its application process and possible improvements as a problem set.

  4. Testing and analysis of dual-mode adaptive landing gear, taxi mode test system for YF-12A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamon, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effectiveness of a dual mode adaptive landing gear system in reducing the dynamic response of an airplane during ground taxiing was studied. The dynamic taxi tests of the YF-12A research airplane are presented. A digital computer program which simulated the test conditions is discussed. The dual mode system as tested provides dynamic taxi response reductions of 25 percent at the cg and 30 to 45 percent at the cockpit.

  5. Flight Test of an L(sub 1) Adaptive Controller on the NASA AirSTAR Flight Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Xargay, Enric; Cao, Chengyu; Hovakimyan, Naira

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of a flight test of the L-1 adaptive control architecture designed to directly compensate for significant uncertain cross-coupling in nonlinear systems. The flight test was conducted on the subscale turbine powered Generic Transport Model that is an integral part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at the NASA Langley Research Center. The results presented are for piloted tasks performed during the flight test.

  6. A multi-timescale adaptive threshold model for the SAI tactile afferent to predict response to mechanical vibration

    PubMed Central

    Jahangiri, Anila F.; Gerling, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    The Leaky Integrate and Fire (LIF) model of a neuron is one of the best known models for a spiking neuron. A current limitation of the LIF model is that it may not accurately reproduce the dynamics of an action potential. There have recently been some studies suggesting that a LIF coupled with a multi-timescale adaptive threshold (MAT) may increase LIF’s accuracy in predicting spikes in cortical neurons. We propose a mechanotransduction process coupled with a LIF model with multi-timescale adaptive threshold to model slowly adapting type I (SAI) mechanoreceptor in monkey’s glabrous skin. In order to test the performance of the model, the spike timings predicted by this MAT model are compared with neural data. We also test a fixed threshold variant of the model by comparing its outcome with the neural data. Initial results indicate that the MAT model predicts spike timings better than a fixed threshold LIF model only. PMID:21814636

  7. Adaptive Stress Testing of Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ritchie; Kochenderfer, Mykel J.; Mengshoel, Ole J.; Brat, Guillaume P.; Owen, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a scalable method to efficiently search for the most likely state trajectory leading to an event given only a simulator of a system. Our approach uses a reinforcement learning formulation and solves it using Monte Carlo Tree Search (MCTS). The approach places very few requirements on the underlying system, requiring only that the simulator provide some basic controls, the ability to evaluate certain conditions, and a mechanism to control the stochasticity in the system. Access to the system state is not required, allowing the method to support systems with hidden state. The method is applied to stress test a prototype aircraft collision avoidance system to identify trajectories that are likely to lead to near mid-air collisions. We present results for both single and multi-threat encounters and discuss their relevance. Compared with direct Monte Carlo search, this MCTS method performs significantly better both in finding events and in maximizing their likelihood.

  8. An adaptive atmospheric transport model for the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D.W.; Randerson, D.

    1998-12-31

    The need to accurately calculate the transport of hazardous material is paramount to environmental safety and health activities, as well as to establish a sound emergency response capability, in the western United States and at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Current efforts are under way at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and the NOAA Air Resources Laboratory in Las Vegas to develop a state-of-the-art atmospheric flow and species transport model that will accurately calculate wind fields and atmospheric particulate transport over complex terrain. In addition, research efforts are needed to improve predictive capabilities for catastrophic events, e.g., volcanic eruptions, thunderstorms, heavy rains and floods, and dust storms. The model has a wide range of environmental, safety, and health applications as required by the US Department of Energy for NTS programs, including those activities associated with emergency response, the Hazard Material Spill Center, and site restoration and remediation.

  9. Examining the Accessibility of a Computerized Adapted Test Using Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamei-Hannan, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the accessibility barriers of a computerized adapted test called the Measure of Academic Performance. The results showed that as magnification increased, time on the test increased and students required visual efficiency skills. Students who used refreshable braille displays were faced with several obstacles. (Contains 4…

  10. Conditional Item-Exposure Control in Adaptive Testing Using Item-Ineligibility Probabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2007-01-01

    Two conditional versions of the exposure-control method with item-ineligibility constraints for adaptive testing in van der Linden and Veldkamp (2004) are presented. The first version is for unconstrained item selection, the second for item selection with content constraints imposed by the shadow-test approach. In both versions, the exposure rates…

  11. Evaluating Comparability in Computerized Adaptive Testing: Issues, Criteria and an Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tianyou; Kolen, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research literature on comparability issues in computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and synthesizes issues specific to comparability and test security. Develops a framework for evaluating comparability that contains three categories of criteria: (1) validity; (2) psychometric property/reliability; and (3) statistical assumption/test…

  12. Predictive Validity of Conventional and Adaptive Tests in an Air Force Training Environment. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sympson, James B.; And Others

    Conventional Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery-7 (ASVAB) Arithmetic Reasoning and Word Knowledge tests, were compared with computer-administered adaptive tests as predictors of performance in an Air Force Jet Engine Mechanic training course (n=495). Results supported earlier research in showing somewhat longer examinee response times for…

  13. The Practical Impact of IRT Models and Parameters When Converting a Test to Adaptive Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizot, Elizabeth B.; Goldman, Steven H.

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of choice of item response theory (IRT) model, parameter calibration group, starting ability estimate, and stopping criterion on the conversion of an 80-item vocabulary test to computer adaptive format. Three parameter calibration groups were tested: (1) a group of 1,000 high school seniors, (2) a…

  14. Applying Bayesian Item Selection Approaches to Adaptive Tests Using Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.

    2006-01-01

    This study applied the maximum expected information (MEI) and the maximum posterior-weighted information (MPI) approaches of computer adaptive testing item selection to the case of a test using polytomous items following the partial credit model. The MEI and MPI approaches are described. A simulation study compared the efficiency of ability…

  15. Direct and Inverse Problems of Item Pool Design for Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.; Armstrong, Ronald D.

    2009-01-01

    The recent literature on computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has developed methods for creating CAT item pools from a large master pool. Each CAT pool is designed as a set of nonoverlapping forms reflecting the skill levels of an assumed population of test takers. This article presents a Monte Carlo method to obtain these CAT pools and discusses…

  16. Application of Computerized Adaptive Testing to Entrance Examination for Graduate Studies in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulut, Okan; Kan, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is a sophisticated and efficient way of delivering examinations. In CAT, items for each examinee are selected from an item bank based on the examinee's responses to the items. In this way, the difficulty level of the test is adjusted based on the examinee's ability level. Instead of…

  17. Computerized Adaptive Testing for Effective and Efficient Measurement in Counseling and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is described and compared with conventional tests, and its advantages summarized. Some item response theory concepts used in CAT are summarized and illustrated. The author describes the potential usefulness of CAT in counseling and education and reviews some current issues in the implementation of CAT.

  18. A Practical Computer Adaptive Testing Model for Small-Scale Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Yu-Hui; Wu, Yu-Lung; Chang, Hsin-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Computer adaptive testing (CAT) is theoretically sound and efficient, and is commonly seen in larger testing programs. It is, however, rarely seen in a smaller-scale scenario, such as in classrooms or business daily routines, because of the complexity of most adopted Item Response Theory (IRT) models. While the Sequential Probability Ratio Test…

  19. Strategies for Controlling Item Exposure in Computerized Adaptive Testing with the Generalized Partial Credit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Laurie Laughlin

    2004-01-01

    Choosing a strategy for controlling item exposure has become an integral part of test development for computerized adaptive testing (CAT). This study investigated the performance of six procedures for controlling item exposure in a series of simulated CATs under the generalized partial credit model. In addition to a no-exposure control baseline…

  20. Detection of Person Misfit in Computerized Adaptive Tests with Polytomous Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Krimpen-Stoop, Edith M. L. A.; Meijer, Rob R.

    2002-01-01

    Compared the nominal and empirical null distributions of the standardized log-likelihood statistic for polytomous items for paper-and-pencil (P&P) and computerized adaptive tests (CATs). Results show that the empirical distribution of the statistic differed from the assumed standard normal distribution for both P&P tests and CATs. Also proposed a…

  1. Flight Test of Composite Model Reference Adaptive Control (CMRAC) Augmentation Using NASA AirSTAR Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Gadient, ROss; Lavretsky, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents flight test results of a robust linear baseline controller with and without composite adaptive control augmentation. The flight testing was conducted using the NASA Generic Transport Model as part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at NASA Langley Research Center.

  2. Considering the Use of General and Modified Assessment Items in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Albano, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    This article used several data sets from a large-scale state testing program to examine the feasibility of combining general and modified assessment items in computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for different groups of students. Results suggested that several of the assumptions made when employing this type of mixed-item CAT may not be met for…

  3. An Enhanced Approach to Combine Item Response Theory with Cognitive Diagnosis in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun; Zheng, Chanjin; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing offers the possibility of gaining information on both the overall ability and cognitive profile in a single assessment administration. Some algorithms aiming for these dual purposes have been proposed, including the shadow test approach, the dual information method (DIM), and the constraint weighted method. The…

  4. Capitalization on Item Calibration Error in Adaptive Testing. Research Report 98-07.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Glas, Cees A. W.

    In adaptive testing, item selection is sequentially optimized during the test. Since the optimization takes place over a pool of items calibrated with estimation error, capitalization on these errors is likely to occur. How serious the consequences of this phenomenon are depends not only on the distribution of the estimation errors in the pool or…

  5. Flexilevel Adaptive Testing Paradigm: Hierarchical Concept Structures. Final Report for Period May 1975-March 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Duncan N.; And Others

    A computerized adaptive testing model was applied to a hierarchically arranged series of subtests within the instructional context of a technical education system. The model was a modification of Lord's flexilevel paradigm; however, it did not allow for individualized entry. Two achievement tests, each divided into five hierarchically related…

  6. Testing the hypothesis that a clade has adaptively radiated: iguanid lizard clades as a case study.

    PubMed

    Losos, Jonathan B; Miles, Donald B

    2002-08-01

    The study of adaptive radiations has played a fundamental role in understanding mechanisms of evolution. A recent resurgence in the study of adaptive radiations highlights a gap in our knowledge about determining whether a clade constitutes adaptive diversification. Specifically, no objective criteria exist to judge whether a clade constitutes an adaptive radiation. Most clades, given enough time, will diversify adaptively to some extent; therefore, we argue that the term "adaptive radiation" should be reserved for those clades that are exceptionally diverse in terms of the range of habitats occupied and attendant morphological adaptations. Making such a definition operational, however, requires a comparative analysis of many clades. Only by comparing clades can one distinguish those that are exceptionally diverse (or nondiverse) from those exhibiting a normal degree of adaptive disparity. We propose such a test, focusing on disparity in the ecological morphology of monophyletic groups within the lizard family Iguanidae. We find that two clades, the Polychrotinae and Phrynosomatinae, are exceptionally diverse and that two others, the Crotaphytinae and Oplurinae, are exceptionally nondiverse. Potential explanations for differences in diversity are discussed, as are caveats and future extensions of our approach. PMID:18707482

  7. Testing the role of luminance edges in White's illusion with contour adaptation.

    PubMed

    Betz, Torsten; Shapley, Robert; Wichmann, Felix A; Maertens, Marianne

    2015-08-01

    White's illusion is the perceptual effect that two equiluminant gray patches superimposed on a black-and-white square-wave grating appear different in lightness: A test patch placed on a dark stripe of the grating looks lighter than one placed on a light stripe. Although the effect does not depend on the aspect ratio of the test patches, and thus on the amount of border that is shared with either the dark or the light stripe, the context of each patch must, in a yet to be specified way, influence their lightness. We employed a contour adaptation paradigm (Anstis, 2013) to test the contribution of each of the test patches' edges to the perceived lightness of the test patches. We found that adapting to the edges that are oriented parallel to the grating slightly increased the lightness illusion, whereas adapting to the orthogonal edges abolished, or for some observers even reversed, the lightness illusion. We implemented a temporal adaptation mechanism in three spatial filtering models of lightness perception, and show that the models cannot account for the observed adaptation effects. We conclude that White's illusion is largely determined by edge contrast across the edge orthogonal to the grating, whereas the parallel edge has little or no influence. We suggest mechanisms that could explain this asymmetry. PMID:26305862

  8. A field operational test on valve-regulated lead-acid absorbent-glass-mat batteries in micro-hybrid electric vehicles. Part I. Results based on kernel density estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Karspeck, T.; Ott, C.; Weckler, M.; Stoermer, A. O.

    2011-03-01

    In March 2007 the BMW Group has launched the micro-hybrid functions brake energy regeneration (BER) and automatic start and stop function (ASSF). Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries in absorbent glass mat (AGM) technology are applied in vehicles with micro-hybrid power system (MHPS). In both part I and part II of this publication vehicles with MHPS and AGM batteries are subject to a field operational test (FOT). Test vehicles with conventional power system (CPS) and flooded batteries were used as a reference. In the FOT sample batteries were mounted several times and electrically tested in the laboratory intermediately. Vehicle- and battery-related diagnosis data were read out for each test run and were matched with laboratory data in a data base. The FOT data were analyzed by the use of two-dimensional, nonparametric kernel estimation for clear data presentation. The data show that capacity loss in the MHPS is comparable to the CPS. However, the influence of mileage performance, which cannot be separated, suggests that battery stress is enhanced in the MHPS although a battery refresh function is applied. Anyway, the FOT demonstrates the unsuitability of flooded batteries for the MHPS because of high early capacity loss due to acid stratification and because of vanishing cranking performance due to increasing internal resistance. Furthermore, the lack of dynamic charge acceptance for high energy regeneration efficiency is illustrated. Under the presented FOT conditions charge acceptance of lead-acid (LA) batteries decreases to less than one third for about half of the sample batteries compared to new battery condition. In part II of this publication FOT data are presented by multiple regression analysis (Schaeck et al., submitted for publication [1]).

  9. ProMAT: protein microarray analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Zangar, Richard C.

    2006-04-04

    Summary: ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from ELISA microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code. Availability: ProMAT is available at http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT. ProMAT requires Java version 1.5.0 and R version 1.9.1 (or more recent versions) which are distributed with the tool.

  10. Effects of Informed Item Selection on Test Performance and Anxiety for Examinees Administered a Self-Adapted Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plake, Barbara S.; And Others

    In self-adapted testing (SAT), examinees select the difficulty level of items administered. This study investigated three variations of prior information provided when taking an SAT: (1) no information (examinees selected item difficulty levels without prior information); (2) view (examinees inspected a typical item from each difficulty level…

  11. Development and Application of Detection Indices for Measuring Guessing Behaviors and Test-Taking Effort in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Shu-Ren; Plake, Barbara S.; Kramer, Gene A.; Lien, Shu-Mei

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the amount of time that different ability-level examinees spend on questions they answer correctly or incorrectly across different pretest item blocks presented on a fixed-length, time-restricted computerized adaptive testing (CAT). Results indicate that different ability-level examinees require different amounts of time to…

  12. Electrospun chitosan/polyvinyl alcohol nanofibre mats for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2014-04-01

    Chitosan (CS) aqueous salt blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibre mats was prepared by electrospinning. CS was dissolved with hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in distilled water without the use of toxic or hazardous solvents. The CS aqueous salts were blended with PVA at different weight ratios, and the effect of the solution ratios was investigated. The morphologies and mechanical and swelling properties of the generated fibres were analysed. Indirect cytotoxicity studies indicated that the CS/PVA nanofibre mats were non-toxic to normal human fibroblast cells. The CS-HOBt/PVA and CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats demonstrated satisfactory antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and an in vivo wound healing test showed that the CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats performed better than gauze in decreasing acute wound size during the first week after tissue damage. In conclusion, the biodegradable, biocompatible and antibacterial CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats have potential for use as wound dressing materials. PMID:22925275

  13. An Information Comparison of Conventional and Adaptive Tests in the Measurement of Classroom Achievement. Research Report 77-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bejar, Isaac I.; And Others

    Information provided by typical and improved conventional classroom achievement tests was compared with information provided by an adaptive test covering the same subject matter. Both tests were administered to over 700 college students in a general biology course. Using the same scoring method, adaptive testing was found to yield substantially…

  14. Hypersaline Microbial Mat Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotopic abundances are powerful tools for studies of contemporary microbial ecosystems. Knowledge of the relationship of biomarkers to microbial physiology and community structure creates important links for understanding the nature of early organisms and paleoenvironments. Our recent work has focused on the hypersaline microbial mats in evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, sulfur oxidizing and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface. The delta C-13 of cyanobacterial biomarkers such as the monomethylalkanes and hopanoids are consistent with the delta C-13 measured for bulk mat (-10%o), while a GNS biomarker, wax esters (WXE), suggests a more depleted delta C-13 for GNS biomass (-16%o). This isotopic relationship is different than that observed in mats at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YSNP) where GNS appear to grow photoheterotrophic ally. WXE abundance, while relatively low, is most pronounced in an anaerobic zone just below the cyanobacterial layer. The WXE isotope composition at GN suggests that these bacteria utilize photoautotrophy incorporating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway using H2S or H2.

  15. Fabrication of robust Antheraea assama fibroin nanofibrous mat using ionic liquid for skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Chandra Mohan; Purwar, Roli

    2016-11-01

    Electrospinning is an emerging technique used for fabrication of nanofibrous mats for skin tissue engineering applications. The aim of this study centered on fabrication of muga fibroin electrospun mats by using ionic liquid and its characterizations. The muga fibroin extracted from cocoon of Antheraea assama is dissolved in 1-butyl, 3-methyl imidazolium acetate (BMIMAc), a green solvent, to prepare a dope solution for electrospinning. The molecular weight, rheology and structural properties of dope solution are characterized. The process parameters of electrospinning machine such as voltage and concentration of dope solution are varied to obtain nanofibrous mats. The nanofibrous mat having average fiber diameter of 160nm are obtained from 10% w/v concentration of muga fibroin in BMIMAc with an applied voltage of 20KV. The mechanical, structural, physical and thermal properties of muga nanofibrous mat (MNF) are analyzed and compare with muga cast film. The cytocompatibility test is performed using L929 fibroblast cells. It is observed that muga nanofibrous mat support higher growth of fibroblast cells (p<0.05) as compared to muga cast film (MCF). Muga nanofibrous mat and cast film are loaded with gentamycin sulphate. The release rate and antimicrobial efficiency of gentamycin sulphate loaded muga nanofibrous mat are found to be significantly higher (p<0.05) as compared to muga cast film. All these results indicate that muga nanofibrous mat would be a promising material for skin tissue engineering. PMID:27524022

  16. New crosslinkers for electrospun chitosan fibre mats. Part II: mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Donius, Amalie E.; Kiechel, Marjorie A.; Schauer, Caroline L.; Wegst, Ulrike G. K.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies exist on the mechanical performance of crosslinked electrospun chitosan (CS) fibre mats. In this study, we show that the mat structure and mechanical performance depend on the different crosslinking agents genipin, epichlorohydrin (ECH), and hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulphonate (HDACS), as well as the post-electrospinning heat and base activation treatments. The mat structure was imaged by field emission scanning electron microscopy and the mechanical performance was tested in tension. The elastic modulus, tensile strength, strain at failure and work to failure were found to range from 52 to 592 MPa, 2 to 30 MPa, 2 to 31 per cent and 0.041 to 3.26 MJ m−3, respectively. In general, neat CS mats were found to be the stiffest and the strongest, though least ductile, while CS–ECH mats were the least stiff, weakest, but the most ductile, and CS–HDACS fibre mats exhibited intermediary mechanical properties. The mechanical performance of the mats is shown to reflect differences in the fibre diameter, number of fibre–fibre contacts formed within the mat, as well as varying intermolecular bonding and moisture content. The findings reported here complement the chemical properties of the mats, described in part I of this study. PMID:23349435

  17. The Extracellular Matrix in Photosynthetic Mats: A Cyanobacterial Gingerbread House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, R.; Stannard, W.; Bebout, B.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Mayali, X.; Weber, P. K.; Lipton, M. S.; Lee, J.; Everroad, R. C.; Thelen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Hypersaline laminated cyanobacterial mats are excellent model systems for investigating photoautotrophic contributions to biogeochemical cycling on a millimeter scale. These self-sustaining ecosystems are characterized by steep physiochemical gradients that fluctuate dramatically on hour timescales, providing a dynamic environment to study microbial response. However, elucidating the distribution of energy from light absorption into biomass requires a complete understanding of the various constituents of the mat. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which can be composed of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and DNA are a major component of these mats and may function in the redistribution of nutrients and metabolites within the community. To test this notion, we established a model mat-building culture for comparison with the phylogenetically diverse natural mat communities. In these two systems we determined how proteins and glycans in the matrix changed as a function of light and tracked nutrient flow from the matrix. Using mass spectrometry metaproteomics analysis, we found homologous proteins in both field and culture extracellular matrix that point to cyanobacterial turnover of amino acids, inorganic nutrients, carbohydrates and nucleic acids from the EPS. Other abundant functions identified included oxidative stress response from both the cyanobacteria and heterotrophs and cyanobacterial structural proteins that may play a role in mat cohesion. Several degradative enzymes also varied in abundance in the EPS in response to light availability, suggesting active secretion. To further test cyanobacterial EPS turnover, we generated isotopically-labeled EPS and used NanoSIMS to trace uptake of this labeled EPS. Our findings suggest Cyanobacteria may facilitate nutrient transfer to other groups, as well as uptake of their own products through degradation of EPS components. This work provides evidence for the essential roles of EPS for storage, structural

  18. Fabrication of poly(ε-caprolactone)/keratin nanofibrous mats as a potential scaffold for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanmei; Wang, Yanfang; Ye, Jingjie; Yuan, Jiang; Xiao, Yinghong

    2016-11-01

    The natural abundance of cell adhesion sequences, RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) and LDV (Leu-Asp-Val) in the keratins make them suitable as biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Herein, keratins were coelectrospun with poly(ε-caprolactone)(PCL) at the ratio of 9/1, 8/2, and 7/3 to afford nanofibrous mats. The resulting mats were surface-characterized by ATR-FTIR, SEM, WCA, and XPS. Cell attachment data showed that NIH 3T3 cells adhered more to the PCL/keratin nanofibrous mats than the pristine PCL mats. The MTT assay revealed that the PCL/keratin mats had improved cell viability. The blood clotting time test (APTT, PT, and TT) indicated the PCL/keratin mats exerted good blood compatibility. These mats would be a good candidate as a scaffold for vascular tissue engineering. PMID:27524010

  19. Fabrication and In Vitro/In Vivo Performance of Mucoadhesive Electrospun Nanofiber Mats Containing α-Mangostin.

    PubMed

    Samprasit, Wipada; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Akkaramongkolporn, Prasert; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to fabricate mucoadhesive electrospun nanofiber mats containing α-mangostin for the maintenance of oral hygiene and reduction of the bacterial growth that causes dental caries. Synthesized thiolated chitosan (CS-SH) blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was selected as the mucoadhesive polymer. α-Mangostin was incorporated into the CS-SH/PVA solution and electrospun to obtain nanofiber mats. Scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and tensile strength testing were used to characterize the mats. The swelling degree and mucoadhesion were also determined. The nanofiber mats were further evaluated regarding their α-mangostin content, in vitro α-mangostin release, antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity, in vivo performance, and stability. The results indicated that the mats were in the nanometer range. The α-mangostin was well incorporated into the mats, with an amorphous form. The mats showed suitable tensile strength, swelling, and mucoadhesive properties. The loading capacity increased when the initial amount of α-mangostin was increased. Rapid release of α-mangostin from the mats was achieved. Additionally, a fast bacterial killing rate occurred at the lowest concentration of nanofiber mats when α-mangostin was added to the mats. The mats were less cytotoxic after use for 72 h. Moreover, in vivo testing indicated that the mats could reduce the number of oral bacteria, with a good mouth feel. The mats maintained the amount of α-mangostin for 6 months. The results suggest that α-mangostin-loaded mucoadhesive electrospun nanofiber mats may be a promising material for oral care and the prevention of dental caries. PMID:25716329

  20. Test Adaptation and Cross-Cultural Assessment From a Business Perspective: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casillas, Alex; Robbins, Steven B.

    2005-01-01

    Test adaptation and cross-cultural assessment activities are skyrocketing as the demand for educational opportunities and personnel selection grow both within the United States and across the industrializing world. We chose a qualitative, case study approach to identify central themes encountered by ACT, a not-for-profit organization that has…

  1. A Genre-Based Perspective for the Development of Communicative Computerized Adaptive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Cuadrado, Javier; Armendariz, Ana J.; Latapy, Marion; Lopisteguy, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the communicative potentials of Computerized Adaptive Testing. The study is based on a model that offers a set of independent communicative concepts to describe the Genre of an interactive application. This model will be the starting point to analyze the stages of the interaction cycle that are typically inherent to every…

  2. Computerized Adaptive Testing: A Comparison of the Nominal Response Model and the Three Parameter Logistic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAyala, R. J.; Koch, William R.

    A nominal response model-based computerized adaptive testing procedure (nominal CAT) was implemented using simulated data. Ability estimates from the nominal CAT were compared to those from a CAT based upon the three-parameter logistic model (3PL CAT). Furthermore, estimates from both CAT procedures were compared with the known true abilities used…

  3. To Weight or Not to Weight? Balancing Influence of Initial Items in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hua-Hua; Ying, Zhiliang

    2008-01-01

    It has been widely reported that in computerized adaptive testing some examinees may get much lower scores than they would normally if an alternative paper-and-pencil version were given. The main purpose of this investigation is to quantitatively reveal the cause for the underestimation phenomenon. The logistic models, including the 1PL, 2PL, and…

  4. Adapting the Bilingual Aphasia Test to Rarotongan (Cook Islands Maori): Linguistic and Clinical Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amberber, Amanda Miller

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the adaptation of the Bilingual Aphasia Test (BAT) to the Rarotongan dialect of Cook Islands Maori, a Polynesian language spoken in the Cook Islands and expatriate communities. A brief linguistic sketch of Rarotongan is presented. As Rarotongan is characterised by a complex pronominal system, "a" versus "o" possession and…

  5. Using Neural Net Technology To Enhance the Efficiency of a Computer Adaptive Testing Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Nelson, C.; Henriksen, Larry W.

    The potential for computer adaptive testing (CAT) has been well documented. In order to improve the efficiency of this process, it may be possible to utilize a neural network, or more specifically, a back propagation neural network. The paper asserts that in order to accomplish this end, it must be shown that grouping examinees by ability as…

  6. Restrictive Stochastic Item Selection Methods in Cognitive Diagnostic Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Huebner, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes two new item selection methods for cognitive diagnostic computerized adaptive testing: the restrictive progressive method and the restrictive threshold method. They are built upon the posterior weighted Kullback-Leibler (KL) information index but include additional stochastic components either in the item selection index or in…

  7. Item Response Theory and Computerized Adaptive Testing Conference Proceedings (Wayzata, Minnesota, July 27-30, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J., Ed.

    This report contains the Proceedings of the 1982 Item Response Theory and Computerized Adaptive Testing Conference. The papers and their discussions are organized into eight sessions: (1) "Developments in Latent Trait Theory," with papers by Fumiko Samejima and Michael V. Levine; (2) "Parameter Estimation," with papers by Frederic M. Lord and…

  8. Potential Sources of Differential Item Functioning in the Adaptation of Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elosua, Paula; Lopez-Jauregui, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    This report shows a classification of differential item functioning (DIF) sources that have an effect on the adaptation of tests. This classification is based on linguistic and cultural criteria. Four general DIF sources are distinguished: cultural relevance, translation problems, morph syntactical differences, and semantic differences. The…

  9. Some Alternatives to Sympson-Hetter Item-Exposure Control in Computerized Adaptive Testing. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    The Sympson and Hetter (SH; J. Sympson and R. Hetter; 1985; 1997) method is a method of probabilistic item exposure control in computerized adaptive testing. Setting its control parameters to admissible values requires an iterative process of computer simulations that has been found to be time consuming, particularly if the parameters have to be…

  10. Students' Perceived Usefulness of Formative Feedback for a Computer-Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, Mariana; Barker, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report on research related to the provision of automated feedback based on a computer adaptive test (CAT), used in formative assessment. A cohort of 76 second year university undergraduates took part in a formative assessment with a CAT and were provided with automated feedback on their performance. A sample of students responded…

  11. The Adapted Fresno Test of Competence in Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Annie; Bishop, Bianca

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Health educators who teach professionals about evidence-based practice (EBP) need instruments to measure change in skills and knowledge. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the interrater reliability, internal consistency, and responsiveness of the Adapted Fresno Test (AFT) of competence in EBP. Methods: Reliability testing…

  12. Firestar-"D": Computerized Adaptive Testing Simulation Program for Dichotomous Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Seung W.; Podrabsky, Tracy; McKinney, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) enables efficient and flexible measurement of latent constructs. The majority of educational and cognitive measurement constructs are based on dichotomous item response theory (IRT) models. An integral part of developing various components of a CAT system is conducting simulations using both known and empirical…

  13. Best Design for Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing with the Bifactor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Dong Gi; Weiss, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Most computerized adaptive tests (CATs) have been studied using the framework of unidimensional item response theory. However, many psychological variables are multidimensional and might benefit from using a multidimensional approach to CATs. This study investigated the accuracy, fidelity, and efficiency of a fully multidimensional CAT algorithm…

  14. Lessons Learned in Designing and Implementing a Computer-Adaptive Test for English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burston, Jack; Neophytou, Maro

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the lessons learned in designing and implementing a computer-adaptive test (CAT) for English. The early identification of students with weak L2 English proficiency is of critical importance in university settings that have compulsory English language course graduation requirements. The most efficient means of diagnosing the L2…

  15. SimulCAT: Windows Software for Simulating Computerized Adaptive Test Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2012-01-01

    Most, if not all, computerized adaptive testing (CAT) programs use simulation techniques to develop and evaluate CAT program administration and operations, but such simulation tools are rarely available to the public. Up to now, several software tools have been available to conduct CAT simulations for research purposes; however, these existing…

  16. Item Pool Design for an Operational Variable-Length Computerized Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Wei; Reckase, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    For computerized adaptive tests (CATs) to work well, they must have an item pool with sufficient numbers of good quality items. Many researchers have pointed out that, in developing item pools for CATs, not only is the item pool size important but also the distribution of item parameters and practical considerations such as content distribution…

  17. Variable-Length Computerized Adaptive Testing Based on Cognitive Diagnosis Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Chia-Ling; Wang, Wen-Chung; Chen, Shu-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Interest in developing computerized adaptive testing (CAT) under cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs) has increased recently. CAT algorithms that use a fixed-length termination rule frequently lead to different degrees of measurement precision for different examinees. Fixed precision, in which the examinees receive the same degree of measurement…

  18. On the Impact of Adaptive Test Question Selection for Learning Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barla, Michal; Bielikova, Maria; Ezzeddinne, Anna Bou; Kramar, Tomas; Simko, Marian; Vozar, Oto

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for adaptive selection of test questions according to the individual needs of students within a web-based educational system. It functions as a combination of three particular methods. The first method is based on the course structure and focuses on the selection of the most appropriate topic for learning. The…

  19. The Use of Unidimensional Item Parameter Estimates of Multidimensional Items in Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Terry A.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of using multidimensional items in a computer adaptive test (CAT) setting which assumes a unidimensional item response theory (IRT) framework. Previous research has suggested that the composite of multidimensional abilities being estimated by a unidimensional IRT model is not constant…

  20. Optimal Item Pool Design for a Highly Constrained Computerized Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Item pool quality has been regarded as one important factor to help realize enhanced measurement quality for the computerized adaptive test (CAT) (e.g., Flaugher, 2000; Jensema, 1977; McBride & Wise, 1976; Reckase, 1976; 2003; van der Linden, Ariel, & Veldkamp, 2006; Veldkamp & van der Linden, 2000; Xing & Hambleton, 2004). However, studies are…

  1. Computerized Adaptive Testing Using a Class of High-Order Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Hung-Yu; Chen, Po-Hsi; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2012-01-01

    In the human sciences, a common assumption is that latent traits have a hierarchical structure. Higher order item response theory models have been developed to account for this hierarchy. In this study, computerized adaptive testing (CAT) algorithms based on these kinds of models were implemented, and their performance under a variety of…

  2. Cognitive Process Development as Measured by an Adapted Version of Wechsler's Similarities Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozencwajg, Paulette

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the development of taxonomic processing as measured by an adapted version of the Wechsler Similarities subtest, which distinguishes between categorization of concrete and abstract words. Two factors--age and concreteness--are also tested by a recall task. The results show an age-related increase in taxonomic categorization,…

  3. A Feedback Control Strategy for Enhancing Item Selection Efficiency in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    A computerized adaptive test (CAT) may be modeled as a closed-loop system, where item selection is influenced by trait level ([theta]) estimation and vice versa. When discrepancies exist between an examinee's estimated and true [theta] levels, nonoptimal item selection is a likely result. Nevertheless, examinee response behavior consistent with…

  4. A Monte Carlo Approach to the Design, Assembly, and Evaluation of Multistage Adaptive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.; Armstrong, Ronald D.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an application of Monte Carlo methods for developing and assembling multistage adaptive tests (MSTs). A major advantage of the Monte Carlo assembly over other approaches (e.g., integer programming or enumerative heuristics) is that it provides a uniform sampling from all MSTs (or MST paths) available from a given item pool.…

  5. A hierarchical Bayesian approach to adaptive vision testing: A case study with the contrast sensitivity function

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hairong; Kim, Woojae; Hou, Fang; Lesmes, Luis Andres; Pitt, Mark A.; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Myung, Jay I.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement efficiency is of concern when a large number of observations are required to obtain reliable estimates for parametric models of vision. The standard entropy-based Bayesian adaptive testing procedures addressed the issue by selecting the most informative stimulus in sequential experimental trials. Noninformative, diffuse priors were commonly used in those tests. Hierarchical adaptive design optimization (HADO; Kim, Pitt, Lu, Steyvers, & Myung, 2014) further improves the efficiency of the standard Bayesian adaptive testing procedures by constructing an informative prior using data from observers who have already participated in the experiment. The present study represents an empirical validation of HADO in estimating the human contrast sensitivity function. The results show that HADO significantly improves the accuracy and precision of parameter estimates, and therefore requires many fewer observations to obtain reliable inference about contrast sensitivity, compared to the method of quick contrast sensitivity function (Lesmes, Lu, Baek, & Albright, 2010), which uses the standard Bayesian procedure. The improvement with HADO was maintained even when the prior was constructed from heterogeneous populations or a relatively small number of observers. These results of this case study support the conclusion that HADO can be used in Bayesian adaptive testing by replacing noninformative, diffuse priors with statistically justified informative priors without introducing unwanted bias. PMID:27105061

  6. Some Alternatives to Sympson-Hetter Item-Exposure Control in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    The Hetter and Sympson (1997; 1985) method is a method of probabilistic item-exposure control in computerized adaptive testing. Setting its control parameters to admissible values requires an iterative process of computer simulations that has been found to be time consuming, particularly if the parameters have to be set conditional on a realistic…

  7. A Method for the Comparison of Item Selection Rules in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrada, Juan Ramon; Olea, Julio; Ponsoda, Vicente; Abad, Francisco Jose

    2010-01-01

    In a typical study comparing the relative efficiency of two item selection rules in computerized adaptive testing, the common result is that they simultaneously differ in accuracy and security, making it difficult to reach a conclusion on which is the more appropriate rule. This study proposes a strategy to conduct a global comparison of two or…

  8. A Revised Version of the Norwegian Adaptation of the Test Anxiety Inventory in a Heterogeneous Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oktedalen, Tuva; Hagtvet, Knut A.

    2011-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis and Multiple Indicators, Multiple Causes (MIMIC) modeling were employed to investigate psychometric properties of a revised adaptation of the Norwegian version of the Test Anxiety Inventory (RTAIN) in a sample of 456 students. The study supported the Norwegian version as a useful inventory for measuring the components…

  9. SIMCA T 1.0: A SAS Computer Program for Simulating Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiche, Gilles; Blais, Jean-Guy

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo methodologies are frequently applied to study the sampling distribution of the estimated proficiency level in adaptive testing. These methods eliminate real situational constraints. However, these Monte Carlo methodologies are not currently supported by the available software programs, and when these programs are available, their…

  10. On the equivalence of host local adaptation and parasite maladaptation: an experimental test.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Mélissa; Doligez, Blandine; Richner, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    In spatiotemporally varying environments, host-parasite coevolution may lead to either host or parasite local adaptation. Using reciprocal infestations over 11 pairs of plots, we tested local adaptation in the hen flea and its main host, the great tit. Flea reproductive success (number of adults at host fledging) was lower on host individuals from the same plot compared with foreign hosts (from another plot), revealing flea local maladaptation. Host reproductive success (number of fledged young) for nests infested by foreign fleas was lower compared with the reproductive success of controls, with an intermediate success for nests infested by local fleas. This suggests host local adaptation although the absence of local adaptation could not be excluded. However, fledglings were heavier and larger when reared with foreign fleas than when reared with local fleas, which could also indicate host local maladaptation if the fitness gain in offspring size offsets the potential cost in offspring number. Our results therefore challenge the traditional view that parasite local maladaptation is equivalent to host local adaptation. The differences in fledgling morphology between nests infested with local fleas and those with foreign fleas suggest that flea origin affects host resource allocation strategy between nestling growth and defense against parasites. Therefore, determining the mechanisms that underlie these local adaptation patterns requires the identification of the relevant fitness measures and life-history trade-offs in both species. PMID:22218315

  11. Applications of Computerized Adaptive Testing. Proceedings of a Symposium presented at the Annual Convention of the Military Testing Association (18th, October 1976). Research Report 77-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J., Ed.

    This symposium consists of five papers and presents some recent developments in adaptive testing which have applications to several military testing problems. The overview, by James R. McBride, defines adaptive testing and discusses some of its item selection and scoring strategies. Item response theory, or item characteristic curve theory, is…

  12. Adapting the Get Yourself Tested Campaign to Reach Black and Latino Sexual-Minority Youth

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, Samantha; Friedman, Allison; Martinez, Omar; Scheinmann, Roberta; Bermudez, Dayana; Silva, Manel; Silverman, Jen; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background Culturally appropriate efforts are needed to increase sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing and care among Black and Latino sexual-minority youth, who are at high risk for STDs. Get Yourself Tested, a national testing campaign, has demonstrated success among youth, but it has yet to be assessed for relevance or impact among this population. Method This effort included (1) formative and materials-testing research through focus groups; (2) adaptation of existing Get Yourself Tested campaign materials to be more inclusive of Black and Latino sexual-minority youth; (3) a 3-month campaign in four venues of New York City, promoting STD testing at events and through mobile testing and online and social media platforms; (4) process evaluation of outreach activities; and (5) an outcome evaluation of testing at select campaign venues, using a preexperimental design. Results During the 3-month campaign period, the number of STD tests conducted at select campaign venues increased from a comparable 3-month baseline period. Although testing uptake through mobile vans remained low in absolute numbers, the van drew a high-prevalence sample, with positivity rates of 26.9% for chlamydia and 11.5% for gonorrhea. This article documents the process and lessons learned from adapting and implementing a local campaign for Black and Latino sexual-minority youth. PMID:27225216

  13. Effects of tacky mat contamination on bond degradation for Chemlok/liner and NBR/liner bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    Tacky mats are placed by the rubber lay-up areas for the solid rocket motor segments. These mats dust off the shoes prior to entering the platform where the lay-up work is performed. The possibility exists that a tacky mat could be touched with gloved hands prior to handling the uncured nitride butadiene rubber (NBR). Tests were run to determine if NBR were accidentally touched would there be any degradation of the liner/NBR bond. The tacky mats were judged solely on the basis of bond degradation caused by either direct or indirect contamination. Test results all indicate that there was no notable NBR/Chemlok or liner/NBR bond degradation on samples that came into contact with the tacky mat material. Testing procedures are described. The tacky mat adhesive composition does not contain fluorocarbons or release agents that would affect bonding.

  14. Bacterial contamination control mats: a comparative study.

    PubMed Central

    Meddick, H. M.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of six different types of contamination control mats currently in use at the entrances to theatre suites and other clean areas to remove bacteria-carrying particles from theatre trolley wheeels was compared. Marked differences in the effectiveness of this property were obtained; and all mats showed some disadvantages. Modification of one of the mats has resulted in improved efficiency under working conditions. Images Plate 1 PMID:267665

  15. Shuttle/Centaur G-prime composite adapters damage tolerance/repair test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollars, Teresa A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle/Centaur Composite Adapters Damage Tolerance/Repair Test program had as its goals the determination of probable and potentially critical defects or damages on the adapters' strength and stability, as well as the adequacy of repairs on significantly damaged areas and the generation of NDT data for the upgrading of acceptance criteria. Such rational accept/reject criteria and repair methods reduce both engineering liason costs and any unnecessary parts-scrapping. Successful 'damage tolerant' design ensures that degradations of strength and stability due to undetected defects or damage will not be catastrophic.

  16. Calibration and testing of the 6.5 m MMT adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert Lee

    2001-10-01

    This dissertation describes the development, calibration, and testing of the adaptive optics system for the 6.5 m Multiple Mirror Telescope. By employing a deformable secondary mirror, the MMT adaptive optics system uniquely solves several problems typical of astronomical adaptive optics systems. Extra components are eliminated, improving throughput and reducing emissivity. Since the adaptive secondary is integral to the telescope, a corrected beam is presented to any instrument mounted at Cassegrain focus. The testing of an adaptive mirror, which is large and convex, poses a new and difficult problem. I present a test apparatus that allows complete calibration and operation, in closed-loop, of the entire adaptive optics system in the laboratory. The test apparatus replicates the optical path of the telescope with a wavefront error of less than 500 nm RMS. To simulate atmospheric turbulence, machined acrylic plates are included. A phase-shifting interferometer allows calibration of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and reconstruction algorithms; comparisons agree to one-third of the root-mean-square wavefront. First, techniques were developed to align the apparatus and measure residual aberration. Then, the wavefront sensor was calibrated by measuring its response to introduced tilt. Lastly, a Fourier wave-optics approach was used to produce a modal wavefront reconstructor. The adaptive secondary mirror uses electro-magnetic force actuators. Capacitive position sensors are placed at each actuator to permit control of the mirror shape without measuring the reflected wavefront. These sensors have nanometer resolution, but require calibration. To calibrate the sensors, I developed a small optical instrument which measures the thickness of transparent films to an absolute accuracy of 5 nm with a precision of 2 nm. The device has applications far beyond the scope of this research. Twenty-four of these optical gap sensors have been built to calibrate the 336 capacitive

  17. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for the Pressurized Mating Adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of three subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). PMAs 1 and 2 flew to ISS on Flight 2A and Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) 3 flew to ISS on Flight 3A. This paper provides a summary of the PMAs ECLS design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodologies utilized for the PMAs.

  18. Approaching Sign Language Test Construction: Adaptation of the German Sign Language Receptive Skills Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    There is a current need for reliable and valid test instruments in different countries in order to monitor deaf children's sign language acquisition. However, very few tests are commercially available that offer strong evidence for their psychometric properties. A German Sign Language (DGS) test focusing on linguistic structures that are acquired…

  19. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  20. Bentonite mat demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.G.

    1994-12-30

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration was developed to provide the Environmental Restoration Department with field performance characteristics and engineering data for an alternative closure cover system configuration. The demonstration was initiated in response to regulatory concerns regarding the use of an alternative cover system for future design configurations. These design considerations are in lieu of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Recommended Design for Closure Cover Systems and specifically a single compacted kaolin clay layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. This alternative configuration is a composite geosynthetic material hydraulic barrier consisting from bottom to top: 2 ft compacted sandy clay layer (typical local Savannah River Site soil type) that is covered by a bentonite mat--geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and is overlaid by a 40 mil High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane--flexible membrane liner. This effort was undertaken to obtain and document the necessary field performance/engineering data for future designs and meet regulatory technical requirements for an alternative cover system configuration. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is the recommended alternative cover system configuration for containment of hazardous and low level radiological waste layers that have a high potential of subsidence to be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This alternative configuration mitigates subsidence effects in providing a flexible, lightweight cover system to maintain the integrity of the closure. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is recommended for the Sanitary Landfill and Low Level Radiological Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) Closures.

  1. High-Resolution Adaptive Optics Test-Bed for Vision Science

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, S C; Thomspon, C A; Olivier, S S; Bauman, B J; Barnes, T; Werner, J S

    2001-09-27

    We discuss the design and implementation of a low-cost, high-resolution adaptive optics test-bed for vision research. It is well known that high-order aberrations in the human eye reduce optical resolution and limit visual acuity. However, the effects of aberration-free eyesight on vision are only now beginning to be studied using adaptive optics to sense and correct the aberrations in the eye. We are developing a high-resolution adaptive optics system for this purpose using a Hamamatsu Parallel Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator. Phase-wrapping is used to extend the effective stroke of the device, and the wavefront sensing and wavefront correction are done at different wavelengths. Issues associated with these techniques will be discussed.

  2. [LAST-Q: Adaptation and normalisation in Quebec of the Language Screening Test].

    PubMed

    Bourgeois-Marcotte, J; Flamand-Roze, C; Denier, C; Monetta, L

    2015-05-01

    The goal of the present study was to adapt and to establish normative data for the recently developed Language Screening Test (LAST; Flamand-Roze et al., 2011) in the French-Canadian population according to age and level of education. After an adaptation process, 100 French-Canadian speakers were evaluated with the LAST-Q. As expected, a perfect score of 15/15 was obtained for all high level education participants, and a score of 14/15 was obtained for all participants with a lowest level of education or aged 80 years or more. Thanks to this adaptation, LAST-Q can be used in acute patients in stroke unit in Quebec. PMID:25917163

  3. An adaptive resampling test for detecting the presence of significant predictors

    PubMed Central

    McKeague, Ian W.; Qian, Min

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates marginal screening for detecting the presence of significant predictors in high-dimensional regression. Screening large numbers of predictors is a challenging problem due to the non-standard limiting behavior of post-model-selected estimators. There is a common misconception that the oracle property for such estimators is a panacea, but the oracle property only holds away from the null hypothesis of interest in marginal screening. To address this difficulty, we propose an adaptive resampling test (ART). Our approach provides an alternative to the popular (yet conservative) Bonferroni method of controlling familywise error rates. ART is adaptive in the sense that thresholding is used to decide whether the centered percentile bootstrap applies, and otherwise adapts to the non-standard asymptotics in the tightest way possible. The performance of the approach is evaluated using a simulation study and applied to gene expression data and HIV drug resistance data. PMID:27073292

  4. An experimental test of host specialization in a ubiquitous polar ectoparasite: a role for adaptation?

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Muriel; Lobato, Elisa; Boulinier, Thierry; McCoy, Karen D

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of host specificity is considered to be an essential mechanism driving parasite diversity. It may be governed by adaptive constraints that lead to host-dependent fitness trade-offs. Alternatively, specificity may arise via transmission constraints that isolate parasite populations, without necessarily involving adaptation per se. Here, we ask whether the repeated observation of host-associated genetic races across the worldwide distribution of the seabird ectoparasite Ixodes uriae is associated with host adaptation. We conducted a field-based experiment to test for adaptive specialisation in host races of I. uriae. We transferred unengorged ticks of two life stages (nymphs and adults) originating from three host species (black-legged kittiwake, common guillemot and Atlantic puffin) onto young kittiwake nestlings and followed attraction and attachment rates, engorgement times and feeding success of the transplanted ticks. All ticks were also typed genetically to match exploitation patterns with genetic differences among races. Ticks from atypical hosts were significantly less attracted to nestlings than ticks from the typical host, and showed lower feeding success and higher mortality. The degree of host specificity matched patterns of neutral genetic variation among races, with puffin ticks being more specific than guillemot ticks. Differences in specificity were also apparent among tick life stages, suggesting that nymphal ticks may be less discriminating of host type than adult ticks. Our results indicate that the genetic divergence previously observed among sympatric I. uriae host races is at least partially linked to adaptive specialisation to the host species and not simply to host-mediated transmission. They also suggest that the adaptation process may evolve differently in different life stages based on trade-offs with physiological constraints. The identification of the selective forces acting in host specialization will now be necessary to

  5. Interaction of gelatin with polyenes modulates antifungal activity and biocompatibility of electrospun fiber mats

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Loh, Xian Jun; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Kalaipriya, Madhaiyan; Kwan, Jia Lin; Liu, Shou Ping; Beuerman, Roger Wilmer; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of antifungals does not have predictable or well-controlled release characteristics and requires reapplication to achieve therapeutic local concentration in a reasonable time period. In this article, the efficacy of five different US Food and Drug Administration-approved antifungal-loaded (amphotericin B, natamycin, terbinafine, fluconazole, and itraconazole) electrospun gelatin fiber mats were compared. Morphological studies show that incorporation of polyenes resulted in a two-fold increase in fiber diameter and the mats inhibit the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungal pathogens. Terbinafine-loaded mats were effective against three filamentous fungal species. Among the two azole antifungals compared, the itraconazole-loaded mat was potent against Aspergillus strains. However, activity loss was observed for fluconazole-loaded mats against all of the test organisms. The polyene-loaded mats displayed rapid candidacidal activities as well. Biophysical and rheological measurements indicate strong interactions between polyene antifungals and gelatin matrix. As a result, the polyenes stabilized the triple helical conformation of gelatin and the presence of gelatin decreased the hemolytic activity of polyenes. The polyene-loaded fiber mats were noncytotoxic to primary human corneal and sclera fibroblasts. The reduction of toxicity with complete retention of activity of the polyene antifungal-loaded gelatin fiber mats can provide new opportunities in the management of superficial skin infections. PMID:24920895

  6. Capabilities of wind tunnels with two-adaptive walls to minimize boundary interference in 3-D model testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebstock, Rainer; Lee, Edwin E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An initial wind tunnel test was made to validate a new wall adaptation method for 3-D models in test sections with two adaptive walls. First part of the adaptation strategy is an on-line assessment of wall interference at the model position. The wall induced blockage was very small at all test conditions. Lift interference occurred at higher angles of attack with the walls set aerodynamically straight. The adaptation of the top and bottom tunnel walls is aimed at achieving a correctable flow condition. The blockage was virtually zero throughout the wing planform after the wall adjustment. The lift curve measured with the walls adapted agreed very well with interference free data for Mach 0.7, regardless of the vertical position of the wing in the test section. The 2-D wall adaptation can significantly improve the correctability of 3-D model data. Nevertheless, residual spanwise variations of wall interference are inevitable.

  7. Test application of Bayesian Programming: Adaptive water quality management under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Kenneth W.

    2007-03-01

    A new method, Bayesian Programming (BP), developed by Harrison [Harrison KW. Multi-stage decision-making under uncertainty and stochasticity: Bayesian Programming. Adv Water Resour, submitted for publication] is tested on a case study involving optimal adaptive management of a river basin. The case study considers anew the process of permitting pulp mills on the Athabasca River in Alberta, Canada. The problem has characteristics common to many environmental management problems. There is uncertainty in the water quality response to pollutant loadings that will not be completely resolved with monitoring and the resolution of this uncertainty is impeded by the stochastic behavior of the water quality system. A two-stage adaptive management process is optimized with BP. Based on monitoring data collected after implementation of the first-stage decision, the uncertainties are updated prior to the second decision stage using Bayesian analysis. The worth of this two-stage adaptive management approach to this problem and the worth of monitoring are evaluated. Conclusions are drawn on the general practicality of BP for adaptive management. Potential strategies are outlined for extending the BP approach to secure further benefits of adaptive management.

  8. Design and Preliminary Testing of the International Docking Adapter's Peripheral Docking Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Christopher W.; Blaschak, Johnathan; Eldridge, Erin A.; Brazzel, Jack P.; Spehar, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    The International Docking Adapter's Peripheral Docking Target (PDT) was designed to allow a docking spacecraft to judge its alignment relative to the docking system. The PDT was designed to be compatible with relative sensors using visible cameras, thermal imagers, or Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) technologies. The conceptual design team tested prototype designs and materials to determine the contrast requirements for the features. This paper will discuss the design of the PDT, the methodology and results of the tests, and the conclusions pertaining to PDT design that were drawn from testing.

  9. Testing for Adaptation to Climate in Arabidopsis thaliana: A Calibrated Common Garden Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, Matthew T.; Fenster, Charles B.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims A recent method used to test for local adaptation is a common garden experiment where analyses are calibrated to the environmental conditions of the garden. In this study the calibrated common garden approach is used to test for patterns of adaptation to climate in accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. Methods Seedlings from 21 accessions of A. thaliana were planted outdoors in College Park, MD, USA, and development was monitored during the course of a growing season. ANOVA and multiple regression analysis were used to determine if development traits were significant predictors of plant success. Previously published data relating to accessional differences in genetic and physiological characters were also examined. Historical records of climate were used to evaluate whether properties of the site of origin of an accession affected the fitness of plants in a novel environment. Key Results By calibrating the analysis to the climatic conditions of the common garden site, performance differences were detected among the accessions consistent with a pattern of adaptation to latitude and climatic conditions. Relatively higher accession fitness was predicted by a latitude and climatic history similar to that of College Park in April and May during the main growth period of this experiment. The climatic histories of the accessions were better predictors of performance than many of the life-history and growth measures taken during the experiment. Conclusions It is concluded that the calibrated common garden experiment can detect local adaptation and guide subsequent reciprocal transplant experiments. PMID:17293351

  10. Sleep deprivation selectively disrupts top-down adaptation to cognitive conflict in the Stroop test.

    PubMed

    Gevers, Wim; Deliens, Gaetane; Hoffmann, Sophie; Notebaert, Wim; Peigneux, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation is known to exert detrimental effects on various cognitive domains, including attention, vigilance and working memory. Seemingly at odds with these findings, prior studies repeatedly failed to evidence an impact of prior sleep deprivation on cognitive interference in the Stroop test, a hallmark paradigm in the study of cognitive control abilities. The present study investigated further the effect of sleep deprivation on cognitive control using an adapted version of the Stroop test that allows to segregate top-down (attentional reconfiguration on incongruent items) and bottom-up (facilitated processing after repetitions in responses and/or features of stimuli) components of performance. Participants underwent a regular night of sleep or a night of total sleep deprivation before cognitive testing. Results disclosed that sleep deprivation selectively impairs top-down adaptation mechanisms: cognitive control no longer increased upon detection of response conflict at the preceding trial. In parallel, bottom-up abilities were found unaffected by sleep deprivation: beneficial effects of stimulus and response repetitions persisted. Changes in vigilance states due to sleep deprivation selectively impact on cognitive control in the Stroop test by affecting top-down, but not bottom-up, mechanisms that guide adaptive behaviours. PMID:26173051

  11. Implementation of an Adaptive Controller System from Concept to Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Richard R.; Burken, John J.; Butler, Bradley S.; Yokum, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) is conducting ongoing flight research using adaptive controller algorithms. A highly modified McDonnell-Douglas NF-15B airplane called the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) is used to test and develop these algorithms. Modifications to this airplane include adding canards and changing the flight control systems to interface a single-string research controller processor for neural network algorithms. Research goals include demonstration of revolutionary control approaches that can efficiently optimize aircraft performance in both normal and failure conditions and advancement of neural-network-based flight control technology for new aerospace system designs. This report presents an overview of the processes utilized to develop adaptive controller algorithms during a flight-test program, including a description of initial adaptive controller concepts and a discussion of modeling formulation and performance testing. Design finalization led to integration with the system interfaces, verification of the software, validation of the hardware to the requirements, design of failure detection, development of safety limiters to minimize the effect of erroneous neural network commands, and creation of flight test control room displays to maximize human situational awareness; these are also discussed.

  12. Computer-Adaptive Testing for Students with Disabilities: A Review of the Literature. Research Report. ETS RR-11-32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Elizabeth; Davey, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increased interest in developing computer-adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage assessments for K-12 accountability assessments. The move to adaptive testing has been met with some resistance by those in the field of special education who express concern about routing of students with divergent profiles (e.g., some students with…

  13. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  14. Direct piezoelectric responses of soft composite fiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, M.; Morvan, J.; Diorio, N.; Buyuktanir, E.; Harden, J.; West, J. L.; Jákli, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recently soft fiber mats electrospun from solutions of Barium Titanate (BT) ferroelectric ceramics particles and polylactic acid (PLA) were found to have large (d33 ˜ 1 nm/V) converse piezoelectric signals offering a myriad of applications ranging from active implants to smart textiles. Here, we report direct piezoelectric measurements (electric signals due to mechanical stress) of the BT/PLA composite fiber mats at several BT concentrations. A homemade testing apparatus provided AC stresses in the 50 Hz-1.5 kHz-frequency range. The piezoelectric constant d33 ˜ 0.5 nC/N and the compression modulus Y ˜ 104-105 Pa found are in agreement with the prior converse piezoelectric and compressibility measurements. Importantly, the direct piezoelectric signal is large enough to power a small LCD by simple finger tapping of a 0.15 mm thick 2-cm2 area mat. We propose using these mats in active Braille cells and in liquid crystal writing tablets.

  15. Performance of ballast mats on passenger railroads: Measurement vs. projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. E.; Singleton, H. L.

    2006-06-01

    Ballast mats have been installed on urban railway systems throughout the world to provide isolation of ground-borne vibrations from trains. In general, the performance has been found to be satisfactory. However, often there is a variance between the claims of the suppliers of ballast mats and the actual performance of the product in the real world. The classic case involves an infinite terminal impedance applicable to a tunnel configuration. However, a ballast mat installation outdoors on surface track with sub-grade slabs may not have the same performance as a tunnel base where sides are stiffened by walls. In order to represent this situation, Kimura developed a simplified prediction procedure based on an original Wettschureck/Kurze model, with a finite termination impedance based on a flat beam model. This prediction procedure has been tested against measurements on at-grade installations on light rail transit and commuter railway installations in Baltimore and Boston. In both cases, the model showed good agreement with measured values for the resonant frequency dip and the mid-frequency insertion loss. At higher frequencies, however, the model over-predicted the insertion loss, as do many of the models used by ballast mat suppliers. Suggestions are made to account for the discrepancies between predicted and measured values.

  16. Assessment of Postflight Locomotor Performance Utilizing a Test of Functional Mobility: Strategic and Adaptive Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, L. E.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Richards, J. T.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Ruttley, T. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Space flight induces adaptive modification in sensorimotor function, allowing crewmembers to operate in the unique microgravity environment. This adaptive state, however, is inappropriate for a terrestrial environment. During a re-adaptation period upon their return to Earth, crewmembers experience alterations in sensorimotor function, causing various disturbances in perception, spatial orientation, posture, gait, and eye-head coordination. Following long duration space flight, sensorimotor dysfunction would prevent or extend the time required to make an emergency egress from the vehicle; compromising crew safety and mission objectives. We are investigating two types of motor learning that may interact with each other and influence a crewmember's ability to re-adapt to Earth's gravity environment. In strategic learning, crewmembers make rapid modifications in their motor control strategy emphasizing error reduction. This type of learning may be critical during the first minutes and hours after landing. In adaptive learning, long-term plastic transformations occur, involving morphological changes and synaptic modification. In recent literature these two behavioral components have been associated with separate brain structures that control the execution of motor strategies: the strategic component was linked to the posterior parietal cortex and the adaptive component was linked to the cerebellum (Pisella, et al. 2004). The goal of this paper was to demonstrate the relative contributions of the strategic and adaptive components to the re-adaptation process in locomotor control after long duration space flight missions on the International Space Station (ISS). The Functional Mobility Test (FMT) was developed to assess crewmember s ability to ambulate postflight from an operational and functional perspective. Sixteen crewmembers were tested preflight (3 sessions) and postflight (days 1, 2, 4, 7, 25) following a long duration space flight (approx 6 months) on the ISS. We

  17. Flat laminated microbial mat communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, John F.

    2009-10-01

    Flat laminated microbial mats are complex microbial ecosystems that inhabit a wide range of environments (e.g., caves, iron springs, thermal springs and pools, salt marshes, hypersaline ponds and lagoons, methane and petroleum seeps, sea mounts, deep sea vents, arctic dry valleys). Their community structure is defined by physical (e.g., light quantity and quality, temperature, density and pressure) and chemical (e.g., oxygen, oxidation/reduction potential, salinity, pH, available electron acceptors and donors, chemical species) parameters as well as species interactions. The main primary producers may be photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria, purple phototrophs, green phototrophs) or chemolithoautophs (e.g., colorless sulfur oxidizing bacteria). Anaerobic phototrophy may predominate in organic rich environments that support high rates of respiration. These communities are dynamic systems exhibiting both spatial and temporal heterogeneity. They are characterized by steep gradients with microenvironments on the submillimeter scale. Diel oscillations in the physical-chemical profile (e.g., oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, pH) and species distribution are typical for phototroph-dominated communities. Flat laminated microbial mats are often sites of robust biogeochemical cycling. In addition to well-established modes of metabolism for phototrophy (oxygenic and non-oxygenic), respiration (both aerobic and anaerobic), and fermentation, novel energetic pathways have been discovered (e.g., nitrate reduction couple to the oxidation of ammonia, sulfur, or arsenite). The application of culture-independent techniques (e.g., 16S rRNA clonal libraries, metagenomics), continue to expand our understanding of species composition and metabolic functions of these complex ecosystems.

  18. Aeroelastic Deformation: Adaptation of Wind Tunnel Measurement Concepts to Full-Scale Vehicle Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Lokos, William A.; Barrows, Danny A.

    2005-01-01

    The adaptation of a proven wind tunnel test technique, known as Videogrammetry, to flight testing of full-scale vehicles is presented. A description is presented of the technique used at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center for the measurement of the change in wing twist and deflection of an F/A-18 research aircraft as a function of both time and aerodynamic load. Requirements for in-flight measurements are compared and contrasted with those for wind tunnel testing. The methodology for the flight-testing technique and differences compared to wind tunnel testing are given. Measurement and operational comparisons to an older in-flight system known as the Flight Deflection Measurement System (FDMS) are presented.

  19. Initial adaptation testing of the bidimensionally self-adapting wall of the French T2 wind tunnel, around a three-dimensional object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archambaud, J. P.; Dor, J. B.; Mignosi, A.; Lamarche, L.

    1986-01-01

    The test series was carried out at ONERA/CERT at the T2 wind tunnel in September 1984. The objective of this series was to minimize wall interference through a bidimensional adaptation around the models, inducing tridimensional flows. For this, three different models were used, measuring either the pressures or the forces and moment of pitch (balance). The adaptation was derived from a correction computation in the compressible axisymmetric tridimensional.

  20. Grain trapping by filamentous cyanobacterial and algal mats: implications for stromatolite microfabrics through time.

    PubMed

    Frantz, C M; Petryshyn, V A; Corsetti, F A

    2015-09-01

    Archean and Proterozoic stromatolites are sparry or fine-grained and finely laminated; coarse-grained stromatolites, such as many found in modern marine systems, do not appear until quite late in the fossil record. The cause of this textural change and its relevance to understanding the evolutionary history of stromatolites is unclear. Cyanobacteria are typically considered the dominant stromatolite builders through time, but studies demonstrating the trapping and binding abilities of cyanobacterial mats are limited. With this in mind, we conducted experiments to test the grain trapping and binding capabilities of filamentous cyanobacterial mats and trapping in larger filamentous algal mats in order to better understand grain size trends in stromatolites. Mats were cut into squares, inclined in saltwater tanks at angles from 0 to 75° (approximating the angle of lamina in typical stromatolites), and grains of various sizes (fine sand, coarse sand, and fine pebbles) were delivered to their surface. Trapping of grains by the cyanobacterial mats depended strongly on (i) how far filaments protruded from the sediment surface, (ii) grain size, and (iii) the mat's incline angle. The cyanobacterial mats were much more effective at trapping fine grains beyond the abiotic slide angle than larger grains. In addition, the cyanobacterial mats actively bound grains of all sizes over time. In contrast, the much larger algal mats trapped medium and coarse grains at all angles. Our experiments suggest that (i) the presence of detrital grains beyond the abiotic slide angle can be considered a biosignature in ancient stromatolites where biogenicity is in question, and, (ii) where coarse grains are present within stromatolite laminae at angles beyond the abiotic angle of slide (e.g., most modern marine stromatolites), typical cyanobacterial-type mats are probably not solely responsible for the construction, giving insight into the evolution of stromatolite microfabrics through time

  1. Validity Study of a Jump Mat Compared to the Reference Standard Force Plate

    PubMed Central

    Rogan, Slavko; Radlinger, Lorenz; Imhasly, Caroline; Kneubuehler, Andrea; Hilfiker, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the field of vertical jump diagnostics, force plates (FP) are the reference standard. Recently, despite a lack of evidence, jump mats have been used increasingly. Important factors in favor of jumping mats are their low cost and portability. Objectives: This validity study compared the Haynl-Elektronik jump mat (HE jump mat) with the reference standard force plate. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy volunteers participated and each participant completed three series of five drop jumps (DJ). The parameters ground contact time (GCT) and vertical jump height (VJH) from the HE jump mat and the FP were used to evaluate the concurrent validity. The following statistical calculations were performed: Pearson's correlation (r), Bland-Altman plots (standard and for adjusted trend), and regression equations. Results: The Bland-Altman plots suggest that the HE jump mat measures shorter contact times and higher jump heights than the FP. The trend-adjusted Bland-Altman plot shows higher mean differences and wider wing-spreads of confidence limits during longer GCT. During the VJH the mean differences and the wing-spreads of the confidence limits throughout the range present as relatively constant. The following regression equations were created, as close as possible to the true value: GCT = 5.920385 + 1.072293 × [value HE jump mat] and VJH = -1.73777 + 1.011156 × [value HE jump mat]. Conclusions: The HE jump mat can be recommended in relation to the validity of constraints. In this study, only a part of the quality criteria were examined. For the final recommendation it is advised to examine the HE jump mat on the other quality criteria (test-retest reliability, sensitivity change). PMID:26715970

  2. Flight Test of L1 Adaptive Control Law: Offset Landings and Large Flight Envelope Modeling Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Xargay, Enric; Cao, Chengyu; Hovakimyan, Naira

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents new results of a flight test of the L1 adaptive control architecture designed to directly compensate for significant uncertain cross-coupling in nonlinear systems. The flight test was conducted on the subscale turbine powered Generic Transport Model that is an integral part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at the NASA Langley Research Center. The results presented include control law evaluation for piloted offset landing tasks as well as results in support of nonlinear aerodynamic modeling and real-time dynamic modeling of the departure-prone edges of the flight envelope.

  3. Rao and Wald Tests for Adaptive Detection in Partially Homogeneous Environment with a Diversely Polarized Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chaozhu; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Chengyuan

    2013-01-01

    This study considers Rao test and Wald test for adaptive detection based on a diversely polarized antenna (DPA) in partially homogeneous environment. The theoretical expressions for the probability of false alarm and detection are derived, and constant false alarm rate (CFAR) behaviour is remarked on. Furthermore, the monotonicities of detection probability of the two detectors are proved, and a polarization optimization detection algorithm to enhance the detection performance is proposed. The numerical simulations are conducted to attest to the validity of the above theoretical analysis and illustrate the improvement in the detection performance of the proposed optimization algorithm. PMID:24174914

  4. Adaptive and qualitative changes in encoding strategy with experience: evidence from the test-expectancy paradigm.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jason R; Benjamin, Aaron S

    2012-05-01

    Three experiments demonstrated learners' abilities to adaptively and qualitatively accommodate their encoding strategies to the demands of an upcoming test. Stimuli were word pairs. In Experiment 1, test expectancy was induced for either cued recall (of targets given cues) or free recall (of targets only) across 4 study-test cycles of the same test format, followed by a final critical cycle featuring either the expected or the unexpected test format. For final tests of both cued and free recall, participants who had expected that test format outperformed those who had not. This disordinal interaction, supported by recognition and self-report data, demonstrated not mere differences in effort based on anticipated test difficulty, but rather qualitative and appropriate differences in encoding strategies based on expected task demands. Participants also came to appropriately modulate metacognitive monitoring (Experiment 2) and study-time allocation (Experiment 3) across study-test cycles. Item and associative recognition performance, as well as self-report data, revealed shifts in encoding strategies across trials; these results were used to characterize and evaluate the different strategies that participants employed for cued versus free recall and to assess the optimality of participants' metacognitive control of encoding strategies. Taken together, these data illustrate a sophisticated form of metacognitive control, in which learners qualitatively shift encoding strategies to match the demands of anticipated tests. PMID:22103783

  5. Translation, cultural adaptation and field-testing of the Thinking Healthy Program for Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are prevalent among women in low- and lower-middle income countries who are pregnant or have recently given birth. There is promising evidence that culturally-adapted, evidence-informed, perinatal psycho-educational programs implemented in local communities are effective in reducing mental health problems. The Thinking Healthy Program (THP) has proved effective in Pakistan. The aims were to adapt the THP for rural Vietnam; establish the program’s comprehensibility, acceptability and salience for universal use, and investigate whether administration to small groups of women might be of equivalent effectiveness to administration in home visits to individual women. Methods The THP Handbook and Calendar were made available in English by the program developers and translated into Vietnamese. Cultural adaptation and field-testing were undertaken using WHO guidance. Field-testing of the four sessions of THP Module One was undertaken in weekly sessions with a small group in a rural commune and evaluated using baseline, process and endline surveys. Results The adapted Vietnamese version of the Thinking Healthy Program (THP-V) was found to be understandable, meaningful and relevant to pregnant women, and commune health centre and Women’s Union representatives in a rural district. It was delivered effectively by trained local facilitators. Role-play, brainstorming and small-group discussions to find shared solutions to common problems were appraised as helpful learning opportunities. Conclusions The THP-V is safe and comprehensible, acceptable and salient to pregnant women without mental health problems in rural Vietnam. Delivery in facilitated small groups provided valued opportunities for role-play rehearsal and shared problem solving. Local observers found the content and approach highly relevant to local needs and endorsed the approach as a mental health promotion strategy with potential for integration into local universal maternal

  6. BRBN-T validation: adaptation of the Selective Reminding Test and Word List Generation.

    PubMed

    Neves, Mariana Rigueiro; Passos, Ana Margarida; Ferreira, Aristides; Sousa, Cláudia; Sá, Andreia; Sá, Maria José

    2015-10-01

    Objective This study aims to present the Selective Reminding Test(SRT) and Word List Generation (WLG) adaptation to the Portuguese population, within the validation of the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests (BRBN-T)for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.Method 66 healthy participants (54.5% female) recruited from the community volunteered to participate in this study.Results A combination of procedures from Classical Test Theory (CTT) and Item Response Theory (ITR) were applied to item analysis and selection. For each SRT list, 12 words were selected and 3 letters were chosen for WLG to constitute the final versions of these tests for the Portuguese population.Conclusion The combination of CTT and ITR maximized the decision making process in the adaptation of the SRT and WLG to a different culture and language (Portuguese). The relevance of this study lies on the production of reliable standardized neuropsychological tests, so that they can be used to facilitate a more rigorous monitoring of the evolution of MS, as well as any therapeutic effects and cognitive rehabilitation. PMID:26465404

  7. Modified H-statistic with adaptive Winsorized mean in two groups test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Kian Wooi; Abdullah, Suhaida; Yahaya, Sharipah Soaad Syed; Yusof, Zahayu Md

    2014-06-01

    t-test is a commonly used test statistics when comparing two independent groups. The computation of this test is simple yet it is powerful under normal distribution and equal variance dataset. However, in real life data, sometimes it is hard to get dataset which has this package. The violation of assumptions (normality and equal variances) will give the devastating effect on the Type I error rate control to the t-test. On the same time, the statistical power also will be reduced. Therefore in this study, the adaptive Winsorised mean with hinge estimator in H-statistic (AWM-H) is proposed. The H-statistic is one of the robust statistics that able to handle the problem of nonnormality in comparing independent group. This procedure originally used Modified One-step M (MOM) estimator which employed trimming process. In the AWM-H procedure, the MOM estimator is replaced with the adaptive Winsorized mean (AWM) as the central tendency measure of the test. The Winsorization process is based on hinge estimator HQ or HQ1. Overall results showed that the proposed method performed better than the original method and the classical method especially under heavy tailed distribution.

  8. Using Tests Designed to Measure Individual Sensorimotor Subsystem Perfomance to Predict Locomotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. T.; Caldwell, E. E.; Batson, C. D.; Guined, J. R.; DeDios, Y. E.; Stepanyan, V.; Gadd, N. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during the initial exposure to microgravity and during the readapation phase following a return to a gravitational environment. These alterations may lead to disruption in the ability to perform mission critical functions during and after these gravitational transitions. Astronauts show significant inter-subject variation in adaptive capability following gravitational transitions. The way each individual's brain synthesizes the available visual, vestibular and somatosensory information is likely the basis for much of the variation. Identifying the presence of biases in each person's use of information available from these sensorimotor subsystems and relating it to their ability to adapt to a novel locomotor task will allow us to customize a training program designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Eight tests are being used to measure sensorimotor subsystem performance. Three of these use measures of body sway to characterize balance during varying sensorimotor challenges. The effect of vision is assessed by repeating conditions with eyes open and eyes closed. Standing on foam, or on a support surface that pitches to maintain a constant ankle angle provide somatosensory challenges. Information from the vestibular system is isolated when vision is removed and the support surface is compromised, and it is challenged when the tasks are done while the head is in motion. The integration and dominance of visual information is assessed in three additional tests. The Rod & Frame Test measures the degree to which a subject's perception of the visual vertical is affected by the orientation of a tilted frame in the periphery. Locomotor visual dependence is determined by assessing how much an oscillating virtual visual world affects a treadmill-walking subject. In the third of the visual manipulation tests, subjects walk an obstacle course while wearing up-down reversing prisms. The two remaining tests include direct

  9. Integration and bench testing for the GRAVITY Coudé IR adaptive optics (CIAO) wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deen, C.; Yang, P.; Huber, A.; Suarez-Valles, M.; Hippler, S.; Brandner, W.; Gendron, E.; Clénet, Y.; Kendrew, S.; Glauser, A.; Klein, R.; Laun, W.; Lenzen, R.; Neumann, U.; Panduro, J.; Ramos, J.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Salzinger, A.; Zimmerman, N.; Henning, T.; Perraut, K.; Perrin, G.; Straubmeier, C.; Amorim, A.; Eisenhauer, F.

    2014-08-01

    GRAVITY, a second generation instrument for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), will provide an astrometric precision of order 10 micro-arcseconds, an imaging resolution of 4 milli-arcseconds, and low/medium resolution spectro-interferometry. These improvements to the VLTI represent a major upgrade to its current infrared interferometric capabilities, allowing detailed study of obscured environments (e.g. the Galactic Center, young dusty planet-forming disks, dense stellar cores, AGN, etc...). Crucial to the final performance of GRAVITY, the Coudé IR Adaptive Optics (CIAO) system will correct for the effects of the atmosphere at each of the VLT Unit Telescopes. CIAO consists of four new infrared Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFS) and associated real-time computers/software which will provide infrared wavefront sensing from 1.45-2.45 microns, allowing AO corrections even in regions where optically bright reference sources are scarce. We present here the latest progress on the GRAVITY wavefront sensors. We describe the adaptation and testing of a light-weight version of the ESO Standard Platform for Adaptive optics Real Time Applications (SPARTA-Light) software architecture to the needs of GRAVITY. We also describe the latest integration and test milestones for construction of the initial wave front sensor.

  10. [Assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness in preschool children: adaptation of the 20 metres shuttle run test].

    PubMed

    Cadenas-Sánchez, Cristina; Alcántara-Moral, Francisco; Sánchez-Delgado, Guillermo; Mora-González, José; Martínez-Téllez, Borja; Herrador-Colmenero, Manuel; Jiménez-Pavón, David; Femia, Pedro; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory fitness is a strong indicator of present and future health in children and adolescents, however it is unknown whether it is for pre-schoolers, from 3 to 5 years. In the present study, we described the adaptation of the original 20m shuttle run test, it feasibility and acceptance in children from 3 to 5 years and its maximality and reliability. A total of 130 students (4.91 ± 0.89 years; 77 boys) performed the test twice, two weeks apart. The test adaptation consisted mainly in reducing the initial speed of 8.5 km/h to 6.5 km/h. The test was feasible and was well accepted in both boys and girls and the three age groups, 3, 4 and 5 years. The maximum heart rate (MHR) achieved for the entire sample was 199.4 ± 12.5 beats/min, equivalent to 97% of the estimated theoretical MHR, and no significant differences by gender or age. Mean test-retest difference (systematic error) in the number of laps achieved was 2 laps, with no significant differences between sex or age. There was no evidence of heteroscedasticity. Our results suggest the test is maximum and reliable in this age group. Future longitudinal or intervention studies using this test should take into account that changes in the test performance of 2 laps may be due to the variability of the measure, while wider changes would be attributable to the intervention or changes associated with age. PMID:25433116

  11. PHURBAS: AN ADAPTIVE, LAGRANGIAN, MESHLESS, MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS CODE. II. IMPLEMENTATION AND TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Maron, Jason L. E-mail: jmaron@amnh.org

    2012-05-01

    We present an algorithm for simulating the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics and other systems of differential equations on an unstructured set of points represented by sample particles. The particles move with the fluid, so the time step is not limited by the Eulerian Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Full spatial adaptivity is required to ensure the particles fill the computational volume and gives the algorithm substantial flexibility and power. A target resolution is specified for each point in space, with particles being added and deleted as needed to meet this target. We have parallelized the code by adapting the framework provided by GADGET-2. A set of standard test problems, including 10{sup -6} amplitude linear magnetohydrodynamics waves, magnetized shock tubes, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities is presented. Finally, we demonstrate good agreement with analytic predictions of linear growth rates for magnetorotational instability in a cylindrical geometry. This paper documents the Phurbas algorithm as implemented in Phurbas version 1.1.

  12. Lockheed L-1011 Test Station installation in support of the Adaptive Performance Optimization flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Technicians John Huffman, Phil Gonia and Mike Kerner of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, carefully insert a monitor into the Research Engineering Test Station during installation of equipment for the Adaptive Performance Optimization experiment aboard Orbital Sciences Corporation's Lockheed L-1011 in Bakersfield, California, May, 6, 1997. The Adaptive Performance Optimization project is designed to reduce the aerodynamic drag of large subsonic transport aircraft by varying the camber of the wing through real-time adjustment of flaps or ailerons in response to changing flight conditions. Reducing the drag will improve aircraft efficiency and performance, resulting in signifigant fuel savings for the nation's airlines worth hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Flights for the NASA experiment will occur periodically over the next couple of years on the modified wide-bodied jetliner, with all flights flown out of Bakersfield's Meadows Field. The experiment is part of Dryden's Advanced Subsonic Transport Aircraft Research program.

  13. A global logrank test for adaptive treatment strategies based on observational studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Valenstein, Marcia; Pfeiffer, Paul; Ganoczy, Dara

    2014-02-28

    In studying adaptive treatment strategies, a natural question that is of paramount interest is whether there is any significant difference among all possible treatment strategies. When the outcome variable of interest is time-to-event, we propose an inverse probability weighted logrank test for testing the equivalence of a fixed set of pre-specified adaptive treatment strategies based on data from an observational study. The weights take into account both the possible selection bias in an observational study and the fact that the same subject may be consistent with more than one treatment strategy. The asymptotic distribution of the weighted logrank statistic under the null hypothesis is obtained. We show that, in an observational study where the treatment selection probabilities need to be estimated, the estimation of these probabilities does not have an effect on the asymptotic distribution of the weighted logrank statistic, as long as the estimation of the parameters in the models for these probabilities is n-consistent. Finite sample performance of the test is assessed via a simulation study. We also show in the simulation that the test can be pretty robust to misspecification of the models for the probabilities of treatment selection. The method is applied to analyze data on antidepressant adherence time from an observational database maintained at the Department of Veterans Affairs' Serious Mental Illness Treatment Research and Evaluation Center. PMID:24108518

  14. The reliability and validity of the Test of Adaptive Behavior in Schizophrenia (TABS).

    PubMed

    Velligan, Dawn I; Diamond, Pamela; Glahn, David C; Ritch, Janice; Maples, Natalie; Castillo, Desiree; Miller, Alexander L

    2007-05-30

    Performance-based tests of functional capacity are important to utilize in schizophrenia where global measures may underestimate community functioning in the context of impoverished environments and disincentives to return to work. The Test of Adaptive Behavior in Schizophrenia (TABS) is a performance-based measure of adaptive functioning designed to address limitations of other available measures including limited assessment of the ability to initiate and of the ability to identify problems that occur in the course of performing functional activities. The TABS and a variety of symptom, functional outcome, and cognitive measures were administered to 264 outpatients with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorders at an initial assessment. At 3 months, 110 subjects received a follow-up assessment. Results indicated that the TABS had very good test-retest reliability (0.80) and inter-item consistency (0.84). Moreover, TABS scores were moderately to strongly correlated with other measures of functional outcome, negative symptoms and neuropsychological test scores (convergent validity). Measures of positive symptoms were not found to be related to TABS performance (discriminate validity). The data provide preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of the TABS. Further studies of the psychometric properties of the TABS including those examining the sensitivity of the TABS to treatments with different pharmacological agents or psychosocial treatments are encouraged. PMID:17379319

  15. Experimental characterization of an adaptive aileron: lab tests and FE correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendola, Gianluca; Dimino, Ignazio; Amoroso, Francesco; Pecora, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    Like any other technology, morphing has to demonstrate system level performance benefits prior to implementation onto a real aircraft. The current status of morphing structures research efforts (as the ones, sponsored by the European Union) involves the design of several subsystems which have to be individually tested in order to consolidate their general performance in view of the final integration into a flyable device. This requires a fundamental understanding of the interaction between aerodynamic, structure and control systems. Important worldwide research collaborations were born in order to exchange acquired experience and better investigate innovative technologies devoted to morphing structures. The "Adaptive Aileron" project represents a joint cooperation between Canadian and Italian research centers and leading industries. In this framework, an overview of the design, manufacturing and testing of a variable camber aileron for a regional aircraft is presented. The key enabling technology for the presented morphing aileron is the actuation structural system, integrating a suitable motor and a load-bearing architecture. The paper describes the lab test campaign of the developed device. The implementation of a distributed actuation system fulfills the actual tendency of the aeronautical research to move toward the use of electrical power to supply non-propulsive systems. The aileron design features are validated by targeted experimental tests, demonstrating both its adaptive capability and robustness under operative loads and its dynamic behavior for further aeroelastic analyses. The experimental results show a satisfactory correlation with the numerical expectations thus validating the followed design approach.

  16. Alignment and integration of ASSIST: a test bench for VLT adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Atul; Arsenault, Robin; Boland, Wilfried; Delabre, Bernard; Hubin, Norbert; La Penna, Paolo; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Molster, Frank; Stuik, Remko; Tordo, Sebastien; Wiegers, Emiel

    2010-08-01

    ASSIST, The Adaptive Secondary Setup and Instrument STimulator, is being developed to provide a testing facility for the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). It will allow the off-telescope testing of three elements of the VLT AOF; the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the AO systems for MUSE and HAWK-I (GALACSI and GRAAL). The core of ASSIST consists of a 2-mirror setup (AM1-AM2) allowing the on-axis test of the DSM in interferometric mode. However, during the initial stages of ASSIST integration, DSM would not be present. This makes the task of aligning AM1-AM2 to within an accuracy of 0.05mm/1 arcmin rather challenging. A novel technique known as Shack-Hartmann method has been developed and tested in the lab for this purpose. A Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor will be used to measure the mis-alignment between AM1-AM2 by recording the coma and astigmatism in the presence of large spherical aberration introduced because of tilt/decenter of AM2 with respect to AM1. Thereafter, 20 optical components including lenses, flat mirrors and beam-splitter cubes divided into five sub-assemblies should be aligned to AM1-AM2- DSM axis which ultimately passes through the mechanical axis of large AMOS rotator.

  17. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activities in cyanobacterial mats of solar lake (Sinai, Egypt).

    PubMed

    Teske, A; Ramsing, N B; Habicht, K; Fukui, M; Küver, J; Jørgensen, B B; Cohen, Y

    1998-08-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 10(6) and 10(7) cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml-1 and showed sulfate reduction rates between 1,000 and 2, 200 nmol ml-1 day-1, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 10(4) to 10(6) cells ml-1. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO2 from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO2 demand of the mat. PMID:9687455

  18. Item Selection in Computerized Adaptive Testing: Improving the a-Stratified Design with the Sympson-Hetter Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Chi-Keung; Chang, Hua-Hua; Hau, Kit-Tai

    2002-01-01

    Item exposure control, test-overlap minimization, and the efficient use of item pool are some of the important issues in computerized adaptive testing (CAT) designs. The overexposure of some items and high test-overlap rate may cause both item and test security problems. Previously these problems associated with the maximum information (Max-I)…

  19. The Use of the Graded Response Model in Computerized Adaptive Testing of the Attitudes to Science Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foong, Yoke-Yeen; Lam, Tit-Loong

    The graded response model for two-stage testing was applied to an attitudes toward science scale using real-data simulation. The 48-item scale was administered to 920 students at a grade-8 equivalent in Singapore. A two-stage 16-item computerized adaptive test was developed. In two-stage testing an initial, or routing, test is followed by a…

  20. Improved Testing Capability and Adaptability Through the Use of Wireless Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.

    2003-01-01

    From the first Saturn V rocket booster (S-II-T) testing in 1966 and the routine Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) testing beginning in 1975, to more recent test programs such as the X-33 Aerospike Engine, the Integrated Powerhead Development (IPD) program, and the Hybrid Sounding Rocket (HYSR), Stennis Space Center (SSC) continues to be a premier location for conducting large-scale testing. Central to each test program is the capability for sensor systems to deliver reliable measurements and high quality data, while also providing a means to monitor the test stand area to the highest degree of safety and sustainability. Sensor wiring is routed along piping and through cable trenches, making its way from the engine test area, through the test stand area and to the signal conditioning building before final transfer to the test control center. When sensor requirements lie outside the reach of the routine sensor cable routing, the use of wireless sensor networks becomes particularly attractive due to their versatility and ease of installation. As part of an on-going effort to enhance the testing capabilities of Stennis Space Center, the Test Technology and Development group has found numerous applications for its sensor-adaptable wireless sensor suite. While not intended for critical engine measurements or control loops, in-house hardware and software development of the sensor suite can provide improved testing capability for a range of applications including the safety monitoring of propellant storage barrels and as an experimental test-bed for embedded health monitoring paradigms.

  1. Applying Computer Adaptive Testing to Optimize Online Assessment of Suicidal Behavior: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Anton LM; de Groot, Marieke H; de Keijser, Jos; Kerkhof, Ad JFM

    2014-01-01

    Background The Internet is used increasingly for both suicide research and prevention. To optimize online assessment of suicidal patients, there is a need for short, good-quality tools to assess elevated risk of future suicidal behavior. Computer adaptive testing (CAT) can be used to reduce response burden and improve accuracy, and make the available pencil-and-paper tools more appropriate for online administration. Objective The aim was to test whether an item response–based computer adaptive simulation can be used to reduce the length of the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSS). Methods The data used for our simulation was obtained from a large multicenter trial from The Netherlands: the Professionals in Training to STOP suicide (PITSTOP suicide) study. We applied a principal components analysis (PCA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), a graded response model (GRM), and simulated a CAT. Results The scores of 505 patients were analyzed. Psychometric analyses showed the questionnaire to be unidimensional with good internal consistency. The computer adaptive simulation showed that for the estimation of elevation of risk of future suicidal behavior 4 items (instead of the full 19) were sufficient, on average. Conclusions This study demonstrated that CAT can be applied successfully to reduce the length of the Dutch version of the BSS. We argue that the use of CAT can improve the accuracy and the response burden when assessing the risk of future suicidal behavior online. Because CAT can be daunting for clinicians and applied scientists, we offer a concrete example of our computer adaptive simulation of the Dutch version of the BSS at the end of the paper. PMID:25213259

  2. Design and Flight Tests of an Adaptive Control System Employing Normal-Acceleration Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, Water E.; McLean, John D.; Hegarty, Daniel M.; Heinle, Donovan R.

    1961-01-01

    An adaptive control system employing normal-acceleration command has been designed with the aid of an analog computer and has been flight tested. The design of the system was based on the concept of using a mathematical model in combination with a high gain and a limiter. The study was undertaken to investigate the application of a system of this type to the task of maintaining nearly constant dynamic longitudinal response of a piloted airplane over the flight envelope without relying on air data measurements for gain adjustment. The range of flight conditions investigated was between Mach numbers of 0.36 and 1.15 and altitudes of 10,000 and 40,000 feet. The final adaptive system configuration was derived from analog computer tests, in which the physical airplane control system and much of the control circuitry were included in the loop. The method employed to generate the feedback signals resulted in a model whose characteristics varied somewhat with changes in flight condition. Flight results showed that the system limited the variation in longitudinal natural frequency of the adaptive airplane to about half that of the basic airplane and that, for the subsonic cases, the damping ratio was maintained between 0.56 and 0.69. The system also automatically compensated for the transonic trim change. Objectionable features of the system were an exaggerated sensitivity of pitch attitude to gust disturbances, abnormally large pitch attitude response for a given pilot input at low speeds, and an initial delay in normal-acceleration response to pilot control at all flight conditions. The adaptive system chatter of +/-0.05 to +/-0.10 of elevon at about 9 cycles per second (resulting in a maximum airplane normal-acceleration response of from +/-0.025 g to +/- 0.035 g) was considered by the pilots to be mildly objectionable but tolerable.

  3. Validation of Computerized Adaptive Testing in an Outpatient Non-academic Setting: the VOCATIONS Trial

    PubMed Central

    Achtyes, Eric Daniel; Halstead, Scott; Smart, LeAnn; Moore, Tara; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J.; Gibbons, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Computerized adaptive tests (CAT) provide an alternative to fixed-length assessments for diagnostic screening and severity measurement of psychiatric disorders. We sought to cross-sectionally validate a suite of computerized adaptive tests for mental health (CAT-MH) in a community psychiatric sample. Methods 145 adult psychiatric outpatients and controls were prospectively evaluated with CAT for depression, mania and anxiety symptoms, compared to gold-standard psychiatric assessments including: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV-TR (SCID), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D25), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Results Sensitivity and specificity for the computerized adaptive diagnostic test for depression (CAD-MDD) were .96 and .64, respectively (.96 and 1.00 for major depression versus controls). CAT for depression severity (CAT-DI) correlated well to standard depression scales HAM-D25 (r=.79), PHQ-9 (r=.90), CES-D (r=.90) and had OR=27.88 for current SCID major depressive disorder diagnosis across its range. CAT for anxiety severity (CAT-ANX) correlated to HAM-D25 (r=.73), PHQ-9 (r=.78), CES-D (r=.81), and had OR=11.52 for current SCID generalized anxiety disorder diagnosis across its range. CAT for mania severity (CAT-MANIA) did not correlate well to HAM-D25 (r=.31), PHQ-9 (r=.37), CES-D (r=.39), but had an OR=11.56 for a current SCID bipolar diagnosis across its range. Participants found the CAT-MH suite of tests acceptable and easy to use, averaging 51.7 items and 9.4 minutes to complete the full battery. Conclusions Compared to current gold-standard diagnostic and assessment measures, CAT-MH provides an effective, rapidly-administered assessment of psychiatric symptoms. PMID:26030317

  4. Microbial communities and exopolysaccharides from Polynesian mats.

    PubMed

    Rougeaux, H; Guezennec, M; Che, L M; Payri, C; Deslandes, E; Guezennec, J

    2001-03-01

    Microbial mats present in two shallow atolls of French Polynesia were characterized by high amounts of exopolysaccharides associated with cyanobacteria as the predominating species. Cyanobacteria were found in the first centimeters of the gelatinous mats, whereas deeper layers showing the occurrence of the sulfate reducers Desulfovibrio and Desulfobacter species as determined by the presence of specific biomarkers. Exopolysaccharides were extracted from these mats and partially characterized. All fractions contained both neutral sugars and uronic acids with a predominance of the former. The large diversity in monosaccharides can be interpreted as the result of exopolymer biosynthesis by either different or unidentified cyanobacterial species. PMID:14961381

  5. A review of culturally adapted versions of the Oswestry Disability Index: the adaptation process, construct validity, test-retest reliability and internal consistency.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, Peter J; Nelson-Wong, Erika J; Fischer, Steven L

    2015-12-01

    The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is a self-report-based outcome measure used to quantify the extent of disability related to low back pain (LBP), a substantial contributor to workplace absenteeism. The ODI tool has been adapted for use by patients in several non-English speaking nations. It is unclear, however, if these adapted versions of the ODI are as credible as the original ODI developed for English-speaking nations. The objective of this study was to conduct a review of the literature to identify culturally adapted versions of the ODI and to report on the adaptation process, construct validity, test-retest reliability and internal consistency of these ODIs. Following a pragmatic review process, data were extracted from each study with regard to these four outcomes. While most studies applied adaptation processes in accordance with best-practice guidelines, there were some deviations. However, all studies reported high-quality psychometric properties: group mean construct validity was 0.734 ± 0.094 (indicated via a correlation coefficient), test-retest reliability was 0.937 ± 0.032 (indicated via an intraclass correlation coefficient) and internal consistency was 0.876 ± 0.047 (indicated via Cronbach's alpha). Researchers can be confident when using any of these culturally adapted ODIs, or when comparing and contrasting results between cultures where these versions were employed. Implications for Rehabilitation Low back pain is the second leading cause of disability in the world, behind only cancer. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) has been developed as a self-report outcome measure of low back pain for administration to patients. An understanding of the various cross-cultural adaptations of the ODI is important for more concerted multi-national research efforts. This review examines 16 cross-cultural adaptations of the ODI and should inform the work of health care and rehabilitation professionals. PMID:25738913

  6. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) for breast tumor imaging: numerical modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lian; Li, Xu; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2011-04-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) was recently introduced as a noninvasive electrical conductivity imaging approach with high spatial resolution close to ultrasound imaging. In this study, we test the feasibility of the MAT-MI method for breast tumor imaging using numerical modeling and computer simulation. Using the finite element method, we have built three-dimensional numerical breast models with varieties of embedded tumors for this simulation study. In order to obtain an accurate and stable forward solution that does not have numerical errors caused by singular MAT-MI acoustic sources at conductivity boundaries, we first derive an integral forward method for calculating MAT-MI acoustic sources over the entire imaging volume. An inverse algorithm for reconstructing the MAT-MI acoustic source is also derived with spherical measurement aperture, which simulates a practical setup for breast imaging. With the numerical breast models, we have conducted computer simulations under different imaging parameter setups and all the results suggest that breast tumors that have large conductivity in contrast to the surrounding tissue as reported in the literature may be readily detected in the reconstructed MAT-MI images. In addition, our simulations also suggest that the sensitivity of imaging breast tumors using the presented MAT-MI setup depends more on the tumor location and the conductivity contrast between the tumor and its surrounding tissue than on the tumor size.

  7. Toward Accessible Assessments: The Promises and Limitations of Test Item Adaptations for Students with Disabilities and English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawthon, Stephanie; Leppo, Rachel; Carr, Therese; Kopriva, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    When do item adaptations veer from their intent and, instead of increasing access, modify the construct being measured? This study analyzed early elementary student achievement data from a statewide field test containing both standard and adapted science items. Four student groups were included in this analysis: English language learners, students…

  8. Clinical relevance of tests on bond strength, microleakage and marginal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Heintze, Siegward D

    2013-01-01

    Dental adhesive systems should provide a variety of capabilities, such as bonding of artificial materials to dentin and enamel, sealing of dentinal tubules, reduction of post-operative sensitivity and marginal sealing to reduce marginal staining and caries. In the laboratory, numerous surrogate parameters that should predict the performance of different materials, material combinations and operative techniques are assessed. These surrogate parameters include bond strength tests of various kinds, evaluation of microleakage with tracer penetration between restorative and tooth, two-dimensional analysis of marginal quality with microscopes and mapping of the micromorphology of the bonding interface. Many of these tests are not systematically validated and show therefore different results between different research institutes. The correlation with clinical phenomena has only partly been established to date. There is some evidence, that macrotensile and microtensile bond strength tests correlate better with clinical retention of cervical restorations than macroshear and microshear bond tests but only if data from different test institutes are pooled. Also there is some evidence that marginal adaptation has a moderate correlation in cervical restorations with clinical retention and in Class II restorations (proximal enamel) with clinical marginal staining. There is moderate evidence that microleakage tests with dye penetration does not correlate with any of the clinical parameters (post-operative hypersensitivity, retention, marginal staining). A rationale which helps the researcher to select and apply clinically relevant test methods in the laboratory is presented in the paper. PMID:22920539

  9. The transition of the national certification examination from paper and pencil to computer adaptive testing.

    PubMed

    Zaglaniczny, K L

    1996-02-01

    The Council on Certification of Nurse Anesthetists (CCNA) has been exploring computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for the national certification examination (NCE) over the past several years. CCNA representatives have consulted with experts in testing and with individuals from professional associations who use CAT for certification or licensure testing. This article will provide an overview of CAT and discuss how the CCNA plans to implement CAT for the NCE beginning April 8, 1996. A future article that explains the theoretical concepts of CAT will be published in the April 1996 AANA Journal. It is important to note that the NCE will not be a new test, the current content outline and item bank will remain the same. It is only the method of test administration that is changed--from paper and pencil to CAT. Each candidate will answer questions and take a test that is individualized to his or her ability or competence level and meets the specifications of the test outline. All candidates must achieve the same passing score. The implementation of CAT for the NCE will be advantageous for the candidates and provide a more efficient competency assessment. The last paper and pencil examination was administered on December 9, 1995. The transition is a significant event in nurse anesthesia history, just as nurse anesthesia was the first advanced practice nursing specialty to implement the certification credential, the CCNA will be the first to introduce CAT. PMID:8928607

  10. A formal protocol test procedure for the Survivable Adaptable Fiber Optic Embedded Network (SAFENET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, Wayne

    1993-03-01

    This thesis focuses upon a new method for verifying the correct operation of a complex, high speed fiber optic communication network. These networks are of growing importance to the military because of their increased connectivity, survivability, and reconfigurability. With the introduction and increased dependence on sophisticated software and protocols, it is essential that their operation be correct. Because of the speed and complexity of fiber optic networks being designed today, they are becoming increasingly difficult to test. Previously, testing was accomplished by application of conformance test methods which had little connection with an implementation's specification. The major goal of conformance testing is to ensure that the implementation of a profile is consistent with its specification. Formal specification is needed to ensure that the implementation performs its intended operations while exhibiting desirable behaviors. The new conformance test method presented is based upon the System of Communicating Machine model which uses a formal protocol specification to generate a test sequence. The major contribution of this thesis is the application of the System of Communicating Machine model to formal profile specifications of the Survivable Adaptable Fiber Optic Embedded Network (SAFENET) standard which results in the derivation of test sequences for a SAFENET profile. The results applying this new method to SAFENET's OSI and Lightweight profiles are presented.

  11. Implementation of an Adaptive Controller System from Concept to Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Richard R.; Burken, John J.; Butler, Bradley S.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) is conducting ongoing flight research using adaptive controller algorithms. A highly modified McDonnell-Douglas NF-15B airplane called the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) was used for these algorithms. This airplane has been modified by the addition of canards and by changing the flight control systems to interface a single-string research controller processor for neural network algorithms. Research goals included demonstration of revolutionary control approaches that can efficiently optimize aircraft performance for both normal and failure conditions, and to advance neural-network-based flight control technology for new aerospace systems designs. Before the NF-15B IFCS airplane was certified for flight test, however, certain processes needed to be completed. This paper presents an overview of these processes, including a description of the initial adaptive controller concepts followed by a discussion of modeling formulation and performance testing. Upon design finalization, the next steps are: integration with the system interfaces, verification of the software, validation of the hardware to the requirements, design of failure detection, development of safety limiters to minimize the effect of erroneous neural network commands, and creation of flight test control room displays to maximize human situational awareness.

  12. Head size, weaponry, and cervical adaptation: Testing craniocervical evolutionary hypotheses in Ceratopsia.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, Collin S; Campione, Nicolás E; Evans, David C

    2015-07-01

    The anterior cervical vertebrae form the skeletal connection between the cranial and postcranial skeletons in higher tetrapods. As a result, the morphology of the atlas-axis complex is likely to be shaped by selection pressures acting on either the head or neck. The neoceratopsian (Reptilia:Dinosauria) syncervical represents one of the most highly modified atlas-axis regions in vertebrates, being formed by the complete coalescence of the three most anterior cervical vertebrae. In ceratopsids, the syncervical has been hypothesized to be an adaptation to support a massive skull, or to act as a buttress during intraspecific head-to-head combat. Here, we test these functional/adaptive hypotheses within a phylogenetic framework and critically examine the previously proposed methods for quantifying relative head size in the fossil record for the first time. Results indicate that neither the evolution of cranial weaponry nor large head size correlates with the origin of cervical fusion in ceratopsians, and we, therefore, reject both adaptive hypotheses for the origin of the syncervical. Anterior cervical fusion has evolved independently in a number of amniote clades, and further research on extant groups with this peculiar anatomy is needed to understand the evolutionary basis for cervical fusion in Neoceratopsia. PMID:26095296

  13. Adaptive time stepping algorithm for Lagrangian transport models: Theory and idealised test cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Syed Hyder Ali Muttaqi; Heemink, Arnold Willem; Gräwe, Ulf; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2013-08-01

    Random walk simulations have an excellent potential in marine and oceanic modelling. This is essentially due to their relative simplicity and their ability to represent advective transport without being plagued by the deficiencies of the Eulerian methods. The physical and mathematical foundations of random walk modelling of turbulent diffusion have become solid over the years. Random walk models rest on the theory of stochastic differential equations. Unfortunately, the latter and the related numerical aspects have not attracted much attention in the oceanic modelling community. The main goal of this paper is to help bridge the gap by developing an efficient adaptive time stepping algorithm for random walk models. Its performance is examined on two idealised test cases of turbulent dispersion; (i) pycnocline crossing and (ii) non-flat isopycnal diffusion, which are inspired by shallow-sea dynamics and large-scale ocean transport processes, respectively. The numerical results of the adaptive time stepping algorithm are compared with the fixed-time increment Milstein scheme, showing that the adaptive time stepping algorithm for Lagrangian random walk models is more efficient than its fixed step-size counterpart without any loss in accuracy.

  14. Testing Local Adaptation in a Natural Great Tit-Malaria System: An Experimental Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Tania; Delhaye, Jessica; Christe, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Finding out whether Plasmodium spp. are coevolving with their vertebrate hosts is of both theoretical and applied interest and can influence our understanding of the effects and dynamics of malaria infection. In this study, we tested for local adaptation as a signature of coevolution between malaria blood parasites, Plasmodium spp. and its host, the great tit, Parus major. We conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment of birds in the field, where we exposed birds from two populations to Plasmodium parasites. This experimental set-up also provided a unique opportunity to study the natural history of malaria infection in the wild and to assess the effects of primary malaria infection on juvenile birds. We present three main findings: i) there was no support for local adaptation; ii) there was a male-biased infection rate; iii) infection occurred towards the end of the summer and differed between sites. There were also site-specific effects of malaria infection on the hosts. Taken together, we present one of the few experimental studies of parasite-host local adaptation in a natural malaria system, and our results shed light on the effects of avian malaria infection in the wild. PMID:26555892

  15. Cyanobacterial mats: Microanalysis of community metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Y.; Bermudes, D.; Fischer, U.; Haddad, R.; Prufert, L.; Scheulderman-Suylen, T.; Shaw, T.

    1985-01-01

    The microbial communities in two sites were studied using several approaches: (1) light microscopy; (2) the measurement of microprofiles of oxygen and sulfide at the surface of the microbial mat; (3) the study of diurnal variation of oxygen and sulfides; (4) in situ measurement of photosynthesis and sulfate reduction and study of the coupling of these two processes; (5) measurement of glutathione in the upper layers of the microbial mat as a possible oxygen quencher; (6) measurement of reduced iron as a possible intermediate electron donor along the established redoxcline in the mats; (7) measurement of dissolved phosphate as an indicator of processes of break down of organic matter in these systems; and (8) measurement of carbon dioxide in the interstitial water and its delta C-13 in an attempt to understand the flow of CO2 through the systems. Microbial processes of primary production and initial degradation at the most active zone of the microbial mat were analyzed.

  16. Improvements on adaptive optics control approaches: experimental tests of wavefront correction forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Stangalini, Marco; Giovannelli, Luca; Berrilli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The FORS (closed loop forecasting system) control algorithm has been already successfully applied to improve the efficiency of a simulated adaptive optics (AO) system. To test its performance in real conditions, we implemented this algorithm in a hardware AO demonstrator, introducing controlled aberrations into the system. We present here the results of introducing into the system both a simple periodic defocus aberration and a real open loop defocus time sequence acquired at the vacuum tower telescope solar telescope. In both cases, FORS yields a significant performance increase, improving the stability of the system in closed-loop conditions and decreasing the amplitude of the residual uncorrected wavefront aberrations.

  17. Electrospun poly(l-lactide)/zein nanofiber mats loaded with Rana chensinensis skin peptides for wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Li, Xueqi; Li, Siming; Liu, Yongjia; Hao, Linlin

    2016-09-01

    Electrospun nanofiber mats can display impressive performance as an ideal wound dressing. In this study, poly(l-lactide)(PLLA)/zein nanofiber mats loaded with Rana chensinensis skin peptides (RCSPs) were successfully produced by two different electrospinning techniques, blend and coaxial, with the goal of developing a wound dressing material. The nanofiber mats were investigated by environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), water contact angle, mechanical tests and cell viability. The resulting nanofiber mats exhibited smooth surfaces, tiny diameters and different cross-sectional shapes from pure PLLA and zein nanofibers. The FTIR result showed that PLLA, zein and RCSPs were well dispersed, without chemical interactions. Compared with coaxial nanofiber mats, blending zein-RCSPs with PLLA enhanced hydrophilicity but decreased mechanical properties. Adding RCSPs into the electrospun nanofibers significantly improved the mechanical properties of the mats. Cell viability studies with human foreskin fibroblasts demonstrated that cell growth on PLLA/zein-RCSPs nanofiber mats was significantly higher than that on PLLA/zein nanofiber mats. The results indicate that nanofiber mats containing RCSPs are potential candidates for wound dressing. PMID:27432415

  18. Hardware and operating features of the adaptive wall test section for the 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1989-01-01

    A 13- by 13-inch adaptive wall test section was installed in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel circuit. This test section has four solid walls and is configured for two-dimensional airfoil testing. The top and bottom walls are flexible and movable, whereas the sidwalls are rigid and fixed. The test section has a turntable to support airfoil models, a survey mechanism to probe the model wake, and provisions for a sidewall boundary-layer-control system. Details of the adaptive wall test section, the tunnel circuit modifications, the supporting instrumentation, the monitoring and control hardware, and the wall adaptation strategy are discussed. Sample results of shakedown tests with the test section empty and with an airfoil installed are also included.

  19. Nonwoven filtration mat production by electrospinning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackowski, M.; Krupa, A.; Jaworek, A.

    2011-06-01

    The filtration of nanoparticles and submicron particles is an important problem in industry and health protection. One of the methods which can be used to solve this problem is to use nonwoven nanofibrous filters. The process of producing filtration mats of different thickness by electrospinning is presented in the paper. The experimental results on filtration properties of nanofibrous filter mat, including the efficiency of removal of cigarette smoke particles from a gas are also presented.

  20. Mattingly and Hartsfield Salute President Regan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Columbia Space Shuttle astronauts Commander Thomas K. Mattingly, foreground, and Pilot Henry W. Hartsfield salute President Ronald Reagan and his wife, Nancy, as the astronauts begin the customary walk-around inspection of the orbiter after landing. Mattingly and Hartsfield were the first to land the Shuttle on a concrete runway. The landing proved that the shuttle could return safely to a precisely targeted location on Earth.

  1. Exploring defocus matting: nonparametric acceleration, super-resolution, and off-center matting.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Neel; Matusik, Wojciech; Avidan, Shai; Pfister, Hanspeter; Freeman, William T

    2007-01-01

    Defocus matting is a fully automatic and passive method for pulling mattes from video captured with coaxial cameras that have different depths of field and planes of focus. Nonparametric sampling can accelerate the video-matting process from minutes to seconds per frame. In addition a super-resolution technique efficiently bridges the gap between mattes from high-resolution video cameras and those from low-resolution cameras. Off-center matting pulls mattes for an external high-resolution camera that doesn't share the same center of projection as the low-resolution cameras used to capture the defocus matting data. PMID:17388202

  2. Adapting a receptive vocabulary test for preschool-aged Greek-speaking children

    PubMed Central

    Okalidou, Areti; Syrika, Asimina; Beckman, Mary E.; Edwards, Jan R.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Receptive vocabulary is an important measure for language evaluations (e.g. Bornstein & Haynes, 1998; Metsala, 1999; Nation & Snowling, 1997). Therefore, norm-referenced receptive vocabulary tests are widely used in several languages (e.g. Brownell, 2000; Dunn, Dunn, Whetton & Burley, 1997). However, a receptive vocabulary test has not yet been normed for Modern Greek. Aims The purposes of this study were to adapt an American English vocabulary test, the Receptive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test-II (ROWPVT-II) for Modern Greek for use with Greek-speaking preschool children. Methods & Procedures The list of 170 English words on the ROWPVT-II was adapted by a) developing two lists (list A and list B) of Greek words that would match either the target English word or another concept corresponding to one of the pictured objects in the 4-picture array and b) determining a developmental order for the chosen Greek words for preschool-aged children. For the first task, adult word frequency measures were used to select the words for the Greek wordlist. For the second task, 427 children, 225 boys and 202 girls, ranging in age from 2;0 years though 5;11 years, were recruited from urban and suburban areas of Greece. A pilot study of the two word lists was performed with the aim of comparing an equal number of list A and list B responses for each age group and deriving a new developmental list order. Outcomes & Results The relative difficulty of each Greek word item, i.e. its accuracy score, was calculated by taking the average proportion of correct responses across ages for that word. Subsequently, the word accuracy scores in the two lists were compared via regression analysis which yielded a highly significant relationship (R2 = 0.97; p<0.0001) and a few outlier pairs (via residuals). Further analysis used the original relative ranking order along with the derived ranking order from the average accuracy scores of the two lists, in order to determine which word

  3. HiMAT onboard flight computer system architecture and qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, A. F.; Earls, M. R.; Callizo, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    Two highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted research vehicles (RPRV's) are being flight tested at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to demonstrate and evaluate a number of technological advances applicable to future fighter aircraft. Closed-loop primary flight control is performed from a ground-based cockpit utilizing a digital computer and up/down telemetry links. A backup flight control system for emergency operation resides in one of two onboard computers. Other functions of the onboard computer system are uplink processing, downlink processing, engine control, failure detection, and redundancy management. This paper describes the architecture, functions, and flight qualification of the HiMAT onboard flight computer systems.

  4. Phylogenetic reconstruction in the Order Nymphaeales: ITS2 secondary structure analysis and in silico testing of maturase k (matK) as a potential marker for DNA bar coding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Nymphaeales (waterlilly and relatives) lineage has diverged as the second branch of basal angiosperms and comprises of two families: Cabombaceae and Nymphaceae. The classification of Nymphaeales and phylogeny within the flowering plants are quite intriguing as several systems (Thorne system, Dahlgren system, Cronquist system, Takhtajan system and APG III system (Angiosperm Phylogeny Group III system) have attempted to redefine the Nymphaeales taxonomy. There have been also fossil records consisting especially of seeds, pollen, stems, leaves and flowers as early as the lower Cretaceous. Here we present an in silico study of the order Nymphaeales taking maturaseK (matK) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) as biomarkers for phylogeny reconstruction (using character-based methods and Bayesian approach) and identification of motifs for DNA barcoding. Results The Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian approach yielded congruent fully resolved and well-supported trees using a concatenated (ITS2+ matK) supermatrix aligned dataset. The taxon sampling corroborates the monophyly of Cabombaceae. Nuphar emerges as a monophyletic clade in the family Nymphaeaceae while there are slight discrepancies in the monophyletic nature of the genera Nymphaea owing to Victoria-Euryale and Ondinea grouping in the same node of Nymphaeaceae. ITS2 secondary structures alignment corroborate the primary sequence analysis. Hydatellaceae emerged as a sister clade to Nymphaeaceae and had a basal lineage amongst the water lilly clades. Species from Cycas and Ginkgo were taken as outgroups and were rooted in the overall tree topology from various methods. Conclusions MatK genes are fast evolving highly variant regions of plant chloroplast DNA that can serve as potential biomarkers for DNA barcoding and also in generating primers for angiosperms with identification of unique motif regions. We have reported unique genus specific motif regions in the Order Nymphaeles from matK dataset

  5. Assessment of Postflight Locomotor Performance Utilizing a Test of Functional Mobility: Strategic and Adaptive Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, L. E.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Richards, J. T.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Ruttley, T. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Space flight induces adaptive modification in sensorimotor function, allowing crewmembers to operate in the unique microgravity environment. This adaptive state, however, is inappropriate for a terrestrial environment. During a re-adaptation period upon their return to Earth, crewmembers experience alterations in sensorimotor function, causing various disturbances in perception, spatial orientation, posture, gait, and eye-head coordination. Following long duration space flight, sensorimotor dysfunction would prevent or extend the time required to make an emergency egress from the vehicle; compromising crew safety and mission objectives. We are investigating two types of motor learning that may interact with each other and influence a crewmember's ability to re-adapt to Earth's gravity environment. In strategic learning, crewmembers make rapid modifications in their motor control strategy emphasizing error reduction. This type of learning may be critical during the first minutes and hours after landing. In adaptive learning, long-term plastic transformations occur, involving morphological changes and synaptic modification. In recent literature these two behavioral components have been associated with separate brain structures that control the execution of motor strategies: the strategic component was linked to the posterior parietal cortex and the adaptive component was linked to the cerebellum (Pisella, et al. 2004). The goal of this paper was to demonstrate the relative contributions of the strategic and adaptive components to the re-adaptation process in locomotor control after long duration space flight missions on the International Space Station (ISS). The Functional Mobility Test (FMT) was developed to assess crewmember s ability to ambulate postflight from an operational and functional perspective. Sixteen crewmembers were tested preflight (3 sessions) and postflight (days 1, 2, 4, 7, 25) following a long duration space flight (approx 6 months) on the ISS. We

  6. Eukaryotes in Arctic and Antarctic cyanobacterial mats.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Anne D; Vincent, Warwick F; Lovejoy, Connie

    2012-11-01

    Cyanobacterial mats are commonly found in freshwater ecosystems throughout the polar regions. Most mats are multilayered three-dimensional structures with the filamentous cyanobacteria embedded in a gel-like matrix. Although early descriptions mentioned the presence of larger organisms including metazoans living in the mats, there have been few studies specifically focused on the microbial eukaryotes, which are often small cells with few morphological features suitable for identification by microscopy. Here, we applied 18S rRNA gene clone library analysis to identify eukaryotes in cyanobacterial mat communities from both the Antarctic and the extreme High Arctic. We identified 39 ribotypes at the level of 99% sequence similarity. These consisted of taxa within algal and other protist groups including Chlorophyceae, Prasinophyceae, Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, Bacillariophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Ciliophora, and Cercozoa. Fungi were also recovered, as were 21 metazoan ribotypes. The eukaryotic taxa appeared habitat-specific with little overlap between lake, pond, and ice shelf communities. Some ribotypes were common to both Arctic and Antarctic mats, suggesting global dispersal of these taxa and similarity in the environmental filters acting on protist communities. Many of these eukaryotic taxa likely benefit from protected, nutrient-rich microhabitats within the cyanobacterial mat environment. PMID:22630054

  7. Flow visualization study of the HiMAT RPRV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorincz, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Water tunnel studies were performed to qualitatively define the flow field of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology remotely piloted research vehicle (HiMAT RPRV). Particular emphasis was placed on defining the vortex flows generated at high angles of attack. The flow visualization tests were conducted in the Northrop water tunnel using a 1/15 scale model of the HiMAT RPRV. Flow visualization photographs were obtained for angles of attack up to 40 deg and sideslip angles up to 5 deg. The HiMAT model was investigated in detail to determine the canard and wing vortex flow field development, vortex paths, and vortex breakdown characteristics as a function of angle of attack and sideslip. The presence of the canard caused the wing vortex to form further outboard and delayed the breakdown of the wing vortex to higher angles of attack. An increase in leading edge camber of the maneuver configuration delayed both the formation and the breakdown of the wing and canard vortices. Additional tests showed that the canard vortex was sensitive to variations in inlet mass flow ratio and canard flap deflection angle.

  8. A unified set-based test with adaptive filtering for gene-environment interaction analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianying; Chen, Lin S; Nicolae, Dan L; Pierce, Brandon L

    2016-06-01

    In genome-wide gene-environment interaction (GxE) studies, a common strategy to improve power is to first conduct a filtering test and retain only the SNPs that pass the filtering in the subsequent GxE analyses. Inspired by two-stage tests and gene-based tests in GxE analysis, we consider the general problem of jointly testing a set of parameters when only a few are truly from the alternative hypothesis and when filtering information is available. We propose a unified set-based test that simultaneously considers filtering on individual parameters and testing on the set. We derive the exact distribution and approximate the power function of the proposed unified statistic in simplified settings, and use them to adaptively calculate the optimal filtering threshold for each set. In the context of gene-based GxE analysis, we show that although the empirical power function may be affected by many factors, the optimal filtering threshold corresponding to the peak of the power curve primarily depends on the size of the gene. We further propose a resampling algorithm to calculate P-values for each gene given the estimated optimal filtering threshold. The performance of the method is evaluated in simulation studies and illustrated via a genome-wide gene-gender interaction analysis using pancreatic cancer genome-wide association data. PMID:26496228

  9. A unified set-based test with adaptive filtering for gene-environment interaction analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qianying; Chen, Lin S.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Pierce, Brandon L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In genome-wide gene-environment interaction (GxE) studies, a common strategy to improve power is to first conduct a filtering test and retain only the SNPs that pass the filtering in the subsequent GxE analyses. Inspired by two-stage tests and gene-based tests in GxE analysis, we consider the general problem of jointly testing a set of parameters when only a few are truly from the alternative hypothesis and when filtering information is available. We propose a unified set-based test that simultaneously considers filtering on individual parameters and testing on the set. We derive the exact distribution and approximate the power function of the proposed unified statistic in simplified settings, and use them to adaptively calculate the optimal filtering threshold for each set. In the context of gene-based GxE analysis, we show that although the empirical power function may be affected by many factors, the optimal filtering threshold corresponding to the peak of the power curve primarily depends on the size of the gene. We further propose a resampling algorithm to calculate p-values for each gene given the estimated optimal filtering threshold. The performance of the method is evaluated in simulation studies and illustrated via a genome-wide gene-gender interaction analysis using pancreatic cancer genome-wide association data. PMID:26496228

  10. Biosignature Preservation Vulnerability Associated with Stress Response Metabolic Redox Mode Switching in a Mars Analogue Coupled Microbial Mat Transiting Near-Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, R.; Ralat, A.

    2016-05-01

    Examination of a coupled microbial mat recovered from Death Valley failed to detect rosickyte, both before and after exposure to near-space conditions; associated redox proxies suggest diagenesis caused by rapid adaptive microbial stress response.

  11. Adapting Tests of Sign Language Assessment for Other Sign Languages--A Review of Linguistic, Cultural, and Psychometric Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Tobias; Mann, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Given the current lack of appropriate assessment tools for measuring deaf children's sign language skills, many test developers have used existing tests of other sign languages as templates to measure the sign language used by deaf people in their country. This article discusses factors that may influence the adaptation of assessment tests from…

  12. Adaptive Management Plan for Sensitive Plant Species on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    C. A. Wills

    2001-03-01

    The Nevada Test Site supports numerous plant species considered sensitive because of their past or present status under the Endangered Species Act and with federal and state agencies. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office (DOE/NV) prepared a Resource Management Plan which commits to protects and conserve these sensitive plant species and to minimize accumulative impacts to them. This document presents the procedures of a long-term adaptive management plan which is meant to ensure that these goals are met. It identifies the parameters that are measured for all sensitive plant populations during long-term monitoring and the adaptive management actions which may be taken if significant threats to these populations are detected. This plan does not, however, identify the current list of sensitive plant species know to occur on the Nevada Test Site. The current species list and progress on their monitoring is reported annually by DOE/NV in the Resource Management Plan.

  13. Can survival processing enhance story memory? Testing the generalizability of the adaptive memory framework.

    PubMed

    Seamon, John G; Bohn, Justin M; Coddington, Inslee E; Ebling, Maritza C; Grund, Ethan M; Haring, Catherine T; Jang, Sue-Jung; Kim, Daniel; Liong, Christopher; Paley, Frances M; Pang, Luke K; Siddique, Ashik H

    2012-07-01

    Research from the adaptive memory framework shows that thinking about words in terms of their survival value in an incidental learning task enhances their free recall relative to other semantic encoding strategies and intentional learning (Nairne, Pandeirada, & Thompson, 2008). We found similar results. When participants used incidental survival encoding for a list of words (e.g., "Will this object enhance my survival if I were stranded in the grasslands of a foreign land?"), they produced better free recall on a surprise test than did participants who intentionally tried to remember those words (Experiment 1). We also found this survival processing advantage when the words were presented within the context of a survival or neutral story (Experiment 2). However, this advantage did not extent to memory for a story's factual content, regardless of whether the participants were tested by cued recall (Experiment 3) or free recall (Experiments 4-5). Listening to a story for understanding under intentional or incidental learning conditions was just as good as survival processing for remembering story content. The functionalist approach to thinking about memory as an evolutionary adaptation designed to solve reproductive fitness problems provides a different theoretical framework for research, but it is not yet clear if survival processing has general applicability or is effective only for processing discrete stimuli in terms of fitness-relevant scenarios from our past. PMID:22288816

  14. Smart monitoring system based on adaptive current control for superconducting cable test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Ballarino, Amalia; Daponte, Vincenzo; Montenero, Giuseppe; Svelto, Cesare

    2014-12-01

    A smart monitoring system for superconducting cable test is proposed with an adaptive current control of a superconducting transformer secondary. The design, based on Fuzzy Gain Scheduling, allows the controller parameters to adapt continuously, and finely, to the working variations arising from transformer nonlinear dynamics. The control system is integrated in a fully digital control loop, with all the related benefits, i.e., high noise rejection, ease of implementation/modification, and so on. In particular, an accurate model of the system, controlled by a Fuzzy Gain Scheduler of the superconducting transformer, was achieved by an experimental campaign through the working domain at several current ramp rates. The model performance was characterized by simulation, under all the main operating conditions, in order to guide the controller design. Finally, the proposed monitoring system was experimentally validated at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in comparison to the state-of-the-art control system [P. Arpaia, L. Bottura, G. Montenero, and S. Le Naour, "Performance improvement of a measurement station for superconducting cable test," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 095111 (2012)] of the Facility for the Research on Superconducting Cables, achieving a significant performance improvement: a reduction in the system overshoot by 50%, with a related attenuation of the corresponding dynamic residual error (both absolute and RMS) up to 52%.

  15. Development and Flight Testing of an Adaptable Vehicle Health-Monitoring Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Coffey, Neil C.; Gonzalez, Guillermo A.; Woodman, Keith L.; Weathered, Brenton W.; Rollins, Courtney H.; Taylor, B. Douglas; Brett, Rube R.

    2003-01-01

    Development and testing of an adaptable wireless health-monitoring architecture for a vehicle fleet is presented. It has three operational levels: one or more remote data acquisition units located throughout the vehicle; a command and control unit located within the vehicle; and a terminal collection unit to collect analysis results from all vehicles. Each level is capable of performing autonomous analysis with a trained adaptable expert system. The remote data acquisition unit has an eight channel programmable digital interface that allows the user discretion for choosing type of sensors; number of sensors, sensor sampling rate, and sampling duration for each sensor. The architecture provides framework for a tributary analysis. All measurements at the lowest operational level are reduced to provide analysis results necessary to gauge changes from established baselines. These are then collected at the next level to identify any global trends or common features from the prior level. This process is repeated until the results are reduced at the highest operational level. In the framework, only analysis results are forwarded to the next level to reduce telemetry congestion. The system's remote data acquisition hardware and non-analysis software have been flight tested on the NASA Langley B757's main landing gear.

  16. Design, fabrication, and testing of SMA-enabled adaptive chevrons for jet noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Cano, Roberto J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2004-07-01

    This study presents the status and results from an effort to design, fabricate, and test an adaptive jet engine chevron concept based upon embedding shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators in a composite laminate, termed a SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC). The approach for fabricating the adaptive SMAHC chevrons involves embedding prestrained Nitinol actuators on one side of the mid-plane of the composite laminate such that thermal excitation generates a thermal moment and deflects the structure. A glass-epoxy pre-preg/Nitinol ribbon material system and a vacuum hot press consolidation approach are employed. A versatile test system for control and measurement of the chevron deflection performance is described. Projection moire interferometry (PMI) is used for global deformation measurement and infrared (IR) thermography is used for 2-D temperature measurement and feedback control. A recently commercialized constitutive model for SMA and SMAHC materials is used in the finite element code ABAQUS to perform nonlinear static analysis of the chevron prototypes. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured chevron deflection performance, thereby validating the design tool. Although the performance results presented in this paper fall short of the requirement, the concept is proven and an approach for achieving the performance objectives is evident.

  17. Smart monitoring system based on adaptive current control for superconducting cable test

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Ballarino, Amalia; Montenero, Giuseppe; Daponte, Vincenzo; Svelto, Cesare

    2014-12-15

    A smart monitoring system for superconducting cable test is proposed with an adaptive current control of a superconducting transformer secondary. The design, based on Fuzzy Gain Scheduling, allows the controller parameters to adapt continuously, and finely, to the working variations arising from transformer nonlinear dynamics. The control system is integrated in a fully digital control loop, with all the related benefits, i.e., high noise rejection, ease of implementation/modification, and so on. In particular, an accurate model of the system, controlled by a Fuzzy Gain Scheduler of the superconducting transformer, was achieved by an experimental campaign through the working domain at several current ramp rates. The model performance was characterized by simulation, under all the main operating conditions, in order to guide the controller design. Finally, the proposed monitoring system was experimentally validated at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in comparison to the state-of-the-art control system [P. Arpaia, L. Bottura, G. Montenero, and S. Le Naour, “Performance improvement of a measurement station for superconducting cable test,” Rev. Sci. Instrum.83, 095111 (2012)] of the Facility for the Research on Superconducting Cables, achieving a significant performance improvement: a reduction in the system overshoot by 50%, with a related attenuation of the corresponding dynamic residual error (both absolute and RMS) up to 52%.

  18. [Motor adaptation in the Bielschowsky head-tilt test in cases of superior oblique palsy].

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, H; Kishimoto, F; Kobashi, R; Watanabe, S; Okano, M; Furuse, H

    1992-08-01

    To elucidate a motor adaptation phenomenon in the Bielschowsky head-tilt test in cases of superior oblique palsy, a gain of the otolith-ocular reflex was studied. The amplitude of ocular counter-rolling (OCR) of the non-paretic eye was measured with a photographic method, using limbal conjunctival marks as landmarks which were marked with indigo carmine. The average preoperative OCR of the non-paretic eye was 10.49 degrees at 30 degrees of head tilt to both sides, but after corrective surgery in the paretic eye the OCR of the non-paretic eye decreased to 8.43 degrees. To clarify the relation between OCR, duration of palsy and vertical deviation of the Bielschowsky head-tilt test (BHP), which was the difference of vertical deviation measured with the head tilted to the left and right shoulders at an angle of 30 degrees, the BHP/OCR ratio was calculated. We found no relation between BHP and OCR, but the BHP/OCR ratio increased proportionally in cases of long-standing palsy, From these results an increased BHP/OCR ratio could be an adaptive phenomenon caused by secondary innervational changes or muscle contracture to minimizing the contralateral head tilt to maintain binocular single vision. PMID:1519508

  19. Smart monitoring system based on adaptive current control for superconducting cable test.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Ballarino, Amalia; Daponte, Vincenzo; Montenero, Giuseppe; Svelto, Cesare

    2014-12-01

    A smart monitoring system for superconducting cable test is proposed with an adaptive current control of a superconducting transformer secondary. The design, based on Fuzzy Gain Scheduling, allows the controller parameters to adapt continuously, and finely, to the working variations arising from transformer nonlinear dynamics. The control system is integrated in a fully digital control loop, with all the related benefits, i.e., high noise rejection, ease of implementation/modification, and so on. In particular, an accurate model of the system, controlled by a Fuzzy Gain Scheduler of the superconducting transformer, was achieved by an experimental campaign through the working domain at several current ramp rates. The model performance was characterized by simulation, under all the main operating conditions, in order to guide the controller design. Finally, the proposed monitoring system was experimentally validated at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in comparison to the state-of-the-art control system [P. Arpaia, L. Bottura, G. Montenero, and S. Le Naour, "Performance improvement of a measurement station for superconducting cable test," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 095111 (2012)] of the Facility for the Research on Superconducting Cables, achieving a significant performance improvement: a reduction in the system overshoot by 50%, with a related attenuation of the corresponding dynamic residual error (both absolute and RMS) up to 52%. PMID:25554330

  20. Testing and integrating the laser system of ARGOS: the ground layer adaptive optics for LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, C.; Rabien, S.; Barl, L.; Borelli, J.; Deysenroth, M.; Gaessler, W.; Gemperlein, H.; Honsberg, M.; Kulas, M.; Lederer, R.; Raab, W.; Rahmer, G.; Ziegleder, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Laser Guide Star facility ARGOS will provide Ground Layer Adaptive Optics to the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The system operates three pulsed laser beacons above each of the two primary mirrors, which are Rayleigh scattered in 12km height. This enables correction over a wide field of view, using the adaptive secondary mirror of the LBT. The ARGOS laser system is designed around commercially available, pulsed Nd:YAG lasers working at 532 nm. In preparation for a successful commissioning, it is important to ascertain that the specifications are met for every component of the laser system. The testing of assembled, optical subsystems is likewise necessary. In particular it is required to confirm a high output power, beam quality and pulse stability of the beacons. In a second step, the integrated laser system along with its electronic cabinets are installed on a telescope simulator. This unit is capable of carrying the whole assembly and can be tilted to imitate working conditions at the LBT. It allows alignment and functionality testing of the entire system, ensuring that flexure compensation and system diagnosis work properly in different orientations.

  1. The adaptive secondary mirror for the Large Binocular Telescope: results of acceptance laboratory test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.; Xompero, M.; Zanotti, D.; Busoni, L.; Del Vecchio, C.; Salinari, P.; Ranfagni, P.; Brusa Zappellini, G.; Biasi, R.; Andrighettoni, M.; Gallieni, D.; Anaclerio, E.; Martin, H. M.; Miller, S. M.

    2008-07-01

    The first of the two Gregorian Adaptive Secondary Mirror (ASM) units for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) has been fully integrated and tested for laboratory acceptance. The LBT unit represents the most advanced ASM device existing in hardware. The unit has 672 electro-magnetic force actuators to change the shape of the 1.6mm-thick and 911mm-diameter Zerodur shell. The actuators control the mirror figure using the position feedback from the internal metrology provided by co-located capacitive sensors. The on-board real-time control electronics has a parallel computational power of 163Gflop/s providing not only the internal control of the unit with a 72kHz loop but also the wavefront reconstruction for the 1kHz Adaptive Optics loop. The paper describes the final configuration of the system and reports the results of the characterization and optimization process together with the results of the laboratory acceptance tests.

  2. Key innovation or adaptive change? A test of leaf traits using Triodiinae in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Toon, A.; Crisp, M. D.; Gamage, H.; Mant, J.; Morris, D. C.; Schmidt, S.; Cook, L. G.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of novel traits (“key innovations”) allows some lineages to move into new environments or adapt to changing climates, whereas other lineages may track suitable habitat or go extinct. We test whether, and how, trait shifts are linked to environmental change using Triodiinae, C4 grasses that form the dominant understory over about 30% of Australia. Using phylogenetic and relaxed molecular clock estimates, we assess the Australian biogeographic origins of Triodiinae and reconstruct the evolution of stomatal and vascular bundle positioning. Triodiinae diversified from the mid-Miocene, coincident with the aridification of Australia. Subsequent niche shifts have been mostly from the Eremaean biome to the savannah, coincident with the expansion of the latter. Biome shifts are correlated with changes in leaf anatomy and radiations within Triodiinae are largely regional. Symplectrodia and Monodia are nested within Triodia. Rather than enabling biome shifts, convergent changes in leaf anatomy have probably occurred after taxa moved into the savannah biome—they are likely to have been subsequent adaptions rather than key innovations. Our study highlights the importance of testing the timing and origin of traits assumed to be phenotypic innovations that enabled ecological shifts. PMID:26215163

  3. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of SMA Enabled Adaptive Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Cano, Roberto J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents the status and results from an effort to design, fabricate, and test an adaptive jet engine chevron concept based upon embedding shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators in a composite laminate, termed a SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC). The approach for fabricating the adaptive SMAHC chevrons involves embedding prestrained Nitinol actuators on one side of the mid-plane of the composite laminate such that thermal excitation generates a thermal moment and deflects the structure. A glass-epoxy pre-preg/Nitinol ribbon material system and a vacuum hot press consolidation approach are employed. A versatile test system for control and measurement of the chevron deflection performance is described. Projection moire interferometry (PMI) is used for global deformation measurement and infrared (IR) thermography is used for 2-D temperature measurement and feedback control. A recently commercialized constitutive model for SMA and SMAHC materials is used in the finite element code ABAQUS to perform nonlinear static analysis of the chevron prototypes. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured chevron deflection performance, thereby validating the design tool. Although the performance results presented in this paper fall short of the requirement, the concept is proven and an approach for achieving the performance objectives is evident.

  4. Illustration of MIMIC-Model DIF Testing with the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality

    PubMed Central

    Oltmanns, Thomas F.; Turkheimer, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This research provides an example of testing for differential item functioning (DIF) using multiple indicator multiple cause (MIMIC) structural equation models. True/False items on five scales of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP) were tested for uniform DIF in a sample of Air Force recruits with groups defined by gender and ethnicity. Uniform DIF exists when an item is more easily endorsed for one group than the other, controlling for group mean differences on the variable under study. Results revealed significant DIF for many SNAP items and some effects were quite large. Differentially-functioning items can produce measurement bias and should be either deleted or modeled as if separate items were administered to different groups. Future research should aim to determine whether the DIF observed here holds for other samples. PMID:20442793

  5. A Rate Function Approach to Computerized Adaptive Testing for Cognitive Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingchen; Ying, Zhiliang; Zhang, Stephanie

    2015-06-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is a sequential experiment design scheme that tailors the selection of experiments to each subject. Such a scheme measures subjects' attributes (unknown parameters) more accurately than the regular prefixed design. In this paper, we consider CAT for diagnostic classification models, for which attribute estimation corresponds to a classification problem. After a review of existing methods, we propose an alternative criterion based on the asymptotic decay rate of the misclassification probabilities. The new criterion is then developed into new CAT algorithms, which are shown to achieve the asymptotically optimal misclassification rate. Simulation studies are conducted to compare the new approach with existing methods, demonstrating its effectiveness, even for moderate length tests. PMID:24327068

  6. Flight control system development and flight test experience with the F-111 mission adaptive wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The wing on the NASA F-111 transonic aircraft technology airplane was modified to provide flexible leading and trailing edge flaps. This wing is known as the mission adaptive wing (MAW) because aerodynamic efficiency can be maintained at all speeds. Unlike a conventional wing, the MAW has no spoilers, external flap hinges, or fairings to break the smooth contour. The leading edge flaps and three-segment trailing edge flaps are controlled by a redundant fly-by-wire control system that features a dual digital primary system architecture providing roll and symmetric commands to the MAW control surfaces. A segregated analog backup system is provided in the event of a primary system failure. This paper discusses the design, development, testing, qualification, and flight test experience of the MAW primary and backup flight control systems.

  7. Acceptance of New Technology: A Usability Test of a Computerized Adaptive Test for Fatigue in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaus, Stephanie; Taal, Erik; Vonkeman, Harald E; Glas, Cees AW; van de Laar, Mart AFJ

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the acceptance and usability of computerized adaptive tests (CATs) among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The main difference between completing a CAT and a traditional questionnaire concerns item presentation. CATs only provide one item at a time on the screen, and skipping forward or backward to review and change already given answers is often not possible. Objective The objective of this study was to examine how patients with RA experience a Web-based CAT for fatigue. Methods In individual sessions, participants filled in the CAT while thinking aloud, and were subsequently interviewed about their experience with the new instrument. The technology acceptance model (TAM) was used to structure the results. Results The participants were 15 patients with RA. They perceived the CAT as clear, brief, and easy to use. They were positive about answering one question per screen, the changing response options, layout, progress bar, and item number. There were 40% (6/15) of the participants that also mentioned that they experienced the completion of the CAT as useful and pleasant, and liked the adaptive test mechanism. However, some participants noted that not all items were applicable to everybody, and that the wordings of questions within the severity dimension were often similar. Conclusions Participants perceived the “CAT Fatigue RA” as easy to use, and also its usefulness was expressed. A 2.0 version has been improved according to the participants’ comments, and is currently being used in a validation study before it will be implemented in daily clinical practice. Our results give a first indication that CAT methodology may outperform traditional questionnaires not merely on measurement precision, but also on usability and acceptance valuation. PMID:27025404

  8. Protein and Bacterial Antifouling Behavior of Melt-Coextruded Nanofiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Eun; Zhang, Cong; Advincula, Abigail A; Baer, Eric; Pokorski, Jonathan K

    2016-04-13

    Antifouling surfaces are important for biomedical devices to prevent secondary infections and mitigate the effects of the foreign body response. Herein, we describe melt-coextruded poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofiber mats grafted with antifouling polymers. Nonwoven PCL fiber mats are produced using a multilayered melt coextrusion process followed by high-pressure hydroentanglement to yield porous patches. The resulting fiber mats show submicrometer cross-sectional fiber dimensions and yield pore sizes that were nearly uniform, with a mean pore size of 1.6 ± 0.9 μm. Several antifouling polymers, including hydrophilic, zwitterionic, and amphipathic molecules, are grafted to the surface of the mats using a two-step procedure that includes photochemistry followed by the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. Fiber mats are evaluated using separate adsorption tests for serum proteins and E. coli. The results indicate that poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate)-co-(trifluoroethyl methacrylate) (poly(OEGMEMA-co-TFEMA)) grafted mats exhibit approximately 85% less protein adhesion and 97% less E. coli adsorption when compared to unmodified PCL fibermats. In dynamic antifouling testing, the amphiphilic fluorous polymer surface shows the highest flux and highest rejection value of foulants. The work presented within has implications on the high-throughput production of antifouling microporous patches for medical applications. PMID:27043205

  9. Functional Task Test: 3. Skeletal Muscle Performance Adaptations to Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Wickwire, P. J.; Buxton, R. E.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    The functional task test is a multi-disciplinary study investigating how space-flight induced changes to physiological systems impacts functional task performance. Impairment of neuromuscular function would be expected to negatively affect functional performance of crewmembers following exposure to microgravity. This presentation reports the results for muscle performance testing in crewmembers. Functional task performance will be presented in the abstract "Functional Task Test 1: sensory motor adaptations associated with postflight alternations in astronaut functional task performance." METHODS: Muscle performance measures were obtained in crewmembers before and after short-duration space flight aboard the Space Shuttle and long-duration International Space Station (ISS) missions. The battery of muscle performance tests included leg press and bench press measures of isometric force, isotonic power and total work. Knee extension was used for the measurement of central activation and maximal isometric force. Upper and lower body force steadiness control were measured on the bench press and knee extension machine, respectively. Tests were implemented 60 and 30 days before launch, on landing day (Shuttle crew only), and 6, 10 and 30 days after landing. Seven Space Shuttle crew and four ISS crew have completed the muscle performance testing to date. RESULTS: Preliminary results for Space Shuttle crew reveal significant reductions in the leg press performance metrics of maximal isometric force, power and total work on R+0 (p<0.05). Bench press total work was also significantly impaired, although maximal isometric force and power were not significantly affected. No changes were noted for measurements of central activation or force steadiness. Results for ISS crew were not analyzed due to the current small sample size. DISCUSSION: Significant reductions in lower body muscle performance metrics were observed in returning Shuttle crew and these adaptations are likely

  10. Managing Depression Among Homeless Mothers: Pilot Testing an Adapted Collaborative Care Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, Linda; Upshur, Carole C.; Fletcher-Blake, Debbian; Reed, George; Frisard, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although depression is common among homeless mothers, little progress has been made in testing treatment strategies for this group. We describe pilot test results of an adapted collaborative care model for homeless mothers with depression. Method We conducted a pilot intervention study of mothers screening positive for depression in 2 randomly selected shelter-based primary care clinics in New York over 18 months in 2010–2012. Study participants completed a psychosocial, health, and mental health assessment at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Results One-third of women screened positive for depression (123 of 328 women). Sixty-seven women (63.2% of the eligible sample) enrolled in the intervention. At 6 months, compared to usual-care women, intervention group women were more likely to be receiving depression treatment (40.0% vs 5.9%, P = .01) and antidepressant medication (73.3% vs 5.9%, P = .001, respectively) and had more primary care physician and care manager visits at both 3 months (74.3% vs 53.3%, P = .009 and 91.4% vs 26.7%, P < .001, respectively) and 6 months (46.7% vs 23.5%, P = .003 and 70% vs 17.7%, P = .001, respectively). More women in the intervention group compared to usual-care women reported ≥ 50% improvement in depression symptoms at 6 months (30% vs 5.9%, P = .07). Conclusions This pilot study found that implementing an adapted collaborative care intervention was feasible in a shelter-based primary care clinic and had promising results that require further testing. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02723058 PMID:27486545

  11. Development and Flight Testing of an Adaptive Vehicle Health-Monitoring Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Coffey, Neil C.; Gonzalez, Guillermo A.; Taylor, B. Douglas; Brett, Rube R.; Woodman, Keith L.; Weathered, Brenton W.; Rollins, Courtney H.

    2002-01-01

    On going development and testing of an adaptable vehicle health-monitoring architecture is presented. The architecture is being developed for a fleet of vehicles. It has three operational levels: one or more remote data acquisition units located throughout the vehicle; a command and control unit located within the vehicle, and, a terminal collection unit to collect analysis results from all vehicles. Each level is capable of performing autonomous analysis with a trained expert system. The expert system is parameterized, which makes it adaptable to be trained to both a user's subject reasoning and existing quantitative analytic tools. Communication between all levels is done with wireless radio frequency interfaces. The remote data acquisition unit has an eight channel programmable digital interface that allows the user discretion for choosing type of sensors; number of sensors, sensor sampling rate and sampling duration for each sensor. The architecture provides framework for a tributary analysis. All measurements at the lowest operational level are reduced to provide analysis results necessary to gauge changes from established baselines. These are then collected at the next level to identify any global trends or common features from the prior level. This process is repeated until the results are reduced at the highest operational level. In the framework, only analysis results are forwarded to the next level to reduce telemetry congestion. The system's remote data acquisition hardware and non-analysis software have been flight tested on the NASA Langley B757's main landing gear. The flight tests were performed to validate the following: the wireless radio frequency communication capabilities of the system, the hardware design, command and control; software operation and, data acquisition, storage and retrieval.

  12. Flight test results of the fuzzy logic adaptive controller-helicopter (FLAC-H)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Robert L.; Walker, Gregory W.

    1996-05-01

    The fuzzy logic adaptive controller for helicopters (FLAC-H) demonstration is a cooperative effort between the US Army Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation Command (STRICOM), the US Army Aviation and Troop Command, and the US Army Missile Command to demonstrate a low-cost drone control system for both full-scale and sub-scale helicopters. FLAC-H was demonstrated on one of STRICOM's fleet of full-scale rotary-winged target drones. FLAC-H exploits fuzzy logic in its flight control system to provide a robust solution to the control of the helicopter's dynamic, nonlinear system. Straight forward, common sense fuzzy rules governing helicopter flight are processed instead of complex mathematical models. This has resulted in a simplified solution to the complexities of helicopter flight. Incorporation of fuzzy logic reduced the cost of development and should also reduce the cost of maintenance of the system. An adaptive algorithm allows the FLAC-H to 'learn' how to fly the helicopter, enabling the control system to adjust to varying helicopter configurations. The adaptive algorithm, based on genetic algorithms, alters the fuzzy rules and their related sets to improve the performance characteristics of the system. This learning allows FLAC-H to automatically be integrated into a new airframe, reducing the development costs associated with altering a control system for a new or heavily modified aircraft. Successful flight tests of the FLAC-H on a UH-1H target drone were completed in September 1994 at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. This paper discuses the objective of the system, its design, and performance.

  13. Environmentally-controlled Microtensile Testing of Mechanically-adaptive Polymer Nanocomposites for ex vivo Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Allison E.; Potter, Kelsey A.; Tyler, Dustin J.; Zorman, Christian A.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable microdevices are gaining significant attention for several biomedical applications1-4. Such devices have been made from a range of materials, each offering its own advantages and shortcomings5,6. Most prominently, due to the microscale device dimensions, a high modulus is required to facilitate implantation into living tissue. Conversely, the stiffness of the device should match the surrounding tissue to minimize induced local strain7-9. Therefore, we recently developed a new class of bio-inspired materials to meet these requirements by responding to environmental stimuli with a change in mechanical properties10-14. Specifically, our poly(vinyl acetate)-based nanocomposite (PVAc-NC) displays a reduction in stiffness when exposed to water and elevated temperatures (e.g. body temperature). Unfortunately, few methods exist to quantify the stiffness of materials in vivo15, and mechanical testing outside of the physiological environment often requires large samples inappropriate for implantation. Further, stimuli-responsive materials may quickly recover their initial stiffness after explantation. Therefore, we have developed a method by which the mechanical properties of implanted microsamples can be measured ex vivo, with simulated physiological conditions maintained using moisture and temperature control13,16,17. To this end, a custom microtensile tester was designed to accommodate microscale samples13,17 with widely-varying Young's moduli (range of 10 MPa to 5 GPa). As our interests are in the application of PVAc-NC as a biologically-adaptable neural probe substrate, a tool capable of mechanical characterization of samples at the microscale was necessary. This tool was adapted to provide humidity and temperature control, which minimized sample drying and cooling17. As a result, the mechanical characteristics of the explanted sample closely reflect those of the sample just prior to explantation. The overall goal of this method is to quantitatively assess

  14. ADAPTATION OF CRACK GROWTH DETECTION TECHNIQUES TO US MATERIAL TEST REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter; Joy L. Rempe

    2015-04-01

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some test reactors outside the United States, such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have developed techniques to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. The basic approach is to use a custom-designed compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation, while the crack in the specimen is monitored in-situ using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. In 2012 the US Department of Energy commissioned the Idaho National Laboratory and the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (MIT NRL) to take the basic concepts developed at the HBWR and adapt them to a test rig capable of conducting in-pile IASCC tests in US Material Test Reactors. The first two and half years of the project consisted of designing and testing the loader mechanism, testing individual components of the in-pile rig and electronic support equipment, and autoclave testing of the rig design prior to insertion in the MIT Reactor. The load was applied to the specimen by means of a scissor like mechanism, actuated by a miniature metal bellows driven by pneumatic pressure and sized to fit within the small in-core irradiation volume. In addition to the loader design, technical challenges included developing robust connections to the specimen for the applied current and voltage measurements, appropriate ceramic insulating materials that can endure the LWR environment, dealing with the high electromagnetic noise environment of a reactor core at full power, and accommodating material property changes in the specimen, due primarily to fast neutron damage, which change the specimen resistance without additional crack growth. The project culminated with an in

  15. rMATS: robust and flexible detection of differential alternative splicing from replicate RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihao; Park, Juw Won; Lu, Zhi-xiang; Lin, Lan; Henry, Michael D; Wu, Ying Nian; Zhou, Qing; Xing, Yi

    2014-12-23

    Ultra-deep RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has become a powerful approach for genome-wide analysis of pre-mRNA alternative splicing. We previously developed multivariate analysis of transcript splicing (MATS), a statistical method for detecting differential alternative splicing between two RNA-Seq samples. Here we describe a new statistical model and computer program, replicate MATS (rMATS), designed for detection of differential alternative splicing from replicate RNA-Seq data. rMATS uses a hierarchical model to simultaneously account for sampling uncertainty in individual replicates and variability among replicates. In addition to the analysis of unpaired replicates, rMATS also includes a model specifically designed for paired replicates between sample groups. The hypothesis-testing framework of rMATS is flexible and can assess the statistical significance over any user-defined magnitude of splicing change. The performance of rMATS is evaluated by the analysis of simulated and real RNA-Seq data. rMATS outperformed two existing methods for replicate RNA-Seq data in all simulation settings, and RT-PCR yielded a high validation rate (94%) in an RNA-Seq dataset of prostate cancer cell lines. Our data also provide guiding principles for designing RNA-Seq studies of alternative splicing. We demonstrate that it is essential to incorporate biological replicates in the study design. Of note, pooling RNAs or merging RNA-Seq data from multiple replicates is not an effective approach to account for variability, and the result is particularly sensitive to outliers. The rMATS source code is freely available at rnaseq-mats.sourceforge.net/. As the popularity of RNA-Seq continues to grow, we expect rMATS will be useful for studies of alternative splicing in diverse RNA-Seq projects. PMID:25480548

  16. Testing Adaptive Hypotheses of Convergence with Functional Landscapes: A Case Study of Bone-Cracking Hypercarnivores

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Zhijie Jack

    2013-01-01

    Morphological convergence is a well documented phenomenon in mammals, and adaptive explanations are commonly employed to infer similar functions for convergent characteristics. I present a study that adopts aspects of theoretical morphology and engineering optimization to test hypotheses about adaptive convergent evolution. Bone-cracking ecomorphologies in Carnivora were used as a case study. Previous research has shown that skull deepening and widening are major evolutionary patterns in convergent bone-cracking canids and hyaenids. A simple two-dimensional design space, with skull width-to-length and depth-to-length ratios as variables, was used to examine optimized shapes for two functional properties: mechanical advantage (MA) and strain energy (SE). Functionality of theoretical skull shapes was studied using finite element analysis (FEA) and visualized as functional landscapes. The distribution of actual skull shapes in the landscape showed a convergent trend of plesiomorphically low-MA and moderate-SE skulls evolving towards higher-MA and moderate-SE skulls; this is corroborated by FEA of 13 actual specimens. Nevertheless, regions exist in the landscape where high-MA and lower-SE shapes are not represented by existing species; their vacancy is observed even at higher taxonomic levels. Results highlight the interaction of biomechanical and non-biomechanical factors in constraining general skull dimensions to localized functional optima through evolution. PMID:23734244

  17. L1 Adaptive Control Law for Flexible Space Launch Vehicle and Proposed Plan for Flight Test Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharisov, Evgeny; Gregory, Irene M.; Cao, Chengyu; Hovakimyan, Naira

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores application of the L1 adaptive control architecture to a generic flexible Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). Adaptive control has the potential to improve performance and enhance safety of space vehicles that often operate in very unforgiving and occasionally highly uncertain environments. NASA s development of the next generation space launch vehicles presents an opportunity for adaptive control to contribute to improved performance of this statically unstable vehicle with low damping and low bending frequency flexible dynamics. In this paper, we consider the L1 adaptive output feedback controller to control the low frequency structural modes and propose steps to validate the adaptive controller performance utilizing one of the experimental test flights for the CLV Ares-I Program.

  18. Flight Test Comparison of Different Adaptive Augmentations for Fault Tolerant Control Laws for a Modified F-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Lee, James A.; Kaneshinge, John T.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the improvements and enhancements to a neural network based approach for directly adapting to aerodynamic changes resulting from damage or failures. This research is a follow-on effort to flight tests performed on the NASA F-15 aircraft as part of the Intelligent Flight Control System research effort. Previous flight test results demonstrated the potential for performance improvement under destabilizing damage conditions. Little or no improvement was provided under simulated control surface failures, however, and the adaptive system was prone to pilot-induced oscillations. An improved controller was designed to reduce the occurrence of pilot-induced oscillations and increase robustness to failures in general. This report presents an analysis of the neural networks used in the previous flight test, the improved adaptive controller, and the baseline case with no adaptation. Flight test results demonstrate significant improvement in performance by using the new adaptive controller compared with the previous adaptive system and the baseline system for control surface failures.

  19. Usability Testing and Adaptation of the Pediatric Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Clinical Decision Support Tool

    PubMed Central

    Furberg, Robert D; Bagwell, Jacqueline E; LaBresh, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is 1 of the leading causes of death, years of life lost, and disability-adjusted years of life lost worldwide. CVD prevention for children and teens is needed, as CVD risk factors and behaviors beginning in youth contribute to CVD development. In 2012, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute released their “Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents” for clinicians, describing CVD risk factors they should address with patients at primary care preventative visits. However, uptake of new guidelines is slow. Clinical decision support (CDS) tools can improve guideline uptake. In this paper, we describe our process of testing and adapting a CDS tool to help clinicians evaluate patient risk, recommend behaviors to prevent development of risk, and complete complex calculations to determine appropriate interventions as recommended by the guidelines, using a user-centered design approach. Objective The objective of the study was to assess the usability of a pediatric CVD risk factor tool by clinicians. Methods The tool was tested using one-on-one in-person testing and a “think aloud” approach with 5 clinicians and by using the tool in clinical practice along with formal usability metrics with 14 pediatricians. Thematic analysis of the data from the in-person testing and clinical practice testing identified suggestions for change in 3 major areas: user experience, content refinement, and technical deployment. Descriptive statistical techniques were employed to summarize users’ overall experience with the tool. Results Data from testers showed that general reactions toward the CDS tool were positive. Clinical practice testers suggested revisions to make the application more user-friendly, especially for clinicians using the application on the iPhone, and called for refining recommendations to be more succinct and better tailored to the patient. Tester feedback was

  20. PROOF OF CONCEPT TEST OF A UNIQUE GASEOUS PERFLUROCARBON TRACER SYSTEM FOR VERIFICATION AND LONG TERM MONITORING OF CAPS AND COVER SYSTEMS CONDUCTED AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BENTONITE MAT TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.; SERRATO,M.

    2002-02-24

    be used as a non-invasive method (if injection ports are emplaced prior to cover emplacement) on new covers or a minimally invasive method on existing covers. PFT verification will be useful at all buried waste sites using a cover system (e.g., treated or untreated chemical waste landfills) including DOE, commercial, and private sector sites. This paper discusses the initial field trial of the PFT cover monitoring system performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in FY01. The experiments provided a successful proof-of-principle test of the PFT technology in monitoring caps and covers. An injection and sampling array was installed in the Bentomat test cap at the SRS Caps Test Facility. This system contained 6 feet of sandy soil beneath a 1/2 inch geosynthetic clay liner covered by an HDPE liner which was covered by 2 feet of clayey top soil. PFTs were injected into the sandy soil though a pre-existing system of access pipes below the cap and soil gas samples were taken on top of the cap. Mid-way into the injection period a series of 1 1/2 inch holes were punched into the cap (through the geomembrane) to provide a positive breach in the cap. Data will be presented that shows the initial cap was fairly tight and leak free and that the artificially induced leaks were detectable within two hours of occurrence.

  1. The focal plane adaptive optics test box of the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschênes, William; Brousseau, Denis; Lavigne, Jean-Francois; Thibault, Simon; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2014-08-01

    With the upcoming construction of Extremely Large Telescopes, several existing technologies are being pushed beyond their performance limit and it becomes essential to develop and evaluate new alternatives. The "Observatoire du Mont Mégantic" (OMM) hosts a telescope having a 1.6-meter diameter primary. The OMM telescope is known to be an excellent location to develop and test precursor instruments which are then upscaled to larger telescopes (ex. SPIOMM which led to SITELLE at the CFHT). We present a specifically designed focal plane box for the OMM which will allow to evaluate, directly on-sky, the performance of a number of next generation adaptive optics related technologies The system will able us to compare the performance of several new wavefront sensors in contrast with the current standard, the Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor.

  2. Testing of Lagrange multiplier damped least-squares control algorithm for woofer-tweeter adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    A Lagrange multiplier-based damped least-squares control algorithm for woofer-tweeter (W-T) dual deformable-mirror (DM) adaptive optics (AO) is tested with a breadboard system. We show that the algorithm can complementarily command the two DMs to correct wavefront aberrations within a single optimization process: the woofer DM correcting the high-stroke, low-order aberrations, and the tweeter DM correcting the low-stroke, high-order aberrations. The optimal damping factor for a DM is found to be the median of the eigenvalue spectrum of the influence matrix of that DM. Wavefront control accuracy is maximized with the optimized control parameters. For the breadboard system, the residual wavefront error can be controlled to the precision of 0.03 μm in root mean square. The W-T dual-DM AO has applications in both ophthalmology and astronomy. PMID:22441462

  3. Some critical concerns for adapting the Bilingual Aphasia Test to Bahasa Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Postman, Whitney Anne

    2011-06-01

    One of the most widely spoken languages of the world, Bahasa Indonesia (BI), became standardized as the official language of Indonesia. Based on Malay, it served as lingua franca in various forms throughout the Indonesian archipelago for centuries. Although BI has been habitually learned as a second language, the number of native speakers of BI continues to increase. As a member of the Western Austronesian branch of the Austronesian language family, its grammar and usage bear some resemblance to related languages such as Tagalog. At the same time, certain morphosyntactic and pragmatic characteristics of BI that distinguish it from other languages have been the subject of extensive research and deliberation. For these reasons, the clinical utility of adapting the Bilingual Aphasia Test ( Paradis, M., & Libben, G. (1987) . The assessment of bilingual aphasia. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates) is as evident as it is essential. PMID:21631309

  4. Conceptualising computerized adaptive testing for measurement of latent variables associated with physical objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, F. R.; Henson, B.

    2015-02-01

    The notion of that more or less of a physical feature affects in different degrees the users' impression with regard to an underlying attribute of a product has frequently been applied in affective engineering. However, those attributes exist only as a premise that cannot directly be measured and, therefore, inferences based on their assessment are error-prone. To establish and improve measurement of latent attributes it is presented in this paper the concept of a stochastic framework using the Rasch model for a wide range of independent variables referred to as an item bank. Based on an item bank, computerized adaptive testing (CAT) can be developed. A CAT system can converge into a sequence of items bracketing to convey information at a user's particular endorsement level. It is through item banking and CAT that the financial benefits of using the Rasch model in affective engineering can be realised.

  5. Carbon and Oxygen Budgets of Subtidal and Intertidal Cyanobacterial Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; Discipulo, Mykell; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Intertidal cyanobacterial mats (Lyngbya-dominated) are contrasted with mats (Microcoleus-dominated) that grow in subtidal (0.7m water depth) hypersaline (90-110 permil) environments. In benthic chamber experiments conducted in Oct., 1999, mats exhibited greater net uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from overlying water during the daylight period than Microcoleus mats (e.g., 200 vs 120 mmol C/m. at 26 deg C, respectively). Net DIC release at night was similar for both mats (approx. 80 mmol C/m). Daytime net O2 release by Lyngby mats exceeded that by Microcoleus mats (150 vs 100 mmol O2/m), and O2 uptake at night was comparable for both mats (60-80 mmol O2/m). Nonphotosynthetic populations are more prominent within the subtidal versus intertidal mats, and accordingly exhibited greater internal 02 uptake and DIC production during the day. Over 24 hours, Lyngby-dominated mats exhibited greater net uptake of DIC than subtidal Microcoleus mats, consistent with these intertidal mats being "pioneer" communities that constantly recover from periodic physical disruption in energetic environments. The Microcoleus-dominated mats achieve steady-state mat thicknesses by balancing primary production against diagenetic decomposition of cellular and extracellular organic constituents.

  6. Adaptability test of lettuce to soil-like substrate in bioregenerative life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yan; Liu, Professor Hong; Wenting, Fu

    Plant cultivation using soil-like substrate (SLS) is considered to be a feasible option for building up matter for biological turnover in bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) by many researchers. The characteristics of SLS are different from those of true soil therefore it is very important to study the adaptability of candidate crop to SLS in BLSS. This study was carried out in three successive steps to test the adaptability of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) to rice straw SLS in BLSS of China. First, six Chinese specific lettuce cultivars which were selected for Chinese advanced life support system were planted into the same rice straw SLS, which was to determine the more suitable plant cultivar to do the next experiment. The results showed that Sharp Leaf lettuce and Red lettuce were more suitable for SLS than other cultivars. Second, the possibility of increasing the crop yield on the SLS was conducted by changing the soil depth and plant density. Sharp Leaf lettuce and Red lettuce were used into this experiment in order to obtain the highest yield under the smallest soil volume and weight at the same light intensity. Crop edible biomass, crop nutrition content and photosynthetic characteristics were estimated during the experiment. Red lettuce obtained higher biomass and photosynthesis capacity. Lastly, the stability of planting system of lettuce and SLS was evaluated in the closed controlled system. Red lettuce would be the test plant. In this experiment different age lettuce groups would be planted together and gas exchange would be measured. In all of these experiments soil physical and chemical characteristics were also be measured which will be the basal data for further research.

  7. Analytical Investigation of an Adaptive Flight-Control System Using a Sinusoidal Test Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Jack E.

    1961-01-01

    An analytical study was made of an adaptive flight-control system which measures vehicle response to small-amplitude control-surface deflections produced by a sinusoidal test signal. Changes in the response to this signal are related to environmental changes,, and the system is continuously altered to maintain this response equal to a preselected value. The system is suitable for use in high-performance aircraft and missiles and requires only the addition of a signal generator and a logic circuit consisting of a filter-rectifier network and a comparator-integrator network to a basic command-control system. Thus, it presents a relatively simple approach to the problem. The effects on system performance of variation in flight condition, system-gain level, test-signal frequency, and sensor location are included in the analysis. Longitudinal control of a high-performance research aircraft over flight conditions ranging from landing approach to a Mach number of 5.8 at an altitude of 150,000 feet, and longitudinal control of a four-stage solid-fuel missile including the first bending mode over the atmospheric portion of a launch trajectory constituted the basis for the analytical study. Results of an analog-computer study using time-varying coefficients are presented to compare the control obtained with the adaptive system with-that obtained with a fixed-gain system during the atmospheric portion of a missile launch trajectory. The system has demonstrated an ability to maintain satisfactory vehicle control-system stability over wide ranges of environmental change.

  8. Niche evolution and adaptive radiation: Testing the order of trait divergence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerly, D.D.; Schwilk, D.W.; Webb, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of an adaptive radiation, the evolution of niche parameters is of particular interest for understanding modes of speciation and the consequences for coexistence of related species within communities. We pose a general question: In the course of an evolutionary radiation, do traits related to within-community niche differences (?? niche) evolve before or after differentiation of macrohabitat affinity or climatic tolerances (?? niche)? Here we introduce a new test to address this question, based on a modification of the method of independent contrasts. The divergence order test (DOT) is based on the average age of the nodes on a tree, weighted by the absolute magnitude of the contrast at each node for a particular trait. The comparison of these weighted averages reveals whether large divergences for one trait have occurred earlier or later in the course of diversification, relative to a second trait; significance is determined by bootstrapping from maximum-likelihood ancestral state reconstructions. The method is applied to the evolution of Ceanothus, a woody plant group in California, in which co-occurring species exhibit significant differences in a key leaf trait (specific leaf area) associated with contrasting physiological and life history strategies. Co-occurring species differ more for this trait than expected under a null model of community assembly. This ?? niche difference evolved early in the divergence of two major subclades within Ceanothus, whereas climatic distributions (?? niche traits) diversified later within each of the subclades. However, rapid evolution of climate parameters makes inferences of early divergence events highly uncertain, and differentiation of the ?? niche might have taken place throughout the evolution of the group, without leaving a clear phylogenetic signal. Similar patterns observed in several plant and animal groups suggest that early divergence of ?? niche traits might be a common feature of niche evolution in

  9. Construct Validation of a Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Test for Fatigue in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaus, Stephanie; Bode, Christina; Taal, Erik; Vonkeman, Harald E.; Glas, Cees A. W.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multidimensional computerized adaptive testing enables precise measurements of patient-reported outcomes at an individual level across different dimensions. This study examined the construct validity of a multidimensional computerized adaptive test (CAT) for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The ‘CAT Fatigue RA’ was constructed based on a previously calibrated item bank. It contains 196 items and three dimensions: ‘severity’, ‘impact’ and ‘variability’ of fatigue. The CAT was administered to 166 patients with RA. They also completed a traditional, multidimensional fatigue questionnaire (BRAF-MDQ) and the SF-36 in order to examine the CAT’s construct validity. A priori criterion for construct validity was that 75% of the correlations between the CAT dimensions and the subscales of the other questionnaires were as expected. Furthermore, comprehensive use of the item bank, measurement precision and score distribution were investigated. Results The a priori criterion for construct validity was supported for two of the three CAT dimensions (severity and impact but not for variability). For severity and impact, 87% of the correlations with the subscales of the well-established questionnaires were as expected but for variability, 53% of the hypothesised relations were found. Eighty-nine percent of the items were selected between one and 137 times for CAT administrations. Measurement precision was excellent for the severity and impact dimensions, with more than 90% of the CAT administrations reaching a standard error below 0.32. The variability dimension showed good measurement precision with 90% of the CAT administrations reaching a standard error below 0.44. No floor- or ceiling-effects were found for the three dimensions. Conclusion The CAT Fatigue RA showed good construct validity and excellent measurement precision on the dimensions severity and impact. The dimension variability had less ideal measurement characteristics

  10. Targeting accurate object extraction from an image: a comprehensive study of natural image matting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingsong; Shao, Ling; Li, Xuelong; Wang, Lei

    2015-02-01

    With the development of digital multimedia technologies, image matting has gained increasing interests from both academic and industrial communities. The purpose of image matting is to precisely extract the foreground objects with arbitrary shapes from an image or a video frame for further editing. It is generally known that image matting is inherently an ill-posed problem because we need to output three images out of only one input image. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of the existing image matting algorithms and evaluate their performance. In addition to the blue screen matting, we systematically divide all existing natural image matting methods into four categories: 1) color sampling-based; 2) propagation-based; 3) combination of sampling-based and propagation-based; and 4) learning-based approaches. Sampling-based methods assume that the foreground and background colors of an unknown pixel can be explicitly estimated by examining nearby pixels. Propagation-based methods are instead based on the assumption that foreground and background colors are locally smooth. Learning-based methods treat the matting process as a supervised or semisupervised learning problem. Via the learning process, users can construct a linear or nonlinear model between the alpha mattes and the image colors using a training set to estimate the alpha matte of an unknown pixel without any assumption about the characteristics of the testing image. With three benchmark data sets, the various matting algorithms are evaluated and compared using several metrics to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of each method both quantitatively and qualitatively. Finally, we conclude this paper by outlining the research trends and suggesting a number of promising directions for future development. PMID:25423658

  11. Microfacies analysis of Green River Formation stromatolites and comparison to microbial mat experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. E.; Bahniuk Rumbelsperger, A. M.; Sauvage, J. F.; Jarrett, A. J.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Corsetti, F. A.; Shapiro, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Stromatolites were collected from the Laney Member of the Early Eocene Green River Formation near LaClede, Wyoming. LaClede stromatolites are laminated at the micron scale and form domes ~10 cm in diameter. Relatively coarse sediments (>300 μm) fill interdomal depressions, but are rare within fine-grained laminae (a grain size distribution common in Proterozoic stromatolites). On the sides of domes, laminae thin significantly and are nearly vertical. Stromatolite growth and infill sedimentation likely occurred simultaneously, as laminae are draped into interdomal areas and are rarely cut by infill. Grains longer than 200 μm are absent on the steep edges of stromatolite domes, despite the presence of >200 μm grains deposited concomitantly in interdomal depressions. To test whether microbial mats are capable of collecting relatively coarse sediments at steep angles, sedimentation experiments were conducted using cyanobacterial mats collected from Catalina Harbor, Catalina Island, California. Fine (0.125-0.250 mm), medium (0.50-1.0 mm), and coarse (1.0-2.0 mm) sediments were dropped on mats inclined at six angles (15° increments from 0-75°). Coarse grains did not adhere to mats steeper than 45°, and all fine grains were captured by mats at angles less than 45°. All grains that settled on mats were strongly bound after one day of further microbial growth. Although we cannot conclude that fine-grained stromatolites were formed by cyanobacteria, our results suggest that coarse-grained stromatolites (e.g., most modern marine stromatolites) require processes not typically observed in modern cyanobacterial mats (e.g., processes associated with algal eukaryotes, diatoms, and/or copious extracellular polymeric substances, or EPS). Similar sedimentation experiments using other microbial mats, such as those with a thicker coating of EPS or a eukaryotic component, may yield additional information on the origins of coarse- and fine-grained stromatolites. This research was

  12. Identification of the Mating-Type (MAT) Locus That Controls Sexual Reproduction of Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Walton, Eric; Averette, Anna Floyd; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Cuomo, Christina A.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is a dimorphic fungal pathogen that primarily causes blastomycosis in the midwestern and northern United States and Canada. While the genes controlling sexual development have been known for a long time, the genes controlling sexual reproduction of B. dermatitidis (teleomorph, Ajellomyces dermatitidis) are unknown. We identified the mating-type (MAT) locus in the B. dermatitidis genome by comparative genomic approaches. The B. dermatitidis MAT locus resembles those of other dimorphic fungi, containing either an alpha-box (MAT1-1) or an HMG domain (MAT1-2) gene linked to the APN2, SLA2, and COX13 genes. However, in some strains of B. dermatitidis, the MAT locus harbors transposable elements (TEs) that make it unusually large compared to the MAT locus of other dimorphic fungi. Based on the MAT locus sequences of B. dermatitidis, we designed specific primers for PCR determination of the mating type. Two B. dermatitidis isolates of opposite mating types were cocultured on mating medium. Immature sexual structures were observed starting at 3 weeks of coculture, with coiled-hyphae-containing cleistothecia developing over the next 3 to 6 weeks. Genetic recombination was detected in potential progeny by mating-type determination, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses, suggesting that a meiotic sexual cycle might have been completed. The F1 progeny were sexually fertile when tested with strains of the opposite mating type. Our studies provide a model for the evolution of the MAT locus in the dimorphic and closely related fungi and open the door to classic genetic analysis and studies on the possible roles of mating and mating type in infection and virulence. PMID:23143684

  13. The MATS-1 Risk Assessment Scale: Summary of Methodological Concerns and an Empirical Validation.

    PubMed

    Helmus, Leslie; Thornton, David

    2016-04-01

    Recently, Wollert and colleagues proposed that sex offender recidivism estimates should be stratified by age and they developed an age-stratified scale called the MATS-1 (Multisample Age-Stratified Table of Sexual Recidivism). The purpose of this article is to highlight concerns with the development of the MATS-1 and to validate the scale using 3,510 sex offenders from 14 unique samples. Concerns with the scale's development fall into three categories: approximations leading to considerable loss of precision, absence of appropriate statistical tests, and the use of inappropriate statistical techniques. The predictive accuracy of the MATS-1 (Area Under the Curve [AUC] = .663) was significantly lower than Static-99R (AUC = .708). The MATS-1 also significantly underestimated recidivism for some offenders. Both the relative and absolute predictive properties of the MATS-1 were not stable across samples. We conclude that the MATS-1 is not appropriate to use for applied risk assessment. Proposals are made for alternate ways to develop risk scales using the age-stratification method. PMID:24743657

  14. Ecological succession leads to chemosynthesis in mats colonizing wood in sea water.

    PubMed

    Kalenitchenko, Dimitri; Dupraz, Marlène; Le Bris, Nadine; Petetin, Carole; Rose, Christophe; West, Nyree J; Galand, Pierre E

    2016-09-01

    Chemosynthetic mats involved in cycling sulfur compounds are often found in hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and whale falls. However, there are only few records of wood fall mats, even though the presence of hydrogen sulfide at the wood surface should create a perfect niche for sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report the growth of microbial mats on wood incubated under conditions that simulate the Mediterranean deep-sea temperature and darkness. We used amplicon and metagenomic sequencing combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to test whether a microbial succession occurs during mat formation and whether the wood fall mats present chemosynthetic features. We show that the wood surface was first colonized by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Arcobacter genus after only 30 days of immersion. Subsequently, the number of sulfate reducers increased and the dominant Arcobacter phylotype changed. The ecological succession was reflected by a change in the metabolic potential of the community from chemolithoheterotrophs to potential chemolithoautotrophs. Our work provides clear evidence for the chemosynthetic nature of wood fall ecosystems and demonstrates the utility to develop experimental incubation in the laboratory to study deep-sea chemosynthetic mats. PMID:26905628

  15. Construct Validity and Measurement Invariance of Computerized Adaptive Testing: Application to Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shudong; McCall, Marty; Jiao, Hong; Harris, Gregg

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are twofold. First, to investigate the construct or factorial structure of a set of Reading and Mathematics computerized adaptive tests (CAT), "Measures of Academic Progress" (MAP), given in different states at different grades and academic terms. The second purpose is to investigate the invariance of test factorial…

  16. An Empirical Evaluation of the Slip Correction in the Four Parameter Logistic Models with Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Yung-Chin; Ho, Rong-Guey; Laio, Wen-Wei; Chen, Li-Ju; Kuo, Ching-Chin

    2012-01-01

    In a selected response test, aberrant responses such as careless errors and lucky guesses might cause error in ability estimation because these responses do not actually reflect the knowledge that examinees possess. In a computerized adaptive test (CAT), these aberrant responses could further cause serious estimation error due to dynamic item…

  17. Executive Functioning in Three Groups of Pupils in D-KEFSs: Selected Issues in Adapting the Test Battery for Slovakia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferjencík, Ján; Slavkovská, Miriam; Kresila, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on the adaptation of a D-KEFS test battery for Slovakia. Drawing on concrete examples, it describes and illustrates the key issues relating to the transfer of test items from one socio-cultural environment to another. The standardisation sample of the population of Slovak pupils in the fourth year of primary school included 250…

  18. A Comparison of an Expert Systems Approach to Computerized Adaptive Testing and an Item Response Theory Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    Expert systems can be used to aid decisionmaking. A computerized adaptive test is one kind of expert system, although not commonly recognized as such. A new approach, termed EXSPRT, was devised that combines expert systems reasoning and sequential probability ratio test stopping rules. Two versions of EXSPRT were developed, one with random…

  19. An Empirical Bayes Enhancement of Mantel-Haenszel DIF Analysis for Computer-Adaptive Tests. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    This study investigated the applicability to computerized adaptive testing (CAT) data of a differential item functioning (DIF) analysis that involves an empirical Bayes (EB) enhancement of the popular Mantel Haenszel (MH) DIF analysis method. The computerized Law School Admission Test (LSAT) assumed for this study was similar to that currently…

  20. Person Fit Based on Statistical Process Control in an Adaptive Testing Environment. Research Report 98-13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Krimpen-Stoop, Edith M. L. A.; Meijer, Rob R.

    Person-fit research in the context of paper-and-pencil tests is reviewed, and some specific problems regarding person fit in the context of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) are discussed. Some new methods are proposed to investigate person fit in a CAT environment. These statistics are based on Statistical Process Control (SPC) theory. A…

  1. Organization and Evolutionary Trajectory of the Mating Type (MAT) Locus in Dermatophyte and Dimorphic Fungal Pathogens▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Metin, Banu; White, Theodore C.; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungi is governed by a specialized genomic region, the mating type (MAT) locus, whose gene identity, organization, and complexity are diverse. We identified the MAT locus of five dermatophyte fungal pathogens (Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton equinum, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans) and a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and performed phylogenetic analyses. The identified MAT locus idiomorphs of M. gypseum control cell type identity in mating assays, and recombinant progeny were produced. Virulence tests in Galleria mellonella larvae suggest the two mating types of M. gypseum may have equivalent virulence. Synteny analysis revealed common features of the MAT locus shared among these five dermatophytes: namely, a small size (∼3 kb) and a novel gene arrangement. The SLA2, COX13, and APN2 genes, which flank the MAT locus in other Ascomycota are instead linked on one side of the dermatophyte MAT locus. In addition, the transcriptional orientations of the APN2 and COX13 genes are reversed compared to the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii. A putative transposable element, pogo, was found to have inserted in the MAT1-2 idiomorph of one P. brasiliensis strain but not others. In conclusion, the evolution of the MAT locus of the dermatophytes and dimorphic fungi from the last common ancestor has been punctuated by both gene acquisition and expansion, and asymmetric gene loss. These studies further support a foundation to develop molecular and genetic tools for dermatophyte and dimorphic human fungal pathogens. PMID:19880755

  2. Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers

    DOEpatents

    Langton, Christine A.; Narasimhan, Rajendran; Karraker, David G.

    2001-01-01

    A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

  3. Qualification of HiMAT flight systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, A. F.; Sheets, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    The highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted research vehicle is discussed with emphasis on the advanced composite and metallic structures, digital fly-by-wire controls, and digitally implemented integrated propulsion control systems. Techniques used to qualify the systems for flight are examined. Computation and simulation of the HiMAT system are investigated in relation to Cyber-Varian simulation. The techniques used in flight qualification are complicated by ground based flight critical systems and severe onboard volume constraints imposed by the scale design.

  4. Nitrogen cycle in microbial mats: completely unknown?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coban, O.; Bebout, B.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial mats are thought to have originated around 3.7 billion years ago, most likely in the areas around submarine hydrothermal vents, which supplied a source of energy in the form of reduced chemical species from the Earth's interior. Active hydrothermal vents are also believed to exist on Jupiter's moon Europa, Saturn's moon Enceladus, and on Mars, earlier in that planet's history. Microbial mats have been an important force in the maintenance of Earth's ecosystems and the first photosynthesis was also originated there. Microbial mats are believed to exhibit most, if not all, biogeochemical processes that exist in aquatic ecosystems, due to the presence of different physiological groups of microorganisms therein. While most microbially mediated biogeochemical transformations have been shown to occur within microbial mats, the nitrogen cycle in the microbial mats has received very little study in spite of the fact that nitrogen usually limits growth in marine environments. We will present the first results in the determination of a complete nitrogen budget for a photosynthetic microbial mat. Both in situ sources and sinks of nitrogen in photosynthetic microbial mats are being measured using stable isotope techniques. Our work has a particular focus on recently described, but poorly understood, processes, e.g., anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and an emphasis on understanding the role that nitrogen cycling may play in generating biogenic nitrogen isotopic signatures and biomarker molecules. Measurements of environmental controls on nitrogen cycling should offer insight into the nature of co-evolution of these microbial communities and their planets of origin. Identifying the spatial (microscale) as well as temporal (diel and seasonal) distribution of nitrogen transformations, e.g., rates of nitrification and denitrification, within mats, particularly with respect to the distribution of photosynthetically-produced oxygen, is anticipated. The results

  5. RPRV research focus on HiMAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockenour, J. L.; Layton, G. P.

    1976-01-01

    A review is presented of the F-15 Remotely Piloted Research Vehicle (RPRV) project. The F-15 RPRV is air-launched from a B-52 at 50,000 ft. Following launch a series of research maneuvers are performed during an unpowered descent to a recovery altitude. Another RPRV program considered is the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) program. This program is designed to use RPRVs to speed the technology transition from wind tunnel to flight and to reduce the cost of aeronautical experiments. It is pointed out that HiMAT will make extensive use of composite materials.

  6. Prokaryotic diversity of arctic ice shelf microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Bottos, Eric M; Vincent, Warwick F; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2008-04-01

    The prokaryotic diversity and respiratory activity of microbial mat communities on the Markham Ice Shelf and Ward Hunt Ice Shelf in the Canadian high Arctic were analysed. All heterotrophic isolates and > 95% of bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library sequences from both ice shelves grouped within the phyla Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Clone library analyses showed that the bacterial communities were diverse and varied significantly between the two ice shelves, with the Markham library having a higher estimated diversity (Chao1 = 243; 105 operational taxonomic units observed in 189 clones) than the Ward Hunt library (Chao1 = 106; 52 operational taxonomic units observed in 128 clones). Archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from both ice shelves were dominated by a single Euryarchaeota sequence, which appears to represent a novel phylotype. Analyses of community activity by radiorespiration assays detected metabolism in mat samples from both ice shelves at temperatures as low as -10 degrees C. These findings provide the first insight into the prokaryotic biodiversity of Arctic ice shelf communities and underscore the importance of these cryo-ecosystems as a rich source of microbiota that are adapted to extreme cold. PMID:18215157

  7. Design, development, and testing of a mini solid state adaptive rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ronald M.; Schliesman, Michael; Frye, Phillip

    1997-06-01

    The design principles, analytical models, construction methods and test results for a new type of solid state adaptive rotor (SSAR) are presented. A pair of directionally attached piezoelectric (DAP) torque-plates were fabricated and attached to the root of a 23.5' diameter helicopter rotor assembly. The DAP torque-plate tips were joined to a pair of graphite-epoxy servopaddles which were moved in pitch by the action of the torque-plates. The torque-plates were constructed from a single aluminum substrate and PZT-5H DAP elements mounted symmetrically at 45 degrees. Electrical signals were carried to the DAP torque-plates via a shielded brush and rotating contact assembly. A series of non-rotating static tests were conducted on the rotor, demonstrating servopaddle pitch deflections up to plus or minus 5.8 degrees and good correlation with classical laminated plate theory. Non rotating dynamic testing showed a system natural frequency in excess of 2.5/rev and good correlation with inertial models. Because the servopaddles were aeroelastically tailored to balance out propeller moments, deflection degradation with increasing rotor speed was barely noticeable up to plus or minus 1 degree pitch levels. However, as rotor speed increased, total servopaddle deflections in the rotating frame at 1600 rpm (full speed) were degraded, but still operated up to plus or minus 2.7 degrees in pitch. To conclude the study, the rotor was attached to a converted Kyosho Hyperfly electric helicopter. Flight tests demonstrated fundamental controllability. A system-level comparison showed that the SSAR Hyperfly experienced a 40% drop in flight control system weight, an 8% cut in total gross weight, a 26% decrease in parasite drag and a part count reduction from 94 components to 5.

  8. Sperm competition leads to functional adaptations in avian testes to maximize sperm quantity and quality.

    PubMed

    Lüpold, Stefan; Wistuba, Joachim; Damm, Oliver S; Rivers, James W; Birkhead, Tim R

    2011-05-01

    The outcome of sperm competition (i.e. competition for fertilization between ejaculates from different males) is primarily determined by the relative number and quality of rival sperm. Therefore, the testes are under strong selection to maximize both sperm number and quality, which are likely to result in trade-offs in the process of spermatogenesis (e.g. between the rate of spermatogenesis and sperm length or sperm energetics). Comparative studies have shown positive associations between the level of sperm competition and both relative testis size and the proportion of seminiferous (sperm-producing) tissue within the testes. However, it is unknown how the seminiferous tissue itself or the process of spermatogenesis might evolve in response to sperm competition. Therefore, we quantified the different germ cell types and Sertoli cells (SC) in testes to assess the efficiency of sperm production and its associations with sperm length and mating system across 10 species of New World Blackbirds (Icteridae) that show marked variation in sperm length and sperm competition level. We found that species under strong sperm competition generate more round spermatids (RS)/spermatogonium and have SC that support a greater number of germ cells, both of which are likely to increase the maximum sperm output. However, fewer of the RS appeared to elongate to mature spermatozoa in these species, which might be the result of selection for discarding spermatids with undesirable characteristics as they develop. Our results suggest that, in addition to overall size and gross morphology, testes have also evolved functional adaptations to maximize sperm quantity and quality. PMID:21307271

  9. Arcjet Testing of Woven Carbon Cloth for Use on Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; laub, Bernard; Chen, Yih-Kang; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Bittner, M. E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes arcjet testing and analysis that has successfully demonstrated the viability of three dimensional woven carbon cloth for dual use in the Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT). ADEPT is an umbrella-like entry system that is folded for stowage in the launch vehicle s shroud and deployed in space prior to reaching the atmospheric interface. A key feature of the ADEPT concept is its lower ballistic coefficient for delivery of a given payload than those for conventional, rigid body entry systems. The benefits that accrue from the lower ballistic coefficient include factor of ten reductions of deceleration forces and entry heating. The former enables consideration of new classes of scientific instruments for solar system exploration while the latter enables the design of a more efficient thermal protection system. The carbon cloth now base lined for ADEPT has a dual use in that it serves as ADEPT s thermal protection system and as the "skin" that transfers aerodynamic deceleration loads to its umbrella-like substructure. The arcjet testing described in this paper was conducted for some of the higher heating conditions for a future Venus mission using the ADEPT concept, thereby showing that the carbon cloth can perform in a relevant entry environment. The ADEPT project considered the carbon cloth to be mission enabling and was carrying it as a major risk during Fiscal Year 2012. The testing and analysis reported here played a major role in retiring that risk and is highly significant to the success and possible adoption of ADEPT for future NASA missions. Finally, this paper also describes a preliminary engineering level code, based on the arcjet data, that can be used to estimate cloth thickness for future missions using ADEPT and to predict carbon cloth performance in future arcjet tests.

  10. Intelligent Condition Diagnosis Method Based on Adaptive Statistic Test Filter and Diagnostic Bayesian Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Qiuju; Wang, Kun; Chen, Peng; Wang, Huaqing

    2016-01-01

    A new fault diagnosis method for rotating machinery based on adaptive statistic test filter (ASTF) and Diagnostic Bayesian Network (DBN) is presented in this paper. ASTF is proposed to obtain weak fault features under background noise, ASTF is based on statistic hypothesis testing in the frequency domain to evaluate similarity between reference signal (noise signal) and original signal, and remove the component of high similarity. The optimal level of significance α is obtained using particle swarm optimization (PSO). To evaluate the performance of the ASTF, evaluation factor Ipq is also defined. In addition, a simulation experiment is designed to verify the effectiveness and robustness of ASTF. A sensitive evaluation method using principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed to evaluate the sensitiveness of symptom parameters (SPs) for condition diagnosis. By this way, the good SPs that have high sensitiveness for condition diagnosis can be selected. A three-layer DBN is developed to identify condition of rotation machinery based on the Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) theory. Condition diagnosis experiment for rolling element bearings demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26761006

  11. Intelligent Condition Diagnosis Method Based on Adaptive Statistic Test Filter and Diagnostic Bayesian Network.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Qiuju; Wang, Kun; Chen, Peng; Wang, Huaqing

    2016-01-01

    A new fault diagnosis method for rotating machinery based on adaptive statistic test filter (ASTF) and Diagnostic Bayesian Network (DBN) is presented in this paper. ASTF is proposed to obtain weak fault features under background noise, ASTF is based on statistic hypothesis testing in the frequency domain to evaluate similarity between reference signal (noise signal) and original signal, and remove the component of high similarity. The optimal level of significance α is obtained using particle swarm optimization (PSO). To evaluate the performance of the ASTF, evaluation factor Ipq is also defined. In addition, a simulation experiment is designed to verify the effectiveness and robustness of ASTF. A sensitive evaluation method using principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed to evaluate the sensitiveness of symptom parameters (SPs) for condition diagnosis. By this way, the good SPs that have high sensitiveness for condition diagnosis can be selected. A three-layer DBN is developed to identify condition of rotation machinery based on the Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) theory. Condition diagnosis experiment for rolling element bearings demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26761006

  12. Biomimetic evolutionary analysis: testing the adaptive value of vertebrate tail stiffness in autonomous swimming robots.

    PubMed

    Long, J H; Koob, T J; Irving, K; Combie, K; Engel, V; Livingston, N; Lammert, A; Schumacher, J

    2006-12-01

    For early vertebrates, a long-standing hypothesis is that vertebrae evolved as a locomotor adaptation, stiffening the body axis and enhancing swimming performance. While supported by biomechanical data, this hypothesis has not been tested using an evolutionary approach. We did so by extending biomimetic evolutionary analysis (BEA), which builds physical simulations of extinct systems, to include use of autonomous robots as proxies of early vertebrates competing in a forage navigation task. Modeled after free-swimming larvae of sea squirts (Chordata, Urochordata), three robotic tadpoles (;Tadros'), each with a propulsive tail bearing a biomimetic notochord of variable spring stiffness, k (N m(-1)), searched for, oriented to, and orbited in two dimensions around a light source. Within each of ten generations, we selected for increased swimming speed, U (m s(-1)) and decreased time to the light source, t (s), average distance from the source, R (m) and wobble maneuvering, W (rad s(-2)). In software simulation, we coded two quantitative trait loci (QTL) that determine k: bending modulus, E (Nm(-2)) and length, L (m). Both QTL were mutated during replication, independently assorted during meiosis and, as haploid gametes, entered into the gene pool in proportion to parental fitness. After random mating created three new diploid genotypes, we fabricated three new offspring tails. In the presence of both selection and chance events (mutation, genetic drift), the phenotypic means of this small population evolved. The classic hypothesis was supported in that k was positively correlated (r(2)=0.40) with navigational prowess, NP, the dimensionless ratio of U to the product of R, t and W. However, the plausible adaptive scenario, even in this simplified system, is more complex, since the remaining variance in NP was correlated with the residuals of R and U taken with respect to k, suggesting that changes in k alone are insufficient to explain the evolution of NP. PMID:17114406

  13. Cortisol profiles: A test for adaptive calibration of the stress response system in maltreated and nonmaltreated youth.

    PubMed

    Peckins, Melissa K; Susman, Elizabeth J; Negriff, Sonya; Noll, Jennie; Trickett, Penelope K

    2015-11-01

    Throughout the life span, exposure to chronic stress such as child maltreatment is thought to contribute to future dysfunction of the stress response system (SRS) through the process of adaptive calibration. Dysfunction of the SRS is associated with numerous health and behavior problems, so it is important to understand under what conditions and what time frame adaptive calibration occurs. The present study tested for adaptive calibration of the SRS in a sample of maltreated (n = 303) and nonmaltreated (n = 151) youth during the important developmental period of adolescence. Data were used from Waves 2, 3, and 4 of a larger study of the consequences of maltreatment on health and well-being. At each time point, participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test for Children and provided a baseline and four poststressor saliva samples to measure cortisol reactivity. Adaptive calibration was tested by performing a latent profile analysis using the five samples of salivary cortisol provided at each time point, and testing whether maltreatment status predicted the likelihood of profile membership at Time 2, Time 3, and Time 4. Three cortisol profiles emerged from the data at each time point (blunted, moderate, and elevated), and results indicated that maltreated youth were more likely than nonmaltreated youth to present with the blunted cortisol profile compared to the moderate and elevated profiles at Time 2 and Time 3, even after controlling for recent exposure to violence and trauma. At Time 4, there was no longer a difference in profile membership between maltreated and nonmaltreated youth, suggesting adaptive calibration may be a lengthy process requiring a period of years to become evident. Overall, the findings provide support for adaptive calibration and offer insight into the conditions under which adaptive calibration occurs. PMID:26535937

  14. Tensile and compressive behavior of a swirl mat composite

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B.

    1998-07-01

    The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the US Department of Energy to provide the experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines necessary to assure long-term structural integrity of automotive composite components. The initial focus of the ORNL Durability Project was on one representative reference material--an isocyanurate (polyurethane) reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass. The present report describes tensile and compressive testing and results for the reference composite. Behavior trends and proportional limit are established for both tension and compression. Damage development due to tensile loading and strain rate effects are discussed.

  15. Validation of a computer-adaptive test to evaluate generic health-related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) is a relevant variable in the evaluation of health outcomes. Questionnaires based on Classical Test Theory typically require a large number of items to evaluate HRQoL. Computer Adaptive Testing (CAT) can be used to reduce tests length while maintaining and, in some cases, improving accuracy. This study aimed at validating a CAT based on Item Response Theory (IRT) for evaluation of generic HRQoL: the CAT-Health instrument. Methods Cross-sectional study of subjects aged over 18 attending Primary Care Centres for any reason. CAT-Health was administered along with the SF-12 Health Survey. Age, gender and a checklist of chronic conditions were also collected. CAT-Health was evaluated considering: 1) feasibility: completion time and test length; 2) content range coverage, Item Exposure Rate (IER) and test precision; and 3) construct validity: differences in the CAT-Health scores according to clinical variables and correlations between both questionnaires. Results 396 subjects answered CAT-Health and SF-12, 67.2% females, mean age (SD) 48.6 (17.7) years. 36.9% did not report any chronic condition. Median completion time for CAT-Health was 81 seconds (IQ range = 59-118) and it increased with age (p < 0.001). The median number of items administered was 8 (IQ range = 6-10). Neither ceiling nor floor effects were found for the score. None of the items in the pool had an IER of 100% and it was over 5% for 27.1% of the items. Test Information Function (TIF) peaked between levels -1 and 0 of HRQoL. Statistically significant differences were observed in the CAT-Health scores according to the number and type of conditions. Conclusions Although domain-specific CATs exist for various areas of HRQoL, CAT-Health is one of the first IRT-based CATs designed to evaluate generic HRQoL and it has proven feasible, valid and efficient, when administered to a broad sample of individuals attending primary care settings. PMID:21129169

  16. Determination of Judo Endurance Performance Using the Uchi - Komi Technique and an Adapted Lactate Minimum Test

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paulo H.S.M.; Drigo, Alexandre J.; Carvalho, Mauro C.G.A.; Oliveira, João C.; Nunes, João E.D.; Baldissera, Vilmar; Perez, Sérgio E.A.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the viability to use Uchi-komi (UK) in the evaluation of the judo endurance performance and using lactate threshold the analysis of the blood lactate ([Lac]) and heart rate (HR) determined through a lactate minimum test. The subjects were a group of 6 male, volunteer judokas, from 25.17 ± 5.76 years old, weight 84.50 ± 23.78 kg and height 1.78 ± 0.10 m, competitors of different levels of performance (from regional to international competitions) and match experience of (11 ± 6) years old. Three tests were performed: a) 3000 m dash in track, b) the adapted test of lactate minimum for running and c) for UK, with execution of the blow ippon-seoi-nague. No significant difference was evident for the track tests and UK in relation to blood lactate and heart rate (p > 0.05) (3.87 ± 0.38 vs 4.17 ± 0.54 mmol·L-1 and 167 ± 2 vs 152 ± 7 b·min-1, respectively). In conclusion it is stressed that: 1) The specific test for lactate minimum in judo sport is a promising possibility of aerobic capacity evaluation and a instrument of intensity training control; 2) The metabolic profile in Vlm and UKlm is similar, because there are not differences in the [Lac] and in the HR at this intensity; 3) It is possible to estimate the training intensity through the determination of the lactate minimum intensity in running (Vlm) and the Heart Rate associated (HR) from the execution of ippon-seoi- nague (uchi-komi) in judo training; 4) The Vlm for judo athletes is approximately 88% of the V3000. Key points The specific test for lactate minimum in judo sport is a promising possibility of aerobic capacity evaluation; This is a instrument for intensity training control for judo players; The metabolic profile is similar between running and uki-komi (ippon-seoi-nague techniques) at lactate minimum intensity. PMID:24198697

  17. Goodness-of-Fit Tests and Nonparametric Adaptive Estimation for Spike Train Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reynaud-Bouret, Patricia; Rivoirard, Vincent; Grammont, Franck; Tuleau-Malot, Christine

    2014-01-01

    When dealing with classical spike train analysis, the practitioner often performs goodness-of-fit tests to test whether the observed process is a Poisson process, for instance, or if it obeys another type of probabilistic model (Yana et al. in Biophys. J. 46(3):323-330, 1984; Brown et al. in Neural Comput. 14(2):325-346, 2002; Pouzat and Chaffiol in Technical report, http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:0909.2785, 2009). In doing so, there is a fundamental plug-in step, where the parameters of the supposed underlying model are estimated. The aim of this article is to show that plug-in has sometimes very undesirable effects. We propose a new method based on subsampling to deal with those plug-in issues in the case of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test of uniformity. The method relies on the plug-in of good estimates of the underlying model that have to be consistent with a controlled rate of convergence. Some nonparametric estimates satisfying those constraints in the Poisson or in the Hawkes framework are highlighted. Moreover, they share adaptive properties that are useful from a practical point of view. We show the performance of those methods on simulated data. We also provide a complete analysis with these tools on single unit activity recorded on a monkey during a sensory-motor task.Electronic Supplementary MaterialThe online version of this article (doi:10.1186/2190-8567-4-3) contains supplementary material. PMID:24742008

  18. Goodness-of-Fit Tests and Nonparametric Adaptive Estimation for Spike Train Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    When dealing with classical spike train analysis, the practitioner often performs goodness-of-fit tests to test whether the observed process is a Poisson process, for instance, or if it obeys another type of probabilistic model (Yana et al. in Biophys. J. 46(3):323–330, 1984; Brown et al. in Neural Comput. 14(2):325–346, 2002; Pouzat and Chaffiol in Technical report, http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:0909.2785, 2009). In doing so, there is a fundamental plug-in step, where the parameters of the supposed underlying model are estimated. The aim of this article is to show that plug-in has sometimes very undesirable effects. We propose a new method based on subsampling to deal with those plug-in issues in the case of the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test of uniformity. The method relies on the plug-in of good estimates of the underlying model that have to be consistent with a controlled rate of convergence. Some nonparametric estimates satisfying those constraints in the Poisson or in the Hawkes framework are highlighted. Moreover, they share adaptive properties that are useful from a practical point of view. We show the performance of those methods on simulated data. We also provide a complete analysis with these tools on single unit activity recorded on a monkey during a sensory-motor task. Electronic Supplementary Material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/2190-8567-4-3) contains supplementary material. PMID:24742008

  19. Systematic testing of flood adaptation options in urban areas through simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwe, Roland; Urich, Christian; Sto. Domingo, Nina; Mark, Ole; Deletic, Ana; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    While models can quantify flood risk in great detail, the results are subject to a number of deep uncertainties. Climate dependent drivers such as sea level and rainfall intensities, population growth and economic development all have a strong influence on future flood risk, but future developments can only be estimated coarsely. In such a situation, robust decision making frameworks call for the systematic evaluation of mitigation measures against ensembles of potential futures. We have coupled the urban development software DAnCE4Water and the 1D-2D hydraulic simulation package MIKE FLOOD to create a framework that allows for such systematic evaluations, considering mitigation measures under a variety of climate futures and urban development scenarios. A wide spectrum of mitigation measures can be considered in this setup, ranging from structural measures such as modifications of the sewer network over local retention of rainwater and the modification of surface flow paths to policy measures such as restrictions on urban development in flood prone areas or master plans that encourage compact development. The setup was tested in a 300 ha residential catchment in Melbourne, Australia. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of considering a range of potential futures in the planning process. For example, local rainwater retention measures strongly reduce flood risk a scenario with moderate increase of rain intensities and moderate urban growth, but their performance strongly varies, yielding very little improvement in situations with pronounced climate change. The systematic testing of adaptation measures further allows for the identification of so-called adaptation tipping points, i.e. levels for the drivers of flood risk where the desired level of flood risk is exceeded despite the implementation of (a combination of) mitigation measures. Assuming a range of development rates for the drivers of flood risk, such tipping points can be translated into

  20. Closing the design loop on HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Robinson, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    The design methodology used in the HiMAT program and the wind tunnel development activities are discussed. Selected results from the flight test program are presented and the strengths and weaknesses of testing advanced technology vehicles using the RPV concept is examined. The role of simulation on the development of digital flight control systems and in RPV's in particular is emphasized.

  1. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    SciTech Connect

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  2. Testing the assumptions underlying fMRI adaptation using intracortical recordings in area MT.

    PubMed

    Kar, Kohitij; Krekelberg, Bart

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how neural activity in the middle temporal area of the macaque monkey changes after 3 sec of exposure to a visual stimulus and used this to gain insight into the assumptions underlying the fMRI adaptation method (fMRIa). We studied both changes in tuning curves following weak and strong motion stimuli (adaptation) and the differences between a first and second exposure to the same stimulus (repetition suppression). Typically, tuning curves had smaller amplitudes and narrower tuning widths after strong adaptation; this was true for single neurons, multi-unit activity (MUA), the evoked local field potential (LFP), as well as gamma band activity. Repetition typically led to reduced responses. This reduction was correlated with direction selectivity and not explained by neural fatigue. Our data, however, warn against a simplistic view of the consequences of adaptation. First, a considerable fraction of neurons and sites showed response enhancements after adaptation, especially when probed with a stimulus that moved opposite to the direction of the adapting stimulus. Second, adaptation was stimulus selective only on a time scale of ∼100 msec. Third, aggregate measures of neural activity (MUA, LFPs) had substantially different adaptation effects. Fourth, there were qualitative differences between our findings in MT and earlier findings in IT cortex. We conclude that selective adaptation effects in fMRIa are relatively easy to miss even when they exist (for instance by presenting stimuli for too long, or because neurons that enhance after adaptation cancel out the effect of neurons that suppress). Moreover, we argue that adaptation should be understood in the context of the computations that a neural circuit perform. Using fMRIa as a tool to uncover neural selectivity requires a better understanding of this circuitry and its consequences for adaptation. PMID:26856637

  3. Applying Computerized Adaptive Testing to the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised: Rasch Analysis of Workplace Bullying

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shu-Ching; Li, Yu-Chi; Yui, Mei-Shu

    2014-01-01

    Background Workplace bullying is a prevalent problem in contemporary work places that has adverse effects on both the victims of bullying and organizations. With the rapid development of computer technology in recent years, there is an urgent need to prove whether item response theory–based computerized adaptive testing (CAT) can be applied to measure exposure to workplace bullying. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative efficiency and measurement precision of a CAT-based test for hospital nurses compared to traditional nonadaptive testing (NAT). Under the preliminary conditions of a single domain derived from the scale, a CAT module bullying scale model with polytomously scored items is provided as an example for evaluation purposes. Methods A total of 300 nurses were recruited and responded to the 22-item Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R). All NAT (or CAT-selected) items were calibrated with the Rasch rating scale model and all respondents were randomly selected for a comparison of the advantages of CAT and NAT in efficiency and precision by paired t tests and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Results The NAQ-R is a unidimensional construct that can be applied to measure exposure to workplace bullying through CAT-based administration. Nursing measures derived from both tests (CAT and NAT) were highly correlated (r=.97) and their measurement precisions were not statistically different (P=.49) as expected. CAT required fewer items than NAT (an efficiency gain of 32%), suggesting a reduced burden for respondents. There were significant differences in work tenure between the 2 groups (bullied and nonbullied) at a cutoff point of 6 years at 1 worksite. An AUROC of 0.75 (95% CI 0.68-0.79) with logits greater than –4.2 (or >30 in summation) was defined as being highly likely bullied in a workplace. Conclusions With CAT-based administration of the NAQ-R for nurses, their burden was substantially

  4. Flight Test of an Adaptive Controller and Simulated Failure/Damage on the NASA NF-15B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschbacher, Mark; Maliska, Heather

    2006-01-01

    The method of flight-testing the Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) Second Generation (Gen-2) project on the NASA NF-15B is herein described. The Gen-2 project objective includes flight-testing a dynamic inversion controller augmented by a direct adaptive neural network to demonstrate performance improvements in the presence of simulated failure/damage. The Gen-2 objectives as implemented on the NASA NF-15B created challenges for software design, structural loading limitations, and flight test operations. Simulated failure/damage is introduced by modifying control surface commands, therefore requiring structural loads measurements. Flight-testing began with the validation of a structural loads model. Flight-testing of the Gen-2 controller continued, using test maneuvers designed in a sequenced approach. Success would clear the new controller with respect to dynamic response, simulated failure/damage, and with adaptation on and off. A handling qualities evaluation was conducted on the capability of the Gen-2 controller to restore aircraft response in the presence of a simulated failure/damage. Control room monitoring of loads sensors, flight dynamics, and controller adaptation, in addition to postflight data comparison to the simulation, ensured a safe methodology of buildup testing. Flight-testing continued without major incident to accomplish the project objectives, successfully uncovering strengths and weaknesses of the Gen-2 control approach in flight.

  5. Effects of Age and Cognition on a Cross-Cultural Paediatric Adaptation of the Sniffin' Sticks Identification Test

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Marilisa Mantovani; Lees, Andrew John; Warner, Thomas T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the effects of age and cognition on the performance of children aged 3 to 18 years on a culturally adapted version of the 16 item smell identification test from Sniffin' Sticks (SS16). Methods A series of pilots were conducted on 29 children aged 3 to 18 years old and 23 adults to produce an adapted version of the SS16 suitable for Brazilian children (SS16-Child). A final version was applied to 51 children alongside a picture identification test (PIT-SS16-Child) to access cognitive abilities involved in the smell identification task. In addition 20 adults performed the same tasks as a comparison group. Results The final adapted SS16-Child was applied to 51 children with a mean age of 9.9 years (range 3-18 years, SD=4.25 years), of which 68.3% were girls. There was an independent effect of age (p<0.05) and PIT-SS16-Child (p<0.001) on the performance on the SS16-Child, and older children reached the ceiling for scoring in the cognitive and olfactory test. Pre-school children had difficulties identifying items of the test. Discussion/Conclusions A cross-culturally adapted version of the SS16 can be used to test olfaction in children but interpretation of the results must take age and cognitive abilities into consideration. PMID:26267145

  6. Diversity techniques for omnidirectional telemetry coverage of the HiMAT research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harney, P. F.

    1981-01-01

    The highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) was flight tested and a number of technological advances applicable to future fighter aircraft were demonstrated. The aircraft control system uses airborne and ground-based computers which communicate via uplink and downlink telemetry. Antenna radiation patterns are normally much less than ideal for continuous reception or transmission for all aircraft attitudes. After flight qualification and testing on other aircraft, a frequency diversity concept and an antenna diversity concept were implemented on the HiMAT vehicle to obtain omnidirectional telemetry coverage.

  7. MAT - MULTI-ATTRIBUTE TASK BATTERY FOR HUMAN OPERATOR WORKLOAD AND STRATEGIC BEHAVIOR RESEARCH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    MAT, a Multi-Attribute Task battery, gives the researcher the capability of performing multi-task workload and performance experiments. The battery provides a benchmark set of tasks for use in a wide range of laboratory studies of operator performance and workload. MAT incorporates tasks analogous to activities that aircraft crew members perform in flight, while providing a high degree of experiment control, performance data on each subtask, and freedom to use non-pilot test subjects. The MAT battery primary display is composed of four separate task windows which are as follows: a monitoring task window which includes gauges and warning lights, a tracking task window for the demands of manual control, a communication task window to simulate air traffic control communications, and a resource management task window which permits maintaining target levels on a fuel management task. In addition, a scheduling task window gives the researcher information about future task demands. The battery also provides the option of manual or automated control of tasks. The task generates performance data for each subtask. The task battery may be paused and onscreen workload rating scales presented to the subject. The MAT battery was designed to use a serially linked second computer to generate the voice messages for the Communications task. The MATREMX program and support files, which are included in the MAT package, were designed to work with the Heath Voice Card (Model HV-2000, available through the Heath Company, Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022); however, the MATREMX program and support files may easily be modified to work with other voice synthesizer or digitizer cards. The MAT battery task computer may also be used independent of the voice computer if no computer synthesized voice messages are desired or if some other method of presenting auditory messages is devised. MAT is written in QuickBasic and assembly language for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. The

  8. 30 CFR 77.513 - Insulating mats at power switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulating mats at power switches. 77.513... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.513 Insulating mats at power switches. Dry wooden platforms, insulating mats, or other electrically nonconductive material shall be kept in place at...

  9. 30 CFR 77.513 - Insulating mats at power switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulating mats at power switches. 77.513... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.513 Insulating mats at power switches. Dry wooden platforms, insulating mats, or other electrically nonconductive material shall be kept in place at...

  10. 30 CFR 77.513 - Insulating mats at power switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulating mats at power switches. 77.513... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.513 Insulating mats at power switches. Dry wooden platforms, insulating mats, or other electrically nonconductive material shall be kept in place at...

  11. 30 CFR 77.513 - Insulating mats at power switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulating mats at power switches. 77.513... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.513 Insulating mats at power switches. Dry wooden platforms, insulating mats, or other electrically nonconductive material shall be kept in place at...

  12. Distribution of cultivated and uncultivated cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus-like bacteria in hot spring microbial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff-Roberts, A. L.; Kuenen, J. G.; Ward, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotide hybridization probes were developed to complement specific regions of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences of cultivated and uncultivated cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus-like bacteria, which inhabit hot spring microbial mats. The probes were used to investigate the natural distribution of SSU rRNAs from these species in mats of Yellowstone hot springs of different temperatures and pHs as well as changes in SSU rRNA distribution resulting from 1-week in situ shifts in temperature, pH, and light intensity. Synechococcus lividus Y-7c-s SSU rRNA was detected only in the mat of a slightly acid spring, from which it may have been initially isolated, or when samples from a more alkaline spring were incubated in the more acid spring. Chloroflexus aurantiacus Y-400-fl SSU rRNA was detected only in a high-temperature mat sample from the alkaline Octopus Spring or when lower-temperature samples from this mat were incubated at the high-temperature site. SSU rRNAs of uncultivated species were more widely distributed. Temperature distributions and responses to in situ temperature shifts suggested that some of the uncultivated cyanobacteria might be adapted to high-, moderate-, and low-temperature ranges whereas an uncultivated Chloroflexus-like bacterium appears to have broad temperature tolerance. SSU rRNAs of all uncultivated species inhabiting a 48 to 51 degrees C Octopus Spring mat site were most abundant in the upper 1 mm and were not detected below a 2.5-to 3.5-mm depth, a finding consistent with their possible phototrophic nature. However, the effects of light intensity reduction on these SSU rRNAs were variable, indicating the difficulty of demonstrating a phototrophic phenotype in light reduction experiments.

  13. Spatial patterns and links between microbial community composition and function in cyanobacterial mats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Najjar, Mohammad A. A.; Ramette, Alban; Kühl, Michael; Hamza, Waleed; Klatt, Judith M.; Polerecky, Lubos

    2014-01-01

    We imaged reflectance and variable fluorescence in 25 cyanobacterial mats from four distant sites around the globe to assess, at different scales of resolution, spatial variabilities in the physiological parameters characterizing their photosynthetic capacity, including the absorptivity by chlorophyll a (Achl), maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Ymax), and light acclimation irradiance (Ik). Generally, these parameters significantly varied within individual mats on a sub-millimeter scale, with about 2-fold higher variability in the vertical than in the horizontal direction. The average vertical profiles of Ymax and Ik decreased with depth in the mat, while Achl exhibited a sub-surface maximum. The within-mat variability was comparable to, but often larger than, the between-sites variability, whereas the within-site variabilities (i.e., between samples from the same site) were generally lowest. When compared based on averaged values of their photosynthetic parameters, mats clustered according to their site of origin. Similar clustering was found when the community composition of the mats' cyanobacterial layers were compared by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), indicating a significant link between the microbial community composition and function. Although this link is likely the result of community adaptation to the prevailing site-specific environmental conditions, our present data is insufficient to identify the main factors determining these patterns. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates that the spatial variability in the photosynthetic capacity and light acclimation of benthic phototrophic microbial communities is at least as large on a sub-millimeter scale as it is on a global scale, and suggests that this pattern of variability scaling is similar for the microbial community composition. PMID:25147548

  14. Distribution of cultivated and uncultivated cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus-like bacteria in hot spring microbial mats.

    PubMed Central

    Ruff-Roberts, A L; Kuenen, J G; Ward, D M

    1994-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotide hybridization probes were developed to complement specific regions of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences of cultivated and uncultivated cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus-like bacteria, which inhabit hot spring microbial mats. The probes were used to investigate the natural distribution of SSU rRNAs from these species in mats of Yellowstone hot springs of different temperatures and pHs as well as changes in SSU rRNA distribution resulting from 1-week in situ shifts in temperature, pH, and light intensity. Synechococcus lividus Y-7c-s SSU rRNA was detected only in the mat of a slightly acid spring, from which it may have been initially isolated, or when samples from a more alkaline spring were incubated in the more acid spring. Chloroflexus aurantiacus Y-400-fl SSU rRNA was detected only in a high-temperature mat sample from the alkaline Octopus Spring or when lower-temperature samples from this mat were incubated at the high-temperature site. SSU rRNAs of uncultivated species were more widely distributed. Temperature distributions and responses to in situ temperature shifts suggested that some of the uncultivated cyanobacteria might be adapted to high-, moderate-, and low-temperature ranges whereas an uncultivated Chloroflexus-like bacterium appears to have broad temperature tolerance. SSU rRNAs of all uncultivated species inhabiting a 48 to 51 degrees C Octopus Spring mat site were most abundant in the upper 1 mm and were not detected below a 2.5-to 3.5-mm depth, a finding consistent with their possible phototrophic nature. However, the effects of light intensity reduction on these SSU rRNAs were variable, indicating the difficulty of demonstrating a phototrophic phenotype in light reduction experiments. Images PMID:11536630

  15. Senescence of reproduction may explain adaptive menopause in humans: a test of the "mother" hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pavard, Samuel; E Metcalf, C Jessica; Heyer, Evelyne

    2008-06-01

    The "mother" hypothesis is one of the main adaptive explanations of human menopause. It postulates that reproductive cessation constitutes a strategy that has been selected for during human evolution because mothers at older ages might maximize their fitness by investing resources in the survival and reproduction of their living children rather than by continuing to reproduce. This study provides a test of this hypothesis. Fertility functions that maximize fitness are built into a model incorporating the fact that the survival of females during the rearing period is a major determinant of their children's survival. Results are given according to different scenarios of increase with mothers' age of maternal mortality risk and risk of stillbirth and birth defects (on the assumption that these females do not experience menopause). Different estimates of the effect of a mother's death on her child's survival were also incorporated. Finally, a population genetics framework allows us to estimate selection on these optimal fertility functions. To determine whether or not these fertility functions show a menopause, three criteria are discussed: the rapidity of fertility decline, if any; the magnitude of selection on menopause compared with a nonmenopausal strategy; and the selection on survival during post-reproductive life. Our results show that menopause and subsequent post-reproductive life are significantly advantageous when two conditions are satisfied: a marked increase in stillbirth and risk of birth defects as well as in maternal mortality with mother's age. PMID:18322919

  16. Participation in Decision Making as a Property of Complex Adaptive Systems: Developing and Testing a Measure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ruth A.; Hsieh, Pi-Ching; Su, Hui Fang; Landerman, Lawrence R.; McDaniel, Reuben R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To (1) describe participation in decision-making as a systems-level property of complex adaptive systems and (2) present empirical evidence of reliability and validity of a corresponding measure. Method. Study 1 was a mail survey of a single respondent (administrators or directors of nursing) in each of 197 nursing homes. Study 2 was a field study using random, proportionally stratified sampling procedure that included 195 organizations with 3,968 respondents. Analysis. In Study 1, we analyzed the data to reduce the number of scale items and establish initial reliability and validity. In Study 2, we strengthened the psychometric test using a large sample. Results. Results demonstrated validity and reliability of the participation in decision-making instrument (PDMI) while measuring participation of workers in two distinct job categories (RNs and CNAs). We established reliability at the organizational level aggregated items scores. We established validity of the multidimensional properties using convergent and discriminant validity and confirmatory factor analysis. Conclusions. Participation in decision making, when modeled as a systems-level property of organization, has multiple dimensions and is more complex than is being traditionally measured. Managers can use this model to form decision teams that maximize the depth and breadth of expertise needed and to foster connection among them. PMID:24349771

  17. Flight Test of an Adaptive Configuration Optimization System for Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Georgie, Jennifer; Barnicki, Joseph S.

    1999-01-01

    A NASA Dryden Flight Research Center program explores the practical application of real-time adaptive configuration optimization for enhanced transport performance on an L-1011 aircraft. This approach is based on calculation of incremental drag from forced-response, symmetric, outboard aileron maneuvers. In real-time operation, the symmetric outboard aileron deflection is directly optimized, and the horizontal stabilator and angle of attack are indirectly optimized. A flight experiment has been conducted from an onboard research engineering test station, and flight research results are presented herein. The optimization system has demonstrated the capability of determining the minimum drag configuration of the aircraft in real time. The drag-minimization algorithm is capable of identifying drag to approximately a one-drag-count level. Optimizing the symmetric outboard aileron position realizes a drag reduction of 2-3 drag counts (approximately 1 percent). Algorithm analysis of maneuvers indicate that two-sided raised-cosine maneuvers improve definition of the symmetric outboard aileron drag effect, thereby improving analysis results and consistency. Ramp maneuvers provide a more even distribution of data collection as a function of excitation deflection than raised-cosine maneuvers provide. A commercial operational system would require airdata calculations and normal output of current inertial navigation systems; engine pressure ratio measurements would be optional.

  18. DRAGON, the Durham real-time, tomographic adaptive optics test bench: progress and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Andrew P.; Myers, Richard M.; Morris, Timothy J.; Basden, Alastair G.; Bharmal, Nazim A.; Rolt, Stephen; Bramall, David G.; Dipper, Nigel A.; Younger, Edward J.

    2014-08-01

    DRAGON is a real-time, tomographic Adaptive Optics test bench currently under development at Durham University. Optical and mechanical design work for DRAGON is now complete, and the system is close to becoming fully operational. DRAGON emulates current 4.2 m and 8 m telescopes, and can also be used to investigate ELT scale issues. The full system features 4 Laser Guide Star (LGS) Wavefront Sensors (WFS), 3 Natural Guide Star (NGS) WFSs and one Truth Sensor, all of which are 31 × 31 sub-aperture Shack-Hartmann WFS. Two Deformable Mirrors (DMs), a Boston MEMS Kilo DM and a Xinetics 97 actuator DM, correct for turbulence induced aberrations and these can be configured to be either open or closed loop of the WFS. A novel method of LGS emulation is implemented which includes the effects of uplink turbulence and elongation in real-time. The atmosphere is emulated by 4 rotating phase screens which can be translated in real-time to replicate altitude evolution of turbulent layers. DRAGON will be used to extensively study tomographic AO algorithms, such as those required for Multi-Object AO. As DRAGON has been designed to be compatible with CANARY, the MOAO demonstrator, results can be compared to those from the CANARY MOAO demonstrator on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. We present here an overview of the current status of DRAGON and some early results, including investigations into the validity of the LGS emulation method.

  19. A Test for Pre-Adapted Phenotypic Plasticity in the Invasive Tree Acer negundo L.

    PubMed Central

    Lamarque, Laurent J.; Porté, Annabel J.; Eymeric, Camille; Lasnier, Jean-Baptiste; Lortie, Christopher J.; Delzon, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is a key mechanism associated with the spread of exotic plants and previous studies have found that invasive species are generally more plastic than co-occurring species. Comparatively, the evolution of phenotypic plasticity in plant invasion has received less attention, and in particular, the genetic basis of plasticity is largely unexamined. Native from North America, Acer negundo L. is aggressively impacting the riparian forests of southern and eastern Europe thanks to higher plasticity relative to co-occurring native species. We therefore tested here whether invasive populations have evolved increased plasticity since introduction. The performance of 1152 seedlings from 8 native and 8 invasive populations was compared in response to nutrient availability. Irrespective of nutrients, invasive populations had higher growth and greater allocation to above-ground biomass relative to their native conspecifics. More importantly, invasive genotypes did not show increased plasticity in any of the 20 traits examined. This result suggests that the high magnitude of plasticity to nutrient variation of invasive seedlings might be pre-adapted in the native range. Invasiveness of A. negundo could be explained by higher mean values of traits due to genetic differentiation rather than by evolution of increased plasticity. PMID:24040212

  20. The MatTek story - how the three Rs principles led to 3-D tissue success!

    PubMed

    Sheasgreen, John; Klausner, Mitch; Kandárová, Helena; Ingalls, David

    2009-12-01

    MatTek Corporation has been working diligently for over 15 years to replace traditional animal-based toxicity and efficacy tests with alternative test methods based on human-cell derived, three-dimensional (3-D) tissue models. First discussed in detail by W.M.S. Russell and R.L. Burch 50 years ago in their book, The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique, and now fully integrated into forward-looking publications such as Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy, the concept of replacing animals in test procedures with human cells and/or human cell-derived in vitro 3-D tissues is being embraced by the world's research scientists and toxicologists at an ever-increasing rate. 3-D in vitro models are being utilised not only for humanitarian reasons, but also because human 3-D tissues, in particular, produce more-physiologically relevant scientific data. Early on in MatTek's efforts to develop this alternative test method, senior management sought the assistance of experts within the in vitro testing and animal rights communities, to help define the specific in vitro human 3-D tissue products needed and navigate the regulatory landscape, especially in Europe where the replacement of animal-based testing with non-animal alternative test methods was well underway. MatTek was fortunate to receive that expert assistance on both fronts from Professor Michael Balls, who at that time was the newly-elected first director of ECVAM. In 1997, with the guidance and support of Professor Balls and others in the animal rights community, MatTek began the effort to validate several of its human 3-D tissue-based alternative test methods. Today, two MatTek human cell-derived 3-D tissue-based test methods are validated as full replacements for existing animal-based tests, with more tests in the validation pipeline. In addition, MatTek in vitro tissue models are in use worldwide by chemical, pharmaceutical and consumer product companies, as evidenced by citations

  1. Benchmark tests and spin adaptation for the particle-particle random phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yang; Steinmann, Stephan N.; Peng, Degao; Aggelen, Helen van; Yang, Weitao

    2013-11-07

    The particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) provides an approximation to the correlation energy in density functional theory via the adiabatic connection [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)]. It has virtually no delocalization error nor static correlation error for single-bond systems. However, with its formal O(N{sup 6}) scaling, the pp-RPA is computationally expensive. In this paper, we implement a spin-separated and spin-adapted pp-RPA algorithm, which reduces the computational cost by a substantial factor. We then perform benchmark tests on the G2/97 enthalpies of formation database, DBH24 reaction barrier database, and four test sets for non-bonded interactions (HB6/04, CT7/04, DI6/04, and WI9/04). For the G2/97 database, the pp-RPA gives a significantly smaller mean absolute error (8.3 kcal/mol) than the direct particle-hole RPA (ph-RPA) (22.7 kcal/mol). Furthermore, the error in the pp-RPA is nearly constant with the number of atoms in a molecule, while the error in the ph-RPA increases. For chemical reactions involving typical organic closed-shell molecules, pp- and ph-RPA both give accurate reaction energies. Similarly, both RPAs perform well for reaction barriers and nonbonded interactions. These results suggest that the pp-RPA gives reliable energies in chemical applications. The adiabatic connection formalism based on pairing matrix fluctuation is therefore expected to lead to widely applicable and accurate density functionals.

  2. Towards a genetics-based adaptive agent to support flight testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbs, Henry Brown, III

    Although the benefits of aircraft simulation have been known since the late 1960s, simulation almost always entails interaction with a human test pilot. This "pilot-in-the-loop" simulation process provides useful evaluative information to the aircraft designer and provides a training tool to the pilot. Emulation of a pilot during the early phases of the aircraft design process might provide designers a useful evaluative tool. Machine learning might emulate a pilot in a simulated aircraft/cockpit setting. Preliminary work in the application of machine learning techniques, such as reinforcement learning, to aircraft maneuvering have shown promise. These studies used simplified interfaces between machine learning agent and the aircraft simulation. The simulations employed low order equivalent system models. High-fidelity aircraft simulations exist, such as the simulations developed by NASA at its Dryden Flight Research Center. To expand the applicational domain of reinforcement learning to aircraft designs, this study presents a series of experiments that examine a reinforcement learning agent in the role of test pilot. The NASA X-31 and F-106 high-fidelity simulations provide realistic aircraft for the agent to maneuver. The approach of the study is to examine an agent possessing a genetic-based, artificial neural network to approximate long-term, expected cost (Bellman value) in a basic maneuvering task. The experiments evaluate different learning methods based on a common feedback function and an identical task. The learning methods evaluated are: Q-learning, Q(lambda)-learning, SARSA learning, and SARSA(lambda) learning. Experimental results indicate that, while prediction error remain quite high, similar, repeatable behaviors occur in both aircraft. Similar behavior exhibits portability of the agent between aircraft with different handling qualities (dynamics). Besides the adaptive behavior aspects of the study, the genetic algorithm used in the agent is shown to

  3. An atmospheric turbulence generator for dynamic tests with LINC-NIRVANA's adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschke, D.; Bizenberger, P.; Gaessler, W.; Zhang, X.; Mohr, L.; Baumeister, H.; Diolaiti, E.

    2010-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA[1] (LN) is an instrument for the Large Binocular Telescope[2] (LBT). Its purpose is to combine the light coming from the two primary mirrors in a Fizeau-type interferometer. In order to compensate turbulence-induced dynamic aberrations, the layer oriented adaptive optics system of LN[3] consists of two major subsystems for each side: the Ground-Layer-Wavefront sensor (GLWS) and the Mid- and High-Layer Wavefront sensor (MHLWS). The MHLWS is currently set up in a laboratory at the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg. To test the multi-conjugate AO with multiple simulated stars in the laboratory and to develop the necessary control software, a dedicated light source is needed. For this reason, we designed an optical system, operating in visible as well as in infrared light, which imitates the telescope's optical train (f-ratio, pupil position and size, field curvature). By inserting rotating surface etched glass phase screens, artificial aberrations corresponding to the atmospheric turbulence are introduced. In addition, different turbulence altitudes can be simulated depending on the position of these screens along the optical axis. In this way, it is possible to comprehensively test the complete system, including electronics and software, in the laboratory before integration into the final LINC-NIRVANA setup. Combined with an atmospheric piston simulator, also this effect can be taken into account. Since we are building two identical sets, it is possible to feed the complete instrument with light for the interferometric combination during the assembly phase in the integration laboratory.

  4. Effect of Rasch Calibration on Ability and DIF Estimation in Computer-Adaptive Tests. Research Report RR-94-32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; And Others

    A previous simulation study of methods for assessing item functioning (DIF) in computer-adaptive tests (CATs) showed that modified versions of the Mantel-Haenszel and standardization methods work well with CAT data. In that study, data were generated using the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model, and this same model was assumed in obtaining item…

  5. Comparison between Dichotomous and Polytomous Scoring of Innovative Items in a Large-Scale Computerized Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Hong; Liu, Junhui; Haynie, Kathleen; Woo, Ada; Gorham, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the impact of partial credit scoring of one type of innovative items (multiple-response items) in a computerized adaptive version of a large-scale licensure pretest and operational test settings. The impacts of partial credit scoring on the estimation of the ability parameters and classification decisions in operational test…

  6. Teaching the Fluctuation Test "In Silico" by Using Mutate: A Program to Distinguish between the Adaptive and Spontaneous Mutation Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvajal-Rodriguez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary…

  7. "Computerized Adaptive Testing: Theory and Practice." Wim J. van der Linden and Cees A. W. Glas, Eds. [book review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reise, Steven P.

    2001-01-01

    This book contains a series of research articles about computerized adaptive testing (CAT) written for advanced psychometricians. The book is divided into sections on: (1) item selection and examinee scoring in CAT; (2) examples of CAT applications; (3) item banks; (4) determining model fit; and (5) using testlets in CAT. (SLD)

  8. Development of a Postacute Hospital Item Bank for the New Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-Computer Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Helene M.

    2010-01-01

    The PEDI-CAT is a new computer adaptive test (CAT) version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). Additional PEDI-CAT items specific to postacute pediatric hospital care were recently developed using expert reviews and cognitive interviewing techniques. Expert reviews established face and construct validity, providing positive…

  9. Content Range and Precision of a Computer Adaptive Test of Upper Extremity Function for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montpetit, Kathleen; Haley, Stephen; Bilodeau, Nathalie; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Gorton, George, III; Mulcahey, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the content range and measurement precision of an upper extremity (UE) computer adaptive testing (CAT) platform of physical function in children with cerebral palsy. Upper extremity items representing skills of all abilities were administered to 305 parents. These responses were compared with two traditional standardized…

  10. Translation, Adaptation and Invariance Testing of the Teaching Perspectives Inventory: Comparing Faculty of Malaysia and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misieng, Jecky

    2013-01-01

    As a result of growing attention in cross-cultural research, existing measurement instruments developed in one language are being translated and adapted for use in other languages and cultural contexts. Producing invariant measurement instruments that assess educational and psychological constructs provide a way of testing the cross-cultural…

  11. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test in an Italian Population.

    PubMed

    Culicchia, Greta; Nobilia, Marta; Asturi, Marilyn; Santilli, Valter; Paoloni, Marco; De Santis, Rita; Galeoto, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This paper describes the Italian translation and adaptation to the Italian culture of the original version of the Jebsen-Taylor hand function test and conveys the procedure for testing its validity and reliability. Design. The cultural adaptation process and validation were based on data from a group of people with no clinical evidence of disease or impairment of the upper limbs. The process required a forward and reverse translation in its original language. The scale obtained was reviewed by 8 experts in the field of psychometrics dealing with statistical methods that are useful for the behavioral and social sciences. The Italian adapted version of the JTHFT was then produced and validated. Participants. The test was submitted to 320 people with no clinical evidence of disease in order to test its acceptability and consistency. Results. The total time required to perform each subtest was 80.16 ± 43.13 seconds for the nondominant hand (NDH) and 49.97 ± 27.28 seconds for the dominant hand (DH). The internal consistency (assessed with Pearson's r) and the reliability or the construct validity (assessed with Cronbach's alpha) are significative. Conclusions. This is the first study reporting the result of the translation, cultural adaptation, and validation protocols of the JTHFT in Italian. It provides a new tool for Italian professionals to measure the functionality of the hand in participants with various upper limb pathologies. PMID:27504203

  12. Testing the Adaptation to Poverty-Related Stress Model: Predicting Psychopathology Symptoms in Families Facing Economic Hardship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, Martha E.; Raviv, Tali; Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Etter, Erica M.

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the Adaptation to Poverty-related Stress Model and its proposed relations between poverty-related stress, effortful and involuntary stress responses, and symptoms of psychopathology in an ethnically diverse sample of low-income children and their parents. Prospective Hierarchical Linear Modeling analyses conducted with 98…

  13. Performance of genetically-colorblind individuals on a rapid dark adaptation test based on the Purkinje shift.

    PubMed

    Kim, V; Solomons, N W

    1983-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether or not genetic colorblindness would limit performance on a rapid dark adaptation test (RDAT) which is based on the Purkinje shift in retinal sensitivity to lower wavelengths of light energy under mesopic/scotopic conditions of illumination. No differences in RDAT performance between age-equivalent colorblind and non-colorblind subjects was observed. PMID:6601793

  14. The Effect of Fitting a Unidimensional IRT Model to Multidimensional Data in Content-Balanced Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Tian

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of fitting a unidimensional IRT model to multidimensional data in content-balanced computerized adaptive testing (CAT). Unconstrained CAT with the maximum information item selection method is chosen as the baseline, and the performances of three content balancing procedures, the constrained CAT (CCAT), the…

  15. Adaptation and Validation of the Tower of London Test of Planning and Problem Solving in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masson, J. D.; Dagnan, D.; Evans, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a need for validated, standardised tools for the assessment of executive functions in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). This study examines the validity of a test of planning and problem solving (Tower of London) with adults with ID. Method: Participants completed an adapted version of the Tower of London (ToL) while…

  16. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test in an Italian Population

    PubMed Central

    Culicchia, Greta; Nobilia, Marta; Asturi, Marilyn; Santilli, Valter; Paoloni, Marco; De Santis, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This paper describes the Italian translation and adaptation to the Italian culture of the original version of the Jebsen-Taylor hand function test and conveys the procedure for testing its validity and reliability. Design. The cultural adaptation process and validation were based on data from a group of people with no clinical evidence of disease or impairment of the upper limbs. The process required a forward and reverse translation in its original language. The scale obtained was reviewed by 8 experts in the field of psychometrics dealing with statistical methods that are useful for the behavioral and social sciences. The Italian adapted version of the JTHFT was then produced and validated. Participants. The test was submitted to 320 people with no clinical evidence of disease in order to test its acceptability and consistency. Results. The total time required to perform each subtest was 80.16 ± 43.13 seconds for the nondominant hand (NDH) and 49.97 ± 27.28 seconds for the dominant hand (DH). The internal consistency (assessed with Pearson's r) and the reliability or the construct validity (assessed with Cronbach's alpha) are significative. Conclusions. This is the first study reporting the result of the translation, cultural adaptation, and validation protocols of the JTHFT in Italian. It provides a new tool for Italian professionals to measure the functionality of the hand in participants with various upper limb pathologies. PMID:27504203

  17. Some Features of the Sampling Distribution of the Ability Estimate in Computerized Adaptive Testing According to Two Stopping Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blais, Jean-Guy; Raiche, Gilles

    This paper examines some characteristics of the statistics associated with the sampling distribution of the proficiency level estimate when the Rasch model is used. These characteristics allow the judgment of the meaning to be given to the proficiency level estimate obtained in adaptive testing, and as a consequence, they can illustrate the…

  18. Indications for near-surface fluid circulation cells at bacterial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubsch, S.; Haeckel, M.; Wallmann, K.

    2009-04-01

    At submarine cold vents off Costa Rica detailed sediment sampling along transects across bacterial mats was conducted during expedition M66/2 with RV METEOR deploying a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Bacterial mats occurred in patches of several m2 in size covering the sediment surface. Porewater analyses of the pushcore sediments revealed rapid sulfate consumption due to anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) below the bacterial mats. SO4 was depleted at ~5 cm sediment depth in the center of the mat and penetrating deeper into the sediment towards the rim of the mat. Pushcores taken in the center of these mats, however, showed a subsequent increase of sulfate concentrations below a sediment depth of ~10 cm. Other dissolved compounds, such as Cl, Br, H2S, TA, NH4, PO4, and SiO4, showed a similar behaviour with concentrations returning towards bottomwater values. Since this trend is common to all of the solutes, it is most likely explained by a physical process. We assume that focussed fluid outflow near the center of the bacterial mat creates a convective flow cell with bottom waters penetrating into the adjacent sediment area and directed towards the flow channel. A set of different 2-D and 3-D transport-reaction models were developed to test this hypothesis. Fluid flow in the central channel turned out to be homogeneous and thus, could be resembled as boundary condition of the surrounding sediment domain. The model also includes AMO as the most important reaction of a cold vent system. Model results indicate that the observed porewater sulfate and chloride profiles can be reproduced fairly well, for example, when applying an advection velocity of 100 cm/a in the central fluid channel and a mean background advection of 3 cm/a in the sediment domain. A detailed sensitivity study has been performed determining the parameters dominating the establishment of the near-surface flow cell.

  19. Design of an Adaptive Power Regulation Mechanism and a Nozzle for a Hydroelectric Power Plant Turbine Test Rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Burak; Aytac, Zeynep; Tascioglu, Yigit; Celebioglu, Kutay; Aradag, Selin; ETU Hydro Research Center Team

    2014-11-01

    This study deals with the design of a power regulation mechanism for a Hydroelectric Power Plant (HEPP) model turbine test system which is designed to test Francis type hydroturbines up to 2 MW power with varying head and flow(discharge) values. Unlike the tailor made regulation mechanisms of full-sized, functional HEPPs; the design for the test system must be easily adapted to various turbines that are to be tested. In order to achieve this adaptability, a dynamic simulation model is constructed in MATLAB/Simulink SimMechanics. This model acquires geometric data and hydraulic loading data of the regulation system from Autodesk Inventor CAD models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis respectively. The dynamic model is explained and case studies of two different HEPPs are performed for validation. CFD aided design of the turbine guide vanes, which is used as input for the dynamic model, is also presented. This research is financially supported by Turkish Ministry of Development.

  20. Ecophysiological Changes in Microbial Mats Incubated in a Greenhouse Collaboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; DesMarais, David J.; GarciaPichel, Ferran; Hogan, Mary; Jahnke, Linda; Keller, Richard M.; Miller, Scott R.

    2001-01-01

    Microbial mats are modern examples of the earliest microbial communities known. Among the best studied are microbial mats growing in hypersaline ponds managed for the production of salt by Exportadora de Sal, S.A. de C.V., Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. In May, 2001, we collected mats from Ponds 4 and 5 in this system and returned them to Ames Research Center, where they have been maintained for a period of over nine months. We report here on both the ecophysiological changes occurring in the mats over that period of time as well as the facility in which they were incubated. Mats (approximately 1 sq. meter total area) were incubated in a greenhouse facility modified to provide the mats with natural levels of visible and ultraviolet radiation as well as constantly flowing, temperature-controlled water. Two replicated treatments were maintained, a 'high salinity' treatment (about 120 ppt) and a 'low salinity' treatment (about 90 ppt). Rates of net biological activity (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration, trace gas production) in the mats were relatively constant over the several months, and were similar to rates of activity measured in the field. However, over the course of the incubation, mats in both treatments changed in physical appearance. The most obvious change was that mats in the higher salinity treatments developed a higher proportion of carotenoid pigments (relative to chlorophyll), resulting in a noticeably orange color in the high salinity mats. This trend is also seen in the natural salinity gradient present at the field site. Changes in the community composition of the mats, as assayed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), as well as biomarker compounds produced in the mats were also monitored. The degree to which the mats kept in the greenhouse changed from the originally collected mats, as well as differences between high and low salinity mats will be discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended

  1. Methodological and Theoretical Issues in the Adaptation of Sign Language Tests: An Example from the Adaptation of a Test to German Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Despite the current need for reliable and valid test instruments in different countries in order to monitor the sign language acquisition of deaf children, very few tests are commercially available that offer strong evidence for their psychometric properties. This mirrors the current state of affairs for many sign languages, where very little…

  2. Biodiversity within hot spring microbial mat communities: molecular monitoring of enrichment cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, D. M.; Santegoeds, C. M.; Nold, S. C.; Ramsing, N. B.; Ferris, M. J.; Bateson, M. M.

    1997-01-01

    We have begun to examine the basis for incongruence between hot spring microbial mat populations detected by cultivation or by 16S rRNA methods. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to monitor enrichments and isolates plated therefrom. At near extincting inoculum dilutions we observed Chloroflexus-like and cyanobacterial populations whose 16S rRNA sequences have been detected in the 'New Pit' Spring Chloroflexus mat and the Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat. Cyanobacterial populations enriched from 44 to 54 degrees C and 56 to 63 degrees C samples at near habitat temperatures were similar to those previously detected in mat samples of comparable temperatures. However, a lower temperature enrichment from the higher temperature sample selected for the populations found in the lower temperature sample. Three Thermus populations detected by both DGGE and isolation exemplify even more how enrichment may bias our view of community structure. The most abundant population was adapted to the habitat temperature (50 degrees C), while populations adapted to 65 degrees C and 70 degrees C were 10(2)- and 10(4)-fold less abundant, respectively. However, enrichment at 70 degrees C favored the least abundant strain. Inoculum dilution and incubation at the habitat temperature favored the more numerically relevant populations. We enriched many other aerobic chemoorganotrophic populations at various inoculum dilutions and substrate concentrations, most of whose 16S rRNA sequences have not been detected in mats. A common feature of numerically relevant cyanobacterial, Chloroflexus-like and aerobic chemorganotrophic populations, is that they grow poorly and resist cultivation on solidified medium, suggesting plating bias, and that the medium composition and incubation conditions may not reflect the natural microenvironments these populations inhabit.

  3. Research on Algorithms based on Web Self-adaptive Study and Intelligent Test Paper Construction and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Limin; Huang, Lihua; Han, Xuming; Gu, Zhenshan; Sang, Juan

    A novel system based on Bernoulli Theorem of Large Number Law and the genetic algorithms was designed and realized in this paper, which had many advantages such as self-adaptive study for difficulty coefficient of item pool and intelligent test paper construction etc. At present, the system has applied in the examination of paperless computer tests of Jinlin university of finance and economics and some satisfactory results have been also obtained.

  4. Development of a Protocol to Test Proprioceptive Utilization as a Predictor for Sensorimotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Caldwell, E. E.; Peters, B. T.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oddsson, L. I. E.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight show significant inter-subject variations in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment because of their innate sensory weighting. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which each individual astronaut will be affected would improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. We hypothesize participant's ability to utilize individual sensory information (vision, proprioception and vestibular) influences adaptation in sensorimotor performance after space flight. The goal of this study is to develop a reliable protocol to test proprioceptive utilization in a functional postural control task. Subjects "stand" in a supine position while strapped to a backpack frame holding a friction-free device using air-bearings that allow the subject to move freely in the frontal plane, similar to when in upright standing. The frame is attached to a pneumatic cylinder, which can provide different levels of a gravity-like force that the subject must balance against to remain "upright". The supine posture with eyes closed ensures reduced vestibular and visual contribution to postural control suggesting somatosensory and/or non-otolith vestibular inputs will provide relevant information for maintaining balance control in this task. This setup is called the gravity bed. Fourteen healthy subjects carried out three trials each with eyes open alternated with eyes closed, "standing" on their dominant leg in the gravity bed environment while loaded with 60 percent of their body weight. Subjects were instructed to: "use your sense of sway about the ankle and pressure changes under the foot to maintain balance." Maximum length of a trial was 45 seconds. A force plate underneath the foot recorded forces and moments during the trial and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) attached on the backpack's frame near the center of mass of the subject recorded upper body postural

  5. Astronaut Thomas Mattingly performs EVA during Apollo 16 transearth coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, performs extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 16 transearth coast. mattingly is assisted by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Mattingly inspected the SIM bay of the Service Module, and retrieved film from the Mapping and Panoramic cameras. Mattingly is wearing the helmet of Astronaut John W. Young, commander. The helmet's lunar extravehicular visor assembly helped protect Mattingly's eyes frmo the bright sun. This view is a frame from motion picture film exposed by a 16mm Maurer camera.

  6. Sociolinguistic reflection on neuropsychological assessment: an insight into selected culturally adapted battery of Lebanese Arabic cognitive testing.

    PubMed

    Abou-Mrad, Fadi; Tarabey, Lubna; Zamrini, Edward; Pasquier, Florence; Chelune, Gordon; Fadel, Patricia; Hayek, Maryse

    2015-10-01

    Neuropsychological tests (NPTs) are highly dependent on education, culture differences as well as age and sex. It is therefore essential to take these factors into consideration when translating NPTs to be used in screening for cognitive impairment. Translations into Arabic must respect the principles of linguistic relativity and cultural specificity of the population under study. The objective is to assess feasibility and outcome of translating neuropsychological tests to Arabic. A team of Lebanese professionals selected a battery of screening NPTs. These tests were translated into Arabic and independently back translated by a team of sociolinguists and cultural specialists. The translations were adapted to suit the Lebanese culture. The final NPT translated versions were reached by consensus of an expert panel and tested on a group of independently living community-dwelling elderly. Translated items had to be modified when: (1) terms could not be translated using one word as required by the test; (2) Concepts were foreign to the culture; (3) Translated words carried multiple meanings; (4) Words were rarely used in Lebanon; (5) Sentences did not have an equivalent; and (6) Words had letters pronounced differently by subgroups in Lebanon. Despite all measures to maintain cultural sensitivity in translations, non-linguistic challenges remained. A battery of cognitive screening tests were translated into Arabic and adapted for the Lebanese population. These adaptations allow for a better assessment of cognitive abilities since they reflect the thought patterns of the population. The challenge is to establish local normative data. PMID:26012851

  7. ChemMatCARS Data Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    ChemMatCARS is a high-brilliance national synchrotron x-ray facility dedicated primarily to static and dynamic condensed matter chemistry and materials science. The scientific focus of the facility includes the study of surface and interfacial properties of liquids and solids as well as their bulk structure at atomic, molecular and mesoscopic length scales with high spatial and energy resolution. Experimental techniques supported by the facility include: 1) Liquid Surface X-ray Scattering; 2) Solid Surface X-ray Scattering; 3) Time-Resolved Crystallography; 4) Micro-Crystal Diffraction; 5) Small and Wide-angle X-ray Scattering. The data archive referenced here contains data for various components along the beamline within the First Optics Enclosure and is intended to be input or parameter data. See the Science Nuggets at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/chemmat/pages/nuggets.html for leads to some of the research conducted at the ChemMatCARS beamline.

  8. Microbial mats: an ecological niche for fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cantrell, Sharon A.; Duval-Pérez, Lisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Fungi were documented in tropical hypersaline microbial mats and their role in the degradation of complex carbohydrates (exopolymeric substance – EPS) was explored. Fungal diversity is higher during the wet season with Acremonium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium among the more common genera. Diversity is also higher in the oxic layer and in young and transient mats. Enrichments with xanthan (a model EPS) show that without antibiotics (full community) degradation is faster than enrichments with antibacterial (fungal community) and antifungal (bacterial community) agents, suggesting that degradation is performed by a consortium of organisms (bacteria and fungi). The combined evidence from all experiments indicates that bacteria carried out approximately two-third of the xanthan degradation. The pattern of degradation is similar between seasons and layers but degradation is faster in enrichments from the wet season. The research suggests that fungi thrive in these hypersaline consortia and may participate in the carbon cycle through the degradation of complex carbohydrates. PMID:23577004

  9. Bioflumology: Microbial mat growth in flumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airo, A.; Weigert, S.; Beck, C.

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis resulted in a transformational change of Earth's geochemical cycles and the subsequent evolution of life. However, it remains vigorously debated when this metabolic ability had evolved in cyanobacteria. This is largely because studies of Archean microfossil morphology, molecular biomarkers, and isotopic characteristics are frequently ambiguous. However, the high degree of morphological similarities between modern photosynthetic and Archean fossil mats has been interpreted to indicate phototactic microbial behavior or oxygenic photosynthesis. In order to better evaluate the relationship between mat morphology and metabolism, we here present a laboratory set-up for conducting month-long experiments in several sterilizable circular flumes designed to allow single-species cyanobacterial growth under adjustable fluid-flow conditions and protected from contamination.

  10. Improving Inpatient Surveys: Web-Based Computer Adaptive Testing Accessed via Mobile Phone QR Codes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The National Health Service (NHS) 70-item inpatient questionnaire surveys inpatients on their perceptions of their hospitalization experience. However, it imposes more burden on the patient than other similar surveys. The literature shows that computerized adaptive testing (CAT) based on item response theory can help shorten the item length of a questionnaire without compromising its precision. Objective Our aim was to investigate whether CAT can be (1) efficient with item reduction and (2) used with quick response (QR) codes scanned by mobile phones. Methods After downloading the 2008 inpatient survey data from the Picker Institute Europe website and analyzing the difficulties of this 70-item questionnaire, we used an author-made Excel program using the Rasch partial credit model to simulate 1000 patients’ true scores followed by a standard normal distribution. The CAT was compared to two other scenarios of answering all items (AAI) and the randomized selection method (RSM), as we investigated item length (efficiency) and measurement accuracy. The author-made Web-based CAT program for gathering patient feedback was effectively accessed from mobile phones by scanning the QR code. Results We found that the CAT can be more efficient for patients answering questions (ie, fewer items to respond to) than either AAI or RSM without compromising its measurement accuracy. A Web-based CAT inpatient survey accessed by scanning a QR code on a mobile phone was viable for gathering inpatient satisfaction responses. Conclusions With advances in technology, patients can now be offered alternatives for providing feedback about hospitalization satisfaction. This Web-based CAT is a possible option in health care settings for reducing the number of survey items, as well as offering an innovative QR code access. PMID:26935793

  11. Comparative ergoespirometric adaptations to a treadmill exercise test in untrained show Andalusian and Arabian horses.

    PubMed

    Castejón-Riber, Cristina; Muñoz, Ana; Trigo, Pablo; Riber, Cristina; Santisteban, Rafael; Castejón, Francisco

    2012-03-01

    Significant differences exist in the respiratory adaptation to exercise in different equine breeds. This research describes the ergoespirometric response to exercise of Andalusian (AN) and Arabian (A) horses, both selected according to morphological criteria. Thirteen untrained male horses (6 AN and 7 A) performed a treadmill exercise test (TET) with a slope of 6%, with workloads starting from 5 m/s and increasing 1 m/s every 3 min until the horses were not able to keep the required velocity. Tidal volume (TV), respiratory rate, minute ventilation (VE), oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), exercise time to fatigue (ETF) and respiratory aerobic threshold (RAT) were determined. AN horses presented higher TV and VE, whereas respiratory rate, VO2 and VCO2 were lower at the same velocities. RER was similar between breeds. ETF was longer in A horses (556.7 ± 66.5 in AN vs. 607.1 ± 71.1 s in A) and no significant differences were found in RAT (5.50 ± 0.50 in AN vs. 5.86 ± 1.07 m/s in A). In summary, despite the more intense ventilatory response to exercise at the same velocity, AN horses had lower VO2. The AN horse develops a more intense ventilatory response to fixed velocities than the A horse and it could be interesting to clarify the role of the locomotion characteristics in this response. PMID:22183731

  12. Brazilian Portuguese adaptation of Dyslexia Early Screening Test - Second edition: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Matta, Tatiana Ribeiro Gomes da; Befi-Lopes, Debora Maria

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of language skills in early childhood can provide important information about the future of literacy and academic performances. Children with reading difficulties should be identified early in their education, before they suffer from shortcomings and experience failures and feel discouraged at school. Considering the importance of early identification of language disorders and the shortage of standardized instruments for the Brazilian scenario, the overall objective of this study was to translate and adapt the Dyslexia Early Screening Test - Second Edition (DEST-2) to, subsequently, verify its applicability and efficacy in preschoolers who had Brazilian Portuguese as their native language. The study was composed of 20 children of both genders, regularly enrolled in a public school in the metropolitan region of São Paulo, none had any complaints related to learning and no indicators of sensory, neurological, cognitive, or behavioral disorders. It was observed that there was no need for significant changes to the original structure of the DEST-2 or in their administration instructions format. The performance of the children in the translated and in the national exams that were used as a benchmark was compatible, suggesting that the adjustments made met the equivalences needed to utilize this instrument with Brazilian children. A randomized study that will complement the preliminarily data obtained is in progress. Taking into consideration the linguistic and cultural diversity of Brazil, it is imperative that the translated version of the DEST-2 can be applied on a large scale and in several states of the country, in order to allow the use of this instrument as a language assessment tool in Brazil. PMID:26222949

  13. Cultural Adaptation of the Portuguese Version of the "Sniffin' Sticks" Smell Test: Reliability, Validity, and Normative Data.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, João Carlos; Simões, João; Silva, Filipe; Silva, Eduardo D; Hummel, Cornelia; Hummel, Thomas; Paiva, António

    2016-01-01

    The cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Sniffin`Sticks test for the Portuguese population is described. Over 270 people participated in four experiments. In Experiment 1, 67 participants rated the familiarity of presented odors and seven descriptors of the original test were adapted to a Portuguese context. In Experiment 2, the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test was administered to 203 healthy participants. Older age, male gender and active smoking status were confirmed as confounding factors. The third experiment showed the validity of the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test in discriminating healthy controls from patients with olfactory dysfunction. In Experiment 4, the test-retest reliability for both the composite score (r71 = 0.86) and the identification test (r71 = 0.62) was established (p<0.001). Normative data for the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test is provided, showing good validity and reliability and effectively distinguishing patients from healthy controls with high sensitivity and specificity. The Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test identification test is a clinically suitable screening tool in routine outpatient Portuguese settings. PMID:26863023

  14. Cultural Adaptation of the Portuguese Version of the “Sniffin’ Sticks” Smell Test: Reliability, Validity, and Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, João Carlos; Simões, João; Silva, Filipe; Silva, Eduardo D.; Hummel, Cornelia; Hummel, Thomas; Paiva, António

    2016-01-01

    The cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Sniffin`Sticks test for the Portuguese population is described. Over 270 people participated in four experiments. In Experiment 1, 67 participants rated the familiarity of presented odors and seven descriptors of the original test were adapted to a Portuguese context. In Experiment 2, the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test was administered to 203 healthy participants. Older age, male gender and active smoking status were confirmed as confounding factors. The third experiment showed the validity of the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test in discriminating healthy controls from patients with olfactory dysfunction. In Experiment 4, the test-retest reliability for both the composite score (r71 = 0.86) and the identification test (r71 = 0.62) was established (p<0.001). Normative data for the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test is provided, showing good validity and reliability and effectively distinguishing patients from healthy controls with high sensitivity and specificity. The Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test identification test is a clinically suitable screening tool in routine outpatient Portuguese settings. PMID:26863023

  15. The Archaea of a Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, C.; Spear, J. R.; Pace, N. R.

    2006-12-01

    The overarching goal of this work is to describe and understand the organismal composition within the domain Archaea for the microbial ecosystem of a hypersaline microbial mat. Sea salt is crystallized by solar evaporation at North America's largest saltworks, the Exportadora de Sal, in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur. Sea water flows through a series of evaporative basins with an increase in salinity until saturation is reached and halite crystallization begins. Several of these ponds are underlined with thick microbial mats. To date, it has not been known what kinds of organisms comprise these complex microbial ecosystems. Here, we report a survey of the stratified microbial communities for the distribution of representatives of Archaea in layers of the mats. This survey uses molecular approaches, based on cloning and sequencing of SSU rRNA genes for phylogenetic analyses, to determine the nature and extent of archaeal diversity that constitute these ecosystems. We compiled an altogether new phylogenetic backbone for the domain Archaea and placed representative sequences from this hypersaline analysis onto that framework. Analyses to date indicate the ubiquitous dominance of uncultured organisms of phylogenetic kinds not generally thought to be associated with hypersaline environments. Collectively, the results indicate that the diversity of life is extensive even in this seemingly inhospitable "extreme" environment.

  16. Healing Our Women for Transgender Women: Adaptation, Acceptability, and Pilot Testing.

    PubMed

    Collier, Kate L; Colarossi, Lisa G; Hazel, Daphne S; Watson, Kim; Wyatt, Gail E

    2015-10-01

    Healing Our Women (HOW) is a group-level HIV risk-reduction intervention developed to address the role of prior sexual victimization in HIV risk and protective behaviors among HIV-positive women of color. This article describes the process of adapting HOW for transgender women of color in New York City in accordance with CDC guidance for the adaptation of efficacious interventions. Twenty-one transgender women were enrolled in a study to evaluate the acceptability and fidelity of the adapted intervention, and to assess HIV knowledge, depressive symptoms, coping, condom use self-efficacy, and condom use via pre- and post-intervention surveys. We found the adapted program to be feasible to implement and acceptable to participants. We also found significant decreases in depressive symptoms and increases in positive coping from pre- to post-intervention, although replication with a larger sample and a control group comparison is needed to determine efficacy with this population. PMID:26485232

  17. Carrageenan analysis. Part 1: Characterisation of the carrageenan test material and stability in swine-adapted infant formula.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, William R; Davis, Steven R; Hroncich, Maggie M; Vurma, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    A method was developed and validated in support of a 28-day feeding study of swine-adapted infant formula stabilised with carrageenan administered to neonatal piglets. Carrageenan concentrations in the test formulations were 0, 300, 1000 and 2250 mg kg(-1) formula. Extraction of carrageenan from swine-adapted infant formula was achieved by breaking carrageenan-protein cross-linkages using saturated sodium chloride, followed by separation of the non-gelling carrageenan fraction via centrifugation. The extraction of carrageenan from formula was successful with respect to consistent recovery of the non-gelling carrageenan fraction from both test and control formula samples. Molecular weight analysis (Mw) of the recovered carrageenan fractions from the test and control formula samples confirmed that the carrageenan used to manufacture the formula was not degraded during the infant formula production process and subsequent storage for 4 months covering the 28-day piglet dietary feeding study. Carrageenan has excellent stability in infant formulations. PMID:25167218

  18. Description of the HiMAT Tailored composite structure and laboratory measured vehicle shape under load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The aeroelastically tailored outer wing and canard of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) vehicle are closely examined and a general description of the overall structure of the vehicle is provided. Test data in the form of laboratory measured twist under load and predicted twist from the HiMAT NASTRAN structural design program are compared. The results of this comparison indicate that the measured twist is generally less than the NASTRAN predicted twist. These discrepancies in twist predictions are attributed, at least in part, to the inability of current analytical composite materials programs to provide sufficiently accurate properties of matrix dominated laminates for input into structural programs such as NASTRAN.

  19. Superhydrophobic PVDF and PVDF-HFP nanofibrous mats with antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasova, M.; Manolova, N.; Markova, N.; Rashkov, I.

    2016-02-01

    Superhydrophobic nanofibrous materials of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) were prepared by one-pot electrospinning technique. The mats were decorated with ZnO nanoparticles with silanized surface and a model drug - 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinol (5Cl8HQ). The obtained hybrid nanofibrous materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), contact angle measurements, mechanical and microbiological tests. The results showed that the incorporation of ZnO nanoparticles into PVDF and PVDF-HFP nanofibers increased the hydrophobicity (contact angle 152°), improved the thermal stability and imparted to the nanofibrous materials anti-adhesive and antimicrobial properties. The mats containing the model drug possessed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results suggested that the obtained hybrid mats could find potential biomedical applications requiring antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties.

  20. Testing for Local Adaptation to Spawning Habitat in Sympatric Subpopulations of Pike by Reciprocal Translocation of Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, Hanna; Nordahl, Oscar; Tibblin, Petter; Larsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    We tested for local adaption in early life-history traits by performing a reciprocal translocation experiment with approximately 2,500 embryos of pike (Esox lucius) divided in paired split-family batches. The experiment indicated local adaptation in one of the two subpopulations manifested as enhanced hatching success of eggs in the native habitat, both when compared to siblings transferred to a non-native habitat, and when compared to immigrant genotypes from the other subpopulation. Gene-by-environment effects on viability of eggs and larvae were evident in both subpopulations, showing that there existed genetic variation allowing for evolutionary responses to divergent selection, and indicating a capacity for plastic responses to environmental change. Next, we tested for differences in female life-history traits. Results uncovered that females from one population invested more resources into reproduction and also produced more (but smaller) eggs in relation to their body size compared to females from the other population. We suggest that these females have adjusted their reproductive strategies as a counter-adaptation because a high amount of sedimentation on the eggs in that subpopulations spawning habitat might benefit smaller eggs. Collectively, our findings point to adaptive divergence among sympatric subpopulations that are physically separated only for a short period during reproduction and early development—which is rare. These results illustrate how combinations of translocation experiments and field studies of life-history traits might infer about local adaptation and evolutionary divergence among populations. Local adaptations in subdivided populations are important to consider in management and conservation of biodiversity, because they may otherwise be negatively affected by harvesting, supplementation, and reintroduction efforts targeted at endangered populations. PMID:27139695