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Sample records for adaptive time stepping

  1. Adaptive time steps in trajectory surface hopping simulations.

    PubMed

    Spörkel, Lasse; Thiel, Walter

    2016-05-21

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) simulations are often performed in combination with active-space multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatments. Technical problems may arise in such simulations if active and inactive orbitals strongly mix and switch in some particular regions. We propose to use adaptive time steps when such regions are encountered in TSH simulations. For this purpose, we present a computational protocol that is easy to implement and increases the computational effort only in the critical regions. We test this procedure through TSH simulations of a GFP chromophore model (OHBI) and a light-driven rotary molecular motor (F-NAIBP) on semiempirical MRCI potential energy surfaces, by comparing the results from simulations with adaptive time steps to analogous ones with constant time steps. For both test molecules, the number of successful trajectories without technical failures rises significantly, from 53% to 95% for OHBI and from 25% to 96% for F-NAIBP. The computed excited-state lifetime remains essentially the same for OHBI and increases somewhat for F-NAIBP, and there is almost no change in the computed quantum efficiency for internal rotation in F-NAIBP. We recommend the general use of adaptive time steps in TSH simulations with active-space CI methods because this will help to avoid technical problems, increase the overall efficiency and robustness of the simulations, and allow for a more complete sampling. PMID:27208937

  2. Adaptive time steps in trajectory surface hopping simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spörkel, Lasse; Thiel, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) simulations are often performed in combination with active-space multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatments. Technical problems may arise in such simulations if active and inactive orbitals strongly mix and switch in some particular regions. We propose to use adaptive time steps when such regions are encountered in TSH simulations. For this purpose, we present a computational protocol that is easy to implement and increases the computational effort only in the critical regions. We test this procedure through TSH simulations of a GFP chromophore model (OHBI) and a light-driven rotary molecular motor (F-NAIBP) on semiempirical MRCI potential energy surfaces, by comparing the results from simulations with adaptive time steps to analogous ones with constant time steps. For both test molecules, the number of successful trajectories without technical failures rises significantly, from 53% to 95% for OHBI and from 25% to 96% for F-NAIBP. The computed excited-state lifetime remains essentially the same for OHBI and increases somewhat for F-NAIBP, and there is almost no change in the computed quantum efficiency for internal rotation in F-NAIBP. We recommend the general use of adaptive time steps in TSH simulations with active-space CI methods because this will help to avoid technical problems, increase the overall efficiency and robustness of the simulations, and allow for a more complete sampling.

  3. Automatic multirate methods for ordinary differential equations. [Adaptive time steps

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A study is made of the application of integration methods in which different step sizes are used for different members of a system of equations. Such methods can result in savings if the cost of derivative evaluation is high or if a system is sparse; however, the estimation and control of errors is very difficult and can lead to high overheads. Three approaches are discussed, and it is shown that the least intuitive is the most promising. 2 figures.

  4. An adaptive time-stepping strategy for solving the phase field crystal model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhengru; Ma, Yuan; Qiao, Zhonghua

    2013-09-15

    In this work, we will propose an adaptive time step method for simulating the dynamics of the phase field crystal (PFC) model. The numerical simulation of the PFC model needs long time to reach steady state, and then large time-stepping method is necessary. Unconditionally energy stable schemes are used to solve the PFC model. The time steps are adaptively determined based on the time derivative of the corresponding energy. It is found that the use of the proposed time step adaptivity cannot only resolve the steady state solution, but also the dynamical development of the solution efficiently and accurately. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the CPU time is significantly saved for long time simulations.

  5. An Adaptive Fourier Filter for Relaxing Time Stepping Constraints for Explicit Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Gelb, Anne; Archibald, Richard K

    2015-01-01

    Filtering is necessary to stabilize piecewise smooth solutions. The resulting diffusion stabilizes the method, but may fail to resolve the solution near discontinuities. Moreover, high order filtering still requires cost prohibitive time stepping. This paper introduces an adaptive filter that controls spurious modes of the solution, but is not unnecessarily diffusive. Consequently we are able to stabilize the solution with larger time steps, but also take advantage of the accuracy of a high order filter.

  6. Non-iterative adaptive time stepping with truncation error control for simulating variable-density flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirthe, E. M.; Graf, T.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid density variations occur due to changes in the solute concentration, temperature and pressure of groundwater. Examples are interaction between freshwater and seawater, radioactive waste disposal, groundwater contamination, and geothermal energy production. The physical coupling between flow and transport introduces non-linearity in the governing mathematical equations, such that solving variable-density flow problems typically requires very long computational time. Computational efficiency can be attained through the use of adaptive time-stepping schemes. The aim of this work is therefore to apply a non-iterative adaptive time-stepping scheme based on local truncation error in variable-density flow problems. That new scheme is implemented into the code of the HydroGeoSphere model (Therrien et al., 2011). The new time-stepping scheme is applied to the Elder (1967) and the Shikaze et al. (1998) problem of free convection in porous and fractured-porous media, respectively. Numerical simulations demonstrate that non-iterative time-stepping based on local truncation error control fully automates the time step size and efficiently limits the temporal discretization error to the user-defined tolerance. Results of the Elder problem show that the new time-stepping scheme presented here is significantly more efficient than uniform time-stepping when high accuracy is required. Results of the Shikaze problem reveal that the new scheme is considerably faster than conventional time-stepping where time step sizes are either constant or controlled by absolute head/concentration changes. Future research will focus on the application of the new time-stepping scheme to variable-density flow in complex real-world fractured-porous rock.

  7. Adaptive time stepping algorithm for Lagrangian transport models: Theory and idealised test cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Syed Hyder Ali Muttaqi; Heemink, Arnold Willem; Gräwe, Ulf; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2013-08-01

    Random walk simulations have an excellent potential in marine and oceanic modelling. This is essentially due to their relative simplicity and their ability to represent advective transport without being plagued by the deficiencies of the Eulerian methods. The physical and mathematical foundations of random walk modelling of turbulent diffusion have become solid over the years. Random walk models rest on the theory of stochastic differential equations. Unfortunately, the latter and the related numerical aspects have not attracted much attention in the oceanic modelling community. The main goal of this paper is to help bridge the gap by developing an efficient adaptive time stepping algorithm for random walk models. Its performance is examined on two idealised test cases of turbulent dispersion; (i) pycnocline crossing and (ii) non-flat isopycnal diffusion, which are inspired by shallow-sea dynamics and large-scale ocean transport processes, respectively. The numerical results of the adaptive time stepping algorithm are compared with the fixed-time increment Milstein scheme, showing that the adaptive time stepping algorithm for Lagrangian random walk models is more efficient than its fixed step-size counterpart without any loss in accuracy.

  8. Exponential time-differencing with embedded Runge–Kutta adaptive step control

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, P.; Brio, M.; Moloney, J.V.

    2015-01-01

    We have presented the first embedded Runge–Kutta exponential time-differencing (RKETD) methods of fourth order with third order embedding and fifth order with third order embedding for non-Rosenbrock type nonlinear systems. A procedure for constructing RKETD methods that accounts for both order conditions and stability is outlined. In our stability analysis, the fast time scale is represented by a full linear operator in contrast to particular scalar cases considered before. An effective time-stepping strategy based on reducing both ETD function evaluations and rejected steps is described. Comparisons of performance with adaptive-stepping integrating factor (IF) are carried out on a set of canonical partial differential equations: the shock-fronts of Burgers equation, interacting KdV solitons, KS controlled chaos, and critical collapse of two-dimensional NLS.

  9. Multi time-step wavefront reconstruction for tomographic adaptive-optics systems.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoshito H; Akiyama, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Lardiére, Olivier; Andersen, David R; Correia, Carlos; Jackson, Kate; Bradley, Colin

    2016-04-01

    In tomographic adaptive-optics (AO) systems, errors due to tomographic wavefront reconstruction limit the performance and angular size of the scientific field of view (FoV), where AO correction is effective. We propose a multi time-step tomographic wavefront reconstruction method to reduce the tomographic error by using measurements from both the current and previous time steps simultaneously. We further outline the method to feed the reconstructor with both wind speed and direction of each turbulence layer. An end-to-end numerical simulation, assuming a multi-object AO (MOAO) system on a 30 m aperture telescope, shows that the multi time-step reconstruction increases the Strehl ratio (SR) over a scientific FoV of 10 arc min in diameter by a factor of 1.5-1.8 when compared to the classical tomographic reconstructor, depending on the guide star asterism and with perfect knowledge of wind speeds and directions. We also evaluate the multi time-step reconstruction method and the wind estimation method on the RAVEN demonstrator under laboratory setting conditions. The wind speeds and directions at multiple atmospheric layers are measured successfully in the laboratory experiment by our wind estimation method with errors below 2  ms-1. With these wind estimates, the multi time-step reconstructor increases the SR value by a factor of 1.2-1.5, which is consistent with a prediction from the end-to-end numerical simulation. PMID:27140785

  10. Using preconditioned adaptive step size Runge-Kutta methods for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Carrington, Tucker Jr.

    2004-12-15

    If the Hamiltonian is time dependent it is common to solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation by dividing the propagation interval into slices and using an (e.g., split operator, Chebyshev, Lanczos) approximate matrix exponential within each slice. We show that a preconditioned adaptive step size Runge-Kutta method can be much more efficient. For a chirped laser pulse designed to favor the dissociation of HF the preconditioned adaptive step size Runge-Kutta method is about an order of magnitude more efficient than the time sliced method.

  11. Numerical simulation of diffusion MRI signals using an adaptive time-stepping method.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Rebecca; Calhoun, Donna; Poupon, Cyril; Le Bihan, Denis

    2014-01-20

    The effect on the MRI signal of water diffusion in biological tissues in the presence of applied magnetic field gradient pulses can be modelled by a multiple compartment Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation. We present a method for the numerical solution of this equation by coupling a standard Cartesian spatial discretization with an adaptive time discretization. The time discretization is done using the explicit Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev method, which is more efficient than the forward Euler time discretization for diffusive-type problems. We use this approach to simulate the diffusion MRI signal from the extra-cylindrical compartment in a tissue model of the brain gray matter consisting of cylindrical and spherical cells and illustrate the effect of cell membrane permeability. PMID:24351275

  12. Numerical simulation of diffusion MRI signals using an adaptive time-stepping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Rebecca; Calhoun, Donna; Poupon, Cyril; Le Bihan, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The effect on the MRI signal of water diffusion in biological tissues in the presence of applied magnetic field gradient pulses can be modelled by a multiple compartment Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation. We present a method for the numerical solution of this equation by coupling a standard Cartesian spatial discretization with an adaptive time discretization. The time discretization is done using the explicit Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev method, which is more efficient than the forward Euler time discretization for diffusive-type problems. We use this approach to simulate the diffusion MRI signal from the extra-cylindrical compartment in a tissue model of the brain gray matter consisting of cylindrical and spherical cells and illustrate the effect of cell membrane permeability.

  13. Non-iterative adaptive time-stepping scheme with temporal truncation error control for simulating variable-density flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirthe, Eugenia M.; Graf, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The automatic non-iterative second-order time-stepping scheme based on the temporal truncation error proposed by Kavetski et al. [Kavetski D, Binning P, Sloan SW. Non-iterative time-stepping schemes with adaptive truncation error control for the solution of Richards equation. Water Resour Res 2002;38(10):1211, http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2001WR000720.] is implemented into the code of the HydroGeoSphere model. This time-stepping scheme is applied for the first time to the low-Rayleigh-number thermal Elder problem of free convection in porous media [van Reeuwijk M, Mathias SA, Simmons CT, Ward JD. Insights from a pseudospectral approach to the Elder problem. Water Resour Res 2009;45:W04416, http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2008WR007421.], and to the solutal [Shikaze SG, Sudicky EA, Schwartz FW. Density-dependent solute transport in discretely-fractured geological media: is prediction possible? J Contam Hydrol 1998;34:273-91] problem of free convection in fractured-porous media. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed scheme efficiently limits the temporal truncation error to a user-defined tolerance by controlling the time-step size. The non-iterative second-order time-stepping scheme can be applied to (i) thermal and solutal variable-density flow problems, (ii) linear and non-linear density functions, and (iii) problems including porous and fractured-porous media.

  14. Efficient computation of the Grünwald-Letnikov fractional diffusion derivative using adaptive time step memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Christopher L.; Bhattacharya, Nirupama; Sprouse, Brian P.; Silva, Gabriel A.

    2015-09-01

    Computing numerical solutions to fractional differential equations can be computationally intensive due to the effect of non-local derivatives in which all previous time points contribute to the current iteration. In general, numerical approaches that depend on truncating part of the system history while efficient, can suffer from high degrees of error and inaccuracy. Here we present an adaptive time step memory method for smooth functions applied to the Grünwald-Letnikov fractional diffusion derivative. This method is computationally efficient and results in smaller errors during numerical simulations. Sampled points along the system's history at progressively longer intervals are assumed to reflect the values of neighboring time points. By including progressively fewer points backward in time, a temporally 'weighted' history is computed that includes contributions from the entire past of the system, maintaining accuracy, but with fewer points actually calculated, greatly improving computational efficiency.

  15. The ESO adaptive optics real-time computer platform: a step toward the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedrigo, Enrico; Donaldson, Robert; Soenke, Christian; Hubin, Norbert N.

    2004-10-01

    ESO now operates several AO systems in the Paranal observatory. Most of them are the outcome of different and independent efforts resulting in different and incompatible systems with all the problems of maintaining and evolving them. At the same time, industry is now proposing powerful embedded computers and new standard technologies that enable the construction of massive real time parallel computers, with a technology roadmap that looks extremely promising. The ESO AO Platform initiative aims at taking this unique opportunity of gathering all the experience accumulated so far in building and operating AO system and the recent advances offered by the industry to define and build a standard hardware and software platform able to run every AO system of the near future of the VLT with an eye towards OWL. We review the key technologies that enable the design of a common AO-RTC and we discuss the main choices of the AO Platform initiative.

  16. Multiple Model Adaptive Two-Step Filter and Motion Tracking Sliding-Mode Guidance for Missiles with Time Lag in Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Di; Zhang, Yong-An; Duan, Guang-Ren

    The two-step filter has been combined with a modified Sage-Husa time-varying measurement noise statistical estimator, which is able to estimate the covariance of measurement noise on line, to generate an adaptive two-step filter. In many practical applications such as the bearings-only guidance, some model parameters and the process noise covariance are also unknown a priori. Based on the adaptive two-step filter, we utilize multiple models in the first-step filtering as well as in the time update of the second-step filtering to handle the uncertainties of model parameters and process noise covariance. In each timestep of the multiple model filtering, probabilistic weights punishing the estimates of first-step state from different models, and their associated covariance matrices are acquired according to Bayes’ rule. The weighted sum of the estimates of first-step state and that of the associated covariance matrices are extracted as the ultimate estimate and covariance of the first-step state, and are used as measurement information for the measurement update of the second-step state. Thus there is still only one iteration process and no apparent enhancement of computation burden. A motion tracking sliding-mode guidance law is presented for missiles with non-negligible delays in actual acceleration. This guidance law guarantees guidance accuracy and is able to enhance observability in bearings-only tracking. In bearings-only cases, the multiple model adaptive two-step filter is applied to the motion tracking sliding-mode guidance law, supplying relative range, relative velocity, and target acceleration information. In simulation experiments satisfactory filtering and guidance results are obtained, even if the filter runs into unknown target maneuvers and unknown time-varying measurement noise covariance, and the guidance law has to deal with a large time lag in acceleration.

  17. A novel adaptive time stepping variant of the Boris–Buneman integrator for the simulation of particle accelerators with space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Toggweiler, Matthias; Adelmann, Andreas; Arbenz, Peter; Yang, Jianjun

    2014-09-15

    We show that adaptive time stepping in particle accelerator simulation is an enhancement for certain problems. The new algorithm has been implemented in the OPAL (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library) framework. The idea is to adjust the frequency of costly self-field calculations, which are needed to model Coulomb interaction (space charge) effects. In analogy to a Kepler orbit simulation that requires a higher time step resolution at the close encounter, we propose to choose the time step based on the magnitude of the space charge forces. Inspired by geometric integration techniques, our algorithm chooses the time step proportional to a function of the current phase space state instead of calculating a local error estimate like a conventional adaptive procedure. Building on recent work, a more profound argument is given on how exactly the time step should be chosen. An intermediate algorithm, initially built to allow a clearer analysis by introducing separate time steps for external field and self-field integration, turned out to be useful by its own, for a large class of problems.

  18. Finite-difference modeling with variable grid-size and adaptive time-step in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinxin; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2014-04-01

    Forward modeling of elastic wave propagation in porous media has great importance for understanding and interpreting the influences of rock properties on characteristics of seismic wavefield. However, the finite-difference forward-modeling method is usually implemented with global spatial grid-size and time-step; it consumes large amounts of computational cost when small-scaled oil/gas-bearing structures or large velocity-contrast exist underground. To overcome this handicap, combined with variable grid-size and time-step, this paper developed a staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for elastic wave modeling in porous media. Variable finite-difference coefficients and wavefield interpolation were used to realize the transition of wave propagation between regions of different grid-size. The accuracy and efficiency of the algorithm were shown by numerical examples. The proposed method is advanced with low computational cost in elastic wave simulation for heterogeneous oil/gas reservoirs.

  19. Continuous-time adaptive critics.

    PubMed

    Hanselmann, Thomas; Noakes, Lyle; Zaknich, Anthony

    2007-05-01

    A continuous-time formulation of an adaptive critic design (ACD) is investigated. Connections to the discrete case are made, where backpropagation through time (BPTT) and real-time recurrent learning (RTRL) are prevalent. Practical benefits are that this framework fits in well with plant descriptions given by differential equations and that any standard integration routine with adaptive step-size does an adaptive sampling for free. A second-order actor adaptation using Newton's method is established for fast actor convergence for a general plant and critic. Also, a fast critic update for concurrent actor-critic training is introduced to immediately apply necessary adjustments of critic parameters induced by actor updates to keep the Bellman optimality correct to first-order approximation after actor changes. Thus, critic and actor updates may be performed at the same time until some substantial error build up in the Bellman optimality or temporal difference equation, when a traditional critic training needs to be performed and then another interval of concurrent actor-critic training may resume. PMID:17526332

  20. Grief: Difficult Times, Simple Steps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waszak, Emily Lane

    This guide presents techniques to assist others in coping with the loss of a loved one. Using the language of 9 layperson, the book contains more than 100 tips for caregivers or loved ones. A simple step is presented on each page, followed by reasons and instructions for each step. Chapters include: "What to Say"; "Helpful Things to Do"; "Dealing…

  1. Secondary tasks impair adaptation to step and gradual visual displacements

    PubMed Central

    Galea, J.M.; Sami, S.; Albert, N.B.; Miall, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Performing two competing tasks can result in dividing cognitive resources between the tasks and impaired motor adaptation. In previous work we have reported impaired learning when participants had to switch from one visual displacement adaptation task to another. Here we examined whether or not a secondary task had a similar effect on adaptation to a visual displacement . The resource dividing task involved simultaneously adapting to a step visual displacement whilst vocally shadowing an auditory stimulus . The switching task required participants to adapt to opposing visual displacements in an alternating manner with the left and right hands. We found that both manipulations had a detrimental effect on adaptation rate. We then integrated these tasks and found the combination caused a greater decrease in adaptation rate than either manipulation in isolation. Experiment 2 showed that adaptation to a gradually imposed visual displacement was influenced in a similar manner to step adaptation. Therefore although gradual adaptation involves minimal awareness it still can be disrupted by a cognitively demanding secondary task. We propose that awareness and cognitive resource can be regarded as qualitatively different but that awareness may be a marker of the amount of resource required. For example, large errors are both noticed and require substantial cognitive resource to connect. However a lack of awareness does not mean an adaptation task will be resistant to interference from a resource consuming secondary task. PMID:20101396

  2. Hydrologic consistency analysed through modeling at multiple time steps: does hydrological model performance benefit from finer time step information?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficchi, Andrea; Perrin, Charles; Andréassian, Vazken

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the operational utility of fine time step hydro-climatic information using a large catchment data set. The originality of this data set lies in the availability of precipitation data from the 6-minute rain gauges of Météo-France, and in the size of the catchment set (217 French catchments in total). The rainfall-runoff model used (GR4) has been adapted to hourly and sub-hourly time steps (up to 6-minute) from the daily time step version (Perrin et al., 2003). The model is applied at different time steps ranging from 6-minute to 1 day (6-, 12-, 30-minute, 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-hour and 1 day) and the evolution of model performance for each catchment is evaluated at the daily time step by aggregation of model outputs. Three classes of behavior are found according to the trend of model performance as the time step becomes finer: (i) catchments presenting an improvement of model performance; (ii) catchments with a model performance insensitive to the time step; (iii) catchments for which the performance even deteriorates as the time step becomes finer. The reasons behind these different trends are investigated from a hydrological point of view, by relating the model sensitivity to data at finer time step to catchment descriptors. References: Perrin, C., C. Michel and V. Andréassian (2003), "Improvement of a parsimonious model for streamflow simulation", Journal of Hydrology, 279(1-4): 275-289.

  3. Simulating system dynamics with arbitrary time step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantorovich, L.

    2007-02-01

    We suggest a dynamic simulation method that allows efficient and realistic modeling of kinetic processes, such as atomic diffusion, in which time has its actual meaning. Our method is similar in spirit to widely used kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) techniques; however, in our approach, the time step can be chosen arbitrarily. This has an advantage in some cases, e.g., when the transition rates change with time sufficiently fast over the period of the KMC time step (e.g., due to time dependence of some external factors influencing kinetics such as moving scanning probe microscopy tip or external time-dependent field) or when the clock time is set by some external conditions, and it is convenient to use equal time steps instead of the random choice of the KMC algorithm in order to build up probability distribution functions. We show that an arbitrary choice of the time step can be afforded by building up the complete list of events including the “residence site” and multihop transitions. The idea of the method is illustrated in a simple “toy” model of a finite one-dimensional lattice of potential wells with unequal jump rates to either side, which can be studied analytically. We show that for any choice of the time step, our general kinetics method reproduces exactly the solution of the corresponding master equations for any choice of the time steps. The final kinetics also matches the standard KMC, and this allows better understanding of this algorithm, in which the time step is chosen in a certain way and the system always advances by a single hop.

  4. "It Might Actually Work This Time": Benefits and Barriers to Adapted 12-Step Facilitation Therapy and Mutual-Help Group Attendance From the Perspective of Dually Diagnosed Individuals.

    PubMed

    Hagler, Kylee J; Rice, Samara L; Muñoz, Rosa E; Salvador, Julie G; Forcehimes, Alyssa A; Bogenschutz, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Most U.S. healthcare professionals encourage mutual-help group involvement as an adjunct to treatment or aftercare for individuals with substance use disorders, yet there are multiple challenges in engaging in these community groups. Dually diagnosed individuals (DDIs) may face additional challenges in affiliating with mutual-help groups. Twelve-step facilitation for DDIs (TSF-DD), a manualized treatment to facilitate mutual-help group involvement, was developed to help patients engage in Double Trouble in Recovery (DTR), a mutual-help group tailored to DDIs. Given the promising role that TSF-DD and DTR may have for increasing abstinence while managing psychiatric symptoms, the aim of the current study was to systematically examine reasons for TSF-DD and DTR attendance from the perspective of DDIs using focus group data. Participants were a subset (n = 15) of individuals diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder as well as a major depressive, bipolar, or psychotic disorder who participated in a parent study testing the efficacy of TSF-DD for increasing mutual-help group involvement and reducing alcohol use. Analyses of focus group data revealed that participants construed DTR and TSF-DD as helpful tools in the understanding and management of their disorders. Relative to other mutual-help groups in which participants reported feeling ostracized because of their dual diagnoses, participants reported that it was beneficial to learn about dual disorders in a safe and accepting environment. Participants also expressed aspects that they disliked. Results from this study yield helpful empirical recommendations to healthcare professionals seeking to increase DDIs' participation in DTR or other mutual-help groups. PMID:26340570

  5. Large step structure measurement by using white light interferometry based on adaptive scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yan; Guo, Tong; Li, Feng; Wang, Siming; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2013-01-01

    As an important measuring technique, white light scanning interferometry can realize non-contact, fast and high accurate measurement. However, when measuring the large step structure, the white light scanning interferometry has the problems of long time consumption and low signal utilization. In this paper, a kind of adaptive scanning technique is proposed to measure the large step structure to improve its efficiency. This technique can be realized in two ways-the pre-configuration mode and the auto-focusing mode. During the scanning process, the image collection is limited within the coherence area, and in other positions, the motion is speeded up. The adaptive scanning is driven by the nano-measuring machine (NMM) which reaches nanometer accuracy and is controlled by the measurement software. The testing result of 100μm step height shows that the adaptive scanning can improve the measuring efficiency dramatically compared with conventional fixed-step scanning and it keeps the same high accuracy.

  6. Extrapolated implicit-explicit time stepping.

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinescu, E. M.; Sandu, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    2010-01-01

    This paper constructs extrapolated implicit-explicit time stepping methods that allow one to efficiently solve problems with both stiff and nonstiff components. The proposed methods are based on Euler steps and can provide very high order discretizations of ODEs, index-1 DAEs, and PDEs in the method-of-lines framework. Implicit-explicit schemes based on extrapolation are simple to construct, easy to implement, and straightforward to parallelize. This work establishes the existence of perturbed asymptotic expansions of global errors, explains the convergence orders of these methods, and studies their linear stability properties. Numerical results with stiff ODE, DAE, and PDE test problems confirm the theoretical findings and illustrate the potential of these methods to solve multiphysics multiscale problems.

  7. Sensory adaptation for timing perception

    PubMed Central

    Roseboom, Warrick; Linares, Daniel; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2015-01-01

    Recent sensory experience modifies subjective timing perception. For example, when visual events repeatedly lead auditory events, such as when the sound and video tracks of a movie are out of sync, subsequent vision-leads-audio presentations are reported as more simultaneous. This phenomenon could provide insights into the fundamental problem of how timing is represented in the brain, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that the effect of recent experience on timing perception is not just subjective; recent sensory experience also modifies relative timing discrimination. This result indicates that recent sensory history alters the encoding of relative timing in sensory areas, excluding explanations of the subjective phenomenon based only on decision-level changes. The pattern of changes in timing discrimination suggests the existence of two sensory components, similar to those previously reported for visual spatial attributes: a lateral shift in the nonlinear transducer that maps relative timing into perceptual relative timing and an increase in transducer slope around the exposed timing. The existence of these components would suggest that previous explanations of how recent experience may change the sensory encoding of timing, such as changes in sensory latencies or simple implementations of neural population codes, cannot account for the effect of sensory adaptation on timing perception. PMID:25788590

  8. Simulating stochastic dynamics using large time steps.

    PubMed

    Corradini, O; Faccioli, P; Orland, H

    2009-12-01

    We present an approach to investigate the long-time stochastic dynamics of multidimensional classical systems, in contact with a heat bath. When the potential energy landscape is rugged, the kinetics displays a decoupling of short- and long-time scales and both molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are generally inefficient. Using a field theoretic approach, we perform analytically the average over the short-time stochastic fluctuations. This way, we obtain an effective theory, which generates the same long-time dynamics of the original theory, but has a lower time-resolution power. Such an approach is used to develop an improved version of the MC algorithm, which is particularly suitable to investigate the dynamics of rare conformational transitions. In the specific case of molecular systems at room temperature, we show that elementary integration time steps used to simulate the effective theory can be chosen a factor approximately 100 larger than those used in the original theory. Our results are illustrated and tested on a simple system, characterized by a rugged energy landscape. PMID:20365123

  9. Projection Operator: A Step Towards Certification of Adaptive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larchev, Gregory V.; Campbell, Stefan F.; Kaneshige, John T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major barriers to wider use of adaptive controllers in commercial aviation is the lack of appropriate certification procedures. In order to be certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), an aircraft controller is expected to meet a set of guidelines on functionality and reliability while not negatively impacting other systems or safety of aircraft operations. Due to their inherent time-variant and non-linear behavior, adaptive controllers cannot be certified via the metrics used for linear conventional controllers, such as gain and phase margin. Projection Operator is a robustness augmentation technique that bounds the output of a non-linear adaptive controller while conforming to the Lyapunov stability rules. It can also be used to limit the control authority of the adaptive component so that the said control authority can be arbitrarily close to that of a linear controller. In this paper we will present the results of applying the Projection Operator to a Model-Reference Adaptive Controller (MRAC), varying the amount of control authority, and comparing controller s performance and stability characteristics with those of a linear controller. We will also show how adjusting Projection Operator parameters can make it easier for the controller to satisfy the certification guidelines by enabling a tradeoff between controller s performance and robustness.

  10. Empirical versus time stepping with embedded error control for density-driven flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, Anis; Ackerer, Philippe

    2010-08-01

    Modeling density-driven flow in porous media may require very long computational time due to the nonlinear coupling between flow and transport equations. Time stepping schemes are often used to adapt the time step size in order to reduce the computational cost of the simulation. In this work, the empirical time stepping scheme which adapts the time step size according to the performance of the iterative nonlinear solver is compared to an adaptive time stepping scheme where the time step length is controlled by the temporal truncation error. Results of the simulations of the Elder problem show that (1) the empirical time stepping scheme can lead to inaccurate results even with a small convergence criterion, (2) accurate results are obtained when the time step size selection is based on the truncation error control, (3) a non iterative scheme with proper time step management can be faster and leads to more accurate solution than the standard iterative procedure with the empirical time stepping and (4) the temporal truncation error can have a significant effect on the results and can be considered as one of the reasons for the differences observed in the Elder numerical results.

  11. Telepresence, time delay, and adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Held, Richard; Durlach, Nathaniel

    1989-01-01

    Displays are now being used extensively throughout the society. More and more time is spent watching television, movies, computer screens, etc. Furthermore, in an increasing number of cases, the observer interacts with the display and plays the role of operator as well as observer. To a large extent, the normal behavior in the normal environment can also be thought of in these same terms. Taking liberties with Shakespeare, it might be said, all the world's a display and all the individuals in it are operators in and on the display. Within this general context of interactive display systems, a discussion is began with a conceptual overview of a particular class of such systems, namely, teleoperator systems. The notion is considered of telepresence and the factors that limit telepresence, including decorrelation between the: (1) motor output of the teleoperator as sensed directly via the kinesthetic/tactual system, and (2) the motor output of the teleoperator as sensed indirectly via feedback from the slave robot, i.e., via a visual display of the motor actions of the slave robot. Finally, the deleterious effect of time delay (a particular decorrelation) on sensory-motor adaptation (an important phenomenon related to telepresence) is examined.

  12. Time to pause before the next step

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    Many scientists, who have staunchly supported ITER for years, are coming to realize it is time to further rethink fusion energy`s development strategy. Specifically, as was suggested by Grant Logan and Dale Meade, and in keeping with the restructuring of 1996, a theme of better, cheaper, faster fusion would serve the program more effectively than ``demonstrating controlled ignition...and integrated testing of the high-heat-flux and nuclear components required to utilize fusion energy...`` which are the important ingredients of ITER`s objectives. The author has personally shifted his view for a mixture of technical and political reasons. On the technical side, he senses that through advanced tokamak research, spherical tokamak research, and advanced stellarator work, scientists are coming to a new understanding that might make a burning-plasma device significantly smaller and less expensive. Thus waiting for a few years, even ten years, seems prudent. Scientifically, there is fascinating physics to be learned through studies of burning plasma on a tokamak. And clearly if one wishes to study burning plasma physics in a sustained plasma, there is no other configuration with an adequate database on which to proceed. But what is the urgency of moving towards an ITER-like step focused on burning plasma? Some of the arguments put forward and the counter arguments are discussed here.

  13. Seven Steps to On-Time Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konchar, Mark; Sanvido, Victor

    1999-01-01

    Describes seven steps to consider when making project-delivery decisions that include defining the school district's goals and profile, selecting the project-delivery system and procurement method, selecting the project team and contract type, and developing and confirming the facility program. Concluding comments address the district review of…

  14. Collocation and Galerkin Time-Stepping Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, H. T.

    2011-01-01

    We study the numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations by one-step methods where the solution at tn is known and that at t(sub n+1) is to be calculated. The approaches employed are collocation, continuous Galerkin (CG) and discontinuous Galerkin (DG). Relations among these three approaches are established. A quadrature formula using s evaluation points is employed for the Galerkin formulations. We show that with such a quadrature, the CG method is identical to the collocation method using quadrature points as collocation points. Furthermore, if the quadrature formula is the right Radau one (including t(sub n+1)), then the DG and CG methods also become identical, and they reduce to the Radau IIA collocation method. In addition, we present a generalization of DG that yields a method identical to CG and collocation with arbitrary collocation points. Thus, the collocation, CG, and generalized DG methods are equivalent, and the latter two methods can be formulated using the differential instead of integral equation. Finally, all schemes discussed can be cast as s-stage implicit Runge-Kutta methods.

  15. Interference between adaptation to double steps and adaptation to rotated feedback in spite of differences in directional selectivity.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Gerd

    2016-06-01

    Two key features of sensorimotor adaptation are the directional selectivity of adaptive changes and the interference of adaptations to opposite directions. The present study investigated whether directional selectivity and interference of adaptation are related to executive functions and whether these phenomena differ between two methods for visuomotor adaptation. Subjects adapted at three target directions to clockwise or counterclockwise rotated feedback or to clockwise or counterclockwise target displacements (double steps). Both adaptation methods induce rotations of movement trajectories into the same direction, but provide visual information differently. The results showed that adaptation progressed differently between three targets. When movements adapted clockwise, adaptation was best at the most clockwise located target, and when movements adapted counterclockwise, it was best at the most counterclockwise located target, suggesting that spatial generalization between target directions is related to the direction of motor adaptation. The two adaptation methods produced different adaptation patterns, which indicate a further impact of visual information. A second adaptation to the other and opposite-directed discordance was worse than naive adaptation and washed out the aftereffects from the first adaptation, confirming that both adaptation methods interfered. Executive functions were significant covariate for overall interference and interference of target-specific adaptation. The results suggest that directional selectivity of adaptation is shaped by the direction of motor adaptation and the visual information provided. The interference of both adaptation methods indicates that they share adaptive mechanisms for recalibration. The interference is the lower the better subjects are able to cognitively switch between tasks and to inhibit prepotent responses. Therefore, cognitive functions seem to be involved in the inhibition of non-adequate sensorimotor

  16. Time scaling relations for step bunches from models with step-step attractions (B1-type models)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasteva, A.; Popova, H.; Akutsu, N.; Tonchev, V.

    2016-03-01

    The step bunching instability is studied in three models of step motion defined in terms of ordinary differential equations (ODE). The source of instability in these models is step-step attraction, it is opposed by step-step repulsion and the developing surface patterns reflect the balance between the two. The first model, TE2, is a generalization of the seminal model of Tersoff et al. (1995). The second one, LW2, is obtained from the model of Liu and Weeks (1998) using the repulsions term to construct the attractions one with retained possibility to change the parameters in the two independently. The third model, MM2, is a minimal one constructed ad hoc and in this article it plays a central role. New scheme for scaling the ODE in vicinal studies is applied towards deciphering the pre-factors in the time-scaling relations. In all these models the patterned surface is self-similar - only one length scale is necessary to describe its evolution (hence B1-type). The bunches form finite angles with the terraces. Integrating numerically the equations for step motion and changing systematically the parameters we obtain the overall dependence of time-scaling exponent β on the power of step-step attractions p as β = 1/(3+p) for MM2 and hypothesize based on restricted set of data that it is β = 1/(5+p) for LW2 and TE2.

  17. Improving quality: one step at a time.

    PubMed

    Blankson-seck, N; Butta, P

    1999-01-01

    The notion that health care workers have the power to improve the quality of their services is a key to AVSC's efforts worldwide. The COPE process, AVSC's low-cost intervention for improving quality at service sites, brings together supervisors and staff at all levels to identify barriers to quality services and helps them find solutions they can implement with their own resources. For example, a hospital in Tanzania had tried unsuccessfully to obtain the funds to repair or replace broken equipment. Using the COPE process, the hospital used available funds to send a technician for training in maintenance and repair. Now everything from blood pressure equipment to bedsprings is repaired promptly, and quality has improved. Another hospital in Tanzania coped with the problem of broken bedsprings (patients were putting mattresses on the floor) by using readily available wire mesh to make repairs. In Kenya, the lack of running water forced staff to collect water from a cistern, taking time from their other responsibilities. During a COPE meeting to resolve the problem the staff bemoaned the fact that they did not have the funds to replace the water system. Then the gardener told the group that all they needed to do was fix a broken pipe. The repair was made at minimal cost, and the water supply was restored. The COPE process reveals that health care staff not only can identify obstacles to quality, they often know the cause of the problem and can offer the best solutions. PMID:12295155

  18. Space-time adaptive numerical methods for geophysical applications.

    PubMed

    Castro, C E; Käser, M; Toro, E F

    2009-11-28

    In this paper we present high-order formulations of the finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin finite-element methods for wave propagation problems with a space-time adaptation technique using unstructured meshes in order to reduce computational cost without reducing accuracy. Both methods can be derived in a similar mathematical framework and are identical in their first-order version. In their extension to higher order accuracy in space and time, both methods use spatial polynomials of higher degree inside each element, a high-order solution of the generalized Riemann problem and a high-order time integration method based on the Taylor series expansion. The static adaptation strategy uses locally refined high-resolution meshes in areas with low wave speeds to improve the approximation quality. Furthermore, the time step length is chosen locally adaptive such that the solution is evolved explicitly in time by an optimal time step determined by a local stability criterion. After validating the numerical approach, both schemes are applied to geophysical wave propagation problems such as tsunami waves and seismic waves comparing the new approach with the classical global time-stepping technique. The problem of mesh partitioning for large-scale applications on multi-processor architectures is discussed and a new mesh partition approach is proposed and tested to further reduce computational cost. PMID:19840984

  19. Multiple-time-stepping generalized hybrid Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano, Bruno; Akhmatskaya, Elena; Reich, Sebastian; Azpiroz, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    Performance of the generalized shadow hybrid Monte Carlo (GSHMC) method [1], which proved to be superior in sampling efficiency over its predecessors [2-4], molecular dynamics and hybrid Monte Carlo, can be further improved by combining it with multi-time-stepping (MTS) and mollification of slow forces. We demonstrate that the comparatively simple modifications of the method not only lead to better performance of GSHMC itself but also allow for beating the best performed methods, which use the similar force splitting schemes. In addition we show that the same ideas can be successfully applied to the conventional generalized hybrid Monte Carlo method (GHMC). The resulting methods, MTS-GHMC and MTS-GSHMC, provide accurate reproduction of thermodynamic and dynamical properties, exact temperature control during simulation and computational robustness and efficiency. MTS-GHMC uses a generalized momentum update to achieve weak stochastic stabilization to the molecular dynamics (MD) integrator. MTS-GSHMC adds the use of a shadow (modified) Hamiltonian to filter the MD trajectories in the HMC scheme. We introduce a new shadow Hamiltonian formulation adapted to force-splitting methods. The use of such Hamiltonians improves the acceptance rate of trajectories and has a strong impact on the sampling efficiency of the method. Both methods were implemented in the open-source MD package ProtoMol and were tested on a water and a protein systems. Results were compared to those obtained using a Langevin Molly (LM) method [5] on the same systems. The test results demonstrate the superiority of the new methods over LM in terms of stability, accuracy and sampling efficiency. This suggests that putting the MTS approach in the framework of hybrid Monte Carlo and using the natural stochasticity offered by the generalized hybrid Monte Carlo lead to improving stability of MTS and allow for achieving larger step sizes in the simulation of complex systems.

  20. Multiple-time-stepping generalized hybrid Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Escribano, Bruno; Akhmatskaya, Elena; Reich, Sebastian; Azpiroz, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    Performance of the generalized shadow hybrid Monte Carlo (GSHMC) method [1], which proved to be superior in sampling efficiency over its predecessors [2–4], molecular dynamics and hybrid Monte Carlo, can be further improved by combining it with multi-time-stepping (MTS) and mollification of slow forces. We demonstrate that the comparatively simple modifications of the method not only lead to better performance of GSHMC itself but also allow for beating the best performed methods, which use the similar force splitting schemes. In addition we show that the same ideas can be successfully applied to the conventional generalized hybrid Monte Carlo method (GHMC). The resulting methods, MTS-GHMC and MTS-GSHMC, provide accurate reproduction of thermodynamic and dynamical properties, exact temperature control during simulation and computational robustness and efficiency. MTS-GHMC uses a generalized momentum update to achieve weak stochastic stabilization to the molecular dynamics (MD) integrator. MTS-GSHMC adds the use of a shadow (modified) Hamiltonian to filter the MD trajectories in the HMC scheme. We introduce a new shadow Hamiltonian formulation adapted to force-splitting methods. The use of such Hamiltonians improves the acceptance rate of trajectories and has a strong impact on the sampling efficiency of the method. Both methods were implemented in the open-source MD package ProtoMol and were tested on a water and a protein systems. Results were compared to those obtained using a Langevin Molly (LM) method [5] on the same systems. The test results demonstrate the superiority of the new methods over LM in terms of stability, accuracy and sampling efficiency. This suggests that putting the MTS approach in the framework of hybrid Monte Carlo and using the natural stochasticity offered by the generalized hybrid Monte Carlo lead to improving stability of MTS and allow for achieving larger step sizes in the simulation of complex systems.

  1. Time step and shadow Hamiltonian in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangrak

    2015-08-01

    We examine the time step and the shadow Hamiltonian of symplectic algorithms for a bound system of a simple harmonic oscillator as a specific example. The phase space trajectory moves on the hyperplane of a constant shadow Hamiltonian. We find a stationary condition for the time step τ n with which the motion repeats itself on the phase space with a period n. Interestingly, that the time steps satisfying the stationary condition turn out to be independent of the symplectic algorithms chosen. Furthermore, the phase volume enclosed by the phase trajectory is given by n τ n Ẽ n , where Ẽ n is the initial shadow energy of the corresponding symplectic algorithm.

  2. Obtaining Runge-Kutta Solutions Between Time Steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    New interpolation method used with existing Runge-Kutta algorithms. Algorithm evaluates solution at intermediate point within integration step. Only few additional computations required to produce intermediate solution data. Runge-Kutta method provides accurate solution with larger time steps than allowable in other methods.

  3. Improving Leadership and Management Practices: One Step at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bella, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Taking small steps toward change is a sensible way to improve the leadership and management practices in an early care and education program. A director must be able to make continuous improvements without alienating staff by asking them to make drastic changes that seem overwhelming and unachievable. Taking on change one step at a time is a way…

  4. Automatic Time Stepping with Global Error Control for Groundwater Flow Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping

    2008-09-01

    An automatic time stepping with global error control is proposed for the time integration of the diffusion equation to simulate groundwater flow in confined aquifers. The scheme is based on an a posteriori error estimate for the discontinuous Galerkin (dG) finite element methods. A stability factor is involved in the error estimate and it is used to adapt the time step and control the global temporal error for the backward difference method. The stability factor can be estimated by solving a dual problem. The stability factor is not sensitive to the accuracy of the dual solution and the overhead computational cost can be minimized by solving the dual problem using large time steps. Numerical experiments are conducted to show the application and the performance of the automatic time stepping scheme. Implementation of the scheme can lead to improvement in accuracy and efficiency for groundwater flow models.

  5. A Stochastic, Resonance-Free Multiple Time-Step Algorithm for Polarizable Models That Permits Very Large Time Steps.

    PubMed

    Margul, Daniel T; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2016-05-10

    Molecular dynamics remains one of the most widely used computational tools in the theoretical molecular sciences to sample an equilibrium ensemble distribution and/or to study the dynamical properties of a system. The efficiency of a molecular dynamics calculation is limited by the size of the time step that can be employed, which is dictated by the highest frequencies in the system. However, many properties of interest are connected to low-frequency, long time-scale phenomena, requiring many small time steps to capture. This ubiquitous problem can be ameliorated by employing multiple time-step algorithms, which assign different time steps to forces acting on different time scales. In such a scheme, fast forces are evaluated more frequently than slow forces, and as the former are often computationally much cheaper to evaluate, the savings can be significant. Standard multiple time-step approaches are limited, however, by resonance phenomena, wherein motion on the fastest time scales limits the step sizes that can be chosen for the slower time scales. In atomistic models of biomolecular systems, for example, the largest time step is typically limited to around 5 fs. Previously, we introduced an isokinetic extended phase-space algorithm (Minary et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2004, 93, 150201) and its stochastic analog (Leimkuhler et al. Mol. Phys. 2013, 111, 3579) that eliminate resonance phenomena through a set of kinetic energy constraints. In simulations of a fixed-charge flexible model of liquid water, for example, the time step that could be assigned to the slow forces approached 100 fs. In this paper, we develop a stochastic isokinetic algorithm for multiple time-step molecular dynamics calculations using a polarizable model based on fluctuating dipoles. The scheme developed here employs two sets of induced dipole moments, specifically, those associated with short-range interactions and those associated with a full set of interactions. The scheme is demonstrated on

  6. Accuracy-based time step criteria for solving parabolic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtar, R.; Segerlind, L.

    1995-12-31

    Parabolic equations govern many transient engineering problems. Space integration using finite element or finite difference methods changes the parabolic partial differential equation into an ordinary differential equation. Time integration schemes are needed to solve the later equation. In order to accurately perform the later integration a proper time step must be provided. Time step estimates based on a stability criteria have been prescribed in the literature. The following paper presents time step estimates that satisfy stability as well as accuracy criteria. These estimates were correlated to the Froude and Courant Numbers. The later criteria were found to be overly conservative for some integration schemes. Suggestions as to which time integration scheme is the best to use are also presented.

  7. Ancient numerical daemons of conceptual hydrological modeling: 1. Fidelity and efficiency of time stepping schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Martyn P.; Kavetski, Dmitri

    2010-10-01

    A major neglected weakness of many current hydrological models is the numerical method used to solve the governing model equations. This paper thoroughly evaluates several classes of time stepping schemes in terms of numerical reliability and computational efficiency in the context of conceptual hydrological modeling. Numerical experiments are carried out using 8 distinct time stepping algorithms and 6 different conceptual rainfall-runoff models, applied in a densely gauged experimental catchment, as well as in 12 basins with diverse physical and hydroclimatic characteristics. Results show that, over vast regions of the parameter space, the numerical errors of fixed-step explicit schemes commonly used in hydrology routinely dwarf the structural errors of the model conceptualization. This substantially degrades model predictions, but also, disturbingly, generates fortuitously adequate performance for parameter sets where numerical errors compensate for model structural errors. Simply running fixed-step explicit schemes with shorter time steps provides a poor balance between accuracy and efficiency: in some cases daily-step adaptive explicit schemes with moderate error tolerances achieved comparable or higher accuracy than 15 min fixed-step explicit approximations but were nearly 10 times more efficient. From the range of simple time stepping schemes investigated in this work, the fixed-step implicit Euler method and the adaptive explicit Heun method emerge as good practical choices for the majority of simulation scenarios. In combination with the companion paper, where impacts on model analysis, interpretation, and prediction are assessed, this two-part study vividly highlights the impact of numerical errors on critical performance aspects of conceptual hydrological models and provides practical guidelines for robust numerical implementation.

  8. Adaptive licensing: taking the next step in the evolution of drug approval.

    PubMed

    Eichler, H-G; Oye, K; Baird, L G; Abadie, E; Brown, J; Drum, C L; Ferguson, J; Garner, S; Honig, P; Hukkelhoven, M; Lim, J C W; Lim, R; Lumpkin, M M; Neil, G; O'Rourke, B; Pezalla, E; Shoda, D; Seyfert-Margolis, V; Sigal, E V; Sobotka, J; Tan, D; Unger, T F; Hirsch, G

    2012-03-01

    Traditional drug licensing approaches are based on binary decisions. At the moment of licensing, an experimental therapy is presumptively transformed into a fully vetted, safe, efficacious therapy. By contrast, adaptive licensing (AL) approaches are based on stepwise learning under conditions of acknowledged uncertainty, with iterative phases of data gathering and regulatory evaluation. This approach allows approval to align more closely with patient needs for timely access to new technologies and for data to inform medical decisions. The concept of AL embraces a range of perspectives. Some see AL as an evolutionary step, extending elements that are now in place. Others envision a transformative framework that may require legislative action before implementation. This article summarizes recent AL proposals; discusses how proposals might be translated into practice, with illustrations in different therapeutic areas; and identifies unresolved issues to inform decisions on the design and implementation of AL. PMID:22336591

  9. Dependence of aqua-planet simulations on time step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David L.; Olson, Jerry G.

    2003-04-01

    Aqua-planet simulations with Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian dynamical cores coupled to the NCAR CCM3 parametrization suite produce very different zonal average precipitation patterns. The model with the Eulerian core forms a narrow single precipitation peak centred on the sea surface temperature (SST) maximum. The one with the semi-Lagrangian core forms a broad structure often with a double peak straddling the SST maximum with a precipitation minimum centred on the SST maximum. The different structure is shown to be caused primarily by the different time step adopted by each core and its effect on the parametrizations rather than by different truncation errors introduced by the dynamical cores themselves. With a longer discrete time step, the surface exchange parametrization deposits more moisture in the atmosphere in a single time step, resulting in convection being initiated farther from the equator, closer to the maximum source. Different diffusive smoothing associated with different spectral resolutions is a secondary effect influencing the strength of the double structure. When the semi-Lagrangian core is configured to match the Eulerian with the same time step, a three-time-level formulation and same spectral truncation it produces precipitation fields similar to those from the Eulerian. It is argued that the broad and double structure forms in this model with the longer time step because more water is put into the atmosphere over a longer discrete time step, the evaporation rate being the same. The additional water vapour in the region of equatorial moisture convergence results in more convective available potential energy farther from the equator which allows convection to initiate farther from the equator.The resulting heating drives upward vertical motion and low-level convergence away from the equator, resulting in much weaker upward motion at the equator. The feedback between the convective heating and dynamics reduces the instability at the equator and

  10. Short-term Time Step Convergence in a Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Hui; Rasch, Philip J.; Taylor, Mark; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2015-02-11

    A testing procedure is designed to assess the convergence property of a global climate model with respect to time step size, based on evaluation of the root-mean-square temperature difference at the end of very short (1 h) simulations with time step sizes ranging from 1 s to 1800 s. A set of validation tests conducted without sub-grid scale parameterizations confirmed that the method was able to correctly assess the convergence rate of the dynamical core under various configurations. The testing procedure was then applied to the full model, and revealed a slow convergence of order 0.4 in contrast to the expected first-order convergence. Sensitivity experiments showed without ambiguity that the time stepping errors in the model were dominated by those from the stratiform cloud parameterizations, in particular the cloud microphysics. This provides a clear guidance for future work on the design of more accurate numerical methods for time stepping and process coupling in the model.

  11. Short-term Time Step Convergence in a Climate Model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wan, Hui; Rasch, Philip J.; Taylor, Mark; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2015-02-11

    A testing procedure is designed to assess the convergence property of a global climate model with respect to time step size, based on evaluation of the root-mean-square temperature difference at the end of very short (1 h) simulations with time step sizes ranging from 1 s to 1800 s. A set of validation tests conducted without sub-grid scale parameterizations confirmed that the method was able to correctly assess the convergence rate of the dynamical core under various configurations. The testing procedure was then applied to the full model, and revealed a slow convergence of order 0.4 in contrast to themore » expected first-order convergence. Sensitivity experiments showed without ambiguity that the time stepping errors in the model were dominated by those from the stratiform cloud parameterizations, in particular the cloud microphysics. This provides a clear guidance for future work on the design of more accurate numerical methods for time stepping and process coupling in the model.« less

  12. Accuracy of Pedometer Steps and Time for Youth with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Combs, Cindy; Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Morgan, Melinda; Bryan, Rebecca R.; Foley, John T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the accuracy of pedometer steps and activity time (Walk4Life, WL) for youth with developmental disabilities. Eighteen youth (11 girls, 7 boys) 4-14 years completed six 80-meter self-paced walking trials while wearing a pedometer at five waist locations (front right, front left, back right, back left, middle…

  13. Solving delay differential equations in S-ADAPT by method of steps.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert J; Mo, Gary; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2013-09-01

    S-ADAPT is a version of the ADAPT program that contains additional simulation and optimization abilities such as parametric population analysis. S-ADAPT utilizes LSODA to solve ordinary differential equations (ODEs), an algorithm designed for large dimension non-stiff and stiff problems. However, S-ADAPT does not have a solver for delay differential equations (DDEs). Our objective was to implement in S-ADAPT a DDE solver using the methods of steps. The method of steps allows one to solve virtually any DDE system by transforming it to an ODE system. The solver was validated for scalar linear DDEs with one delay and bolus and infusion inputs for which explicit analytic solutions were derived. Solutions of nonlinear DDE problems coded in S-ADAPT were validated by comparing them with ones obtained by the MATLAB DDE solver dde23. The estimation of parameters was tested on the MATLB simulated population pharmacodynamics data. The comparison of S-ADAPT generated solutions for DDE problems with the explicit solutions as well as MATLAB produced solutions which agreed to at least 7 significant digits. The population parameter estimates from using importance sampling expectation-maximization in S-ADAPT agreed with ones used to generate the data. PMID:23810514

  14. Cross-cultural adaptation of instruments assessing breastfeeding determinants: a multi-step approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-cultural adaptation is a necessary process to effectively use existing instruments in other cultural and language settings. The process of cross-culturally adapting, including translation, of existing instruments is considered a critical set to establishing a meaningful instrument for use in another setting. Using a multi-step approach is considered best practice in achieving cultural and semantic equivalence of the adapted version. We aimed to ensure the content validity of our instruments in the cultural context of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods The Iowa Infant Feeding Attitudes Scale, Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form and additional items comprise our consolidated instrument, which was cross-culturally adapted utilizing a multi-step approach during August 2012. Cross-cultural adaptation was achieved through steps to maintain content validity and attain semantic equivalence in the target version. Specifically, Lynn’s recommendation to apply an item-level content validity index score was followed. The revised instrument was translated and back-translated. To ensure semantic equivalence, Brislin’s back-translation approach was utilized followed by the committee review to address any discrepancies that emerged from translation. Results Our consolidated instrument was adapted to be culturally relevant and translated to yield more reliable and valid results for use in our larger research study to measure infant feeding determinants effectively in our target cultural context. Conclusions Undertaking rigorous steps to effectively ensure cross-cultural adaptation increases our confidence that the conclusions we make based on our self-report instrument(s) will be stronger. In this way, our aim to achieve strong cross-cultural adaptation of our consolidated instruments was achieved while also providing a clear framework for other researchers choosing to utilize existing instruments for work in other cultural, geographic and population

  15. Consistency of internal fluxes in a hydrological model running at multiple time steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficchi, Andrea; Perrin, Charles; Andréassian, Vazken

    2016-04-01

    Improving hydrological models remains a difficult task and many ways can be explored, among which one can find the improvement of spatial representation, the search for more robust parametrization, the better formulation of some processes or the modification of model structures by trial-and-error procedure. Several past works indicate that model parameters and structure can be dependent on the modelling time step, and there is thus some rationale in investigating how a model behaves across various modelling time steps, to find solutions for improvements. Here we analyse the impact of data time step on the consistency of the internal fluxes of a rainfall-runoff model run at various time steps, by using a large data set of 240 catchments. To this end, fine time step hydro-climatic information at sub-hourly resolution is used as input of a parsimonious rainfall-runoff model (GR) that is run at eight different model time steps (from 6 minutes to one day). The initial structure of the tested model (i.e. the baseline) corresponds to the daily model GR4J (Perrin et al., 2003), adapted to be run at variable sub-daily time steps. The modelled fluxes considered are interception, actual evapotranspiration and intercatchment groundwater flows. Observations of these fluxes are not available, but the comparison of modelled fluxes at multiple time steps gives additional information for model identification. The joint analysis of flow simulation performance and consistency of internal fluxes at different time steps provides guidance to the identification of the model components that should be improved. Our analysis indicates that the baseline model structure is to be modified at sub-daily time steps to warrant the consistency and realism of the modelled fluxes. For the baseline model improvement, particular attention is devoted to the interception model component, whose output flux showed the strongest sensitivity to modelling time step. The dependency of the optimal model

  16. Two-dimensional implicit time dependent calculations on adaptive unstructured meshes with time evolving boundaries.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Paul Tinphone; Jameson, Antony, 1934-; Baker, Timothy J.; Martinelli, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    An implicit multigrid-driven algorithm for two-dimensional incompressible laminar viscous flows has been coupled with a solution adaptation method and a mesh movement method for boundary movement. Time-dependent calculations are performed implicitly by regarding each time step as a steady-state problem in pseudo-time. The method of artificial compressibility is used to solve the flow equations. The solution mesh adaptation method performs local mesh refinement using an incremental Delaunay algorithm and mesh coarsening by means of edge collapse. Mesh movement is achieved by modeling the computational domain as an elastic solid and solving the equilibrium equations for the stress field. The solution adaptation method has been validated by comparison with experimental results and other computational results for low Reynolds number flow over a shedding circular cylinder. Preliminary validation of the mesh movement method has been demonstrated by a comparison with experimental results of an oscillating airfoil and with computational results for an oscillating cylinder.

  17. Durham adaptive optics real-time controller.

    PubMed

    Basden, Alastair; Geng, Deli; Myers, Richard; Younger, Eddy

    2010-11-10

    The Durham adaptive optics (AO) real-time controller was initially a proof of concept design for a generic AO control system. It has since been developed into a modern and powerful central-processing-unit-based real-time control system, capable of using hardware acceleration (including field programmable gate arrays and graphical processing units), based primarily around commercial off-the-shelf hardware. It is powerful enough to be used as the real-time controller for all currently planned 8 m class telescope AO systems. Here we give details of this controller and the concepts behind it, and report on performance, including latency and jitter, which is less than 10 μs for small AO systems. PMID:21068868

  18. Manual for implementing a Shared Time Engineering Program (STEP) September 1980 through September 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronoff, H. I.; Leslie, J. J.; Mittleman, A. N.; Holt, S.

    1983-11-01

    This manual describes a Shared Time Engineering Program (STEP) conducted by the New England Apparel Manufacturers Association (NEAMA) headquartered in Fall River Massachusetts, and funded by the Office of Trade Adjustment Assistance of the U.S. Department of Commerce. It is addressed to industry association executives, industrial engineers and others interested in examining an innovative model of industrial engineering assistance to small plants which might be adapted to their particular needs.

  19. Accuracy of Pedometer Steps and Time for Youth with Intellectual Disabilities during Dynamic Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Beets, Michael W.; Flaming, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Pedometer accuracy for steps and activity time during dynamic movement for youth with intellectual disabilities (ID) were examined. Twenty-four youth with ID (13 girls, 13.1 [plus or minus] 3.2 yrs; 11 boys, 14.7 [plus or minus] 2.7 yrs) were videotaped during adapted physical education class while wearing a Walk4Life 2505 pedometer in five…

  20. Adapting STePS, an Adult Team Problem Solving Model, for Use with Sixth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheive, L. T.; And Others

    Structured Team Problem Solving (STePS) is a problem solving model for shared decision making. This project uses the model to discover if children can learn using this method, and what adaptations would be necessary for child use. Sixth grade students in their social studies class worked together in teams (6-8) to identify what they already think…

  1. Multiple time step integrators in ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-02-28

    Multiple time-scale algorithms exploit the natural separation of time-scales in chemical systems to greatly accelerate the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations. Although the utility of these methods in systems where the interactions are described by empirical potentials is now well established, their application to ab initio molecular dynamics calculations has been limited by difficulties associated with splitting the ab initio potential into fast and slowly varying components. Here we present two schemes that enable efficient time-scale separation in ab initio calculations: one based on fragment decomposition and the other on range separation of the Coulomb operator in the electronic Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for both water clusters and a solvated hydroxide ion that multiple time-scale molecular dynamics allows for outer time steps of 2.5 fs, which are as large as those obtained when such schemes are applied to empirical potentials, while still allowing for bonds to be broken and reformed throughout the dynamics. This permits computational speedups of up to 4.4x, compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics with a 0.5 fs time step, while maintaining the same energy conservation and accuracy.

  2. A method for improving time-stepping numerics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.

    2012-04-01

    In contemporary numerical simulations of the atmosphere, evidence suggests that time-stepping errors may be a significant component of total model error, on both weather and climate time-scales. This presentation will review the available evidence, and will then suggest a simple but effective method for substantially improving the time-stepping numerics at no extra computational expense. The most common time-stepping method is the leapfrog scheme combined with the Robert-Asselin (RA) filter. This method is used in the following atmospheric models (and many more): ECHAM, MAECHAM, MM5, CAM, MESO-NH, HIRLAM, KMCM, LIMA, SPEEDY, IGCM, PUMA, COSMO, FSU-GSM, FSU-NRSM, NCEP-GFS, NCEP-RSM, NSEAM, NOGAPS, RAMS, and CCSR/NIES-AGCM. Although the RA filter controls the time-splitting instability in these models, it also introduces non-physical damping and reduces the accuracy. This presentation proposes a simple modification to the RA filter. The modification has become known as the RAW filter (Williams 2011). When used in conjunction with the leapfrog scheme, the RAW filter eliminates the non-physical damping and increases the amplitude accuracy by two orders, yielding third-order accuracy. (The phase accuracy remains second-order.) The RAW filter can easily be incorporated into existing models, typically via the insertion of just a single line of code. Better simulations are obtained at no extra computational expense. Results will be shown from recent implementations of the RAW filter in various atmospheric models, including SPEEDY and COSMO. For example, in SPEEDY, the skill of weather forecasts is found to be significantly improved. In particular, in tropical surface pressure predictions, five-day forecasts made using the RAW filter have approximately the same skill as four-day forecasts made using the RA filter (Amezcua, Kalnay & Williams 2011). These improvements are encouraging for the use of the RAW filter in other models.

  3. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  4. Accurate Monotonicity - Preserving Schemes With Runge-Kutta Time Stepping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, A.; Huynh, H. T.

    1997-01-01

    A new class of high-order monotonicity-preserving schemes for the numerical solution of conservation laws is presented. The interface value in these schemes is obtained by limiting a higher-order polynominal reconstruction. The limiting is designed to preserve accuracy near extrema and to work well with Runge-Kutta time stepping. Computational efficiency is enhanced by a simple test that determines whether the limiting procedure is needed. For linear advection in one dimension, these schemes are shown as well as the Euler equations also confirm their high accuracy, good shock resolution, and computational efficiency.

  5. Real-time adaptive video image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garside, John R.; Harrison, Chris G.

    1999-07-01

    As part of a continuing collaboration between the University of Manchester and British Aerospace, a signal processing array has been constructed to demonstrate that it is feasible to compensate a video signal for the degradation caused by atmospheric haze in real-time. Previously reported work has shown good agreement between a simple physical model of light scattering by atmospheric haze and the observed loss of contrast. This model predicts a characteristic relationship between contrast loss in the image and the range from the camera to the scene. For an airborne camera, the slant-range to a point on the ground may be estimated from the airplane's pose, as reported by the inertial navigation system, and the contrast may be obtained from the camera's output. Fusing data from these two streams provides a means of estimating model parameters such as the visibility and the overall illumination of the scene. This knowledge allows the same model to be applied in reverse, thus restoring the contrast lost to atmospheric haze. An efficient approximation of range is vital for a real-time implementation of the method. Preliminary results show that an adaptive approach to fitting the model's parameters, exploiting the temporal correlation between video frames, leads to a robust implementation with a significantly accelerated throughput.

  6. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of adaptive immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information-processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS that we call an adaptive immune response simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system that responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner that is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate AIS, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices.

  7. Adaptive back-stepping tracking control for rotor shaft tilting of active magnetically suspended momentum wheel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuan-jin; Fang, Jian-cheng; Xiang, Biao; Wang, Chun-e

    2014-11-01

    Two-dimensional gyroscopic torque can be produced by tilting the rotor shaft of the active magnetically suspended momentum wheel. The nonlinear magnetic torque is analyzed and then an adaptive back-stepping tracking method is proposed to deal with the nonlinearity and uncertainty. The nonlinearity of magnetic torque is represented as bounded unknown uncertainty stiffness, and an adaptive law is proposed to estimate the stiffness. Combined with back-stepping method, the proposed method can deal with the uncertainty. This method is designed by Lyapunov stability theory to ensure the stability, and its effectiveness is validated by simulations and experiments. These results indicate that this method can realize higher tracking precision and faster tracking velocity than the conventional cross feedback method to provide high precision and wide bandwidth outputting torque. PMID:25104645

  8. Adaptive step ODE algorithms for the 3D simulation of electric heart activity with graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Molla, V M; Liberos, A; Vidal, A; Guillem, M S; Millet, J; Gonzalez, A; Martinez-Zaldivar, F J; Climent, A M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we studied the implementation and performance of adaptive step methods for large systems of ordinary differential equations systems in graphics processing units, focusing on the simulation of three-dimensional electric cardiac activity. The Rush-Larsen method was applied in all the implemented solvers to improve efficiency. We compared the adaptive methods with the fixed step methods, and we found that the fixed step methods can be faster while the adaptive step methods are better in terms of accuracy and robustness. PMID:24377685

  9. Analysis of steps adapted protocol in cardiac rehabilitation in the hospital phase

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Dallazen, Fernanda; Bronzatti, Angela Beerbaum Steinke; Lorenzoni, Juliara Cristina Werner; Windmöller, Pollyana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze a cardiac rehabilitation adapted protocol in physical therapy during the postoperative hospital phase of cardiac surgery in a service of high complexity, in aspects regarded to complications and mortality prevalence and hospitalization days. Methods This is an observational cross-sectional, retrospective and analytical study performed by investigating 99 patients who underwent cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass graft, heart valve replacement or a combination of both. Step program adapted for rehabilitation after cardiac surgery was analyzed under the command of the physiotherapy professional team. Results In average, a patient stays for two days in the Intensive Care Unit and three to four days in the hospital room, totalizing six days of hospitalization. Fatalities occurred in a higher percentage during hospitalization (5.1%) and up to two years period (8.6%) when compared to 30 days after hospital discharge (1.1%). Among the postoperative complications, the hemodynamic (63.4%) and respiratory (42.6%) were the most prevalent. 36-42% of complications occurred between the immediate postoperative period and the second postoperative day. The hospital discharge started from the fifth postoperative day. We can observe that in each following day, the patients are evolving in achieving the Steps, where Step 3 was the most used during the rehabilitation phase I. Conclusion This evolution program by steps can to guide the physical rehabilitation at the hospital in patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:25859866

  10. Adaptive step-size strategy for noise-robust Fourier ptychographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Chen, Qian

    2016-09-01

    The incremental gradient approaches, such as PIE and ePIE, are widely used in the field of ptychographic imaging due to their great flexibility and computational efficiency. Nevertheless, their stability and reconstruction quality may be significantly degraded when non-negligible noise is present in the image. Though this problem is often attributed to the non-convex nature of phase retrieval, we found the reason for this is more closely related to the choice of the step-size, which needs to be gradually diminishing for convergence even in the convex case. To this end, we introduce an adaptive step-size strategy that decreases the step-size whenever sufficient progress is not made. The synthetic and real experiments on Fourier ptychographic microscopy show that the adaptive step-size strategy significantly improves the stability and robustness of the reconstruction towards noise yet retains the fast initial convergence speed of PIE and ePIE. More importantly, the proposed approach is simple, nonparametric, and does not require any preknowledge about the noise statistics. The great performance and limited computational complexity make it a very attractive and promising technique for robust Fourier ptychographic microscopy under noisy conditions. PMID:27607676

  11. Adaptive Controller Adaptation Time and Available Control Authority Effects on Piloting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna; Gregory, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive control is considered for highly uncertain, and potentially unpredictable, flight dynamics characteristic of adverse conditions. This experiment looked at how adaptive controller adaptation time to recover nominal aircraft dynamics affects pilots and how pilots want information about available control authority transmitted. Results indicate that an adaptive controller that takes three seconds to adapt helped pilots when looking at lateral and longitudinal errors. The controllability ratings improved with the adaptive controller, again the most for the three seconds adaptation time while workload decreased with the adaptive controller. The effects of the displays showing the percentage amount of available safe flight envelope used in the maneuver were dominated by the adaptation time. With the displays, the altitude error increased, controllability slightly decreased, and mental demand increased. Therefore, the displays did require some of the subjects resources but these negatives may be outweighed by pilots having more situation awareness of their aircraft.

  12. Schwarz type domain decomposition and subcycling multi-time step approach for solving Richards equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraz, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Modelling the transport processes in a vadose zone, e.g. modelling contaminant transport or the effect of the soil water regime on changes in soil structure and composition, plays an important role in predicting the reactions of soil biotopes to anthropogenic activity. Water flow is governed by the quasilinear Richards equation. The paper concerns the implementation of a multi-time-step approach for solving a nonlinear Richards equation. When modelling porous media flow with a Richards equation, due to a possible convection dominance and a convergence of a nonlinear solver, a stable finite element approximation requires accurate temporal and spatial integration. The method presented here enables adaptive domain decomposition algorithm together with a multi-time-step treatment of actively changing subdomains.

  13. Adaptability of stride-to-stride control of stepping movements in human walking.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack-McLagan, Nicole K; Cusumano, Joseph P; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2016-01-25

    Humans continually adapt their movements as they walk on different surfaces, avoid obstacles, etc. External (environmental) and internal (physiological) noise-like disturbances, and the responses that correct for them, each contribute to locomotor variability. This variability may sometimes be detrimental (perhaps increasing fall risk), or sometimes beneficial (perhaps reflecting exploration of multiple task solutions). Here, we determined how humans regulated stride-to-stride fluctuations in walking when presented different task goals that allowed them to exploit inherent redundancies in different ways. Fourteen healthy adults walked on a treadmill under each of four conditions: constant speed only (SPD), constant speed and stride length (LEN), constant speed and stride time (TIM), or constant speed, stride length, and stride time (ALL). Multiple analyses tested competing hypotheses that participants might attempt to either equally satisfy all goals simultaneously, or instead adopt systematic intermediate strategies that only partly satisfied each individual goal. Participants exhibited similar average stepping behavior, but significant differences in variability and stride-to-stride serial correlations across conditions. Analyses of the structure of stride-to-stride fluctuation dynamics demonstrated humans resolved the competing goals presented not by minimizing errors equally with respect to all goals, but instead by trying to only partly satisfy each goal. Thus, humans exploit task redundancies even when they are explicitly removed from the task specifications. These findings may help identify when variability is predictive of, or protective against, fall risk. They may also help inform rehabilitation interventions to better exploit the positive contributions of variability, while minimizing the negative. PMID:26725217

  14. Step-Detection and Adaptive Step-Length Estimation for Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning at Various Walking Speeds Using a Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ngoc-Huynh; Truong, Phuc Huu; Jeong, Gu-Min

    2016-01-01

    We propose a walking distance estimation method based on an adaptive step-length estimator at various walking speeds using a smartphone. First, we apply a fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based smoother on the acceleration data collected by the smartphone to remove the interference signals. Then, we analyze these data using a set of step-detection rules in order to detect walking steps. Using an adaptive estimator, which is based on a model of average step speed, we accurately obtain the walking step length. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we examine the distance estimation for four different distances and three speed levels. The experimental results show that the proposed method significantly outperforms conventional estimation methods in terms of accuracy. PMID:27598171

  15. Accelerating spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation using local time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, D. B.; Rietmann, M.; Galvez, P.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Grote, M.; Schenk, O.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic tomography using full-waveform inversion requires accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media. However, finite element meshing in complex media often leads to areas of local refinement, generating small elements that accurately capture e.g. strong topography and/or low-velocity sediment basins. For explicit time schemes, this dramatically reduces the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to numerical stability conditions, ultimately making seismic inversions prohibitively expensive. To alleviate this problem, local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. Numerical simulations are thus liberated of global time-step constraints potentially speeding up simulation runtimes significantly. We present here a new, efficient multi-level LTS-Newmark scheme for general use with spectral-element methods (SEM) with applications in seismic wave propagation. We fit the implementation of our scheme onto the package SPECFEM3D_Cartesian, which is a widely used community code, simulating seismic and acoustic wave propagation in earth-science applications. Our new LTS scheme extends the 2nd-order accurate Newmark time-stepping scheme, and leads to an efficient implementation, producing real-world speedup of multi-resolution seismic applications. Furthermore, we generalize the method to utilize many refinement levels with a design specifically for continuous finite elements. We demonstrate performance speedup using a state-of-the-art dynamic earthquake rupture model for the Tohoku-Oki event, which is currently limited by small elements along the rupture fault. Utilizing our new algorithmic LTS implementation together with advances in exploiting graphic processing units (GPUs), numerical seismic wave propagation simulations in complex media will dramatically reduce computation times, empowering high

  16. Adaptice-step time integration package for stiff, nonstiff and multi-rate systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs)

    2014-06-01

    ARKode is part of a software family called SUNDIALS: SUite of Nonlinear and Differential/ALgebraic equation Solvers [1]. The ARKode solver library provides an adaptive-step time integration package for stiff, nonstiff and multi-rate systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) using Runge Kutta methods [2].

  17. Experiments on the role of deleterious mutations as stepping stones in adaptive evolution.

    PubMed

    Covert, Arthur W; Lenski, Richard E; Wilke, Claus O; Ofria, Charles

    2013-08-20

    Many evolutionary studies assume that deleterious mutations necessarily impede adaptive evolution. However, a later mutation that is conditionally beneficial may interact with a deleterious predecessor before it is eliminated, thereby providing access to adaptations that might otherwise be inaccessible. It is unknown whether such sign-epistatic recoveries are inconsequential events or an important factor in evolution, owing to the difficulty of monitoring the effects and fates of all mutations during experiments with biological organisms. Here, we used digital organisms to compare the extent of adaptive evolution in populations when deleterious mutations were disallowed with control populations in which such mutations were allowed. Significantly higher fitness levels were achieved over the long term in the control populations because some of the deleterious mutations served as stepping stones across otherwise impassable fitness valleys. As a consequence, initially deleterious mutations facilitated the evolution of complex, beneficial functions. We also examined the effects of disallowing neutral mutations, of varying the mutation rate, and of sexual recombination. Populations evolving without neutral mutations were able to leverage deleterious and compensatory mutation pairs to overcome, at least partially, the absence of neutral mutations. Substantially raising or lowering the mutation rate reduced or eliminated the long-term benefit of deleterious mutations, but introducing recombination did not. Our work demonstrates that deleterious mutations can play an important role in adaptive evolution under at least some conditions. PMID:23918358

  18. A new time-stepping method for regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamical cores of many regional climate models use the Robert-Asselin filter to suppress the spurious computational mode of the leapfrog scheme. Unfortunately, whilst successfully eliminating the unwanted mode, the Robert-Asselin filter also weakly suppresses the physical solution and degrades the numerical accuracy. These two concomitant problems occur because the filter does not conserve the mean state, averaged over the three time slices on which it operates. This presentation proposes a simple modification to the Robert-Asselin filter, which does conserve the three-time-level mean state. When used in conjunction with the leapfrog scheme, the modification vastly reduces the artificial damping of the physical solution. Correspondingly, the modification increases the numerical accuracy for amplitude errors by two orders, yielding third-order accuracy. The modified filter may easily be incorporated into existing regional climate models, via the addition of only a few lines of code that are computationally very inexpensive. Results will be shown from recent implementations of the modified filter in various models. The modification will be shown to reduce model biases and to significantly improve the predictive skill. Magnitude of the complex amplification factor as a function of the non-dimensional time step, for leapfrog integrations. This quantity would be identical to 1 for a perfect numerical scheme. Clearly, the filter proposed here (case α=0.53) has much smaller numerical errors than the original Robert-Asselin filter (case α=1). Moreover, the proposed filter is trivial to implement and is no more computationally expensive. Taken from Williams (2009; Monthly Weather Review).

  19. Watching Proteins Direct Crystal Growth One Step at a Time

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at Berkeley Labs Molecular Foundry use an atomic force microscope to record this movie of a peptide being adsorbed to a crystal surface while two successive crystal steps interact, then progress beyond the peptide. The peptide temporarily slows the step before transferring up to the next atomic layer. The lattice pattern on the surface corresponds to the molecular structure of the underlying crystal.

  20. The USMLE Step 2 CS: Time for a change.

    PubMed

    Alvin, Matthew D

    2016-08-01

    The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE(®)) Steps are a series of mandatory licensing assessments for all allopathic (MD degree) medical students in their transition from student to intern to resident physician. Steps 1, 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK), and 3 are daylong multiple-choice exams that quantify a medical student's basic science and clinical knowledge as well as their application of that knowledge using a three-digit score. In doing so, these Steps provide a standardized assessment that residency programs use to differentiate applicants and evaluate their competitiveness. Step 2 Clinical Skills (CS), the only other Step exam and the second component of Step 2, was created in 2004 to test clinical reasoning and patient-centered skills. As a Pass/Fail exam without a numerical scoring component, Step 2 CS provides minimal differentiation among applicants for residency programs. In this personal view article, it is argued that the current Step 2 CS exam should be eliminated for US medical students and propose an alternative consistent with the mission and purpose of the exam that imposes less of a burden on medical students. PMID:27007882

  1. Constrained Density Functional Theory by Imaginary Time-Step Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Daniel

    Constrained Density Functional Theory (CDFT) has been a popular choice within the last decade for sidestepping the self interaction problem within long-range charge transfer calculations. Typically an inner constraint loop is added within the self-consistent field iterations of DFT in order to enforce this charge transfer state by means of a Lagrange multiplier method. In this work, an alternate implementation of CDFT is introduced, that of the imaginary time-step method, which lends itself more readily to real space calculations in the ability to solve numerically for 3D local external potentials which enforce arbitrary given densities. This method has been shown to reproduce the proper 1 / R dependence of charge transfer systems in real space calculations as well as the ability to generate useful constraint potentials. As an example application, this method is shown to be capable of describing defects within periodic systems using finite calculations by constraining the 3D density to that of the periodically calculated perfect system at the boundaries.

  2. DNA walks one step at a time in electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Juan; Wang, Bo; Granick, Steve

    2011-03-01

    Testing the classical view that in DNA gel electrophoresis, long polymer chains navigate through their gel environment via reptation, we reach a different conclusion: this driven motion proceeds by stick-slip. Our single-molecule experiments visualize fluorescent-labeled lambda-DNA, whose intramolecular conformations are resolved with 30 ms resolution using home-written software. Combining hundreds to thousands of trajectories under amplitudes of electric field ranging from zero to large, we quantify the full statistical distribution of motion with unprecedented statistics. Pauses are seen between steps of driven motion, probably reflecting that the chain is trapped inside the gel matrix. The pausing time is exponentially distributed and decreases with increasing electric field strength, suggesting that the jerky behavior is an activated process, facilitated by electric field. We propose a stretch-assisted mechanism: that the energy barrier to move through the gel environment is first overcome by a leading segment, the ensuing intramolecular stress from stretching causing lagging segments to recoil and follow along.

  3. Predicting Hyper-Chaotic Time Series Using Adaptive Higher-Order Nonlinear Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Shu; Xiao, Xian-Ci

    2001-03-01

    A newly proposed method, i.e. the adaptive higher-order nonlinear finite impulse response (HONFIR) filter based on higher-order sparse Volterra series expansions, is introduced to predict hyper-chaotic time series. The effectiveness of using the adaptive HONFIR filter for making one-step and multi-step predictions is tested based on very few data points by computer-generated hyper-chaotic time series including the Mackey-Glass equation and four-dimensional nonlinear dynamical system. A comparison is made with some neural networks for predicting the Mackey-Glass hyper-chaotic time series. Numerical simulation results show that the adaptive HONFIR filter proposed here is a very powerful tool for making prediction of hyper-chaotic time series.

  4. An averaging analysis of discrete-time indirect adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Stephen M.; Kosut, Robert L.; Franklin, Gene F.

    1988-01-01

    An averaging analysis of indirect, discrete-time, adaptive control systems is presented. The analysis results in a signal-dependent stability condition and accounts for unmodeled plant dynamics as well as exogenous disturbances. This analysis is applied to two discrete-time adaptive algorithms: an unnormalized gradient algorithm and a recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm with resetting. Since linearization and averaging are used for the gradient analysis, a local stability result valid for small adaptation gains is found. For RLS with resetting, the assumption is that there is a long time between resets. The results for the two algorithms are virtually identical, emphasizing their similarities in adaptive control.

  5. Effect of Margin Design and Processing Steps on Marginal Adaptation of Captek Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Amy; Flinton, Robert; Vaidyanathan, Jayalakshmi; Vaidyanathan, Tritala

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of four margin designs on marginal adaptation of Captek crowns during selected processing steps. Twenty-four Captek crowns were fabricated, six each of four margin designs: shoulder (Group A), chamfer (Group B), chamfer with bevel (Group C), and shoulder with bevel (Group D). Marginal discrepancies between crowns and matching dies were measured at selected points for each sample at the coping stage (Stage 1), following porcelain application (Stage 2) and cementation (Stage 3). Digital imaging methods were used to measure marginal gap. The results indicate decreasing trend of margin gap as a function of margin design in the order A>B>C>D. Between processing steps, the trend was in the order Stage 3 < Stage 1 < Stage 2. Porcelain firing had no significant effect on marginal adaptation, but cementation decreased the marginal gap. Generally, the margin gap in Captek restorations were in all cases less than the reported acceptable range of margin gaps for ceramometal restorations. These results are clinically favorable outcomes and may be associated with the ductility and burnishability of matrix phase in Captek metal coping margins. PMID:21991488

  6. Daily Time Step Refinement of Optimized Flood Control Rule Curves for a Global Warming Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Fitzgerald, C.; Hamlet, A. F.; Burges, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    Pacific Northwest temperatures have warmed by 0.8 °C since 1920 and are predicted to further increase in the 21st century. Simulated streamflow timing shifts associated with climate change have been found in past research to degrade water resources system performance in the Columbia River Basin when using existing system operating policies. To adapt to these hydrologic changes, optimized flood control operating rule curves were developed in a previous study using a hybrid optimization-simulation approach which rebalanced flood control and reservoir refill at a monthly time step. For the climate change scenario, use of the optimized flood control curves restored reservoir refill capability without increasing flood risk. Here we extend the earlier studies using a detailed daily time step simulation model applied over a somewhat smaller portion of the domain (encompassing Libby, Duncan, and Corra Linn dams, and Kootenai Lake) to evaluate and refine the optimized flood control curves derived from monthly time step analysis. Moving from a monthly to daily analysis, we found that the timing of flood control evacuation needed adjustment to avoid unintended outcomes affecting Kootenai Lake. We refined the flood rule curves derived from monthly analysis by creating a more gradual evacuation schedule, but kept the timing and magnitude of maximum evacuation the same as in the monthly analysis. After these refinements, the performance at monthly time scales reported in our previous study proved robust at daily time scales. Due to a decrease in July storage deficits, additional benefits such as more revenue from hydropower generation and more July and August outflow for fish augmentation were observed when the optimized flood control curves were used for the climate change scenario.

  7. Transform Domain Robust Variable Step Size Griffiths' Adaptive Algorithm for Noise Cancellation in ECG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Veena; Deekshit, Ravishankar; Satyanarayana, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is widely used for diagnosis of heart diseases. Good quality of ECG is utilized by physicians for interpretation and identification of physiological and pathological phenomena. However, in real situations, ECG recordings are often corrupted by artifacts or noise. Noise severely limits the utility of the recorded ECG and thus needs to be removed, for better clinical evaluation. In the present paper a new noise cancellation technique is proposed for removal of random noise like muscle artifact from ECG signal. A transform domain robust variable step size Griffiths' LMS algorithm (TVGLMS) is proposed for noise cancellation. For the TVGLMS, the robust variable step size has been achieved by using the Griffiths' gradient which uses cross-correlation between the desired signal contaminated with observation or random noise and the input. The algorithm is discrete cosine transform (DCT) based and uses symmetric property of the signal to represent the signal in frequency domain with lesser number of frequency coefficients when compared to that of discrete Fourier transform (DFT). The algorithm is implemented for adaptive line enhancer (ALE) filter which extracts the ECG signal in a noisy environment using LMS filter adaptation. The proposed algorithm is found to have better convergence error/misadjustment when compared to that of ordinary transform domain LMS (TLMS) algorithm, both in the presence of white/colored observation noise. The reduction in convergence error achieved by the new algorithm with desired signal decomposition is found to be lower than that obtained without decomposition. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is better than traditional adaptive filter using LMS algorithm in the aspects of retaining geometrical characteristics of ECG signal.

  8. Mathematical analysis of adaptive step-size techniques when solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for simulating light-wave propagation in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balac, Stéphane; Fernandez, Arnaud

    2014-10-01

    In optics the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) which modelizes light-wave propagation in an optical fibre is the most widely solved by the Symmetric Split-Step method. The practical efficiency of the Symmetric Split-Step method is highly dependent on the computational grid points distribution along the fiber and therefore an efficient adaptive step-size control strategy is mandatory. A lot of adaptive step-size methods designed to be used in conjunction with the Symmetric Split-Step method for solving the various forms taken by the NLSE can be found in the literature dedicated to optics. These methods can be gathered together into two groups. Broadly speaking, a first group of methods is based on the observation along the propagation length of the behavior of a given optical quantity (e.g. the photons number) and the step-size at each computational step is set so as to guarantee that the known properties of the quantity are preserved. Most of the time these approaches are derived under specific assumptions and the step-size selection criterion depends on the fiber parameters. The second group of methods makes use of some mathematical concepts to estimate the local error at each computational grid point and the step-size is set so as to maintain it lower than a prescribed tolerance. This approach should be preferred due to its generality of use but suffers from a lack of understanding in the mathematical concepts of numerical analysis it involves. The aim of this paper is to present an analysis of local error estimate and adaptive step-size control techniques for solving the NSLE by the Symmetric Split-Step method with all the unavoidable mathematical rigor required for a comprehensive understanding of the topic.

  9. A New Modified Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm with Exponential Function Adaptive Steps

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wei; Li, Hao-ru

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most recent popular swarm intelligence techniques, artificial bee colony algorithm is poor at exploitation and has some defects such as slow search speed, poor population diversity, the stagnation in the working process, and being trapped into the local optimal solution. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new modified artificial bee colony algorithm in view of the initial population structure, subpopulation groups, step updating, and population elimination. Further, depending on opposition-based learning theory and the new modified algorithms, an improved S-type grouping method is proposed and the original way of roulette wheel selection is substituted through sensitivity-pheromone way. Then, an adaptive step with exponential functions is designed for replacing the original random step. Finally, based on the new test function versions CEC13, six benchmark functions with the dimensions D = 20 and D = 40 are chosen and applied in the experiments for analyzing and comparing the iteration speed and accuracy of the new modified algorithms. The experimental results show that the new modified algorithm has faster and more stable searching and can quickly increase poor population diversity and bring out the global optimal solutions. PMID:27293426

  10. A New Modified Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm with Exponential Function Adaptive Steps.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wei; Lan, Heng-You; Li, Hao-Ru

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most recent popular swarm intelligence techniques, artificial bee colony algorithm is poor at exploitation and has some defects such as slow search speed, poor population diversity, the stagnation in the working process, and being trapped into the local optimal solution. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new modified artificial bee colony algorithm in view of the initial population structure, subpopulation groups, step updating, and population elimination. Further, depending on opposition-based learning theory and the new modified algorithms, an improved S-type grouping method is proposed and the original way of roulette wheel selection is substituted through sensitivity-pheromone way. Then, an adaptive step with exponential functions is designed for replacing the original random step. Finally, based on the new test function versions CEC13, six benchmark functions with the dimensions D = 20 and D = 40 are chosen and applied in the experiments for analyzing and comparing the iteration speed and accuracy of the new modified algorithms. The experimental results show that the new modified algorithm has faster and more stable searching and can quickly increase poor population diversity and bring out the global optimal solutions. PMID:27293426

  11. Averaging analysis for discrete time and sampled data adaptive systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Li-Chen; Bai, Er-Wei; Sastry, Shankar S.

    1986-01-01

    Earlier continuous time averaging theorems are extended to the nonlinear discrete time case. Theorems for the study of the convergence analysis of discrete time adaptive identification and control systems are used. Instability theorems are also derived and used for the study of robust stability and instability of adaptive control schemes applied to sampled data systems. As a by product, the effects of sampling on unmodeled dynamics in continuous time systems are also studied.

  12. Impact of space-time mesh adaptation on solute transport modeling in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiar, Bahman; Porta, Giovanni; Perotto, Simona; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    We implement a space-time grid adaptation procedure to efficiently improve the accuracy of numerical simulations of solute transport in porous media in the context of model parameter estimation. We focus on the Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE) for the interpretation of nonreactive transport experiments in laboratory-scale heterogeneous porous media. When compared to a numerical approximation based on a fixed space-time discretization, our approach is grounded on a joint automatic selection of the spatial grid and the time step to capture the main (space-time) system dynamics. Spatial mesh adaptation is driven by an anisotropic recovery-based error estimator which enables us to properly select the size, shape, and orientation of the mesh elements. Adaptation of the time step is performed through an ad hoc local reconstruction of the temporal derivative of the solution via a recovery-based approach. The impact of the proposed adaptation strategy on the ability to provide reliable estimates of the key parameters of an ADE model is assessed on the basis of experimental solute breakthrough data measured following tracer injection in a nonuniform porous system. Model calibration is performed in a Maximum Likelihood (ML) framework upon relying on the representation of the ADE solution through a generalized Polynomial Chaos Expansion (gPCE). Our results show that the proposed anisotropic space-time grid adaptation leads to ML parameter estimates and to model results of markedly improved quality when compared to classical inversion approaches based on a uniform space-time discretization.

  13. Nonlinear time-series-based adaptive control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, R. R.; Rajkumar, V.; Zakrzewski, R. R.

    1991-01-01

    A control design methodology based on a nonlinear time-series reference model is presented. It is indicated by highly nonlinear simulations that such designs successfully stabilize troublesome aircraft maneuvers undergoing large changes in angle of attack as well as large electric power transients due to line faults. In both applications, the nonlinear controller was significantly better than the corresponding linear adaptive controller. For the electric power network, a flexible AC transmission system with series capacitor power feedback control is studied. A bilinear autoregressive moving average reference model is identified from system data, and the feedback control is manipulated according to a desired reference state. The control is optimized according to a predictive one-step quadratic performance index. A similar algorithm is derived for control of rapid changes in aircraft angle of attack over a normally unstable flight regime. In the latter case, however, a generalization of a bilinear time-series model reference includes quadratic and cubic terms in angle of attack.

  14. Adaptive median filtering for preprocessing of time series measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paunonen, Matti

    1993-01-01

    A median (L1-norm) filtering program using polynomials was developed. This program was used in automatic recycling data screening. Additionally, a special adaptive program to work with asymmetric distributions was developed. Examples of adaptive median filtering of satellite laser range observations and TV satellite time measurements are given. The program proved to be versatile and time saving in data screening of time series measurements.

  15. Guidelines for Adapting Manualized Interventions for New Target Populations: A Step-Wise Approach Using Anger Management as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Naomi E. S.; Kemp, Kathleen A.; Leff, Stephen S.; Lochman, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of manual-based interventions tends to improve client outcomes and promote replicability. With an increasingly strong link between funding and the use of empirically supported prevention and intervention programs, manual development and adaptation have become research priorities. As a result, researchers and scholars have generated guidelines for developing manuals from scratch, but there are no extant guidelines for adapting empirically supported, manualized prevention and intervention programs for use with new populations. Thus, this article proposes step-by-step guidelines for the manual adaptation process. It also describes two adaptations of an extensively researched anger management intervention to exemplify how an empirically supported program was systematically and efficiently adapted to achieve similar outcomes with vastly different populations in unique settings. PMID:25110403

  16. Discrete-time adaptive control of robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarokh, M.

    1989-01-01

    A discrete-time model reference adaptive control scheme is developed for trajectory tracking of robot manipulators. Hyperstability theory is utilized to derive the adaptation laws for the controller gain matrices. It is shown that asymptotic trajectory tracking is achieved despite gross robot parameter variation and uncertainties. The method offers considerable design flexibility and enables the designer to improve the performance of the control system by adjusting free design parameters. The discrete-time adaptation algorithm is extremely simple and is therefore suitable for real-time implementation.

  17. The prevalence of upright non-stepping time in comparison to stepping time in 11-13 year old school children across seasons.

    PubMed

    McCrorie, P Rw; Duncan, E; Granat, M H; Stansfield, B W

    2012-11-01

    Evidence suggests that behaviours such as standing are beneficial for our health. Unfortunately, little is known of the prevalence of this state, its importance in relation to time spent stepping or variation across seasons. The aim of this study was to quantify, in young adolescents, the prevalence and seasonal changes in time spent upright and not stepping (UNSt(time)) as well as time spent upright and stepping (USt(time)), and their contribution to overall upright time (U(time)). Thirty-three adolescents (12.2 ± 0.3 y) wore the activPAL activity monitor during four school days on two occasions: November/December (winter) and May/June (summer). UNSt(time) contributed 60% of daily U(time) at winter (Mean = 196 min) and 53% at summer (Mean = 171 min); a significant seasonal effect, p < 0.001. USt(time) was significantly greater in summer compared to winter (153 min versus 131 min, p < 0.001). The effects in UNSt(time) could be explained through significant seasonal differences during the school hours (09:00-16:00), whereas the effects in USt(time) could be explained through significant seasonal differences in the evening period (16:00-22:00). Adolescents spent a greater amount of time upright and not stepping than they did stepping, in both winter and summer. The observed seasonal effects for both UNSt(time) and USt(time) provide important information for behaviour change intervention programs. PMID:23111187

  18. Stochastic analysis of epidemics on adaptive time varying networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotnis, Bhushan; Kuri, Joy

    2013-06-01

    Many studies investigating the effect of human social connectivity structures (networks) and human behavioral adaptations on the spread of infectious diseases have assumed either a static connectivity structure or a network which adapts itself in response to the epidemic (adaptive networks). However, human social connections are inherently dynamic or time varying. Furthermore, the spread of many infectious diseases occur on a time scale comparable to the time scale of the evolving network structure. Here we aim to quantify the effect of human behavioral adaptations on the spread of asymptomatic infectious diseases on time varying networks. We perform a full stochastic analysis using a continuous time Markov chain approach for calculating the outbreak probability, mean epidemic duration, epidemic reemergence probability, etc. Additionally, we use mean-field theory for calculating epidemic thresholds. Theoretical predictions are verified using extensive simulations. Our studies have uncovered the existence of an “adaptive threshold,” i.e., when the ratio of susceptibility (or infectivity) rate to recovery rate is below the threshold value, adaptive behavior can prevent the epidemic. However, if it is above the threshold, no amount of behavioral adaptations can prevent the epidemic. Our analyses suggest that the interaction patterns of the infected population play a major role in sustaining the epidemic. Our results have implications on epidemic containment policies, as awareness campaigns and human behavioral responses can be effective only if the interaction levels of the infected populace are kept in check.

  19. One step at a time: endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Vembar, Shruthi S.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is monitored by ER quality control (ERQC) mechanisms. Proteins that pass ERQC criteria traffic to their final destinations through the secretory pathway, whereas non-native and unassembled subunits of multimeric proteins are degraded by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. During ERAD, molecular chaperones and associated factors recognize and target substrates for retrotranslocation to the cytoplasm, where they are degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome machinery. The discovery of diseases that are associated with ERAD substrates highlights the importance of this pathway. Here, we summarize our current understanding of each step during ERAD, with emphasis on the factors that catalyse distinct activities. PMID:19002207

  20. Real-time adaptive aircraft scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolitz, Stephan E.; Terrab, Mostafa

    1990-01-01

    One of the most important functions of any air traffic management system is the assignment of ground-holding times to flights, i.e., the determination of whether and by how much the take-off of a particular aircraft headed for a congested part of the air traffic control (ATC) system should be postponed in order to reduce the likelihood and extent of airborne delays. An analysis is presented for the fundamental case in which flights from many destinations must be scheduled for arrival at a single congested airport; the formulation is also useful in scheduling the landing of airborne flights within the extended terminal area. A set of approaches is described for addressing a deterministic and a probabilistic version of this problem. For the deterministic case, where airport capacities are known and fixed, several models were developed with associated low-order polynomial-time algorithms. For general delay cost functions, these algorithms find an optimal solution. Under a particular natural assumption regarding the delay cost function, an extremely fast (O(n ln n)) algorithm was developed. For the probabilistic case, using an estimated probability distribution of airport capacities, a model was developed with an associated low-order polynomial-time heuristic algorithm with useful properties.

  1. Consensus time and conformity in the adaptive voter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2013-09-01

    The adaptive voter model is a paradigmatic model in the study of opinion formation. Here we propose an extension for this model, in which conflicts are resolved by obtaining another opinion, and analytically study the time required for consensus to emerge. Our results shed light on the rich phenomenology of both the original and extended adaptive voter models, including a dynamical phase transition in the scaling behavior of the mean time to consensus.

  2. PIC Algorithm with Multiple Poisson Equation Solves During One Time Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Junxue; Godar, Trenton; Menart, James; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Choi, Yongjun; Loverich, John; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2015-09-01

    In order to reduce the overall computational time of a PIC (particle-in-cell) computer simulation, an attempt was made to utilize larger time step sizes by implementing multiple solutions of Poisson's equation within one time step. The hope was this would make the PIC simulation stable at larger time steps than an explicit technique can use, and using larger time steps would reduce the overall computational time, even though the computational time per time step would increase. A three-dimensional PIC code that tracks electrons and ions throughout a three-dimensional Cartesian computational domain is used to perform this study. The results of altering the number of times Poisson's equation is solved during a single time step are presented. Also, the size of the time that can be used and still maintain a stable solution is surveyed. The results indicate that using multiple Poisson solves during one time step provides some ability to use larger time steps in PIC simulations, but the increase in time step size is not significant and the overall simulation run time is not reduced

  3. A Step Towards Developing Adaptive Robot-Mediated Intervention Architecture (ARIA) for Children With Autism

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Esubalew T; Lahiri, Uttama; Swanson, Amy R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Warren, Zachary E.; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technology, especially robotic technology, has been shown to be appealing to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Such interest may be leveraged to provide repeatable, accurate and individualized intervention services to young children with ASD based on quantitative metrics. However, existing robot-mediated systems tend to have limited adaptive capability that may impact individualization. Our current work seeks to bridge this gap by developing an adaptive and individualized robot-mediated technology for children with ASD. The system is composed of a humanoid robot with its vision augmented by a network of cameras for real-time head tracking using a distributed architecture. Based on the cues from the child’s head movement, the robot intelligently adapts itself in an individualized manner to generate prompts and reinforcements with potential to promote skills in the ASD core deficit area of early social orienting. The system was validated for feasibility, accuracy, and performance. Results from a pilot usability study involving six children with ASD and a control group of six typically developing (TD) children are presented. PMID:23221831

  4. A step towards developing adaptive robot-mediated intervention architecture (ARIA) for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Esubalew T; Lahiri, Uttama; Swanson, Amy R; Crittendon, Julie A; Warren, Zachary E; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2013-03-01

    Emerging technology, especially robotic technology, has been shown to be appealing to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Such interest may be leveraged to provide repeatable, accurate and individualized intervention services to young children with ASD based on quantitative metrics. However, existing robot-mediated systems tend to have limited adaptive capability that may impact individualization. Our current work seeks to bridge this gap by developing an adaptive and individualized robot-mediated technology for children with ASD. The system is composed of a humanoid robot with its vision augmented by a network of cameras for real-time head tracking using a distributed architecture. Based on the cues from the child's head movement, the robot intelligently adapts itself in an individualized manner to generate prompts and reinforcements with potential to promote skills in the ASD core deficit area of early social orienting. The system was validated for feasibility, accuracy, and performance. Results from a pilot usability study involving six children with ASD and a control group of six typically developing (TD) children are presented. PMID:23221831

  5. A novel online adaptive time delay identification technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrak, Alper; Tatlicioglu, Enver

    2016-05-01

    Time delay is a phenomenon which is common in signal processing, communication, control applications, etc. The special feature of time delay that makes it attractive is that it is a commonly faced problem in many systems. A literature search on time-delay identification highlights the fact that most studies focused on numerical solutions. In this study, a novel online adaptive time-delay identification technique is proposed. This technique is based on an adaptive update law through a minimum-maximum strategy which is firstly applied to time-delay identification. In the design of the adaptive identification law, Lyapunov-based stability analysis techniques are utilised. Several numerical simulations were conducted with Matlab/Simulink to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique. It is numerically demonstrated that the proposed technique works efficiently in identifying both constant and disturbed time delays, and is also robust to measurement noise.

  6. Competencies for Part-Time Faculty--the First Step.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Margaret; Dickens, Mary Ellen

    1978-01-01

    Discusses hiring, evaluation, involvement, and competencies of the increasing number of part-time teachers in colleges throughout the country, and the unclear expectations placed on them. Includes a competencies questionnaire for part-time instructors developed at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute.

  7. Viral DNA Packaging: One Step at a Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Carlos; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    During its life-cycle the bacteriophage φ29 actively packages its dsDNA genome into a proteinacious capsid, compressing its genome to near crystalline densities against large electrostatic, elastic, and entropic forces. This remarkable process is accomplished by a nano-scale, molecular DNA pump - a complex assembly of three protein and nucleic acid rings which utilizes the free energy released in ATP hydrolysis to perform the mechanical work necessary to overcome these large energetic barriers. We have developed a single molecule optical tweezers assay which has allowed us to probe the detailed mechanism of this packaging motor. By following the rate of packaging of a single bacteriophage as the capsid is filled with genome and as a function of optically applied load, we find that the compression of the genome results in the build-up of an internal force, on the order of ˜ 55 pN, due to the compressed genome. The ability to work against such large forces makes the packaging motor one of the strongest known molecular motors. By titrating the concentration of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate at different opposing load, we are able to determine features of the mechanochemistry of this motor - the coupling between the mechanical and chemical cycles. We find that force is generated not upon binding of ATP, but rather upon release of hydrolysis products. Finally, by improving the resolution of the optical tweezers assay, we are able to observe the discrete increments of DNA encapsidated each cycle of the packaging motor. We find that DNA is packaged in 10-bp increments preceded by the binding of multiple ATPs. The application of large external forces slows the packaging rate of the motor, revealing that the 10-bp steps are actually composed of four 2.5-bp steps which occur in rapid succession. These data show that the individual subunits of the pentameric ring-ATPase at the core of the packaging motor are highly coordinated, with the binding of ATP and the

  8. Inherent robustness of discrete-time adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C. C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Global stability robustness with respect to unmodeled dynamics, arbitrary bounded internal noise, as well as external disturbance is shown to exist for a class of discrete-time adaptive control systems when the regressor vectors of these systems are persistently exciting. Although fast adaptation is definitely undesirable, so far as attaining the greatest amount of global stability robustness is concerned, slow adaptation is shown to be not necessarily beneficial. The entire analysis in this paper holds for systems with slowly varying return difference matrices; the plants in these systems need not be slowly varying.

  9. Active movement restores veridical event-timing after tactile adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tomassini, Alice; Gori, Monica; Burr, David; Sandini, Giulio; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence suggests that time in the subsecond range is tightly linked to sensory processing. Event-time can be distorted by sensory adaptation, and many temporal illusions can accompany action execution. In this study, we show that adaptation to tactile motion causes a strong contraction of the apparent duration of tactile stimuli. However, when subjects make a voluntary motor act before judging the duration, it annuls the adaptation-induced temporal distortion, reestablishing veridical event-time. The movement needs to be performed actively by the subject: passive movement of similar magnitude and dynamics has no effect on adaptation, showing that it is the motor commands themselves, rather than reafferent signals from body movement, which reset the adaptation for tactile duration. No other concomitant perceptual changes were reported (such as apparent speed or enhanced temporal discrimination), ruling out a generalized effect of body movement on somatosensory processing. We suggest that active movement resets timing mechanisms in preparation for the new scenario that the movement will cause, eliminating inappropriate biases in perceived time. Our brain seems to utilize the intention-to-move signals to retune its perceptual machinery appropriately, to prepare to extract new temporal information. PMID:22832572

  10. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    We perform a stability analysis of a Monte Carlo method for simulating the Compton scattering of photons by free electron in high energy density applications and develop time-step limits that avoid unstable and oscillatory solutions. Implementing this Monte Carlo technique in multi physics problems typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value, which can lead to this undesirable behavior. With a set of numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficacy of our time-step limits.

  11. Formulation of an explicit-multiple-time-step time integration method for use in a global primitive equation grid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    With appropriate modifications, a recently proposed explicit-multiple-time-step scheme (EMTSS) is incorporated into the UCLA model. In this scheme, the linearized terms in the governing equations that generate the gravity waves are split into different vertical modes. Each mode is integrated with an optimal time step, and at periodic intervals these modes are recombined. The other terms are integrated with a time step dictated by the CFL condition for low-frequency waves. This large time step requires a special modification of the advective terms in the polar region to maintain stability. Test runs for 72 h show that EMTSS is a stable, efficient and accurate scheme.

  12. Using Response Times for Item Selection in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Response times on items can be used to improve item selection in adaptive testing provided that a probabilistic model for their distribution is available. In this research, the author used a hierarchical modeling framework with separate first-level models for the responses and response times and a second-level model for the distribution of the…

  13. Importance of variable time-step algorithms in spatial kinetics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aviles, B.N.

    1994-12-31

    The use of spatial kinetics codes in conjunction with advanced thermal-hydraulics codes is becoming more widespread as better methods and faster computers appear. The integrated code packages are being used for routine nuclear power plant design and analysis, including simulations with instrumentation and control systems initiating system perturbations such as rod motion and scrams. As a result, it is important to include a robust variable time-step algorithm that can accurately and efficiently follow widely varying plant neutronic behavior. This paper describes the variable time-step algorithm in SPANDEX and compares the automatic time-step scheme with a more traditional fixed time-step scheme.

  14. IMPROVEMENTS TO THE TIME STEPPING ALGORITHM OF RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Cumberland, R.; Mesina, G.

    2009-01-01

    The RELAP5-3D time step method is used to perform thermo-hydraulic and neutronic simulations of nuclear reactors and other devices. It discretizes time and space by numerically solving several differential equations. Previously, time step size was controlled by halving or doubling the size of a previous time step. This process caused the code to run slower than it potentially could. In this research project, the RELAP5-3D time step method was modifi ed to allow a new method of changing time steps to improve execution speed and to control error. The new RELAP5-3D time step method being studied involves making the time step proportional to the material courant limit (MCL), while insuring that the time step does not increase by more than a factor of two between advancements. As before, if a step fails or mass error is excessive, the time step is cut in half. To examine performance of the new method, a measure of run time and a measure of error were plotted against a changing MCL proportionality constant (m) in seven test cases. The removal of the upper time step limit produced a small increase in error, but a large decrease in execution time. The best value of m was found to be 0.9. The new algorithm is capable of producing a signifi cant increase in execution speed, with a relatively small increase in mass error. The improvements made are now under consideration for inclusion as a special option in the RELAP5-3D production code.

  15. Two-stepping through time: mammals and viruses.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Nicholas R; Sawyer, Sara L

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have identified ancient virus genomes preserved as fossils within diverse animal genomes. These fossils have led to the revelation that a broad range of mammalian virus families are older and more ubiquitous than previously appreciated. Long-term interactions between viruses and their hosts often develop into genetic arms races where both parties continually jockey for evolutionary dominance. It is difficult to imagine how mammalian hosts have kept pace in the evolutionary race against rapidly evolving viruses over large expanses of time, given their much slower evolutionary rates. However, recent data has begun to reveal the evolutionary strategy of slowly-evolving hosts. We review these data and suggest a modified arms race model where the evolutionary possibilities of viruses are relatively constrained. Such a model could allow more accurate forecasting of virus evolution. PMID:21531564

  16. A discrete-time adaptive control scheme for robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarokh, M.

    1990-01-01

    A discrete-time model reference adaptive control scheme is developed for trajectory tracking of robot manipulators. The scheme utilizes feedback, feedforward, and auxiliary signals, obtained from joint angle measurement through simple expressions. Hyperstability theory is utilized to derive the adaptation laws for the controller gain matrices. It is shown that trajectory tracking is achieved despite gross robot parameter variation and uncertainties. The method offers considerable design flexibility and enables the designer to improve the performance of the control system by adjusting free design parameters. The discrete-time adaptation algorithm is extremely simple and is therefore suitable for real-time implementation. Simulations and experimental results are given to demonstrate the performance of the scheme.

  17. A family of variable step-size affine projection adaptive filter algorithms using statistics of channel impulse response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams Esfand Abadi, Mohammad; AbbasZadeh Arani, Seyed Ali Asghar

    2011-12-01

    This paper extends the recently introduced variable step-size (VSS) approach to the family of adaptive filter algorithms. This method uses prior knowledge of the channel impulse response statistic. Accordingly, optimal step-size vector is obtained by minimizing the mean-square deviation (MSD). The presented algorithms are the VSS affine projection algorithm (VSS-APA), the VSS selective partial update NLMS (VSS-SPU-NLMS), the VSS-SPU-APA, and the VSS selective regressor APA (VSS-SR-APA). In VSS-SPU adaptive algorithms the filter coefficients are partially updated which reduce the computational complexity. In VSS-SR-APA, the optimal selection of input regressors is performed during the adaptation. The presented algorithms have good convergence speed, low steady state mean square error (MSE), and low computational complexity features. We demonstrate the good performance of the proposed algorithms through several simulations in system identification scenario.

  18. Convergence Acceleration for Multistage Time-Stepping Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Turkel, Eli L.; Rossow, C-C; Vasta, V. N.

    2006-01-01

    The convergence of a Runge-Kutta (RK) scheme with multigrid is accelerated by preconditioning with a fully implicit operator. With the extended stability of the Runge-Kutta scheme, CFL numbers as high as 1000 could be used. The implicit preconditioner addresses the stiffness in the discrete equations associated with stretched meshes. Numerical dissipation operators (based on the Roe scheme, a matrix formulation, and the CUSP scheme) as well as the number of RK stages are considered in evaluating the RK/implicit scheme. Both the numerical and computational efficiency of the scheme with the different dissipation operators are discussed. The RK/implicit scheme is used to solve the two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. In two dimensions, turbulent flows over an airfoil at subsonic and transonic conditions are computed. The effects of mesh cell aspect ratio on convergence are investigated for Reynolds numbers between 5.7 x 10(exp 6) and 100.0 x 10(exp 6). Results are also obtained for a transonic wing flow. For both 2-D and 3-D problems, the computational time of a well-tuned standard RK scheme is reduced at least a factor of four.

  19. A Dynamic Era-Based Time-Symmetric Block Time-Step Algorithm with Parallel Implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Murat; Saygin, Hasan

    2012-06-01

    The time-symmetric block time-step (TSBTS) algorithm is a newly developed efficient scheme for N-body integrations. It is constructed on an era-based iteration. In this work, we re-designed the TSBTS integration scheme with a dynamically changing era size. A number of numerical tests were performed to show the importance of choosing the size of the era, especially for long-time integrations. Our second aim was to show that the TSBTS scheme is as suitable as previously known schemes for developing parallel N-body codes. In this work, we relied on a parallel scheme using the copy algorithm for the time-symmetric scheme. We implemented a hybrid of data and task parallelization for force calculation to handle load balancing problems that can appear in practice. Using the Plummer model initial conditions for different numbers of particles, we obtained the expected efficiency and speedup for a small number of particles. Although parallelization of the direct N-body codes is negatively affected by the communication/calculation ratios, we obtained good load-balanced results. Moreover, we were able to conserve the advantages of the algorithm (e.g., energy conservation for long-term simulations).

  20. Time Adaptation Shows Duration Selectivity in the Human Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Masamichi J.; Ditye, Thomas; Harada, Tokiko; Hashiguchi, Maho; Sadato, Norihiro; Carlson, Synnöve; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    Although psychological and computational models of time estimation have postulated the existence of neural representations tuned for specific durations, empirical evidence of this notion has been lacking. Here, using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation paradigm, we show that the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) (corresponding to the supramarginal gyrus) exhibited reduction in neural activity due to adaptation when a visual stimulus of the same duration was repeatedly presented. Adaptation was strongest when stimuli of identical durations were repeated, and it gradually decreased as the difference between the reference and test durations increased. This tuning property generalized across a broad range of durations, indicating the presence of general time-representation mechanisms in the IPL. Furthermore, adaptation was observed irrespective of the subject’s attention to time. Repetition of a nontemporal aspect of the stimulus (i.e., shape) did not produce neural adaptation in the IPL. These results provide neural evidence for duration-tuned representations in the human brain. PMID:26378440

  1. The Effects of Predator Arrival Timing on Adaptive Radiation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, J.; Knope, M. L.; Fukami, T.

    2009-12-01

    Much of Earth’s biodiversity is thought to have arisen by adaptive radiation, the rapid diversification of a single ancestral species to fill a wide-variety of ecological niches. Both theory and empirical evidence have long supported competition for limited resources as a primary driver of adaptive radiation. While predation has also been postulated to be an important selective force during radiation, empirical evidence is surprisingly scant and its role remains controversial. However, two recent empirical studies suggest that predation can promote divergence during adaptive radiation. Using an experimental laboratory microcosm system, we examined how predator arrival timing affects the rate and extent of diversification during adaptive radiation. We varied the introduction timing of a protozoan predator (Tetrahymena thermophila) into populations of the bacteria Pseudomonas flourescens, which is known for its ability to undergo rapid adaptive radiation in aqueous microcosms. While our results show that predator arrival timing may have a significant impact on the rate, but not extent, of diversification, these results are tenuous and should be interpreted with caution, as the protozoan predators died early in the majority of our treatments, hampering our ability for comparison across treatments. Additionally, the abundance of newly derived bacterial genotypes was markedly lower in all treatments than observed in previous experiments utilizing this microbial experimental evolution system. To address these shortcomings, we will be repeating the experiment in the near future to further explore the impact of predator arrival timing on adaptive radiation. Smooth Morph and small-Wrinkly Spreader Pseudomonas flourescens diversification in the 96 hour treatment. Day 10, diluted to 1e-5.

  2. ADAPTIVE DATA ANALYSIS OF COMPLEX FLUCTUATIONS IN PHYSIOLOGIC TIME SERIES

    PubMed Central

    PENG, C.-K.; COSTA, MADALENA; GOLDBERGER, ARY L.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a generic framework of dynamical complexity to understand and quantify fluctuations of physiologic time series. In particular, we discuss the importance of applying adaptive data analysis techniques, such as the empirical mode decomposition algorithm, to address the challenges of nonlinearity and nonstationarity that are typically exhibited in biological fluctuations. PMID:20041035

  3. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented. PMID:26581455

  4. Sensitivity of a thermodynamic sea ice model with leads to time step size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledley, T. S.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of sea ice models, developed to study the physics of the growth and melt of ice at the ocean surface and the variations in ice extent, depend on the size of the time step. Thus, to study longer-term variations within a reasonable computer budget, a model with a scheme allowing longer time steps has been constructed. However, the results produced by the model can definitely depend on the length of the time step. The sensitivity of a model to time-step size can be reduced by appropriate approaches. The present investigation is concerned with experiments which use a formulation of a lead parameterization that can be considered as a first step toward the development of a lead parameterization suitable for a use in long-term climate studies.

  5. An Explicit Super-Time-Stepping Scheme for Non-Symmetric Parabolic Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurski, K. F.; O'Sullivan, S.

    2010-09-01

    Explicit numerical methods for the solution of a system of differential equations may suffer from a time step size that approaches zero in order to satisfy stability conditions. When the differential equations are dominated by a skew-symmetric component, the problem is that the real eigenvalues are dominated by imaginary eigenvalues. We compare results for stable time step limits for the super-time-stepping method of Alexiades, Amiez, and Gremaud (super-time-stepping methods belong to the Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev class) and a new method modeled on a predictor-corrector scheme with multiplicative operator splitting. This new explicit method increases stability of the original super-time-stepping whenever the skew-symmetric term is nonzero, which occurs in particular convection-diffusion problems and more generally when the iteration matrix represents a nonlinear operator. The new method is stable for skew symmetric dominated systems where the regular super-time-stepping scheme fails. This method is second order in time (may be increased by Richardson extrapolation) and the spatial order is determined by the user's choice of discretization scheme. We present a comparison between the two super-time-stepping methods to show the speed up available for any non-symmetric system using the nearly symmetric Black-Scholes equation as an example.

  6. Multiple Steps to Activate FAK’s Kinase Domain: Adaptation to Confined Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Florian A.; Vogel, Viola

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate cell signaling by phosphorylating their substrates in response to environment-specific stimuli. Using molecular dynamics, we studied the catalytically active and inactive conformations of the kinase domain of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which are distinguished by displaying a structured or unstructured activation loop, respectively. Upon removal of an ATP analog, we show that the nucleotide-binding pocket in the catalytically active conformation is structurally unstable and fluctuates between an open and closed configuration. In contrast, the pocket remains open in the catalytically inactive form upon removal of an inhibitor from the pocket. Because temporal pocket closures will slow the ATP on-rate, these simulations suggest a multistep process in which the kinase domain is more likely to bind ATP in the catalytically inactive than in the active form. Transient closures of the ATP-binding pocket might allow FAK to slow down its catalytic cycle. These short cat naps could be adaptions to crowded or confined environments by giving the substrate sufficient time to diffuse away. The simulations show further how either the phosphorylation of the activation loop or the activating mutations of the so-called SuperFAK influence the electrostatic switch that controls kinase activity. PMID:23746525

  7. An adaptive robust controller for time delay maglev transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Reza Hamidi; Zarabadipour, Hassan; Shahnazi, Reza

    2012-12-01

    For engineering systems, uncertainties and time delays are two important issues that must be considered in control design. Uncertainties are often encountered in various dynamical systems due to modeling errors, measurement noises, linearization and approximations. Time delays have always been among the most difficult problems encountered in process control. In practical applications of feedback control, time delay arises frequently and can severely degrade closed-loop system performance and in some cases, drives the system to instability. Therefore, stability analysis and controller synthesis for uncertain nonlinear time-delay systems are important both in theory and in practice and many analytical techniques have been developed using delay-dependent Lyapunov function. In the past decade the magnetic and levitation (maglev) transportation system as a new system with high functionality has been the focus of numerous studies. However, maglev transportation systems are highly nonlinear and thus designing controller for those are challenging. The main topic of this paper is to design an adaptive robust controller for maglev transportation systems with time-delay, parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. In this paper, an adaptive robust control (ARC) is designed for this purpose. It should be noted that the adaptive gain is derived from Lyapunov-Krasovskii synthesis method, therefore asymptotic stability is guaranteed.

  8. Adaptive back-stepping pitch angle control for wind turbine based on a new electro-hydraulic pitch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiu-xing; Lin, Yong-gang; Li, Wei; Gu, Ya-jing; Lei, Peng-fei; Liu, Hong-wei

    2015-11-01

    A new electro-hydraulic pitch system is proposed to smooth the output power and drive-train torque fluctuations for wind turbine. This new pitch system employs a servo-valve-controlled hydraulic motor to enhance pitch control performances. This pitch system is represented by a state-space model with parametric uncertainties and nonlinearities. An adaptive back-stepping pitch angle controller is synthesised based on this state-space model to accurately achieve the desired pitch angle control regardless of such uncertainties and nonlinearities. This pitch angle controller includes a back-stepping procedure and an adaption law to deal with such uncertainties and nonlinearities and hence to improve the final pitch control performances. The proposed pitch system and the designed pitch angle controller have been validated for achievable and efficient power and torque regulation performances by comparative experimental results under various operating conditions.

  9. Towards automated on-line adaptation of 2-Step IMRT plans: QUASIMODO phantom and prostate cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The standard clinical protocol of image-guided IMRT for prostate carcinoma introduces isocenter relocation to restore the conformity of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) segments to the target as seen in the cone-beam CT on the day of treatment. The large interfractional deformations of the clinical target volume (CTV) still require introduction of safety margins which leads to undesirably high rectum toxicity. Here we present further results from the 2-Step IMRT method which generates adaptable prostate IMRT plans using Beam Eye View (BEV) and 3D information. Methods Intermediate/high-risk prostate carcinoma cases are treated using Simultaneous Integrated Boost at the Universitätsklinkum Würzburg (UKW). Based on the planning CT a CTV is defined as the prostate and the base of seminal vesicles. The CTV is expanded by 10 mm resulting in the PTV; the posterior margin is limited to 7 mm. The Boost is obtained by expanding the CTV by 5 mm, overlap with rectum is not allowed. Prescription doses to PTV and Boost are 60.1 and 74 Gy respectively given in 33 fractions. We analyse the geometry of the structures of interest (SOIs): PTV, Boost, and rectum, and generate 2-Step IMRT plans to deliver three fluence steps: conformal to the target SOIs (S0), sparing the rectum (S1), and narrow segments compensating the underdosage in the target SOIs due to the rectum sparing (S2). The width of S2 segments is calculated for every MLC leaf pair based on the target and rectum geometry in the corresponding CT layer to have best target coverage. The resulting segments are then fed into the DMPO optimizer of the Pinnacle treatment planning system for weight optimization and fine-tuning of the form, prior to final dose calculation using the collapsed cone algorithm. We adapt 2-Step IMRT plans to changed geometry whilst simultaneously preserving the number of initially planned Monitor Units (MU). The adaptation adds three further steps to the previous isocenter relocation: 1

  10. Real time adaptive filtering for digital X-ray applications.

    PubMed

    Bockenbach, Olivier; Mangin, Michel; Schuberth, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade, many methods for adaptively filtering a data stream have been proposed. Those methods have applications in two dimensional imaging as well as in three dimensional image reconstruction. Although the primary objective of this filtering technique is to reduce the noise while avoiding to blur the edges, diagnostic, automated segmentation and surgery show a growing interest in enhancing the features contained in the image flow. Most of the methods proposed so far emerged from thorough studies of the physics of the considered modality and therefore show only a marginal capability to be extended across modalities. Moreover, adaptive filtering belongs to the family of processing intensive algorithms. Existing technology has often driven to simplifications and modality specific optimization to sustain the expected performances. In the specific case of real time digital X-ray as used surgery, the system has to sustain a throughput of 30 frames per second. In this study, we take a generalized approach for adaptive filtering based on multiple oriented filters. Mapping the filtering part to the embedded real time image processing while a user/application defined adaptive recombination of the filter outputs allow to change the smoothing and edge enhancement properties of the filter without changing the oriented filter parameters. We have implemented the filtering on a Cell Broadband Engine processor and the adaptive recombination on an off-the-shelf PC, connected via Gigabit Ethernet. This implementation is capable of filtering images of 5122 pixels at a throughput in excess of 40 frames per second while allowing to change the parameters in real time. PMID:17354937

  11. Adaptive dynamic surface control for MIMO nonlinear time-varying systems with prescribed tracking performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenliang; Lin, Yan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme is proposed for a class of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) nonlinear time-varying systems. By fusing a bound estimation approach, a smooth function and a time-varying matrix factorisation, the obstacle caused by unknown time-varying parameters is circumvented. The proposed scheme is free of the problem of explosion of complexity and needs only one updated parameter at each design step. Moreover, all tracking errors can converge to predefined arbitrarily small residual sets with a prescribed convergence rate and maximum overshoot. Such features result in a simple adaptive controller which can be easily implemented in applications with less computational burden and satisfactory tracking performance. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  12. From wavelets to adaptive approximations: time-frequency parametrization of EEG.

    PubMed

    Durka, Piotr J

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of time-frequency analysis of the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). It covers in details two major steps: introduction of wavelets and adaptive approximations. Presented studies include time-frequency solutions to several standard research and clinical problems, encountered in analysis of evoked potentials, sleep EEG, epileptic activities, ERD/ERS and pharmaco-EEG. Based upon these results we conclude that the matching pursuit algorithm provides a unified parametrization of EEG, applicable in a variety of experimental and clinical setups. This conclusion is followed by a brief discussion of the current state of the mathematical and algorithmical aspects of adaptive time-frequency approximations of signals. PMID:12605721

  13. Frequency Adaptability and Waveform Design for OFDM Radar Space-Time Adaptive Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata; Glover, Charles Wayne

    2012-01-01

    We propose an adaptive waveform design technique for an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar signal employing a space-time adaptive processing (STAP) technique. We observe that there are inherent variabilities of the target and interference responses in the frequency domain. Therefore, the use of an OFDM signal can not only increase the frequency diversity of our system, but also improve the target detectability by adaptively modifying the OFDM coefficients in order to exploit the frequency-variabilities of the scenario. First, we formulate a realistic OFDM-STAP measurement model considering the sparse nature of the target and interference spectra in the spatio-temporal domain. Then, we show that the optimal STAP-filter weight-vector is equal to the generalized eigenvector corresponding to the minimum generalized eigenvalue of the interference and target covariance matrices. With numerical examples we demonstrate that the resultant OFDM-STAP filter-weights are adaptable to the frequency-variabilities of the target and interference responses, in addition to the spatio-temporal variabilities. Hence, by better utilizing the frequency variabilities, we propose an adaptive OFDM-waveform design technique, and consequently gain a significant amount of STAP-performance improvement.

  14. Closed loop adaptive control of spectrum-producing step using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.

    1998-11-24

    Characteristics of the plasma in a plasma-based manufacturing process step are monitored directly and in real time by observing the spectrum which it produces. An artificial neural network analyzes the plasma spectrum and generates control signals to control one or more of the process input parameters in response to any deviation of the spectrum beyond a narrow range. In an embodiment, a plasma reaction chamber forms a plasma in response to input parameters such as gas flow, pressure and power. The chamber includes a window through which the electromagnetic spectrum produced by a plasma in the chamber, just above the subject surface, may be viewed. The spectrum is conducted to an optical spectrometer which measures the intensity of the incoming optical spectrum at different wavelengths. The output of optical spectrometer is provided to an analyzer which produces a plurality of error signals, each indicating whether a respective one of the input parameters to the chamber is to be increased or decreased. The microcontroller provides signals to control respective controls, but these lines are intercepted and first added to the error signals, before being provided to the controls for the chamber. The analyzer can include a neural network and an optional spectrum preprocessor to reduce background noise, as well as a comparator which compares the parameter values predicted by the neural network with a set of desired values provided by the microcontroller. 7 figs.

  15. Closed loop adaptive control of spectrum-producing step using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi Yung

    1998-01-01

    Characteristics of the plasma in a plasma-based manufacturing process step are monitored directly and in real time by observing the spectrum which it produces. An artificial neural network analyzes the plasma spectrum and generates control signals to control one or more of the process input parameters in response to any deviation of the spectrum beyond a narrow range. In an embodiment, a plasma reaction chamber forms a plasma in response to input parameters such as gas flow, pressure and power. The chamber includes a window through which the electromagnetic spectrum produced by a plasma in the chamber, just above the subject surface, may be viewed. The spectrum is conducted to an optical spectrometer which measures the intensity of the incoming optical spectrum at different wavelengths. The output of optical spectrometer is provided to an analyzer which produces a plurality of error signals, each indicating whether a respective one of the input parameters to the chamber is to be increased or decreased. The microcontroller provides signals to control respective controls, but these lines are intercepted and first added to the error signals, before being provided to the controls for the chamber. The analyzer can include a neural network and an optional spectrum preprocessor to reduce background noise, as well as a comparator which compares the parameter values predicted by the neural network with a set of desired values provided by the microcontroller.

  16. Discrete-time minimal control synthesis adaptive algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Bernardo, M.; di Gennaro, F.; Olm, J. M.; Santini, S.

    2010-12-01

    This article proposes a discrete-time Minimal Control Synthesis (MCS) algorithm for a class of single-input single-output discrete-time systems written in controllable canonical form. As it happens with the continuous-time MCS strategy, the algorithm arises from the family of hyperstability-based discrete-time model reference adaptive controllers introduced in (Landau, Y. (1979), Adaptive Control: The Model Reference Approach, New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.) and is able to ensure tracking of the states of a given reference model with minimal knowledge about the plant. The control design shows robustness to parameter uncertainties, slow parameter variation and matched disturbances. Furthermore, it is proved that the proposed discrete-time MCS algorithm can be used to control discretised continuous-time plants with the same performance features. Contrary to previous discrete-time implementations of the continuous-time MCS algorithm, here a formal proof of asymptotic stability is given for generic n-dimensional plants in controllable canonical form. The theoretical approach is validated by means of simulation results.

  17. Speech perception at positive signal-to-noise ratios using adaptive adjustment of time compression.

    PubMed

    Schlueter, Anne; Brand, Thomas; Lemke, Ulrike; Nitzschner, Stefan; Kollmeier, Birger; Holube, Inga

    2015-11-01

    Positive signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) characterize listening situations most relevant for hearing-impaired listeners in daily life and should therefore be considered when evaluating hearing aid algorithms. For this, a speech-in-noise test was developed and evaluated, in which the background noise is presented at fixed positive SNRs and the speech rate (i.e., the time compression of the speech material) is adaptively adjusted. In total, 29 younger and 12 older normal-hearing, as well as 24 older hearing-impaired listeners took part in repeated measurements. Younger normal-hearing and older hearing-impaired listeners conducted one of two adaptive methods which differed in adaptive procedure and step size. Analysis of the measurements with regard to list length and estimation strategy for thresholds resulted in a practical method measuring the time compression for 50% recognition. This method uses time-compression adjustment and step sizes according to Versfeld and Dreschler [(2002). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 401-408], with sentence scoring, lists of 30 sentences, and a maximum likelihood method for threshold estimation. Evaluation of the procedure showed that older participants obtained higher test-retest reliability compared to younger participants. Depending on the group of listeners, one or two lists are required for training prior to data collection. PMID:26627804

  18. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence—favorably evaluated in the West—for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The adaptation process was theory-driven and covered several key issues of cultural adaptation. We considered the importance of interpersonal relationships and family in China and cultural notions of health. Using an evidence-based treatment protocol originally designed for Western HIV-positive patients, we developed an 11-step Chinese Life-Steps program with an additional culture-specific intervention option. We describe in detail how the cultural elements were incorporated into the intervention and put into practice at each stage. Clinical considerations are also outlined and followed by two case examples that are provided to illustrate our application of the intervention. Finally, we discuss practical and research issues and limitations emerging from our field experiments in a HIV clinic in Beijing. The intervention was tailored to address both universal and culturally specific barriers to adherence and is readily applicable to generalized clinical settings. This evidence-based intervention provides a case example of the process of adapting behavioral interventions to culturally diverse communities with limited resources. PMID:23667305

  19. Adaptive Sensing of Time Series with Application to Remote Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Furlong, Michael; Hardgrove, Craig; Low, Bryan K. H.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Wettergreen, David

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of adaptive informationoptimal data collection in time series. Here a remote sensor or explorer agent throttles its sampling rate in order to track anomalous events while obeying constraints on time and power. This problem is challenging because the agent has limited visibility -- all collected datapoints lie in the past, but its resource allocation decisions require predicting far into the future. Our solution is to continually fit a Gaussian process model to the latest data and optimize the sampling plan on line to maximize information gain. We compare the performance characteristics of stationary and nonstationary Gaussian process models. We also describe an application based on geologic analysis during planetary rover exploration. Here adaptive sampling can improve coverage of localized anomalies and potentially benefit mission science yield of long autonomous traverses.

  20. Sparse time-frequency decomposition based on dictionary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Thomas Y; Shi, Zuoqiang

    2016-04-13

    In this paper, we propose a time-frequency analysis method to obtain instantaneous frequencies and the corresponding decomposition by solving an optimization problem. In this optimization problem, the basis that is used to decompose the signal is not known a priori. Instead, it is adapted to the signal and is determined as part of the optimization problem. In this sense, this optimization problem can be seen as a dictionary adaptation problem, in which the dictionary is adaptive to one signal rather than a training set in dictionary learning. This dictionary adaptation problem is solved by using the augmented Lagrangian multiplier (ALM) method iteratively. We further accelerate the ALM method in each iteration by using the fast wavelet transform. We apply our method to decompose several signals, including signals with poor scale separation, signals with outliers and polluted by noise and a real signal. The results show that this method can give accurate recovery of both the instantaneous frequencies and the intrinsic mode functions. PMID:26953172

  1. Stability analysis and time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D. Warsa, James S. Lowrie, Robert B.

    2010-05-20

    A Monte Carlo method for simulating Compton scattering in high energy density applications has been presented that models the photon-electron collision kinematics exactly [E. Canfield, W.M. Howard, E.P. Liang, Inverse Comptonization by one-dimensional relativistic electrons, Astrophys. J. 323 (1987) 565]. However, implementing this technique typically requires an explicit evaluation of the material temperature, which can lead to unstable and oscillatory solutions. In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of this Monte Carlo method and develop two time-step limits that avoid undesirable behavior. The first time-step limit prevents instabilities, while the second, more restrictive time-step limit avoids both instabilities and nonphysical oscillations. With a set of numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficacy of these time-step limits.

  2. Robustness via Run-Time Adaptation of Contingent Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresina, John L.; Washington, Richard; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss our approach to making the behavior of planetary rovers more robust for the purpose of increased productivity. Due to the inherent uncertainty in rover exploration, the traditional approach to rover control is conservative, limiting the autonomous operation of the rover and sacrificing performance for safety. Our objective is to increase the science productivity possible within a single uplink by allowing the rover's behavior to be specified with flexible, contingent plans and by employing dynamic plan adaptation during execution. We have deployed a system exhibiting flexible, contingent execution; this paper concentrates on our ongoing efforts on plan adaptation, Plans can be revised in two ways: plan steps may be deleted, with execution continuing with the plan suffix; and the current plan may be merged with an "alternate plan" from an on-board library. The plan revision action is chosen to maximize the expected utility of the plan. Plan merging and action deletion constitute a more conservative general-purpose planning system; in return, our approach is more efficient and more easily verified, two important criteria for deployed rovers.

  3. Stance time and step width variability have unique contributing impairments in older persons.

    PubMed

    Brach, Jennifer S; Studenski, Stephanie; Perera, Subashan; VanSwearingen, Jessie M; Newman, Anne B

    2008-04-01

    Gait variability may have multiple causes. We hypothesized that central nervous system (CNS) impairments would affect motor control and be manifested as increased stance time and step length variability, while sensory impairments would affect balance and be manifested as increased step width variability. Older adults (mean+/-standard deviation (S.D.) age=79.4+/-4.1, n=558) from the Pittsburgh site of the Cardiovascular Health Study participated. The S.D. across steps was the indicator of gait variability, determined for three gait measures, step length, stance time and step width, using a computerized walkway. Impairment measures included CNS function (modified mini-mental state examination, Trails A and B, Digit Symbol Substitution, finger tapping), sensory function (lower extremity (LE) vibration, vision), strength (grip strength, repeated chair stands), mood, and LE pain. Linear regression models were fit for the three gait variability characteristics using impairment measures as independent variables, adjusted for age, race, gender, and height. Analyses were repeated stratified by gait speed. All measures of CNS impairment were directly related to stance time variability (p<0.01), with increased CNS impairment associated with increased stance time variability. CNS impairments were not related to step length or width variability. Both sensory impairments were inversely related to step width (p<0.01) but not step length or stance time variability. CNS impairments affected stance time variability especially in slow walkers while sensory impairments affected step width variability in fast walkers. Specific patterns of gait variability may imply different underlying causes. Types of gait variability should be specified. Interventions may be targeted at specific types of gait variability. PMID:17632004

  4. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  5. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  6. The First Steps of Adaptation of Escherichia coli to the Gut Are Dominated by Soft Sweeps

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Marta; Bergman, Marie-Louise; Sobral, Daniel; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Xavier, Karina B.; Gordo, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of adaptive mutations is essential for survival in novel environments. However, in clonal populations with a high mutational supply, the power of natural selection is expected to be limited. This is due to clonal interference - the competition of clones carrying different beneficial mutations - which leads to the loss of many small effect mutations and fixation of large effect ones. If interference is abundant, then mechanisms for horizontal transfer of genes, which allow the immediate combination of beneficial alleles in a single background, are expected to evolve. However, the relevance of interference in natural complex environments, such as the gut, is poorly known. To address this issue, we have developed an experimental system which allows to uncover the nature of the adaptive process as Escherichia coli adapts to the mouse gut. This system shows the invasion of beneficial mutations in the bacterial populations and demonstrates the pervasiveness of clonal interference. The observed dynamics of change in frequency of beneficial mutations are consistent with soft sweeps, where different adaptive mutations with similar phenotypes, arise repeatedly on different haplotypes without reaching fixation. Despite the complexity of this ecosystem, the genetic basis of the adaptive mutations revealed a striking parallelism in independently evolving populations. This was mainly characterized by the insertion of transposable elements in both coding and regulatory regions of a few genes. Interestingly, in most populations we observed a complete phenotypic sweep without loss of genetic variation. The intense clonal interference during adaptation to the gut environment, here demonstrated, may be important for our understanding of the levels of strain diversity of E. coli inhabiting the human gut microbiota and of its recombination rate. PMID:24603313

  7. Real-time Adaptive Control Using Neural Generalized Predictive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, Pam; Soloway, Don; Gold, Brian

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a Nonlinear Generalized Predictive Control algorithm by showing real-time adaptive control on a plant with relatively fast time-constants. Generalized Predictive Control has classically been used in process control where linear control laws were formulated for plants with relatively slow time-constants. The plant of interest for this paper is a magnetic levitation device that is nonlinear and open-loop unstable. In this application, the reference model of the plant is a neural network that has an embedded nominal linear model in the network weights. The control based on the linear model provides initial stability at the beginning of network training. In using a neural network the control laws are nonlinear and online adaptation of the model is possible to capture unmodeled or time-varying dynamics. Newton-Raphson is the minimization algorithm. Newton-Raphson requires the calculation of the Hessian, but even with this computational expense the low iteration rate make this a viable algorithm for real-time control.

  8. Adaptive Sampling of Time Series During Remote Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the challenge of online adaptive data collection in a time series. A remote sensor or explorer agent adapts its rate of data collection in order to track anomalous events while obeying constraints on time and power. This problem is challenging because the agent has limited visibility (all its datapoints lie in the past) and limited control (it can only decide when to collect its next datapoint). This problem is treated from an information-theoretic perspective, fitting a probabilistic model to collected data and optimizing the future sampling strategy to maximize information gain. The performance characteristics of stationary and nonstationary Gaussian process models are compared. Self-throttling sensors could benefit environmental sensor networks and monitoring as well as robotic exploration. Explorer agents can improve performance by adjusting their data collection rate, preserving scarce power or bandwidth resources during uninteresting times while fully covering anomalous events of interest. For example, a remote earthquake sensor could conserve power by limiting its measurements during normal conditions and increasing its cadence during rare earthquake events. A similar capability could improve sensor platforms traversing a fixed trajectory, such as an exploration rover transect or a deep space flyby. These agents can adapt observation times to improve sample coverage during moments of rapid change. An adaptive sampling approach couples sensor autonomy, instrument interpretation, and sampling. The challenge is addressed as an active learning problem, which already has extensive theoretical treatment in the statistics and machine learning literature. A statistical Gaussian process (GP) model is employed to guide sample decisions that maximize information gain. Nonsta tion - ary (e.g., time-varying) covariance relationships permit the system to represent and track local anomalies, in contrast with current GP approaches. Most common GP models

  9. Modeling solute transport in distribution networks with variable demand and time step sizes.

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, Chad E.; Bilisoly, Roger Lee; Buchberger, Steven G.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Yarrington, Lane

    2004-06-01

    The effect of variable demands at short time scales on the transport of a solute through a water distribution network has not previously been studied. We simulate flow and transport in a small water distribution network using EPANET to explore the effect of variable demand on solute transport across a range of hydraulic time step scales from 1 minute to 2 hours. We show that variable demands at short time scales can have the following effects: smoothing of a pulse of tracer injected into a distribution network and increasing the variability of both the transport pathway and transport timing through the network. Variable demands are simulated for these different time step sizes using a previously developed Poisson rectangular pulse (PRP) demand generator that considers demand at a node to be a combination of exponentially distributed arrival times with log-normally distributed intensities and durations. Solute is introduced at a tank and at three different network nodes and concentrations are modeled through the system using the Lagrangian transport scheme within EPANET. The transport equations within EPANET assume perfect mixing of the solute within a parcel of water and therefore physical dispersion cannot occur. However, variation in demands along the solute transport path contribute to both removal and distortion of the injected pulse. The model performance measures examined are the distribution of the Reynolds number, the variation in the center of mass of the solute across time, and the transport path and timing of the solute through the network. Variation in all three performance measures is greatest at the shortest time step sizes. As the scale of the time step increases, the variability in these performance measures decreases. The largest time steps produce results that are inconsistent with the results produced by the smaller time steps.

  10. Adaptive control of systems with unknown time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, James P.

    Control systems, on earth or in outer-space, may exhibit time delays in their dynamic behavior. Aerospace control systems must be able to operate in the presence of time delays both internal to the system and in its inputs and outputs. These delays are often introduced via systems controlled through a network, by information, energy or mass transport phenomena, but can also be caused by computer processing time or by the accumulation of time lags in a number of simple dynamic systems connected in series. When a dynamic system is subject to a time delay, unlike other parameters, this affects the temporal characteristics of the system and exact control over system operation cannot be strictly implemented. Systems with significant time delays are difficult to control using standard feedback controllers. The United States Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is considering the use of router-based data networks on-board next generation satellites and in decentralized control architectures. This approach has the potential to introduce non-constant and non-deterministic communications delays into feedback control loops that make use of these data networks. The desire for rapid deployment of new spacecraft architectures will also introduce many other control issues as the rigorous measurement, calibration and performance tests usually conducted on spacecraft systems to develop a highly precise dynamic model will need to be drastically shortened due to the desired abbreviated build and launch schedule. Due to limited testing and system identification, the spacecraft model will have uncertainties/perturbations from the actual plant. This will require a controller that can robustly control the non-linear dynamic model with limited plant knowledge. The problems created by the control of time delay systems and the limited plant knowledge nature of the systems of interest leads us to the concept of adaptive control. Adaptive control makes adjustment of the controllers

  11. A proposed adaptive step size perturbation and observation maximum power point tracking algorithm based on photovoltaic system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu

    Solar energy becomes one of the major alternative renewable energy options for its huge abundance and accessibility. Due to the intermittent nature, the high demand of Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) techniques exists when a Photovoltaic (PV) system is used to extract energy from the sunlight. This thesis proposed an advanced Perturbation and Observation (P&O) algorithm aiming for relatively practical circumstances. Firstly, a practical PV system model is studied with determining the series and shunt resistances which are neglected in some research. Moreover, in this proposed algorithm, the duty ratio of a boost DC-DC converter is the object of the perturbation deploying input impedance conversion to achieve working voltage adjustment. Based on the control strategy, the adaptive duty ratio step size P&O algorithm is proposed with major modifications made for sharp insolation change as well as low insolation scenarios. Matlab/Simulink simulation for PV model, boost converter control strategy and various MPPT process is conducted step by step. The proposed adaptive P&O algorithm is validated by the simulation results and detail analysis of sharp insolation changes, low insolation condition and continuous insolation variation.

  12. The energy expenditure of stair climbing one step and two steps at a time: estimations from measures of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Lewis G; Watkins, David A R; Duggan, Brendan M

    2012-01-01

    Stairway climbing provides a ubiquitous and inconspicuous method of burning calories. While typically two strategies are employed for climbing stairs, climbing one stair step per stride or two steps per stride, research to date has not clarified if there are any differences in energy expenditure between them. Fourteen participants took part in two stair climbing trials whereby measures of heart rate were used to estimate energy expenditure during stairway ascent at speeds chosen by the participants. The relationship between rate of oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]) and heart rate was calibrated for each participant using an inclined treadmill. The trials involved climbing up and down a 14.05 m high stairway, either ascending one step per stride or ascending two stair steps per stride. Single-step climbing used 8.5±0.1 kcal min(-1), whereas double step climbing used 9.2±0.1 kcal min(-1). These estimations are similar to equivalent measures in all previous studies, which have all directly measured [Formula: see text] The present study findings indicate that (1) treadmill-calibrated heart rate recordings can be used as a valid alternative to respirometry to ascertain rate of energy expenditure during stair climbing; (2) two step climbing invokes a higher rate of energy expenditure; however, one step climbing is energetically more expensive in total over the entirety of a stairway. Therefore to expend the maximum number of calories when climbing a set of stairs the single-step strategy is better. PMID:23251455

  13. The Energy Expenditure of Stair Climbing One Step and Two Steps at a Time: Estimations from Measures of Heart Rate

    PubMed Central

    Halsey, Lewis G.; Watkins, David A. R.; Duggan, Brendan M.

    2012-01-01

    Stairway climbing provides a ubiquitous and inconspicuous method of burning calories. While typically two strategies are employed for climbing stairs, climbing one stair step per stride or two steps per stride, research to date has not clarified if there are any differences in energy expenditure between them. Fourteen participants took part in two stair climbing trials whereby measures of heart rate were used to estimate energy expenditure during stairway ascent at speeds chosen by the participants. The relationship between rate of oxygen consumption () and heart rate was calibrated for each participant using an inclined treadmill. The trials involved climbing up and down a 14.05 m high stairway, either ascending one step per stride or ascending two stair steps per stride. Single-step climbing used 8.5±0.1 kcal min−1, whereas double step climbing used 9.2±0.1 kcal min−1. These estimations are similar to equivalent measures in all previous studies, which have all directly measured The present study findings indicate that (1) treadmill-calibrated heart rate recordings can be used as a valid alternative to respirometry to ascertain rate of energy expenditure during stair climbing; (2) two step climbing invokes a higher rate of energy expenditure; however, one step climbing is energetically more expensive in total over the entirety of a stairway. Therefore to expend the maximum number of calories when climbing a set of stairs the single-step strategy is better. PMID:23251455

  14. First-Step Mutations during Adaptation Restore the Expression of Hundreds of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Verdugo, Alejandra; Tenaillon, Olivier; Gaut, Brandon S.

    2016-01-01

    The temporal change of phenotypes during the adaptive process remains largely unexplored, as do the genetic changes that affect these phenotypic changes. Here we focused on three mutations that rose to high frequency in the early stages of adaptation within 12 Escherichia coli populations subjected to thermal stress (42 °C). All the mutations were in the rpoB gene, which encodes the RNA polymerase beta subunit. For each mutation, we measured the growth curves and gene expression (mRNAseq) of clones at 42 °C. We also compared growth and gene expression with their ancestor under unstressed (37 °C) and stressed conditions (42 °C). Each of the three mutations changed the expression of hundreds of genes and conferred large fitness advantages, apparently through the restoration of global gene expression from the stressed toward the prestressed state. These three mutations had a similar effect on gene expression as another single mutation in a distinct domain of the rpoB protein. Finally, we compared the phenotypic characteristics of one mutant, I572L, with two high-temperature adapted clones that have this mutation plus additional background mutations. The background mutations increased fitness, but they did not substantially change gene expression. We conclude that early mutations in a global transcriptional regulator cause extensive changes in gene expression, many of which are likely under positive selection for their effect in restoring the prestress physiology. PMID:26500250

  15. Adaptive time-frequency parametrization of epileptic spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durka, Piotr J.

    2004-05-01

    Adaptive time-frequency approximations of signals have proven to be a valuable tool in electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis and research, where it is believed that oscillatory phenomena play a crucial role in the brain’s information processing. This paper extends this paradigm to the nonoscillating structures such as the epileptic EEG spikes, and presents the advantages of their parametrization in general terms such as amplitude and half-width. A simple detector of epileptic spikes in the space of these parameters, tested on a limited data set, gives very promising results. It also provides a direct distinction between randomly occurring spikes or spike/wave complexes and rhythmic discharges.

  16. Modified Chebyshev pseudospectral method with O(N exp -1) time step restriction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosloff, Dan; Tal-Ezer, Hillel

    1989-01-01

    The extreme eigenvalues of the Chebyshev pseudospectral differentiation operator are O(N exp 2) where N is the number of grid points. As a result of this, the allowable time step in an explicit time marching algorithm is O(N exp -2) which, in many cases, is much below the time step dictated by the physics of the partial differential equation. A new set of interpolating points is introduced such that the eigenvalues of the differentiation operator are O(N) and the allowable time step is O(N exp -1). The properties of the new algorithm are similar to those of the Fourier method. The new algorithm also provides a highly accurate solution for non-periodic boundary value problems.

  17. Cross-cultural adaptation of research instruments: language, setting, time and statistical considerations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Research questionnaires are not always translated appropriately before they are used in new temporal, cultural or linguistic settings. The results based on such instruments may therefore not accurately reflect what they are supposed to measure. This paper aims to illustrate the process and required steps involved in the cross-cultural adaptation of a research instrument using the adaptation process of an attitudinal instrument as an example. Methods A questionnaire was needed for the implementation of a study in Norway 2007. There was no appropriate instruments available in Norwegian, thus an Australian-English instrument was cross-culturally adapted. Results The adaptation process included investigation of conceptual and item equivalence. Two forward and two back-translations were synthesized and compared by an expert committee. Thereafter the instrument was pretested and adjusted accordingly. The final questionnaire was administered to opioid maintenance treatment staff (n=140) and harm reduction staff (n=180). The overall response rate was 84%. The original instrument failed confirmatory analysis. Instead a new two-factor scale was identified and found valid in the new setting. Conclusions The failure of the original scale highlights the importance of adapting instruments to current research settings. It also emphasizes the importance of ensuring that concepts within an instrument are equal between the original and target language, time and context. If the described stages in the cross-cultural adaptation process had been omitted, the findings would have been misleading, even if presented with apparent precision. Thus, it is important to consider possible barriers when making a direct comparison between different nations, cultures and times. PMID:20144247

  18. Dissolvable fluidic time delays for programming multi-step assays in instrument-free paper diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Barry; Liang, Tinny; Fu, Elain; Ramachandran, Sujatha; Kauffman, Peter; Yager, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Lateral flow tests (LFTs) are an ingenious format for rapid and easy-to-use diagnostics, but they are fundamentally limited to assay chemistries that can be reduced to a single chemical step. In contrast, most laboratory diagnostic assays rely on multiple timed steps carried out by a human or a machine. Here, we use dissolvable sugar applied to paper to create programmable flow delays and present a paper network topology that uses these time delays to program automated multi-step fluidic protocols. Solutions of sucrose at different concentrations (10-70% of saturation) were added to paper strips and dried to create fluidic time delays spanning minutes to nearly an hour. A simple folding card format employing sugar delays was shown to automate a four-step fluidic process initiated by a single user activation step (folding the card); this device was used to perform a signal-amplified sandwich immunoassay for a diagnostic biomarker for malaria. The cards are capable of automating multi-step assay protocols normally used in laboratories, but in a rapid, low-cost, and easy-to-use format. PMID:23685876

  19. Time Step Rescaling Recovers Continuous-Time Dynamical Properties for Discrete-Time Langevin Integration of Nonequilibrium Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    When simulating molecular systems using deterministic equations of motion (e.g., Newtonian dynamics), such equations are generally numerically integrated according to a well-developed set of algorithms that share commonly agreed-upon desirable properties. However, for stochastic equations of motion (e.g., Langevin dynamics), there is still broad disagreement over which integration algorithms are most appropriate. While multiple desiderata have been proposed throughout the literature, consensus on which criteria are important is absent, and no published integration scheme satisfies all desiderata simultaneously. Additional nontrivial complications stem from simulating systems driven out of equilibrium using existing stochastic integration schemes in conjunction with recently developed nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems. Here, we examine a family of discrete time integration schemes for Langevin dynamics, assessing how each member satisfies a variety of desiderata that have been enumerated in prior efforts to construct suitable Langevin integrators. We show that the incorporation of a novel time step rescaling in the deterministic updates of position and velocity can correct a number of dynamical defects in these integrators. Finally, we identify a particular splitting (related to the velocity Verlet discretization) that has essentially universally appropriate properties for the simulation of Langevin dynamics for molecular systems in equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and path sampling contexts. PMID:24555448

  20. A modified implicit Monte Carlo method for time-dependent radiative transfer with adaptive material coupling

    SciTech Connect

    McClarren, Ryan G. Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we develop a robust implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) algorithm based on more accurately updating the linearized equilibrium radiation energy density. The method does not introduce oscillations in the solution and has the same limit as {delta}t{yields}{infinity} as the standard Fleck and Cummings IMC method. Moreover, the approach we introduce can be trivially added to current implementations of IMC by changing the definition of the Fleck factor. Using this new method we develop an adaptive scheme that uses either standard IMC or the modified method basing the adaptation on a zero-dimensional problem solved in each cell. Numerical results demonstrate that the new method can avoid the nonphysical overheating that occurs in standard IMC when the time step is large. The method also leads to decreased noise in the material temperature at the cost of a potential increase in the radiation temperature noise.

  1. Choice stepping reaction time test using exergame technology for fall risk assessment in older people.

    PubMed

    Ejupi, Andreas; Brodie, Matthew; Gschwind, Yves J; Schoene, Daniel; Lord, Stephen; Delbaere, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Accidental falls remain an important problem in older people. Stepping is a common task to avoid a fall and requires good interplay between sensory functions, central processing and motor execution. Increased choice stepping reaction time has been associated with recurrent falls in older people. The aim of this study was to examine if a sensor-based Exergame Choice Stepping Reaction Time test can successfully discriminate older fallers from non-fallers. The stepping test was conducted in a cohort of 104 community-dwelling older people (mean age: 80.7 ± 7.0 years). Participants were asked to step laterally as quickly as possible after a light stimulus appeared on a TV screen. Spatial and temporal measurements of the lower and upper body were derived from a low-cost and portable 3D-depth sensor (i.e. Microsoft Kinect) and 3D-accelerometer. Fallers had a slower stepping reaction time (970 ± 228 ms vs. 858 ± 123 ms, P = 0.001) and a slower reaction of their upper body (719 ± 289 ms vs. 631 ± 166 ms, P = 0.052) compared to non-fallers. It took fallers significantly longer than non-fallers to recover their balance after initiating the step (2147 ± 800 ms vs. 1841 ± 591 ms, P = 0.029). This study demonstrated that a sensor-based, low-cost and easy to administer stepping test, with the potential to be used in clinical practice or regular unsupervised home assessments, was able to identify significant differences between performances by fallers and non-fallers. PMID:25571596

  2. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B

    2008-01-01

    Compton scattering is an important aspect of radiative transfer in high energy density applications. In this process, the frequency and direction of a photon are altered by colliding with a free electron. The change in frequency of a scattered photon results in an energy exchange between the photon and target electron and energy coupling between radiation and matter. Canfield, Howard, and Liang have presented a Monte Carlo method for simulating Compton scattering that models the photon-electron collision kinematics exactly. However, implementing their technique in multiphysics problems that include the effects of radiation-matter energy coupling typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value. This explicit evaluation can lead to unstable and oscillatory solutions. In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of this Monte Carlo method and present time-step limits that avoid instabilities and nonphysical oscillations by considering a spatially independent, purely scattering radiative-transfer problem. Examining a simplified problem is justified because it isolates the effects of Compton scattering, and existing Monte Carlo techniques can robustly model other physics (such as absorption, emission, sources, and photon streaming). Our analysis begins by simplifying the equations that are solved via Monte Carlo within each time step using the Fokker-Planck approximation. Next, we linearize these approximate equations about an equilibrium solution such that the resulting linearized equations describe perturbations about this equilibrium. We then solve these linearized equations over a time step and determine the corresponding eigenvalues, quantities that can predict the behavior of solutions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation as a function of time-step size and other physical parameters. With these results, we develop our time-step limits. This approach is similar to our recent investigation of time discretizations for the

  3. Robust time and frequency domain estimation methods in adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamaire, Richard Orville

    1987-01-01

    A robust identification method was developed for use in an adaptive control system. The type of estimator is called the robust estimator, since it is robust to the effects of both unmodeled dynamics and an unmeasurable disturbance. The development of the robust estimator was motivated by a need to provide guarantees in the identification part of an adaptive controller. To enable the design of a robust control system, a nominal model as well as a frequency-domain bounding function on the modeling uncertainty associated with this nominal model must be provided. Two estimation methods are presented for finding parameter estimates, and, hence, a nominal model. One of these methods is based on the well developed field of time-domain parameter estimation. In a second method of finding parameter estimates, a type of weighted least-squares fitting to a frequency-domain estimated model is used. The frequency-domain estimator is shown to perform better, in general, than the time-domain parameter estimator. In addition, a methodology for finding a frequency-domain bounding function on the disturbance is used to compute a frequency-domain bounding function on the additive modeling error due to the effects of the disturbance and the use of finite-length data. The performance of the robust estimator in both open-loop and closed-loop situations is examined through the use of simulations.

  4. Enabling fast, stable and accurate peridynamic computations using multi-time-step integration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lindsay, P.; Parks, M. L.; Prakash, A.

    2016-04-13

    Peridynamics is a nonlocal extension of classical continuum mechanics that is well-suited for solving problems with discontinuities such as cracks. This paper extends the peridynamic formulation to decompose a problem domain into a number of smaller overlapping subdomains and to enable the use of different time steps in different subdomains. This approach allows regions of interest to be isolated and solved at a small time step for increased accuracy while the rest of the problem domain can be solved at a larger time step for greater computational efficiency. Lastly, performance of the proposed method in terms of stability, accuracy, andmore » computational cost is examined and several numerical examples are presented to corroborate the findings.« less

  5. Muscle contraction: the step-size distance and the impulse-time per ATP.

    PubMed

    Worthington, C R; Elliott, G F

    1996-02-01

    We derive the step-size distance, and the impulse time per ATP split, from a consideration of Hill's energy rate equation coupled with the enthalpy available per ATP split. This definition of step-size distance is model-independent, and is calculated to have a maximum of 17 A at no load and to reduce to zero at isometric tension, since it will depend on the velocity of shortening. We revisit a derivation of Hill's force-velocity equation depending on impulsive forces working against frictional forces and show that this gives a physical meaning to Hill's constants a and b. This is particularly elegant for Hill's constant b, which is directly related to the impulse time; the value of this impulse time is 1/2 ms. The question that muscle contraction may involve overlapping interactions is considered. However, we find that the step-size distance is not dependent on the possibility of overlapping interactions. PMID:8852761

  6. Variable grid-size and time-step finite difference method for seismic forward modeling and reverse-time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue

    A new variable grid-size and time-step finite-difference (FD) method is developed and applied to three different geophysical problems: simulation of tube waves in boreholes, three-dimensional (3-D) ground-motion simulation in sedimentary basin models, and reverse-time migration of multicomponent data. Unlike the conventional FD method, which uses a fixed grid-size and time-step for the entire model region, spatially variable grid-sizes and time-steps are used to achieve the optimal computational efficiency. For tube wave simulations, a fine grid-spacing is used for simulation inside the borehole region, while a coarse grid is used in the exterior region. While the stability condition requires a very fine time step for the fine grid, a variable time-step method provides coarse time steps for simulation in the coarse grid. Variable grid-size and time-step changes are used to achieve both accuracy and efficiency in the simulations. Numerical tests are performed for the Bayou Choctaw salt-flank model with different borehole models. The results show the important borehole effects on the seismic wavefield for a realistic source bandwidth. The combination of variable grid-size and time-step methods reduces computational costs by several orders of magnitude for the borehole models. Viscoelastic 3-D simulations are performed for a three-layer Salt Lake basin model. The near-surface unconsolidated layer is modeled with a fine grid, and the deep part of the model is modeled by a coarse grid. Simulation results show that the 3-D basin features and the shallow layer significantly affect the amplitude and duration time of the ground motion. In the elastic case, the approximation by 2-D modeling is insufficient to simulate the 3-D ground motion response. A basin model without a shallow low-velocity layer underestimates the ground motion duration and cumulative kinetic energy by 50% or more. The simulation of a Bingham Mine blast suggests that a lower S-velocity should be used to

  7. Numerical solution of the Euler equations by finite volume methods using Runge Kutta time stepping schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A.; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Turkel, Eli

    1981-01-01

    A new combination of a finite volume discretization in conjunction with carefully designed dissipative terms of third order, and a Runge Kutta time stepping scheme, is shown to yield an effective method for solving the Euler equations in arbitrary geometric domains. The method has been used to determine the steady transonic flow past an airfoil using an O mesh. Convergence to a steady state is accelerated by the use of a variable time step determined by the local Courant member, and the introduction of a forcing term proportional to the difference between the local total enthalpy and its free stream value.

  8. Real-Time Feedback Control of Flow-Induced Cavity Tones. Part 2; Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, M. A.; Cabell, R. H.; Cattafesta, L. N., III

    2006-01-01

    An adaptive generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm was formulated and applied to the cavity flow-tone problem. The algorithm employs gradient descent to update the GPC coefficients at each time step. Past input-output data and an estimate of the open-loop pulse response sequence are all that is needed to implement the algorithm for application at fixed Mach numbers. Transient measurements made during controller adaptation revealed that the controller coefficients converged to a steady state in the mean, and this implies that adaptation can be turned off at some point with no degradation in control performance. When converged, the control algorithm demonstrated multiple Rossiter mode suppression at fixed Mach numbers ranging from 0.275 to 0.38. However, as in the case of fixed-gain GPC, the adaptive GPC performance was limited by spillover in sidebands around the suppressed Rossiter modes. The algorithm was also able to maintain suppression of multiple cavity tones as the freestream Mach number was varied over a modest range (0.275 to 0.29). Beyond this range, stable operation of the control algorithm was not possible due to the fixed plant model in the algorithm.

  9. One-step synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposite coatings by novel laser adaptive ablation deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbezov, Valery; Sotirov, Sotir

    2013-03-01

    A novel approach for one-step synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposite coatings by new modification of Pulsed Laser Deposition technology called Laser Adaptive Ablation Deposition (LAAD) is presented. Hybrid nanocomposite coatings including Mg- Rapamycin and Mg- Desoximetasone were produced by UV TEA N2 laser under low vacuum (0.1 Pa) and room temperature onto substrates from SS 316L, KCl and NaCl. The laser fluence for Mg alloy was 1, 8 J/cm2 and for Desoximetasone 0,176 J/cm2 and for Rapamycin 0,118 J/cm2 were respectively. The threedimensional two-segmented single target was used to adapt the interaction of focused laser beam with inorganic and organic material. Magnesium alloy nanoparticles with sizes from 50 nm to 250 nm were obtained in organic matrices. The morphology of nanocomposites films were studied by Bright field / Fluorescence optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements were applied in order to study the functional properties of organic component before and after the LAAD process. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) was used for identification of Mg alloy presence in hybrid nanocomposites coatings. The precise control of process parameters and particularly of the laser fluence adjustment enables transfer on materials with different physical chemical properties and one-step synthesis of complex inorganic- organic nanocomposites coatings.

  10. Real-Time Adaptive Least-Squares Drag Minimization for Performance Adaptive Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrier, Yvonne L.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ting, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper contains a simulation study of a real-time adaptive least-squares drag minimization algorithm for an aeroelastic model of a flexible wing aircraft. The aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM). The wing structures incorporate a novel aerodynamic control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF). The drag minimization algorithm uses the Newton-Raphson method to find the optimal VCCTEF deflections for minimum drag in the context of an altitude-hold flight control mode at cruise conditions. The aerodynamic coefficient parameters used in this optimization method are identified in real-time using Recursive Least Squares (RLS). The results demonstrate the potential of the VCCTEF to improve aerodynamic efficiency for drag minimization for transport aircraft.

  11. A step in time: Changes in standard-frequency and time-signal broadcasts, 1 January 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, A. R.; Fosque, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    An improved coordinated universal time (UTC) system has been adopted by the International Radio Consultative Committee. It was implemented internationally by the standard-frequency and time-broadcast stations on 1 Jan. 1972. The new UTC system eliminates the frequency offset of 300 parts in 10 to the 10th power between the old UTC and atomic time, thus making the broadcast time interval (the UTC second) constant and defined by the resonant frequency of cesium atoms. The new time scale is kept in synchronism with the rotation of the Earth within plus or minus 0.7 s by step-time adjustments of exactly 1 s, when needed. A time code has been added to the disseminated time signals to permit universal time to be obtained from the broadcasts to the nearest 0.1 s for users requiring such precision. The texts of the International Radio Consultative Committee recommendation and report to implement the new UTC system are given. The coding formats used by various standard time broadcast services to transmit the difference between the universal time (UT1) and the UTC are also given. For users' convenience, worldwide primary VLF and HF transmissions stations, frequencies, and schedules of time emissions are also included. Actual time-step adjustments made by various stations on 1 Jan. 1972, are provided for future reference.

  12. A Monolithic Multi-Time-Step Computational Framework for Transient Advective-Diffusive-Reactive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, S.; Nakshatrala, K. B.

    2014-12-01

    Advection-Diffusion-Reaction (ADR) equations play a crucial role in simulating numerous geo- physical phenomena. It is well-known that the solution to these equations exhibit disparate spatial and temporal scales. These mathematical scales occur due to relative dominance of either advec- tion, diffusion, or reaction processes. Hence, in a careful simulation, one has to choose appropriate time-integrators, time-steps, and numerical formulations for spatial discretization. Multi-time-step coupling methods allow specific choice of integration methods (either temporal or spatial) in dif- ferent regions of the spatial domain. In recent years, most of the attempts to design monolithic multi-time-step frameworks favored second-order transient systems in structural dynamics. In this presentation, we will introduce monolithic multi-time-step computational frameworks for ADR equations. These methods are based on the theory of differential/algebraic equations. We shall also provide an overview of results from stability analysis, study of drift from compatibility con- straints, and analysis of influence of perturbations. Several benchmark problems will be utilized to demonstrate the theoretical findings and features of the proposed frameworks. Finally, application of the proposed methods to fast bimolecular reactive systems will be shown.

  13. Time-step Considerations in Particle Simulation Algorithms for Coulomb Collisions in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Dimits, A; Friedman, A; Caflisch, R

    2009-10-29

    The accuracy of first-order Euler and higher-order time-integration algorithms for grid-based Langevin equations collision models in a specific relaxation test problem is assessed. We show that statistical noise errors can overshadow time-step errors and argue that statistical noise errors can be conflated with time-step effects. Using a higher-order integration scheme may not achieve any benefit in accuracy for examples of practical interest. We also investigate the collisional relaxation of an initial electron-ion relative drift and the collisional relaxation to a resistive steady-state in which a quasi-steady current is driven by a constant applied electric field, as functions of the time step used to resolve the collision processes using binary and grid-based, test-particle Langevin equations models. We compare results from two grid-based Langevin equations collision algorithms to results from a binary collision algorithm for modeling electronion collisions. Some guidance is provided regarding how large a time step can be used compared to the inverse of the characteristic collision frequency for specific relaxation processes.

  14. 5-Step Methodology for Evaluation and Adaptation of Print Patient Health Information to Meet the <5th Grade Readability Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Schumann, Kristina P.; Dike, Ogechi

    2012-01-01

    Background In the setting of declining U.S. literacy, new policies include use of clear communication and low literacy accessibility practices with all patients. Reliable methods for adapting health information to meet such criteria remain a pressing need. Objectives To report method validation (Study 1) and method replication (Study 2) procedures and outcomes for a 5-step method for evaluating and adapting print health information to meet the current low literacy criterion of <5th grade readability. Materials Sets of 18 and 11 publicly-disseminated patient education documents developed by a university-affiliated medical center. Measures Three low-literacy criteria were strategically targeted for efficient, systematic evaluation and text modification to meet a <5th grade reading level: sentence length <15 words, writing in active voice, and use of common words with multisyllabic words (>2–3 syllables) minimized or avoided. Inter-rater reliability for the document evaluations was determined. Results Training in the methodology resulted in inter-rater reliability of 0.99–1.00 in Study 1 and 0.98–1.00 in Study 2. Original documents met none of the targeted low literacy criteria. In Study 1, following low-literacy adaptation, mean reading grade level decreased from 10.4±1.8 to 3.8±0.6 (p<0.0001), with consistent achievement of criteria for words per sentence, passive voice, and syllables per word. Study 2 demonstrated similar achievement of all target criteria, with a resulting decrease in mean reading grade level from 11.0±1.8 to 4.6±0.3 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions The 5-step methodology proved teachable and efficient. Targeting a limited set of modifiable criteria was effective and reliable in achieving <5th grade readability. PMID:22354210

  15. Developing a two-step heat treatment for inactivating desiccation-adapted Salmonella spp. in aged chicken litter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao; Wang, Hongye; Jiang, Xiuping

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of a two-step heat treatment for eliminating desiccation-adapted Salmonella spp. in aged chicken litter was evaluated. The aged chicken litter with 20, 30, 40, and 50% moisture contents was inoculated with a mixture of four Salmonella serotypes for a 24-h adaptation. Afterwards, the inoculated chicken litter was added into the chicken litter with the adjusted moisture content for a 1-h moist-heat treatment at 65 °C and 100% relative humidity inside a water bath, followed by a dry-heat treatment in a convection oven at 85 °C for 1 h to the desired moisture level (<10-12%). After moist-heat treatment, the populations of Salmonella in aged chicken litter at 20 and 30% moisture contents declined from ≈6.70 log colony-forming units (CFU)/g to 3.31 and 3.00 log CFU/g, respectively. After subsequent 1-h dry-heat treatment, the populations further decreased to 2.97 and 2.57 log CFU/g, respectively. Salmonella cells in chicken litter with 40% and 50% moisture contents were only detectable by enrichment after 40 and 20 min of moist-heat treatment, respectively. Moisture contents in all samples were reduced to <10% after a 1-h dry-heat process. Our results demonstrated that the two-step heat treatment was effective in reducing >5.5 logs of desiccation-adapted Salmonella in aged chicken litter with moisture content at or above 40%. Clearly, the findings from this study may provide the chicken litter processing industry with an effective heat treatment method for producing Salmonella-free chicken litter. PMID:25405539

  16. The large discretization step method for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haras, Zigo; Taasan, Shlomo

    1995-01-01

    A new method for the acceleration of linear and nonlinear time dependent calculations is presented. It is based on the Large Discretization Step (LDS) approximation, defined in this work, which employs an extended system of low accuracy schemes to approximate a high accuracy discrete approximation to a time dependent differential operator. Error bounds on such approximations are derived. These approximations are efficiently implemented in the LDS methods for linear and nonlinear hyperbolic equations, presented here. In these algorithms the high and low accuracy schemes are interpreted as the same discretization of a time dependent operator on fine and coarse grids, respectively. Thus, a system of correction terms and corresponding equations are derived and solved on the coarse grid to yield the fine grid accuracy. These terms are initialized by visiting the fine grid once in many coarse grid time steps. The resulting methods are very general, simple to implement and may be used to accelerate many existing time marching schemes.

  17. Simulating diffusion processes in discontinuous media: A numerical scheme with constant time steps

    SciTech Connect

    Lejay, Antoine; Pichot, Geraldine

    2012-08-30

    In this article, we propose new Monte Carlo techniques for moving a diffusive particle in a discontinuous media. In this framework, we characterize the stochastic process that governs the positions of the particle. The key tool is the reduction of the process to a Skew Brownian motion (SBM). In a zone where the coefficients are locally constant on each side of the discontinuity, the new position of the particle after a constant time step is sampled from the exact distribution of the SBM process at the considered time. To do so, we propose two different but equivalent algorithms: a two-steps simulation with a stop at the discontinuity and a one-step direct simulation of the SBM dynamic. Some benchmark tests illustrate their effectiveness.

  18. Adaptive spatial combining for passive time-reversed communications.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João; Silva, António; Jesus, Sérgio

    2008-08-01

    Passive time reversal has aroused considerable interest in underwater communications as a computationally inexpensive means of mitigating the intersymbol interference introduced by the channel using a receiver array. In this paper the basic technique is extended by adaptively weighting sensor contributions to partially compensate for degraded focusing due to mismatch between the assumed and actual medium impulse responses. Two algorithms are proposed, one of which restores constructive interference between sensors, and the other one minimizes the output residual as in widely used equalization schemes. These are compared with plain time reversal and variants that employ postequalization and channel tracking. They are shown to improve the residual error and temporal stability of basic time reversal with very little added complexity. Results are presented for data collected in a passive time-reversal experiment that was conducted during the MREA'04 sea trial. In that experiment a single acoustic projector generated a 24-PSK (phase-shift keyed) stream at 200400 baud, modulated at 3.6 kHz, and received at a range of about 2 km on a sparse vertical array with eight hydrophones. The data were found to exhibit significant Doppler scaling, and a resampling-based preprocessing method is also proposed here to compensate for that scaling. PMID:18681595

  19. A double-inverted pendulum model for studying the adaptability of postural control to frequency during human stepping in place.

    PubMed

    Breniere, Y; Ribreau, C

    1998-10-01

    In order to analyze the influence of gravity and body characteristics on the control of center of mass (CM) oscillations in stepping in place, equations of motion in oscillating systems were developed using a double-inverted pendulum model which accounts for both the head-arms-trunk (HAT) segment and the two-legged system. The principal goal of this work is to propose an equivalent model which makes use of the usual anthropometric data for the human body, in order to study the ability of postural control to adapt to the step frequency in this particular paradigm of human gait. This model allows the computation of CM-to-CP amplitude ratios, when the center of foot pressure (CP) oscillates, as a parametric function of the stepping in place frequency, whose parameters are gravity and major body characteristics. Motion analysis from a force plate was used to test the model by comparing experimental and simulated values of variations of the CM-to-CP amplitude ratio in the frontal plane versus the frequency. With data from the literature, the model is used to calculate the intersegmental torque which stabilizes the HAT when the Leg segment is subjected to a harmonic torque with an imposed frequency. PMID:9830708

  20. Unconditionally stable split-step finite difference time domain formulations for double-dispersive electromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Omar

    2014-12-01

    Systematic split-step finite difference time domain (SS-FDTD) formulations, based on the general Lie-Trotter-Suzuki product formula, are presented for solving the time-dependent Maxwell equations in double-dispersive electromagnetic materials. The proposed formulations provide a unified tool for constructing a family of unconditionally stable algorithms such as the first order split-step FDTD (SS1-FDTD), the second order split-step FDTD (SS2-FDTD), and the second order alternating direction implicit FDTD (ADI-FDTD) schemes. The theoretical stability of the formulations is included and it has been demonstrated that the formulations are unconditionally stable by construction. Furthermore, the dispersion relation of the formulations is derived and it has been found that the proposed formulations are best suited for those applications where a high space resolution is needed. Two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D numerical examples are included and it has been observed that the SS1-FDTD scheme is computationally more efficient than the ADI-FDTD counterpart, while maintaining approximately the same numerical accuracy. Moreover, the SS2-FDTD scheme allows using larger time step than the SS1-FDTD or ADI-FDTD and therefore necessitates less CPU time, while giving approximately the same numerical accuracy.

  1. Suggestions for CAP-TSD mesh and time-step input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Samuel R.

    1991-01-01

    Suggestions for some of the input parameters used in the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program-Transonic Small Disturbance) computer code are presented. These parameters include those associated with the mesh design and time step. The guidelines are based principally on experience with a one-dimensional model problem used to study wave propagation in the vertical direction.

  2. Dependence of Hurricane intensity and structures on vertical resolution and time-step size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Lin; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2003-09-01

    In view of the growing interests in the explicit modeling of clouds and precipitation, the effects of varying vertical resolution and time-step sizes on the 72-h explicit simulation of Hurricane Andrew (1992) are studied using the Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU/NCAR) mesoscale model (i.e., MM5) with the finest grid size of 6 km. It is shown that changing vertical resolution and time-step size has significant effects on hurricane intensity and inner-core cloud/precipitation, but little impact on the hurricane track. In general, increasing vertical resolution tends to produce a deeper storm with lower central pressure and stronger three-dimensional winds, and more precipitation. Similar effects, but to a less extent, occur when the time-step size is reduced. It is found that increasing the low-level vertical resolution is more efficient in intensifying a hurricane, whereas changing the upper-level vertical resolution has little impact on the hurricane intensity. Moreover, the use of a thicker surface layer tends to produce higher maximum surface winds. It is concluded that the use of higher vertical resolution, a thin surface layer, and smaller time-step sizes, along with higher horizontal resolution, is desirable to model more realistically the intensity and inner-core structures and evolution of tropical storms as well as the other convectively driven weather systems.

  3. Causal-Path Local Time-Stepping in the discontinuous Galerkin method for Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, L. D.; Alvarez, J.; Teixeira, F. L.; Pantoja, M. F.; Garcia, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel local time-stepping technique for marching-in-time algorithms. The technique is denoted as Causal-Path Local Time-Stepping (CPLTS) and it is applied for two time integration techniques: fourth-order low-storage explicit Runge-Kutta (LSERK4) and second-order Leap-Frog (LF2). The CPLTS method is applied to evolve Maxwell's curl equations using a Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme for the spatial discretization. Numerical results for LF2 and LSERK4 are compared with analytical solutions and the Montseny's LF2 technique. The results show that the CPLTS technique improves the dispersive and dissipative properties of LF2-LTS scheme.

  4. Development of a variable time-step transient NEW code: SPANDEX

    SciTech Connect

    Aviles, B.N. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional, variable time-step transient multigroup diffusion theory code, SPANDEX (space-time nodal expansion method). SPANDEX is based on the static nodal expansion method (NEM) code, NODEX (Ref. 1), and employs a nonlinear algorithm and a fifth-order expansion of the transverse-integrated fluxes. The time integration scheme in SPANDEX is a fourth-order implicit generalized Runge-Kutta method (GRK) with on-line error control and variable time-step selection. This Runge-Kutta method has been applied previously to point kinetics and one-dimensional finite difference transient analysis. This paper describes the application of the Runge-Kutta method to three-dimensional reactor transient analysis in a multigroup NEM code.

  5. Promoting rest using a quiet time innovation in an adult neuroscience step down unit.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and rest are fundamental for the restoration of energy needed to recuperate from illness, trauma and surgery. At present hospitals are too noisy to promote rest for patients. A literature search produced research that described how quiet time interventions addressing noise levels have met with positive patient and staff satisfaction, as well as creating a more peaceful and healing environment. In this paper, a description of the importance of quiet time and how a small butfeasible innovation was carried out in an adult neuroscience step down unit in a large tertiary health care facility in Canada is provided. Anecdotal evidence from patients, families, and staff suggests that quiet time may have positive effects for patients, their families, and the adult neuroscience step down unit staff Future research examining the effect of quiet time on patient, family and staff satisfaction and patient healing is necessary. PMID:25638912

  6. Two-step adaptive extraction method for ground points and breaklines from lidar point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Huang, Ronggang; Dong, Zhen; Zang, Yufu; Li, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The extraction of ground points and breaklines is a crucial step during generation of high quality digital elevation models (DEMs) from airborne LiDAR point clouds. In this study, we propose a novel automated method for this task. To overcome the disadvantages of applying a single filtering method in areas with various types of terrain, the proposed method first classifies the points into a set of segments and one set of individual points, which are filtered by segment-based filtering and multi-scale morphological filtering, respectively. In the process of multi-scale morphological filtering, the proposed method removes amorphous objects from the set of individual points to decrease the effect of the maximum scale on the filtering result. The proposed method then extracts the breaklines from the ground points, which provide a good foundation for generation of a high quality DEM. Finally, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method extracts ground points in a robust manner while preserving the breaklines.

  7. A multiple time stepping algorithm for efficient multiscale modeling of platelets flowing in blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Na; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-03-01

    We developed a multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithm for multiscale modeling of the dynamics of platelets flowing in viscous blood plasma. This MTS algorithm improves considerably the computational efficiency without significant loss of accuracy. This study of the dynamic properties of flowing platelets employs a combination of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and the coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) methods to describe the dynamic microstructures of deformable platelets in response to extracellular flow-induced stresses. The disparate spatial scales between the two methods are handled by a hybrid force field interface. However, the disparity in temporal scales between the DPD and CGMD that requires time stepping at microseconds and nanoseconds respectively, represents a computational challenge that may become prohibitive. Classical MTS algorithms manage to improve computing efficiency by multi-stepping within DPD or CGMD for up to one order of magnitude of scale differential. In order to handle 3-4 orders of magnitude disparity in the temporal scales between DPD and CGMD, we introduce a new MTS scheme hybridizing DPD and CGMD by utilizing four different time stepping sizes. We advance the fluid system at the largest time step, the fluid-platelet interface at a middle timestep size, and the nonbonded and bonded potentials of the platelet structural system at two smallest timestep sizes. Additionally, we introduce parameters to study the relationship of accuracy versus computational complexities. The numerical experiments demonstrated 3000x reduction in computing time over standard MTS methods for solving the multiscale model. This MTS algorithm establishes a computationally feasible approach for solving a particle-based system at multiple scales for performing efficient multiscale simulations.

  8. A Multiple Time Stepping Algorithm for Efficient Multiscale Modeling of Platelets Flowing in Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Na; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithm for multiscale modeling of the dynamics of platelets flowing in viscous blood plasma. This MTS algorithm improves considerably the computational efficiency without significant loss of accuracy. This study of the dynamic properties of flowing platelets employs a combination of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and the coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) methods to describe the dynamic microstructures of deformable platelets in response to extracellular flow-induced stresses. The disparate spatial scales between the two methods are handled by a hybrid force field interface. However, the disparity in temporal scales between the DPD and CGMD that requires time stepping at microseconds and nanoseconds respectively, represents a computational challenge that may become prohibitive. Classical MTS algorithms manage to improve computing efficiency by multi-stepping within DPD or CGMD for up to one order of magnitude of scale differential. In order to handle 3–4 orders of magnitude disparity in the temporal scales between DPD and CGMD, we introduce a new MTS scheme hybridizing DPD and CGMD by utilizing four different time stepping sizes. We advance the fluid system at the largest time step, the fluid-platelet interface at a middle timestep size, and the nonbonded and bonded potentials of the platelet structural system at two smallest timestep sizes. Additionally, we introduce parameters to study the relationship of accuracy versus computational complexities. The numerical experiments demonstrated 3000x reduction in computing time over standard MTS methods for solving the multiscale model. This MTS algorithm establishes a computationally feasible approach for solving a particle-based system at multiple scales for performing efficient multiscale simulations. PMID:25641983

  9. An implicit time-stepping scheme for rigid body dynamics with Coulomb friction

    SciTech Connect

    STEWART,DAVID; TRINKLE,JEFFREY C.

    2000-02-15

    In this paper a new time-stepping method for simulating systems of rigid bodies is given. Unlike methods which take an instantaneous point of view, the method is based on impulse-momentum equations, and so does not need to explicitly resolve impulsive forces. On the other hand, the method is distinct from previous impulsive methods in that it does not require explicit collision checking and it can handle simultaneous impacts. Numerical results are given for one planar and one three-dimensional example, which demonstrate the practicality of the method, and its convergence as the step size becomes small.

  10. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  11. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  12. Evaluating mallard adaptive management models with time series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, P.B.; Kendall, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Wildlife practitioners concerned with midcontinent mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) management in the United States have instituted a system of adaptive harvest management (AHM) as an objective format for setting harvest regulations. Under the AHM paradigm, predictions from a set of models that reflect key uncertainties about processes underlying population dynamics are used in coordination with optimization software to determine an optimal set of harvest decisions. Managers use comparisons of the predictive abilities of these models to gauge the relative truth of different hypotheses about density-dependent recruitment and survival, with better-predicting models giving more weight to the determination of harvest regulations. We tested the effectiveness of this strategy by examining convergence rates of 'predictor' models when the true model for population dynamics was known a priori. We generated time series for cases when the a priori model was 1 of the predictor models as well as for several cases when the a priori model was not in the model set. We further examined the addition of different levels of uncertainty into the variance structure of predictor models, reflecting different levels of confidence about estimated parameters. We showed that in certain situations, the model-selection process favors a predictor model that incorporates the hypotheses of additive harvest mortality and weakly density-dependent recruitment, even when the model is not used to generate data. Higher levels of predictor model variance led to decreased rates of convergence to the model that generated the data, but model weight trajectories were in general more stable. We suggest that predictive models should incorporate all sources of uncertainty about estimated parameters, that the variance structure should be similar for all predictor models, and that models with different functional forms for population dynamics should be considered for inclusion in predictor model! sets. All of these

  13. Real-Time Adaptive Color Segmentation by Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.

    2004-01-01

    Artificial neural networks that would utilize the cascade error projection (CEP) algorithm have been proposed as means of autonomous, real-time, adaptive color segmentation of images that change with time. In the original intended application, such a neural network would be used to analyze digitized color video images of terrain on a remote planet as viewed from an uninhabited spacecraft approaching the planet. During descent toward the surface of the planet, information on the segmentation of the images into differently colored areas would be updated adaptively in real time to capture changes in contrast, brightness, and resolution, all in an effort to identify a safe and scientifically productive landing site and provide control feedback to steer the spacecraft toward that site. Potential terrestrial applications include monitoring images of crops to detect insect invasions and monitoring of buildings and other facilities to detect intruders. The CEP algorithm is reliable and is well suited to implementation in very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry. It was chosen over other neural-network learning algorithms because it is better suited to realtime learning: It provides a self-evolving neural-network structure, requires fewer iterations to converge and is more tolerant to low resolution (that is, fewer bits) in the quantization of neural-network synaptic weights. Consequently, a CEP neural network learns relatively quickly, and the circuitry needed to implement it is relatively simple. Like other neural networks, a CEP neural network includes an input layer, hidden units, and output units (see figure). As in other neural networks, a CEP network is presented with a succession of input training patterns, giving rise to a set of outputs that are compared with the desired outputs. Also as in other neural networks, the synaptic weights are updated iteratively in an effort to bring the outputs closer to target values. A distinctive feature of the CEP neural

  14. Inertial stochastic dynamics. I. Long-time-step methods for Langevin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Daniel A.; Schlick, Tamar

    2000-05-01

    Two algorithms are presented for integrating the Langevin dynamics equation with long numerical time steps while treating the mass terms as finite. The development of these methods is motivated by the need for accurate methods for simulating slow processes in polymer systems such as two-site intermolecular distances in supercoiled DNA, which evolve over the time scale of milliseconds. Our new approaches refine the common Brownian dynamics (BD) scheme, which approximates the Langevin equation in the highly damped diffusive limit. Our LTID ("long-time-step inertial dynamics") method is based on an eigenmode decomposition of the friction tensor. The less costly integrator IBD ("inertial Brownian dynamics") modifies the usual BD algorithm by the addition of a mass-dependent correction term. To validate the methods, we evaluate the accuracy of LTID and IBD and compare their behavior to that of BD for the simple example of a harmonic oscillator. We find that the LTID method produces the expected correlation structure for Langevin dynamics regardless of the level of damping. In fact, LTID is the only consistent method among the three, with error vanishing as the time step approaches zero. In contrast, BD is accurate only for highly overdamped systems. For cases of moderate overdamping, and for the appropriate choice of time step, IBD is significantly more accurate than BD. IBD is also less computationally expensive than LTID (though both are the same order of complexity as BD), and thus can be applied to simulate systems of size and time scale ranges previously accessible to only the usual BD approach. Such simulations are discussed in our companion paper, for long DNA molecules modeled as wormlike chains.

  15. ROAMing terrain (Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes)

    SciTech Connect

    Duchaineau, M.; Wolinsky, M.; Sigeti, D.E.; Miller, M.C.; Aldrich, C.; Mineev, M.

    1997-07-01

    Terrain visualization is a difficult problem for applications requiring accurate images of large datasets at high frame rates, such as flight simulation and ground-based aircraft testing using synthetic sensor stimulation. On current graphics hardware, the problem is to maintain dynamic, view-dependent triangle meshes and texture maps that produce good images at the required frame rate. We present an algorithm for constructing triangle meshes that optimizes flexible view-dependent error metrics, produces guaranteed error bounds, achieves specified triangle counts directly, and uses frame-to-frame coherence to operate at high frame rates for thousands of triangles per frame. Our method, dubbed Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM), uses two priority queues to drive split and merge operations that maintain continuous triangulations built from pre-processed bintree triangles. We introduce two additional performance optimizations: incremental triangle stripping and priority-computation deferral lists. ROAM execution time is proportionate to the number of triangle changes per frame, which is typically a few percent of the output mesh size, hence ROAM performance is insensitive to the resolution and extent of the input terrain. Dynamic terrain and simple vertex morphing are supported.

  16. Augmenting synthetic aperture radar with space time adaptive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, Michael; Potter, Lee C.; Ertin, Emre

    2013-05-01

    Wide-area persistent radar video offers the ability to track moving targets. A shortcoming of the current technology is an inability to maintain track when Doppler shift places moving target returns co-located with strong clutter. Further, the high down-link data rate required for wide-area imaging presents a stringent system bottleneck. We present a multi-channel approach to augment the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) modality with space time adaptive processing (STAP) while constraining the down-link data rate to that of a single antenna SAR system. To this end, we adopt a multiple transmit, single receive (MISO) architecture. A frequency division design for orthogonal transmit waveforms is presented; the approach maintains coherence on clutter, achieves the maximal unaliased band of radial velocities, retains full resolution SAR images, and requires no increase in receiver data rate vis-a-vis the wide-area SAR modality. For Nt transmit antennas and N samples per pulse, the enhanced sensing provides a STAP capability with Nt times larger range bins than the SAR mode, at the cost of O(log N) more computations per pulse. The proposed MISO system and the associated signal processing are detailed, and the approach is numerically demonstrated via simulation of an airborne X-band system.

  17. Adaptive multimode signal reconstruction from time-frequency representations.

    PubMed

    Meignen, Sylvain; Oberlin, Thomas; Depalle, Philippe; Flandrin, Patrick; McLaughlin, Stephen

    2016-04-13

    This paper discusses methods for the adaptive reconstruction of the modes of multicomponent AM-FM signals by their time-frequency (TF) representation derived from their short-time Fourier transform (STFT). The STFT of an AM-FM component or mode spreads the information relative to that mode in the TF plane around curves commonly called ridges. An alternative view is to consider a mode as a particular TF domain termed a basin of attraction. Here we discuss two new approaches to mode reconstruction. The first determines the ridge associated with a mode by considering the location where the direction of the reassignment vector sharply changes, the technique used to determine the basin of attraction being directly derived from that used for ridge extraction. A second uses the fact that the STFT of a signal is fully characterized by its zeros (and then the particular distribution of these zeros for Gaussian noise) to deduce an algorithm to compute the mode domains. For both techniques, mode reconstruction is then carried out by simply integrating the information inside these basins of attraction or domains. PMID:26953184

  18. High-Order Implicit-Explicit Multi-Block Time-stepping Method for Hyperbolic PDEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner B.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Fisher, Travis C.; Frankel, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    This work seeks to explore and improve the current time-stepping schemes used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in order to reduce overall computational time. A high-order scheme has been developed using a combination of implicit and explicit (IMEX) time-stepping Runge-Kutta (RK) schemes which increases numerical stability with respect to the time step size, resulting in decreased computational time. The IMEX scheme alone does not yield the desired increase in numerical stability, but when used in conjunction with an overlapping partitioned (multi-block) domain significant increase in stability is observed. To show this, the Overlapping-Partition IMEX (OP IMEX) scheme is applied to both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) problems, the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation and 2D advection equation, respectively. The method uses two different summation by parts (SBP) derivative approximations, second-order and fourth-order accurate. The Dirichlet boundary conditions are imposed using the Simultaneous Approximation Term (SAT) penalty method. The 6-stage additive Runge-Kutta IMEX time integration schemes are fourth-order accurate in time. An increase in numerical stability 65 times greater than the fully explicit scheme is demonstrated to be achievable with the OP IMEX method applied to 1D Burger's equation. Results from the 2D, purely convective, advection equation show stability increases on the order of 10 times the explicit scheme using the OP IMEX method. Also, the domain partitioning method in this work shows potential for breaking the computational domain into manageable sizes such that implicit solutions for full three-dimensional CFD simulations can be computed using direct solving methods rather than the standard iterative methods currently used.

  19. The Semi-implicit Time-stepping Algorithm in MH4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadlamani, Srinath; Shumlak, Uri; Marklin, George; Meier, Eric; Lionello, Roberto

    2006-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI Center) at the University of Washington is developing MHD codes to accurately model Emerging Concept (EC) devices. Examination of the semi-implicit time stepping algorithm implemented in the tetrahedral mesh MHD simulation code, MH4D, is presented. The time steps for standard explicit methods, which are constrained by the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, are typically small for simulations of EC experiments due to the large Alfven speed. The CFL constraint is more severe with a tetrahedral mesh because of the irregular cell geometry. The semi-implicit algorithm [1] removes the fast waves constraint, thus allowing for larger time steps. We will present the implementation method of this algorithm, and numerical results for test problems in simple geometry. Also, we will present the effectiveness in simulations of complex geometry, similar to the ZaP [2] experiment at the University of Washington. References: [1]Douglas S. Harned and D. D. Schnack, Semi-implicit method for long time scale magnetohy drodynamic computations in three dimensions, JCP, Volume 65, Issue 1, July 1986, Pages 57-70. [2]U. Shumlak, B. A. Nelson, R. P. Golingo, S. L. Jackson, E. A. Crawford, and D. J. Den Hartog, Sheared flow stabilization experiments in the ZaP flow Zpinch, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1683 (2003).

  20. Error correction in short time steps during the application of quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, L. A.; Napolitano, R. d. J.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a modification of the standard quantum error-correction method to enable the correction of errors that occur due to the interaction with a noisy environment during quantum gates without modifying the codification used for memory qubits. Using a perturbation treatment of the noise that allows us to separate it from the ideal evolution of the quantum gate, we demonstrate that in certain cases it is necessary to divide the logical operation in short time steps intercalated by correction procedures. A prescription of how these gates can be constructed is provided, as well as a proof that, even for the cases when the division of the quantum gate in short time steps is not necessary, this method may be advantageous for reducing the total duration of the computation.

  1. A conservative finite volume scheme with time-accurate local time stepping for scalar transport on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, José Rafael; Dumbser, Michael; Motta-Marques, David da; Fragoso Junior, Carlos Ruberto

    2015-12-01

    In this article we propose a new conservative high resolution TVD (total variation diminishing) finite volume scheme with time-accurate local time stepping (LTS) on unstructured grids for the solution of scalar transport problems, which are typical in the context of water quality simulations. To keep the presentation of the new method as simple as possible, the algorithm is only derived in two space dimensions and for purely convective transport problems, hence neglecting diffusion and reaction terms. The new numerical method for the solution of the scalar transport is directly coupled to the hydrodynamic model of Casulli and Walters (2000) that provides the dynamics of the free surface and the velocity vector field based on a semi-implicit discretization of the shallow water equations. Wetting and drying is handled rigorously by the nonlinear algorithm proposed by Casulli (2009). The new time-accurate LTS algorithm allows a different time step size for each element of the unstructured grid, based on an element-local Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) stability condition. The proposed method does not need any synchronization between different time steps of different elements and is by construction locally and globally conservative. The LTS scheme is based on a piecewise linear polynomial reconstruction in space-time using the MUSCL-Hancock method, to obtain second order of accuracy in both space and time. The new algorithm is first validated on some classical test cases for pure advection problems, for which exact solutions are known. In all cases we obtain a very good level of accuracy, showing also numerical convergence results; we furthermore confirm mass conservation up to machine precision and observe an improved computational efficiency compared to a standard second order TVD scheme for scalar transport with global time stepping (GTS). Then, the new LTS method is applied to some more complex problems, where the new scalar transport scheme has also been coupled to

  2. Personality traits, future time perspective and adaptive behavior in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Gomes Carvalho, Renato Gil; Novo, Rosa Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Several studies provide evidence of the importance of future time perspective (FTP) for individual success. However, little research addresses the relationship between FTP and personality traits, particularly if FTP can mediate their influence on behavior. In this study we analyze the mediating of FTP in the influence of personality traits on the way adolescents live their life at school. Sample consisted in 351 students, aged from 14 to 18 years-old, at different schooling levels. Instruments were the Portuguese version of the MMPI-A, particularly the PSY-5 dimensions (Aggressiveness, Psychoticism, Disconstraint, Neuroticism, Introversion), a FTP questionnaire, and a survey on school life, involving several indicators of achievement, social integration, and overall satisfaction. With the exception of Neuroticism, the results show significant mediation effects (p < .001) of FTP on most relationships between PSY-5 dimensions and school life variables. Concerning Disconstraint, FTP mediated its influence on overall satisfaction (β = -.125) and school achievement (β = -.106). In the case of Introversion, significant mediation effects occurred for interpersonal difficulties (β = .099) and participation in extracurricular activities (β = -.085). FTP was also a mediator of Psychoticism influence in overall satisfaction (β = -.094), interpersonal difficulties (β = .057), and behavior problems (β = .037). Finally, FTP mediated the influence of Aggressiveness on overall satisfaction (β = -.061), interpersonal difficulties (β = .040), achievement (β = -.052), and behavior problems (β = .023). Results are discussed considering the importance of FTP in the impact of some personality structural characteristics in students' school adaptation. PMID:25907852

  3. Adaptive real-time dual-comb spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Poisson, Antonin; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqué, Nathalie; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of a laser frequency comb consists of several hundred thousand equally spaced lines over a broad spectral bandwidth. Such frequency combs have revolutionized optical frequency metrology and they now hold much promise for significant advances in a growing number of applications including molecular spectroscopy. Despite an intriguing potential for the measurement of molecular spectra spanning tens of nanometres within tens of microseconds at Doppler-limited resolution, the development of dual-comb spectroscopy is hindered by the demanding stability requirements of the laser combs. Here we overcome this difficulty and experimentally demonstrate a concept of real-time dual-comb spectroscopy, which compensates for laser instabilities by electronic signal processing. It only uses free-running mode-locked lasers without any phase-lock electronics. We record spectra spanning the full bandwidth of near-infrared fibre lasers with Doppler-limited line profiles highly suitable for measurements of concentrations or line intensities. Our new technique of adaptive dual-comb spectroscopy offers a powerful transdisciplinary instrument for analytical sciences. PMID:24572636

  4. Adaptive real-time dual-comb spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Poisson, Antonin; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqué, Nathalie; Hänsch, Theodor W.

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of a laser frequency comb consists of several hundred thousand equally spaced lines over a broad spectral bandwidth. Such frequency combs have revolutionized optical frequency metrology and they now hold much promise for significant advances in a growing number of applications including molecular spectroscopy. Despite an intriguing potential for the measurement of molecular spectra spanning tens of nanometres within tens of microseconds at Doppler-limited resolution, the development of dual-comb spectroscopy is hindered by the demanding stability requirements of the laser combs. Here we overcome this difficulty and experimentally demonstrate a concept of real-time dual-comb spectroscopy, which compensates for laser instabilities by electronic signal processing. It only uses free-running mode-locked lasers without any phase-lock electronics. We record spectra spanning the full bandwidth of near-infrared fibre lasers with Doppler-limited line profiles highly suitable for measurements of concentrations or line intensities. Our new technique of adaptive dual-comb spectroscopy offers a powerful transdisciplinary instrument for analytical sciences. PMID:24572636

  5. Adaptive real-time dual-comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Poisson, Antonin; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqué, Nathalie; Hänsch, Theodor W.

    2014-02-01

    The spectrum of a laser frequency comb consists of several hundred thousand equally spaced lines over a broad spectral bandwidth. Such frequency combs have revolutionized optical frequency metrology and they now hold much promise for significant advances in a growing number of applications including molecular spectroscopy. Despite an intriguing potential for the measurement of molecular spectra spanning tens of nanometres within tens of microseconds at Doppler-limited resolution, the development of dual-comb spectroscopy is hindered by the demanding stability requirements of the laser combs. Here we overcome this difficulty and experimentally demonstrate a concept of real-time dual-comb spectroscopy, which compensates for laser instabilities by electronic signal processing. It only uses free-running mode-locked lasers without any phase-lock electronics. We record spectra spanning the full bandwidth of near-infrared fibre lasers with Doppler-limited line profiles highly suitable for measurements of concentrations or line intensities. Our new technique of adaptive dual-comb spectroscopy offers a powerful transdisciplinary instrument for analytical sciences.

  6. Multiple Time-Step Dual-Hamiltonian Hybrid Molecular Dynamics - Monte Carlo Canonical Propagation Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjie; Kale, Seyit; Weare, Jonathan; Dinner, Aaron R; Roux, Benoît

    2016-04-12

    A multiple time-step integrator based on a dual Hamiltonian and a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) is proposed to sample systems in the canonical ensemble. The Dual Hamiltonian Multiple Time-Step (DHMTS) algorithm is based on two similar Hamiltonians: a computationally expensive one that serves as a reference and a computationally inexpensive one to which the workload is shifted. The central assumption is that the difference between the two Hamiltonians is slowly varying. Earlier work has shown that such dual Hamiltonian multiple time-step schemes effectively precondition nonlinear differential equations for dynamics by reformulating them into a recursive root finding problem that can be solved by propagating a correction term through an internal loop, analogous to RESPA. Of special interest in the present context, a hybrid MD-MC version of the DHMTS algorithm is introduced to enforce detailed balance via a Metropolis acceptance criterion and ensure consistency with the Boltzmann distribution. The Metropolis criterion suppresses the discretization errors normally associated with the propagation according to the computationally inexpensive Hamiltonian, treating the discretization error as an external work. Illustrative tests are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. PMID:26918826

  7. Multiple Time-Step Dual-Hamiltonian Hybrid Molecular Dynamics — Monte Carlo Canonical Propagation Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Weare, Jonathan; Dinner, Aaron R.; Roux, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    A multiple time-step integrator based on a dual Hamiltonian and a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) is proposed to sample systems in the canonical ensemble. The Dual Hamiltonian Multiple Time-Step (DHMTS) algorithm is based on two similar Hamiltonians: a computationally expensive one that serves as a reference and a computationally inexpensive one to which the workload is shifted. The central assumption is that the difference between the two Hamiltonians is slowly varying. Earlier work has shown that such dual Hamiltonian multiple time-step schemes effectively precondition nonlinear differential equations for dynamics by reformulating them into a recursive root finding problem that can be solved by propagating a correction term through an internal loop, analogous to RESPA. Of special interest in the present context, a hybrid MD-MC version of the DHMTS algorithm is introduced to enforce detailed balance via a Metropolis acceptance criterion and ensure consistency with the Boltzmann distribution. The Metropolis criterion suppresses the discretization errors normally associated with the propagation according to the computationally inexpensive Hamiltonian, treating the discretization error as an external work. Illustrative tests are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. PMID:26918826

  8. Toward fast feature adaptation and localization for real-time face recognition systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Fei; de With, Peter H.

    2003-06-01

    In a home environment, video surveillance employing face detection and recognition is attractive for new applications. Facial feature (e.g. eyes and mouth) localization in the face is an essential task for face recognition because it constitutes an indispensable step for face geometry normalization. This paper presents a new and efficient feature localization approach for real-time personal surveillance applications with low-quality images. The proposed approach consists of three major steps: (1) self-adaptive iris tracing, which is preceded by a trace-point selection process with multiple initializations to overcome the local convergence problem, (2) eye structure verification using an eye template with limited deformation freedom, and (3) eye-pair selection based on a combination of metrics. We have tested our facial feature localization method on about 100 randomly selected face images from the AR database and 30 face images downloaded from the Internet. The results show that our approach achieves a correct detection rate of 96%. Since our eye-selection technique does not involve time-consuming deformation processes, it yields relatively fast processing. The proposed algorithm has been successfully applied to a real-time home video surveillance system and proven to be an effective and computationally efficient face normalization method preceding the face recognition.

  9. A novel adaptive, real-time algorithm to detect gait events from wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Chia Bejarano, Noelia; Ambrosini, Emilia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona

    2015-05-01

    A real-time, adaptive algorithm based on two inertial and magnetic sensors placed on the shanks was developed for gait-event detection. For each leg, the algorithm detected the Initial Contact (IC), as the minimum of the flexion/extension angle, and the End Contact (EC) and the Mid-Swing (MS), as minimum and maximum of the angular velocity, respectively. The algorithm consisted of calibration, real-time detection, and step-by-step update. Data collected from 22 healthy subjects (21 to 85 years) walking at three self-selected speeds were used to validate the algorithm against the GaitRite system. Comparable levels of accuracy and significantly lower detection delays were achieved with respect to other published methods. The algorithm robustness was tested on ten healthy subjects performing sudden speed changes and on ten stroke subjects (43 to 89 years). For healthy subjects, F1-scores of 1 and mean detection delays lower than 14 ms were obtained. For stroke subjects, F1-scores of 0.998 and 0.944 were obtained for IC and EC, respectively, with mean detection delays always below 31 ms. The algorithm accurately detected gait events in real time from a heterogeneous dataset of gait patterns and paves the way for the design of closed-loop controllers for customized gait trainings and/or assistive devices. PMID:25069118

  10. Real-Time, Single-Step Bioassay Using Nanoplasmonic Resonator With Ultra-High Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiang (Inventor); Ellman, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Fanqing Frank (Inventor); Su, Kai-Hang (Inventor); Wei, Qi-Huo (Inventor); Sun, Cheng (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A nanoplasmonic resonator (NPR) comprising a metallic nanodisk with alternating shielding layer(s), having a tagged biomolecule conjugated or tethered to the surface of the nanoplasmonic resonator for highly sensitive measurement of enzymatic activity. NPRs enhance Raman signals in a highly reproducible manner, enabling fast detection of protease and enzyme activity, such as Prostate Specific Antigen (paPSA), in real-time, at picomolar sensitivity levels. Experiments on extracellular fluid (ECF) from paPSA-positive cells demonstrate specific detection in a complex bio-fluid background in real-time single-step detection in very small sample volumes.

  11. Real-time, single-step bioassay using nanoplasmonic resonator with ultra-high sensitivity

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Xiang; Ellman, Jonathan A; Chen, Fanqing Frank; Su, Kai-Hang; Wei, Qi-Huo; Sun, Cheng

    2014-04-01

    A nanoplasmonic resonator (NPR) comprising a metallic nanodisk with alternating shielding layer(s), having a tagged biomolecule conjugated or tethered to the surface of the nanoplasmonic resonator for highly sensitive measurement of enzymatic activity. NPRs enhance Raman signals in a highly reproducible manner, enabling fast detection of protease and enzyme activity, such as Prostate Specific Antigen (paPSA), in real-time, at picomolar sensitivity levels. Experiments on extracellular fluid (ECF) from paPSA-positive cells demonstrate specific detection in a complex bio-fluid background in real-time single-step detection in very small sample volumes.

  12. Moment tensor inversion of waveforms: a two-step time-frequency approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavryčuk, Václav; Kühn, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    We present a moment tensor inversion of waveforms, which is more robust and yields more stable and more accurate results than standard approaches. The inversion is performed in two steps and combines inversions in time and frequency domains. First, the inversion for the source-time function is performed in the frequency domain using complex spectra. Second, the time-domain inversion for the moment tensor is performed using the source-time function calculated in the first step. In this way, we can consider a realistic, complex source-time function and still keep the final moment tensor inversion linear. Using numerical modelling, we compare the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed approach with standard waveform inversions. We study the sensitivity of the retrieved double-couple and non-double-couple components of the moment tensors to noise in the data, to inaccuracies of the location and of the velocity model, and to the type of the focal mechanism. Finally, the proposed moment tensor inversion is tested on real data observed in a complex 3-D inhomogeneous geological environment: a production blast and a rockburst in the Pyhäsalmi ore mine, Finland.

  13. Practical Method of Adaptive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Noel, Camille E.; Baker, Kenneth; Santanam, Lakshmi; Michalski, Jeff M.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have created an automated process using real-time tracking data to evaluate the adequacy of planning target volume (PTV) margins in prostate cancer, allowing a process of adaptive radiotherapy with minimal physician workload. We present an analysis of PTV adequacy and a proposed adaptive process. Methods and Materials: Tracking data were analyzed for 15 patients who underwent step-and-shoot multi-leaf collimation (SMLC) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with uniform 5-mm PTV margins for prostate cancer using the Calypso Registered-Sign Localization System. Additional plans were generated with 0- and 3-mm margins. A custom software application using the planned dose distribution and structure location from computed tomography (CT) simulation was developed to evaluate the dosimetric impact to the target due to motion. The dose delivered to the prostate was calculated for the initial three, five, and 10 fractions, and for the entire treatment. Treatment was accepted as adequate if the minimum delivered prostate dose (D{sub min}) was at least 98% of the planned D{sub min}. Results: For 0-, 3-, and 5-mm PTV margins, adequate treatment was obtained in 3 of 15, 12 of 15, and 15 of 15 patients, and the delivered D{sub min} ranged from 78% to 99%, 96% to 100%, and 99% to 100% of the planned D{sub min}. Changes in D{sub min} did not correlate with magnitude of prostate motion. Treatment adequacy during the first 10 fractions predicted sufficient dose delivery for the entire treatment for all patients and margins. Conclusions: Our adaptive process successfully used real-time tracking data to predict the need for PTV modifications, without the added burden of physician contouring and image analysis. Our methods are applicable to other uses of real-time tracking, including hypofractionated treatment.

  14. Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  15. Real-Time Adaptive Control of Flow-Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Cattafesta, Louis N.

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm was formulated and applied to the cavity flow-tone problem. The algorithm employs gradient descent to update the GPC coefficients at each time step. The adaptive control algorithm demonstrated multiple Rossiter mode suppression at fixed Mach numbers ranging from 0.275 to 0.38. The algorithm was also able t o maintain suppression of multiple cavity tones as the freestream Mach number was varied over a modest range (0.275 to 0.29). Controller performance was evaluated with a measure of output disturbance rejection and an input sensitivity transfer function. The results suggest that disturbances entering the cavity flow are colocated with the control input at the cavity leading edge. In that case, only tonal components of the cavity wall-pressure fluctuations can be suppressed and arbitrary broadband pressure reduction is not possible. In the control-algorithm development, the cavity dynamics are treated as linear and time invariant (LTI) for a fixed Mach number. The experimental results lend support this treatment.

  16. Adaptive control for a class of MIMO nonlinear time delay systems against time varying actuator failures.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mahnaz; Ghaisari, Jafar; Askari, Javad

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates an adaptive controller for a class of Multi Input Multi Output (MIMO) nonlinear systems with unknown parameters, bounded time delays and in the presence of unknown time varying actuator failures. The type of considered actuator failure is one in which some inputs may be stuck at some time varying values where the values, times and patterns of the failures are unknown. The proposed approach is constructed based on a backstepping design method. The boundedness of all the closed-loop signals is guaranteed and the tracking errors are proved to converge to a small neighborhood of the origin. The proposed approach is employed for a double inverted pendulums benchmark and a chemical reactor system. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25792517

  17. A shorter time step for eco-friendly reservoir operation does not always produce better water availability and ecosystem benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chunxue; Yin, Xin'an; Yang, Zhifeng; Cai, Yanpeng; Sun, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The time step used in the operation of eco-friendly reservoirs has decreased from monthly to daily, and even sub-daily. The shorter time step is considered a better choice for satisfying downstream environmental requirements because it more closely resembles the natural flow regime. However, little consideration has been given to the influence of different time steps on the ability to simultaneously meet human and environmental flow requirements. To analyze this influence, we used an optimization model to explore the relationships among the time step, environmental flow (e-flow) requirements, and human water needs for a wide range of time steps and e-flow scenarios. We used the degree of hydrologic alteration to evaluate the regime's ability to satisfy the e-flow requirements of riverine ecosystems, and used water supply reliability to evaluate the ability to satisfy human needs. We then applied the model to a case study of China's Tanghe Reservoir. We found four efficient time steps (2, 3, 4, and 5 days), with a remarkably high water supply reliability (around 80%) and a low alteration of the flow regime (<35%). Our analysis of the hydrologic alteration revealed the smallest alteration at time steps ranging from 1 to 7 days. However, longer time steps led to higher water supply reliability to meet human needs under several e-flow scenarios. Our results show that adjusting the time step is a simple way to improve reservoir operation performance to balance human and e-flow needs.

  18. Exploration of zeroth-order wavefunctions and energies as a first step toward intramolecular symmetry-adapted perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Jérôme F.; Corminboeuf, Clémence

    2014-04-01

    Non-covalent interactions occur between and within all molecules and have a profound impact on structural and electronic phenomena in chemistry, biology, and material science. Understanding the nature of inter- and intramolecular interactions is essential not only for establishing the relation between structure and properties, but also for facilitating the rational design of molecules with targeted properties. These objectives have motivated the development of theoretical schemes decomposing intermolecular interactions into physically meaningful terms. Among the various existing energy decomposition schemes, Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT) is one of the most successful as it naturally decomposes the interaction energy into physical and intuitive terms. Unfortunately, analogous approaches for intramolecular energies are theoretically highly challenging and virtually nonexistent. Here, we introduce a zeroth-order wavefunction and energy, which represent the first step toward the development of an intramolecular variant of the SAPT formalism. The proposed energy expression is based on the Chemical Hamiltonian Approach (CHA), which relies upon an asymmetric interpretation of the electronic integrals. The orbitals are optimized with a non-hermitian Fock matrix based on two variants: one using orbitals strictly localized on individual fragments and the other using canonical (delocalized) orbitals. The zeroth-order wavefunction and energy expression are validated on a series of prototypical systems. The computed intramolecular interaction energies demonstrate that our approach combining the CHA with strictly localized orbitals achieves reasonable interaction energies and basis set dependence in addition to producing intuitive energy trends. Our zeroth-order wavefunction is the primary step fundamental to the derivation of any perturbation theory correction, which has the potential to truly transform our understanding and quantification of non

  19. Exploration of zeroth-order wavefunctions and energies as a first step toward intramolecular symmetry-adapted perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gonthier, Jérôme F.; Corminboeuf, Clémence

    2014-04-21

    Non-covalent interactions occur between and within all molecules and have a profound impact on structural and electronic phenomena in chemistry, biology, and material science. Understanding the nature of inter- and intramolecular interactions is essential not only for establishing the relation between structure and properties, but also for facilitating the rational design of molecules with targeted properties. These objectives have motivated the development of theoretical schemes decomposing intermolecular interactions into physically meaningful terms. Among the various existing energy decomposition schemes, Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT) is one of the most successful as it naturally decomposes the interaction energy into physical and intuitive terms. Unfortunately, analogous approaches for intramolecular energies are theoretically highly challenging and virtually nonexistent. Here, we introduce a zeroth-order wavefunction and energy, which represent the first step toward the development of an intramolecular variant of the SAPT formalism. The proposed energy expression is based on the Chemical Hamiltonian Approach (CHA), which relies upon an asymmetric interpretation of the electronic integrals. The orbitals are optimized with a non-hermitian Fock matrix based on two variants: one using orbitals strictly localized on individual fragments and the other using canonical (delocalized) orbitals. The zeroth-order wavefunction and energy expression are validated on a series of prototypical systems. The computed intramolecular interaction energies demonstrate that our approach combining the CHA with strictly localized orbitals achieves reasonable interaction energies and basis set dependence in addition to producing intuitive energy trends. Our zeroth-order wavefunction is the primary step fundamental to the derivation of any perturbation theory correction, which has the potential to truly transform our understanding and quantification of non

  20. Resource Management for Real-Time Adaptive Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Lonnie; Chelberg, David; Pfarr, Barbara; Fleeman, David; Parrott, David; Tan, Zhen-Yu; Jain, Shikha; Drews, Frank; Bruggeman, Carl; Shuler, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Increased autonomy and automation in onboard flight systems offer numerous potential benefits, including cost reduction and greater flexibility. The existence of generic mechanisms for automation is critical for handling unanticipated science events and anomalies where limitations in traditional control software with fixed, predetermined algorithms can mean loss of science data and missed opportunities for observing important terrestrial events. We have developed such a mechanism by adding a Hierarchical Agent-based ReaLTime technology (HART) extension to our Dynamic Resource Management (DRM) middleware. Traditional DRM provides mechanisms to monitor the realtime performance of distributed applications and to move applications among processors to improve real-time performance. In the HART project we have designed and implemented a performance adaptation mechanism to improve reaktime performance. To use this mechanism, applications are developed that can run at various levels of quality. The DRM can choose a setting for the quality level of an application dynamically at run-time in order to manage satellite resource usage more effectively. A groundbased prototype of a satellite system that captures and processes images has also been developed as part of this project to be used as a benchmark for evaluating the resource management framework A significant enhancement of this generic mission-independent framework allows scientists to specify the utility, or "scientific benefit," of science observations under various conditions like cloud cover and compression method. The resource manager then uses these benefit tables to determine in redtime how to set the quality levels for applications to maximize overall system utility as defined by the scientists running the mission. We also show how maintenance functions llke health and safety data can be integrated into the utility framework. Once thls framework has been certified for missions and successfully flight tested it

  1. Sensitivity of The High-resolution Wam Model With Respect To Time Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasemets, K.; Soomere, T.

    The northern part of the Baltic Proper and its subbasins (Bothnian Sea, the Gulf of Finland, Moonsund) serve as a challenge for wave modellers. In difference from the southern and the eastern parts of the Baltic Sea, their coasts are highly irregular and contain many peculiarities with the characteristic horizontal scale of the order of a few kilometres. For example, the northern coast of the Gulf of Finland is extremely ragged and contains a huge number of small islands. Its southern coast is more or less regular but has up to 50m high cliff that is frequently covered by high forests. The area also contains numerous banks that have water depth a couple of meters and that may essentially modify wave properties near the banks owing to topographical effects. This feature suggests that a high-resolution wave model should be applied for the region in question, with a horizontal resolution of an order of 1 km or even less. According to the Courant-Friedrich-Lewy criterion, the integration time step for such models must be of the order of a few tens of seconds. A high-resolution WAM model turns out to be fairly sensitive with respect to the particular choice of the time step. In our experiments, a medium-resolution model for the whole Baltic Sea was used, with the horizontal resolution 3 miles (3' along latitudes and 6' along longitudes) and the angular resolution 12 directions. The model was run with steady wind blowing 20 m/s from different directions and with two time steps (1 and 3 minutes). For most of the wind directions, the rms. difference of significant wave heights calculated with differ- ent time steps did not exceed 10 cm and typically was of the order of a few per cents. The difference arose within a few tens of minutes and generally did not increase in further computations. However, in the case of the north wind, the difference increased nearly monotonously and reached 25-35 cm (10-15%) within three hours of integra- tion whereas mean of significant wave

  2. Timing paradox of stepping and falls in ageing: not so quick and quick(er) on the trigger.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Mark W; Mille, Marie-Laure

    2016-08-15

    Physiological and degenerative changes affecting human standing balance are major contributors to falls with ageing. During imbalance, stepping is a powerful protective action for preserving balance that may be voluntarily initiated in recognition of a balance threat, or be induced by an externally imposed mechanical or sensory perturbation. Paradoxically, with ageing and falls, initiation slowing of voluntary stepping is observed together with perturbation-induced steps that are triggered as fast as or faster than for younger adults. While age-associated changes in sensorimotor conduction, central neuronal processing and cognitive functions are linked to delayed voluntary stepping, alterations in the coupling of posture and locomotion may also prolong step triggering. It is less clear, however, how these factors may explain the accelerated triggering of induced stepping. We present a conceptual model that addresses this issue. For voluntary stepping, a disruption in the normal coupling between posture and locomotion may underlie step-triggering delays through suppression of the locomotion network based on an estimation of the evolving mechanical state conditions for stability. During induced stepping, accelerated step initiation may represent an event-triggering process whereby stepping is released according to the occurrence of a perturbation rather than to the specific sensorimotor information reflecting the evolving instability. In this case, errors in the parametric control of induced stepping and its effectiveness in stabilizing balance would be likely to occur. We further suggest that there is a residual adaptive capacity with ageing that could be exploited to improve paradoxical triggering and other changes in protective stepping to impact fall risk. PMID:26915664

  3. Large time-step stability of explicit one-dimensional advection schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    1993-01-01

    There is a wide-spread belief that most explicit one-dimensional advection schemes need to satisfy the so-called 'CFL condition' - that the Courant number, c = udelta(t)/delta(x), must be less than or equal to one, for stability in the von Neumann sense. This puts severe limitations on the time-step in high-speed, fine-grid calculations and is an impetus for the development of implicit schemes, which often require less restrictive time-step conditions for stability, but are more expensive per time-step. However, it turns out that, at least in one dimension, if explicit schemes are formulated in a consistent flux-based conservative finite-volume form, von Neumann stability analysis does not place any restriction on the allowable Courant number. Any explicit scheme that is stable for c is less than 1, with a complex amplitude ratio, G(c), can be easily extended to arbitrarily large c. The complex amplitude ratio is then given by exp(- (Iota)(Nu)(Theta)) G(delta(c)), where N is the integer part of c, and delta(c) = c - N (less than 1); this is clearly stable. The CFL condition is, in fact, not a stability condition at all, but, rather, a 'range restriction' on the 'pieces' in a piece-wise polynomial interpolation. When a global view is taken of the interpolation, the need for a CFL condition evaporates. A number of well-known explicit advection schemes are considered and thus extended to large delta(t). The analysis also includes a simple interpretation of (large delta(t)) total-variation-diminishing (TVD) constraints.

  4. Space-time variability of floods across Germany: Gradual trends, step changes and fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, Bruno; Vorogushyn, Sergiy; Viet Dung, Nguyen; Schröter, Kai

    2015-04-01

    The space-time variability of flood magnitude and frequency across Germany at the interannual and decadal time scale is analyzed and interpreted. The analyses are based on flood time series of 68 catchments for a joint period of 74 years. The catchments are distributed across Germany and show different flood regimes. Different statistical tests are applied to investigate different types of flood changes: gradual trends, step changes and fluctuations. In addition, changes in the mean behavior and in the variability are studied. A focus is placed on the spatial stability of changes, i.e. answering the question to which extent flood changes are coherent across Germany. The joint analysis of changes for a large number of catchments allows interpreting the causes of the observed changes. For instance, climate-related flood changes are expected to show a different behavior than changes caused by river training or land-use change.

  5. System for direct measurement of the step response of electronic devices on the picosecond time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, J. A.; Bloom, D. M.; Solomon, P. M.

    1995-03-01

    We have built a system capable of measuring the step response of III-V electronic devices on the picosecond time scale, with no alteration in device design or epitaxy. To switch on the device under test (DUT), we have designed and fabricated a new type of photoconductor, the recessed-ohmic photoconductor, which swings 0.45 V with a 2-ps rise time and maintains constant output voltage for 100 ps. This switch is monolithically integrated with the DUT. To measure the output current of the DUT, we have built a Ti:sapphire-laser-based pump-probe direct electro-optic sampling system that has a minimum detectable voltage of 70 mu V / \\radical Hz \\end-radical and a measurement bandwidth of 750 GHz. The overall system, comprised of the recessed ohmic photoconductor and the electro-optic sampling system, can be used to measure the step response of III-V electronic devices on the picosecond time scale.

  6. A class of large time step Godunov schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, ZhanSen; Lee, Chun-Hian

    2011-08-01

    A large time step (LTS) Godunov scheme firstly proposed by LeVeque is further developed in the present work and applied to Euler equations. Based on the analysis of the computational performances of LeVeque's linear approximation on wave interactions, a multi-wave approximation on rarefaction fan is proposed to avoid the occurrences of rarefaction shocks in computations. The developed LTS scheme is validated using 1-D test cases, manifesting high resolution for discontinuities and the capability of maintaining computational stability when large CFL numbers are imposed. The scheme is then extended to multidimensional problems using dimensional splitting technique; the treatment of boundary condition for this multidimensional LTS scheme is also proposed. As for demonstration problems, inviscid flows over NACA0012 airfoil and ONERA M6 wing with given swept angle are simulated using the developed LTS scheme. The numerical results reveal the high resolution nature of the scheme, where the shock can be captured within 1-2 grid points. The resolution of the scheme would improve gradually along with the increasing of CFL number under an upper bound where the solution becomes severely oscillating across the shock. Computational efficiency comparisons show that the developed scheme is capable of reducing the computational time effectively with increasing the time step (CFL number).

  7. A multistage time-stepping scheme for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    A class of explicit multistage time-stepping schemes is used to construct an algorithm for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Flexibility in treating arbitrary geometries is obtained with a finite-volume formulation. Numerical efficiency is achieved by employing techniques for accelerating convergence to steady state. Computer processing is enhanced through vectorization of the algorithm. The scheme is evaluated by solving laminar and turbulent flows over a flat plate and an NACA 0012 airfoil. Numerical results are compared with theoretical solutions or other numerical solutions and/or experimental data.

  8. Imaginary Time Step Method to Solve the Dirac Equation with Nonlocal Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ying; Liang Haozhao; Meng Jie

    2009-08-26

    The imaginary time step (ITS) method is applied to solve the Dirac equation with nonlocal potentials in coordinate space. Taking the nucleus {sup 12}C as an example, even with nonlocal potentials, the direct ITS evolution for the Dirac equation still meets the disaster of the Dirac sea. However, following the recipe in our former investigation, the disaster can be avoided by the ITS evolution for the corresponding Schroedinger-like equation without localization, which gives the convergent results exactly the same with those obtained iteratively by the shooting method with localized effective potentials.

  9. A simple method for improving the time-stepping accuracy in atmosphere and ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    In contemporary numerical simulations of the atmosphere and ocean, evidence suggests that time-stepping errors may be a significant component of total model error, on both weather and climate time-scales. This presentation will review the available evidence, and will then suggest a simple but effective method for substantially improving the time-stepping numerics at no extra computational expense. A common time-stepping method in atmosphere and ocean models is the leapfrog scheme combined with the Robert-Asselin (RA) filter. This method is used in the following models (and many more): ECHAM, MAECHAM, MM5, CAM, MESO-NH, HIRLAM, KMCM, LIMA, SPEEDY, IGCM, PUMA, COSMO, FSU-GSM, FSU-NRSM, NCEP-GFS, NCEP-RSM, NSEAM, NOGAPS, RAMS, and CCSR/NIES-AGCM. Although the RA filter controls the time-splitting instability, it also introduces non-physical damping and reduces the accuracy. This presentation proposes a simple modification to the RA filter, which has become known as the RAW filter (Williams 2009, 2011). When used in conjunction with the leapfrog scheme, the RAW filter eliminates the non-physical damping and increases the amplitude accuracy by two orders, yielding third-order accuracy. (The phase accuracy remains second-order.) The RAW filter can easily be incorporated into existing models, typically via the insertion of just a single line of code. Better simulations are obtained at no extra computational expense. Results will be shown from recent implementations of the RAW filter in various models, including SPEEDY and COSMO. For example, in SPEEDY, the skill of weather forecasts is found to be significantly improved. In particular, in tropical surface pressure predictions, five-day forecasts made using the RAW filter have approximately the same skill as four-day forecasts made using the RA filter (Amezcua, Kalnay & Williams 2011). These improvements are encouraging for the use of the RAW filter in other atmosphere and ocean models. References PD Williams (2009) A

  10. One-Step Direct Aeroacoustic Simulation Using Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. Y.; Leung, R. C. K.; Zhou, K.; Lam, G. C. Y.; Jiang, Z.

    2011-09-01

    One-step direct aeroacoustic simulation (DAS) has received attention from aerospace and mechanical high-pressure fluid-moving system manufacturers for quite some time. They aim to simulate the unsteady flow and acoustic field in the duct simultaneously in order to investigate the aeroacoustic generation mechanisms. Because of the large length and energy scale disparities between the acoustic far field and the aerodynamic near field, highly accurate and high-resolution simulation scheme is required. This involves the use of high order compact finite difference and time advancement schemes in simulation. However, in this situation, large buffer zones are always needed to suppress the spurious numerical waves emanating from computational boundaries. This further increases the computational resources to yield accurate results. On the other hand, for such problem as supersonic jet noise, the numerical scheme should be able to resolve both strong shock waves and weak acoustic waves simultaneously. Usually numerical aeroa-coustic scheme that is good for low Mach number flow is not able to give satisfactory simulation results for shock wave. Therefore, the aeroacoustic research community has been looking for a more efficient one-step DAS scheme that has the comparable accuracy to the finite-difference approach with smaller buffer regions, yet is able to give accurate solutions from subsonic to supersonic flows. The conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) scheme is one of the possible schemes satisfying the above requirements. This paper aims to report the development of a CE/SE scheme for one-step DAS and illustrate its robustness and effectiveness with two selected benchmark problems.

  11. Detection of Zika virus by SYBR green one-step real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Yue; Liu, Si-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has rapidly spread to new areas of Americas, which were the first transmissions outside its traditional endemic areas in Africa and Asia. Due to the link with newborn defects and neurological disorder, numerous infected cases throughout the world and various mosquito vectors, the virus has been considered to be an international public health emergency. In the present study, we developed a SYBR Green based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid detection of ZIKV. Our results revealed that the real-time assay is highly specific and sensitive in detection of ZIKV in cell samples. Importantly, the replication of ZIKV at different time points in infected cells could be rapidly monitored by the real-time RT-PCR assay. Specifically, the real-time RT-PCR showed acceptable performance in measurement of infectious ZIKV RNA. This assay could detect ZIKV at a titer as low as 1PFU/mL. The real-time RT-PCR assay could be a useful tool for further virology surveillance and diagnosis of ZIKV. PMID:27444120

  12. Multiple ``time step'' Monte Carlo simulations: Application to charged systems with Ewald summation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernacki, Katarzyna; Hetényi, Balázs; Berne, B. J.

    2004-07-01

    Recently, we have proposed an efficient scheme for Monte Carlo simulations, the multiple "time step" Monte Carlo (MTS-MC) [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 8203 (2002)] based on the separation of the potential interactions into two additive parts. In this paper, the structural and thermodynamic properties of the simple point charge water model combined with the Ewald sum are compared for the MTS-MC real-/reciprocal-space split of the Ewald summation and the common Metropolis Monte Carlo method. We report a number of observables as a function of CPU time calculated using MC and MTS-MC. The correlation functions indicate that speedups on the order of 4.5-7.5 can be obtained for systems of 108-500 waters for n=10 splitting parameter.

  13. The multiple time step r-RESPA procedure and polarizable potentials based on induced dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masella, Michel

    In the present study, we present an accelerating scheme based on the reversible multiple time step r-RESPA method to be used in molecular dynamics simulations with polarizable potentials based on induced dipole moments. Even if the induced dipoles are estimated with an iterative self-consistent procedure, this scheme significantly reduces the CPU time needed to perform a molecular dynamics simulation, up to a factor 2, as compared to the Car-Parrinello method where additional dynamical variables are introduced for the treatment of the induced dipoles. The tests show that stable and reliable molecular dynamics trajectories can be generated with that scheme, and that the physical properties derived from the trajectories are equivalent to those computed with the classical all atom iterative approach and the Car-Parrinello one.

  14. An Efficient Time-Stepping Scheme for Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Eiji

    2016-08-01

    In ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of real-world problems, the simple Verlet method is still widely used for integrating the equations of motion, while more efficient algorithms are routinely used in classical molecular dynamics. We show that if the Verlet method is used in conjunction with pre- and postprocessing, the accuracy of the time integration is significantly improved with only a small computational overhead. We also propose several extensions of the algorithm required for use in ab initio molecular dynamics. The validity of the processed Verlet method is demonstrated in several examples including ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water. The structural properties obtained from the processed Verlet method are found to be sufficiently accurate even for large time steps close to the stability limit. This approach results in a 2× performance gain over the standard Verlet method for a given accuracy. We also show how to generate a canonical ensemble within this approach.

  15. Adaptive, real-time hypoxia measurements using an autonomous boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkez, B.; Wong, B. P.; Balzano, L.; Lipor, J.; Scavia, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present an autonomous system to measure hypoxia at high spatial resolutions. The approach combines a robotic boat, cloud hosted data services, and a suite of adaptive sampling algorithms to minimize the number of samples required to delineate hypoxic extents. The boat lowers sensors into the water column to provide depth profiles of temperature and oxygen concentrations. An adaptive path-planning algorithm continuously analyzes the in-situ observations and directs the boat to its next measurement location. This significantly reduces number of samples compared to a gridded sampling approach, while simultaneously improving the certainty with which the hypoxic regions are delineated. The method has been evaluated on small lakes throughout Michigan and shows significant promise to scale to the Great Lakes, where hypoxia is common occurrence that adversely affects various stakeholder and ecosystems.

  16. PFC design via FRIT Approach for Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Discrete-time Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, Ikuro; Takagi, Taro; Fukui, Sota; Shah, Sirish L.

    This paper deals with a design problem of an adaptive output feedback control for discrete-time systems with a parallel feedforward compensator (PFC) which is designed for making the augmented controlled system ASPR. A PFC design scheme by a FRIT approach with only using an input/output experimental data set will be proposed for discrete-time systems in order to design an adaptive output feedback control system. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the proposed PFC design method will be confirmed through numerical simulations by designing adaptive control system with adaptive NN (Neural Network) for an uncertain discrete-time system.

  17. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion

    PubMed Central

    Fornaciai, Michele; Arrighi, Roberto; Burr, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. These results show that adaptation-induced compression of event-time occurs only for uni-directional translational motion, ruling out the possibility that the neural mechanisms of the adaptation occur at early levels of visual processing. PMID:27003445

  18. Multi-rate time stepping schemes for hydro-geomechanical model for subsurface methane hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shubhangi; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Helmig, Rainer

    2016-05-01

    We present an extrapolation-based semi-implicit multi-rate time stepping (MRT) scheme and a compound-fast MRT scheme for a naturally partitioned, multi-time-scale hydro-geomechanical hydrate reservoir model. We evaluate the performance of the two MRT methods compared to an iteratively coupled solution scheme and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. The performance of the two MRT methods is evaluated in terms of speed-up and accuracy by comparison to an iteratively coupled solution scheme. We observe that the extrapolation-based semi-implicit method gives a higher speed-up but is strongly dependent on the relative time scales of the latent (slow) and active (fast) components. On the other hand, the compound-fast method is more robust and less sensitive to the relative time scales, but gives lower speed up as compared to the semi-implicit method, especially when the relative time scales of the active and latent components are comparable.

  19. Time-Accurate Local Time Stepping and High-Order Time CESE Methods for Multi-Dimensional Flows Using Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary

    2013-01-01

    With the wide availability of affordable multiple-core parallel supercomputers, next generation numerical simulations of flow physics are being focused on unsteady computations for problems involving multiple time scales and multiple physics. These simulations require higher solution accuracy than most algorithms and computational fluid dynamics codes currently available. This paper focuses on the developmental effort for high-fidelity multi-dimensional, unstructured-mesh flow solvers using the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) framework. Two approaches have been investigated in this research in order to provide high-accuracy, cross-cutting numerical simulations for a variety of flow regimes: 1) time-accurate local time stepping and 2) highorder CESE method. The first approach utilizes consistent numerical formulations in the space-time flux integration to preserve temporal conservation across the cells with different marching time steps. Such approach relieves the stringent time step constraint associated with the smallest time step in the computational domain while preserving temporal accuracy for all the cells. For flows involving multiple scales, both numerical accuracy and efficiency can be significantly enhanced. The second approach extends the current CESE solver to higher-order accuracy. Unlike other existing explicit high-order methods for unstructured meshes, the CESE framework maintains a CFL condition of one for arbitrarily high-order formulations while retaining the same compact stencil as its second-order counterpart. For large-scale unsteady computations, this feature substantially enhances numerical efficiency. Numerical formulations and validations using benchmark problems are discussed in this paper along with realistic examples.

  20. The two-step shape and timing of the last deglaciation in Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Jouzel, J.; Petit, J.R. |; Duclos, Y.

    1995-04-01

    The two-step character of the last deglaciation is well recognized in Western Europe, in Greenland and in the North Atlantic. For example, in Greenland, a gradual temperature decrease started at the Boelling (B) around 14.5 ky BP, spanned through the Alleroed (A) and was followed by the cold Younger Dryas (YD) event which terminated abruptly around 11.5 ky BP. Recent results suggest that this BA/YD sequence may have extended throughout all the Northern Hemisphere but the evidence of a late transition cooling is still poor for the Southern Hemisphere. Here we present a detailed isotopic record analyzed in a new ice core drilled at Dome B in East Antarctica that fully demonstrates the existence of an Antarctic cold reversal (ACR). These results suggest that the two-step shape of the last deglaciation has a worldwide character but they also point to noticeable interhemispheric differences. Thus. the coldest part of the ACR. which shows a temperature drop about three times weaker than that recorded during the YD in Greenland, may have preceded the YD. Antarctica did not experienced abrupt changes and the two warming periods started there before they started in Greenland. The links between Southern and Northern Hemisphere climates throughout this period are discussed in the light of additional information derived from the Antarctic dust record. 87 refs., 5 figs.

  1. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  2. Structural damage evolution assessment using the regularised time step integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Peng; Maung, Than Soe

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents an approach to identify both the location and severity evolution of damage in engineering structures directly from measured dynamic response data. A relationship between the change in structural parameters such as stiffness caused by structural damage development and the measured dynamic response data such as accelerations is proposed, on the basis of the governing equations of motion for the original and damaged structural systems. Structural damage parameters associated with time are properly chosen to reflect both the location and severity development over time of damage in a structure. Basic equations are provided to solve the chosen time-dependent damage parameters, which are constructed by using the Newmark time step integration method without requiring a modal analysis procedure. The Tikhonov regularisation method incorporating the L-curve criterion for determining the regularisation parameter is then employed to reduce the influence of measurement errors in dynamic response data and then to produce stable solutions for structural damage parameters. Results for two numerical examples with various simulated damage scenarios show that the proposed method can accurately identify the locations of structural damage and correctly assess the evolution of damage severity from information on vibration measurements with uncertainties.

  3. Incorporating system latency associated with real-time target tracking radiotherapy in the dose prediction step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Teboh; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Shi, Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-05-01

    System latency introduces geometric errors in the course of real-time target tracking radiotherapy. This effect can be minimized, for example by the use of predictive filters, but cannot be completely avoided. In this work, we present a convolution technique that can incorporate the effect as part of the treatment planning process. The method can be applied independently or in conjunction with the predictive filters to compensate for residual latency effects. The implementation was performed on TrackBeam (Initia Ltd, Israel), a prototype real-time target tracking system assembled and evaluated at our Cancer Institute. For the experimental system settings examined, a Gaussian distribution attributable to the TrackBeam latency was derived with σ = 3.7 mm. The TrackBeam latency, expressed as an average response time, was deduced to be 172 ms. Phantom investigations were further performed to verify the convolution technique. In addition, patient studies involving 4DCT volumes of previously treated lung cancer patients were performed to incorporate the latency effect in the dose prediction step. This also enabled us to effectively quantify the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of the TrackBeam and other higher latency effects on the clinical outcome of a real-time target tracking delivery.

  4. Simulations of precipitation using the Community Earth System Model (CESM): Sensitivity to microphysics time step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthi, A.; Menon, S.; Sednev, I.

    2011-12-01

    An inherent difficulty in the ability of global climate models to accurately simulate precipitation lies in the use of a large time step, Δt (usually 30 minutes), to solve the governing equations. Since microphysical processes are characterized by small time scales compared to Δt, finite difference approximations used to advance microphysics equations suffer from numerical instability and large time truncation errors. With this in mind, the sensitivity of precipitation simulated by the atmospheric component of CESM, namely the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.1), to the microphysics time step (τ) is investigated. Model integrations are carried out for a period of five years with a spin up time of about six months for a horizontal resolution of 2.5 × 1.9 degrees and 30 levels in the vertical, with Δt = 1800 s. The control simulation with τ = 900 s is compared with one using τ = 300 s for accumulated precipitation and radi- ation budgets at the surface and top of the atmosphere (TOA), while keeping Δt fixed. Our choice of τ = 300 s is motivated by previous work on warm rain processes wherein it was shown that a value of τ around 300 s was necessary, but not sufficient, to ensure positive definiteness and numerical stability of the explicit time integration scheme used to integrate the microphysical equations. However, since the entire suite of microphysical processes are represented in our case, we suspect that this might impose additional restrictions on τ. The τ = 300 s case produces differences in large-scale accumulated rainfall from the τ = 900 s case by as large as 200 mm, over certain regions of the globe. The spatial patterns of total accumulated precipitation using τ = 300 s are in closer agreement with satellite observed precipitation, when compared to the τ = 900 s case. Differences are also seen in the radiation budget with the τ = 300 (900) s cases producing surpluses that range between 1-3 W/m2 at both the TOA and surface in the global

  5. Improved tomographic reconstructions using adaptive time-dependent intensity normalization

    PubMed Central

    Titarenko, Valeriy; Titarenko, Sofya; Withers, Philip J.; De Carlo, Francesco; Xiao, Xianghui

    2010-01-01

    The first processing step in synchrotron-based micro-tomography is the normalization of the projection images against the background, also referred to as a white field. Owing to time-dependent variations in illumination and defects in detection sensitivity, the white field is different from the projection background. In this case standard normalization methods introduce ring and wave artefacts into the resulting three-dimensional reconstruction. In this paper the authors propose a new adaptive technique accounting for these variations and allowing one to obtain cleaner normalized data and to suppress ring and wave artefacts. The background is modelled by the product of two time-dependent terms representing the illumination and detection stages. These terms are written as unknown functions, one scaled and shifted along a fixed direction (describing the illumination term) and one translated by an unknown two-dimensional vector (describing the detection term). The proposed method is applied to two sets (a stem Salix variegata and a zebrafish Danio rerio) acquired at the parallel beam of the micro-tomography station 2-BM at the Advanced Photon Source showing significant reductions in both ring and wave artefacts. In principle the method could be used to correct for time-dependent phenomena that affect other tomographic imaging geometries such as cone beam laboratory X-ray computed tomography. PMID:20724791

  6. Detection and Correction of Step Discontinuities in Kepler Flux Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, J. J.; Morris, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    PDC 8.0 includes an implementation of a new algorithm to detect and correct step discontinuities appearing in roughly one of every 20 stellar light curves during a given quarter. The majority of such discontinuities are believed to result from high-energy particles (either cosmic or solar in origin) striking the photometer and causing permanent local changes (typically -0.5%) in quantum efficiency, though a partial exponential recovery is often observed [1]. Since these features, dubbed sudden pixel sensitivity dropouts (SPSDs), are uncorrelated across targets they cannot be properly accounted for by the current detrending algorithm. PDC detrending is based on the assumption that features in flux time series are due either to intrinsic stellar phenomena or to systematic errors and that systematics will exhibit measurable correlations across targets. SPSD events violate these assumptions and their successful removal not only rectifies the flux values of affected targets, but demonstrably improves the overall performance of PDC detrending [1].

  7. Electric and hybrid electric vehicle study utilizing a time-stepping simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Shaltens, Richard K.; Beremand, Donald G.

    1992-01-01

    The applicability of NASA's advanced power technologies to electric and hybrid vehicles was assessed using a time-stepping computer simulation to model electric and hybrid vehicles operating over the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS). Both the energy and power demands of the FUDS were taken into account and vehicle economy, range, and performance were addressed simultaneously. Results indicate that a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) configured with a flywheel buffer energy storage device and a free-piston Stirling convertor fulfills the emissions, fuel economy, range, and performance requirements that would make it acceptable to the consumer. It is noted that an assessment to determine which of the candidate technologies are suited for the HEV application has yet to be made. A proper assessment should take into account the fuel economy and range, along with the driveability and total emissions produced.

  8. Comparison of Fixed and Variable Time Step Trajectory Integration Methods for Cislunar Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, ichael W.; Thrasher, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the nonlinear nature of the Earth-Moon-Sun three-body problem and non-spherical gravity, CEV cislunar targeting algorithms will require many propagations in their search for a desired trajectory. For on-board targeting especially, the algorithm must have a simple, fast, and accurate propagator to calculate a trajectory with reasonable computation time, and still be robust enough to remain stable in the various flight regimes that the CEV will experience. This paper compares Cowell s method with a fourth-order Runge- Kutta integrator (RK4), Encke s method with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta- Nystr m integrator (RKN4), and a method known as Multi-Conic. Additionally, the study includes the Bond-Gottlieb 14-element method (BG14) and extends the investigation of Encke-Nystrom methods to integrators of higher order and with variable step size.

  9. Effect of the processing steps on compositions of table olive since harvesting time to pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Nasim; Sahari, Mohammad A; Vanak, Zahra Piravi; Safafar, Hamed; Boland-nazar, Seyed A

    2013-08-01

    Weight, oil, fatty acids, tocopherol, polyphenol, and sterol properties of 5 olive cultivars (Zard, Fishomi, Ascolana, Amigdalolia, and Conservalia) during crude, lye treatment, washing, fermentation, and pasteurization steps were studied. Results showed: oil percent was higher and lower in Ascolana (crude step) and in Fishomi (pasteurization step), respectively; during processing steps, in all cultivars, oleic, palmitic, linoleic, and stearic acids were higher; the highest changes in saturated and unsaturated fatty acids were in fermentation step; the highest and the lowest ratios of ω3 / ω6 were in Ascolana (washing step) and in Zard (pasteurization step), respectively; the highest and the lowest tocopherol were in Amigdalolia and Fishomi, respectively, and major damage occurred in lye step; the highest and the lowest polyphenols were in Ascolana (crude step) and in Zard and Ascolana (pasteurization step), respectively; the major damage among cultivars occurred during lye step, in which the polyphenol reduced to 1/10 of first content; sterol did not undergo changes during steps. Reviewing of olive patents shows that many compositions of fruits such as oil quality, fatty acids, quantity and its fraction can be changed by alteration in cultivar and process. PMID:23688142

  10. Adaptive time-delayed stabilization of steady states and periodic orbits.

    PubMed

    Selivanov, Anton; Lehnert, Judith; Fradkov, Alexander; Schöll, Eckehard

    2015-01-01

    We derive adaptive time-delayed feedback controllers that stabilize fixed points and periodic orbits. First, we develop an adaptive controller for stabilization of a steady state by applying the speed-gradient method to an appropriate goal function and prove global asymptotic stability of the resulting system. For an example we show that the advantage of the adaptive controller over the nonadaptive one is in a smaller controller gain. Second, we propose adaptive time-delayed algorithms for stabilization of periodic orbits. Their efficiency is confirmed by local stability analysis. Numerical examples demonstrate the applicability of the proposed controllers. PMID:25679681

  11. Adaptive time-delayed stabilization of steady states and periodic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selivanov, Anton; Lehnert, Judith; Fradkov, Alexander; Schöll, Eckehard

    2015-01-01

    We derive adaptive time-delayed feedback controllers that stabilize fixed points and periodic orbits. First, we develop an adaptive controller for stabilization of a steady state by applying the speed-gradient method to an appropriate goal function and prove global asymptotic stability of the resulting system. For an example we show that the advantage of the adaptive controller over the nonadaptive one is in a smaller controller gain. Second, we propose adaptive time-delayed algorithms for stabilization of periodic orbits. Their efficiency is confirmed by local stability analysis. Numerical examples demonstrate the applicability of the proposed controllers.

  12. Bounded Linear Stability Analysis - A Time Delay Margin Estimation Approach for Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham K.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinlvas; Bakhtiari-Nejad, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating time delay margin for model-reference adaptive control of systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent the conventional model-reference adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window using the comparison lemma. The locally bounded linear approximation of the combined adaptive system is cast in a form of an input-time-delay differential equation over a small time window. The time delay margin of this system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by a matrix measure method, which provides a simple analytical technique for estimating an upper bound of time delay margin. Based on simulation results for a scalar model-reference adaptive control system, both the bounded linear stability method and the matrix measure method are seen to provide a reasonably accurate and yet not too conservative time delay margin estimation.

  13. Prisms to travel in time: Investigation of time-space association through prismatic adaptation effect on mental time travel.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Filomena; Ciaramelli, Elisa; Arzy, Shahar; Frassinetti, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that humans process time and space in similar veins. Humans represent time along a spatial continuum, and perception of temporal durations can be altered through manipulations of spatial attention by prismatic adaptation (PA). Here, we investigated whether PA-induced manipulations of spatial attention can also influence more conceptual aspects of time, such as humans' ability to travel mentally back and forward in time (mental time travel, MTT). Before and after leftward- and rightward-PA, participants projected themselves in the past, present or future time (i.e., self-projection), and, for each condition, determined whether a series of events were located in the past or the future with respect to that specific self-location in time (i.e., self-reference). The results demonstrated that leftward and rightward shifts of spatial attention facilitated recognition of past and future events, respectively. These findings suggest that spatial attention affects the temporal processing of the human self. PMID:27467891

  14. Contextual control of inhibition with reinforcement: Adaptation and timing mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Mark E.; Frohardt, Russell J.; Sunsay, Ceyhun; Waddell, Jaylyn; Morris, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments with rats studied the effects of switching the context after Pavlovian conditioning. In three conditioned suppression experiments, a large number of conditioning trials created “inhibition with reinforcement” (IWR), in which fear of the conditional stimulus (CS) reached a maximum and then declined despite continued CS – unconditional stimulus pairings. When IWR occurred, a context switch augmented fear of the CS; IWR and augmentation were highly correlated. Neither IWR nor augmentation resulted from inhibition of delay (IOD): In conditioned suppression, IWR and augmentation occurred without IOD (Experiment 3), and in appetitive conditioning (Experiment 4), IOD occurred without IWR or augmentation. IWR may occur in conditioned suppression because the animal adapts to fear of the CS in a context-specific manner. We discuss several implications. PMID:18426305

  15. On Time Delay Margin Estimation for Adaptive Control and Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for estimating time delay margin for adaptive control of input delay systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent an adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window. The time delay margin of this input delay system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by three methods: Pade approximation, Lyapunov-Krasovskii method, and the matrix measure method. These methods are applied to the standard model-reference adaptive control, s-modification adaptive law, and optimal control modification adaptive law. The windowing analysis results in non-unique estimates of the time delay margin since it is dependent on the length of a time window and parameters which vary from one time window to the next. The optimal control modification adaptive law overcomes this limitation in that, as the adaptive gain tends to infinity and if the matched uncertainty is linear, then the closed-loop input delay system tends to a LTI system. A lower bound of the time delay margin of this system can then be estimated uniquely without the need for the windowing analysis. Simulation results demonstrates the feasibility of the bounded linear stability method for time delay margin estimation.

  16. Time-of-flight direct recoil spectrometry: Application to liquid surfaces and steps toward quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassotto, Michael

    2001-08-01

    Liquid surfaces are very abundant in nature. Despite the importance of the liquid interface in general, experimental molecular-level data was almost completely lacking prior to the last decade and a half. The intent of this work is to provide a means by which experimental data on the composition of liquid surfaces and the average orientation of their constituent molecules can be obtained in order to supplement data from molecular dynamics and related computational techniques. To this end, a unique time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer, which constitutes the backbone of a new method to study liquid surfaces, was constructed and commissioned. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated in a number of exemplary TOF spectra obtained from liquid glycerol. Moving from mere qualitative to quantitative surface analysis necessitates the ability to relate physical quantities such as detection efficiencies, accurate signal intensities, and interaction cross-sections for all elements to one another. As a first step, the absolute detection efficiency of a channel electron multiplier, used as particle detector in the spectrometer, was measured for the noble gas ions He+, Ar+, and Xe +. The data obtained led to an empirically derived, general expression of the detection efficiency that is applicable to particles of any atomic number. The results also show that the threshold velocity, below which a multiplier does not respond to impinging ions, cannot be regarded as independent of the ion's atomic number as previously reported in the literature. The second step involved a comprehensive investigation of ion-atom interactions and spectral features that are crucial for the processing of experimental signal intensities for quantitative analysis. For this purpose, the binary collision code MARLOWE was used in extensive trajectory calculations simulating TOF spectra. The simulation results confirm the high surface sensitivity of the technique and reveal the strong dependence of the

  17. DECREASING COMPUTING TIME WITH SYMPLECTIC CORRECTORS IN ADAPTIVE TIMESTEPPING ROUTINES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaib, Nathan A.; Quinn, Thomas; Brasser, Ramon

    2011-01-15

    It has previously been shown that varying the numerical timestep during a symplectic orbital integration leads to a random walk in energy and angular momentum, destroying the phase space-conserving property of symplectic integrators. Here we show that when altering the timestep symplectic correctors can be used to reduce this error to a negligible level. Furthermore, these correctors can also be employed to avoid a large error introduction when changing the Hamiltonian's partitioning. We have constructed a numerical integrator using this technique that is nearly as accurate as widely used fixed-step routines. In addition, our algorithm is drastically faster for integrations of highly eccentricitic, large semimajor axis orbits, such as those found in the Oort Cloud.

  18. Database Integration: An Intial Step Towards the Deep-Time Data Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolankowski, S. M.; Fox, P. A.; Ma, X.

    2015-12-01

    As our knowledge of Earth's geologic history grows, we require more robust methods of sharing immense amounts of data. Various databases across numerous disciplines have been widely utilized to offer extensive information on very specific pieces of both Earth's history and its current state, ie. fossil record, rock composition, proteins, etc. In order to gain a deeper understanding of our planet's past we must combine the resources present in our online communities. These databases could be a powerful force in identifying previously unseen correlations if used in tandem rather than as separate entities. Creating a unifying site that provides links to these databases will aid in our ability as a collaborative scientific community to utilize our findings on a larger scale. The Deep-Time Data Infrastructure is currently underway as part of a larger effort to accomplish this goal. DTDI works not to build a new database, but to integrate existing resources. This research is the beginning step in the DTDI program. To create this infrastructure, all current geologic and related databases had to be identified and their schema recorded. Using variables from their combined records, we are able to determine the best way to integrate them using common factors. The Deep-Time Data Infrastructure will allow geoscientists to bridge gaps in data and further our understanding of our planet's history.

  19. Long-Lasting Modifications of Saccadic Eye Movements Following Adaptation Induced in the Double-Step Target Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alahyane, Nadia; Pelisson, Denis

    2005-01-01

    The adaptation of saccadic eye movements to environmental changes occurring throughout life is a good model of motor learning and motor memory. Numerous studies have analyzed the behavioral properties and neural substrate of oculomotor learning in short-term saccadic adaptation protocols, but to our knowledge, none have tested the persistence of…

  20. On discontinuous Galerkin for time integration in option pricing problems with adaptive finite differences in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Sydow, Lina

    2013-10-01

    The discontinuous Galerkin method for time integration of the Black-Scholes partial differential equation for option pricing problems is studied and compared with more standard time-integrators. In space an adaptive finite difference discretization is employed. The results show that the dG method are in most cases at least comparable to standard time-integrators and in some cases superior to them. Together with adaptive spatial grids the suggested pricing method shows great qualities.

  1. Real-Time Adaptive Foreground/Background Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Darren E.; Bove, V. Michael; Sridharan, Sridha

    2005-12-01

    The automatic analysis of digital video scenes often requires the segmentation of moving objects from a static background. Historically, algorithms developed for this purpose have been restricted to small frame sizes, low frame rates, or offline processing. The simplest approach involves subtracting the current frame from the known background. However, as the background is rarely known beforehand, the key is how to learn and model it. This paper proposes a new algorithm that represents each pixel in the frame by a group of clusters. The clusters are sorted in order of the likelihood that they model the background and are adapted to deal with background and lighting variations. Incoming pixels are matched against the corresponding cluster group and are classified according to whether the matching cluster is considered part of the background. The algorithm has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated against three other well-known techniques. It demonstrated equal or better segmentation and proved capable of processing [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] PAL video at full frame rate using only 35%-40% of a [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] GHz Pentium 4 computer.

  2. Security: Step by Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetcov, Eric

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a list of the essential steps to keeping a school's or district's network safe and sound. It describes how to establish a security architecture and approach that will continually evolve as the threat environment changes over time. The article discusses the methodology for implementing this approach and then discusses the…

  3. Real-time control of geometry and stiffness in adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesh, A. V.; Utku, S.; Wada, B. K.

    1991-01-01

    The basic theory is presented for the geometry, stiffness, and damping control of adaptive structures, with emphasis on adaptive truss structures. Necessary and sufficient conditions are given for stress-free geometry control in statically determinate and indeterminate adaptive discrete structures. Two criteria for selecting the controls are proposed, and their use in real-time control is illustrated by numerical simulation results. It is shown that the stiffness and damping control of adaptive truss structures for vibration suppression is possible by elongation and elongation rate dependent feedback forces from the active elements.

  4. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, J.; Hövel, P.; Flunkert, V.; Guzenko, P. Yu.; Fradkov, A. L.; Schöll, E.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions.

  5. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, J; Hövel, P; Flunkert, V; Guzenko, P Yu; Fradkov, A L; Schöll, E

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions. PMID:22225348

  6. Cartesian Off-Body Grid Adaption for Viscous Time- Accurate Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An improved solution adaption capability has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid CFD code. Building on the Cartesian off-body approach inherent in OVERFLOW and the original adaptive refinement method developed by Meakin, the new scheme provides for automated creation of multiple levels of finer Cartesian grids. Refinement can be based on the undivided second-difference of the flow solution variables, or on a specific flow quantity such as vorticity. Coupled with load-balancing and an inmemory solution interpolation procedure, the adaption process provides very good performance for time-accurate simulations on parallel compute platforms. A method of using refined, thin body-fitted grids combined with adaption in the off-body grids is presented, which maximizes the part of the domain subject to adaption. Two- and three-dimensional examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the adaption scheme.

  7. Verification and Validation Methodology of Real-Time Adaptive Neural Networks for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pramod; Loparo, Kenneth; Mackall, Dale; Schumann, Johann; Soares, Fola

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has shown that adaptive neural based control systems are very effective in restoring stability and control of an aircraft in the presence of damage or failures. The application of an adaptive neural network with a flight critical control system requires a thorough and proven process to ensure safe and proper flight operation. Unique testing tools have been developed as part of a process to perform verification and validation (V&V) of real time adaptive neural networks used in recent adaptive flight control system, to evaluate the performance of the on line trained neural networks. The tools will help in certification from FAA and will help in the successful deployment of neural network based adaptive controllers in safety-critical applications. The process to perform verification and validation is evaluated against a typical neural adaptive controller and the results are discussed.

  8. Write a Research Paper One Step at a Time: Research Writing Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Helen, Ed.

    Intended to supplement the textbook series "Houghton Mifflin English Grammar and Composition" and to offer students and classroom teachers in the secondary schools a review of research writing, this guide outlines a step-by-step process allowing for thorough student comprehension and comfort with the application of basic research and writing…

  9. Outward Bound to the Galaxies--One Step at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, R. Bruce; Miller-Friedmann, Jaimie; Sienkiewicz, Frank; Antonucci, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Less than a century ago, astronomers began to unlock the cosmic distances within and beyond the Milky Way. Understanding the size and scale of the universe is a continuing, step-by-step process that began with the remarkably accurate measurement of the distance to the Moon made by early Greeks. In part, the authors have ITEAMS (Innovative…

  10. Adaptive spark timing controller for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Javaherian, H.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes a system for determining the ignition timing value in an ignition control system for an internal combustion engine having cylinders and an output crankshaft rotated during operation of the engine. The ignition control system initiating combustion in each cylinder of the engine at the determined ignition timing value. The system comprising, combination: means for sensing the end of combustion in a cylinder of the engine, the means for sensing including means for determining when an indicator function is at a peak as the crankshaft rotates; means for determining the magnitude of the crankshaft angle after top dead center of the cylinder at which the end of combustion in the cylinder was sensed; and means for establishing the ignition timing value at a start of combustion angle {theta}inew in advance of top dead center of the cylinders having a predetermined relationship to the determined magnitude of the end of combustion angle.

  11. Variations in force-time histories of cat gastrocnemius, soleus and plantaris muscles for consecutive walking steps.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W; Zatsiorsky, V; Prilutsky, B I; Leonard, T R

    1994-06-01

    Force-sharing among muscles during locomotion has been studied experimentally using 'representative' or 'average' step cycles. Mathematical approaches aimed at predicting individual muscle forces during locomotion are based on the assumption that force-sharing among muscles occurs in a consistent and unique way. In this study, we quantify normal variations in muscular force-time histories for step cycles executed at a given nominal speed, so that we can appreciate what it means to analyze 'representative' or 'average' step cycles and can evaluate whether these normal variations in muscular force-time histories are random or may be associated with variations in the kinematics of consecutive step cycles. Forces in gastrocnemius, soleus and plantaris muscles were measured for step cycles performed at a constant nominal speed in freely moving cats. Gastrocnemius forces were always larger than peak plantaris or soleus forces. Also, peak gastrocnemius forces typically occurred first after paw contact, followed by peak soleus and then peak plantaris forces. Furthermore, it was found that variations in muscular force-time histories were substantial and were systematically related to step-cycle durations. The results of this study suggest that findings based on 'representative' or 'average' step cycles for a given nominal speed of locomotion should be viewed cautiously and that variations in force-sharing among muscles are systematically related to variations in locomotor kinematics. PMID:7931035

  12. Feedback-linearization-based neural adaptive control for unknown nonaffine nonlinear discrete-time systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Li, Han-Xiong; Wu, Yi-Hu

    2008-09-01

    A new feedback-linearization-based neural network (NN) adaptive control is proposed for unknown nonaffine nonlinear discrete-time systems. An equivalent model in affine-like form is first derived for the original nonaffine discrete-time systems as feedback linearization methods cannot be implemented for such systems. Then, feedback linearization adaptive control is implemented based on the affine-like equivalent model identified with neural networks. Pretraining is not required and the weights of the neural networks used in adaptive control are directly updated online based on the input-output measurement. The dead-zone technique is used to remove the requirement of persistence excitation during the adaptation. With the proposed neural network adaptive control, stability and performance of the closed-loop system are rigorously established. Illustrated examples are provided to validate the theoretical findings. PMID:18779092

  13. Time-of-Arrival Measurements of X-ray Emission Associated with Dart-Stepped Leader Steps in Natural and Rocket-and-Wire Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, D. M.; Hill, J. D.; Uman, M. A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2012-12-01

    Time-of-arrival (TOA) techniques were used to determine the three-dimensional locations and emission times of x-ray and dE/dt sources measured at ground level in association with dart-stepped leader steps in natural and rocket-and-wire triggered lightning discharges recorded during summer 2011 at Camp Blanding, FL. The measurement network consisted of ten flat plate dE/dt antennas approximately co-located with eight plastic and two Lanthanum Bromide scintillation detectors arrayed around the launching facility over an area of about 0.25 square kilometers. For two triggered lightning dart-stepped leaders, x-ray sources were emitted from locations separated by average distances of 22.7 m and 29 m, respectively, from the locations of the associated dE/dt pulse peaks. The x-ray sources occurred beneath the dE/dt sources in 88% of the cases. X-rays were emitted from 20 ns to 2.16 μs following the dE/dt pulse peaks, with average temporal separations of 150 ns and 290 ns, respectively, for the two triggered lightning events. For one natural lightning dart-stepped leader, x-ray sources were emitted an average total distance of 39.2 m from the associated dE/dt pulse peak, and occurred beneath the location of the dE/dt source in 86% of the cases. The x-rays were emitted from 10 ns to 1.76 μs following the dE/dt pulse peak with an average temporal separation of 280 ns. In each of the three events, the altitude displacement between the dE/dt and x-ray sources dominated the total separation, accounting for 90%, 63%, and 72%, respectively, of the total separation. X-ray sources were distributed randomly in the lateral directions about the lightning channel in each event. For the triggered lightning events, x-rays were located from 2.5-83.5 μs prior to the return stroke at altitudes ranging from 24-336 m. For the natural lightning event, x-rays were located from 40.4-222.3 μs prior to the return stroke at altitudes ranging from 99-394 m. Cumulatively, 67% of the located x

  14. Emergence of adaptability to time delay in bipedal locomotion.

    PubMed

    Ohgane, Kunishige; Ei, Shin-Ichiro; Kazutoshi, Kudo; Ohtsuki, Tatsuyuki

    2004-02-01

    Based on neurophysiological evidence, theoretical studies have shown that locomotion is generated by mutual entrainment between the oscillatory activities of central pattern generators (CPGs) and body motion. However, it has also been shown that the time delay in the sensorimotor loop can destabilize mutual entrainment and result in the failure to walk. In this study, a new mechanism called flexible-phase locking is proposed to overcome the time delay. It is realized by employing the Bonhoeffer-Van der Pol formalism - well known as a physiologically faithful neuronal model - for neurons in the CPG. The formalism states that neurons modulate their phase according to the delay so that mutual entrainment is stabilized. Flexible-phase locking derives from the phase dynamics related to an asymptotically stable limit cycle of the neuron. The effectiveness of the mechanism is verified by computer simulations of a bipedal locomotion model. PMID:14999479

  15. An online novel adaptive filter for denoising time series measurements.

    PubMed

    Willis, Andrew J

    2006-04-01

    A nonstationary form of the Wiener filter based on a principal components analysis is described for filtering time series data possibly derived from noisy instrumentation. The theory of the filter is developed, implementation details are presented and two examples are given. The filter operates online, approximating the maximum a posteriori optimal Bayes reconstruction of a signal with arbitrarily distributed and non stationary statistics. PMID:16649562

  16. Adaptive Haar transforms with arbitrary time and scale splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egiazarian, Karen O.; Astola, Jaakko T.

    2001-05-01

    The Haar transform is generalized to the case of an arbitrary time and scale splitting. To any binary tree we associate an orthogonal system of Haar-type functions - tree-structured Haar (TSH) functions. Unified fast algorithm for computation of the introduced tree-structured Haar transforms is presented. It requires 2(N - 1) additions and 3N - 2 multiplications, where N is transform order or, equivalently, the number of leaves of the binary tree.

  17. Adaptive spark timing controller for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Javaherian, H.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes a system for controlling the ignition timing angle in the ignition control system for an internal combustion engine having cylinders and an output crankshaft rotated during operation of the engine. The ignition control system initiating combustion in each cylinder of the engine at the determined ignition timing value. The system comprising, in combination: means for determining the start of combustion in a cylinder; means for monitoring the value of an indicator function during rotation of the crankshaft after the start of combustion; means for sensing the fpeak value of the indicator function; means for determining the crankshaft angle at which the value of the indicator function is one half the sume of the values of the indicator function at the start of combustion and the peak value occurring at the end of combustion; and means for controlling the ignition timing angle to initiate combustion in the cylinders to establish the crankshaft angle and therefore the cylinder burn establish the crankshaft angle and therefore the cylinder burn center at a predetermined crankshaft angle.

  18. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Learn, R.; Feigenbaum, E.

    2016-05-27

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. Furthermore, the second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  19. The Influence of Time Spent in Outdoor Play on Daily and Aerobic Step Count in Costa Rican Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morera Castro, Maria del Rocio

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of time spent in outdoor play (i.e., on weekday and weekend days) on daily (i.e., average step count) and aerobic step count (i.e., average moderate to vigorous physical activity [MVPA] during the weekdays and weekend days) in fifth grade Costa Rican children. It was hypothesized that: (a)…

  20. Social Influences on Executive Functions Development in Children and Adolescents: Steps Toward a Social Neuroscience of Predictive Adaptive Responses.

    PubMed

    Dishion, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    This commentary discusses the findings and implications of four empirical papers that establish a reciprocal, longitudinal link between the social environment and executive functions from childhood to adolescence. Two future directions are suggested by this work. The first is a call for measurement research to clarify the nomological network of various measurements of self-regulation and executive functions across a variety of methods and procedures. The second new direction is to broaden the analysis of executive function to include a wider array of predictive adaptive responses to various environmental conditions, including those where youth are chronically marginalized or otherwise stressed. Findings from these studies suggest that the executive functions within the brain guide adaptation in both deviant as well as competent responses to the social environment. Understanding various forms of adaptation will enhance the potential for prevention as well as avoid iatrogenic intervention strategies with misinformed targets. PMID:26729426

  1. Adaptive Feedforward Compensation by Specified Step Settling Considering Resonance Frequency Variation and Constraint on Control Input Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshihiro; Wada, Masatake; Iwasaki, Makoto; Hirai, Hiromu

    This paper presents an adaptive feedfowad (FF) compensation method based on a deadbeat control framework for fast and precise positioning in mechatronic systems. The conventional FF compensation approach can design a FF compensator by considering both the frequency shaping and amplitude of FF control input, to suppress the response variations due to the perturbations in plant resonance frequency. However, since the conventional approach is not adaptive against frequency variations, an overshoot and/or undershoot response at the settling region would deteriorate the positioning performance. In this research, therefore, the proposed FF compensation approach with an adaptive identification system for the resonance frequency is adopted to achieve the desired positioning performance. The effectiveness of the proposed FF compensation approach has been verified by experiments using a prototype of an industrial positioning device.

  2. Kinetic Analysis of Parallel-Consecutive First-Order Reactions with a Reversible Step: Concentration-Time Integrals Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mucientes, A. E.; de la Pena, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The concentration-time integrals method has been used to solve kinetic equations of parallel-consecutive first-order reactions with a reversible step. This method involves the determination of the area under the curve for the concentration of a given species against time. Computer techniques are used to integrate experimental curves and the method…

  3. Time course of adaptation to stimuli presented along cardinal lines in color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Alan; Demarco, Paul J.

    2003-12-01

    Visual sensitivity is a process that allows the visual system to maintain optimal response over a wide range of ambient light levels and chromaticities. Several studies have used variants of the probe-flash paradigm to show that the time course of adaptation to abrupt changes in ambient luminance depends on both receptoral and postreceptoral mechanisms. Though a few studies have explored how these processes govern adaptation to color changes, most of this effort has targeted the L-M-cone pathway. The purpose of our work was to use the probe-flash paradigm to more fully explore light adaptation in both the L-M- and the S-cone pathways. We measured sensitivity to chromatic probes presented after the onset of a 2-s chromatic flash. Test and flash stimuli were spatially coextensive 2° fields presented in Maxwellian view. Flash stimuli were presented as excursions from white and could extended in one of two directions along an equiluminant L-M-cone or S-cone line. Probes were presented as excursions from the adapting flash chromaticity and could extend either toward the spectrum locus or toward white. For both color lines, the data show a fast and slow adaptation component, although this was less evident in the S-cone data. The fast and slow components were modeled as first- and second-site adaptive processes, respectively. We find that the time course of adaptation is different for the two cardinal pathways. In addition, the time course for S-cone stimulation is polarity dependent. Our results characterize the rapid time course of adaptation in the chromatic pathways and reveal that the mechanics of adaptation within the S-cone pathway are distinct from those in the L-M-cone pathways.

  4. Stress avoidance in a common annual: reproductive timing is important for local adaptation and geographic distribution.

    PubMed

    Griffith, T M; Watson, M A

    2005-11-01

    Adaptation to local environments may be an important determinant of species' geographic range. However, little is known about which traits contribute to adaptation or whether their further evolution would facilitate range expansion. In this study, we assessed the adaptive value of stress avoidance traits in the common annual Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) by performing a reciprocal transplant across a broad latitudinal gradient extending to the species' northern border. Populations were locally adapted and stress avoidance traits accounted for most fitness differences between populations. At the northern border where growing seasons are cooler and shorter, native populations had evolved to reproduce earlier than native populations in the lower latitude gardens. This clinal pattern in reproductive timing corresponded to a shift in selection from favouring later to earlier reproduction. Thus, earlier reproduction is an important adaptation to northern latitudes and constraint on the further evolution of this trait in marginal populations could potentially limit distribution. PMID:16313471

  5. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  6. Time scale matters: genetic analysis does not support adaptation-by-time as the mechanism for adaptive seasonal declines in kokanee reproductive life span

    PubMed Central

    Morbey, Yolanda E; Jensen, Evelyn L; Russello, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal declines of fitness-related traits are often attributed to environmental effects or individual-level decisions about reproductive timing and effort, but genetic variation may also play a role. In populations of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), seasonal declines in reproductive life span have been attributed to adaptation-by-time, in which divergent selection for different traits occurs among reproductively isolated temporal components of a population. We evaluated this hypothesis in kokanee (freshwater obligate Oncorhynchus nerka) by testing for temporal genetic structure in neutral and circadian-linked loci. We detected no genetic differences in presumably neutral loci among kokanee with different arrival and maturation dates within a spawning season. Similarly, we detected no temporal genetic structure in OtsClock1b, Omy1009uw, or OmyFbxw11, candidate loci associated with circadian function. The genetic evidence from this study and others indicates a lack of support for adaptation-by-time as an important evolutionary mechanism underlying seasonal declines in reproductive life span and a need for greater consideration of other mechanisms such as time-dependent, adaptive adjustment of reproductive effort. PMID:25478160

  7. Effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity on coherence resonance and synchronization transitions by time delay in adaptive neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing; Wang, Qi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we numerically study how time delay induces multiple coherence resonance (MCR) and synchronization transitions (ST) in adaptive Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). It is found that MCR induced by time delay STDP can be either enhanced or suppressed as the adjusting rate Ap of STDP changes, and ST by time delay varies with the increase of Ap, and there is optimal Ap by which the ST becomes strongest. It is also found that there are optimal network randomness and network size by which ST by time delay becomes strongest, and when Ap increases, the optimal network randomness and optimal network size increase and related ST is enhanced. These results show that STDP can either enhance or suppress MCR and optimal STDP can enhance ST induced by time delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into STDP's role for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  8. Compact Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for in Situ Analyses of Aromatic Organics on Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, Stephanie; Brickerhoff, William; Cornish, Timothy; Ecelberger, Scott; Floyd, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE A miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been adapted to demonstrate two-step laser desorption-ionization (LOI) in a compact instrument package for enhanced organics detection. Two-step LDI decouples the desorption and ionization processes, relative to traditional laser ionization-desorption, in order to produce low-fragmentation conditions for complex organic analytes. Tuning UV ionization laser energy allowed control ofthe degree of fragmentation, which may enable better identification of constituent species. METHODS A reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer prototype measuring 20 cm in length was adapted to a two-laser configuration, with IR (1064 nm) desorption followed by UV (266 nm) postionization. A relatively low ion extraction voltage of 5 kV was applied at the sample inlet. Instrument capabilities and performance were demonstrated with analysis of a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, representing a class of compounds important to the fields of Earth and planetary science. RESULTS L2MS analysis of a model PAH standard, pyrene, has been demonstrated, including parent mass identification and the onset o(tunable fragmentation as a function of ionizing laser energy. Mass resolution m/llm = 380 at full width at half-maximum was achieved which is notable for gas-phase ionization of desorbed neutrals in a highly-compact mass analyzer. CONCLUSIONS Achieving two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) in a highly-miniature instrument enables a powerful approach to the detection and characterization of aromatic organics in remote terrestrial and planetary applications. Tunable detection of parent and fragment ions with high mass resolution, diagnostic of molecular structure, is possible on such a compact L2MS instrument. Selectivity of L2MS against low-mass inorganic salt interferences is a key advantage when working with unprocessed, natural samples, and a mechanism for the observed selectivity is presented.

  9. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence--favorably evaluated in the West--for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The…

  10. Steps Ahead: Adaptation of physical activity and dietary guidelines for reducing unhealthy weight gain in the Lower Misissippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of our study was to test the effectiveness of adapting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) (DG), with and without a physical activity (PA) component, in reducing weight gain in the Lower Mississippi Delta region (LMD) of the United States. A sample of 121 White and African-Americ...

  11. A Step Response Based Mixed-Signal BIST Approach for Continuous-time Linear Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Alvernon; Lala, P. K.

    2001-01-01

    A new Mixed-Signal Built-in self-test approach that is based upon the step response of a reconfigurable (or multifunction) analog block is presented in this paper. The technique requires the overlapping step response of the Circuit Under Test (CUT) for two circuit configurations. Each configuration can be realized by changing the topology of the CUT or by sampling two CUT nodes with differing step responses. The technique can effectively detect both soft and hard faults and does not require an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and/or digital-to-analog converter(DAC). It also does not require any precision voltage sources or comparators. This approach does not require any additional analog circuits to realize the test signal generator and sample circuits. The paper is concluded with the application of the proposed approach to a circuit found in the work of Epstein et al and two ITC 97 analog benchmark circuits.

  12. Using a scale selective tendency filter and forward-backward time stepping to calculate consistent semi-Lagrangian trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alerskans, Emy; Kaas, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    In semi-Lagrangian models used for climate and NWP the trajectories are normally/often determined kinematically. Here we propose a new method for calculating trajectories in a more dynamically consistent way by pre-integrating the governing equations in a pseudo-Lagrangian manner using a short time step. Only non-advective adiabatic terms are included in this calculation, i.e., the Coriolis and pressure gradient force plus gravity in the momentum equations, and the divergence term in the continuity equation. This integration is performed with a forward-backward time step. Optionally, the tendencies are filtered with a local space filter, which reduces the phase speed of short wave gravity and sound waves. The filter relaxes the time step limitation related to high frequency oscillations without compromising locality of the solution. The filter can be considered as an alternative to less local or global semi-implicit solvers. Once trajectories are estimated over a complete long advective time step the full set of governing equations is stepped forward using these trajectories in combination with a flux form semi-Lagrangian formulation of the equations. The methodology is designed to improve consistency and scalability on massively parallel systems, although here it has only been verified that the technique produces realistic results in a shallow water model and a 2D model based on the full Euler equations.

  13. Does it pay to delay? Flesh flies show adaptive plasticity in reproductive timing.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Frank J; Kristal, Ross; Netter, Fleta; Hatle, John D; Hahn, Daniel A

    2011-02-01

    Life-history plasticity is widespread among organisms. However, an important question is whether it is adaptive. Most models for plasticity in life-history timing predict that animals, once they have reached the minimal nutritional threshold under poor conditions, will accelerate development or time to reproduction. Adaptive delays in reproduction are not common, especially in short-lived species. Examples of adaptive reproductive delays exist in mammalian populations experiencing strong interspecific (e.g., predation) and intraspecific (e.g., infanticide) competition. But are there other environmental factors that may trigger an adaptive delay in reproductive timing? We show that the short-lived flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis will delay reproduction under nutrient-poor conditions, even though it has already met the minimal nutritional threshold for reproduction. We test whether this delay strategy is an adaptive response allowing the scavenger time to locate more resources by experimentally providing supplemental protein pulses (early, mid and late) throughout the reproductive delay period. Flies receiving additional protein produced more and larger eggs, demonstrating a benefit of the delay. In addition, by tracking the allocation of carbon from the pulses using stable isotopes, we show that flies receiving earlier pulses incorporated more carbon into eggs and somatic tissue than those given a later pulse. These results indicate that the reproductive delay in S. crassipalpis is consistent with adaptive post-threshold plasticity, a nutritionally linked reproductive strategy that has not been reported previously in an invertebrate species. PMID:20953961

  14. Optimized quantum sensing with a single electron spin using real-time adaptive measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonato, C.; Blok, M. S.; Dinani, H. T.; Berry, D. W.; Markham, M. L.; Twitchen, D. J.; Hanson, R.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum sensors based on single solid-state spins promise a unique combination of sensitivity and spatial resolution. The key challenge in sensing is to achieve minimum estimation uncertainty within a given time and with high dynamic range. Adaptive strategies have been proposed to achieve optimal performance, but their implementation in solid-state systems has been hindered by the demanding experimental requirements. Here, we realize adaptive d.c. sensing by combining single-shot readout of an electron spin in diamond with fast feedback. By adapting the spin readout basis in real time based on previous outcomes, we demonstrate a sensitivity in Ramsey interferometry surpassing the standard measurement limit. Furthermore, we find by simulations and experiments that adaptive protocols offer a distinctive advantage over the best known non-adaptive protocols when overhead and limited estimation time are taken into account. Using an optimized adaptive protocol we achieve a magnetic field sensitivity of 6.1 ± 1.7 nT Hz-1/2 over a wide range of 1.78 mT. These results open up a new class of experiments for solid-state sensors in which real-time knowledge of the measurement history is exploited to obtain optimal performance.

  15. Studies on effects of feedback delay on the convergence performance of adaptive time-domain equalizers for fiber dispersive channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qun; Xu, Bo; Qiu, Kun

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive time-domain equalizer (TDE) is an important module for digital optical coherent receivers. From an implementation perspective, we analyze and compare in detail the effects of error signal feedback delay on the convergence performance of TDE using either least-mean square (LMS) or constant modulus algorithm (CMA). For this purpose, a simplified theoretical model is proposed based on which iterative equations on the mean value and the variance of the tap coefficient are derived with or without error signal feedback delay for both LMS- and CMA-based methods for the first time. The analytical results show that decreased step size has to be used for TDE to converge and a slower convergence speed cannot be avoided as the feedback delay increases. Compared with the data-aided LMS-based method, the CMA-based method has a slower convergence speed and larger variation after convergence. Similar results are confirmed using numerical simulations for fiber dispersive channels. As the step size increases, a feedback delay of 20 clock cycles might cause the TDE to diverge. Compared with the CMA-based method, the LMS-based method has a higher tolerance on the feedback delay and allows a larger step size for a faster convergence speed.

  16. Time domain and frequency domain design techniques for model reference adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1971-01-01

    Some problems associated with the design of model-reference adaptive control systems are considered and solutions to these problems are advanced. The stability of the adapted system is a primary consideration in the development of both the time-domain and the frequency-domain design techniques. Consequentially, the use of Liapunov's direct method forms an integral part of the derivation of the design procedures. The application of sensitivity coefficients to the design of model-reference adaptive control systems is considered. An application of the design techniques is also presented.

  17. Peak Muscle Activation, Joint Kinematics, and Kinetics during Elliptical and Stepping Movement Pattern on a Precor Adaptive Motion Trainer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogatzki, Matthew J.; Kernozek, Thomas W.; Willson, John D.; Greany, John F.; Hong, Di-An; Porcari, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Kinematic, kinetic, and electromyography data were collected from the biceps femoris, rectus femoris (RF), gluteus maximus, and erector spinae (ES) during a step and elliptical exercise at a standardized workload with no hand use. Findings depicted 95% greater ankle plantar flexion (p = 0.01), 29% more knee extension (p = 0.003), 101% higher peak…

  18. Characterization of Energy Conservation in Primary Knock-On Atom Cascades: Ballistic Phase Effects on Variable Time Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Corrales, Louis R.; Devanathan, Ram

    2006-09-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation trajectories must in principle conserve energy along the entire path. Processes exist in high-energy primary knock-on atom cascades that can affect the energy conservation, specifically during the ballistic phase where collisions bring atoms into very close proximities. The solution, in general, is to reduce the time step size of the simulation. This work explores the effects of variable time step algorithms and the effects of specifying a maximum displacement. The period of the ballistic phase can be well characterized by methods developed in this work to monitor the kinetic energy dissipation during a high-energy cascade.

  19. Changing Step or Marking Time? Teacher Education Reforms for the Learning and Skills Sector in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ron; Robinson, Denise

    2008-01-01

    The unprecedented degree of attention given to the learning and skills sector in England by successive New Labour governments has led to a significant increase in what is expected of the teaching workforce. To help meet these expectations, a "step change" in the quality of initial teacher training for the sector is promised, alongside provisions…

  20. Adaptation to visual or auditory time intervals modulates the perception of visual apparent motion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huihui; Chen, Lihan; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    It is debated whether sub-second timing is subserved by a centralized mechanism or by the intrinsic properties of task-related neural activity in specific modalities (Ivry and Schlerf, 2008). By using a temporal adaptation task, we investigated whether adapting to different time intervals conveyed through stimuli in different modalities (i.e., frames of a visual Ternus display, visual blinking discs, or auditory beeps) would affect the subsequent implicit perception of visual timing, i.e., inter-stimulus interval (ISI) between two frames in a Ternus display. The Ternus display can induce two percepts of apparent motion (AM), depending on the ISI between the two frames: “element motion” for short ISIs, in which the endmost disc is seen as moving back and forth while the middle disc at the overlapping or central position remains stationary; “group motion” for longer ISIs, in which both discs appear to move in a manner of lateral displacement as a whole. In Experiment 1, participants adapted to either the typical “element motion” (ISI = 50 ms) or the typical “group motion” (ISI = 200 ms). In Experiments 2 and 3, participants adapted to a time interval of 50 or 200 ms through observing a series of two paired blinking discs at the center of the screen (Experiment 2) or hearing a sequence of two paired beeps (with pitch 1000 Hz). In Experiment 4, participants adapted to sequences of paired beeps with either low pitches (500 Hz) or high pitches (5000 Hz). After adaptation in each trial, participants were presented with a Ternus probe in which the ISI between the two frames was equal to the transitional threshold of the two types of motions, as determined by a pretest. Results showed that adapting to the short time interval in all the situations led to more reports of “group motion” in the subsequent Ternus probes; adapting to the long time interval, however, caused no aftereffect for visual adaptation but significantly more reports of group motion for

  1. BIOMAP A Daily Time Step, Mechanistic Model for the Study of Ecosystem Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, J. R.; Neilson, R. P.; Drapek, R. J.; Pitts, B. S.

    2010-12-01

    of both climate and ecosystems must be done at coarse grid resolutions; smaller domains require higher resolution for the simulation of natural resource processes at the landscape scale and that of on-the-ground management practices. Via a combined multi-agency and private conservation effort we have implemented a Nested Scale Experiment (NeScE) that ranges from 1/2 degree resolution (global, ca. 50 km) to ca. 8km (North America) and 800 m (conterminous U.S.). Our first DGVM, MC1, has been implemented at all 3 scales. We are just beginning to implement BIOMAP into NeScE, with its unique features, and daily time step, as a counterpoint to MC1. We believe it will be more accurate at all resolutions providing better simulations of vegetation distribution, carbon balance, runoff, fire regimes and drought impacts.

  2. First steps toward 3D high resolution imaging using adaptive optics and full-field optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Leonardo; Blavier, Marie; Glanc, Marie; Pouplard, Florence; Tick, Sarah; Maksimovic, Ivan; Chenegros, Guillaume; Mugnier, Laurent; Lacombe, Francois; Rousset, Gérard; Paques, Michel; Le Gargasson, Jean-François; Sahel, Jose-Alain

    2008-09-01

    We describe here two parts of our future 3D fundus camera coupling Adaptive Optics and full-field Optical Coherence Tomography. The first part is an Adaptive Optics flood imager installed at the Quinze-Vingts Hospital, regularly used on healthy and pathological eyes. A posteriori image reconstruction is performed, increasing the final image quality and field of view. The instrument lateral resolution is better than 2 microns. The second part is a full-field Optical Coherence Tomograph, which has demonstrated capability of performing a simple kind of "4 phases" image reconstruction of non biological samples and ex situ retinas. Final aim is to couple both parts in order to achieve 3D high resolution mapping of in vivo retinas.

  3. Translation, Validation, and Adaptation of the Time Use Diary from English into the Malay Language for Use in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Asmuri, Siti Noraini; Brown, Ted; Broom, Lisa J

    2016-07-01

    Valid translations of time use scales are needed by occupational therapists for use in different cross-cultural contexts to gather relevant data to inform practice and research. The purpose of this study was to describe the process of translating, adapting, and validating the Time Use Diary from its current English language edition into a Malay language version. Five steps of the cross-cultural adaptation process were completed: (i) translation from English into the Malay language by a qualified translator, (ii) synthesis of the translated Malay version, (iii) backtranslation from Malay to English by three bilingual speakers, (iv) expert committee review and discussion, and (v) pilot testing of the Malay language version with two participant groups. The translated version was found to be a reliable and valid tool identifying changes and potential challenges in the time use of older adults. This provides Malaysian occupational therapists with a useful tool for gathering time use data in practice settings and for research purposes. PMID:27219119

  4. Adaptive time-lapse optimized survey design for electrical resistivity tomography monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Paul B.; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Meldrum, Philip I.; Chambers, Jonathan E.; Carrière, Simon; Oxby, Lucy S.; Loke, M. H.

    2015-10-01

    Adaptive optimal experimental design methods use previous data and results to guide the choice and design of future experiments. This paper describes the formulation of an adaptive survey design technique to produce optimal resistivity imaging surveys for time-lapse geoelectrical monitoring experiments. These survey designs are time-dependent and, compared to dipole-dipole or static optimized surveys that do not change over time, focus a greater degree of the image resolution on regions of the subsurface that are actively changing. The adaptive optimization method is validated using a controlled laboratory monitoring experiment comprising a well-defined cylindrical target moving along a trajectory that changes its depth and lateral position. The algorithm is implemented on a standard PC in conjunction with a modified automated multichannel resistivity imaging system. Data acquisition using the adaptive survey designs requires no more time or power than with comparable standard surveys, and the algorithm processing takes place while the system batteries recharge. The results show that adaptively designed optimal surveys yield a quantitative increase in image quality over and above that produced by using standard dipole-dipole or static (time-independent) optimized surveys.

  5. Remote mission specialist - A study in real-time, adaptive planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokey, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    A high-level planning architecture for robotic operations is presented. The remote mission specialist integrates high-level directives with low-level primitives executable by a run-time controller for command of autonomous servicing activities. The planner has been designed to address such issues as adaptive plan generation, real-time performance, and operator intervention.

  6. Multi-Step Ahead Predictions for Critical Levels in Physiological Time Series.

    PubMed

    ElMoaqet, Hisham; Tilbury, Dawn M; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna

    2016-07-01

    Standard modeling and evaluation methods have been classically used in analyzing engineering dynamical systems where the fundamental problem is to minimize the (mean) error between the real and predicted systems. Although these methods have been applied to multi-step ahead predictions of physiological signals, it is often more important to predict clinically relevant events than just to match these signals. Adverse clinical events, which occur after a physiological signal breaches a clinically defined critical threshold, are a popular class of such events. This paper presents a framework for multi-step ahead predictions of critical levels of abnormality in physiological signals. First, a performance metric is presented for evaluating multi-step ahead predictions. Then, this metric is used to identify personalized models optimized with respect to predictions of critical levels of abnormality. To address the paucity of adverse events, weighted support vector machines and cost-sensitive learning are used to optimize the proposed framework with respect to statistical metrics that can take into account the relative rarity of such events. PMID:27244754

  7. LPTA: Location Predictive and Time Adaptive Data Gathering Scheme with Mobile Sink for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper exploits sink mobility to prolong the lifetime of sensor networks while maintaining the data transmission delay relatively low. A location predictive and time adaptive data gathering scheme is proposed. In this paper, we introduce a sink location prediction principle based on loose time synchronization and deduce the time-location formulas of the mobile sink. According to local clocks and the time-location formulas of the mobile sink, nodes in the network are able to calculate the current location of the mobile sink accurately and route data packets timely toward the mobile sink by multihop relay. Considering that data packets generating from different areas may be different greatly, an adaptive dwelling time adjustment method is also proposed to balance energy consumption among nodes in the network. Simulation results show that our data gathering scheme enables data routing with less data transmission time delay and balance energy consumption among nodes. PMID:25302327

  8. Multi-time-step ahead daily and hourly intermittent reservoir inflow prediction by artificial intelligent techniques using lumped and distributed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jothiprakash, V.; Magar, R. B.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryIn this study, artificial intelligent (AI) techniques such as artificial neural network (ANN), Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and Linear genetic programming (LGP) are used to predict daily and hourly multi-time-step ahead intermittent reservoir inflow. To illustrate the applicability of AI techniques, intermittent Koyna river watershed in Maharashtra, India is chosen as a case study. Based on the observed daily and hourly rainfall and reservoir inflow various types of time-series, cause-effect and combined models are developed with lumped and distributed input data. Further, the model performance was evaluated using various performance criteria. From the results, it is found that the performances of LGP models are found to be superior to ANN and ANFIS models especially in predicting the peak inflows for both daily and hourly time-step. A detailed comparison of the overall performance indicated that the combined input model (combination of rainfall and inflow) performed better in both lumped and distributed input data modelling. It was observed that the lumped input data models performed slightly better because; apart from reducing the noise in the data, the better techniques and their training approach, appropriate selection of network architecture, required inputs, and also training-testing ratios of the data set. The slight poor performance of distributed data is due to large variations and lesser number of observed values.

  9. Operational flood control of a low-lying delta system using large time step Model Predictive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xin; van Overloop, Peter-Jules; Negenborn, Rudy R.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The safety of low-lying deltas is threatened not only by riverine flooding but by storm-induced coastal flooding as well. For the purpose of flood control, these deltas are mostly protected in a man-made environment, where dikes, dams and other adjustable infrastructures, such as gates, barriers and pumps are widely constructed. Instead of always reinforcing and heightening these structures, it is worth considering making the most of the existing infrastructure to reduce the damage and manage the delta in an operational and overall way. In this study, an advanced real-time control approach, Model Predictive Control, is proposed to operate these structures in the Dutch delta system (the Rhine-Meuse delta). The application covers non-linearity in the dynamic behavior of the water system and the structures. To deal with the non-linearity, a linearization scheme is applied which directly uses the gate height instead of the structure flow as the control variable. Given the fact that MPC needs to compute control actions in real-time, we address issues regarding computational time. A new large time step scheme is proposed in order to save computation time, in which different control variables can have different control time steps. Simulation experiments demonstrate that Model Predictive Control with the large time step setting is able to control a delta system better and much more efficiently than the conventional operational schemes.

  10. Adaptive NN tracking control of uncertain nonlinear discrete-time systems with nonaffine dead-zone input.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Tong, Shaocheng

    2015-03-01

    In the paper, an adaptive tracking control design is studied for a class of nonlinear discrete-time systems with dead-zone input. The considered systems are of the nonaffine pure-feedback form and the dead-zone input appears nonlinearly in the systems. The contributions of the paper are that: 1) it is for the first time to investigate the control problem for this class of discrete-time systems with dead-zone; 2) there are major difficulties for stabilizing such systems and in order to overcome the difficulties, the systems are transformed into an n-step-ahead predictor but nonaffine function is still existent; and 3) an adaptive compensative term is constructed to compensate for the parameters of the dead-zone. The neural networks are used to approximate the unknown functions in the transformed systems. Based on the Lyapunov theory, it is proven that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded and the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of zero. Two simulation examples are provided to verify the effectiveness of the control approach in the paper. PMID:24968366

  11. A stabilized Runge–Kutta–Legendre method for explicit super-time-stepping of parabolic and mixed equations

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Chad D.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Aslam, Tariq D.

    2014-01-15

    Parabolic partial differential equations appear in several physical problems, including problems that have a dominant hyperbolic part coupled to a sub-dominant parabolic component. Explicit methods for their solution are easy to implement but have very restrictive time step constraints. Implicit solution methods can be unconditionally stable but have the disadvantage of being computationally costly or difficult to implement. Super-time-stepping methods for treating parabolic terms in mixed type partial differential equations occupy an intermediate position. In such methods each superstep takes “s” explicit Runge–Kutta-like time-steps to advance the parabolic terms by a time-step that is s{sup 2} times larger than a single explicit time-step. The expanded stability is usually obtained by mapping the short recursion relation of the explicit Runge–Kutta scheme to the recursion relation of some well-known, stable polynomial. Prior work has built temporally first- and second-order accurate super-time-stepping methods around the recursion relation associated with Chebyshev polynomials. Since their stability is based on the boundedness of the Chebyshev polynomials, these methods have been called RKC1 and RKC2. In this work we build temporally first- and second-order accurate super-time-stepping methods around the recursion relation associated with Legendre polynomials. We call these methods RKL1 and RKL2. The RKL1 method is first-order accurate in time; the RKL2 method is second-order accurate in time. We verify that the newly-designed RKL1 and RKL2 schemes have a very desirable monotonicity preserving property for one-dimensional problems – a solution that is monotone at the beginning of a time step retains that property at the end of that time step. It is shown that RKL1 and RKL2 methods are stable for all values of the diffusion coefficient up to the maximum value. We call this a convex monotonicity preserving property and show by examples that it is very

  12. Large-scale MOSFET and interconnect circuit simulation using waveform relaxation and transmission line time step control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Jung; Chang, Allen Y.; Tsai, Chang-Lung; Lee, Chih-Jen; Chou, Li-Ping; Shin, Tien-Hao

    2012-04-01

    A modified Waveform Relaxation algorithm with transmission line calculation ability is proposed to perform large-scale circuit simulation for MOSFET circuits with lossy coupled transmission lines. The adopted full time-domain transmission line calculation algorithm, based on the Method of Characteristic, has been equipped with a time step control scheme to improve the calculation efficiency. All proposed methods have been implemented in a simulation program to simulate several circuits. The simulation results well justify the success of proposed methods.

  13. Development of a time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes solver based on a fractional-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Moshe

    1990-01-01

    The development, validation and application of a fractional step solution method of the time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized coordinate systems are discussed. A solution method that combines a finite-volume discretization with a novel choice of the dependent variables and a fractional step splitting to obtain accurate solutions in arbitrary geometries was previously developed for fixed-grids. In the present research effort, this solution method is extended to include more general situations, including cases with moving grids. The numerical techniques are enhanced to gain efficiency and generality.

  14. A novel method for the precise determination of step times and sizes in counting large numbers of photobleaching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Presse, Steve

    Counting of photobleaching steps is of importance in the investigation of many open problems in biophysics. Current methods of counting photo- bleaching steps cannot directly account for fluorophore photophysical behaviors such as fluorophore self-quenching, blinking and flickering. Our Bayesian approach to the counting problem allows for fluorophore blinking and reactivation as well as for multiple simultaneous photobleaching events and is neither computational resource- nor time- heavy. We detail the method's applicability and limitations and present examples of application in photobleach event counting.

  15. Time-course proteomic profile of Candida albicans during adaptation to a fetal serum.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Tomomi; Tatsukami, Yohei; Kitahara, Nao; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2013-02-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal organism; however, it causes fatal diseases if the host immunity is compromised. The mortality rate is very high due to the lack of effective treatment, leading to ceaseless demand for novel pharmaceuticals. In this study, time-course proteomics of C. albicans during adaptation to fetal bovine serum (FBS) was described. Time-course proteomics is a promising way to understand the exact process of going adaptation in dynamically changing environments. Candida albicans was cultivated in yeast nitrogen base (YNB) ± FBS media, and we identified 1418 proteins in the endpoint samples incubated for 0 or 60 min by a LC-MS/MS system with a long monolithic silica capillary column. Next, we carried out time-course proteomics of the YNB + FBS samples to identify top-priority proteins for adaption to FBS. We identified 16 proteins as nascent/newly synthesized proteins, and they were recognized as candidates of important virulent factors. Gene ontology analysis revealed that transport-related proteins were enriched in the 16 proteins, indicating that C. albicans probably put priority in time on the acquisition of essential elements. Time-course proteomics of C. albicans revealed the order of priority to adapt to FBS. Depicting time-course dynamics will lead to profound understandings of virulence of C. albicans. PMID:23620121

  16. Adaptive-grid methods for time-dependent partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, G.W.; Rodrique, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper contains a survey of recent developments of adaptive-grid algorithms for time-dependent partial differential equations. Two lines of research are discussed. One involves the automatic selection of moving grids to follow propagating waves. The other is based on stationary grids but uses local mesh refinement in both space and time. Advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are discussed. The development of adaptive-grid schemes shows promise of greatly increasing our ability to solve problems in several spatial dimensions.

  17. Real-Time Robust Adaptive Modeling and Scheduling for an Electronic Commerce Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bing; Ruan, Chun

    With the increasing importance and pervasiveness of Internet services, it is becoming a challenge for the proliferation of electronic commerce services to provide performance guarantees under extreme overload. This paper describes a real-time optimization modeling and scheduling approach for performance guarantee of electronic commerce servers. We show that an electronic commerce server may be simulated as a multi-tank system. A robust adaptive server model is subject to unknown additive load disturbances and uncertain model matching. Overload control techniques are based on adaptive admission control to achieve timing guarantees. We evaluate the performance of the model using a complex simulation that is subjected to varying model parameters and massive overload.

  18. A dissociative fluorescence enhancement technique for one-step time-resolved immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Mukkala, Veli-Matti; Hakala, Harri H. O.; Mäkinen, Pauliina H.; Suonpää, Mikko U.; Hemmilä, Ilkka A.

    2010-01-01

    The limitation of current dissociative fluorescence enhancement techniques is that the lanthanide chelate structures used as molecular probes are not stable enough in one-step assays with high concentrations of complexones or metal ions in the reaction mixture since these substances interfere with lanthanide chelate conjugated to the detector molecule. Lanthanide chelates of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are extremely stable, and we used EuDTPA derivatives conjugated to antibodies as tracers in one-step immunoassays containing high concentrations of complexones or metal ions. Enhancement solutions based on different β-diketones were developed and tested for their fluorescence-enhancing capability in immunoassays with EuDTPA-labelled antibodies. Characteristics tested were fluorescence intensity, analytical sensitivity, kinetics of complex formation and signal stability. Formation of fluorescent complexes is fast (5 min) in the presented enhancement solution with EuDTPA probes withstanding strong complexones (ethylenediaminetetra acetate (EDTA) up to 100 mM) or metal ions (up to 200 μM) in the reaction mixture, the signal is intensive, stable for 4 h and the analytical sensitivity with Eu is 40 fmol/L, Tb 130 fmol/L, Sm 2.1 pmol/L and Dy 8.5 pmol/L. With the improved fluorescence enhancement technique, EDTA and citrate plasma samples as well as samples containing relatively high concentrations of metal ions can be analysed using a one-step immunoassay format also at elevated temperatures. It facilitates four-plexing, is based on one chelate structure for detector molecule labelling and is suitable for immunoassays due to the wide dynamic range and the analytical sensitivity. Figure   PMID:21161513

  19. Between-Trial Forgetting Due to Interference and Time in Motor Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungshin; Oh, Youngmin; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Learning a motor task with temporally spaced presentations or with other tasks intermixed between presentations reduces performance during training, but can enhance retention post training. These two effects are known as the spacing and contextual interference effect, respectively. Here, we aimed at testing a unifying hypothesis of the spacing and contextual interference effects in visuomotor adaptation, according to which forgetting between trials due to either spaced presentations or interference by another task will promote between-trial forgetting, which will depress performance during acquisition, but will promote retention. We first performed an experiment with three visuomotor adaptation conditions: a short inter-trial-interval (ITI) condition (SHORT-ITI); a long ITI condition (LONG-ITI); and an alternating condition with two alternated opposite tasks (ALT), with the same single-task ITI as in LONG-ITI. In the SHORT-ITI condition, there was fastest increase in performance during training and largest immediate forgetting in the retention tests. In contrast, in the ALT condition, there was slowest increase in performance during training and little immediate forgetting in the retention tests. Compared to these two conditions, in the LONG-ITI, we found intermediate increase in performance during training and intermediate immediate forgetting. To account for these results, we fitted to the data six possible adaptation models with one or two time scales, and with interference in the fast, or in the slow, or in both time scales. Model comparison confirmed that two time scales and some degree of interferences in either time scale are needed to account for our experimental results. In summary, our results suggest that retention following adaptation is modulated by the degree of between-trial forgetting, which is due to time-based decay in single adaptation task and interferences in multiple adaptation tasks. PMID:26599075

  20. DOUBLE-STEP MULTIPLEX REAL TIME PCR WITH MELTING CURVE ANALYSIS FOR DETECTION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF MYCOBACTERIA IN SPUTUM.

    PubMed

    Kasa, Sawinee; Faksri, Kiatichai; Kaewkes, Wanlop; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Namwat, Wises

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) is a causative agent of tuberculosis, a worldwide public health problem. In recent years, the incidence of human mycobacterial infection due to species other than M. tb has increased. However, the lack of specific, rapid, and inexpensive methods for identification of mycobacterial species remains a pressing problem. A diagnostic test was developed for mycobacterial strain differentiation utilizing a double-step multiplex real time PCR together with melting curve analysis for identifying and distinguishing among M. tb, M. bovis BCG, other members of M. tb. complex, M. avium, and non-tuberculosis mycobacteria. The assay was tested using 167 clinical sputum samples in comparison with acid-fast staining and culturing. Using only the first step (step A) the assay achieved sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 95%, respectively. The detection limit was equivalent to 50 genome copies. PMID:26513906

  1. Novel algorithm for real-time onset detection of surface electromyography in step-tracking wrist movements.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Nisky, Ilana; Uranishi, Yuki; Imura, Masataka; Okamura, Allison M; Oshiro, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for real-time detection of the onset of surface electromyography signal in step-tracking wrist movements. The method identifies abrupt increase of the quasi-tension signal calculated from sEMG resulting from the step-by-step recruitment of activated motor units. We assessed the performance of our proposed algorithm using both simulated and real sEMG signals, and compared with two existing detection methods. Evaluation with simulated sEMG showed that the detection accuracy of our method is robust to different signal-to-noise ratios, and that it outperforms the existing methods in terms of bias when the noise is large (low SNR). Evaluation with real sEMG analysis also indicated better detection performance compared to existing methods. PMID:24110123

  2. Ultra-fast consensus of discrete-time multi-agent systems with multi-step predictive output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenle; Liu, Jianchang

    2016-04-01

    This article addresses the ultra-fast consensus problem of high-order discrete-time multi-agent systems based on a unified consensus framework. A novel multi-step predictive output mechanism is proposed under a directed communication topology containing a spanning tree. By predicting the outputs of a network several steps ahead and adding this information into the consensus protocol, it is shown that the asymptotic convergence factor is improved by a power of q + 1 compared to the routine consensus. The difficult problem of selecting the optimal control gain is solved well by introducing a variable called convergence step. In addition, the ultra-fast formation achievement is studied on the basis of this new consensus protocol. Finally, the ultra-fast consensus with respect to a reference model and robust consensus is discussed. Some simulations are performed to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  3. A novel algorithm for real-time adaptive signal detection and identification

    SciTech Connect

    Sleefe, G.E.; Ladd, M.D.; Gallegos, D.E.; Sicking, C.W.; Erteza, I.A.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a novel digital signal processing algorithm for adaptively detecting and identifying signals buried in noise. The algorithm continually computes and updates the long-term statistics and spectral characteristics of the background noise. Using this noise model, a set of adaptive thresholds and matched digital filters are implemented to enhance and detect signals that are buried in the noise. The algorithm furthermore automatically suppresses coherent noise sources and adapts to time-varying signal conditions. Signal detection is performed in both the time-domain and the frequency-domain, thereby permitting the detection of both broad-band transients and narrow-band signals. The detection algorithm also provides for the computation of important signal features such as amplitude, timing, and phase information. Signal identification is achieved through a combination of frequency-domain template matching and spectral peak picking. The algorithm described herein is well suited for real-time implementation on digital signal processing hardware. This paper presents the theory of the adaptive algorithm, provides an algorithmic block diagram, and demonstrate its implementation and performance with real-world data. The computational efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated through benchmarks on specific DSP hardware. The applications for this algorithm, which range from vibration analysis to real-time image processing, are also discussed.

  4. The role of time delay in adaptive cellular negative feedback systems.

    PubMed

    Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2016-06-01

    Adaptation in cellular systems is often mediated by negative feedbacks, which usually come with certain time delays causing several characteristic response patterns including an overdamped response, damped or sustained oscillations. Here, we analyse generic two-dimensional delay differential equations with delayed negative feedback describing the dynamics of biochemical adaptive signal-response networks. We derive explicit thresholds and boundaries showing how time delay determines characteristic response patterns of these networks. Applying our theoretical analyses to concrete data we show that adaptation to osmotic stress in yeast is optimal in the sense of minimizing adaptation time without causing oscillatory behaviour, i.e., a critically damped response. In addition, our framework demonstrates that a slight increase of time delay in the NF-κB system might induce a switch from damped to sustained oscillatory behaviour. Thus, we demonstrate how delay differential equations can be used to explicitly study the delay in biochemical negative feedback systems. Our analysis also provides insight into how time delay may tune biological signal-response patterns and control the systems behaviour. PMID:26995333

  5. Counterrotating prop-fan simulations which feature a relative-motion multiblock grid decomposition enabling arbitrary time-steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janus, J. Mark; Whitfield, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Improvements are presented of a computer algorithm developed for the time-accurate flow analysis of rotating machines. The flow model is a finite volume method utilizing a high-resolution approximate Riemann solver for interface flux definitions. The numerical scheme is a block LU implicit iterative-refinement method which possesses apparent unconditional stability. Multiblock composite gridding is used to orderly partition the field into a specified arrangement of blocks exhibiting varying degrees of similarity. Block-block relative motion is achieved using local grid distortion to reduce grid skewness and accommodate arbitrary time step selection. A general high-order numerical scheme is applied to satisfy the geometric conservation law. An even-blade-count counterrotating unducted fan configuration is chosen for a computational study comparing solutions resulting from altering parameters such as time step size and iteration count. The solutions are compared with measured data.

  6. Adaptive Output-Feedback Neural Control of Switched Uncertain Nonlinear Systems With Average Dwell Time.

    PubMed

    Long, Lijun; Zhao, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of adaptive neural tracking control via output-feedback for a class of switched uncertain nonlinear systems without the measurements of the system states. The unknown control signals are approximated directly by neural networks. A novel adaptive neural control technique for the problem studied is set up by exploiting the average dwell time method and backstepping. A switched filter and different update laws are designed to reduce the conservativeness caused by adoption of a common observer and a common update law for all subsystems. The proposed controllers of subsystems guarantee that all closed-loop signals remain bounded under a class of switching signals with average dwell time, while the output tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. As an application of the proposed design method, adaptive output feedback neural tracking controllers for a mass-spring-damper system are constructed. PMID:25122844

  7. A Time-Critical Adaptive Approach for Visualizing Natural Scenes on Different Devices

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Tianyang; Liu, Siyuan; Xia, Jiajia; Fan, Jing; Zhang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    To automatically adapt to various hardware and software environments on different devices, this paper presents a time-critical adaptive approach for visualizing natural scenes. In this method, a simplified expression of a tree model is used for different devices. The best rendering scheme is intelligently selected to generate a particular scene by estimating the rendering time of trees based on their visual importance. Therefore, this approach can ensure the reality of natural scenes while maintaining a constant frame rate for their interactive display. To verify its effectiveness and flexibility, this method is applied in different devices, such as a desktop computer, laptop, iPad and smart phone. Applications show that the method proposed in this paper can not only adapt to devices with different computing abilities and system resources very well but can also achieve rather good visual realism and a constant frame rate for natural scenes. PMID:25723177

  8. Adaptive Fuzzy Control of Strict-Feedback Nonlinear Time-Delay Systems With Unmodeled Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shen; Shi, Peng; Yang, Hongyan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, an approximated-based adaptive fuzzy control approach with only one adaptive parameter is presented for a class of single input single output strict-feedback nonlinear systems in order to deal with phenomena like nonlinear uncertainties, unmodeled dynamics, dynamic disturbances, and unknown time delays. Lyapunov-Krasovskii function approach is employed to compensate the unknown time delays in the design procedure. By combining the advances of the hyperbolic tangent function with adaptive fuzzy backstepping technique, the proposed controller guarantees the semi-globally uniformly ultimately boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system from the mean square point of view. Two simulation examples are finally provided to show the superior effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26302525

  9. A Neural Mechanism for Time-Window Separation Resolves Ambiguity of Adaptive Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, K. Jannis; Ronacher, Bernhard; Hennig, R. Matthias; Benda, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The senses of animals are confronted with changing environments and different contexts. Neural adaptation is one important tool to adjust sensitivity to varying intensity ranges. For instance, in a quiet night outdoors, our hearing is more sensitive than when we are confronted with the plurality of sounds in a large city during the day. However, adaptation also removes available information on absolute sound levels and may thus cause ambiguity. Experimental data on the trade-off between benefits and loss through adaptation is scarce and very few mechanisms have been proposed to resolve it. We present an example where adaptation is beneficial for one task—namely, the reliable encoding of the pattern of an acoustic signal—but detrimental for another—the localization of the same acoustic stimulus. With a combination of neurophysiological data, modeling, and behavioral tests, we show that adaptation in the periphery of the auditory pathway of grasshoppers enables intensity-invariant coding of amplitude modulations, but at the same time, degrades information available for sound localization. We demonstrate how focusing the response of localization neurons to the onset of relevant signals separates processing of localization and pattern information temporally. In this way, the ambiguity of adaptive coding can be circumvented and both absolute and relative levels can be processed using the same set of peripheral neurons. PMID:25761097

  10. A neural mechanism for time-window separation resolves ambiguity of adaptive coding.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, K Jannis; Ronacher, Bernhard; Hennig, R Matthias; Benda, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The senses of animals are confronted with changing environments and different contexts. Neural adaptation is one important tool to adjust sensitivity to varying intensity ranges. For instance, in a quiet night outdoors, our hearing is more sensitive than when we are confronted with the plurality of sounds in a large city during the day. However, adaptation also removes available information on absolute sound levels and may thus cause ambiguity. Experimental data on the trade-off between benefits and loss through adaptation is scarce and very few mechanisms have been proposed to resolve it. We present an example where adaptation is beneficial for one task--namely, the reliable encoding of the pattern of an acoustic signal-but detrimental for another--the localization of the same acoustic stimulus. With a combination of neurophysiological data, modeling, and behavioral tests, we show that adaptation in the periphery of the auditory pathway of grasshoppers enables intensity-invariant coding of amplitude modulations, but at the same time, degrades information available for sound localization. We demonstrate how focusing the response of localization neurons to the onset of relevant signals separates processing of localization and pattern information temporally. In this way, the ambiguity of adaptive coding can be circumvented and both absolute and relative levels can be processed using the same set of peripheral neurons. PMID:25761097

  11. Time-stepping methods for the simulation of the self-assembly of nano-crystals in MATLAB on a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzec, M. D.; Ahnert, T.

    2013-10-01

    Partial differential equations describing the patterning of thin crystalline films are typically of fourth or sixth order, they are quasi- or semilinear and they are mostly defined on simple geometries such as rectangular domains. For the numerical simulation of these kinds of problems spectral methods are an efficient approach. We apply several implicit-explicit schemes to one recently derived PDE that we express in terms of coefficients of trigonometric interpolants. While the simplest IMEX scheme turns out to have the mildest step-size restriction, higher order SBDF schemes tend to be more unstable and exponential time integrators are fastest for the calculation of very accurate solutions. We implemented a reduced model in the EXPINT package syntax [3] and compared various exponential schemes. A convexity splitting approach was employed to stabilize the SBDF1 scheme. We show that accuracy control is crucial when using this idea, therefore we present a time-adaptive SBDF1/SBDF1-2-step method that yields convincing results reflecting the change in timescales during topological changes of the nanostructures. The implementation of all presented methods is carried out in MATLAB. We used the open source GPUmat package to gain up to 5-fold runtime benefits by carrying out calculations on a low-cost GPU without having to prescribe any knowledge in low-level programming or CUDA implementations and found comparable speedups as with MATLAB's PCT or with GPUmat run on Octave.

  12. From Dinosaurs to Modern Bird Diversity: Extending the Time Scale of Adaptive Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Daniel; Morlon, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    What explains why some groups of organisms, like birds, are so species rich? And what explains their extraordinary ecological diversity, ranging from large, flightless birds to small migratory species that fly thousand of kilometers every year? These and similar questions have spurred great interest in adaptive radiation, the diversification of ecological traits in a rapidly speciating group of organisms. Although the initial formulation of modern concepts of adaptive radiation arose from consideration of the fossil record, rigorous attempts to identify adaptive radiation in the fossil record are still uncommon. Moreover, most studies of adaptive radiation concern groups that are less than 50 million years old. Thus, it is unclear how important adaptive radiation is over temporal scales that span much larger portions of the history of life. In this issue, Benson et al. test the idea of a “deep-time” adaptive radiation in dinosaurs, compiling and using one of the most comprehensive phylogenetic and body-size datasets for fossils. Using recent phylogenetic statistical methods, they find that in most clades of dinosaurs there is a strong signal of an “early burst” in body-size evolution, a predicted pattern of adaptive radiation in which rapid trait evolution happens early in a group's history and then slows down. They also find that body-size evolution did not slow down in the lineage leading to birds, hinting at why birds survived to the present day and diversified. This paper represents one of the most convincing attempts at understanding deep-time adaptive radiations. PMID:24802950

  13. Diversity and disparity through time in the adaptive radiation of Antarctic notothenioid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, M; Damerau, M; Hanel, R; Salzburger, W; Matschiner, M

    2015-01-01

    According to theory, adaptive radiation is triggered by ecological opportunity that can arise through the colonization of new habitats, the extinction of antagonists or the origin of key innovations. In the course of an adaptive radiation, diversification and morphological evolution are expected to slow down after an initial phase of rapid adaptation to vacant ecological niches, followed by speciation. Such ‘early bursts’ of diversification are thought to occur because niche space becomes increasingly filled over time. The diversification of Antarctic notothenioid fishes into over 120 species has become one of the prime examples of adaptive radiation in the marine realm and has likely been triggered by an evolutionary key innovation in the form of the emergence of antifreeze glycoproteins. Here, we test, using a novel time-calibrated phylogeny of 49 species and five traits that characterize notothenioid body size and shape as well as buoyancy adaptations and habitat preferences, whether the notothenioid adaptive radiation is compatible with an early burst scenario. Extensive Bayesian model comparison shows that phylogenetic age estimates are highly dependent on model choice and that models with unlinked gene trees are generally better supported and result in younger age estimates. We find strong evidence for elevated diversification rates in Antarctic notothenioids compared to outgroups, yet no sign of rate heterogeneity in the course of the radiation, except that the notothenioid family Artedidraconidae appears to show secondarily elevated diversification rates. We further observe an early burst in trophic morphology, suggesting that the notothenioid radiation proceeds in stages similar to other prominent examples of adaptive radiation. PMID:25495187

  14. Diversity and disparity through time in the adaptive radiation of Antarctic notothenioid fishes.

    PubMed

    Colombo, M; Damerau, M; Hanel, R; Salzburger, W; Matschiner, M

    2015-02-01

    According to theory, adaptive radiation is triggered by ecological opportunity that can arise through the colonization of new habitats, the extinction of antagonists or the origin of key innovations. In the course of an adaptive radiation, diversification and morphological evolution are expected to slow down after an initial phase of rapid adaptation to vacant ecological niches, followed by speciation. Such 'early bursts' of diversification are thought to occur because niche space becomes increasingly filled over time. The diversification of Antarctic notothenioid fishes into over 120 species has become one of the prime examples of adaptive radiation in the marine realm and has likely been triggered by an evolutionary key innovation in the form of the emergence of antifreeze glycoproteins. Here, we test, using a novel time-calibrated phylogeny of 49 species and five traits that characterize notothenioid body size and shape as well as buoyancy adaptations and habitat preferences, whether the notothenioid adaptive radiation is compatible with an early burst scenario. Extensive Bayesian model comparison shows that phylogenetic age estimates are highly dependent on model choice and that models with unlinked gene trees are generally better supported and result in younger age estimates. We find strong evidence for elevated diversification rates in Antarctic notothenioids compared to outgroups, yet no sign of rate heterogeneity in the course of the radiation, except that the notothenioid family Artedidraconidae appears to show secondarily elevated diversification rates. We further observe an early burst in trophic morphology, suggesting that the notothenioid radiation proceeds in stages similar to other prominent examples of adaptive radiation. PMID:25495187

  15. Stable Collocated-grid Finite Difference Seismic Wave Modeling Using Discontinuous Grids with Locally Variable Time Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    It is widely accepted that they are oversampled in spatial grid spacing and temporal time step in the high speed medium if uniform grids are used for the numerical simulation. This oversampled grid spacing and time step will lower the efficiency of the calculation, especially high velocity contrast exists. Based on the collocated-grid finite-difference method (FDM), we present an algorithm of spatial discontinuous grid, with localized grid blocks and locally varying time steps, which will increase the efficiency of simulation of seismic wave propagation and earthquake strong ground motion. According to the velocity structure, we discretize the model into discontinuous grid blocks, and the time step of each block is determined according to the local stability. The key problem of the discontinuous grid method is the connection between grid blocks with different grid spacing. We use a transitional area overlapped by both of the finer and the coarser grids to deal with the problem. In the transitional area, the values of finer ghost points are obtained by interpolation from the coarser grid in space and time domain, while the values of coarser ghost points are obtained by downsampling from the finer grid. How to deal with coarser ghost points can influent the stability of long time simulation. After testing different downsampling methods and finally we choose the Gaussian filtering. Basically, 4th order Rung-Kutta scheme will be used for the time integral for our numerical method. For our discontinuous grid FDM, discontinuous time steps for the coarser and the finer grids will be used to increase the simulation efficiency. Numerical tests indicate that our method can provide a stable solution even for the long time simulation without any additional filtration for grid spacing ratio n=2. And for larger grid spacing ratio, Gaussian filtration could be used to preserve the stability. With the collocated-grid FDM, which is flexible and accurate in implementation of free

  16. Adaptive dynamic programming for finite-horizon optimal control of discrete-time nonlinear systems with ε-error bound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-Yue; Jin, Ning; Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the finite-horizon optimal control problem for discrete-time nonlinear systems using the adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) approach. The idea is to use an iterative ADP algorithm to obtain the optimal control law which makes the performance index function close to the greatest lower bound of all performance indices within an ε-error bound. The optimal number of control steps can also be obtained by the proposed ADP algorithms. A convergence analysis of the proposed ADP algorithms in terms of performance index function and control policy is made. In order to facilitate the implementation of the iterative ADP algorithms, neural networks are used for approximating the performance index function, computing the optimal control policy, and modeling the nonlinear system. Finally, two simulation examples are employed to illustrate the applicability of the proposed method. PMID:20876014

  17. Genomic Evidence of Rapid and Stable Adaptive Oscillations over Seasonal Time Scales in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bergland, Alan O.; Behrman, Emily L.; O'Brien, Katherine R.; Schmidt, Paul S.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    In many species, genomic data have revealed pervasive adaptive evolution indicated by the fixation of beneficial alleles. However, when selection pressures are highly variable along a species' range or through time adaptive alleles may persist at intermediate frequencies for long periods. So called “balanced polymorphisms” have long been understood to be an important component of standing genetic variation, yet direct evidence of the strength of balancing selection and the stability and prevalence of balanced polymorphisms has remained elusive. We hypothesized that environmental fluctuations among seasons in a North American orchard would impose temporally variable selection on Drosophila melanogaster that would drive repeatable adaptive oscillations at balanced polymorphisms. We identified hundreds of polymorphisms whose frequency oscillates among seasons and argue that these loci are subject to strong, temporally variable selection. We show that these polymorphisms respond to acute and persistent changes in climate and are associated in predictable ways with seasonally variable phenotypes. In addition, our results suggest that adaptively oscillating polymorphisms are likely millions of years old, with some possibly predating the divergence between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Taken together, our results are consistent with a model of balancing selection wherein rapid temporal fluctuations in climate over generational time promotes adaptive genetic diversity at loci underlying polygenic variation in fitness related phenotypes. PMID:25375361

  18. A highly adjustable magnetorheological elastomer base isolator for applications of real-time adaptive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun; Tian, Tongfei; Li, Weihua

    2013-09-01

    Inspired by its controllable and field-dependent stiffness/damping properties, there has been increasing research and development of magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) for mitigation of unwanted structural or machinery vibrations using MRE isolators or absorbers. Recently, a breakthrough pilot research on the development of a highly innovative prototype adaptive MRE base isolator, with the ability for real-time adaptive control of base isolated structures against various types of earthquakes including near- or far-fault earthquakes, has been reported by the authors. As a further effort to improve the proposed MRE adaptive base isolator and to address some of the shortcomings and challenges, this paper presents systematic investigations on the development of a new highly adjustable MRE base isolator, including experimental testing and characterization of the new isolator. A soft MR elastomer has been designed, fabricated and incorporated in the laminated structure of the new MRE base isolator, which aims to obtain a highly adjustable shear modulus under a medium level of magnetic field. Comprehensive static and dynamic testing was conducted on this new adaptive MRE base isolator to examine its characteristics and evaluate its performance. The experimental results show that this new MRE base isolator can remarkably change the lateral stiffness of the isolator up to 1630% under a medium level of magnetic field. Such highly adjustable MRE base isolator makes the design and implementation of truly real-time adaptive (e.g. semi-active or smart passive) seismic isolation systems become feasible.

  19. Future Time Perspective as a Predictor of Adolescents' Adaptive Behavior in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Renato Gil Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Future time perspective (FTP) has been associated with positive outcomes in adolescents' development across different contexts. However, the extent to which FTP influences adaptation needs additional understanding. In this study, we analysed the relationship between FTP and adolescents' behavior in school, as expressed in several indicators of…

  20. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  1. Features: Real-Time Adaptive Feature and Document Learning for Web Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zhixiang; Meng, Xiannong; Fowler, Richard H.; Zhu, Binhai

    2001-01-01

    Describes Features, an intelligent Web search engine that is able to perform real-time adaptive feature (i.e., keyword) and document learning. Explains how Features learns from users' document relevance feedback and automatically extracts and suggests indexing keywords relevant to a search query, and learns from users' keyword relevance feedback…

  2. Consequences of Part-Time Work on the Academic and Psychosocial Adaptation of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumont, Michelle; Leclerc, Danielle; McKinnon, Suzie

    2009-01-01

    Part-time work is becoming a common fact of life for high school students. Furthermore, its short and intermediate term impacts on the academic and psychosocial adaptation of students between the middle and end of high school are fairly unknown. To compensate for this lack of information, students in Grades 9 and 11 were consulted and asked to…

  3. Multi-channel holographic birfurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Diep, J.; Huang, K.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on multi-channel holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive Earth Observing System (EOS) data analysis are presented. The objective is to research and develop an optical bifurcating neuromorphic pattern recognition system for making optical data array comparisons and to evaluate the use of the system for EOS data classification, reduction, analysis, and other applications.

  4. Asynchrony adaptation reveals neural population code for audio-visual timing

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Neil W.; Heron, James; Whitaker, David; McGraw, Paul V.

    2011-01-01

    The relative timing of auditory and visual stimuli is a critical cue for determining whether sensory signals relate to a common source and for making inferences about causality. However, the way in which the brain represents temporal relationships remains poorly understood. Recent studies indicate that our perception of multisensory timing is flexible—adaptation to a regular inter-modal delay alters the point at which subsequent stimuli are judged to be simultaneous. Here, we measure the effect of audio-visual asynchrony adaptation on the perception of a wide range of sub-second temporal relationships. We find distinctive patterns of induced biases that are inconsistent with the previous explanations based on changes in perceptual latency. Instead, our results can be well accounted for by a neural population coding model in which: (i) relative audio-visual timing is represented by the distributed activity across a relatively small number of neurons tuned to different delays; (ii) the algorithm for reading out this population code is efficient, but subject to biases owing to under-sampling; and (iii) the effect of adaptation is to modify neuronal response gain. These results suggest that multisensory timing information is represented by a dedicated population code and that shifts in perceived simultaneity following asynchrony adaptation arise from analogous neural processes to well-known perceptual after-effects. PMID:20961905

  5. PHOEBE - step by step manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.

    2016-03-01

    An easy step-by-step manual of PHOEBE is presented. It should serve as a starting point for the first time users of PHOEBE analyzing the eclipsing binary light curve. It is demonstrated on one particular detached system also with the downloadable data and the whole procedure is described easily till the final trustworthy fit is being reached.

  6. Convergence of a class of semi-implicit time-stepping schemes for nonsmooth rigid multibody dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrea, B. I.; Anitescu, M.; Potra, F. A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Pennsylvania; Univ. of Maryland

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present a framework for the convergence analysis in a measure differential inclusion sense of a class of time-stepping schemes for multibody dynamics with contacts, joints, and friction. This class of methods solves one linear complementarity problem per step and contains the semi-implicit Euler method, as well as trapezoidal-like methods for which second-order convergence was recently proved under certain conditions. By using the concept of a reduced friction cone, the analysis includes, for the first time, a convergence result for the case that includes joints. An unexpected intermediary result is that we are able to define a discrete velocity function of bounded variation, although the natural discrete velocity function produced by our algorithm may have unbounded variation.

  7. Adaptive Network Dynamics - Modeling and Control of Time-Dependent Social Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Shaw, Leah B.; Shkarayev, Maxim S.

    2013-01-01

    Real networks consisting of social contacts do not possess static connections. That is, social connections may be time dependent due to a variety of individual behavioral decisions based on current network connections. Examples of adaptive networks occur in epidemics, where information about infectious individuals may change the rewiring of healthy people, or in the recruitment of individuals to a cause or fad, where rewiring may optimize recruitment of susceptible individuals. In this paper, we will review some of the dynamical properties of adaptive networks, and show how they predict novel phenomena as well as yield insight into new controls. The applications will be control of epidemic outbreaks and terrorist recruitment modeling. PMID:25414913

  8. Adaptive Synchronization of Memristor-Based Neural Networks with Time-Varying Delays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Yin, Quan; Zhang, Guodong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, adaptive synchronization of memristor-based neural networks (MNNs) with time-varying delays is investigated. The dynamical analysis here employs results from the theory of differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides as introduced by Filippov. Sufficient conditions for the global synchronization of MNNs are established with a general adaptive controller. The update gain of the controller can be adjusted to control the synchronization speed. The obtained results complement and improve the previously known results. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. PMID:25389244

  9. Review of RT-LAB and Steps Involved for Implementation of a Simulink Model from MATLAB to REAL-TIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkili, Suresh; Panda, Anup Kumar

    2013-11-01

    In recent days, every researcher wants to develop his/her model in real-time. Simulation tools have been widely used for the design and improvement of electrical systems since the mid-twentieth century. The evolution of simulation tools has progressed in step with the evolution of computing technologies. Now a days, computing technologies have improved dramatically in performance and become widely available at a steadily decreasing cost. Consequently, simulation tools have also seen dramatic performance gains and steady cost decreases. Researchers and engineers now have access to affordable, high-performance simulation tools that were previously too cost prohibitive, except for the largest manufacturers and utilities.This article has introduced a specific class of digital simulator known as a real-time simulator by answering the questions "What is real-time simulation?" "Why is it needed" and "How it works". The latest trend in real-time simulation consists of exporting simulation models to FPGA. In this article, the steps involved for implementation of a model from MATLAB to REAL-TIME are provided in detail. The detailed real-time results are presented to support the feasibility of real-time digital simulator.

  10. High resolution frequency to time domain transformations applied to the stepped carrier MRIS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardalan, Sasan H.

    1992-01-01

    Two narrow-band radar systems are developed for high resolution target range estimation in inhomogeneous media. They are reformulations of two presently existing systems such that high resolution target range estimates may be achieved despite the use of narrow bandwidth radar pulses. A double sideband suppressed carrier radar technique originally derived in 1962, and later abandoned due to its inability to accurately measure target range in the presence of an interfering reflection, is rederived to incorporate the presence of an interfering reflection. The new derivation shows that the interfering reflection causes a period perturbation in the measured phase response. A high resolution spectral estimation technique is used to extract the period of this perturbation leading to accurate target range estimates independent of the signal-to-interference ratio. A non-linear optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for a frequency-stepped continuous wave radar system. The resolution enhancement offered by optimal signal processing of the data over the conventional Fourier Transform technique is clearly demonstrated using measured radar data. A method for modeling plane wave propagation in inhomogeneous media based on transmission line theory is derived and studied. Several simulation results including measurement of non-uniform electron plasma densities that develop near the heat tiles of a space re-entry vehicle are presented which verify the validity of the model.

  11. Spectral (600-1050 nm) time exposures (99.6 μs) of a lightning stepped leader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Tom A.; Orville, Richard E.; Marshall, J. L.; Huggins, Kyle

    2011-06-01

    A cloud-to-ground lightning stepped leader has been recorded with a slitless spectrograph at a recording rate of 10,000 images per second at a distance of 0.6 km. Five sequential images of the leader spectra were recorded with an exposure (integration) time of 99.6 μs each over a spectral range from 600 to 1050 nm. These are the first stepped leader spectra covering the range 600 to 1050 nm. The last three spectra, obtained immediately before the return stroke, were analyzed at an altitude of between 108 and 122 m above a struck vehicle. The spectral emissions in the near infrared are dominated by neutral nitrogen and oxygen emissions, and Hα, with only a few emission lines from singly ionized nitrogen. A singly ionized nitrogen line at 661.1 nm is present in the first analyzed image, but not in the two subsequent images at the same height, which suggests a cooling of the channel. The emissions are integrated over a 99.6 μs exposure time and therefore show no evidence of stepping. The ensuing negative return stroke was detected by the National Lightning Detection Network and had an estimated peak current of -15.2 kA. One subsequent stroke was outside the field of view of the spectrograph. The flash occurred on 11 September 2009 near New Underwood, South Dakota, and the exact location of the first stroke is known because it struck a car traveling on Interstate 90. The stepped leader two-dimensional speed increased in the last four steps from 1.53 × 105 to 2.42 × 105 m/s with an average of 2.03 × 105 m/s.

  12. A low-dimensional, time-resolved and adapting model neuron.

    PubMed

    Cartling, B

    1996-07-01

    A low-dimensional, time-resolved and adapting model neuron is formulated and evaluated. The model is an extension of the integrate-and-fire type of model with respect to adaptation and of a recent adapting firing-rate model with respect to time-resolution. It is obtained from detailed conductance-based models by a separation of fast and slow ionic processes of action potential generation. The model explicitly includes firing-rate regulation via the slow afterhyperpolarization phase of action potentials, which is controlled by calcium-sensitive potassium channels. It is demonstrated that the model closely reproduces the firing pattern and excitability behaviour of a detailed multicompartment conductance-based model of a neocortical pyramidal cell. The inclusion of adaptation in a model neuron is important for its capability to generate complex dynamics of networks of interconnected neurons. The time-resolution is required for studies of systems in which the temporal aspects of neural coding are important. The simplicity of the model facilitates analytical studies, insight into neurocomputational mechanisms and simulations of large-scale systems. The capability to generate complex network computations may also make the model useful in practical applications of artificial neural networks. PMID:8891839

  13. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  14. Hierarchical Adaptive Means (HAM) clustering for hardware-efficient, unsupervised and real-time spike sorting.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulou, Sivylla E; Wu, Di; Eftekhar, Amir; Constandinou, Timothy G

    2014-09-30

    This work presents a novel unsupervised algorithm for real-time adaptive clustering of neural spike data (spike sorting). The proposed Hierarchical Adaptive Means (HAM) clustering method combines centroid-based clustering with hierarchical cluster connectivity to classify incoming spikes using groups of clusters. It is described how the proposed method can adaptively track the incoming spike data without requiring any past history, iteration or training and autonomously determines the number of spike classes. Its performance (classification accuracy) has been tested using multiple datasets (both simulated and recorded) achieving a near-identical accuracy compared to k-means (using 10-iterations and provided with the number of spike classes). Also, its robustness in applying to different feature extraction methods has been demonstrated by achieving classification accuracies above 80% across multiple datasets. Last but crucially, its low complexity, that has been quantified through both memory and computation requirements makes this method hugely attractive for future hardware implementation. PMID:25035965

  15. A dosimetric comparison of real-time adaptive and non-adaptive radiotherapy: A multi-institutional study encompassing robotic, gimbaled, multileaf collimator and couch tracking

    PubMed Central

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy; Nill, Simeon; Fast, Martin; Bedford, James; Oelfke, Uwe; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Poulsen, Per; Worm, Esben; Hansen, Rune; Ravkilde, Thomas; Scherman Rydhög, Jonas; Pommer, Tobias; Munck af Rosenschold, Per; Lang, Stephanie; Guckenberger, Matthias; Groh, Christian; Herrmann, Christian; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Wang, Lei; Hadsell, Michael; Sothmann, Thilo; Blanck, Oliver; Keall, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A study of real-time adaptive radiotherapy systems was performed to test the hypothesis that, across delivery systems and institutions, the dosimetric accuracy is improved with adaptive treatments over non-adaptive radiotherapy in the presence of patient-measured tumor motion. Methods and materials Ten institutions with robotic(2), gimbaled(2), MLC(4) or couch tracking(2) used common materials including CT and structure sets, motion traces and planning protocols to create a lung and a prostate plan. For each motion trace, the plan was delivered twice to a moving dosimeter; with and without real-time adaptation. Each measurement was compared to a static measurement and the percentage of failed points for γ-tests recorded. Results For all lung traces all measurement sets show improved dose accuracy with a mean 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate of 1.6% with adaptation and 15.2% without adaptation (p < 0.001). For all prostate the mean 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate was 1.4% with adaptation and 17.3% without adaptation (p < 0.001). The difference between the four systems was small with an average 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate of <3% for all systems with adaptation for lung and prostate. Conclusions The investigated systems all accounted for realistic tumor motion accurately and performed to a similar high standard, with real-time adaptation significantly outperforming non-adaptive delivery methods. PMID:27016171

  16. Digital timing recovery combined with adaptive equalization for optical coherent receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xian; Chen, Xue; Zhou, Weiqing; Fan, Yangyang; Zhu, Hai; Li, Zhiyu

    2009-11-01

    We propose a novel equalization and timing recovery scheme, which adds an adaptive butterfly-structured equalizer in an all-digital timing recovery loop, for polarization multiplexing (POLMUX) coherent receivers. It resolves an incompatible problem that digital equalizer requires the timing recovered (synchronous) signal and Gardner timing-error detection algorithm requires the equalized signal because of its small tolerance on dispersion. This joint module can complete synchronization, equalization and polarization de-multiplexing simultaneously without any extra computational cost. Finally, we demonstrate the good performance of the new scheme in a 112-Gbit/s POLMUX-NRZ-DQPSK digital optical coherent receiver.

  17. Finite time step and spatial grid effects in δf simulation of warm plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturdevant, Benjamin J.; Parker, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a technique for analyzing time integration methods used with the particle weight equations in δf method particle-in-cell (PIC) schemes. The analysis applies to the simulation of warm, uniform, periodic or infinite plasmas in the linear regime and considers the collective behavior similar to the analysis performed by Langdon for full-f PIC schemes [1,2]. We perform both a time integration analysis and spatial grid analysis for a kinetic ion, adiabatic electron model of ion acoustic waves. An implicit time integration scheme is studied in detail for δf simulations using our weight equation analysis and for full-f simulations using the method of Langdon. It is found that the δf method exhibits a CFL-like stability condition for low temperature ions, which is independent of the parameter characterizing the implicitness of the scheme. The accuracy of the real frequency and damping rate due to the discrete time and spatial schemes is also derived using a perturbative method. The theoretical analysis of numerical error presented here may be useful for the verification of simulations and for providing intuition for the design of new implicit time integration schemes for the δf method, as well as understanding differences between δf and full-f approaches to plasma simulation.

  18. Automatic Adaptation to Fast Input Changes in a Time-Invariant Neural Circuit.

    PubMed

    Bharioke, Arjun; Chklovskii, Dmitri B

    2015-08-01

    Neurons must faithfully encode signals that can vary over many orders of magnitude despite having only limited dynamic ranges. For a correlated signal, this dynamic range constraint can be relieved by subtracting away components of the signal that can be predicted from the past, a strategy known as predictive coding, that relies on learning the input statistics. However, the statistics of input natural signals can also vary over very short time scales e.g., following saccades across a visual scene. To maintain a reduced transmission cost to signals with rapidly varying statistics, neuronal circuits implementing predictive coding must also rapidly adapt their properties. Experimentally, in different sensory modalities, sensory neurons have shown such adaptations within 100 ms of an input change. Here, we show first that linear neurons connected in a feedback inhibitory circuit can implement predictive coding. We then show that adding a rectification nonlinearity to such a feedback inhibitory circuit allows it to automatically adapt and approximate the performance of an optimal linear predictive coding network, over a wide range of inputs, while keeping its underlying temporal and synaptic properties unchanged. We demonstrate that the resulting changes to the linearized temporal filters of this nonlinear network match the fast adaptations observed experimentally in different sensory modalities, in different vertebrate species. Therefore, the nonlinear feedback inhibitory network can provide automatic adaptation to fast varying signals, maintaining the dynamic range necessary for accurate neuronal transmission of natural inputs. PMID:26247884

  19. Parallel machine scheduling with step-deteriorating jobs and setup times by a hybrid discrete cuckoo search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng; Cheng, Wenming; Wang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    This article considers the parallel machine scheduling problem with step-deteriorating jobs and sequence-dependent setup times. The objective is to minimize the total tardiness by determining the allocation and sequence of jobs on identical parallel machines. In this problem, the processing time of each job is a step function dependent upon its starting time. An individual extended time is penalized when the starting time of a job is later than a specific deterioration date. The possibility of deterioration of a job makes the parallel machine scheduling problem more challenging than ordinary ones. A mixed integer programming model for the optimal solution is derived. Due to its NP-hard nature, a hybrid discrete cuckoo search algorithm is proposed to solve this problem. In order to generate a good initial swarm, a modified Biskup-Hermann-Gupta (BHG) heuristic called MBHG is incorporated into the population initialization. Several discrete operators are proposed in the random walk of Lévy flights and the crossover search. Moreover, a local search procedure based on variable neighbourhood descent is integrated into the algorithm as a hybrid strategy in order to improve the quality of elite solutions. Computational experiments are executed on two sets of randomly generated test instances. The results show that the proposed hybrid algorithm can yield better solutions in comparison with the commercial solver CPLEX® with a one hour time limit, the discrete cuckoo search algorithm and the existing variable neighbourhood search algorithm.

  20. “So We Adapt Step by Step”: Acculturation Experiences Affecting Diabetes Management and Perceived Health for Chinese American Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kevin M.; Chesla, Catherine A.; Kwan, Christine M.L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how acculturation affects type 2 diabetes management and perceived health for Chinese American immigrants in the U.S. Acculturation experiences or cultural adaptation experiences affecting diabetes management and health were solicited from an informant group of immigrant patients and their spouses (N=40) during group, couple and individual interviews conducted in 2005 to 2008. A separate respondent group of immigrant patients and their spouses (N=19) meeting inclusion criteria reviewed and confirmed themes generated by the informant group. Using interpretive phenomenology, three key themes in patients’ and spouses’ acculturation experiences were identified: a) utilizing health care, b) maintaining family relations and roles, and c) establishing community ties and groundedness in the U.S. Acculturation experiences reflecting these themes were broad in scope and not fully captured by current self-report and proxy acculturation measures. In the current study, shifting family roles and evaluations of diabetes care and physical environment in the U.S. significantly affected diabetes management and health, yet are overlooked in acculturation and health investigations. Furthermore, the salience and impact of specific acculturation experiences respective to diabetes management and perceived health varied across participants due to individual, family, developmental, and environmental factors. In regards to salience, maintaining filial and interdependent family relations in the U.S. was of particular concern for older participants and coping with inadequate health insurance in the U.S. was especially distressing for self-described lower-middle to middle-class participants. In terms of impact, family separation and relocating to ethnically similar neighborhoods in the U.S. differentially affected diabetes management and health due to participants’ varied family relations and pre-migration family support levels and diverse cultural and linguistic

  1. A new adaptive exponential smoothing method for non-stationary time series with level shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Mohammad Ali Saniee; Ghandali, Razieh; Esmaeili, Maryam

    2014-07-01

    Simple exponential smoothing (SES) methods are the most commonly used methods in forecasting and time series analysis. However, they are generally insensitive to non-stationary structural events such as level shifts, ramp shifts, and spikes or impulses. Similar to that of outliers in stationary time series, these non-stationary events will lead to increased level of errors in the forecasting process. This paper generalizes the SES method into a new adaptive method called revised simple exponential smoothing (RSES), as an alternative method to recognize non-stationary level shifts in the time series. We show that the new method improves the accuracy of the forecasting process. This is done by controlling the number of observations and the smoothing parameter in an adaptive approach, and in accordance with the laws of statistical control limits and the Bayes rule of conditioning. We use a numerical example to show how the new RSES method outperforms its traditional counterpart, SES.

  2. A New Approach to Interference Excision in Radio Astronomy: Real-Time Adaptive Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnbaum, Cecilia; Bradley, Richard F.

    1998-11-01

    Every year, an increasing amount of radio-frequency (RF) spectrum in the VHF, UHF, and microwave bands is being utilized to support new commercial and military ventures, and all have the potential to interfere with radio astronomy observations. Such services already cause problems for radio astronomy even in very remote observing sites, and the potential for this form of light pollution to grow is alarming. Preventive measures to eliminate interference through FCC legislation and ITU agreements can be effective; however, many times this approach is inadequate and interference excision at the receiver is necessary. Conventional techniques such as RF filters, RF shielding, and postprocessing of data have been only somewhat successful, but none has been sufficient. Adaptive interference cancellation is a real-time approach to interference excision that has not been used before in radio astronomy. We describe here, for the first time, adaptive interference cancellation in the context of radio astronomy instrumentation, and we present initial results for our prototype receiver. In the 1960s, analog adaptive interference cancelers were developed that obtain a high degree of cancellation in problems of radio communications and radar. However, analog systems lack the dynamic range, noised performance, and versatility required by radio astronomy. The concept of digital adaptive interference cancellation was introduced in the mid-1960s as a way to reduce unwanted noise in low-frequency (audio) systems. Examples of such systems include the canceling of maternal ECG in fetal electrocardiography and the reduction of engine noise in the passenger compartments of automobiles. These audio-frequency applications require bandwidths of only a few tens of kilohertz. Only recently has high-speed digital filter technology made high dynamic range adaptive canceling possible in a bandwidth as large as a few megahertz, finally opening the door to application in radio astronomy. We have

  3. Steps toward an Empirical Evaluation of Robust Regression Applied to Reaction-Time Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Saul; And Others

    Because analyses of reaction-time data are sensitive to aberrant observations and violations of statistical assumptions, a new approach is suggested. In this empirical approach, one applies the same criteria to the problem of selecting a statistical method as one uses to select among alternative experimental procedures. Six criteria are presented…

  4. Seasonal signal capturing in time series of up coordinates by means of adaptive filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalvac, S.; Ustun, A.

    2013-12-01

    Digital filters, is a system that performs mathematical operations on a sampled or discrete time signals. Adaptive filters designed for noise canceling are capable tools of decomposing correlated parts of data sets. This kind of filters which optimize itself using Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm is a powerful tool for understand the truth hidden into the complex data sets like time series in Geosciences. The complex data sets such as CGPS (Continuously operating reference station) station's time series can be understood better with adaptive noise canceling by means of decompose coherent (seasonal effect, tectonic plate motion) and incoherent (noise; site-specific effects) parts of data. In this study, it is aimed to model the subsidence caused by groundwater withdrawal based on the seasonal correlation between consecutive years of CGPS time series. For this purpose, two stations where located into subsidence area of 3 year time series have analyzed with adaptive noise canceling filter. According to the results, the annual movement of these two stations have strong relationship. Also, subsidence behavior are correlated with annual rainfall data. BELD station one year filtered movement KAMN station one year filtered movements

  5. Adaptive sliding mode back-stepping pitch angle control of a variable-displacement pump controlled pitch system for wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiu-xing; Lin, Yong-gang; Li, Wei; Liu, Hong-wei; Gu, Ya-jing

    2015-09-01

    A variable-displacement pump controlled pitch system is proposed to mitigate generator power and flap-wise load fluctuations for wind turbines. The pitch system mainly consists of a variable-displacement hydraulic pump, a fixed-displacement hydraulic motor and a gear set. The hydraulic motor can be accurately regulated by controlling the pump displacement and fluid flows to change the pitch angle through the gear set. The detailed mathematical representation and dynamic characteristics of the proposed pitch system are thoroughly analyzed. An adaptive sliding mode pump displacement controller and a back-stepping stroke piston controller are designed for the proposed pitch system such that the resulting pitch angle tracks its desired value regardless of external disturbances and uncertainties. The effectiveness and control efficiency of the proposed pitch system and controllers have been verified by using realistic dataset of a 750 kW research wind turbine. PMID:26303957

  6. Evolution of time-keeping mechanisms: early emergence and adaptation to photoperiod

    PubMed Central

    Hut, R. A.; Beersma, D. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Virtually all species have developed cellular oscillations and mechanisms that synchronize these cellular oscillations to environmental cycles. Such environmental cycles in biotic (e.g. food availability and predation risk) or abiotic (e.g. temperature and light) factors may occur on a daily, annual or tidal time scale. Internal timing mechanisms may facilitate behavioural or physiological adaptation to such changes in environmental conditions. These timing mechanisms commonly involve an internal molecular oscillator (a ‘clock’) that is synchronized (‘entrained’) to the environmental cycle by receptor mechanisms responding to relevant environmental signals (‘Zeitgeber’, i.e. German for time-giver). To understand the evolution of such timing mechanisms, we have to understand the mechanisms leading to selective advantage. Although major advances have been made in our understanding of the physiological and molecular mechanisms driving internal cycles (proximate questions), studies identifying mechanisms of natural selection on clock systems (ultimate questions) are rather limited. Here, we discuss the selective advantage of a circadian system and how its adaptation to day length variation may have a functional role in optimizing seasonal timing. We discuss various cases where selective advantages of circadian timing mechanisms have been shown and cases where temporarily loss of circadian timing may cause selective advantage. We suggest an explanation for why a circadian timing system has emerged in primitive life forms like cyanobacteria and we evaluate a possible molecular mechanism that enabled these bacteria to adapt to seasonal variation in day length. We further discuss how the role of the circadian system in photoperiodic time measurement may explain differential selection pressures on circadian period when species are exposed to changing climatic conditions (e.g. global warming) or when they expand their geographical range to different latitudes or

  7. Online adaptive optimal control for continuous-time nonlinear systems with completely unknown dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yongfeng; Na, Jing; Yang, Qinmin; Wu, Xing; Guo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    An online adaptive optimal control is proposed for continuous-time nonlinear systems with completely unknown dynamics, which is achieved by developing a novel identifier-critic-based approximate dynamic programming algorithm with a dual neural network (NN) approximation structure. First, an adaptive NN identifier is designed to obviate the requirement of complete knowledge of system dynamics, and a critic NN is employed to approximate the optimal value function. Then, the optimal control law is computed based on the information from the identifier NN and the critic NN, so that the actor NN is not needed. In particular, a novel adaptive law design method with the parameter estimation error is proposed to online update the weights of both identifier NN and critic NN simultaneously, which converge to small neighbourhoods around their ideal values. The closed-loop system stability and the convergence to small vicinity around the optimal solution are all proved by means of the Lyapunov theory. The proposed adaptation algorithm is also improved to achieve finite-time convergence of the NN weights. Finally, simulation results are provided to exemplify the efficacy of the proposed methods.

  8. Leap Frog and Time Step Sub-Cycle Scheme for Coupled Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulic Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.

    2002-07-01

    As the result of the advancing TCP/IP based inter-process communication technology, more and more legacy thermal-hydraulic codes have been coupled with neutronics codes to provide best-estimate capabilities for reactivity related reactor transient analysis. Most of the coupling schemes are based on closely coupled serial or parallel approaches. Therefore, the execution of the coupled codes usually requires significant CPU time, when a complicated system is analyzed. Leap Frog scheme has been used to reduce the run time. The extent of the decoupling is usually determined based on a trial and error process for a specific analysis. It is the intent of this paper to develop a set of general criteria, which can be used to invoke the automatic Leap Frog algorithm. The algorithm will not only provide the run time reduction but also preserve the accuracy. The criteria will also serve as the base of an automatic time step sub-cycle scheme when a sudden reactivity change is introduced and the thermal-hydraulic code is marching with a relatively large time step. (authors)

  9. Development of a protocol to quantify local bone adaptation over space and time: Quantification of reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongtao; Boudiffa, Maya; Dall'Ara, Enrico; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-07-01

    In vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) scanning of small rodents is a powerful method for longitudinal monitoring of bone adaptation. However, the life-time bone growth in small rodents makes it a challenge to quantify local bone adaptation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol, which can take into account large bone growth, to quantify local bone adaptations over space and time. The entire right tibiae of eight 14-week-old C57BL/6J female mice were consecutively scanned four times in an in vivo µCT scanner using a nominal isotropic image voxel size of 10.4µm. The repeated scan image datasets were aligned to the corresponding baseline (first) scan image dataset using rigid registration. 80% of tibia length (starting from the endpoint of the proximal growth plate) was selected as the volume of interest and partitioned into 40 regions along the tibial long axis (10 divisions) and in the cross-section (4 sectors). The bone mineral content (BMC) was used to quantify bone adaptation and was calculated in each region. All local BMCs have precision errors (PE%CV) of less than 3.5% (24 out of 40 regions have PE%CV of less than 2%), least significant changes (LSCs) of less than 3.8%, and 38 out of 40 regions have intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of over 0.8. The proposed protocol allows to quantify local bone adaptations over an entire tibia in longitudinal studies, with a high reproducibility, an essential requirement to reduce the number of animals to achieve the necessary statistical power. PMID:27262181

  10. Paper Laser: a step towards a time scale generation from an ensemble of optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C. A.; de Carlos, E.; Lopez, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a simple and innovative technique to combine n optical frequencies with the aim to produce a virtual laser with superior metrological characteristics is introduced. The algorithms to combine a number of clocks to produce a virtual clock, which is also referred as paper clock, are well known. An example of this is the statistical generation of the UTC time scale by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) using a recursive algorithm (ALGOS). A similar algorithm to combine n optical frequencies, all of them with same nominal value, to produce a “paper laser” whose frequency is known through its difference with respect to the optical frequencies of the ensemble is proposed here. As a demonstration of this, three optical frequencies stabilized to the D2 Cs-133 line, all of them with similar frequency stability were experimentally combined. A paper laser has been produced during hours whose frequency stability is about 3-1/2 times with respect to the original optical frequencies. This technique can be applied to combine ultra-stable optical frequencies to produce a paper laser that can be materialized by correcting one of the real optical frequencies of the ensemble. The robustness and stability of a paper laser is very attractive to produce a time scale from its operation.

  11. Accelerometer data requirements for reliable estimation of habitual physical activity and sedentary time of children during the early years - a worked example following a stepped approach.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Daniel D; Costa, Silvia; Clemes, Stacy A; Routen, Ash C; Moore, Helen J; Barber, Sally E

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a worked example of a stepped process to reliably estimate the habitual physical activity and sedentary time of a sample of young children. A total of 299 children (2.9 ± 0.6 years) were recruited. Outcome variables were daily minutes of total physical activity, sedentary time, moderate to vigorous physical activity and proportional values of each variable. In total, 282 (94%) provided 3 h of accelerometer data on ≥1 day and were included in a 6-step process: Step-1: determine minimum wear-time; Step-2: process 7-day-data; Step-3: determine the inclusion of a weekend day; Step-4: examine day-to-day variability; Step-5: calculate single day intraclass correlation (ICC) (2,1); Step-6: calculate number of days required to reach reliability. Following the process the results were, Step-1: 6 h was estimated as minimum wear-time of a standard day. Step-2: 98 (32%) children had ≥6 h wear on 7 days. Step-3: no differences were found between weekdays and weekend days (P ≥ 0.05). Step-4: no differences were found between day-to-day variability (P ≥ 0.05). Step-5: single day ICC's (2,1) ranged from 0.48 (total physical activity and sedentary time) to 0.53 (proportion of moderate to vigorous physical activity). Step-6: to reach reliability (ICC = 0.7), 3 days were required for all outcomes. In conclusion following a 7 day wear protocol, ≥6 h on any 3 days was found to have acceptable reliability. The stepped-process offers researchers a method to derive sample-specific wear-time criterion. PMID:26920123

  12. Adaptive correction method for an OCXO and investigation of analytical cumulative time error upper bound.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Kunz, Thomas; Schwartz, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Traditional oscillators used in timing modules of CDMA and WiMAX base stations are large and expensive. Applying cheaper and smaller, albeit more inaccurate, oscillators in timing modules is an interesting research challenge. An adaptive control algorithm is presented to enhance the oscillators to meet the requirements of base stations during holdover mode. An oscillator frequency stability model is developed for the adaptive control algorithm. This model takes into account the control loop which creates the correction signal when the timing module is in locked mode. A recursive prediction error method is used to identify the system model parameters. Simulation results show that an oscillator enhanced by our adaptive control algorithm improves the oscillator performance significantly, compared with uncorrected oscillators. Our results also show the benefit of explicitly modeling the control loop. Finally, the cumulative time error upper bound of such enhanced oscillators is investigated analytically and comparison results between the analytical and simulated upper bound are provided. The results show that the analytical upper bound can serve as a practical guide for system designers. PMID:21244973

  13. First steps towards real-time radiography at the NECTAR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bücherl, T.; Wagner, F. M.; v. Gostomski, Ch. Lierse

    2009-06-01

    The beam tube SR10 at Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) provides an intense beam of fission neutrons for medical application (MEDAPP) and for radiography and tomography of technical and other objects (NECTAR). The high neutron flux of up to 9.8E+07 cm -2 s -1 (depending on filters and collimation) with a mean energy of about 1.9 MeV at the sample position at the NECTAR facility prompted an experimental feasibility study to investigate the potential for real-time (RT) radiography.

  14. Steps Toward Real-Time Atmospheric Phase Fluctuation Correction for a High Resolution Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, Grant R.; Geldzahler, Barry; Birr, Rick; Brown, Robert; Hoblitzell, Richard; Grant, Kevin; Miller, Michael; Woods, Gary; Archuleta, Arby; Ciminera, Michael; Cornish, Timothy; davarian, faramaz; kocz, jonathan; lee, dennis; Morabito, David Dominic; Soriano, Melissa; Tsao, Philip; Vilnrotter, Victor; Jakeman-Flores, Hali; Ott, melanie; Thomes, W. Joe; Soloff, Jason; NASA Kennedy Space Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Metropolitan State University of Denver

    2016-01-01

    NASA is pursuing a demonstration of coherent uplink arraying at 7.145-7.190 GHz (X-band) and 30-31 GHz (Ka-band) using three 12m diameter COTS antennas separated by 60m at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the goal of a high-power, high-resolution radar array that employs real-time correction for tropospheric phase fluctuation. The major uses for this array will be (a) observations of Near Earth Objects, (b) detection and tracking of orbital debris, (c) high power emergency uplink capability for spacecraft, and (d) radio science experiments.

  15. Model reference adaptive control in fractional order systems using discrete-time approximation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini, Mohammad; Nojoumian, Mohammad Ali; Salarieh, Hassan; Meghdari, Ali

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, model reference control of a fractional order system has been discussed. In order to control the fractional order plant, discrete-time approximation methods have been applied. Plant and reference model are discretized by Grünwald-Letnikov definition of the fractional order derivative using "Short Memory Principle". Unknown parameters of the fractional order system are appeared in the discrete time approximate model as combinations of parameters of the main system. The discrete time MRAC via RLS identification is modified to estimate the parameters and control the fractional order plant. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed method of model reference adaptive control.

  16. Adaptive Timing of Motor Output in the Mouse: The Role of Movement Oscillations in Eyelid Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Chettih, Selmaan N.; McDougle, Samuel D.; Ruffolo, Luis I.; Medina, Javier F.

    2011-01-01

    To survive, animals must learn to control their movements with millisecond-level precision, and adjust the kinematics if conditions, or task requirements, change. Here, we examine adaptive timing of motor output in mice, using a simple eyelid conditioning task. Mice were trained to blink in response to a light stimulus that was always followed by a corneal air-puff at a constant time interval. Different mice were trained with different intervals of time separating the onset of the light and the air-puff. As in previous work in other animal species, mice learned to control the speed of the blink, such that the time of maximum eyelid closure matched the interval used during training. However, we found that the time of maximum eyelid speed was always in the first 100 ms after movement onset and did not scale with the training interval, indicating that adaptive timing is not accomplished by slowing down (or speeding up) the eyelid movement uniformly throughout the duration of the blink. A new analysis, specifically designed to examine the kinematics of blinks in single trials, revealed that the underlying control signal responsible for the eyelid movement is made up of oscillatory bursts that are time-locked to the light stimulus at the beginning of the blink, becoming desynchronized later on. Furthermore, mice learn to blink at different speeds and time the movement appropriately by adjusting the amplitude, but not the frequency of the bursts in the eyelid oscillation. PMID:22144951

  17. Steps Towards an Operational Service Using Near Real-Time Altimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, E. R.

    2006-07-01

    Thanks largely to modern computing power, numerical forecasts of w inds and waves over the oceans ar e ev er improving, offering greater accuracy and finer resolution in time and sp ace. Howev er, it is recognized that met-ocean models still have difficulty in accurately forecasting sever e w eather conditions, conditions that cause the most damag e and difficulty in mar itime operations. Ther efore a key requir emen t is to provid e improved information on sever e conditions. No individual measur emen t or prediction system is perfect. Offshore buoys provide a continuous long-ter m record of wind and wave conditions, but only at a limited numb er of sites. Satellite data offer all-weath er global cov erage, but with relatively infrequen t samp ling. Forecasts rely on imperf ect numerical schemes and the ab ility to manage a vast quantity of input data. Therefore the best system is one that integr ates information from all available sources, taking advantage of the benef its that each can offer. We report on an initiative supported by the European Space Agen cy (ESA) which investig ated how satellite data could be used to enhan ce systems to provide Near Real Time mon itor ing of met-ocean conditions.

  18. Steps toward thin film metal thermistors with microsecond time response for shock temperature measurements of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. E.; Williamson, D. M.; Jardine, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Equations of state can be used to predict the relationship between pressure, volume and temperature. However, in shock physics, they are usually only constrained by experimental observations of pressure and volume. Direct observation of temperature in a shock is therefore valuable in constraining equations of state. Bloomquist and Sheffield (1980, 1981) and Rosenberg and Partom (1984) have attempted such observations in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). However, their results disagree strongly above 2GPa shock pressure. Here we present an improved fabrication technique, to examine this outstanding issue. We make use of the fact that the electrical resistivity of most metals is a known function of both pressure and temperature. If the change in resistance of a thin metal thermistor gauge is measured during a shock experiment of known pressure, the temperature can be calculated directly. The time response is limited by the time taken for the gauge to reach thermal equilibrium with the medium in which it is embedded. Gold gauges of thickness up to 200 nm have been produced by thermal evaporation, and fully embedded in PMMA. These reach thermal equilibrium with the host material in under 1 us, allowing temperature measurement within the duration of a plate impact experiment.

  19. In the time of significant generational diversity - surgical leadership must step up!

    PubMed

    Money, Samuel R; O'Donnell, Mark E; Gray, Richard J

    2014-02-01

    The diverse attitudes and motivations of surgeons and surgical trainees within different age groups present an important challenge for surgical leaders and educators. These challenges to surgical leadership are not unique, and other industries have likewise needed to grapple with how best to manage these various age groups. The authors will herein explore management and leadership for surgeons in a time of age diversity, define generational variations within "Baby-Boomer", "Generation X" and "Generation Y" populations, and identify work ethos concepts amongst these three groups. The surgical community must understand and embrace these concepts in order to continue to attract a stellar pool of applicants from medical school. By not accepting the changing attitudes and motivations of young trainees and medical students, we may disenfranchise a high percentage of potential future surgeons. Surgical training programs will fill, but will they contain the highest quality trainees? PMID:24090677

  20. Time step size and model stiffness in the simulated slew of a tow of square sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greschik, Gyula

    2011-12-01

    In order to assess space tow solar sail stability and control feasibility, slew simulations are performed for a simplified but dynamically representative km-class tow-like sail of sixteen 25 m square units (10,000 m 2 total area and 110 kg gross mass) with a 250 kg payload. It is seen that, for the dimensions considered, the space tow concept is structurally sound and its control is feasible. While observed instabilities are identified as numeric in nature and are eliminated accordingly, their very occurrence highlights the need for a refinement of the model for future studies. The analyses are carried out with custom software implementing non-standard implicit-iterative time integration with innovative elements. A new damping model, specifically tailored for the analysis of truly gossamer systems such as solar sails, is also proposed.

  1. One-step Real-time Food Quality Analysis by Simultaneous DSC-FTIR Microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Lin, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses an analytical technique that combines differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared (DSC-FTIR) microspectroscopy, which simulates the accelerated stability test and detects decomposition products simultaneously in real time. We show that the DSC-FTIR technique is a fast, simple and powerful analytical tool with applications in food sciences. This technique has been applied successfully to the simultaneous investigation of: encapsulated squid oil stability; the dehydration and intramolecular condensation of sweetener (aspartame); the dehydration, rehydration and solidification of trehalose; and online monitoring of the Maillard reaction for glucose (Glc)/asparagine (Asn) in the solid state. This technique delivers rapid and appropriate interpretations with food science applications. PMID:24762327

  2. H∞ Adaptive tracking control for switched systems based on an average dwell-time method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Caiyun; Zhao, Jun

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the H∞ state tracking model reference adaptive control (MRAC) problem for a class of switched systems using an average dwell-time method. First, a stability criterion is established for a switched reference model. Then, an adaptive controller is designed and the state tracking control problem is converted into the stability analysis. The global practical stability of the error switched system can be guaranteed under a class of switching signals characterised by an average dwell time. Consequently, sufficient conditions for the solvability of the H∞ state tracking MRAC problem are derived. An example of highly manoeuvrable aircraft technology vehicle is given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  3. Tracking rhythmicity in nonstationary quasi-periodic biomedical signals using adaptive time-varying covariance.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Jung, Ranu

    2002-07-01

    A time-varying covariance method for detecting and quantifying the evolution of rhythmicity (frequency) in persistently varying quasi-periodic nonstationary signals is presented. The basic method, evaluated using chirp signals, utilizes a shifting window of fixed length. A substantial reduction in estimation bias and variability are obtained by utilizing an adaptive window whose length is dependent on past frequency estimates. The adaptive window yields estimates that are comparable in accuracy to those obtained using high-resolution time-frequency representation but with lower computation requirements and the potential for on-line application. Finally, an example of the application of the method for analyzing a neural recording is also illustrated. PMID:11931864

  4. Time reversal versus adaptive optimization for spatiotemporal nanolocalization in a random nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Differt, Dominik; Hensen, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Spatiotemporal nanolocalization of ultrashort pulses in a random scattering nanostructure via time reversal and adaptive optimization employing a genetic algorithm and a suitably defined fitness function is studied for two embedded nanoparticles that are separated by only a tenth of the free space wavelength. The nanostructure is composed of resonant core-shell nanoparticles (TiO2 core and Ag shell) placed randomly surrounding these two nanoparticles acting as targets. The time reversal scheme achieves selective nanolocalization only by chance if the incident radiation can couple efficiently to dipolar local modes interacting with the target/emitter particle. Even embedding the structure in a reverberation chamber fails improving the nanolocalization. In contrast, the adaptive optimization strategy reliably yields nanolocalization of the radiation and allows a highly selective excitation of either target position. This demonstrates that random scattering structures are interesting multi-purpose optical nanoantennas to realize highly flexible spatiotemporal optical near-field control.

  5. Link flexibility: evidence for environment-dependent adaptive foraging in a food web time-series.

    PubMed

    Henri, D C; Van Veen, F J F

    2016-06-01

    Temporal variability in the distribution of feeding links in a food web can be an important stabilizing factor for these complex systems. Adaptive foraging and prey choice have been hypothesized to cause this link flexibility as organisms adjust their behavior to variation in the prey community. Here, we analyze a 10-yr time series of monthly aphid-parasitoid-secondary-parasitoid networks and show that interaction strengths for polyphagous secondary parasitoids are generally biased toward the larger host species within their fundamental niche; however, in months of higher competition for hosts, size-based biases are reduced. The results corroborate a previous hypothesis stating that host selectivity of parasitoids should be correlated to the relative likelihood of egg limitation vs. time limitation. Our results evince adaptation of foraging behavior to varying conditions affects the distribution of host-parasitoid link strengths, where link-rewiring may be integral to stability in complex communities. PMID:27459769

  6. A time-accurate adaptive grid method and the numerical simulation of a shock-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelie, Michael J.; Eiseman, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    A time accurate, general purpose, adaptive grid method is developed that is suitable for multidimensional steady and unsteady numerical simulations. The grid point movement is performed in a manner that generates smooth grids which resolve the severe solution gradients and the sharp transitions in the solution gradients. The temporal coupling of the adaptive grid and the PDE solver is performed with a grid prediction correction method that is simple to implement and ensures the time accuracy of the grid. Time accurate solutions of the 2-D Euler equations for an unsteady shock vortex interaction demonstrate the ability of the adaptive method to accurately adapt the grid to multiple solution features.

  7. Modelling of Thermal Advective Reactive Flow in Hydrothermal Mineral Systems Using an Implicit Time-stepped Finite Element Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, P. G.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding chemical and thermal processes taking place in hydrothermal mineral deposition systems could well be a key to unlocking new mineral reserves through improved targeting of exploration efforts. To aid in this understanding it is very helpful to be able to model such processes with sufficient fidelity to test process hypotheses. To gain understanding, it is often sufficient to obtain semi-quantitative results that model the broad aspects of the complex set of thermal and chemical effects taking place in hydrothermal systems. For example, it is often sufficient to gain an understanding of where thermal, geometric and chemical factors converge to precipitate gold (say) without being perfectly precise about how much gold is precipitated. The traditional approach is to use incompressible Darcy flow together with the Boussinesq approximation. From the flow field, the heat equation is used to advect-conduct the heat. The flow field is also used to transport solutes by solving an advection-dispersion-diffusion equation. The reactions in the fluid and between fluid and rock act as source terms for these advection-dispersion equations. Many existing modelling systems that are used for simulating such systems use explicit time marching schemes and finite differences. The disadvantage of this approach is the need to work on rectilinear grids and the number of time steps required by the Courant condition in the solute transport step. The second factor can be particularly significant if the chemical system is complex, requiring (at a minimum) an equilibrium calculation at each grid point at each time step. In the approach we describe, we use finite elements rather than finite differences, and the pressure, heat and advection-dispersion equations are solved implicitly. The general idea is to put unconditional numerical stability of the time integration first, and let accuracy assume a secondary role. It is in this sense that the method is semi-quantiative. However

  8. Adaptive mesh refinement for time-domain electromagnetics using vector finite elements :a feasibility study.

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C. David; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2005-12-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of applying Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques to a vector finite element formulation for the wave equation in three dimensions. Possible error estimators are considered first. Next, approaches for refining tetrahedral elements are reviewed. AMR capabilities within the Nevada framework are then evaluated. We summarize our conclusions on the feasibility of AMR for time-domain vector finite elements and identify a path forward.

  9. Oppositional children and their families: an adaptational dance in space and time.

    PubMed

    Mones, A G

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual map is proposed in which oppositional behavior is seen as an adaptational struggle within a context of interpersonal and intrapsychic spheres of family systems. Preservation of self is viewed as inherent in all childhood psychological symptomatology, and oppositionalism serves as a prime survival strategy, aimed at navigating the conflictual forces of connectedness and individuation and regulating the progression, through time, of the family life cycle. PMID:9494652

  10. Medical alert management: a real-time adaptive decision support tool to reduce alert fatigue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eva K; Wu, Tsung-Lin; Senior, Tal; Jose, James

    2014-01-01

    With the adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs), drug safety alerts are increasingly recognized as valuable tools for reducing adverse drug events and improving patient safety. However, even with proper tuning of the EMR alert parameters, the volume of unfiltered alerts can be overwhelming to users. In this paper, we design an adaptive decision support tool in which past cognitive overriding decisions of users are learned, adapted and used for filtering actions to be performed on current alerts. The filters are designed and learned based on a moving time window, number of alerts, overriding rates, and monthly overriding fluctuations. Using alerts from two separate years to derive filters and test performance, predictive accuracy rates of 91.3%-100% are achieved. The moving time window works better than a static training approach. It allows continuous learning and capturing of the most recent decision characteristics and seasonal variations in drug usage. The decision support system facilitates filtering of non-essential alerts and adaptively learns critical alerts and highlights them prominently to catch providers' attention. The tool can be plugged into an existing EMR system as an add-on, allowing real-time decision support to users without interfering with existing EMR functionalities. By automatically filtering the alerts, the decision support tool mitigates alert fatigue and allows users to focus resources on potentially vital alerts, thus reducing the occurrence of adverse drug events. PMID:25954391

  11. Development of a scalable generic platform for adaptive optics real time control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surendran, Avinash; Burse, Mahesh P.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Parihar, Padmakar

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of the present project is to explore the viability of an adaptive optics control system based exclusively on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), making strong use of their parallel processing capability. In an Adaptive Optics (AO) system, the generation of the Deformable Mirror (DM) control voltages from the Wavefront Sensor (WFS) measurements is usually through the multiplication of the wavefront slopes with a predetermined reconstructor matrix. The ability to access several hundred hard multipliers and memories concurrently in an FPGA allows performance far beyond that of a modern CPU or GPU for tasks with a well-defined structure such as Adaptive Optics control. The target of the current project is to generate a signal for a real time wavefront correction, from the signals coming from a Wavefront Sensor, wherein the system would be flexible to accommodate all the current Wavefront Sensing techniques and also the different methods which are used for wavefront compensation. The system should also accommodate for different data transmission protocols (like Ethernet, USB, IEEE 1394 etc.) for transmitting data to and from the FPGA device, thus providing a more flexible platform for Adaptive Optics control. Preliminary simulation results for the formulation of the platform, and a design of a fully scalable slope computer is presented.

  12. Throwing accuracy in the vertical direction during prism adaptation: not simply timing of ball release.

    PubMed

    Martin, T A; Greger, B E; Norris, S A; Thach, W T

    2001-05-01

    In a previous study, others have hypothesized that the variance in vertical errors that occurs while throwing at visual targets is caused by changes in any of three throw parameters: hand location in space, hand translational velocity, and hand orientation. From an analysis of skilled throwers, those authors concluded that vertical error is best correlated with variance in hand orientation, which in turn is related to the timing of ball release. We used a vertical prism adaptation paradigm to investigate which of these throwing parameters subjects use when adapting to external perturbation. Our subjects showed no correlation between hand position or hand translational velocity and ball impact height in normal, over-practiced throwing. However, video-based motion analysis showed that modifications both of position and speed of the hand play an important role when subjects are forced to compensate for a vertically shifting prism perturbation during a dart-like throw (these factors contribute approximately 30% of the adaptation). We concluded that, during adaptation, more degrees of freedom and more sources of potential error are modified to achieve the gaze-throw recalibration required to hit the target than are employed in this type of throw during normal conditions. PMID:11353043

  13. ADAPT model: Model use, calibration and validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents an overview of the Agricultural Drainage and Pesticide Transport (ADAPT) model and a case study to illustrate the calibration and validation steps for predicting subsurface tile drainage and nitrate-N losses from an agricultural system. The ADAPT model is a daily time step field ...

  14. Navier-Stokes calculations for DFVLR F5-wing in wind tunnel using Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, V. N.; Wedan, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code using an explicit multistage Runge-Kutta type of time-stepping scheme is used for solving the transonic flow past a finite wing mounted inside a wind tunnel. Flow past the same wing in free air was also computed to assess the effect of wind-tunnel walls on such flows. Numerical efficiency is enhanced through vectorization of the computer code. A Cyber 205 computer with 32 million words of internal memory was used for these computations.

  15. Changing Safety Culture, One Step at a Time: The Value of the DOE-VPP Program at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Patrick A.; Isern, Nancy G.

    2005-02-01

    The primary value of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is the ongoing partnership between management and staff committed to change Laboratory safety culture one step at a time. VPP enables PNNL's safety and health program to transcend a top-down, by-the-book approach to safety, and it also raises grassroots safety consciousness by promoting a commitment to safety and health 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. PNNL VPP is a dynamic, evolving program that fosters innovative approaches to continuous improvement in safety and health performance at the Laboratory.

  16. Mean square displacements with error estimates from non-equidistant time-step kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leetmaa, Mikael; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2015-06-01

    We present a method to calculate mean square displacements (MSD) with error estimates from kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of diffusion processes with non-equidistant time-steps. An analytical solution for estimating the errors is presented for the special case of one moving particle at fixed rate constant. The method is generalized to an efficient computational algorithm that can handle any number of moving particles or different rates in the simulated system. We show with examples that the proposed method gives the correct statistical error when the MSD curve describes pure Brownian motion and can otherwise be used as an upper bound for the true error.

  17. Space-time adaptive approach to variational data assimilation using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souopgui, Innocent; Wieland, Scott A.; Yousuff Hussaini, M.; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on one of the main challenges of 4-dimensional variational data assimilation, namely the requirement to have a forward solution available when solving the adjoint problem. The issue is addressed by considering the time in the same fashion as the space variables, reformulating the mathematical model in the entire space-time domain, and solving the problem on a near optimal computational mesh that automatically adapts to spatio-temporal structures of the solution. The compressed form of the solution eliminates the need to save or recompute data for every time slice as it is typically done in traditional time marching approaches to 4-dimensional variational data assimilation. The reduction of the required computational degrees of freedom is achieved using the compression properties of multi-dimensional second generation wavelets. The simultaneous space-time discretization of both the forward and the adjoint models makes it possible to solve both models either concurrently or sequentially. In addition, the grid adaptation reduces the amount of saved data to the strict minimum for a given a priori controlled accuracy of the solution. The proposed approach is demonstrated for the advection diffusion problem in two space-time dimensions.

  18. Time-dependent rheological behavior of natural polysaccharide xanthan gum solutions in interrupted shear and step-incremental/reductional shear flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Seok; Song, Ki-Won

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the present study is to systematically elucidate the time-dependent rheological behavior of concentrated xanthan gum systems in complicated step-shear flow fields. Using a strain-controlled rheometer (ARES), step-shear flow behaviors of a concentrated xanthan gum model solution have been experimentally investigated in interrupted shear flow fields with a various combination of different shear rates, shearing times and rest times, and step-incremental and step-reductional shear flow fields with various shearing times. The main findings obtained from this study are summarized as follows. (i) In interrupted shear flow fields, the shear stress is sharply increased until reaching the maximum stress at an initial stage of shearing times, and then a stress decay towards a steady state is observed as the shearing time is increased in both start-up shear flow fields. The shear stress is suddenly decreased immediately after the imposed shear rate is stopped, and then slowly decayed during the period of a rest time. (ii) As an increase in rest time, the difference in the maximum stress values between the two start-up shear flow fields is decreased whereas the shearing time exerts a slight influence on this behavior. (iii) In step-incremental shear flow fields, after passing through the maximum stress, structural destruction causes a stress decay behavior towards a steady state as an increase in shearing time in each step shear flow region. The time needed to reach the maximum stress value is shortened as an increase in step-increased shear rate. (iv) In step-reductional shear flow fields, after passing through the minimum stress, structural recovery induces a stress growth behavior towards an equilibrium state as an increase in shearing time in each step shear flow region. The time needed to reach the minimum stress value is lengthened as a decrease in step-decreased shear rate.

  19. A quantitative method for evaluating numerical simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation with its applications to selecting appropriate element size and time step.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Tse, Peter W; Tan, Haihui

    2016-01-01

    Lamb wave technique has been widely used in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). However, due to the multi-mode characteristics and dispersive nature, Lamb wave propagation behavior is much more complex than that of bulk waves. Numerous numerical simulations on Lamb wave propagation have been conducted to study its physical principles. However, few quantitative studies on evaluating the accuracy of these numerical simulations were reported. In this paper, a method based on cross correlation analysis for quantitatively evaluating the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb waves propagation is proposed. Two kinds of error, affecting the position and shape accuracies are firstly identified. Consequently, two quantitative indices, i.e., the GVE (group velocity error) and MACCC (maximum absolute value of cross correlation coefficient) derived from cross correlation analysis between a simulated signal and a reference waveform, are proposed to assess the position and shape errors of the simulated signal. In this way, the simulation accuracy on the position and shape is quantitatively evaluated. In order to apply this proposed method to select appropriate element size and time step, a specialized 2D-FEM program combined with the proposed method is developed. Then, the proper element size considering different element types and time step considering different time integration schemes are selected. These results proved that the proposed method is feasible and effective, and can be used as an efficient tool for quantitatively evaluating and verifying the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation. PMID:26315506

  20. Review of Real-Time Simulator and the Steps Involved for Implementation of a Model from MATLAB/SIMULINK to Real-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkili, Suresh; Panda, Anup Kumar; Prattipati, Jayanthi

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays the researchers want to develop their model in real-time environment. Simulation tools have been widely used for the design and improvement of electrical systems since the mid twentieth century. The evolution of simulation tools has progressed in step with the evolution of computing technologies. In recent years, computing technologies have improved dramatically in performance and become widely available at a steadily decreasing cost. Consequently, simulation tools have also seen dramatic performance gains and steady cost decreases. Researchers and engineers now have the access to affordable, high performance simulation tools that were previously too cost prohibitive, except for the largest manufacturers. This work has introduced a specific class of digital simulator known as a real-time simulator by answering the questions "what is real-time simulation", "why is it needed" and "how it works". The latest trend in real-time simulation consists of exporting simulation models to FPGA. In this article, the Steps involved for implementation of a model from MATLAB to REAL-TIME are provided in detail.

  1. Changes in cortical activity associated with adaptive behavior during repeated balance perturbation of unpredictable timing

    PubMed Central

    Mierau, Andreas; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Strüder, Heiko K.

    2015-01-01

    The compensation for a sudden balance perturbation, unpracticed and unpredictable in timing and magnitude is accompanied by pronounced postural instability that is suggested to be causal to falls. However, subsequent presentations of an identical perturbation are characterized by a marked decrease of the amplitude of postural reactions; a phenomenon called adaptation or habituation. This study aimed to identify cortical characteristics associated with adaptive behavior during repetitive balance perturbations based on single-trial analyses of the P1 and N1 perturbation-evoked potentials. Thirty-seven young men were exposed to ten transient balance perturbations while balancing on the dominant leg. Thirty two-channel electroencephalography (EEG), surface electromyography (EMG) of the ankle plantar flexor muscles and postural sway (i.e., Euclidean distance of the supporting platform) were recorded simultaneously. The P1 and N1 potentials were localized and the amplitude/latency was analyzed trial by trial. The best match sources for P1 and N1 potentials were located in the parietal (Brodmann area (BA) 5) and midline fronto-central cortex (BA 6), respectively. The amplitude and latency of the P1 potential remained unchanged over trials. In contrast, a significant adaptation of the N1 amplitude was observed. Similar adaptation effects were found with regard to postural sway and ankle plantarflexors EMG activity of the non-dominant (free) leg; i.e., an indicator for reduced muscular co-contraction and/or less temporary bipedal stance to regain stability. Significant but weak correlations were found between N1 amplitude and postural sway as well as EMG activity. These results highlight the important role of the midline fronto-central cortex for adaptive behavior associated with balance control. PMID:26528154

  2. Length and time for development of laminar flow in tubes following a step increase of volume flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Rafeed A.; Herrmann, Marcus; Frakes, David H.; Adrian, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Laminar flows starting up from rest in round tubes are relevant to numerous industrial and biomedical applications. The two most common types are flows driven by an abruptly imposed constant pressure gradient or by an abruptly imposed constant volume flux. Analytical solutions are available for transient, fully developed flows, wherein streamwise development over the entrance length is absent (Szymanski in J de Mathématiques Pures et Appliquées 11:67-107, 1932; Andersson and Tiseth in Chem Eng Commun 112(1):121-133, 1992, respectively). They represent the transient responses of flows in tubes that are very long compared with the entrance length, a condition that is seldom satisfied in biomedical tube networks. This study establishes the entrance (development) length and development time of starting laminar flow in a round tube of finite length driven by a piston pump that produces a step change from zero flow to a constant volume flux for Reynolds numbers between 500 and 3,000. The flows are examined experimentally, using stereographic particle image velocimetry and computationally using computational fluid dynamics, and are then compared with the known analytical solutions for fully developed flow conditions in infinitely long tubes. Results show that step function volume flux start-up flows reach steady state and fully developed flow five times more quickly than those driven by a step function pressure gradient, a 500 % change when compared with existing estimates. Based on these results, we present new, simple guidelines for achieving experimental flows that are fully developed in space and time in realistic (finite) tube geometries. To a first approximation, the time to achieve steady spatially developing flow is nearly equal to the time needed to achieve steady, fully developed flow. Conversely, the entrance length needed to achieve fully developed transient flow is approximately equal to the length needed to achieve fully developed steady flow. Beyond this

  3. Adaptive sliding control of non-autonomous active suspension systems with time-varying loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Chang; Huang, An-Chyau

    2005-04-01

    An adaptive sliding controller is proposed in this paper for controlling a non-autonomous quarter-car suspension system with time-varying loadings. The bound of the car-body loading is assumed to be available. Then, the reference coordinate is placed at the static position under the nominal loading so that the system dynamic equation is derived. Due to spring nonlinearities, the system property becomes asymmetric after coordinate transformation. Besides, in practical cases, system parameters are not easy to be obtained precisely for controller design. Therefore, in this paper, system uncertainties are lumped into two unknown time-varying functions. Since the variation bound of one of the unknown functions is not available, conventional adaptive schemes and robust designs are not applicable. To deal with this problem, the function approximation technique is employed to represent the unknown function as a finite combination of basis functions. The Lyapunov direct method can thus be used to find adaptive laws for updating coefficients in the approximating series and to prove stability of the closed-loop system. Since the position and velocity measurements of the unsprung mass are lumped into the unknown function, there is no need to install sensors on the axle and wheel assembly in the actual implementation. Simulation results are presented to show the performance of the proposed strategy.

  4. Prototype adaptive bow-tie filter based on spatial exposure time modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badal, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the development of dynamic bow-tie filters that are able to provide patient-specific x-ray beam shaping. We introduce the first physical prototype of a new adaptive bow-tie filter design based on the concept of "spatial exposure time modulation." While most existing bow-tie filters operate by attenuating the radiation beam differently in different locations using partially attenuating objects, the presented filter shapes the radiation field using two movable completely radio-opaque collimators. The aperture and speed of the collimators is modulated in synchrony with the x-ray exposure to selectively block the radiation emitted to different parts of the object. This mode of operation does not allow the reproduction of every possible attenuation profile, but it can reproduce the profile of any object with an attenuation profile monotonically decreasing from the center to the periphery, such as an object with an elliptical cross section. Therefore, the new adaptive filter provides the same advantages as the currently existing static bow-tie filters, which are typically designed to work for a pre-determined cylindrical object at a fixed distance from the source, and provides the additional capability to adapt its performance at image acquisition time to better compensate for the actual diameter and location of the imaged object. A detailed description of the prototype filter, the implemented control methods, and a preliminary experimental validation of its performance are presented.

  5. Real-Time Adaptive Control Allocation Applied to a High Performance Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Lallman, Frederick J.; Bundick, W. Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the development and application of one approach to the control of aircraft with large numbers of control effectors. This approach, referred to as real-time adaptive control allocation, combines a nonlinear method for control allocation with actuator failure detection and isolation. The control allocator maps moment (or angular acceleration) commands into physical control effector commands as functions of individual control effectiveness and availability. The actuator failure detection and isolation algorithm is a model-based approach that uses models of the actuators to predict actuator behavior and an adaptive decision threshold to achieve acceptable false alarm/missed detection rates. This integrated approach provides control reconfiguration when an aircraft is subjected to actuator failure, thereby improving maneuverability and survivability of the degraded aircraft. This method is demonstrated on a next generation military aircraft Lockheed-Martin Innovative Control Effector) simulation that has been modified to include a novel nonlinear fluid flow control control effector based on passive porosity. Desktop and real-time piloted simulation results demonstrate the performance of this integrated adaptive control allocation approach.

  6. Real-Time Tracking Framework with Adaptive Features and Constrained Labels.

    PubMed

    Li, Daqun; Xu, Tingfa; Chen, Shuoyang; Zhang, Jizhou; Jiang, Shenwang

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel tracking framework with adaptive features and constrained labels (AFCL) to handle illumination variation, occlusion and appearance changes caused by the variation of positions. The novel ensemble classifier, including the Forward-Backward error and the location constraint is applied, to get the precise coordinates of the promising bounding boxes. The Forward-Backward error can enhance the adaptation and accuracy of the binary features, whereas the location constraint can overcome the label noise to a certain degree. We use the combiner which can evaluate the online templates and the outputs of the classifier to accommodate the complex situation. Evaluation of the widely used tracking benchmark shows that the proposed framework can significantly improve the tracking accuracy, and thus reduce the processing time. The proposed framework has been tested and implemented on the embedded system using TMS320C6416 and Cyclone Ⅲ kernel processors. The outputs show that achievable and satisfying results can be obtained. PMID:27618052

  7. The Information Adaptive System - A demonstration of real-time onboard image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. L.; Carney, P. C.; Meredith, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    The Information Adaptive System (IAS) program has the objective to develop and demonstrate, at the brassboard level, an architecture which can be used to perform advanced signal procesing functions on board the spacecraft. Particular attention is given to the processing of high-speed multispectral imaging data in real-time, and the development of advanced technology which could be employed for future space applications. An IAS functional description is provided, and questions of radiometric correction are examined. Problems of data packetization are considered along with data selection, a distortion coefficient processor, an adaptive system controller, an image processing demonstration system, a sensor simulator and output data buffer, a test support and demonstration controller, and IAS demonstration operating modes.

  8. [Non-linear real-time adaptive filtration of ultrasound TI628A echotomoscope images].

    PubMed

    Barannik, E A; Volokhov, Iu V; Marusenko, A I

    1997-01-01

    The statistical uncertainty caused by speckle noise artifacts is the reason for the great importance of the problem which is the optimum choice between the medical diagnostic systems resolution and the statistical accuracy of histological tissue identification. The way of speckle noise suppression, which is closely associated with the well-known idea of adaptive filtration and based on the physical analysis of the origin of true and false signals, is very promising. The testing results of the nonlinear real-time adaptive filter which has been designed for a TI628A echotomoscope are presented. The filter has been shown to have a rather high contrast and space resolution and reduces the speckle noise and other artifacts of the images. PMID:9445983

  9. Non-linear adaptive sliding mode switching control with average dwell-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Maoqing; Fei, Shumin

    2013-03-01

    In this article, an adaptive integral sliding mode control scheme is addressed for switched non-linear systems in the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances. The control law includes two parts: a slide mode controller for the reduced model of the plant and a compensation controller to deal with the non-linear systems with parameter uncertainties. The adaptive updated laws have been derived from the switched multiple Lyapunov function method, also an admissible switching signal with average dwell-time technique is given. The simplicity of the proposed control scheme facilitates its implementation and the overall control scheme guarantees the global asymptotic stability in the Lyapunov sense such that the sliding surface of the control system is well reached. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  10. Pitch Adaptation Patterns in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users: Over Time and After Experience

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Lina A.J.; Ito, Rindy A.; Eggleston, Jessica L.; Liao, Selena; Becker, Jillian J.; Lakin, Carrie E.; Warren, Frank M.; McMenomey, Sean O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pitch plasticity has been observed in Hybrid cochlear implant (CI) users. Does pitch plasticity also occur in bimodal CI users with traditional long-electrode CIs, and is pitch adaptation pattern associated with electrode discrimination or speech recognition performance? Objective Characterize pitch adaptation patterns in long-electrode CI users, correlate these patterns with electrode discrimination and speech perception outcomes, and analyze which subject factors are associated with the different patterns. Methods Electric-to-acoustic pitch matches were obtained in 19 subjects over time from CI activation to at least 12 months after activation, and in a separate group of 18 subjects in a single visit after at least 24 months of CI experience. Audiometric thresholds, electrode discrimination performance, and speech perception scores were also measured. Results Subjects measured over time had pitch adaptation patterns that fit one of the following categories: 1) “Pitch-adapting”, i.e. the mismatch between perceived electrode pitch and the corresponding frequency-to-electrode allocations decreased; 2) “Pitch-dropping”, i.e. the pitches of multiple electrodes dropped and converged to a similar low pitch; 3) “Pitch-unchanging”, i.e. electrode pitches did not change. Subjects measured after CI experience had a parallel set of adaptation patterns: 1) “Matched-pitch”, i.e. the electrode pitch was matched to the frequency allocation; 2) “Low-pitch”, i.e. the pitches of multiple electrodes were all around the lowest frequency allocation; 3) “Nonmatched-pitch”, i.e. the pitch patterns were compressed relative to the frequency allocations and did not fit either the matched-pitch or low-pitch categories. Unlike Hybrid CI users which were mostly in the pitch-adapting/matched-pitch category, the majority of bimodal CI users were in the latter two categories, pitch-dropping/low-pitch or pitch-unchanging/nonmatched-pitch. Subjects with pitch-adapting

  11. The STEP model: Characterizing simultaneous time effects on practice for flight simulator performance among middle-aged and older pilots.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome; Lazzeroni, Laura C

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the possible effects of the number of practice sessions (practice) and time between practice sessions (interval) among middle-aged and older adults in real-world tasks has important implications for skill maintenance. Prior training and cognitive ability may impact practice and interval effects on real-world tasks. In this study, we took advantage of existing practice data from 5 simulated flights among 263 middle-aged and older pilots with varying levels of flight expertise (defined by U.S. Federal Aviation Administration proficiency ratings). We developed a new Simultaneous Time Effects on Practice (STEP) model: (a) to model the simultaneous effects of practice and interval on performance of the 5 flights, and (b) to examine the effects of selected covariates (i.e., age, flight expertise, and 3 composite measures of cognitive ability). The STEP model demonstrated consistent positive practice effects, negative interval effects, and predicted covariate effects. Age negatively moderated the beneficial effects of practice. Additionally, cognitive processing speed and intraindividual variability (IIV) in processing speed moderated the benefits of practice and/or the negative influence of interval for particular flight performance measures. Expertise did not interact with practice or interval. Results indicated that practice and interval effects occur in simulated flight tasks. However, processing speed and IIV may influence these effects, even among high-functioning adults. Results have implications for the design and assessment of training interventions targeted at middle-aged and older adults for complex real-world tasks. PMID:26280383

  12. The Subarray MVDR Beamformer: A Space-Time Adaptive Processor Applied to Active Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezanson, Leverett Guidroz

    The research for this thesis was mainly performed at the NATO Underwater Research Center, now named the Center for Maritime Research and Experimentation (CMRE). The purpose of the research was to improve the detection of underwater targets in the littoral ocean when using active sonar. Currently these detections are being made by towed line arrays using a delay and sum beamformer for bearing measurements and noise suppression. This method of beamforming has can suffer from reverberation that commonly is present in the littoral environment. A proposed solution is to use an adaptive beamformer which can attenuate reverberation and increase the bearing resolution. The adaptive beamforming algorithms have existed for a long time and typically are not used in the active case due to limited amount of observable data that is needed for adaptation. This deficiency is caused by the conflicting requirements for high Doppler resolution for target detection and small time windows for building up full-rank covariance estimates. The algorithms also are sensitive to bearing estimate errors that commonly occur in active sonar systems. Recently it has been proposed to overcome these limitations through the use of reduced beamspace adaptive beamforming. The Subarray MVDR beamformer is analyzed, both against simulated data and against experimental data collected by CMRE during the GLINT/NGAS11 experiment in 2011. Simulation results indicate that the Subarray MVDR beamformer rejects interfering signals that are not effectively attenuated by conventional beamforming. The application of the Subarray MVDR beamformer to the experimental data shows that the Doppler spread of the reverberation ridge is reduced, and the bearing resolution improved. The signal to noise ratio is calculated at the target location and also shows improvement. These calculated and observed performance metrics indicate an improvement of detection in reverberation noise.

  13. The adaptive CCCG({eta}) method for efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F.F.; Birkett, N.R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The Controlled Cholesky factorisation has been shown to be a robust preconditioner for the Conjugate Gradient method. In this scheme the amount of fill-in is defined in terms of a parameter {eta}, the number of extra elements allowed per column. It is demonstrated how an optimum value of {eta} can be automatically determined when solving time dependent p.d.e.`s using an implicit time step method. A comparison between CCCG({eta}) and the standard ICCG solving parabolic problems on general grids shows CCCG({eta}) to be an efficient general purpose solver.

  14. A new time-adaptive discrete bionic wavelet transform for enhancing speech from adverse noise environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniswamy, Sumithra; Duraisamy, Prakash; Alam, Mohammad Showkat; Yuan, Xiaohui

    2012-04-01

    Automatic speech processing systems are widely used in everyday life such as mobile communication, speech and speaker recognition, and for assisting the hearing impaired. In speech communication systems, the quality and intelligibility of speech is of utmost importance for ease and accuracy of information exchange. To obtain an intelligible speech signal and one that is more pleasant to listen, noise reduction is essential. In this paper a new Time Adaptive Discrete Bionic Wavelet Thresholding (TADBWT) scheme is proposed. The proposed technique uses Daubechies mother wavelet to achieve better enhancement of speech from additive non- stationary noises which occur in real life such as street noise and factory noise. Due to the integration of human auditory system model into the wavelet transform, bionic wavelet transform (BWT) has great potential for speech enhancement which may lead to a new path in speech processing. In the proposed technique, at first, discrete BWT is applied to noisy speech to derive TADBWT coefficients. Then the adaptive nature of the BWT is captured by introducing a time varying linear factor which updates the coefficients at each scale over time. This approach has shown better performance than the existing algorithms at lower input SNR due to modified soft level dependent thresholding on time adaptive coefficients. The objective and subjective test results confirmed the competency of the TADBWT technique. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is also evaluated for speaker recognition task under noisy environment. The recognition results show that the TADWT technique yields better performance when compared to alternate methods specifically at lower input SNR.

  15. A time self-adaptive multilevel algorithm for large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terracol, M.; Sagaut, P.; Basdevant, C.

    2003-01-01

    An extension of the multilevel method applied to LES proposed in Terracol et al. [J. Comput. Phys. 167 (2001) 439] is introduced here to reduce the CPU times in unsteady simulation of turbulent flows. Flow variables are decomposed into several wavenumber bands, each band being associated to a computational grid in physical space. The general framework associated to such a decomposition is presented, and a new adapted closure is proposed for the subgrid terms which appear at each filtering level, while the closure at the finest level is performed with a classical LES model. CPU time saving is obtained by the use of V-cycles, as in the multigrid terminology. The main part of the simulation is thus performed on the coarse levels, while the smallest resolved scales are kept frozen (quasi-static approximation [Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. 159 (1998) 123]). This allows to reduce significantly the CPU times in comparison with classical LES, while the accuracy of the simulation is preserved by the use of a fine discretization level. To ensure the validity of the quasi-static approximation, a dynamic evaluation of the time during which it remains valid is performed at each level through an a priori error estimation of the small-scales time variation. This leads to a totally self-adaptive method in which both the number of levels and the integration times on each grid level are evaluated dynamically. The method is assessed on a fully unsteady time-developing compressible mixing layer at a low-Reynolds number for which a DNS has also been performed, and in the inviscid case. Finally, a plane channel flow configuration has been considered. In all cases, the results obtained are in good agreement with classical LES performed on a fine grid, with CPU time reduction factors of up to five.

  16. High-order time-stepping for nonlinear PDEs through rapid estimation of block Gaussian quadrature nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambers, James V.

    2016-06-01

    The stiffness of systems of ODEs that arise from spatial discretization of PDEs causes difficulties for both explicit and implicit time-stepping methods. Krylov Subspace Spectral (KSS) methods present a balance between the efficiency of explicit methods and the stability of implicit methods by computing each Fourier coefficient from an individualized approximation of the solution operator of the PDE. While KSS methods are explicit methods that exhibit a high order of accuracy and stability similar to that of implicit methods, their efficiency needs to be improved. Here, a detailed asymptotic study is performed in order to rapidly estimate all nodes, thus drastically reducing computational expense without sacrificing accuracy. Extension to PDEs on a disk, through expansions built on Legendre polynomials, is also discussed. Exponential propagation iterative (EPI) methods provide an efficient approach to the solution of large stiff nonlinear systems of ODE, compared to standard integrators. However, the bulk of the computational effort in these methods is due to products of matrix functions and vectors, which can become very costly at high resolution due to an increase in the number of Krylov projection steps needed to maintain accuracy. In this talk, it is proposed to modify EPI methods by using KSS methods, instead of standard Krylov projection methods, to compute products of matrix functions and vectors. Numerical experiments demonstrate that this modification causes the number of Krylov projection steps to become bounded independently of the grid size, thus dramatically improving efficiency and scalability. It is also demonstrated that the convergence of Krylov projection can be significantly accelerated, without noticeable loss of accuracy, through filtering techniques, thus improving performance and scalability even further.

  17. An FPGA-based frequency response analyzer for multisine and stepped sine measurements on stationary and time-varying impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, B.; Fernandez, X.; Reig, S.; Bragos, R.

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based frequency response analyzer (FRA) for impedance frequency response function (FRF) measurements using periodic excitations, i.e. sine waves and multisines. The stepped sine measurement uses two dedicated hardware-built digital embedded multiplier blocks to extract the phase and quadrature components of the output signal. The multisine FRF measurements compute the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the input/output signals. In this paper, we describe its design, implementation and performance evaluation, performing electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements on phantoms. The stepped sine accuracy is 1.21% at 1 kΩ (1%), the precision is 35 mΩ and the total harmonic distortion plus noise (THD+N) is -120 dB. As for the multisine impedance FRF measurements, the magnitude and phase precision are, respectively, 0.23 Ω at 48.828 kHz and 0.021 deg at 8.087 MHz when measuring a resistor 505 Ω (1%). The magnitude accuracy is 0.55% at 8.087 MHz while the phase accuracy is 0.17 deg at 6.54 MHz. In all, the stepped sine signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 84 dB and 65 dB at frequencies below and above 1 MHz respectively. The SNR for the multisine FRF measurements is above 65 dB (30 kHz-10 MHz). The FRA bandwidth is 610.4 mHz-12.5 MHz and the maximum FRF measurement rate exciting with multisines starting at 30 kHz is 200 spectra s-1. Based on its technical specifications and versatility, the FRA presented can be used in many applications, e.g. for getting insight quickly into the instantaneous impedance FRF of the time-varying impedance under test.

  18. Sequential Insertion Heuristic with Adaptive Bee Colony Optimisation Algorithm for Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

    PubMed Central

    Jawarneh, Sana; Abdullah, Salwani

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a bee colony optimisation (BCO) algorithm to tackle the vehicle routing problem with time window (VRPTW). The VRPTW involves recovering an ideal set of routes for a fleet of vehicles serving a defined number of customers. The BCO algorithm is a population-based algorithm that mimics the social communication patterns of honeybees in solving problems. The performance of the BCO algorithm is dependent on its parameters, so the online (self-adaptive) parameter tuning strategy is used to improve its effectiveness and robustness. Compared with the basic BCO, the adaptive BCO performs better. Diversification is crucial to the performance of the population-based algorithm, but the initial population in the BCO algorithm is generated using a greedy heuristic, which has insufficient diversification. Therefore the ways in which the sequential insertion heuristic (SIH) for the initial population drives the population toward improved solutions are examined. Experimental comparisons indicate that the proposed adaptive BCO-SIH algorithm works well across all instances and is able to obtain 11 best results in comparison with the best-known results in the literature when tested on Solomon’s 56 VRPTW 100 customer instances. Also, a statistical test shows that there is a significant difference between the results. PMID:26132158

  19. Real-time blind deconvolution of retinal images in adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2011-06-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), the ocular aberrations can be compensated to get high-resolution image of living human retina. However, the wavefront correction is not perfect due to the wavefront measure error and hardware restrictions. Thus, it is necessary to use a deconvolution algorithm to recover the retinal images. In this paper, a blind deconvolution technique called Incremental Wiener filter is used to restore the adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images. The point-spread function (PSF) measured by wavefront sensor is only used as an initial value of our algorithm. We also realize the Incremental Wiener filter on graphics processing unit (GPU) in real-time. When the image size is 512 × 480 pixels, six iterations of our algorithm only spend about 10 ms. Retinal blood vessels as well as cells in retinal images are restored by our algorithm, and the PSFs are also revised. Retinal images with and without adaptive optics are both restored. The results show that Incremental Wiener filter reduces the noises and improve the image quality.

  20. OFDM Radar Space-Time Adaptive Processing by Exploiting Spatio-Temporal Sparsity

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    We propose a sparsity-based space-time adaptive processing (STAP) algorithm to detect a slowly-moving target using an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar. We observe that the target and interference spectra are inherently sparse in the spatio-temporal domain. Hence, we exploit that sparsity to develop an efficient STAP technique that utilizes considerably lesser number of secondary data and produces an equivalent performance as the other existing STAP techniques. In addition, the use of an OFDM signal increases the frequency diversity of our system, as different scattering centers of a target resonate at different frequencies, and thus improves the target detectability. First, we formulate a realistic sparse-measurement model for an OFDM radar considering both the clutter and jammer as the interfering sources. Then, we apply a residual sparse-recovery technique based on the LASSO estimator to estimate the target and interference covariance matrices, and subsequently compute the optimal STAP-filter weights. Our numerical results demonstrate a comparative performance analysis of the proposed sparse-STAP algorithm with four other existing STAP methods. Furthermore, we discover that the OFDM-STAP filter-weights are adaptable to the frequency-variabilities of the target and interference responses, in addition to the spatio-temporal variabilities. Hence, by better utilizing the frequency variabilities, we propose an adaptive OFDM-waveform design technique, and consequently gain a significant amount of STAP-performance improvement.

  1. A one step real-time RT-PCR assay for the quantitation of Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) is an important pathogen in China and other countries. It is the member of the genus Bymovirus and transmitted primarily by Polymyxa graminis. The incidence of wheat infections in endemic areas has risen in recent years. Prompt and dependable identification of WYMV is a critical component of response to suspect cases. Methods In this study, a one step real-time RT-PCR, followed by standard curve analysis for the detection and identification of WYMV, was developed. Two reference genes, 18s RNA and β-actin were selected in order to adjust the veracity of the real-time RT-PCR assay. Results We developed a one-step Taqman-based real-time quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) assay targeting the conserved region of the 879 bp long full-length WYMV coat protein gene. The accuracy of normalized data was analyzed along with appropriate internal control genes: β-actin and 18s rRNA which were included in detecting of WYMV-infected wheat leaf tissues. The detectable end point sensitivity in RT-qPCR assay was reaching the minimum limit of the quantitative assay and the measurable copy numbers were about 30 at106-fold dilution of total RNA. This value was close to 104-fold more sensitive than that of indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. More positive samples were detected by RT-qPCR assay than gel-based RT-PCR when detecting the suspected samples collected from 8 regions of China. Based on presented results, RT-qPCR will provide a valuable method for the quantitative detection of WYMV. Conclusions The Taqman-based RT-qPCR assay is a faster, simpler, more sensitive and less expensive procedure for detection and quantification of WYMV than other currently used methods. PMID:23725024

  2. Hard real-time beam scheduler enables adaptive images in multi-probe systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    Real-time embedded-system concepts were adapted to allow an imaging system to responsively control the firing of multiple probes. Large-volume, operator-independent (LVOI) imaging would increase the diagnostic utility of ultrasound. An obstacle to this innovation is the inability of current systems to drive multiple transducers dynamically. Commercial systems schedule scanning with static lists of beams to be fired and processed; here we allow an imager to adapt to changing beam schedule demands, as an intelligent response to incoming image data. An example of scheduling changes is demonstrated with a flexible duplex mode two-transducer application mimicking LVOI imaging. Embedded-system concepts allow an imager to responsively control the firing of multiple probes. Operating systems use powerful dynamic scheduling algorithms, such as fixed priority preemptive scheduling. Even real-time operating systems lack the timing constraints required for ultrasound. Particularly for Doppler modes, events must be scheduled with sub-nanosecond precision, and acquired data is useless without this requirement. A successful scheduler needs unique characteristics. To get close to what would be needed in LVOI imaging, we show two transducers scanning different parts of a subjects leg. When one transducer notices flow in a region where their scans overlap, the system reschedules the other transducer to start flow mode and alter its beams to get a view of the observed vessel and produce a flow measurement. The second transducer does this in a focused region only. This demonstrates key attributes of a successful LVOI system, such as robustness against obstructions and adaptive self-correction.

  3. New sensitive one-step real-time duplex PCR method for group A and B HIV-2 RNA load.

    PubMed

    Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique; Damond, Florence; Gueudin, Marie; Matheron, Sophie; Mélard, Adeline; Collin, Gilles; Descamps, Diane; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Rouzioux, Christine; Plantier, Jean-Christophe

    2014-08-01

    The Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le Sida et les hépatites virales (ANRS) previously developed a widely used method for HIV-1 RNA quantification (Biocentric). Here, we report the development of a new specific and sensitive method for HIV-2 RNA quantification, based on an adaptation of the existing HIV-1 protocol. The new test is based on TaqMan one-step reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) targeting two conserved consensus regions of HIV-2 (long terminal repeat [LTR] and gag). Analytic performances were determined in three laboratories. Clinical performances were evaluated on 100 plasma samples from HIV-2-infected patients (groups A, B, and H) by comparison with the assay currently used for the ANRS HIV-2 cohort. The specificity was 100%. Sensitivity was 50 copies/ml (cp/ml) and was optimized to 10 cp/ml. The within-run coefficients of variation in the three laboratories varied from 0.54% to 1.61% at 4 log10 copies/ml and from 7.24% to 14.32% at 2 log10 cp/ml. The between-run coefficients of variation varied from 2.28% to 6.43%. Of the 39 clinical samples below 2 log10 in the current assay, the new test improved the detection or quantification of 17 samples, including eight group B samples. For quantifiable samples, similar loads were obtained with the two assays for group A samples. The median difference between the two assays for group B samples was +0.18 but with greater heterogeneity than for group A. The HIV-2 group H sample had similar results with the two assays. This new assay is highly sensitive and accurately quantifies the most prevalent HIV-2 groups. This test will be useful for monitoring low viral loads in HIV-2-infected patients. PMID:24920771

  4. Deficits in stepping response time are associated with impairments in balance and mobility in people with Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Allon; Schepens, Stacey L.; Feely, Shawna M. E.; Garbern, James Y.; Miller, Lindsey J.; Siskind, Carly E.; Conti, Gerry E

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a disorder characterized by chorea, dystonia, bradykinesia, cognitive decline and psychiatric comorbidities. Balance and gait impairments, as well as falls, are common manifestations of the disease. The importance of compensatory rapid stepping to maintain equilibrium in older adults is established, yet little is known of the role of stepping response times (SRTs) in balance control in people with HD. SRTs and commonly-used clinical measures of balance and mobility were evaluated in fourteen symptomatic participants with HD, and nine controls at a university mobility research laboratory. Relative and absolute reliability, as well as minimal detectable change in SRT were quantified in the HD participants. HD participants exhibited slower SRTs and poorer dynamic balance, mobility and motor performance than controls. HD participants also reported lower balance confidence than controls. Deficits in SRT were associated with low balance confidence and impairments on clinical measures of balance, mobility, and motor performance in HD participants. Measures of relative and absolute reliability indicate that SRT is reliable and reproducible across trials in people with HD. A moderately low percent minimal detectable change suggests that SRT appears sensitive to detecting real change in people with HD. SRT is impaired in people with HD and may be a valid and objective marker of disease progression. PMID:20804986

  5. Unified Modeling Language description of the object-oriented multi-scale adaptive finite element method for Step-and-Flash Imprint Lithography Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszyński, Maciej; Gurgul, Piotr; Sieniek, Marcin; Pardo, David

    2010-06-01

    In the first part of the paper we present the multi-scale simulation of the Step-and-Flash Imprint Lithography (SFIL), a modern patterning process. The simulation utilizes the hp adaptive Finite Element Method (hp-FEM) coupled with Molecular Statics (MS) model. Thus, we consider the multi-scale problem, with molecular statics applied in the areas of the mesh where the highest accuracy is required, and the continuous linear elasticity with thermal expansion coefficient applied in the remaining part of the domain. The degrees of freedom from macro-scale element's nodes located on the macro-scale side of the interface have been identified with particles from nano-scale elements located on the nano-scale side of the interface. In the second part of the paper we present Unified Modeling Language (UML) description of the resulting multi-scale application (hp-FEM coupled with MS). We investigated classical, procedural codes from the point of view of the object-oriented (O-O) programming paradigm. The discovered hierarchical structure of classes and algorithms makes the UML project as independent on the spatial dimension of the problem as possible. The O-O UML project was defined at an abstract level, independent on the programming language used.

  6. Real-time, adaptive machine learning for non-stationary, near chaotic gasoline engine combustion time series.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Adam; Bohac, Stanislav V

    2015-10-01

    Fuel efficient Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine combustion timing predictions must contend with non-linear chemistry, non-linear physics, period doubling bifurcation(s), turbulent mixing, model parameters that can drift day-to-day, and air-fuel mixture state information that cannot typically be resolved on a cycle-to-cycle basis, especially during transients. In previous work, an abstract cycle-to-cycle mapping function coupled with ϵ-Support Vector Regression was shown to predict experimentally observed cycle-to-cycle combustion timing over a wide range of engine conditions, despite some of the aforementioned difficulties. The main limitation of the previous approach was that a partially acasual randomly sampled training dataset was used to train proof of concept offline predictions. The objective of this paper is to address this limitation by proposing a new online adaptive Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) extension named Weighted Ring-ELM. This extension enables fully causal combustion timing predictions at randomly chosen engine set points, and is shown to achieve results that are as good as or better than the previous offline method. The broader objective of this approach is to enable a new class of real-time model predictive control strategies for high variability HCCI and, ultimately, to bring HCCI's low engine-out NOx and reduced CO2 emissions to production engines. PMID:26164437

  7. Visualization of Time-Series Sensor Data to Inform the Design of Just-In-Time Adaptive Stress Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Moushumi; Raij, Andrew; Epstien, David; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Beck, J. Gayle; Vhaduri, Sudip; Preston, Kenzie; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    We investigate needs, challenges, and opportunities in visualizing time-series sensor data on stress to inform the design of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). We identify seven key challenges: massive volume and variety of data, complexity in identifying stressors, scalability of space, multifaceted relationship between stress and time, a need for representation at multiple granularities, interperson variability, and limited understanding of JITAI design requirements due to its novelty. We propose four new visualizations based on one million minutes of sensor data (n=70). We evaluate our visualizations with stress researchers (n=6) to gain first insights into its usability and usefulness in JITAI design. Our results indicate that spatio-temporal visualizations help identify and explain between- and within-person variability in stress patterns and contextual visualizations enable decisions regarding the timing, content, and modality of intervention. Interestingly, a granular representation is considered informative but noise-prone; an abstract representation is the preferred starting point for designing JITAIs. PMID:26539566

  8. Gas image enhancement based on adaptive time-domain filtering and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Changxing; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Long, Yunting; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    The fingerprint region of most gases is within 3 to 14μm. A mid-wave or long-wave infrared thermal imager is therefore commonly applied in gas detection. With further influence of low gas concentration and heterogeneity of infrared focal plane arrays, the image has numerous drawbacks. These include loud noise, weak gas signal, gridding, and dead points, all of which are particularly evident in sequential images. In order to solve these problems, we take into account the characteristics of the leaking gas image and propose an enhancement method based on adaptive time-domain filtering with morphology. The adaptive time-domain filtering which operates on time sequence images is a hybrid method combining the recursive filtering and mean filtering. It segments gas and background according to a selected threshold; removes speckle noise according to the median; and removes background domain using weighted difference image. The morphology method can not only dilate the gas region along the direction of gas diffusion to greatly enhance the visibility of the leakage area, but also effectively remove the noise, and smooth the contour. Finally, the false color is added to the gas domain. Results show that the gas infrared region is effectively enhanced.

  9. Evolving curriculum design: a novel framework for continuous, timely, and relevant curriculum adaptation in faculty development.

    PubMed

    Lieff, Susan Janet

    2009-01-01

    The time lag between needs assessment and implementation of faculty development curricula assumes a certain stability of participants' individual and contextual needs which may not reflect the often complex and shifting priorities in health professional schools. In addition to the variability of issues they face, participants are typically better able to recognize and articulate their needs once engaged in a curriculum.This article is a conceptual description of how applying an umbrella strategy to curriculum design illuminated an iterative methodology for continuous adaptation of the 2004-2006 University of Toronto Education Scholars Program in real time to the emergent needs of participants and their context. The general goals or umbrella for the core curriculum were determined by a broad-based environmental scan. In keeping with a learner-centered collaborative program, a number of process strategies were developed to solicit input from participants during the two years of the program. These included creating a dialogue space, use of class and program evaluations, modified Delphi needs assessments, and opinion leader interviews. Adaptation of curriculum was enabled by protection of curriculum time and flexibility of course leadership. The application of strategy theory to curriculum design has not been previously described. This iterative approach enabled course leadership to successfully identify multiple unperceived issues to address. With this unique and cyclical process, curricular relevance and timeliness are ensured as well as enhancing participant motivation and engagement, consistent with adult learning principles. This methodology should be considered by course directors of all continuing professional development programs. PMID:19116491

  10. Neural network approach to continuous-time direct adaptive optimal control for partially unknown nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Vrabie, Draguna; Lewis, Frank

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we present in a continuous-time framework an online approach to direct adaptive optimal control with infinite horizon cost for nonlinear systems. The algorithm converges online to the optimal control solution without knowledge of the internal system dynamics. Closed-loop dynamic stability is guaranteed throughout. The algorithm is based on a reinforcement learning scheme, namely Policy Iterations, and makes use of neural networks, in an Actor/Critic structure, to parametrically represent the control policy and the performance of the control system. The two neural networks are trained to express the optimal controller and optimal cost function which describes the infinite horizon control performance. Convergence of the algorithm is proven under the realistic assumption that the two neural networks do not provide perfect representations for the nonlinear control and cost functions. The result is a hybrid control structure which involves a continuous-time controller and a supervisory adaptation structure which operates based on data sampled from the plant and from the continuous-time performance dynamics. Such control structure is unlike any standard form of controllers previously seen in the literature. Simulation results, obtained considering two second-order nonlinear systems, are provided. PMID:19362449

  11. Adaptive instant record signals applied to detection with time reversal operator decomposition.

    PubMed

    Folegot, Thomas; de Rosny, Julien; Prada, Claire; Fink, Mathias

    2005-06-01

    Time reversal arrays are becoming common tools whether for detection or tomography. These applications require the measurement of the response from the array to one or several receivers. The most natural way to record the impulse responses for several sources is to generate pulses successively from each emitting point and record simultaneously the signals from the receivers. However, this method is very time consuming or inefficient in terms of signal-to-noise ratio. To overcome this limitation quasi-orthogonal pseudonoise signals like Kasami sequences can be used. For guided wave propagation, a very high degree of orthogonality between the signal is necessary to allow an accurate measure of the whole multipath structure of the transfer function. Hence, in this work, we propose a new family of pseudo-orthogonal signals that is adapted to the environment and more specifically, to highly dispersive media. These adaptive instant records signals are used experimentally to detect targets using the time reversal operator decomposition method. The accuracy of the 15 x 15 transfer functions acquired simultaneously, and therefore the detection capability, are demonstrated in an experimental ultrasonic waveguide as a small-scale model of shallow water propagation including bottom absorption and reverberation. PMID:16018479

  12. Congruency sequence effects and previous response times: conflict adaptation or temporal learning?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, James R; Weissman, Daniel H

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we followed up on a recent report of two experiments in which the congruency sequence effect-the reduction of the congruency effect after incongruent relative to congruent trials in Stroop-like tasks-was observed without feature repetition or contingency learning confounds. Specifically, we further scrutinized these data to determine the plausibility of a temporal learning account as an alternative to the popular conflict adaptation account. To this end, we employed a linear mixed effects model to investigate the role of previous response time in producing the congruency sequence effect, because previous response time is thought to influence temporal learning. Interestingly, slower previous response times were associated with a reduced current-trial congruency effect, but only when the previous trial was congruent. An adapted version of the parallel episodic processing (PEP) model was able to fit these data if it was additionally assumed that attention "wanders" during different parts of the experiment (e.g., due to fatigue or other factors). Consistent with this assumption, the magnitude of the congruency effect was correlated across small blocks of trials. These findings demonstrate that a temporal learning mechanism provides a plausible account of the congruency sequence effect. PMID:26093801

  13. Adaptive and optimal detection of elastic object scattering with single-channel monostatic iterative time reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Ying-Zi; Ma, Li; Guo, Sheng-Ming

    2011-05-01

    In active sonar operation, the presence of background reverberation and the low signal-to-noise ratio hinder the detection of targets. This paper investigates the application of single-channel monostatic iterative time reversal to mitigate the difficulties by exploiting the resonances of the target. Theoretical analysis indicates that the iterative process will adaptively lead echoes to converge to a narrowband signal corresponding to a scattering object's dominant resonance mode, thus optimising the return level. The experiments in detection of targets in free field and near a planar interface have been performed. The results illustrate the feasibility of the method.

  14. Discrete-time entropy formulation of optimal and adaptive control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Yweting A.; Casiello, Francisco A.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    1992-01-01

    The discrete-time version of the entropy formulation of optimal control of problems developed by G. N. Saridis (1988) is discussed. Given a dynamical system, the uncertainty in the selection of the control is characterized by the probability distribution (density) function which maximizes the total entropy. The equivalence between the optimal control problem and the optimal entropy problem is established, and the total entropy is decomposed into a term associated with the certainty equivalent control law, the entropy of estimation, and the so-called equivocation of the active transmission of information from the controller to the estimator. This provides a useful framework for studying the certainty equivalent and adaptive control laws.

  15. Adaptive mode control of a few-mode fiber by real-time mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liangjin; Leng, Jinyong; Zhou, Pu; Guo, Shaofeng; Lü, Haibin; Cheng, Xiang'ai

    2015-10-19

    A novel approach to adaptively control the beam profile in a few-mode fiber is experimentally demonstrated. We stress the fiber through an electric-controlled polarization controller, whose driven voltage depends on the current and target modal content difference obtained with the real-time mode decomposition. We have achieved selective excitations of LP01 and LP11 modes, as well as significant improvement of the beam quality factor, which may play crucial roles for high-power fiber lasers, fiber based telecommunication systems and other fundamental researches and applications. PMID:26480466

  16. Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Palmer, D

    2004-03-22

    Time series analysis techniques are applied to wave-front sensor telemetry data from the Lick Adaptive Optics System. For 28 fully-illuminated subapertures, telemetry data of 4096 consecutive slope estimates for each subaperture are available. The primary problem is performance comparison of alternative wave-front sensing algorithms. Using direct comparison of data in open loop and closed-loop trials, we analyze algorithm performance in terms of gain, noise and residual power. We also explore the benefits of multi-input Wiener filtering and analyze the open-loop and closed-loop spatial correlations of the sensor measurements.

  17. Adaptive feedback synchronisation of complex dynamical network with discrete-time communications and delayed nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Ding, Yongsheng; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Kuangrong

    2016-08-01

    This paper considered the synchronisation of continuous complex dynamical networks with discrete-time communications and delayed nodes. The nodes in the dynamical networks act in the continuous manner, while the communications between nodes are discrete-time; that is, they communicate with others only at discrete time instants. The communication intervals in communication period can be uncertain and variable. By using a piecewise Lyapunov-Krasovskii function to govern the characteristics of the discrete communication instants, we investigate the adaptive feedback synchronisation and a criterion is derived to guarantee the existence of the desired controllers. The globally exponential synchronisation can be achieved by the controllers under the updating laws. Finally, two numerical examples including globally coupled network and nearest-neighbour coupled networks are presented to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  18. Real-time artificial intelligence issues in the development of the adaptive tactical navigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Peter E.; Glasson, Douglas P.; Pomarede, Jean-Michel L.; Acharya, Narayan A.

    1987-01-01

    Adaptive Tactical Navigation (ATN) is a laboratory prototype of a knowledge based system to provide navigation system management and decision aiding in the next generation of tactical aircraft. ATN's purpose is to manage a set of multimode navigation equipment, dynamically selecting the best equipment to use in accordance with mission goals and phase, threat environment, equipment malfunction status, and battle damage. ATN encompasses functions as diverse as sensor data interpretation, diagnosis, and planning. Real time issues that were identified in ATN and the approaches used to address them are addressed. Functional requirements and a global architecture for the ATN system are described. Decision making with time constraints are discussed. Two subproblems are identified; making decisions with incomplete information and with limited resources. Approaches used in ATN to address real time performance are described and simulation results are discussed.

  19. Multi-layer holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Huang, K.; Diep, J.

    1992-01-01

    Optical data processing techniques have the inherent advantage of high data throughout, low weight and low power requirements. These features are particularly desirable for onboard spacecraft in-situ real-time data analysis and data compression applications. The proposed multi-layer optical holographic neural net pattern recognition technique will utilize the nonlinear photorefractive devices for real-time adaptive learning to classify input data content and recognize unexpected features. Information can be stored either in analog or digital form in a nonlinear photorefractive device. The recording can be accomplished in time scales ranging from milliseconds to microseconds. When a system consisting of these devices is organized in a multi-layer structure, a feed forward neural net with bifurcating data classification capability is formed. The interdisciplinary research will involve the collaboration with top digital computer architecture experts at the University of Southern California.

  20. Multi-layer holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Huang, K. S.; Diep, J.

    1993-01-01

    Optical data processing techniques have the inherent advantage of high data throughout, low weight and low power requirements. These features are particularly desirable for onboard spacecraft in-situ real-time data analysis and data compression applications. the proposed multi-layer optical holographic neural net pattern recognition technique will utilize the nonlinear photorefractive devices for real-time adaptive learning to classify input data content and recognize unexpected features. Information can be stored either in analog or digital form in a nonlinear photofractive device. The recording can be accomplished in time scales ranging from milliseconds to microseconds. When a system consisting of these devices is organized in a multi-layer structure, a feedforward neural net with bifurcating data classification capability is formed. The interdisciplinary research will involve the collaboration with top digital computer architecture experts at the University of Southern California.

  1. Adaptive finite volume methods for time-dependent P.D.E.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.; Berzins, M.

    1995-12-31

    The aim of adaptive methods for time-dependent p.d.e.s is to control the numerical error so that it is less than a user-specified tolerance. This error depends on the spatial discretization method, the spatial mesh, the method of time integration and the timestep. The spatial discretization method and positioning of the spatial mesh points should attempt to ensure that the spatial error is controlled to meet the user`s requirements. It is then desirable to integrate the o.d.e. system in time with sufficient accuracy so that the temporal error does not corrupt the spatial accuracy or the reliability of the spatial error estimates. This paper is concerned with the development of a prototype algorithm of this type, based on a cell-centered triangular finite volume scheme, for two space dimensional convection-dominated problems.

  2. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Postprostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, Hiram A.; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials: Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (D{sub min}) with the planned D{sub min} to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV D{sub min} is at least 95% of the planned CTV D{sub min}. Results: Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: −0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion: Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery.

  3. Photocycles of bacteriorhodopsin in light- and dark-adapted purple membrane studied by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hofrichter, J; Henry, E R; Lozier, R H

    1989-01-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved absorption spectra have been measured throughout the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin in both light-adapted and dark-adapted purple membrane (PM). The data from dark-adapted samples are interpretable as the superposition of two photocycles arising independently from the all-trans and 13-cis retinal isomers that coexist in the dark-adapted state. The presence of a photocycle in dark-adapted PM which is indistinguishable from that observed for light-adapted PM under the same experimental conditions is demonstrated by the observation of the same five relaxation rates associated with essentially identical changes in the photoproduct spectra. This cycle is attributed to the all-trans component. The cycle of the 13-cis component is revealed by scaling the data measured for the light-adapted sample and subtracting it from the data on the dark-adapted mixture. At times less than 1 ms, the resulting difference spectra are nearly time-independent. The peak of the difference spectrum is near 600 nm, although there appears to be a slight (approximately 2 nm) blue-shift in the first few microseconds. Subsequently the amplitude of this spectrum decays and the peak of the difference spectrum shifts in two relaxations. Most of the amplitude of the photoproduct difference spectrum (approximately 80%) decays in a single relaxation having a time constant of approximately 35 ms. The difference spectrum remaining after this relaxation peaks at approximately 590 nm and is indistinguishable from the classical light-dark difference spectrum, which we find, in experiments performed on a much longer time scale, to peak at 588 nm. The decay of this remaining photo-product is not resolvable in the nanosecond kinetic experiments, but dark adaptation of a completely light-adapted sample is found to occur exponentially with a relaxation time of approximately 2,000 s under the conditions of our experiments. PMID:2819234

  4. Third-order-accurate numerical methods for efficient, large time-step solutions of mixed linear and nonlinear problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    There is an increasing need for more accurate numerical methods for large-scale nonlinear magneto-fluid turbulence calculations. These methods should not only increase the current state of the art in terms of accuracy, but should also continue to optimize other desired properties such as simplicity, minimized computation, minimized memory requirements, and robust stability. This includes the ability to stably solve stiff problems with long time-steps. This work discusses a general methodology for deriving higher-order numerical methods. It also discusses how the selection of various choices can affect the desired properties. The explicit discussion focuses on third-order Runge-Kutta methods, including general solutions and five examples. The study investigates the linear numerical analysis of these methods, including their accuracy, general stability, and stiff stability. Additional appendices discuss linear multistep methods, discuss directions for further work, and exhibit numerical analysis results for some other commonly used lower-order methods.

  5. Stepped mirrored structures for generating true time delays in stationary optical delay line proof-of-principle experiments for application to optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansz, Paul Vernon; Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Conventional time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) relies on the detection of an interference pattern generated by the interference of backscattered light from the sample and a reference Optical Delay Line (ODL). By referencing the sample interference with the scan depth of the ODL, constructive interference indicates depth in the sample of a reflecting structure. Conventional ODLs used in time domain OCT require some physical movement of a mirror to scan a given depth range. This movement results in instrument degradation. Also in some situations it is necessary to have no moving parts. Stationary ODLs (SODLs) include dual Reflective Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) systems (Type I) and single Transmissive SLM with match-arrayed-waveguide systems (Type II). In this paper, the method of fabrication and characterisation of a number of Stepped Mirrored Structures (SMS) is presented. These structures are intended for later use in proof-of-principle experiments that demonstrate Type II SODL: a six step, 2 mm step depth macro-SMS, an eight step 150 um deep micro-SMS with glue between steps, and a six step 150 um deep micro-SMS with no glue between steps. These SMS are characterized in terms of their fabrication, step alignment and step height increment precision. The degree of alignment of each step was verified using half of a bulk Michelson interferometer. Step height was gauged using a pair of vernier callipers measuring each individual step. A change in notch frequency using an in-fibre Mach-Zhender interferometer was used to gauge the average step height and the result compared to the vernier calliper results. The best aligned SMS was the micro-SMS prepared by method B with no glue between steps. It demonstrated a 95% confidence interval variation of 1% in reflected intensity, with the least variation in intensity within steps. This SMS also had the least absolute variation in step height increment: less than 8 um. Though less variation would be ideal, for

  6. The role of the time step and overshooting in the modelling of PMS evolution: The case of EK Cephei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, J. P.; Fernandes, J.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.

    2004-07-01

    EK Cephei (HD 206821) is a unique candidate to test predictions based on stellar evolutionary models. It is a double-lined detached eclipsing binary system with accurate absolute dimensions available and a precise determination of the metallicity. Most importantly for our work, its low mass (1.12 Msun) component appears to be in the pre-main sequence (PMS) phase. We have produced detailed evolutionary models of the binary EK Cep using the CESAM stellar evolution code (Morel \\cite{morel97}). A χ2-minimisation was performed to derive the most reliable set of modelling parameters (age, αA, αB and Yi). We have found that an evolutionary age of about 26.8 Myr fits both components in the same isochrone. The positions of EK Cep A and B in the HR diagram are consistent (within the observational uncertainties) with our results. Our revised calibration shows clearly that EK Cep A is in the beginning of the main sequence, while EK Cep B is indeed a PMS star. Such a combination allows for a precise age determination of the binary, and provides a strict test of the modelling. In particular we have found that the definition of the time step in calculating the PMS evolution is crucial to reproduce the observations. A discussion of the optimal time step for calculating PMS evolution is presented. The fitting to the radii of both components is a more difficult task; although we managed to do it for EK Cep B, EK Cep A has a lower radius than our best models. We further studied the effect of the inclusion of a moderate convective overshooting; the calibration of the binary is not significantly altered, but the effect of the inclusion of overshooting can be dramatic in the approach to the main sequence of stars with masses high enough to burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle on the main sequence.

  7. Volume and enthalpy changes in the early steps of bacteriorhodopsin photocycle studied by time-resolved photoacoustics.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, D; Mauzerall, D

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the photoinduced volume changes, energetics, and kinetics in the early steps of the bacteriorhodopsin (BR) photocycle with pulsed, time-resolved photoacoustics. Our data show that there are two volume changes. The fast volume change ( < or = 200 ns) is an expansion (2.5 +/- 0.3 A3/molecule) and is observed exclusively in the purple membrane (PM), vanishing in the 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio] -1-propane-sulfonate-sulfonate-solubilized BR sample; the slow change (approximately 1 micros) is a volume contraction (-3.7 +/- 0.3 A3/molecule). The fast expansion is assigned to the restructuring of the aggregated BR in the PM, and the 1-micros contraction to the change in hydrogen bonding of water at Asp 212 (Kandori et al. 1995. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117:2118-2119). The formation of the K intermediate releases most of the absorbed energy as heat, with delta Hk = -36 +/- 8 kJ/mol. The activation energy of the K --> L step is 49 +/- 6 kJ/mol, but the enthalpy change is small, -4 +/- 10 kJ/mol. On the time scale we studied, the primary photochemical kinetics, enthalpy, and volume changes are not affected by substituting the solvent D2O for H2O. Comparing data on monomeric and aggregated BR, we conclude that the functional unit for the photocycle is the BR monomer, because both the kinetics (rate constant and activation energy) and the enthalpy changes are independent of its aggregation state. PMID:8804620

  8. Adaptive and phase selective spike timing dependent plasticity in synaptically coupled neuronal oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, Victor; Tyukin, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    We consider and analyze the influence of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) on homeostatic states in synaptically coupled neuronal oscillators. In contrast to conventional models of STDP in which spike-timing affects weights of synaptic connections, we consider a model of STDP in which the time lags between pre- and/or post-synaptic spikes change internal state of pre- and/or post-synaptic neurons respectively. The analysis reveals that STDP processes of this type, modeled by a single ordinary differential equation, may ensure efficient, yet coarse, phase-locking of spikes in the system to a given reference phase. Precision of the phase locking, i.e. the amplitude of relative phase deviations from the reference, depends on the values of natural frequencies of oscillators and, additionally, on parameters of the STDP law. These deviations can be optimized by appropriate tuning of gains (i.e. sensitivity to spike-timing mismatches) of the STDP mechanism. However, as we demonstrate, such deviations can not be made arbitrarily small neither by mere tuning of STDP gains nor by adjusting synaptic weights. Thus if accurate phase-locking in the system is required then an additional tuning mechanism is generally needed. We found that adding a very simple adaptation dynamics in the form of slow fluctuations of the base line in the STDP mechanism enables accurate phase tuning in the system with arbitrary high precision. Adaptation operating at a slow time scale may be associated with extracellular matter such as matrix and glia. Thus the findings may suggest a possible role of the latter in regulating synaptic transmission in neuronal circuits. PMID:22412830

  9. Adaptive and Phase Selective Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity in Synaptically Coupled Neuronal Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Kazantsev, Victor; Tyukin, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    We consider and analyze the influence of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) on homeostatic states in synaptically coupled neuronal oscillators. In contrast to conventional models of STDP in which spike-timing affects weights of synaptic connections, we consider a model of STDP in which the time lags between pre- and/or post-synaptic spikes change internal state of pre- and/or post-synaptic neurons respectively. The analysis reveals that STDP processes of this type, modeled by a single ordinary differential equation, may ensure efficient, yet coarse, phase-locking of spikes in the system to a given reference phase. Precision of the phase locking, i.e. the amplitude of relative phase deviations from the reference, depends on the values of natural frequencies of oscillators and, additionally, on parameters of the STDP law. These deviations can be optimized by appropriate tuning of gains (i.e. sensitivity to spike-timing mismatches) of the STDP mechanism. However, as we demonstrate, such deviations can not be made arbitrarily small neither by mere tuning of STDP gains nor by adjusting synaptic weights. Thus if accurate phase-locking in the system is required then an additional tuning mechanism is generally needed. We found that adding a very simple adaptation dynamics in the form of slow fluctuations of the base line in the STDP mechanism enables accurate phase tuning in the system with arbitrary high precision. Adaptation operating at a slow time scale may be associated with extracellular matter such as matrix and glia. Thus the findings may suggest a possible role of the latter in regulating synaptic transmission in neuronal circuits. PMID:22412830

  10. Self-Adaptive Spike-Time-Dependent Plasticity of Metal-Oxide Memristors

    PubMed Central

    Prezioso, M.; Merrikh Bayat, F.; Hoskins, B.; Likharev, K.; Strukov, D.

    2016-01-01

    Metal-oxide memristors have emerged as promising candidates for hardware implementation of artificial synapses – the key components of high-performance, analog neuromorphic networks - due to their excellent scaling prospects. Since some advanced cognitive tasks require spiking neuromorphic networks, which explicitly model individual neural pulses (“spikes”) in biological neural systems, it is crucial for memristive synapses to support the spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). A major challenge for the STDP implementation is that, in contrast to some simplistic models of the plasticity, the elementary change of a synaptic weight in an artificial hardware synapse depends not only on the pre-synaptic and post-synaptic signals, but also on the initial weight (memristor’s conductance) value. Here we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, an STDP behavior that ensures self-adaptation of the average memristor conductance, making the plasticity stable, i.e. insensitive to the initial state of the devices. The experiments have been carried out with 200-nm Al2O3/TiO2−x memristors integrated into 12 × 12 crossbars. The experimentally observed self-adaptive STDP behavior has been complemented with numerical modeling of weight dynamics in a simple system with a leaky-integrate-and-fire neuron with a random spike-train input, using a compact model of memristor plasticity, fitted for quantitatively correct description of our memristors. PMID:26893175

  11. Data rate management and real time operation: recursive adaptive frame integration of limited data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Michael K.

    2006-08-01

    Recursive Limited Frame Integration was proposed as a way to improve frame integration performance and mitigate issues related to high data rate needed to support conventional frame integration. The technique uses two thresholds -one tuned for optimum probability of detection, the other to manage required false alarm rate, and places integration process between those thresholds. This configuration allows a non-linear integration process that, along with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) gain, provides system designers more capability where cost, weight, or power considerations limit system data rate, processing, or memory capability. However, Recursive Frame Integration Limited may have performance issues when single-frame SNR is really low. Recursive Adaptive Limited Frame Integration was proposed as a means to improve limited integration performance with really low single-frame SNR. It combines the benefits of nonlinear recursive limited frame integration and adaptive thresholds with a kind of conventional frame integration. Adding the third threshold may help in managing real time operations. In the paper the Recursive Frame Integration is presented in form of multiple parallel recursive integration. Such an approach can help not only in data rate management but in mitigation of low single frame SNR issue for Recursive Integration as well as in real time operations with frame integration.

  12. Self-Adaptive Spike-Time-Dependent Plasticity of Metal-Oxide Memristors.

    PubMed

    Prezioso, M; Merrikh Bayat, F; Hoskins, B; Likharev, K; Strukov, D

    2016-01-01

    Metal-oxide memristors have emerged as promising candidates for hardware implementation of artificial synapses - the key components of high-performance, analog neuromorphic networks - due to their excellent scaling prospects. Since some advanced cognitive tasks require spiking neuromorphic networks, which explicitly model individual neural pulses ("spikes") in biological neural systems, it is crucial for memristive synapses to support the spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). A major challenge for the STDP implementation is that, in contrast to some simplistic models of the plasticity, the elementary change of a synaptic weight in an artificial hardware synapse depends not only on the pre-synaptic and post-synaptic signals, but also on the initial weight (memristor's conductance) value. Here we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, an STDP behavior that ensures self-adaptation of the average memristor conductance, making the plasticity stable, i.e. insensitive to the initial state of the devices. The experiments have been carried out with 200-nm Al2O3/TiO2-x memristors integrated into 12 × 12 crossbars. The experimentally observed self-adaptive STDP behavior has been complemented with numerical modeling of weight dynamics in a simple system with a leaky-integrate-and-fire neuron with a random spike-train input, using a compact model of memristor plasticity, fitted for quantitatively correct description of our memristors. PMID:26893175

  13. Finite-approximation-error-based discrete-time iterative adaptive dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qinglai; Wang, Fei-Yue; Liu, Derong; Yang, Xiong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a new iterative adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm is developed to solve optimal control problems for infinite horizon discrete-time nonlinear systems with finite approximation errors. First, a new generalized value iteration algorithm of ADP is developed to make the iterative performance index function converge to the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. The generalized value iteration algorithm permits an arbitrary positive semi-definite function to initialize it, which overcomes the disadvantage of traditional value iteration algorithms. When the iterative control law and iterative performance index function in each iteration cannot accurately be obtained, for the first time a new "design method of the convergence criteria" for the finite-approximation-error-based generalized value iteration algorithm is established. A suitable approximation error can be designed adaptively to make the iterative performance index function converge to a finite neighborhood of the optimal performance index function. Neural networks are used to implement the iterative ADP algorithm. Finally, two simulation examples are given to illustrate the performance of the developed method. PMID:25265640

  14. Self-Adaptive Spike-Time-Dependent Plasticity of Metal-Oxide Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezioso, M.; Merrikh Bayat, F.; Hoskins, B.; Likharev, K.; Strukov, D.

    2016-02-01

    Metal-oxide memristors have emerged as promising candidates for hardware implementation of artificial synapses - the key components of high-performance, analog neuromorphic networks - due to their excellent scaling prospects. Since some advanced cognitive tasks require spiking neuromorphic networks, which explicitly model individual neural pulses (“spikes”) in biological neural systems, it is crucial for memristive synapses to support the spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). A major challenge for the STDP implementation is that, in contrast to some simplistic models of the plasticity, the elementary change of a synaptic weight in an artificial hardware synapse depends not only on the pre-synaptic and post-synaptic signals, but also on the initial weight (memristor’s conductance) value. Here we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, an STDP behavior that ensures self-adaptation of the average memristor conductance, making the plasticity stable, i.e. insensitive to the initial state of the devices. The experiments have been carried out with 200-nm Al2O3/TiO2-x memristors integrated into 12 × 12 crossbars. The experimentally observed self-adaptive STDP behavior has been complemented with numerical modeling of weight dynamics in a simple system with a leaky-integrate-and-fire neuron with a random spike-train input, using a compact model of memristor plasticity, fitted for quantitatively correct description of our memristors.

  15. Real-Time Adaptive EEG Source Separation Using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Mullen, Tim R; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-03-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has been widely applied to electroencephalographic (EEG) biosignal processing and brain-computer interfaces. The practical use of ICA, however, is limited by its computational complexity, data requirements for convergence, and assumption of data stationarity, especially for high-density data. Here we study and validate an optimized online recursive ICA algorithm (ORICA) with online recursive least squares (RLS) whitening for blind source separation of high-density EEG data, which offers instantaneous incremental convergence upon presentation of new data. Empirical results of this study demonstrate the algorithm's: 1) suitability for accurate and efficient source identification in high-density (64-channel) realistically-simulated EEG data; 2) capability to detect and adapt to nonstationarity in 64-ch simulated EEG data; and 3) utility for rapidly extracting principal brain and artifact sources in real 61-channel EEG data recorded by a dry and wearable EEG system in a cognitive experiment. ORICA was implemented as functions in BCILAB and EEGLAB and was integrated in an open-source Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), supporting applications in ICA-based online artifact rejection, feature extraction for real-time biosignal monitoring in clinical environments, and adaptable classifications in brain-computer interfaces. PMID:26685257

  16. A Unified Approach to Adaptive Neural Control for Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems With Nonlinear Dead-Zone Input.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Gao, Ying; Tong, Shaocheng; Chen, C L Philip

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an effective adaptive control approach is constructed to stabilize a class of nonlinear discrete-time systems, which contain unknown functions, unknown dead-zone input, and unknown control direction. Different from linear dead zone, the dead zone, in this paper, is a kind of nonlinear dead zone. To overcome the noncausal problem, which leads to the control scheme infeasible, the systems can be transformed into a m -step-ahead predictor. Due to nonlinear dead-zone appearance, the transformed predictor still contains the nonaffine function. In addition, it is assumed that the gain function of dead-zone input and the control direction are unknown. These conditions bring about the difficulties and the complicacy in the controller design. Thus, the implicit function theorem is applied to deal with nonaffine dead-zone appearance, the problem caused by the unknown control direction can be resolved through applying the discrete Nussbaum gain, and the neural networks are used to approximate the unknown function. Based on the Lyapunov theory, all the signals of the resulting closed-loop system are proved to be semiglobal uniformly ultimately bounded. Moreover, the tracking error is proved to be regulated to a small neighborhood around zero. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by a simulation example. PMID:26353383

  17. Application of fuzzy adaptive control to a MIMO nonlinear time-delay pump-valve system.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhounian; Wu, Peng; Wu, Dazhuan

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a control strategy to balance the reliability against efficiency is introduced to overcome the common off-design operation problem in pump-valve systems. The pump-valve system is a nonlinear multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) system with time delays which cannot be accurately measured but can be approximately modeled using Bernoulli Principle. A fuzzy adaptive controller is applied to approximate system parameters and achieve the control of delay-free model since the system model is inaccurate and the direct feedback linearization method cannot be applied. An extended Smith predictor is introduced to compensate time delays of the system using the inaccurate system model. The experiment is carried out to verify the effectiveness of the control strategy whose results show that the control performance is well achieved. PMID:25681018

  18. Adaptive Neural Control of MIMO Nonstrict-Feedback Nonlinear Systems With Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yang, Haijiao; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Zhu, Yanzheng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural output-feedback tracking controller is designed for a class of multiple-input and multiple-output nonstrict-feedback nonlinear systems with time delay. The system coefficient and uncertain functions of our considered systems are both unknown. By employing neural networks to approximate the unknown function entries, and constructing a new input-driven filter, a backstepping design method of tracking controller is developed for the systems under consideration. The proposed controller can guarantee that all the signals in the closed-loop systems are ultimately bounded, and the time-varying target signal can be tracked within a small error as well. The main contributions of this paper lie in that the systems under consideration are more general, and an effective design procedure of output-feedback controller is developed for the considered systems, which is more applicable in practice. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26099151

  19. Nonlinear adaptive control for teleoperation systems with symmetrical and unsymmetrical time-varying delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, S.; Liu, P. X.; El Saddik, A.

    2015-12-01

    The stability and trajectory tracking control problem of passive teleoperation systems with the presence of the symmetrical and unsymmetrical time-varying communication delay is addressed in this paper. The proposed teleoperator is designed by coupling local and remote sites by delaying position signals of the master and slave manipulator. The design also comprises local proportional and derivative signals with nonlinear adaptive terms to cope with parametric uncertainty associated with the master and slave dynamics. The Lyapunov-Krasovskii function is employed to establish stability conditions for the closed-loop teleoperators under both symmetrical and unsymmetrical time-varying communication delay. These delay-dependent conditions allow the designer to estimate the control gains a priori in order to achieve asymptotic property of the position, velocity and synchronisation errors of the master and slave systems. Finally, simulation results along with comparative studies are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Time-reversed adapted-perturbation (TRAP) optical focusing onto dynamic objects inside scattering media

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cheng; Xu, Xiao; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to steer and focus light inside scattering media has long been sought for a multitude of applications. To form optical foci inside scattering media, the only feasible strategy at present is to guide photons by using either implanted1 or virtual2–4 guide stars, which can be inconvenient and limits potential applications. Here, we report a scheme for focusing light inside scattering media by employing intrinsic dynamics as guide stars. By time-reversing the perturbed component of the scattered light adaptively, we show that it is possible to focus light to the origin of the perturbation. Using the approach, we demonstrate non-invasive dynamic light focusing onto moving targets and imaging of a time-variant object obscured by highly scattering media. Anticipated applications include imaging and photoablation of angiogenic vessels in tumours as well as other biomedical uses. PMID:25530797

  1. Adaptive load-stand design for real-time HWIL JSOW missile control section characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, E. Paul

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of having dynamically adaptive load stand capability is to verify and monitor control section actuator performance under simulated free-flight aerodynamic load conditions in a Closed Loop Real Time HWIL environment. HWIL testing is a cost effective and risk reducing means of evaluating missile system prior to flight testing. This article develops methods of designing, analyzing, and testing of an extension spring driven load stand. Load stand spring natural and surging frequencies are evaluated. Nonlinear control section actuator anomalies are discussed in terms of load stand testing. Actuator time response data is examined under hinge moment and normal force loaded conditions. A design verification procedure was executed to provide a high degree of assurance that the load stand would perform as predicted by analytical methods.

  2. Adaptive filters for monitoring localized brain activity from surface potential time series

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, M.E. |; Leahy, R.M.; Mosher, J.C. |; Lewis, P.S.

    1992-12-01

    We address the problem of processing electroencephalographic (EEG) data to monitor the time series of the components of a current dipole source vector at a given location in the head. This is the spatial filtering problem for vector sources in a lossy, three dimensional, zero delay medium. Dipolar and distributed sources at other than the desired location are canceled or attenuated with an adaptive linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. Actual EEG data acquired from a human subject serves as the interference in a case where the desired source is simulated and superimposed on the actual data. It is shown that the LCMV beamformer extracts the desired dipole time series while effectively canceling the subjects interference.

  3. Adaptive filters for monitoring localized brain activity from surface potential time series

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, M.E. . Signal and Image Processing Inst. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA ); Leahy, R.M. . Signal and Image Processing Inst.); Mosher, J.C. . Signal and Image Processing Inst. Lo

    1992-01-01

    We address the problem of processing electroencephalographic (EEG) data to monitor the time series of the components of a current dipole source vector at a given location in the head. This is the spatial filtering problem for vector sources in a lossy, three dimensional, zero delay medium. Dipolar and distributed sources at other than the desired location are canceled or attenuated with an adaptive linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. Actual EEG data acquired from a human subject serves as the interference in a case where the desired source is simulated and superimposed on the actual data. It is shown that the LCMV beamformer extracts the desired dipole time series while effectively canceling the subjects interference.

  4. A Space-Time Adaptive Method for Simulating Complex Cardiac Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, E. M.; Greenside, H. S.; Henriquez, C. S.

    2000-03-01

    A new space-time adaptive mesh refinement algorithm (AMRA) is presented and analyzed which, by automatically adding and deleting local patches of higher-resolution Cartesian meshes, can simulate quantitatively accurate models of cardiac electrical dynamics efficiently in large domains. We find in two space dimensions that the AMRA is able to achieve a factor of 5 speedup and a factor of 5 reduction in memory while achieving the same accuracy compared to a code based on a uniform space-time mesh at the highest resolution of the AMRA method. We summarize applications of the code to the Luo-Rudy 1 cardiac model in large two- and three-dimensional domains and discuss the implications of our results for understanding the initiation of arrhythmias.

  5. Adaptive, spatially-varying aberration correction for real-time holographic projectors.

    PubMed

    Kaczorowski, Andrzej; Gordon, George S D; Wilkinson, Timothy D

    2016-07-11

    A method of generating an aberration- and distortion-free wide-angle holographically projected image in real time is presented. The target projector is first calibrated using an automated adaptive-optical mechanism. The calibration parameters are then fed into the hologram generation program, which applies a novel piece-wise aberration correction algorithm. The method is found to offer hologram generation times up to three orders of magnitude faster than the standard method. A projection of an aberration- and distortion-free image with a field of view of 90x45 degrees is demonstrated. The implementation on a mid-range GPU achieves high resolution at a frame rate up to 12fps. The presented methods are automated and can be performed on any holographic projector. PMID:27410846

  6. Block structured adaptive mesh and time refinement for hybrid, hyperbolic + N-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Colella, Phillip

    2007-11-01

    We present a new numerical algorithm for the solution of coupled collisional and collisionless systems, based on the block structured adaptive mesh and time refinement strategy (AMR). We describe the issues associated with the discretization of the system equations and the synchronization of the numerical solution on the hierarchy of grid levels. We implement a code based on a higher order, conservative and directionally unsplit Godunov’s method for hydrodynamics; a symmetric, time centered modified symplectic scheme for collisionless component; and a multilevel, multigrid relaxation algorithm for the elliptic equation coupling the two components. Numerical results that illustrate the accuracy of the code and the relative merit of various implemented schemes are also presented.

  7. Real-time motion-adaptive-optimization (MAO) in TomoTherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Mingli; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Chen, Quan; Langen, Katja M.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Olivera, Gustavo H.

    2009-07-01

    IMRT delivery follows a planned leaf sequence, which is optimized before treatment delivery. However, it is hard to model real-time variations, such as respiration, in the planning procedure. In this paper, we propose a negative feedback system of IMRT delivery that incorporates real-time optimization to account for intra-fraction motion. Specifically, we developed a feasible workflow of real-time motion-adaptive-optimization (MAO) for TomoTherapy delivery. TomoTherapy delivery is characterized by thousands of projections with a fast projection rate and ultra-fast binary leaf motion. The technique of MAO-guided delivery calculates (i) the motion-encoded dose that has been delivered up to any given projection during the delivery and (ii) the future dose that will be delivered based on the estimated motion probability and future fluence map. These two pieces of information are then used to optimize the leaf open time of the upcoming projection right before its delivery. It consists of several real-time procedures, including 'motion detection and prediction', 'delivered dose accumulation', 'future dose estimation' and 'projection optimization'. Real-time MAO requires that all procedures are executed in time less than the duration of a projection. We implemented and tested this technique using a TomoTherapy® research system. The MAO calculation took about 100 ms per projection. We calculated and compared MAO-guided delivery with two other types of delivery, motion-without-compensation delivery (MD) and static delivery (SD), using simulated 1D cases, real TomoTherapy plans and the motion traces from clinical lung and prostate patients. The results showed that the proposed technique effectively compensated for motion errors of all test cases. Dose distributions and DVHs of MAO-guided delivery approached those of SD, for regular and irregular respiration with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3 cm, and for medium and large prostate motions. The results conceptually proved that

  8. Real-Time Accelerated Interactive MRI With Adaptive TSENSE and UNFOLD

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Michael A.; Kellman, Peter; Dick, Alexander J.; Lederman, Robert J.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Reduced field-of-view (FOV) acceleration using time-adaptive sensitivity encoding (TSENSE) or unaliasing by Fourier encoding the overlaps using the temporal dimension (UNFOLD) can improve the depiction of motion in real-time MRI. However, increased computational resources are required to maintain a high frame rate and low latency in image reconstruction and display. A high-performance software system has been implemented to perform TSENSE and UNFOLD reconstructions for real-time MRI with interactive, on-line display. Images were displayed in the scanner room to investigate image-guided procedures. Examples are shown for normal volunteers and cardiac interventional experiments in animals using a steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequence. In order to maintain adequate image quality for interventional procedures, the imaging rate was limited to seven frames per second after an acceleration factor of 2 with a voxel size of 1.8 × 3.5 × 8 mm. Initial experiences suggest that TSENSE and UNFOLD can each improve the compromise between spatial and temporal resolution in real-time imaging, and can function well in interactive imaging. UNFOLD places no additional constraints on receiver coils, and is therefore more flexible than SENSE methods; however, the temporal image filtering can blur motion and reduce the effective acceleration. Methods are proposed to overcome the challenges presented by the use of TSENSE in interactive imaging. TSENSE may be temporarily disabled after changing the imaging plane to avoid transient artifacts as the sensitivity coefficients adapt. For imaging with a combination of surface and interventional coils, a hybrid reconstruction approach is proposed whereby UNFOLD is used for the interventional coils, and TSENSE with or without UNFOLD is used for the surface coils. PMID:12876708

  9. Spike timing precision changes with spike rate adaptation in the owl's auditory space map.

    PubMed

    Keller, Clifford H; Takahashi, Terry T

    2015-10-01

    Spike rate adaptation (SRA) is a continuing change of responsiveness to ongoing stimuli, which is ubiquitous across species and levels of sensory systems. Under SRA, auditory responses to constant stimuli change over time, relaxing toward a long-term rate often over multiple timescales. With more variable stimuli, SRA causes the dependence of spike rate on sound pressure level to shift toward the mean level of recent stimulus history. A model based on subtractive adaptation (Benda J, Hennig RM. J Comput Neurosci 24: 113-136, 2008) shows that changes in spike rate and level dependence are mechanistically linked. Space-specific neurons in the barn owl's midbrain, when recorded under ketamine-diazepam anesthesia, showed these classical characteristics of SRA, while at the same time exhibiting changes in spike timing precision. Abrupt level increases of sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) noise initially led to spiking at higher rates with lower temporal precision. Spike rate and precision relaxed toward their long-term values with a time course similar to SRA, results that were also replicated by the subtractive model. Stimuli whose amplitude modulations (AMs) were not synchronous across carrier frequency evoked spikes in response to stimulus envelopes of a particular shape, characterized by the spectrotemporal receptive field (STRF). Again, abrupt stimulus level changes initially disrupted the temporal precision of spiking, which then relaxed along with SRA. We suggest that shifts in latency associated with stimulus level changes may differ between carrier frequency bands and underlie decreased spike precision. Thus SRA is manifest not simply as a change in spike rate but also as a change in the temporal precision of spiking. PMID:26269555

  10. Development of real-time diagnostics and feedback algorithms for JET in view of the next step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, A.; Joffrin, E.; Felton, R.; Mazon, D.; Zabeo, L.; Albanese, R.; Arena, P.; Ambrosino, G.; Ariola, M.; Barana, O.; Bruno, M.; Laborde, L.; Moreau, D.; Piccolo, F.; Sartori, F.; Crisanti, F.; de la Luna, E.; Sanchez, J.; Contributors, EFDA-JET

    2005-03-01

    Real-time control of many plasma parameters will be an essential aspect in the development of reliable high performance operation of next step tokamaks. The main prerequisites for any feedback scheme are the precise real-time determination of the quantities to be controlled, requiring top quality and highly reliable diagnostics, and the availability of robust control algorithms. A new set of real-time diagnostics was recently implemented on JET to prove the feasibility of determining, with high accuracy and time resolution, the most important plasma quantities. Some of the signals now routinely provided in real time at JET are: (i) the internal inductance and the main confinement quantities obtained by calculating the Shafranov integrals from the pick-up coils with 2 ms time resolution; (ii) the electron temperature profile, from electron cylotron emission every 10 ms; (iii) the ion temperature and plasma toroidal velocity profiles, from charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, provided every 50 ms; and (iv) the safety factor profile, derived from the inversion of the polarimetric line integrals every 2 ms. With regard to feedback algorithms, new model-based controllers were developed to allow a more robust control of several plasma parameters. With these new tools, several real-time schemes were implemented, among which the most significant is the simultaneous control of the safety factor and the plasma pressure profiles using the additional heating systems (LH, NBI, ICRH) as actuators. The control strategy adopted in this case consists of a multi-variable model-based technique, which was implemented as a truncated singular value decomposition of an integral operator. This approach is considered essential for systems like tokamak machines, characterized by a strong mutual dependence of the various parameters and the distributed nature of the quantities, the plasma profiles, to be controlled. First encouraging results were also obtained using non

  11. Space Weather Prediction Error Bounding for Real-Time Ionospheric Threat Adaptation of GNSS Augmentation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Yoon, M.; Lee, J.

    2014-12-01

    Current Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) augmentation systems attempt to consider all possible ionospheric events in their correction computations of worst-case errors. This conservatism can be mitigated by subdividing anomalous conditions and using different values of ionospheric threat-model bounds for each class. A new concept of 'real-time ionospheric threat adaptation' that adjusts the threat model in real time instead of always using the same 'worst-case' model was introduced in my previous research. The concept utilizes predicted values of space weather indices for determining the corresponding threat model based on the pre-defined worst-case threat as a function of space weather indices. Since space weather prediction is not reliable due to prediction errors, prediction errors are needed to be bounded to the required level of integrity of the system being supported. The previous research performed prediction error bounding using disturbance, storm time (Dst) index. The distribution of Dst prediction error over the 15-year data was bounded by applying 'inflated-probability density function (pdf) Gaussian bounding'. Since the error distribution has thick and non-Gaussian tails, investigation on statistical distributions which properly describe heavy tails with less conservatism is required for the system performance. This paper suggests two potential approaches for improving space weather prediction error bounding. First, we suggest using different statistical models when fit the error distribution, such as the Laplacian distribution which has fat tails, and the folded Gaussian cumulative distribution function (cdf) distribution. Second approach is to bound the error distribution by segregating data based on the overall level of solar activity. Bounding errors using only solar minimum period data will have less uncertainty and it may allow the use of 'solar cycle prediction' provided by NASA when implementing to real-time threat adaptation. Lastly

  12. Electromagnetic Detection and Real-Time DMLC Adaptation to Target Rotation During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Junqing; Ruan, Dan; Cho, Byungchul; Sawant, Amit; Petersen, Jay; Newell, Laurence J.; Cattell, Herbert; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Intrafraction rotation of more than 45 Degree-Sign and 25 Degree-Sign has been observed for lung and prostate tumors, respectively. Such rotation is not routinely adapted to during current radiotherapy, which may compromise tumor dose coverage. The aim of the study was to investigate the geometric and dosimetric performance of an electromagnetically guided real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking system to adapt to intrafractional tumor rotation. Materials/Methods: Target rotation was provided by changing the treatment couch angle. The target rotation was measured by a research Calypso system integrated with a real-time DMLC tracking system employed on a Varian linac. The geometric beam-target rotational alignment difference was measured using electronic portal images. The dosimetric accuracy was quantified using a two-dimensional ion chamber array. For each beam, the following five delivery modes were tested: 1) nonrotated target (reference); 2) fixed rotated target with tracking; 3) fixed rotated target without tracking; 4) actively rotating target with tracking; and 5) actively rotating target without tracking. Dosimetric performance of the latter four modes was measured and compared to the reference dose distribution using a 3 mm/3% {gamma}-test. Results: Geometrically, the beam-target rotational alignment difference was 0.3 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.6 Degree-Sign for fixed rotation and 0.3 Degree-Sign {+-} 1.3 Degree-Sign for active rotation. Dosimetrically, the average failure rate for the {gamma}-test for a fixed rotated target was 11% with tracking and 36% without tracking. The average failure rate for an actively rotating target was 9% with tracking and 35% without tracking. Conclusions: For the first time, real-time target rotation has been accurately detected and adapted to during radiation delivery via DMLC tracking. The beam-target rotational alignment difference was mostly within 1 Degree-Sign . Dose distributions to fixed and actively

  13. A robust adaptive denoising framework for real-time artifact removal in scalp EEG measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicarslan, Atilla; Grossman, Robert G.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Non-invasive measurement of human neural activity based on the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) allows for the development of biomedical devices that interface with the nervous system for scientific, diagnostic, therapeutic, or restorative purposes. However, EEG recordings are often considered as prone to physiological and non-physiological artifacts of different types and frequency characteristics. Among them, ocular artifacts and signal drifts represent major sources of EEG contamination, particularly in real-time closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) applications, which require effective handling of these artifacts across sessions and in natural settings. Approach. We extend the usage of a robust adaptive noise cancelling (ANC) scheme ({H}∞ filtering) for removal of eye blinks, eye motions, amplitude drifts and recording biases simultaneously. We also characterize the volume conduction, by estimating the signal propagation levels across all EEG scalp recording areas due to ocular artifact generators. We find that the amplitude and spatial distribution of ocular artifacts vary greatly depending on the electrode location. Therefore, fixed filtering parameters for all recording areas would naturally hinder the true overall performance of an ANC scheme for artifact removal. We treat each electrode as a separate sub-system to be filtered, and without the loss of generality, they are assumed to be uncorrelated and uncoupled. Main results. Our results show over 95-99.9% correlation between the raw and processed signals at non-ocular artifact regions, and depending on the contamination profile, 40-70% correlation when ocular artifacts are dominant. We also compare our results with the offline independent component analysis and artifact subspace reconstruction methods, and show that some local quantities are handled better by our sample-adaptive real-time framework. Decoding performance is also compared with multi-day experimental data from 2 subjects

  14. Adaptive Kalman filtering for real-time mapping of the visual field

    PubMed Central

    Ward, B. Douglas; Janik, John; Mazaheri, Yousef; Ma, Yan; DeYoe, Edgar A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of real-time mapping of the visual field for clinical applications. Specifically, three aspects of this problem were considered: (1) experimental design, (2) statistical analysis, and (3) display of results. Proper experimental design is essential to achieving a successful outcome, particularly for real-time applications. A random-block experimental design was shown to have less sensitivity to measurement noise, as well as greater robustness to error in modeling of the hemodynamic impulse response function (IRF) and greater flexibility than common alternatives. In addition, random encoding of the visual field allows for the detection of voxels that are responsive to multiple, not necessarily contiguous, regions of the visual field. Due to its recursive nature, the Kalman filter is ideally suited for real-time statistical analysis of visual field mapping data. An important feature of the Kalman filter is that it can be used for nonstationary time series analysis. The capability of the Kalman filter to adapt, in real time, to abrupt changes in the baseline arising from subject motion inside the scanner and other external system disturbances is important for the success of clinical applications. The clinician needs real-time information to evaluate the success or failure of the imaging run and to decide whether to extend, modify, or terminate the run. Accordingly, the analytical software provides real-time displays of (1) brain activation maps for each stimulus segment, (2) voxel-wise spatial tuning profiles, (3) time plots of the variability of response parameters, and (4) time plots of activated volume. PMID:22100663

  15. Designing Adaptive Low-Dissipative High Order Schemes for Long-Time Integrations. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen C.; Sjoegreen, B.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A general framework for the design of adaptive low-dissipative high order schemes is presented. It encompasses a rather complete treatment of the numerical approach based on four integrated design criteria: (1) For stability considerations, condition the governing equations before the application of the appropriate numerical scheme whenever it is possible; (2) For consistency, compatible schemes that possess stability properties, including physical and numerical boundary condition treatments, similar to those of the discrete analogue of the continuum are preferred; (3) For the minimization of numerical dissipation contamination, efficient and adaptive numerical dissipation control to further improve nonlinear stability and accuracy should be used; and (4) For practical considerations, the numerical approach should be efficient and applicable to general geometries, and an efficient and reliable dynamic grid adaptation should be used if necessary. These design criteria are, in general, very useful to a wide spectrum of flow simulations. However, the demand on the overall numerical approach for nonlinear stability and accuracy is much more stringent for long-time integration of complex multiscale viscous shock/shear/turbulence/acoustics interactions and numerical combustion. Robust classical numerical methods for less complex flow physics are not suitable or practical for such applications. The present approach is designed expressly to address such flow problems, especially unsteady flows. The minimization of employing very fine grids to overcome the production of spurious numerical solutions and/or instability due to under-resolved grids is also sought. The incremental studies to illustrate the performance of the approach are summarized. Extensive testing and full implementation of the approach is forthcoming. The results shown so far are very encouraging.

  16. Time course of shape and category selectivity revealed by EEG rapid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Clara A; Jiang, Xiong; Martin, Jacob G; Riesenhuber, Maximilian

    2014-02-01

    A hallmark of human cognition is the ability to rapidly assign meaning to sensory stimuli. It has been suggested that this fast visual object categorization ability is accomplished by a feedforward processing hierarchy consisting of shape-selective neurons in occipito-temporal cortex that feed into task circuits in frontal cortex computing conceptual category membership. We performed an EEG rapid adaptation study to test this hypothesis. Participants were trained to categorize novel stimuli generated with a morphing system that precisely controlled both stimulus shape and category membership. We subsequently performed EEG recordings while participants performed a category matching task on pairs of successively presented stimuli. We used space-time cluster analysis to identify channels and latencies exhibiting selective neural responses. Neural signals before 200 msec on posterior channels demonstrated a release from adaptation for shape changes, irrespective of category membership, compatible with a shape- but not explicitly category-selective neural representation. A subsequent cluster with anterior topography appeared after 200 msec and exhibited release from adaptation consistent with explicit categorization. These signals were subsequently modulated by perceptual uncertainty starting around 300 msec. The degree of category selectivity of the anterior signals was strongly predictive of behavioral performance. We also observed a posterior category-selective signal after 300 msec exhibiting significant functional connectivity with the initial anterior category-selective signal. In summary, our study supports the proposition that perceptual categorization is accomplished by the brain within a quarter second through a largely feedforward process culminating in frontal areas, followed by later category-selective signals in posterior regions. PMID:24001003

  17. Electric and magnetic losses modeled by a stable hybrid with explicit-implicit time-stepping for Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Halleroed, Tomas Rylander, Thomas

    2008-04-20

    A stable hybridization of the finite-element method (FEM) and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme for Maxwell's equations with electric and magnetic losses is presented for two-dimensional problems. The hybrid method combines the flexibility of the FEM with the efficiency of the FDTD scheme and it is based directly on Ampere's and Faraday's law. The electric and magnetic losses can be treated implicitly by the FEM on an unstructured mesh, which allows for local mesh refinement in order to resolve rapid variations in the material parameters and/or the electromagnetic field. It is also feasible to handle larger homogeneous regions with losses by the explicit FDTD scheme connected to an implicitly time-stepped and lossy FEM region. The hybrid method shows second-order convergence for smooth scatterers. The bistatic radar cross section (RCS) for a circular metal cylinder with a lossy coating converges to the analytical solution and an accuracy of 2% is achieved for about 20 points per wavelength. The monostatic RCS for an airfoil that features sharp corners yields a lower order of convergence and it is found to agree well with what can be expected for singular fields at the sharp corners. A careful convergence study with resolutions from 20 to 140 points per wavelength provides accurate extrapolated results for this non-trivial test case, which makes it possible to use as a reference problem for scattering codes that model both electric and magnetic losses.

  18. An Adaptive Framework for Real-Time ECG Transmission in Mobile Environments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Wireless electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring involves the measurement of ECG signals and their timely transmission over wireless networks to remote healthcare professionals. However, fluctuations in wireless channel conditions pose quality-of-service challenges for real-time ECG monitoring services in a mobile environment. We present an adaptive framework for layered coding and transmission of ECG data that can cope with a time-varying wireless channel. The ECG is segmented into layers with differing importance with respect to the quality of the reconstructed signal. According to this observation, we have devised a simple and efficient real-time scheduling algorithm based on the earliest deadline first (EDF) policy, which decides the order of transmitting or retransmitting packets that contain ECG data at any given time for the delivery of scalable ECG data over a lossy channel. The algorithm takes into account the differing priorities of packets in each layer, which prevents the perceived quality of the reconstructed ECG signal from degrading abruptly as channel conditions worsen, while using the available bandwidth efficiently. Extensive simulations demonstrate this improvement in perceived quality. PMID:25097886

  19. Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming for Adapting to the Change of Stock Prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Mabu, Shingo; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    The key in stock trading model is to take the right actions for trading at the right time, primarily based on the accurate forecast of future stock trends. Since an effective trading with given information of stock prices needs an intelligent strategy for the decision making, we applied Genetic Network Programming (GNP) to creating a stock trading model. In this paper, we propose a new method called Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming (RTU-GNP) for adapting to the change of stock prices. There are three important points in this paper: First, the RTU-GNP method makes a stock trading decision considering both the recommendable information of technical indices and the candlestick charts according to the real time stock prices. Second, we combine RTU-GNP with a Sarsa learning algorithm to create the programs efficiently. Also, sub-nodes are introduced in each judgment and processing node to determine appropriate actions (buying/selling) and to select appropriate stock price information depending on the situation. Third, a Real Time Updating system has been firstly introduced in our paper considering the change of the trend of stock prices. The experimental results on the Japanese stock market show that the trading model with the proposed RTU-GNP method outperforms other models without real time updating. We also compared the experimental results using the proposed method with Buy&Hold method to confirm its effectiveness, and it is clarified that the proposed trading model can obtain much higher profits than Buy&Hold method.

  20. Vibrational resonance in adaptive small-world neuronal networks with spike-timing-dependent plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenon of vibrational resonance is investigated in adaptive Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks, where the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is modulated based on spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Numerical results demonstrate that there exists appropriate amplitude of high-frequency driving which is able to optimize the neural ensemble response to the weak low-frequency periodic signal. The effect of networked vibrational resonance can be significantly affected by spike-timing-dependent plasticity. It is shown that spike-timing-dependent plasticity with dominant depression can always improve the efficiency of vibrational resonance, and a small adjusting rate can promote the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, the network topology plays an important role in the vibrational resonance in spike-timing-dependent plasticity-induced neural systems, where the system response to the subthreshold signal is maximized by an optimal network structure. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the introduction of inhibitory synapses can considerably weaken the phenomenon of vibrational resonance in the hybrid small-world neuronal networks with spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

  1. Global surface mass time variations by using a two-step inversion for cumulating daily satellite gravity information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, Guillaume; Frappart, Frappart; Seoane, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new method to produce time series of global maps of surface mass variations by progressive integration of daily geopotential variations measured by orbiting satellites. In the case of the GRACE mission (2002 - 2012), these geopotential variations can be determined from very accurate inter-satellite K-Band Range Rate (KBRR) measurements of 5-second daily orbits. In particular, the along-track gravity contribution of hydrology is extracted by removing de-aliasing models for static field, atmosphere, oceans mass variations (including periodical tides), as well as polar movements. Our determination of surface mass sources consists of two successive dependent Kalman filter stages. The first one consists of reducing the satellite-based potential anomalies by adjusting the longest spatial wavelengths (i.e., low-degree spherical harmonics less than 5-6). In the second stage, the residual potential anomalies from the previous stage are used to recover surface mass density changes - in terms of Equivalent-Water Height (EWH) - over a global network of juxtaposed triangular elements. These surface tiles of ~40,000 km x km are imposed to be identical and homogeneously-distributed over the terrestrial sphere, however they can be adapted to the local geometry of the surface mass. Our global approach was tested by inverting simulated hydrology-related geopotential data, and successfully applied to estimate time-varying surface mass densities from real GRACE-based residuals. This strategy of combined Kalman filter-type inversions can also be useful for exploring the possibility of reaching better time and space resolutions for hydrology, that would be hopefully brought by future low altitude geodetic missions.

  2. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Omelyan, Igor E-mail: omelyan@icmp.lviv.ua; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-12-28

    We develop efficient handling of solvation forces in the multiscale method of multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of a biomolecule steered by the solvation free energy (effective solvation forces) obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model complemented with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation). To reduce the computational expenses, we calculate the effective solvation forces acting on the biomolecule by using advanced solvation force extrapolation (ASFE) at inner time steps while converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations only at large outer time steps. The idea of ASFE consists in developing a discrete non-Eckart rotational transformation of atomic coordinates that minimizes the distances between the atomic positions of the biomolecule at different time moments. The effective solvation forces for the biomolecule in a current conformation at an inner time step are then extrapolated in the transformed subspace of those at outer time steps by using a modified least square fit approach applied to a relatively small number of the best force-coordinate pairs. The latter are selected from an extended set collecting the effective solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps over a broad time interval. The MTS-MD integration with effective solvation forces obtained by converging 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps and applying ASFE at inner time steps is stabilized by employing the optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) ensemble. Compared to the previous extrapolation schemes used in combination with the Langevin thermostat, the ASFE approach substantially improves the accuracy of evaluation of effective solvation forces and in combination with the OIN thermostat enables a dramatic increase of outer time steps. We demonstrate on a fully flexible model of alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution that the MTS-MD/OIN/ASFE/3D-RISM-KH multiscale method of molecular dynamics

  3. Adaptive algorithm for blind separation from noisy time-varying mixtures.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, V; Enescu, M; Oja, E

    2001-10-01

    This article addresses the problem of blind source separation from time-varying noisy mixtures using a state variable model and recursive estimation. An estimate of each source signal is produced real time at the arrival of new observed mixture vector. The goal is to perform the separation and attenuate noise simultaneously, as well as to adapt to changes that occur in the mixing system. The observed data are projected along the eigenvectors in signal subspace. The subspace is tracked real time. Source signals are modeled using low-order AR (autoregressive) models, and noise is attenuated by trading off between the model and the information provided by measurements. The type of zero-memory nonlinearity needed in separation is determined on-line. Predictor-corrector filter structures are proposed, and their performance is investigated in simulation using biomedical and communications signals at different noise levels and a time-varying mixing system. In quantitative comparison to other widely used methods, significant improvement in output signal-to-noise ratio is achieved. PMID:11571001

  4. Uncertainties of reverberation time estimation via adaptively identified room impulse responses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lifu; Qiu, Xiaojun; Burnett, Ian; Guo, Yecai

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the reverberation time estimation methods which employ backward integration of adaptively identified room impulse responses (RIRs). Two kinds of conditions are considered; the first is the "ideal condition" where the anechoic and reverberant signals are both known a priori so that the RIRs can be identified using system identification methods. The second is that only the reverberant speech signal is available, and blind identification of the RIRs via dereverberation is employed for reverberation time estimation. Results show that under the "ideal condition," the average relative errors in 7 octave bands are less than 2% for white noise and 15% for speech, respectively, when both the anechoic and reverberant signals are available. In contrast, under the second condition, the average relative errors of the blindly identified RIR-based reverberation time estimation are around 20%-30% except the 63 Hz octave band. The fluctuation of reverberation times estimated under the second condition is more severe than that under the ideal condition and the relative error for low frequency octave bands is larger than that for high octave bands under both conditions. PMID:27036246

  5. Directional selection for flowering time leads to adaptive evolution in Raphanus raphanistrum (Wild radish).

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Michael B; Walsh, Michael J; Flower, Ken C; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Powles, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Herbicides have been the primary tool for controlling large populations of yield depleting weeds from agro-ecosystems, resulting in the evolution of widespread herbicide resistance. In response, nonherbicidal techniques have been developed which intercept weed seeds at harvest before they enter the soil seed bank. However, the efficiency of these techniques allows an intense selection for any trait that enables weeds to evade collection, with early-flowering ecotypes considered likely to result in early seed shedding. Using a field-collected wild radish population, five recurrent generations were selected for early maturity and three generations for late maturity. Phenology associated with flowering time and growth traits were measured. Our results demonstrate the adaptive capacity of wild radish to halve its time to flowering following five generations of early-flowering selection. Early-maturing phenotypes had reduced height and biomass at maturity, leading to less competitive, more prostrate growth forms. Following three generations of late-flowering selection, wild radish doubled its time to flowering time leading to increased biomass and flowering height at maturity. This study demonstrates the potential for the rapid evolution in growth traits in response to highly effective seed collection techniques that imposed a selection on weed populations within agro-ecosystems at harvest. PMID:27099626

  6. Wavelet-Based Speech Enhancement Using Time-Adapted Noise Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sheau-Fang; Tung, Ying-Kai

    Spectral subtraction is commonly used for speech enhancement in a single channel system because of the simplicity of its implementation. However, this algorithm introduces perceptually musical noise while suppressing the background noise. We propose a wavelet-based approach in this paper for suppressing the background noise for speech enhancement in a single channel system. The wavelet packet transform, which emulates the human auditory system, is used to decompose the noisy signal into critical bands. Wavelet thresholding is then temporally adjusted with the noise power by time-adapted noise estimation. The proposed algorithm can efficiently suppress the noise while reducing speech distortion. Experimental results, including several objective measurements, show that the proposed wavelet-based algorithm outperforms spectral subtraction and other wavelet-based denoising approaches for speech enhancement for nonstationary noise environments.

  7. Real-time wavefront control for the PALM-3000 high order adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Tuan N.; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Dekany, Richard G.; Shelton, Jean C.; Troy, Mitchell; Angione, John R.; Burruss, Rick S.; Cromer, John L.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Roberts, Jennifer E.

    2008-07-01

    We present a cost-effective scalable real-time wavefront control architecture based on off-the-shelf graphics processing units hosted in an ultra-low latency, high-bandwidth interconnect PC cluster environment composed of modules written in the component-oriented language of nesC. We demonstrate the architecture is capable of supporting the most computation and memory intensive wavefront reconstruction method (vector-matrix-multiply) at frame rates up to 2 KHz with latency under 250 μs for the PALM-3000 adaptive optics systems, a state-of-the-art upgrade on the 5.1 meter Hale Telescope that consists of a 64x64 subaperture Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a 3368 active actuator high order deformable mirror in series with a 349 actuator "woofer" DM. This architecture can easily scale up to support larger AO systems at higher rates and lower latency.

  8. Reinforcement learning for adaptive optimal control of unknown continuous-time nonlinear systems with input constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiong; Liu, Derong; Wang, Ding

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an adaptive reinforcement learning-based solution is developed for the infinite-horizon optimal control problem of constrained-input continuous-time nonlinear systems in the presence of nonlinearities with unknown structures. Two different types of neural networks (NNs) are employed to approximate the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. That is, an recurrent NN is constructed to identify the unknown dynamical system, and two feedforward NNs are used as the actor and the critic to approximate the optimal control and the optimal cost, respectively. Based on this framework, the action NN and the critic NN are tuned simultaneously, without the requirement for the knowledge of system drift dynamics. Moreover, by using Lyapunov's direct method, the weights of the action NN and the critic NN are guaranteed to be uniformly ultimately bounded, while keeping the closed-loop system stable. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the present approach, simulation results are illustrated.

  9. Riemannian mean and space-time adaptive processing using projection and inversion algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam; Barbaresco, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    The estimation of the covariance matrix from real data is required in the application of space-time adaptive processing (STAP) to an airborne ground moving target indication (GMTI) radar. A natural approach to estimation of the covariance matrix that is based on the information geometry has been proposed. In this paper, the output of the Riemannian mean is used in inversion and projection algorithms. It is found that the projection class of algorithms can yield very significant gains, even when the gains due to inversion-based algorithms are marginal over standard algorithms. The performance of the projection class of algorithms does not appear to be overly sensitive to the projected subspace dimension.

  10. Real-time infrared gas detection based on an adaptive Savitzky-Golay algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingsong; Deng, Hao; Li, Pengfei; Yu, Benli

    2015-08-01

    Based on the Savitzky-Golay filter, we have developed in the present study a simple but robust method for real-time processing of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) signals. Our method was developed to resolve the blindness of selecting the input filter parameters and to mitigate potential signal distortion induced in digital signal processing. Application of the developed adaptive Savitzky-Golay filter algorithm to the simulated and experimentally observed signals and comparison with the wavelet-based de-noising technique indicate that the newly developed method is effective in obtaining high-quality TDLAS data for a wide variety of applications including atmospheric environmental monitoring and industrial processing control.

  11. Optimal control for unknown discrete-time nonlinear Markov jump systems using adaptive dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiangnan; He, Haibo; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Zhanshan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we develop and analyze an optimal control method for a class of discrete-time nonlinear Markov jump systems (MJSs) with unknown system dynamics. Specifically, an identifier is established for the unknown systems to approximate system states, and an optimal control approach for nonlinear MJSs is developed to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation based on the adaptive dynamic programming technique. We also develop detailed stability analysis of the control approach, including the convergence of the performance index function for nonlinear MJSs and the existence of the corresponding admissible control. Neural network techniques are used to approximate the proposed performance index function and the control law. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, three simulation studies, one linear case, one nonlinear case, and one single link robot arm case, are used to validate the performance of the proposed optimal control method. PMID:25420238

  12. A real-time digital adaptive tracking controller for a dc motor

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this design is to implement an accurate and cost effective adaptive tracking controller for a DC motor using an 80C196kr microcontroller system. The on-chip embedded functions, optical quadrature encoder and a Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) waveform generator, are used to measure motor positions and generate DC voltages to drive a DC motor respectively. A homing routine that incorporates a photo electric sensor is used to position the motor at a reference point. Users communicate with the system through a 4x4 matrix keypad and 20x2 LCD display or through a PC. The experimental results have shown the validity of this simple microcontroller-based digital control system. This system is performed on a real-time basis, and the control law can be easily replaced by any advanced control laws without changing the hardware setup.

  13. An adaptive learning rate for RBFNN using time-domain feedback analysis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Saad Azhar; Moinuddin, Muhammad; Raza, Kamran; Adil, Syed Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Radial basis function neural networks are used in a variety of applications such as pattern recognition, nonlinear identification, control and time series prediction. In this paper, the learning algorithm of radial basis function neural networks is analyzed in a feedback structure. The robustness of the learning algorithm is discussed in the presence of uncertainties that might be due to noisy perturbations at the input or to modeling mismatch. An intelligent adaptation rule is developed for the learning rate of RBFNN which gives faster convergence via an estimate of error energy while giving guarantee to the l 2 stability governed by the upper bounding via small gain theorem. Simulation results are presented to support our theoretical development. PMID:24987745

  14. Real-Time Wavefront Control for the PALM-3000 High Order Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Tuan N.; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Dekany, Richard G.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Troy, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    We present a cost-effective scalable real-time wavefront control architecture based on off-the-shelf graphics processing units hosted in an ultra-low latency, high-bandwidth interconnect PC cluster environment composed of modules written in the component-oriented language of nesC. The architecture enables full-matrix reconstruction of the wavefront at up to 2 KHz with latency under 250 us for the PALM-3000 adaptive optics systems, a state-of-the-art upgrade on the 5.1 meter Hale Telescope that consists of a 64 x 64 subaperture Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a 3368 active actuator high order deformable mirror in series with a 241 active actuator tweeter DM. The architecture can easily scale up to support much larger AO systems at higher rates and lower latency.

  15. A stereoscopic movie player with real-time content adaptation to the display geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duch"ne, Sylvain; Lambers, Martin; Devernay, Frédéric

    2012-03-01

    3D shape perception in a stereoscopic movie depends on several depth cues, including stereopsis. For a given content, the depth perceived from stereopsis highly depends on the camera setup as well as on the display size and distance. This can lead to disturbing depth distortions such as the cardboard effect or the puppet theater effect. As more and more stereoscopic 3D content is produced in 3D (feature movies, documentaries, sports broadcasts), a key point is to get the same 3D experience on any display. For this purpose, perceived depth distortions can be resolved by performing view synthesis. We propose a real time implementation of a stereoscopic player based on the open-source software Bino, which is able to adapt a stereoscopic movie to any display, based on user-provided camera and display parameters.

  16. Real-time optimal adaptation for planetary geometry and texture: 4-8 tile hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Lok M; Duchaineau, Mark A; Joy, Kenneth I

    2005-01-01

    The real-time display of huge geometry and imagery databases involves view-dependent approximations, typically through the use of precomputed hierarchies that are selectively refined at runtime. A classic motivating problem is terrain visualization in which planetary databases involving billions of elevation and color values are displayed on PC graphics hardware at high frame rates. This paper introduces a new diamond data structure for the basic selective-refinement processing, which is a streamlined method of representing the well-known hierarchies of right triangles that have enjoyed much success in real-time, view-dependent terrain display. Regular-grid tiles are proposed as the payload data per diamond for both geometry and texture. The use of 4-8 grid refinement and coarsening schemes allows level-of-detail transitions that are twice as gradual as traditional quadtree-based hierarchies, as well as very high-quality low-pass filtering compared to subsampling-based hierarchies. An out-of-core storage organization is introduced based on Sierpinski indices per diamond, along with a tile preprocessing framework based on fine-to-coarse, same-level, and coarse-to-fine gathering operations. To attain optimal frame-to-frame coherence and processing-order priorities, dual split and merge queues are developed similar to the Realtime Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM) Algorithm, as well as an adaptation of the ROAM frustum culling technique. Example applications of lake-detection and procedural terrain generation demonstrate the flexibility of the tile processing framework. PMID:16138547

  17. Adaptive Control for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots Considering Time Delay and Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armah, Stephen Kofi

    Autonomous control of mobile robots has attracted considerable attention of researchers in the areas of robotics and autonomous systems during the past decades. One of the goals in the field of mobile robotics is development of platforms that robustly operate in given, partially unknown, or unpredictable environments and offer desired services to humans. Autonomous mobile robots need to be equipped with effective, robust and/or adaptive, navigation control systems. In spite of enormous reported work on autonomous navigation control systems for mobile robots, achieving the goal above is still an open problem. Robustness and reliability of the controlled system can always be improved. The fundamental issues affecting the stability of the control systems include the undesired nonlinear effects introduced by actuator saturation, time delay in the controlled system, and uncertainty in the model. This research work develops robustly stabilizing control systems by investigating and addressing such nonlinear effects through analytical, simulations, and experiments. The control systems are designed to meet specified transient and steady-state specifications. The systems used for this research are ground (Dr Robot X80SV) and aerial (Parrot AR.Drone 2.0) mobile robots. Firstly, an effective autonomous navigation control system is developed for X80SV using logic control by combining 'go-to-goal', 'avoid-obstacle', and 'follow-wall' controllers. A MATLAB robot simulator is developed to implement this control algorithm and experiments are conducted in a typical office environment. The next stage of the research develops an autonomous position (x, y, and z) and attitude (roll, pitch, and yaw) controllers for a quadrotor, and PD-feedback control is used to achieve stabilization. The quadrotor's nonlinear dynamics and kinematics are implemented using MATLAB S-function to generate the state output. Secondly, the white-box and black-box approaches are used to obtain a linearized

  18. Manipulation of visual biofeedback during gait with a time delayed adaptive Virtual Mirror Box

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A mirror placed in the mid-sagittal plane of the body has been used to reduce phantom limb pain and improve movement function in medical conditions characterised by asymmetrical movement control. The mirrored illusion of unimpaired limb movement during gait might enhance the effect, but a physical mirror is only capable of showing parallel movement of limbs in real time typically while sitting. We aimed to overcome the limitations of physical mirrors by developing and evaluating a Virtual Mirror Box which delays the mirrored image of limbs during gait to ensure temporal congruency with the impaired physical limb. Methods An application was developed in the CAREN system’s D-Flow software which mirrors selected limbs recorded by real-time motion capture to the contralateral side. To achieve phase shifted movement of limbs during gait, the mirrored virtual limbs are also delayed by a continuously calculated amount derived from past gait events. In order to accommodate non-normal proportions and offsets of pathological gait, the movements are morphed so that the physical and virtual contact events match on the mirrored side. Our method was tested with a trans-femoral amputee walking on a treadmill using his artificial limb. Joint angles of the elbow and knee were compared between the intact and mirrored side using cross correlation, root mean squared difference and correlation coefficients. Results The time delayed adaptive virtual mirror box produced a symmetrical looking gait of the avatar coupled with a reduction of the difference between the intact and virtual knee and elbow angles (10.86° and 5.34° reduced to 4.99° and 2.54° respectively). Dynamic morphing of the delay caused a non-significant change of toe-off events when compared to delaying by 50% of the previous gait cycle, as opposed to the initial contact events which showed a practically negligible but statistically significant increase (p < 0.05). Conclusions Adding an adaptive time

  19. Capacity planning for electronic waste management facilities under uncertainty: multi-objective multi-time-step model development.

    PubMed

    Poonam Khanijo Ahluwalia; Nema, Arvind K

    2011-07-01

    Selection of optimum locations for locating new facilities and decision regarding capacities at the proposed facilities is a major concern for municipal authorities/managers. The decision as to whether a single facility is preferred over multiple facilities of smaller capacities would vary with varying priorities to cost and associated risks such as environmental or health risk or risk perceived by the society. Currently management of waste streams such as that of computer waste is being done using rudimentary practices and is flourishing as an unorganized sector, mainly as backyard workshops in many cities of developing nations such as India. Uncertainty in the quantification of computer waste generation is another major concern due to the informal setup of present computer waste management scenario. Hence, there is a need to simultaneously address uncertainty in waste generation quantities while analyzing the tradeoffs between cost and associated risks. The present study aimed to address the above-mentioned issues in a multi-time-step, multi-objective decision-support model, which can address multiple objectives of cost, environmental risk, socially perceived risk and health risk, while selecting the optimum configuration of existing and proposed facilities (location and capacities). PMID:20935026

  20. Policy iteration adaptive dynamic programming algorithm for discrete-time nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a new discrete-time policy iteration adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) method for solving the infinite horizon optimal control problem of nonlinear systems. The idea is to use an iterative ADP technique to obtain the iterative control law, which optimizes the iterative performance index function. The main contribution of this paper is to analyze the convergence and stability properties of policy iteration method for discrete-time nonlinear systems for the first time. It shows that the iterative performance index function is nonincreasingly convergent to the optimal solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. It is also proven that any of the iterative control laws can stabilize the nonlinear systems. Neural networks are used to approximate the performance index function and compute the optimal control law, respectively, for facilitating the implementation of the iterative ADP algorithm, where the convergence of the weight matrices is analyzed. Finally, the numerical results and analysis are presented to illustrate the performance of the developed method. PMID:24807455