Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive time stepping

  1. Adaptive time steps in trajectory surface hopping simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spörkel, Lasse; Thiel, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) simulations are often performed in combination with active-space multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatments. Technical problems may arise in such simulations if active and inactive orbitals strongly mix and switch in some particular regions. We propose to use adaptive time steps when such regions are encountered in TSH simulations. For this purpose, we present a computational protocol that is easy to implement and increases the computational effort only in the critical regions. We test this procedure through TSH simulations of a GFP chromophore model (OHBI) and a light-driven rotary molecular motor (F-NAIBP) on semiempirical MRCI potential energy surfaces, by comparing the results from simulations with adaptive time steps to analogous ones with constant time steps. For both test molecules, the number of successful trajectories without technical failures rises significantly, from 53% to 95% for OHBI and from 25% to 96% for F-NAIBP. The computed excited-state lifetime remains essentially the same for OHBI and increases somewhat for F-NAIBP, and there is almost no change in the computed quantum efficiency for internal rotation in F-NAIBP. We recommend the general use of adaptive time steps in TSH simulations with active-space CI methods because this will help to avoid technical problems, increase the overall efficiency and robustness of the simulations, and allow for a more complete sampling.

  2. A new adaptive time step method for unsteady flow simulations in a human lung.

    PubMed

    Fenández-Tena, Ana; Marcos, Alfonso C; Martínez, Cristina; Keith Walters, D

    2017-04-07

    The innovation presented is a method for adaptive time-stepping that allows clustering of time steps in portions of the cycle for which flow variables are rapidly changing, based on the concept of using a uniform step in a relevant dependent variable rather than a uniform step in the independent variable time. A user-defined function was developed to adapt the magnitude of the time step (adaptive time step) to a defined rate of change in inlet velocity. Quantitative comparison indicates that the new adaptive time stepping method significantly improves accuracy for simulations using an equivalent number of time steps per cycle.

  3. Automatic multirate methods for ordinary differential equations. [Adaptive time steps

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A study is made of the application of integration methods in which different step sizes are used for different members of a system of equations. Such methods can result in savings if the cost of derivative evaluation is high or if a system is sparse; however, the estimation and control of errors is very difficult and can lead to high overheads. Three approaches are discussed, and it is shown that the least intuitive is the most promising. 2 figures.

  4. An adaptive time-stepping strategy for solving the phase field crystal model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhengru; Ma, Yuan; Qiao, Zhonghua

    2013-09-15

    In this work, we will propose an adaptive time step method for simulating the dynamics of the phase field crystal (PFC) model. The numerical simulation of the PFC model needs long time to reach steady state, and then large time-stepping method is necessary. Unconditionally energy stable schemes are used to solve the PFC model. The time steps are adaptively determined based on the time derivative of the corresponding energy. It is found that the use of the proposed time step adaptivity cannot only resolve the steady state solution, but also the dynamical development of the solution efficiently and accurately. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the CPU time is significantly saved for long time simulations.

  5. Finite element/finite volume approaches with adaptive time stepping strategies for transient thermal problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohan, Ram V.; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1993-01-01

    An adaptive time stepping strategy for transient thermal analysis of engineering systems is described which computes the time step based on the local truncation error with a good global error control and obtains optimal time steps to be used during the analysis. Combined mesh partitionings involving FEM/FVM meshes based on physical situations to obtain numerically improved physical representations are also proposed. Numerical test cases are described and comparative pros and cons are identified for practical situations.

  6. An Adaptive Fourier Filter for Relaxing Time Stepping Constraints for Explicit Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Gelb, Anne; Archibald, Richard K

    2015-01-01

    Filtering is necessary to stabilize piecewise smooth solutions. The resulting diffusion stabilizes the method, but may fail to resolve the solution near discontinuities. Moreover, high order filtering still requires cost prohibitive time stepping. This paper introduces an adaptive filter that controls spurious modes of the solution, but is not unnecessarily diffusive. Consequently we are able to stabilize the solution with larger time steps, but also take advantage of the accuracy of a high order filter.

  7. A chaos detectable and time step-size adaptive numerical scheme for nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-Wei; Liu, Chein-Shan; Chang, Jiang-Ren

    2007-02-01

    The first step in investigation the dynamics of a continuous time system described by ordinary differential equations is to integrate them to obtain trajectories. In this paper, we convert the group-preserving scheme (GPS) developed by Liu [International Journal of Non-Linear Mechanics 36 (2001) 1047-1068] to a time step-size adaptive scheme, x=x+hf(x,t), where x∈R is the system variables we are concerned with, and f(x,t)∈R is a time-varying vector field. The scheme has the form similar to the Euler scheme, x=x+Δtf(x,t), but our step-size h is adaptive automatically. Very interestingly, the ratio h/Δt, which we call the adaptive factor, can forecast the appearance of chaos if the considered dynamical system becomes chaotical. The numerical examples of the Duffing equation, the Lorenz equation and the Rossler equation, which may exhibit chaotic behaviors under certain parameters values, are used to demonstrate these phenomena. Two other non-chaotic examples are included to compare the performance of the GPS and the adaptive one.

  8. Exponential time-differencing with embedded Runge–Kutta adaptive step control

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, P.; Brio, M.; Moloney, J.V.

    2015-01-01

    We have presented the first embedded Runge–Kutta exponential time-differencing (RKETD) methods of fourth order with third order embedding and fifth order with third order embedding for non-Rosenbrock type nonlinear systems. A procedure for constructing RKETD methods that accounts for both order conditions and stability is outlined. In our stability analysis, the fast time scale is represented by a full linear operator in contrast to particular scalar cases considered before. An effective time-stepping strategy based on reducing both ETD function evaluations and rejected steps is described. Comparisons of performance with adaptive-stepping integrating factor (IF) are carried out on a set of canonical partial differential equations: the shock-fronts of Burgers equation, interacting KdV solitons, KS controlled chaos, and critical collapse of two-dimensional NLS.

  9. Multi time-step wavefront reconstruction for tomographic adaptive-optics systems.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoshito H; Akiyama, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Lardiére, Olivier; Andersen, David R; Correia, Carlos; Jackson, Kate; Bradley, Colin

    2016-04-01

    In tomographic adaptive-optics (AO) systems, errors due to tomographic wavefront reconstruction limit the performance and angular size of the scientific field of view (FoV), where AO correction is effective. We propose a multi time-step tomographic wavefront reconstruction method to reduce the tomographic error by using measurements from both the current and previous time steps simultaneously. We further outline the method to feed the reconstructor with both wind speed and direction of each turbulence layer. An end-to-end numerical simulation, assuming a multi-object AO (MOAO) system on a 30 m aperture telescope, shows that the multi time-step reconstruction increases the Strehl ratio (SR) over a scientific FoV of 10 arc min in diameter by a factor of 1.5-1.8 when compared to the classical tomographic reconstructor, depending on the guide star asterism and with perfect knowledge of wind speeds and directions. We also evaluate the multi time-step reconstruction method and the wind estimation method on the RAVEN demonstrator under laboratory setting conditions. The wind speeds and directions at multiple atmospheric layers are measured successfully in the laboratory experiment by our wind estimation method with errors below 2  ms-1. With these wind estimates, the multi time-step reconstructor increases the SR value by a factor of 1.2-1.5, which is consistent with a prediction from the end-to-end numerical simulation.

  10. Numerical simulation of diffusion MRI signals using an adaptive time-stepping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Rebecca; Calhoun, Donna; Poupon, Cyril; Le Bihan, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The effect on the MRI signal of water diffusion in biological tissues in the presence of applied magnetic field gradient pulses can be modelled by a multiple compartment Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation. We present a method for the numerical solution of this equation by coupling a standard Cartesian spatial discretization with an adaptive time discretization. The time discretization is done using the explicit Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev method, which is more efficient than the forward Euler time discretization for diffusive-type problems. We use this approach to simulate the diffusion MRI signal from the extra-cylindrical compartment in a tissue model of the brain gray matter consisting of cylindrical and spherical cells and illustrate the effect of cell membrane permeability.

  11. High order finite volume methods on wavelet-adapted grids with local time-stepping on multicore architectures for the simulation of shock-bubble interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazialhosseini, Babak; Rossinelli, Diego; Bergdorf, Michael; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We present a space-time adaptive solver for single- and multi-phase compressible flows that couples average interpolating wavelets with high-order finite volume schemes. The solver introduces the concept of wavelet blocks, handles large jumps in resolution and employs local time-stepping for efficient time integration. We demonstrate that the inherently sequential wavelet-based adaptivity can be implemented efficiently in multicore computer architectures using task-based parallelism and introducing the concept of wavelet blocks. We validate our computational method on a number of benchmark problems and we present simulations of shock-bubble interaction at different Mach numbers, demonstrating the accuracy and computational performance of the method.

  12. An adaptive out-of-step relay

    SciTech Connect

    Centeno, V.; Phadke, A.G.; Edris, A.; Benton, J.; Gaudi, M.; Michel, G.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes the development of an adaptive out-of-step relay, from the formulation of its concept to its field implementation at the Florida-Georgia interface. Adaptive relaying seeks to make adjustments to the relay characteristics as system conditions change, thereby making the relay more attuned to the prevailing power system conditions. The work described here began as a theoretical examination of the out-of-step relaying application, its possible shortcomings, and the opportunities to make adaptive improvements. It is shown that for a system that behaves primarily as a two-machine power system, the out-of-step relay could be made more secure by applying the principle of equal area criterion. The paper describes the theory of such a relay, its hardware configuration, and the system as it is installed in the field. The newly developed technology of synchronized phasor measurements plays an important role in the realization of this relay. The paper includes a summary of the field experience gathered over a period of one year.

  13. Using a generational time-step model to simulate dynamics of adaptation to transgenic corn and crop rotation by western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Crowder, D W; Onstad, D W

    2005-04-01

    We expanded a simulation model of the population dynamics and genetics of the western corn rootworm for a landscape of corn, soybean, and other crops to study the simultaneous development of resistance to both crop rotation and transgenic corn. Transgenic corn effective against corn rootworm was recently approved in 2003 and may be a very effective new technology for control of western corn rootworm in areas with or without the rotation-resistant variant. In simulations of areas with rotation-resistant populations, planting transgenic corn to only rotated cornfields was a robust strategy to prevent resistance to both traits. In these areas, planting transgenic corn to only continuous fields was not an effective strategy for preventing adaptation to crop rotation or transgenic corn. In areas without rotation-resistant phenotypes, gene expression of the allele for resistance to transgenic corn was the most important factor affecting the development of resistance to transgenic corn. If the allele for resistance to transgenic corn is recessive, resistance can be delayed longer than 15 yr, but if the resistant allele is dominant then resistance usually developed within 15 yr. In a sensitivity analysis, among the parameters investigated, initial allele frequency and density dependence were the two most important factors affecting the evolution of resistance. We compared the results of this simulation model with a more complicated model and results between the two were similar. This indicates that results from a simpler model with a generational time-step can compare favorably with a more complex model with a daily time-step.

  14. Stepping strategies for regulating gait adaptability and stability.

    PubMed

    Hak, Laura; Houdijk, Han; Steenbrink, Frans; Mert, Agali; van der Wurff, Peter; Beek, Peter J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-03-15

    Besides a stable gait pattern, gait in daily life requires the capability to adapt this pattern in response to environmental conditions. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the anticipatory strategies used by able-bodied people to attain an adaptive gait pattern, and how these strategies interact with strategies used to maintain gait stability. Ten healthy subjects walked in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation ENvironment (CAREN). To provoke an adaptive gait pattern, subjects had to hit virtual targets, with markers guided by their knees, while walking on a self-paced treadmill. The effects of walking with and without this task on walking speed, step length, step frequency, step width and the margins of stability (MoS) were assessed. Furthermore, these trials were performed with and without additional continuous ML platform translations. When an adaptive gait pattern was required, subjects decreased step length (p<0.01), tended to increase step width (p=0.074), and decreased walking speed while maintaining similar step frequency compared to unconstrained walking. These adaptations resulted in the preservation of equal MoS between trials, despite the disturbing influence of the gait adaptability task. When the gait adaptability task was combined with the balance perturbation subjects further decreased step length, as evidenced by a significant interaction between both manipulations (p=0.012). In conclusion, able-bodied people reduce step length and increase step width during walking conditions requiring a high level of both stability and adaptability. Although an increase in step frequency has previously been found to enhance stability, a faster movement, which would coincide with a higher step frequency, hampers accuracy and may consequently limit gait adaptability.

  15. Hydrologic consistency analysed through modeling at multiple time steps: does hydrological model performance benefit from finer time step information?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficchi, Andrea; Perrin, Charles; Andréassian, Vazken

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the operational utility of fine time step hydro-climatic information using a large catchment data set. The originality of this data set lies in the availability of precipitation data from the 6-minute rain gauges of Météo-France, and in the size of the catchment set (217 French catchments in total). The rainfall-runoff model used (GR4) has been adapted to hourly and sub-hourly time steps (up to 6-minute) from the daily time step version (Perrin et al., 2003). The model is applied at different time steps ranging from 6-minute to 1 day (6-, 12-, 30-minute, 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-hour and 1 day) and the evolution of model performance for each catchment is evaluated at the daily time step by aggregation of model outputs. Three classes of behavior are found according to the trend of model performance as the time step becomes finer: (i) catchments presenting an improvement of model performance; (ii) catchments with a model performance insensitive to the time step; (iii) catchments for which the performance even deteriorates as the time step becomes finer. The reasons behind these different trends are investigated from a hydrological point of view, by relating the model sensitivity to data at finer time step to catchment descriptors. References: Perrin, C., C. Michel and V. Andréassian (2003), "Improvement of a parsimonious model for streamflow simulation", Journal of Hydrology, 279(1-4): 275-289.

  16. Optimal time step for incompressible SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violeau, Damien; Leroy, Agnès

    2015-05-01

    A classical incompressible algorithm for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) is analyzed in terms of critical time step for numerical stability. For this purpose, a theoretical linear stability analysis is conducted for unbounded homogeneous flows, leading to an analytical formula for the maximum CFL (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) number as a function of the Fourier number. This gives the maximum time step as a function of the fluid viscosity, the flow velocity scale and the SPH discretization size (kernel standard deviation). Importantly, the maximum CFL number at large Reynolds number appears twice smaller than with the traditional Weakly Compressible (WCSPH) approach. As a consequence, the optimal time step for ISPH is only five times larger than with WCSPH. The theory agrees very well with numerical data for two usual kernels in a 2-D periodic flow. On the other hand, numerical experiments in a plane Poiseuille flow show that the theory overestimates the maximum allowed time step for small Reynolds numbers.

  17. Secondary tasks impair adaptation to step and gradual visual displacements

    PubMed Central

    Galea, J.M.; Sami, S.; Albert, N.B.; Miall, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Performing two competing tasks can result in dividing cognitive resources between the tasks and impaired motor adaptation. In previous work we have reported impaired learning when participants had to switch from one visual displacement adaptation task to another. Here we examined whether or not a secondary task had a similar effect on adaptation to a visual displacement . The resource dividing task involved simultaneously adapting to a step visual displacement whilst vocally shadowing an auditory stimulus . The switching task required participants to adapt to opposing visual displacements in an alternating manner with the left and right hands. We found that both manipulations had a detrimental effect on adaptation rate. We then integrated these tasks and found the combination caused a greater decrease in adaptation rate than either manipulation in isolation. Experiment 2 showed that adaptation to a gradually imposed visual displacement was influenced in a similar manner to step adaptation. Therefore although gradual adaptation involves minimal awareness it still can be disrupted by a cognitively demanding secondary task. We propose that awareness and cognitive resource can be regarded as qualitatively different but that awareness may be a marker of the amount of resource required. For example, large errors are both noticed and require substantial cognitive resource to connect. However a lack of awareness does not mean an adaptation task will be resistant to interference from a resource consuming secondary task. PMID:20101396

  18. Analysis of the dynamics of adaptation to transgenic corn and crop rotation by western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) using a daily time-step model.

    PubMed

    Crowder, D W; Onstad, D W; Cray, M E; Pierce, C M F; Hager, A G; Ratcliffe, S T; Steffey, K L

    2005-04-01

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, has overcome crop rotation in several areas of the north central United States. The effectiveness of crop rotation for management of corn rootworm has begun to fail in many areas of the midwestern United States, thus new management strategies need to be developed to control rotation-resistant populations. Transgenic corn, Zea mays L., effective against western corn rootworm, may be the most effective new technology for control of this pest in areas with or without populations adapted to crop rotation. We expanded a simulation model of the population dynamics and genetics of the western corn rootworm for a landscape of corn; soybean, Glycine max (L.); and other crops to study the simultaneous development of resistance to both crop rotation and transgenic corn. Results indicate that planting transgenic corn to first-year cornfields is a robust strategy to prevent resistance to both crop rotation and transgenic corn in areas where rotation-resistant populations are currently a problem or may be a problem in the future. In these areas, planting transgenic corn only in continuous cornfields is not an effective strategy to prevent resistance to either trait. In areas without rotation-resistant populations, gene expression of the allele for resistance to transgenic corn, R, is the most important factor affecting the evolution of resistance. If R is recessive, resistance can be delayed longer than 15 yr. If R is dominant, resistance may be difficult to prevent. In a sensitivity analysis, results indicate that density dependence, rotational level in the landscape, and initial allele frequency are the three most important factors affecting the results.

  19. Optimization Integrator for Large Time Steps.

    PubMed

    Gast, Theodore F; Schroeder, Craig; Stomakhin, Alexey; Jiang, Chenfanfu; Teran, Joseph M

    2015-10-01

    Practical time steps in today's state-of-the-art simulators typically rely on Newton's method to solve large systems of nonlinear equations. In practice, this works well for small time steps but is unreliable at large time steps at or near the frame rate, particularly for difficult or stiff simulations. We show that recasting backward Euler as a minimization problem allows Newton's method to be stabilized by standard optimization techniques with some novel improvements of our own. The resulting solver is capable of solving even the toughest simulations at the [Formula: see text] frame rate and beyond. We show how simple collisions can be incorporated directly into the solver through constrained minimization without sacrificing efficiency. We also present novel penalty collision formulations for self collisions and collisions against scripted bodies designed for the unique demands of this solver. Finally, we show that these techniques improve the behavior of Material Point Method (MPM) simulations by recasting it as an optimization problem.

  20. Newmark local time stepping on high-performance computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmann, Max; Grote, Marcus; Peter, Daniel; Schenk, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    In multi-scale complex media, finite element meshes often require areas of local refinement, creating small elements that can dramatically reduce the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to the CFL condition. Local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. We develop an efficient multilevel LTS-Newmark scheme and implement it in a widely used continuous finite element seismic wave-propagation package. In particular, we extend the standard LTS formulation with adaptations to continuous finite element methods that can be implemented very efficiently with very strong element-size contrasts (more than 100x). Capable of running on large CPU and GPU clusters, we present both synthetic validation examples and large scale, realistic application examples to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the method and implementation on thousands of CPU cores and hundreds of GPUs.

  1. Split-Step Timing of Professional and Junior Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Leskosek, Bojan; Filipcic, Tjasa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of the study was to determine the timing of a split-step in three categories of tennis players in four groups of strokes. Subjects were divided into three groups: male and female junior, and male professional tennis players. During two tournaments, all matches were recorded with two fixed video cameras. For every stroke, the timing of the split-step between the opponent’s impact point when hitting the ball and the player’s split-step was measured. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the differences between groups of strokes, players and the interaction Player x Stroke Group. A Tukey post-hoc test was employed to determine specific differences. The results revealed differences between players in detecting the opponent’s movement, stroke and ball flight, which were reflected in different split-step timings. Each tennis player has his/her own timing mechanism which they adapt to various game situations. Response times differ significantly depending on the game situation. On average, they are the lowest in the serve, and then gradually rise from the return of the serve to baseline game, reaching the highest values in specific game situations. Players react faster in the first serve than in the second one and in the return of the serve, the response times are lower after the return of the second serve PMID:28210342

  2. Accurate and stable time stepping in ice sheet modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gong; Lötstedt, Per; von Sydow, Lina

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we introduce adaptive time step control for simulation of the evolution of ice sheets. The discretization error in the approximations is estimated using "Milne's device" by comparing the result from two different methods in a predictor-corrector pair. Using a predictor-corrector pair the expensive part of the procedure, the solution of the velocity and pressure equations, is performed only once per time step and an estimate of the local error is easily obtained. The stability of the numerical solution is maintained and the accuracy is controlled by keeping the local error below a given threshold using PI-control. Depending on the threshold, the time step Δt is bound by stability requirements or accuracy requirements. Our method takes a shorter Δt than an implicit method but with less work in each time step and the solver is simpler. The method is analyzed theoretically with respect to stability and applied to the simulation of a 2D ice slab and a 3D circular ice sheet. The stability bounds in the experiments are explained by and agree well with the theoretical results.

  3. Sensory adaptation for timing perception

    PubMed Central

    Roseboom, Warrick; Linares, Daniel; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2015-01-01

    Recent sensory experience modifies subjective timing perception. For example, when visual events repeatedly lead auditory events, such as when the sound and video tracks of a movie are out of sync, subsequent vision-leads-audio presentations are reported as more simultaneous. This phenomenon could provide insights into the fundamental problem of how timing is represented in the brain, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that the effect of recent experience on timing perception is not just subjective; recent sensory experience also modifies relative timing discrimination. This result indicates that recent sensory history alters the encoding of relative timing in sensory areas, excluding explanations of the subjective phenomenon based only on decision-level changes. The pattern of changes in timing discrimination suggests the existence of two sensory components, similar to those previously reported for visual spatial attributes: a lateral shift in the nonlinear transducer that maps relative timing into perceptual relative timing and an increase in transducer slope around the exposed timing. The existence of these components would suggest that previous explanations of how recent experience may change the sensory encoding of timing, such as changes in sensory latencies or simple implementations of neural population codes, cannot account for the effect of sensory adaptation on timing perception. PMID:25788590

  4. Efficient multiple time-stepping algorithms of higher order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Abdullah; Niegemann, Jens; Busch, Kurt; Hochbruck, Marlis

    2015-03-01

    Multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithms allow to efficiently integrate large systems of ordinary differential equations, where a few stiff terms restrict the timestep of an otherwise non-stiff system. In this work, we discuss a flexible class of MTS techniques, based on multistep methods. Our approach contains several popular methods as special cases and it allows for the easy construction of novel and efficient higher-order MTS schemes. In addition, we demonstrate how to adapt the stability contour of the non-stiff time-integration to the physical system at hand. This allows significantly larger timesteps when compared to previously known multistep MTS approaches. As an example, we derive novel predictor-corrector (PCMTS) schemes specifically optimized for the time-integration of damped wave equations on locally refined meshes. In a set of numerical experiments, we demonstrate the performance of our scheme on discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) simulations of Maxwell's equations.

  5. Time to pause before the next step

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    Many scientists, who have staunchly supported ITER for years, are coming to realize it is time to further rethink fusion energy`s development strategy. Specifically, as was suggested by Grant Logan and Dale Meade, and in keeping with the restructuring of 1996, a theme of better, cheaper, faster fusion would serve the program more effectively than ``demonstrating controlled ignition...and integrated testing of the high-heat-flux and nuclear components required to utilize fusion energy...`` which are the important ingredients of ITER`s objectives. The author has personally shifted his view for a mixture of technical and political reasons. On the technical side, he senses that through advanced tokamak research, spherical tokamak research, and advanced stellarator work, scientists are coming to a new understanding that might make a burning-plasma device significantly smaller and less expensive. Thus waiting for a few years, even ten years, seems prudent. Scientifically, there is fascinating physics to be learned through studies of burning plasma on a tokamak. And clearly if one wishes to study burning plasma physics in a sustained plasma, there is no other configuration with an adequate database on which to proceed. But what is the urgency of moving towards an ITER-like step focused on burning plasma? Some of the arguments put forward and the counter arguments are discussed here.

  6. Projection Operator: A Step Towards Certification of Adaptive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larchev, Gregory V.; Campbell, Stefan F.; Kaneshige, John T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major barriers to wider use of adaptive controllers in commercial aviation is the lack of appropriate certification procedures. In order to be certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), an aircraft controller is expected to meet a set of guidelines on functionality and reliability while not negatively impacting other systems or safety of aircraft operations. Due to their inherent time-variant and non-linear behavior, adaptive controllers cannot be certified via the metrics used for linear conventional controllers, such as gain and phase margin. Projection Operator is a robustness augmentation technique that bounds the output of a non-linear adaptive controller while conforming to the Lyapunov stability rules. It can also be used to limit the control authority of the adaptive component so that the said control authority can be arbitrarily close to that of a linear controller. In this paper we will present the results of applying the Projection Operator to a Model-Reference Adaptive Controller (MRAC), varying the amount of control authority, and comparing controller s performance and stability characteristics with those of a linear controller. We will also show how adjusting Projection Operator parameters can make it easier for the controller to satisfy the certification guidelines by enabling a tradeoff between controller s performance and robustness.

  7. Discontinuous Galerkin Methods and Local Time Stepping for Wave Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, M. J.; Mitkova, T.

    2010-09-30

    Locally refined meshes impose severe stability constraints on explicit time-stepping methods for the numerical simulation of time dependent wave phenomena. To overcome that stability restriction, local time-stepping methods are developed, which allow arbitrarily small time steps precisely where small elements in the mesh are located. When combined with a discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretization in space, which inherently leads to a diagonal mass matrix, the resulting numerical schemes are fully explicit. Starting from the classical Adams-Bashforth multi-step methods, local time stepping schemes of arbitrarily high accuracy are derived. Numerical experiments validate the theory and illustrate the usefulness of the proposed time integration schemes.

  8. Telepresence, time delay, and adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Held, Richard; Durlach, Nathaniel

    1989-01-01

    Displays are now being used extensively throughout the society. More and more time is spent watching television, movies, computer screens, etc. Furthermore, in an increasing number of cases, the observer interacts with the display and plays the role of operator as well as observer. To a large extent, the normal behavior in the normal environment can also be thought of in these same terms. Taking liberties with Shakespeare, it might be said, all the world's a display and all the individuals in it are operators in and on the display. Within this general context of interactive display systems, a discussion is began with a conceptual overview of a particular class of such systems, namely, teleoperator systems. The notion is considered of telepresence and the factors that limit telepresence, including decorrelation between the: (1) motor output of the teleoperator as sensed directly via the kinesthetic/tactual system, and (2) the motor output of the teleoperator as sensed indirectly via feedback from the slave robot, i.e., via a visual display of the motor actions of the slave robot. Finally, the deleterious effect of time delay (a particular decorrelation) on sensory-motor adaptation (an important phenomenon related to telepresence) is examined.

  9. A marching-walking hybrid induces step length adaptation and transfers to natural walking.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew W; Finley, James M; Bastian, Amy J

    2015-06-01

    Walking is highly adaptable to new demands and environments. We have previously studied adaptation of locomotor patterns via a split-belt treadmill, where subjects learn to walk with one foot moving faster than the other. Subjects learn to adapt their walking pattern by changing the location (spatial) and time (temporal) of foot placement. Here we asked whether we can induce adaptation of a specific walking pattern when one limb does not "walk" but instead marches in place (i.e., marching-walking hybrid). The marching leg's movement is limited during the stance phase, and thus certain sensory signals important for walking may be reduced. We hypothesized that this would produce a spatial-temporal strategy different from that of normal split-belt adaptation. Healthy subjects performed two experiments to determine whether they could adapt their spatial-temporal pattern of step lengths during the marching-walking hybrid and whether the learning transfers to over ground walking. Results showed that the hybrid group did adapt their step lengths, but the time course of adaptation and deadaption was slower than that for the split-belt group. We also observed that the hybrid group utilized a mostly spatial strategy whereas the split-belt group utilized both spatial and temporal strategies. Surprisingly, we found no significant difference between the hybrid and split-belt groups in over ground transfer. Moreover, the hybrid group retained more of the learned pattern when they returned to the treadmill. These findings suggest that physical rehabilitation with this marching-walking paradigm on conventional treadmills may produce changes in symmetry comparable to what is observed during split-belt training.

  10. A marching-walking hybrid induces step length adaptation and transfers to natural walking

    PubMed Central

    Long, Andrew W.; Finley, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is highly adaptable to new demands and environments. We have previously studied adaptation of locomotor patterns via a split-belt treadmill, where subjects learn to walk with one foot moving faster than the other. Subjects learn to adapt their walking pattern by changing the location (spatial) and time (temporal) of foot placement. Here we asked whether we can induce adaptation of a specific walking pattern when one limb does not “walk” but instead marches in place (i.e., marching-walking hybrid). The marching leg's movement is limited during the stance phase, and thus certain sensory signals important for walking may be reduced. We hypothesized that this would produce a spatial-temporal strategy different from that of normal split-belt adaptation. Healthy subjects performed two experiments to determine whether they could adapt their spatial-temporal pattern of step lengths during the marching-walking hybrid and whether the learning transfers to over ground walking. Results showed that the hybrid group did adapt their step lengths, but the time course of adaptation and deadaption was slower than that for the split-belt group. We also observed that the hybrid group utilized a mostly spatial strategy whereas the split-belt group utilized both spatial and temporal strategies. Surprisingly, we found no significant difference between the hybrid and split-belt groups in over ground transfer. Moreover, the hybrid group retained more of the learned pattern when they returned to the treadmill. These findings suggest that physical rehabilitation with this marching-walking paradigm on conventional treadmills may produce changes in symmetry comparable to what is observed during split-belt training. PMID:25867742

  11. Adaptability: Time to Start Thinking about Thinking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    Adaptability : Time to Start Thinking about Thinking A Monograph by MAJ Cassandra S. Crosby United States Army School of Advanced Military...Monograph 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2014 - May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adaptability : Time to Start Thinking about Thinking 5a...understanding of adaptability and the conditions required to achieve it. Developing adaptive leaders is one of the Chief of Staff of the US Army’s top

  12. Collocation and Galerkin Time-Stepping Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, H. T.

    2011-01-01

    We study the numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations by one-step methods where the solution at tn is known and that at t(sub n+1) is to be calculated. The approaches employed are collocation, continuous Galerkin (CG) and discontinuous Galerkin (DG). Relations among these three approaches are established. A quadrature formula using s evaluation points is employed for the Galerkin formulations. We show that with such a quadrature, the CG method is identical to the collocation method using quadrature points as collocation points. Furthermore, if the quadrature formula is the right Radau one (including t(sub n+1)), then the DG and CG methods also become identical, and they reduce to the Radau IIA collocation method. In addition, we present a generalization of DG that yields a method identical to CG and collocation with arbitrary collocation points. Thus, the collocation, CG, and generalized DG methods are equivalent, and the latter two methods can be formulated using the differential instead of integral equation. Finally, all schemes discussed can be cast as s-stage implicit Runge-Kutta methods.

  13. Opinion: Adaptive Computing and the Internet: One Step forward, Two Steps Back?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Joseph J.

    1994-01-01

    This overview of adaptive technology for computers and networking identifies issues that must be addressed for people with disabilities to participate fully in online activities. Discussion includes adaptive equipment; Internet access; and graphical user interface (GUI) concerns. Contact information for vendors for adaptive technology and…

  14. Multiple-time-stepping generalized hybrid Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Escribano, Bruno; Akhmatskaya, Elena; Reich, Sebastian; Azpiroz, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    Performance of the generalized shadow hybrid Monte Carlo (GSHMC) method [1], which proved to be superior in sampling efficiency over its predecessors [2–4], molecular dynamics and hybrid Monte Carlo, can be further improved by combining it with multi-time-stepping (MTS) and mollification of slow forces. We demonstrate that the comparatively simple modifications of the method not only lead to better performance of GSHMC itself but also allow for beating the best performed methods, which use the similar force splitting schemes. In addition we show that the same ideas can be successfully applied to the conventional generalized hybrid Monte Carlo method (GHMC). The resulting methods, MTS-GHMC and MTS-GSHMC, provide accurate reproduction of thermodynamic and dynamical properties, exact temperature control during simulation and computational robustness and efficiency. MTS-GHMC uses a generalized momentum update to achieve weak stochastic stabilization to the molecular dynamics (MD) integrator. MTS-GSHMC adds the use of a shadow (modified) Hamiltonian to filter the MD trajectories in the HMC scheme. We introduce a new shadow Hamiltonian formulation adapted to force-splitting methods. The use of such Hamiltonians improves the acceptance rate of trajectories and has a strong impact on the sampling efficiency of the method. Both methods were implemented in the open-source MD package ProtoMol and were tested on a water and a protein systems. Results were compared to those obtained using a Langevin Molly (LM) method [5] on the same systems. The test results demonstrate the superiority of the new methods over LM in terms of stability, accuracy and sampling efficiency. This suggests that putting the MTS approach in the framework of hybrid Monte Carlo and using the natural stochasticity offered by the generalized hybrid Monte Carlo lead to improving stability of MTS and allow for achieving larger step sizes in the simulation of complex systems.

  15. Space-time adaptive numerical methods for geophysical applications.

    PubMed

    Castro, C E; Käser, M; Toro, E F

    2009-11-28

    In this paper we present high-order formulations of the finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin finite-element methods for wave propagation problems with a space-time adaptation technique using unstructured meshes in order to reduce computational cost without reducing accuracy. Both methods can be derived in a similar mathematical framework and are identical in their first-order version. In their extension to higher order accuracy in space and time, both methods use spatial polynomials of higher degree inside each element, a high-order solution of the generalized Riemann problem and a high-order time integration method based on the Taylor series expansion. The static adaptation strategy uses locally refined high-resolution meshes in areas with low wave speeds to improve the approximation quality. Furthermore, the time step length is chosen locally adaptive such that the solution is evolved explicitly in time by an optimal time step determined by a local stability criterion. After validating the numerical approach, both schemes are applied to geophysical wave propagation problems such as tsunami waves and seismic waves comparing the new approach with the classical global time-stepping technique. The problem of mesh partitioning for large-scale applications on multi-processor architectures is discussed and a new mesh partition approach is proposed and tested to further reduce computational cost.

  16. Space-Time Adaptive Solution of Richards' Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhishek, C.; Miller, C. T.; Farthing, M. W.

    2003-12-01

    Efficient, robust simulation of groundwater flow in the unsaturated zone remains computationally expensive, especially for problems characterized by sharp fronts in both space and time. Standard approaches that employ uniform spatial and temporal discretizations for the numerical solution of these problems lead to inefficient and expensive simulations. In this work, we solve Richards' equation using adaptive methods in both space and time. Spatial adaption is based upon a coarse grid solve and gradient-based error indicators, while the spatial step size is adjusted using a fixed-order approximation. Temporal adaption is accomplished using variable-order, variable-step-size approximations based upon the backward difference formulas up to fifth order. Since the advantages of similar adaptive methods in time are now established, we evaluate our method by comparison with a uniform spatial discretization that is adaptive in time for four different test problems. The numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method provides a robust and efficient alternative to standard approaches for simulating variably saturated flow.

  17. Automatic Time Stepping with Global Error Control for Groundwater Flow Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping

    2008-09-01

    An automatic time stepping with global error control is proposed for the time integration of the diffusion equation to simulate groundwater flow in confined aquifers. The scheme is based on an a posteriori error estimate for the discontinuous Galerkin (dG) finite element methods. A stability factor is involved in the error estimate and it is used to adapt the time step and control the global temporal error for the backward difference method. The stability factor can be estimated by solving a dual problem. The stability factor is not sensitive to the accuracy of the dual solution and the overhead computational cost can be minimized by solving the dual problem using large time steps. Numerical experiments are conducted to show the application and the performance of the automatic time stepping scheme. Implementation of the scheme can lead to improvement in accuracy and efficiency for groundwater flow models.

  18. Effect of Time Step On Atmospheric Model Systematic Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, D. L.

    Semi-Lagrangian approximations are becoming more common in operational Numer- ical Weather Prediction models because of the efficiency allowed by their long time steps. The early work that demonstrated that semi-Lagrangian forecasts were compa- rable to Eulerian in accuracy were based on mid-latitude short-range forecasts which were dominated by dynamical processes. These indicated no significant loss of accu- racy with semi-Lagrangian approximations and long time steps. Today, subgrid-scale parameterizations play a larger role in even short range forecasts. While not ignored, the effect of a longer time step on the parameterizations has been less thoroughly stud- ied. We present results from the NCAR CCM3 that indicate that the systematic errors in tropical precipitation patterns can depend on the time step. The actual dependency depends on the parameterization suite of the model. We identify the dependency in aqua-planet integrations. With the CCM3 parameterization suite, longer time steps re- sult in double precipitation maxima straddling the SST maximum while shorter time steps result in a single precipitation maximum over the SST maximum. Other param- eterization suites behave differently. The cause of the dependency will be discussed.

  19. GOTHIC: Gravitational oct-tree code accelerated by hierarchical time step controlling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Yohei; Umemura, Masayuki

    2017-04-01

    The tree method is a widely implemented algorithm for collisionless N-body simulations in astrophysics well suited for GPU(s). Adopting hierarchical time stepping can accelerate N-body simulations; however, it is infrequently implemented and its potential remains untested in GPU implementations. We have developed a Gravitational Oct-Tree code accelerated by HIerarchical time step Controlling named GOTHIC, which adopts both the tree method and the hierarchical time step. The code adopts some adaptive optimizations by monitoring the execution time of each function on-the-fly and minimizes the time-to-solution by balancing the measured time of multiple functions. Results of performance measurements with realistic particle distribution performed on NVIDIA Tesla M2090, K20X, and GeForce GTX TITAN X, which are representative GPUs of the Fermi, Kepler, and Maxwell generation of GPUs, show that the hierarchical time step achieves a speedup by a factor of around 3-5 times compared to the shared time step. The measured elapsed time per step of GOTHIC is 0.30 s or 0.44 s on GTX TITAN X when the particle distribution represents the Andromeda galaxy or the NFW sphere, respectively, with 224 = 16,777,216 particles. The averaged performance of the code corresponds to 10-30% of the theoretical single precision peak performance of the GPU.

  20. Long-term planetary integration with individual time steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Prasenjit; Tremaine, Scott

    1994-11-01

    We describe an algorithm for long-term planetary orbit integrations, including the dominant post-Newtonian effects, that employs individual time steps for each planet. The algorithm is symplectic and exhibits short-term errors that are O(epsilon(Omega2)(tau 2) where tau is the time step, Omega is a typical orbital frequency, and epsilon much less than 1 is a typical planetary mass in solar units. By a special starting procedure long-term errors over an integration interval T can be reduced to O(epsilon2(Omega3)(tau2)T. A sample 0.8 Myr integration of the nine planets illustrates that Pluto can have a time step more than 100 times Mercury's, without dominating the positional error. Our algorithm is applicable to other N-body systems.

  1. Short‐term time step convergence in a climate model

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Philip J.; Taylor, Mark A.; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This paper evaluates the numerical convergence of very short (1 h) simulations carried out with a spectral‐element (SE) configuration of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). While the horizontal grid spacing is fixed at approximately 110 km, the process‐coupling time step is varied between 1800 and 1 s to reveal the convergence rate with respect to the temporal resolution. Special attention is paid to the behavior of the parameterized subgrid‐scale physics. First, a dynamical core test with reduced dynamics time steps is presented. The results demonstrate that the experimental setup is able to correctly assess the convergence rate of the discrete solutions to the adiabatic equations of atmospheric motion. Second, results from full‐physics CAM5 simulations with reduced physics and dynamics time steps are discussed. It is shown that the convergence rate is 0.4—considerably slower than the expected rate of 1.0. Sensitivity experiments indicate that, among the various subgrid‐scale physical parameterizations, the stratiform cloud schemes are associated with the largest time‐stepping errors, and are the primary cause of slow time step convergence. While the details of our findings are model specific, the general test procedure is applicable to any atmospheric general circulation model. The need for more accurate numerical treatments of physical parameterizations, especially the representation of stratiform clouds, is likely common in many models. The suggested test technique can help quantify the time‐stepping errors and identify the related model sensitivities. PMID:27660669

  2. Accuracy of Pedometer Steps and Time for Youth with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Combs, Cindy; Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Morgan, Melinda; Bryan, Rebecca R.; Foley, John T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the accuracy of pedometer steps and activity time (Walk4Life, WL) for youth with developmental disabilities. Eighteen youth (11 girls, 7 boys) 4-14 years completed six 80-meter self-paced walking trials while wearing a pedometer at five waist locations (front right, front left, back right, back left, middle…

  3. 4 Steps for Redesigning Time for Student and Teacher Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazareno, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Everybody complains about a lack of time in school, but few are prepared to do anything about it. Laying the foundation before making such a shift is essential to the success of the change. Once a broad-based team has been chosen to do the work, they can follow a process explained in four steps with the apt acronym of T.I.M.E.: Taking stock,…

  4. Consistency of internal fluxes in a hydrological model running at multiple time steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficchi, Andrea; Perrin, Charles; Andréassian, Vazken

    2016-04-01

    Improving hydrological models remains a difficult task and many ways can be explored, among which one can find the improvement of spatial representation, the search for more robust parametrization, the better formulation of some processes or the modification of model structures by trial-and-error procedure. Several past works indicate that model parameters and structure can be dependent on the modelling time step, and there is thus some rationale in investigating how a model behaves across various modelling time steps, to find solutions for improvements. Here we analyse the impact of data time step on the consistency of the internal fluxes of a rainfall-runoff model run at various time steps, by using a large data set of 240 catchments. To this end, fine time step hydro-climatic information at sub-hourly resolution is used as input of a parsimonious rainfall-runoff model (GR) that is run at eight different model time steps (from 6 minutes to one day). The initial structure of the tested model (i.e. the baseline) corresponds to the daily model GR4J (Perrin et al., 2003), adapted to be run at variable sub-daily time steps. The modelled fluxes considered are interception, actual evapotranspiration and intercatchment groundwater flows. Observations of these fluxes are not available, but the comparison of modelled fluxes at multiple time steps gives additional information for model identification. The joint analysis of flow simulation performance and consistency of internal fluxes at different time steps provides guidance to the identification of the model components that should be improved. Our analysis indicates that the baseline model structure is to be modified at sub-daily time steps to warrant the consistency and realism of the modelled fluxes. For the baseline model improvement, particular attention is devoted to the interception model component, whose output flux showed the strongest sensitivity to modelling time step. The dependency of the optimal model

  5. Accuracy of Pedometer Steps and Time for Youth with Intellectual Disabilities during Dynamic Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Beets, Michael W.; Flaming, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Pedometer accuracy for steps and activity time during dynamic movement for youth with intellectual disabilities (ID) were examined. Twenty-four youth with ID (13 girls, 13.1 [plus or minus] 3.2 yrs; 11 boys, 14.7 [plus or minus] 2.7 yrs) were videotaped during adapted physical education class while wearing a Walk4Life 2505 pedometer in five…

  6. Manual for implementing a Shared Time Engineering Program (STEP) September 1980 through September 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronoff, H. I.; Leslie, J. J.; Mittleman, A. N.; Holt, S.

    1983-11-01

    This manual describes a Shared Time Engineering Program (STEP) conducted by the New England Apparel Manufacturers Association (NEAMA) headquartered in Fall River Massachusetts, and funded by the Office of Trade Adjustment Assistance of the U.S. Department of Commerce. It is addressed to industry association executives, industrial engineers and others interested in examining an innovative model of industrial engineering assistance to small plants which might be adapted to their particular needs.

  7. The Dynamics of Cumulative Step Size Adaptation on the Ellipsoid Model.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hans-Georg; Hellwig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of the [Formula: see text]-Evolution Strategy (ES) with cumulative step size adaptation (CSA) on the ellipsoid model is investigated using dynamic systems analysis. At first a nonlinear system of difference equations is derived that describes the mean value evolution of the ES. This system is successively simplified to finally allow for deriving closed-form solutions of the steady state behavior in the asymptotic limit case of large search space dimensions. It is shown that the system exhibits linear convergence order. The steady state mutation strength is calculated, and it is shown that compared to standard settings in [Formula: see text] self-adaptive ESs, the CSA control rule allows for an approximately [Formula: see text]-fold larger mutation strength. This explains the superior performance of the CSA in non-noisy environments. The results are used to derive a formula for the expected running time. Conclusions regarding the choice of the cumulation parameter c and the damping constant D are drawn.

  8. Two-step Adaptive Management for choosing between two management actions.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alana L; Walker, Leila; Runge, Michael C; McDonald-Madden, Eve; McCarthy, Michael A

    2017-01-31

    Adaptive management is widely advocated to improve environmental management. Derivations of optimal strategies for adaptive management, however, tend to be case specific and time consuming. In contrast, managers might seek relatively simple guidance, such as insight into when a new potential management action should be considered, and how much effort should be expended on trialing such an action. We constructed a two time-step scenario where a manager is choosing between two possible management actions. The manager has a total budget which can be split between a learning phase and an implementation phase. We use this scenario to investigate when and how much a manager should invest in learning about the management actions available. The optimal investment in learning can be understood intuitively by accounting for the expected value of sample information, the benefits that accrue during learning, the direct costs of learning, and the opportunity costs of learning. We find that the optimal proportion of the budget to spend on learning is characterized by several critical thresholds that mark a jump from spending a large proportion of the budget on learning to spending nothing. For example, as sampling variance increases it is optimal to spend a larger proportion of the budget on learning, up to a point - if the sampling variance passes a critical threshold, it is no longer beneficial to invest in learning. Similar thresholds are observed as a function of the total budget and the difference in the expected performance of the two actions. We illustrate how this model can be applied using a case study of choosing between alternative rearing diets for hihi, an endangered New Zealand passerine. Although the model presented is a simplified scenario, we believe it is relevant to many management situations. Managers often have relatively short time horizons for management, and might be reluctant to consider further investment in learning and monitoring beyond collecting

  9. Multiple time step integrators in ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-02-28

    Multiple time-scale algorithms exploit the natural separation of time-scales in chemical systems to greatly accelerate the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations. Although the utility of these methods in systems where the interactions are described by empirical potentials is now well established, their application to ab initio molecular dynamics calculations has been limited by difficulties associated with splitting the ab initio potential into fast and slowly varying components. Here we present two schemes that enable efficient time-scale separation in ab initio calculations: one based on fragment decomposition and the other on range separation of the Coulomb operator in the electronic Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for both water clusters and a solvated hydroxide ion that multiple time-scale molecular dynamics allows for outer time steps of 2.5 fs, which are as large as those obtained when such schemes are applied to empirical potentials, while still allowing for bonds to be broken and reformed throughout the dynamics. This permits computational speedups of up to 4.4x, compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics with a 0.5 fs time step, while maintaining the same energy conservation and accuracy.

  10. A method for improving time-stepping numerics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.

    2012-04-01

    In contemporary numerical simulations of the atmosphere, evidence suggests that time-stepping errors may be a significant component of total model error, on both weather and climate time-scales. This presentation will review the available evidence, and will then suggest a simple but effective method for substantially improving the time-stepping numerics at no extra computational expense. The most common time-stepping method is the leapfrog scheme combined with the Robert-Asselin (RA) filter. This method is used in the following atmospheric models (and many more): ECHAM, MAECHAM, MM5, CAM, MESO-NH, HIRLAM, KMCM, LIMA, SPEEDY, IGCM, PUMA, COSMO, FSU-GSM, FSU-NRSM, NCEP-GFS, NCEP-RSM, NSEAM, NOGAPS, RAMS, and CCSR/NIES-AGCM. Although the RA filter controls the time-splitting instability in these models, it also introduces non-physical damping and reduces the accuracy. This presentation proposes a simple modification to the RA filter. The modification has become known as the RAW filter (Williams 2011). When used in conjunction with the leapfrog scheme, the RAW filter eliminates the non-physical damping and increases the amplitude accuracy by two orders, yielding third-order accuracy. (The phase accuracy remains second-order.) The RAW filter can easily be incorporated into existing models, typically via the insertion of just a single line of code. Better simulations are obtained at no extra computational expense. Results will be shown from recent implementations of the RAW filter in various atmospheric models, including SPEEDY and COSMO. For example, in SPEEDY, the skill of weather forecasts is found to be significantly improved. In particular, in tropical surface pressure predictions, five-day forecasts made using the RAW filter have approximately the same skill as four-day forecasts made using the RA filter (Amezcua, Kalnay & Williams 2011). These improvements are encouraging for the use of the RAW filter in other models.

  11. Real Time & Power Efficient Adaptive - Robust Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioan Gliga, Lavinius; Constantin Mihai, Cosmin; Lupu, Ciprian; Popescu, Dumitru

    2017-01-01

    A design procedure for a control system suited for dynamic variable processes is presented in this paper. The proposed adaptive - robust control strategy considers both adaptive control advantages and robust control benefits. It estimates the degradation of the system’s performances due to the dynamic variation in the process and it then utilizes it to determine when the system must be adapted with a redesign of the robust controller. A single integral criterion is used for the identification of the process, and for the design of the control algorithm, which is expressed in direct form, through a cost function defined in the space of the parameters of both the process and the controller. For the minimization of this nonlinear function, an adequate mathematical programming minimization method is used. The theoretical approach presented in this paper was validated for a closed loop control system, simulated in an application developed in C. Because of the reduced number of operations, this method is suitable for implementation on fast processes. Due to its effectiveness, it increases the idle time of the CPU, thereby saving electrical energy.

  12. On the maximum time step in weakly compressible SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violeau, Damien; Leroy, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    In the SPH method for viscous fluids, the time step is subject to empirical stability criteria. We proceed to a stability analysis of the Weakly Compressible SPH equations using the von Neumann approach in arbitrary space dimension for unbounded flow. Considering the continuous SPH interpolant based on integrals, we obtain a theoretical stability criterion for the time step, depending on the kernel standard deviation, the speed of sound and the viscosity. The stability domain appears to be almost independent of the kernel choice for a given space discretisation. Numerical tests show that the theory is very accurate, despite the approximations made. We then extend the theory in order to study the influence of the method used to compute the density, of the gradient and divergence SPH operators, of background pressure, of the model used for viscous forces and of a constant velocity gradient. The influence of time integration scheme is also studied, and proved to be prominent. All of the above theoretical developments give excellent agreement against numerical results. It is found that velocity gradients almost do not affect stability, provided some background pressure is used. Finally, the case of bounded flows is briefly addressed from numerical tests in three cases: a laminar Poiseuille flow in a pipe, a lid-driven cavity and the collapse of a water column on a wedge.

  13. Adaptability of stride-to-stride control of stepping movements in human walking.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack-McLagan, Nicole K; Cusumano, Joseph P; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2016-01-25

    Humans continually adapt their movements as they walk on different surfaces, avoid obstacles, etc. External (environmental) and internal (physiological) noise-like disturbances, and the responses that correct for them, each contribute to locomotor variability. This variability may sometimes be detrimental (perhaps increasing fall risk), or sometimes beneficial (perhaps reflecting exploration of multiple task solutions). Here, we determined how humans regulated stride-to-stride fluctuations in walking when presented different task goals that allowed them to exploit inherent redundancies in different ways. Fourteen healthy adults walked on a treadmill under each of four conditions: constant speed only (SPD), constant speed and stride length (LEN), constant speed and stride time (TIM), or constant speed, stride length, and stride time (ALL). Multiple analyses tested competing hypotheses that participants might attempt to either equally satisfy all goals simultaneously, or instead adopt systematic intermediate strategies that only partly satisfied each individual goal. Participants exhibited similar average stepping behavior, but significant differences in variability and stride-to-stride serial correlations across conditions. Analyses of the structure of stride-to-stride fluctuation dynamics demonstrated humans resolved the competing goals presented not by minimizing errors equally with respect to all goals, but instead by trying to only partly satisfy each goal. Thus, humans exploit task redundancies even when they are explicitly removed from the task specifications. These findings may help identify when variability is predictive of, or protective against, fall risk. They may also help inform rehabilitation interventions to better exploit the positive contributions of variability, while minimizing the negative.

  14. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of adaptive immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information-processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS that we call an adaptive immune response simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system that responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner that is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate AIS, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices.

  15. On the performance of voltage stepping for the simulation of adaptive, nonlinear integrate-and-fire neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Kaabi, Mohamed Ghaith; Tonnelier, Arnaud; Martinez, Dominique

    2011-05-01

    In traditional event-driven strategies, spike timings are analytically given or calculated with arbitrary precision (up to machine precision). Exact computation is possible only for simplified neuron models, mainly the leaky integrate-and-fire model. In a recent paper, Zheng, Tonnelier, and Martinez (2009) introduced an approximate event-driven strategy, named voltage stepping, that allows the generic simulation of nonlinear spiking neurons. Promising results were achieved in the simulation of single quadratic integrate-and-fire neurons. Here, we assess the performance of voltage stepping in network simulations by considering more complex neurons (quadratic integrate-and-fire neurons with adaptation) coupled with multiple synapses. To handle the discrete nature of synaptic interactions, we recast voltage stepping in a general framework, the discrete event system specification. The efficiency of the method is assessed through simulations and comparisons with a modified time-stepping scheme of the Runge-Kutta type. We demonstrated numerically that the original order of voltage stepping is preserved when simulating connected spiking neurons, independent of the network activity and connectivity.

  16. Search Control Algorithm Based on Random Step Size Hill-Climbing Method for Adaptive PMD Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanizawa, Ken; Hirose, Akira

    Adaptive polarization mode dispersion (PMD) compensation is required for the speed-up and advancement of the present optical communications. The combination of a tunable PMD compensator and its adaptive control method achieves adaptive PMD compensation. In this paper, we report an effective search control algorithm for the feedback control of the PMD compensator. The algorithm is based on the hill-climbing method. However, the step size changes randomly to prevent the convergence from being trapped at a local maximum or a flat, unlike the conventional hill-climbing method. The randomness depends on the Gaussian probability density functions. We conducted transmission simulations at 160Gb/s and the results show that the proposed method provides more optimal compensator control than the conventional hill-climbing method.

  17. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  18. Analysis of steps adapted protocol in cardiac rehabilitation in the hospital phase

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Dallazen, Fernanda; Bronzatti, Angela Beerbaum Steinke; Lorenzoni, Juliara Cristina Werner; Windmöller, Pollyana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze a cardiac rehabilitation adapted protocol in physical therapy during the postoperative hospital phase of cardiac surgery in a service of high complexity, in aspects regarded to complications and mortality prevalence and hospitalization days. Methods This is an observational cross-sectional, retrospective and analytical study performed by investigating 99 patients who underwent cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass graft, heart valve replacement or a combination of both. Step program adapted for rehabilitation after cardiac surgery was analyzed under the command of the physiotherapy professional team. Results In average, a patient stays for two days in the Intensive Care Unit and three to four days in the hospital room, totalizing six days of hospitalization. Fatalities occurred in a higher percentage during hospitalization (5.1%) and up to two years period (8.6%) when compared to 30 days after hospital discharge (1.1%). Among the postoperative complications, the hemodynamic (63.4%) and respiratory (42.6%) were the most prevalent. 36-42% of complications occurred between the immediate postoperative period and the second postoperative day. The hospital discharge started from the fifth postoperative day. We can observe that in each following day, the patients are evolving in achieving the Steps, where Step 3 was the most used during the rehabilitation phase I. Conclusion This evolution program by steps can to guide the physical rehabilitation at the hospital in patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:25859866

  19. Step-Detection and Adaptive Step-Length Estimation for Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning at Various Walking Speeds Using a Smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ngoc-Huynh; Truong, Phuc Huu; Jeong, Gu-Min

    2016-01-01

    We propose a walking distance estimation method based on an adaptive step-length estimator at various walking speeds using a smartphone. First, we apply a fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based smoother on the acceleration data collected by the smartphone to remove the interference signals. Then, we analyze these data using a set of step-detection rules in order to detect walking steps. Using an adaptive estimator, which is based on a model of average step speed, we accurately obtain the walking step length. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we examine the distance estimation for four different distances and three speed levels. The experimental results show that the proposed method significantly outperforms conventional estimation methods in terms of accuracy. PMID:27598171

  20. Adaptice-step time integration package for stiff, nonstiff and multi-rate systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs)

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-01

    ARKode is part of a software family called SUNDIALS: SUite of Nonlinear and Differential/ALgebraic equation Solvers [1]. The ARKode solver library provides an adaptive-step time integration package for stiff, nonstiff and multi-rate systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) using Runge Kutta methods [2].

  1. Thermodynamics and kinetics of large-time-step molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Francesco; Spichty, Martin

    2012-02-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide essential information about the thermodynamics and kinetics of proteins. Technological advances in both hardware and algorithms have seen this method accessing timescales that used to be unreachable only few years ago. The quest to simulate slow, biologically relevant macromolecular conformational changes, is still open. Here, we present an approximate approach to increase the speed of MD simulations by a factor of ∼4.5. This is achieved by using a large integration time step of 7 fs, in combination with frozen covalent bonds and look-up tables for nonbonded interactions of the solvent. Extensive atomistic MD simulations for a flexible peptide in water show that the approach reproduces the peptide's equilibrium conformational changes, preserving the essential properties of both thermodynamics and kinetics. Comparison of this approximate method with state-of-the-art implicit solvation simulations indicates that the former provides a better description of the underlying free-energy surface. Finally, simulations of a 33-residue peptide show that these fast MD settings are readily applicable to investigate biologically relevant systems.

  2. Adaptive Controller Adaptation Time and Available Control Authority Effects on Piloting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna; Gregory, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive control is considered for highly uncertain, and potentially unpredictable, flight dynamics characteristic of adverse conditions. This experiment looked at how adaptive controller adaptation time to recover nominal aircraft dynamics affects pilots and how pilots want information about available control authority transmitted. Results indicate that an adaptive controller that takes three seconds to adapt helped pilots when looking at lateral and longitudinal errors. The controllability ratings improved with the adaptive controller, again the most for the three seconds adaptation time while workload decreased with the adaptive controller. The effects of the displays showing the percentage amount of available safe flight envelope used in the maneuver were dominated by the adaptation time. With the displays, the altitude error increased, controllability slightly decreased, and mental demand increased. Therefore, the displays did require some of the subjects resources but these negatives may be outweighed by pilots having more situation awareness of their aircraft.

  3. Variable time-stepping in the pathwise numerical solution of the chemical Langevin equation.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Silvana

    2012-12-21

    Stochastic modeling is essential for an accurate description of the biochemical network dynamics at the level of a single cell. Biochemically reacting systems often evolve on multiple time-scales, thus their stochastic mathematical models manifest stiffness. Stochastic models which, in addition, are stiff and computationally very challenging, therefore the need for developing effective and accurate numerical methods for approximating their solution. An important stochastic model of well-stirred biochemical systems is the chemical Langevin Equation. The chemical Langevin equation is a system of stochastic differential equation with multidimensional non-commutative noise. This model is valid in the regime of large molecular populations, far from the thermodynamic limit. In this paper, we propose a variable time-stepping strategy for the numerical solution of a general chemical Langevin equation, which applies for any level of randomness in the system. Our variable stepsize method allows arbitrary values of the time-step. Numerical results on several models arising in applications show significant improvement in accuracy and efficiency of the proposed adaptive scheme over the existing methods, the strategies based on halving/doubling of the stepsize and the fixed step-size ones.

  4. A Three-Step Approach with Adaptive Additive Magnitude Selection for the Sharpening of Images

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tien-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Aimed to find the additive magnitude automatically and adaptively, we propose a three-step and model-based approach for the sharpening of images in this paper. In the first pass, a Grey prediction model is applied to find a global maximal additive magnitude so that the condition of oversharpening in images to be sharpened can be avoided. During the second pass, edge pixels are picked out with our previously proposed edge detection mechanism. In this pass, a low-pass filter is also applied so that isolated pixels will not be regarded as around an edge. In the final pass, those pixels detected as around an edge are adjusted adaptively based on the local statistics, and those nonedge pixels are kept unaltered. Extensive experiments on natural images as well as medical images with subjective and objective evaluations will be given to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed approach. PMID:25309951

  5. Daily Time Step Refinement of Optimized Flood Control Rule Curves for a Global Warming Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Fitzgerald, C.; Hamlet, A. F.; Burges, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    Pacific Northwest temperatures have warmed by 0.8 °C since 1920 and are predicted to further increase in the 21st century. Simulated streamflow timing shifts associated with climate change have been found in past research to degrade water resources system performance in the Columbia River Basin when using existing system operating policies. To adapt to these hydrologic changes, optimized flood control operating rule curves were developed in a previous study using a hybrid optimization-simulation approach which rebalanced flood control and reservoir refill at a monthly time step. For the climate change scenario, use of the optimized flood control curves restored reservoir refill capability without increasing flood risk. Here we extend the earlier studies using a detailed daily time step simulation model applied over a somewhat smaller portion of the domain (encompassing Libby, Duncan, and Corra Linn dams, and Kootenai Lake) to evaluate and refine the optimized flood control curves derived from monthly time step analysis. Moving from a monthly to daily analysis, we found that the timing of flood control evacuation needed adjustment to avoid unintended outcomes affecting Kootenai Lake. We refined the flood rule curves derived from monthly analysis by creating a more gradual evacuation schedule, but kept the timing and magnitude of maximum evacuation the same as in the monthly analysis. After these refinements, the performance at monthly time scales reported in our previous study proved robust at daily time scales. Due to a decrease in July storage deficits, additional benefits such as more revenue from hydropower generation and more July and August outflow for fish augmentation were observed when the optimized flood control curves were used for the climate change scenario.

  6. Analysis of one-step and two-step real-time RT-PCR using SuperScript III.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Michael J; Godard, Michael P

    2005-09-01

    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a commonly used technique to analyze gene expression. There has been little research conducted to test if SuperScript III quantitative one-step (reverse transcription carried out in the same tube as PCR) and two-step (reverse transcription carried out in a separate reaction) RT-PCR systems provide similar real-time results. In this study, real-time reactions were set up using the housekeeping genes glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), beta2-microglobulin (B2M), and RNA polymerase 2 subunit A (PolR2A). Reaction efficiencies were determined by generating standard curves using total RNA isolated from human skeletal muscle and brain. Reaction efficiencies ranged from 97.7+/-0.9% to 99.4+/-1.8% for one-step and 98.0+/-0.2% to 102.6+/-1.3% for two-step RT-PCR (R2 values for all reactions>or=0.995). The sensitivities of one-step and two-step methods, as measured by cycle threshold values, were similar for GAPDH and B2M. However, for the lesser expressed PolR2A mRNA there was a 5 cycle lower threshold for one-step. In summary, both SuperScript III one-step and two-step methods yield reaction efficiencies close to 100% and produce similar, accurate, linear standard curves. However, using the one-step method with gene-specific priming may be more sensitive for quantification of certain genes such as PolR2A.

  7. Effects of the computational time step on numerical solutions for turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Moin, Parviz

    1994-01-01

    Effects of large computational time steps on the computed turbulence were investigated using a fully implicit method. In turbulent channel flow computations the largest computational time step in wall units which led to accurate prediction of turbulence statistics was determined. Turbulence fluctuations could not be sustained if the computational time step was near or larger than the Kolmogorov time scale.

  8. Adaptive multi-step Full Waveform Inversion based on Waveform Mode Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong; Han, Liguo; Xu, Zhuo; Zhang, Fengjiao; Zeng, Jingwen

    2017-04-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) can be used to build high resolution velocity models, but there are still many challenges in seismic field data processing. The most difficult problem is about how to recover long-wavelength components of subsurface velocity models when seismic data is lacking of low frequency information and without long-offsets. To solve this problem, we propose to use Waveform Mode Decomposition (WMD) method to reconstruct low frequency information for FWI to obtain a smooth model, so that the initial model dependence of FWI can be reduced. In this paper, we use adjoint-state method to calculate the gradient for Waveform Mode Decomposition Full Waveform Inversion (WMDFWI). Through the illustrative numerical examples, we proved that the low frequency which is reconstructed by WMD method is very reliable. WMDFWI in combination with the adaptive multi-step inversion strategy can obtain more faithful and accurate final inversion results. Numerical examples show that even if the initial velocity model is far from the true model and lacking of low frequency information, we still can obtain good inversion results with WMD method. From numerical examples of anti-noise test, we see that the adaptive multi-step inversion strategy for WMDFWI has strong ability to resist Gaussian noise. WMD method is promising to be able to implement for the land seismic FWI, because it can reconstruct the low frequency information, lower the dominant frequency in the adjoint source, and has a strong ability to resist noise.

  9. Lean Software Development: One Step at a Time

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    NVAN Types of Waste L SW A first step in implementing Lean software development is learning to Lean Manufacturing ean Development Defects Defects...move on… COPYRIGHT © 2008 THE BOEING COMPANY Principle 2: Build Quality In Key insight from Lean manufacturing : • You cannot inspect quality into a

  10. Adaptivity in space and time for shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi Cecchi, M.; Marcuzzi, F.

    1999-09-01

    In this paper, adaptive algorithms for time and space discretizations are added to an existing solution method previously applied to the Venice Lagoon Tidal Circulation problem. An analysis of the interactions between space and time discretizations adaptation algorithms is presented. In particular, it turns out that both error estimations in space and time must be present for maintaining the adaptation efficiency. Several advantages, for adaptivity and for time decoupling of the equations, offered by the operator-splitting adopted for shallow water equations solution are presented. Copyright

  11. Transform Domain Robust Variable Step Size Griffiths' Adaptive Algorithm for Noise Cancellation in ECG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Veena; Deekshit, Ravishankar; Satyanarayana, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is widely used for diagnosis of heart diseases. Good quality of ECG is utilized by physicians for interpretation and identification of physiological and pathological phenomena. However, in real situations, ECG recordings are often corrupted by artifacts or noise. Noise severely limits the utility of the recorded ECG and thus needs to be removed, for better clinical evaluation. In the present paper a new noise cancellation technique is proposed for removal of random noise like muscle artifact from ECG signal. A transform domain robust variable step size Griffiths' LMS algorithm (TVGLMS) is proposed for noise cancellation. For the TVGLMS, the robust variable step size has been achieved by using the Griffiths' gradient which uses cross-correlation between the desired signal contaminated with observation or random noise and the input. The algorithm is discrete cosine transform (DCT) based and uses symmetric property of the signal to represent the signal in frequency domain with lesser number of frequency coefficients when compared to that of discrete Fourier transform (DFT). The algorithm is implemented for adaptive line enhancer (ALE) filter which extracts the ECG signal in a noisy environment using LMS filter adaptation. The proposed algorithm is found to have better convergence error/misadjustment when compared to that of ordinary transform domain LMS (TLMS) algorithm, both in the presence of white/colored observation noise. The reduction in convergence error achieved by the new algorithm with desired signal decomposition is found to be lower than that obtained without decomposition. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is better than traditional adaptive filter using LMS algorithm in the aspects of retaining geometrical characteristics of ECG signal.

  12. Comparing adaptive stepped care and monetary-based voucher interventions for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Brooner, Robert K; Kidorf, Michael S; King, Van L; Stoller, Kenneth B; Neufeld, Karin J; Kolodner, Ken

    2007-05-01

    This 6-month randomized clinical trial (with 3-month follow-up) used a 2x2 design to compare the independent and combined effectiveness of two interventions designed to improve outcomes in treatment-seeking opioid dependent patients (n=236): motivated stepped care (MSC) and contingent voucher incentives (CVI). MSC is an adaptive treatment strategy that uses principles of negative reinforcement and avoidance to motivate both attendance to varying levels of counseling services and brief periods of abstinence [Brooner, R.K., Kidorf, M., 2002. Using behavioral reinforcement to improve methadone treatment participation. Sci. Pract. Perspect. 1, 38-46; Brooner, R.K., Kidorf, M.S., King, V.L., Peirce, J.M., Bigelow, G.E., Kolodner, K., 2004. A modified "stepped care" approach to improve attendance behavior in treatment seeking opioid abusers. J. Subst. Abuse Treat. 27, 223-232]. In contrast, CVI [Higgins, S., Delaney, D.D., Budney, A.J., Bickel, W.K., Hughes, J.R., Foerg, B.A., Fenwick, J.W., 1991. A behavioral approach to achieving initial cocaine abstinence. Am. Psychiatr. 148, 1218-1224] relies on positive reinforcement to motivate drug abstinence. The results showed that the combined approach (MSC+CVI) was associated with the highest proportion of drug-negative urine samples during both the randomized and 3-month follow-up arms of the evaluation. The CVI-only and the MSC-only conditions evidenced similar proportions of drug-negative urine samples that were both significantly greater than the standard care (SC) comparison group. Voucher-based reinforcement was associated with better retention, while adaptive stepped-based care was associated with better adherence to scheduled counseling sessions. These results suggest that both CVI and MSC are more effective than routine care for reducing drug use in opioid dependent outpatients, and that the overall benefits of MSC are enhanced further by adding positive reinforcement.

  13. A New Modified Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm with Exponential Function Adaptive Steps.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wei; Lan, Heng-You; Li, Hao-Ru

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most recent popular swarm intelligence techniques, artificial bee colony algorithm is poor at exploitation and has some defects such as slow search speed, poor population diversity, the stagnation in the working process, and being trapped into the local optimal solution. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new modified artificial bee colony algorithm in view of the initial population structure, subpopulation groups, step updating, and population elimination. Further, depending on opposition-based learning theory and the new modified algorithms, an improved S-type grouping method is proposed and the original way of roulette wheel selection is substituted through sensitivity-pheromone way. Then, an adaptive step with exponential functions is designed for replacing the original random step. Finally, based on the new test function versions CEC13, six benchmark functions with the dimensions D = 20 and D = 40 are chosen and applied in the experiments for analyzing and comparing the iteration speed and accuracy of the new modified algorithms. The experimental results show that the new modified algorithm has faster and more stable searching and can quickly increase poor population diversity and bring out the global optimal solutions.

  14. A New Modified Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm with Exponential Function Adaptive Steps

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wei; Li, Hao-ru

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most recent popular swarm intelligence techniques, artificial bee colony algorithm is poor at exploitation and has some defects such as slow search speed, poor population diversity, the stagnation in the working process, and being trapped into the local optimal solution. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new modified artificial bee colony algorithm in view of the initial population structure, subpopulation groups, step updating, and population elimination. Further, depending on opposition-based learning theory and the new modified algorithms, an improved S-type grouping method is proposed and the original way of roulette wheel selection is substituted through sensitivity-pheromone way. Then, an adaptive step with exponential functions is designed for replacing the original random step. Finally, based on the new test function versions CEC13, six benchmark functions with the dimensions D = 20 and D = 40 are chosen and applied in the experiments for analyzing and comparing the iteration speed and accuracy of the new modified algorithms. The experimental results show that the new modified algorithm has faster and more stable searching and can quickly increase poor population diversity and bring out the global optimal solutions. PMID:27293426

  15. An averaging analysis of discrete-time indirect adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Stephen M.; Kosut, Robert L.; Franklin, Gene F.

    1988-01-01

    An averaging analysis of indirect, discrete-time, adaptive control systems is presented. The analysis results in a signal-dependent stability condition and accounts for unmodeled plant dynamics as well as exogenous disturbances. This analysis is applied to two discrete-time adaptive algorithms: an unnormalized gradient algorithm and a recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm with resetting. Since linearization and averaging are used for the gradient analysis, a local stability result valid for small adaptation gains is found. For RLS with resetting, the assumption is that there is a long time between resets. The results for the two algorithms are virtually identical, emphasizing their similarities in adaptive control.

  16. ADER-WENO finite volume schemes with space-time adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbser, Michael; Zanotti, Olindo; Hidalgo, Arturo; Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    2013-09-01

    We present the first high order one-step ADER-WENO finite volume scheme with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in multiple space dimensions. High order spatial accuracy is obtained through a WENO reconstruction, while a high order one-step time discretization is achieved using a local space-time discontinuous Galerkin predictor method. Due to the one-step nature of the underlying scheme, the resulting algorithm is particularly well suited for an AMR strategy on space-time adaptive meshes, i.e. with time-accurate local time stepping. The AMR property has been implemented 'cell-by-cell', with a standard tree-type algorithm, while the scheme has been parallelized via the message passing interface (MPI) paradigm. The new scheme has been tested over a wide range of examples for nonlinear systems of hyperbolic conservation laws, including the classical Euler equations of compressible gas dynamics and the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). High order in space and time have been confirmed via a numerical convergence study and a detailed analysis of the computational speed-up with respect to highly refined uniform meshes is also presented. We also show test problems where the presented high order AMR scheme behaves clearly better than traditional second order AMR methods. The proposed scheme that combines for the first time high order ADER methods with space-time adaptive grids in two and three space dimensions is likely to become a useful tool in several fields of computational physics, applied mathematics and mechanics.

  17. The prevalence of upright non-stepping time in comparison to stepping time in 11-13 year old school children across seasons.

    PubMed

    McCrorie, P Rw; Duncan, E; Granat, M H; Stansfield, B W

    2012-11-01

    Evidence suggests that behaviours such as standing are beneficial for our health. Unfortunately, little is known of the prevalence of this state, its importance in relation to time spent stepping or variation across seasons. The aim of this study was to quantify, in young adolescents, the prevalence and seasonal changes in time spent upright and not stepping (UNSt(time)) as well as time spent upright and stepping (USt(time)), and their contribution to overall upright time (U(time)). Thirty-three adolescents (12.2 ± 0.3 y) wore the activPAL activity monitor during four school days on two occasions: November/December (winter) and May/June (summer). UNSt(time) contributed 60% of daily U(time) at winter (Mean = 196 min) and 53% at summer (Mean = 171 min); a significant seasonal effect, p < 0.001. USt(time) was significantly greater in summer compared to winter (153 min versus 131 min, p < 0.001). The effects in UNSt(time) could be explained through significant seasonal differences during the school hours (09:00-16:00), whereas the effects in USt(time) could be explained through significant seasonal differences in the evening period (16:00-22:00). Adolescents spent a greater amount of time upright and not stepping than they did stepping, in both winter and summer. The observed seasonal effects for both UNSt(time) and USt(time) provide important information for behaviour change intervention programs.

  18. Error and timing analysis of multiple time-step integration methods for molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guowen; Deng, Yuefan; Glimm, James; Martyna, Glenn

    2007-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules performed using multiple time-step integration methods are hampered by resonance instabilities. We analyze the properties of a simple 1D linear system integrated with the symplectic reference system propagator MTS (r-RESPA) technique following earlier work by others. A closed form expression for the time step dependent Hamiltonian which corresponds to r-RESPA integration of the model is derived. This permits us to present an analytic formula for the dependence of the integration accuracy on short-range force cutoff range. A detailed analysis of the force decomposition for the standard Ewald summation method is then given as the Ewald method is a good candidate to achieve high scaling on modern massively parallel machines. We test the new analysis on a realistic system, a protein in water. Under Langevin dynamics with a weak friction coefficient ( ζ=1 ps) to maintain temperature control and using the SHAKE algorithm to freeze out high frequency vibrations, we show that the 5 fs resonance barrier present when all degrees of freedom are unconstrained is postponed to ≈12 fs. An iso-error boundary with respect to the short-range cutoff range and multiple time step size agrees well with the analytical results which are valid due to dominance of the high frequency modes in determining integrator accuracy. Using r-RESPA to treat the long range interactions results in a 6× increase in efficiency for the decomposition described in the text.

  19. Its Time to Step into Science at Medgar Evers College.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Margaret A; Skeete, Dereck; Catapane, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    Over the next decade, demand and job opportunities in science and engineering (S&E) are expected to grow. With so many S&E "baby-boomers" retiring, questions arise as to whether America will be able to attract enough young people into Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) to maintain a S&E workforce that keeps up with what is becoming a more globally technologically and scientifically advancing society. Furthermore, considering recent projections of a nation more racially and ethnically diverse by mid-century, will America's future STEM workforce reflect the diversity projected for our growing U.S. population? In 2006, the authors received an award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to direct a new initiative titled "STEP into Science." Funded under the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program (STEP) of the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education, the main goal of the project is to increase the number of STEM majors that graduate with baccalaureate degree, specifically B.S. degrees in Biology or Environmental Science. The program has had great success implementing the use of "peer recruiters" to attract more high school, transfer, and non-science college students into STEM majors and places emphasis on the role of undergraduate research experiences as a successful strategy to increase the quality and retention of science majors through their baccalaureate degree. Since the inception of the program, total STEM enrollment has more than doubled and the number of majors actively engaged in research has risen 38% with a concurrent increase in student research presentations at scientific conference, and the number of students receiving external research internships and travel awards to attend national conferences. The number of STEM graduates (both A.S. and B.S.) has also increased and the program anticipates that these and future STEP into Science graduates will continue on to Masters and Doctoral programs in

  20. Solar-driven thermo- and electrochemical degradation of nitrobenzene in wastewater: Adaptation and adoption of solar STEP concept.

    PubMed

    Gu, Di; Shao, Nan; Zhu, Yanji; Wu, Hongjun; Wang, Baohui

    2017-01-05

    The STEP concept has successfully been demonstrated for driving chemical reaction by utilization of solar heat and electricity to minimize the fossil energy, meanwhile, maximize the rate of thermo- and electrochemical reactions in thermodynamics and kinetics. This pioneering investigation experimentally exhibit that the STEP concept is adapted and adopted efficiently for degradation of nitrobenzene. By employing the theoretical calculation and thermo-dependent cyclic voltammetry, the degradation potential of nitrobenzene was found to be decreased obviously, at the same time, with greatly lifting the current, while the temperature was increased. Compared with the conventional electrochemical methods, high efficiency and fast degradation rate were markedly displayed due to the co-action of thermo- and electrochemical effects and the switch of the indirect electrochemical oxidation to the direct one for oxidation of nitrobenzene. A clear conclusion on the mechanism of nitrobenzene degradation by the STEP can be schematically proposed and discussed by the combination of thermo- and electrochemistry based the analysis of the HPLC, UV-vis and degradation data. This theory and experiment provide a pilot for the treatment of nitrobenzene wastewater with high efficiency, clean operation and low carbon footprint, without any other input of energy and chemicals from solar energy.

  1. A Step-by-Step Picture of Pulsed (Time-Domain) NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Leslie J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a method for teaching time pulsed NMR principals that are as simple and pictorial as possible. Uses xyz coordinate figures and presents theoretical explanations using a Fourier transformation spectrum. Assumes no previous knowledge of quantum mechanics for students. Usable for undergraduates. (MVL)

  2. Lateral root initiation: one step at a time.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Ive

    2012-03-01

    Plant growth relies heavily on a root system that is hidden belowground, which develops post-embryonically through the formation of lateral roots. The de novo formation of lateral root organs requires tightly coordinated asymmetric cell division of a limited number of pericycle cells located at the xylem pole. This typically involves the formation of founder cells, followed by a number of cellular changes until the cells divide and give rise to two unequally sized daughter cells. Over the past few years, our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms behind lateral root initiation has increased dramatically. Here, I will summarize these recent advances, focusing on the prominent role of auxin and cell cycle activity, and elaborating on the three key steps of pericycle cell priming, founder cell establishment and asymmetric cell division. Taken together, recent findings suggest a tentative model in which successive auxin response modules are crucial for lateral root initiation, and additional factors provide more layers of control.

  3. Adaptive median filtering for preprocessing of time series measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paunonen, Matti

    1993-01-01

    A median (L1-norm) filtering program using polynomials was developed. This program was used in automatic recycling data screening. Additionally, a special adaptive program to work with asymmetric distributions was developed. Examples of adaptive median filtering of satellite laser range observations and TV satellite time measurements are given. The program proved to be versatile and time saving in data screening of time series measurements.

  4. Discrete-time adaptive control of robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarokh, M.

    1989-01-01

    A discrete-time model reference adaptive control scheme is developed for trajectory tracking of robot manipulators. Hyperstability theory is utilized to derive the adaptation laws for the controller gain matrices. It is shown that asymptotic trajectory tracking is achieved despite gross robot parameter variation and uncertainties. The method offers considerable design flexibility and enables the designer to improve the performance of the control system by adjusting free design parameters. The discrete-time adaptation algorithm is extremely simple and is therefore suitable for real-time implementation.

  5. Local Discontinuous Galerkin Approximations And Variable Step Size, Variable Order Time Integration For Richards' Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Farthing, M. W.; Dawson, C. N.; Miller, C. T.

    2004-12-01

    Numerical simulation of Richards' equation continues to be difficult. It is highly nonlinear under common constitutive relations and exhibits sharp fronts in both the pressure head and volume fraction for many problems of interest. For a number of multiphase flow problems, the use of variable order and variable step size temporal discretizations has shown some advantages. However, the spatial discretizations commonly used for variably saturated flow are dominated by nonadaptive, low-order finite difference and finite element methods. Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element methods have received significant attention in a number of fields for hyperbolic PDE's and, more recently, for elliptic and parabolic problems. DG approaches like the local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) method are appealing for modeling subsurface flow since they can lead to velocity fields that are locally mass-conservative without the need for auxiliary variables or alternative meshes. DG discretizations are also inherently local and so better-suited for unstructured meshes and h-p adaption strategies than traditional methods. While some work has been done recently for multiphase subsurface flow, there are a range of issues related to the performance of DG methods for highly nonlinear parabolic problems like Richards' equation that have not been investigated fully. In this work, we consider the combination of higher order adaptive time integration with an LDG spatial discretization for Richards' equation. We compare this approach to standard low-order methods for a series of test problems and consider a number of issues including the methods' relative accuracy and computational efficiency.

  6. A Step Towards Developing Adaptive Robot-Mediated Intervention Architecture (ARIA) for Children With Autism

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Esubalew T; Lahiri, Uttama; Swanson, Amy R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Warren, Zachary E.; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technology, especially robotic technology, has been shown to be appealing to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Such interest may be leveraged to provide repeatable, accurate and individualized intervention services to young children with ASD based on quantitative metrics. However, existing robot-mediated systems tend to have limited adaptive capability that may impact individualization. Our current work seeks to bridge this gap by developing an adaptive and individualized robot-mediated technology for children with ASD. The system is composed of a humanoid robot with its vision augmented by a network of cameras for real-time head tracking using a distributed architecture. Based on the cues from the child’s head movement, the robot intelligently adapts itself in an individualized manner to generate prompts and reinforcements with potential to promote skills in the ASD core deficit area of early social orienting. The system was validated for feasibility, accuracy, and performance. Results from a pilot usability study involving six children with ASD and a control group of six typically developing (TD) children are presented. PMID:23221831

  7. Adolescent Time Attitude Scale: Adaptation into Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çelik, Eyüp; Sahranç, Ümit; Kaya, Mehmet; Turan, Mehmet Emin

    2017-01-01

    This research is aimed at examining the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Time Attitude Scale. Data was collected from 433 adolescents; 206 males and 227 females participated in the study. Confirmatory factor analysis performed to discover the structural validity of the scale. The internal consistency method was used for…

  8. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    We perform a stability analysis of a Monte Carlo method for simulating the Compton scattering of photons by free electron in high energy density applications and develop time-step limits that avoid unstable and oscillatory solutions. Implementing this Monte Carlo technique in multi physics problems typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value, which can lead to this undesirable behavior. With a set of numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficacy of our time-step limits.

  9. Formulation of an explicit-multiple-time-step time integration method for use in a global primitive equation grid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    With appropriate modifications, a recently proposed explicit-multiple-time-step scheme (EMTSS) is incorporated into the UCLA model. In this scheme, the linearized terms in the governing equations that generate the gravity waves are split into different vertical modes. Each mode is integrated with an optimal time step, and at periodic intervals these modes are recombined. The other terms are integrated with a time step dictated by the CFL condition for low-frequency waves. This large time step requires a special modification of the advective terms in the polar region to maintain stability. Test runs for 72 h show that EMTSS is a stable, efficient and accurate scheme.

  10. Real-time adaptive aircraft scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolitz, Stephan E.; Terrab, Mostafa

    1990-01-01

    One of the most important functions of any air traffic management system is the assignment of ground-holding times to flights, i.e., the determination of whether and by how much the take-off of a particular aircraft headed for a congested part of the air traffic control (ATC) system should be postponed in order to reduce the likelihood and extent of airborne delays. An analysis is presented for the fundamental case in which flights from many destinations must be scheduled for arrival at a single congested airport; the formulation is also useful in scheduling the landing of airborne flights within the extended terminal area. A set of approaches is described for addressing a deterministic and a probabilistic version of this problem. For the deterministic case, where airport capacities are known and fixed, several models were developed with associated low-order polynomial-time algorithms. For general delay cost functions, these algorithms find an optimal solution. Under a particular natural assumption regarding the delay cost function, an extremely fast (O(n ln n)) algorithm was developed. For the probabilistic case, using an estimated probability distribution of airport capacities, a model was developed with an associated low-order polynomial-time heuristic algorithm with useful properties.

  11. IMPROVEMENTS TO THE TIME STEPPING ALGORITHM OF RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Cumberland, R.; Mesina, G.

    2009-01-01

    The RELAP5-3D time step method is used to perform thermo-hydraulic and neutronic simulations of nuclear reactors and other devices. It discretizes time and space by numerically solving several differential equations. Previously, time step size was controlled by halving or doubling the size of a previous time step. This process caused the code to run slower than it potentially could. In this research project, the RELAP5-3D time step method was modifi ed to allow a new method of changing time steps to improve execution speed and to control error. The new RELAP5-3D time step method being studied involves making the time step proportional to the material courant limit (MCL), while insuring that the time step does not increase by more than a factor of two between advancements. As before, if a step fails or mass error is excessive, the time step is cut in half. To examine performance of the new method, a measure of run time and a measure of error were plotted against a changing MCL proportionality constant (m) in seven test cases. The removal of the upper time step limit produced a small increase in error, but a large decrease in execution time. The best value of m was found to be 0.9. The new algorithm is capable of producing a signifi cant increase in execution speed, with a relatively small increase in mass error. The improvements made are now under consideration for inclusion as a special option in the RELAP5-3D production code.

  12. Consensus time and conformity in the adaptive voter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2013-09-01

    The adaptive voter model is a paradigmatic model in the study of opinion formation. Here we propose an extension for this model, in which conflicts are resolved by obtaining another opinion, and analytically study the time required for consensus to emerge. Our results shed light on the rich phenomenology of both the original and extended adaptive voter models, including a dynamical phase transition in the scaling behavior of the mean time to consensus.

  13. Convergence Acceleration for Multistage Time-Stepping Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Turkel, Eli L.; Rossow, C-C; Vasta, V. N.

    2006-01-01

    The convergence of a Runge-Kutta (RK) scheme with multigrid is accelerated by preconditioning with a fully implicit operator. With the extended stability of the Runge-Kutta scheme, CFL numbers as high as 1000 could be used. The implicit preconditioner addresses the stiffness in the discrete equations associated with stretched meshes. Numerical dissipation operators (based on the Roe scheme, a matrix formulation, and the CUSP scheme) as well as the number of RK stages are considered in evaluating the RK/implicit scheme. Both the numerical and computational efficiency of the scheme with the different dissipation operators are discussed. The RK/implicit scheme is used to solve the two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. In two dimensions, turbulent flows over an airfoil at subsonic and transonic conditions are computed. The effects of mesh cell aspect ratio on convergence are investigated for Reynolds numbers between 5.7 x 10(exp 6) and 100.0 x 10(exp 6). Results are also obtained for a transonic wing flow. For both 2-D and 3-D problems, the computational time of a well-tuned standard RK scheme is reduced at least a factor of four.

  14. Mechanisms of adaptation from a multiple to a single step recovery strategy following repeated exposure to forward loss of balance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Carty, Christopher P; Cronin, Neil J; Lichtwark, Glen A; Mills, Peter M; Barrett, Rod S

    2012-01-01

    When released from an initial, static, forward lean angle and instructed to recover with a single step, some older adults are able to meet the task requirements, whereas others either stumble or fall. The purpose of the present study was to use the concept of margin of stability (MoS) to investigate balance recovery responses in the anterior-posterior direction exhibited by older single steppers, multiple steppers and those that are able to adapt from multiple to single steps following exposure to repeated forward loss of balance. One hundred and fifty-one healthy, community dwelling, older adults, aged 65-80 years, participated in the study. Participants performed four trials of the balance recovery task from each of three initial lean angles. Balance recovery responses in the anterior-posterior direction were quantified at three events; cable release (CR), toe-off (TO) and foot contact (FC), for trials performed at the intermediate lean angle. MoS was computed as the anterior-posterior distance between the forward boundary of the Base of Support (BoS) and the vertical projection of the velocity adjusted centre of mass position (XCoM). Approximately one-third of participants adapted from a multiple to a single step recovery strategy following repeated exposure to the task. MoS at FC for the single and multiple step trials in the adaptation group were intermediate between the exclusively single step group and the exclusively multiple step group, with the single step trials having a significant, 3.7 times higher MoS at FC than the multiple step trials. Consistent with differences between single and multiple steppers, adaptation from multiple to single steps was attributed to an increased BoS at FC, a reduced XCoM at FC and an increased rate of BoS displacement from TO to FC. Adaptations occurred within a single test session and suggest older adults that are close to the threshold of successful recovery can rapidly improve dynamic stability following repeated

  15. A novel online adaptive time delay identification technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrak, Alper; Tatlicioglu, Enver

    2016-05-01

    Time delay is a phenomenon which is common in signal processing, communication, control applications, etc. The special feature of time delay that makes it attractive is that it is a commonly faced problem in many systems. A literature search on time-delay identification highlights the fact that most studies focused on numerical solutions. In this study, a novel online adaptive time-delay identification technique is proposed. This technique is based on an adaptive update law through a minimum-maximum strategy which is firstly applied to time-delay identification. In the design of the adaptive identification law, Lyapunov-based stability analysis techniques are utilised. Several numerical simulations were conducted with Matlab/Simulink to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique. It is numerically demonstrated that the proposed technique works efficiently in identifying both constant and disturbed time delays, and is also robust to measurement noise.

  16. Real-time adaptive radiometric compensation.

    PubMed

    Grundhöfer, Anselm; Bimber, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Recent radiometric compensation techniques make it possible to project images onto colored and textured surfaces. This is realized with projector-camera systems by scanning the projection surface on a per-pixel basis. Using the captured information, a compensation image is calculated that neutralizes geometric distortions and color blending caused by the underlying surface. As a result, the brightness and the contrast of the input image is reduced compared to a conventional projection onto a white canvas. If the input image is not manipulated in its intensities, the compensation image can contain values that are outside the dynamic range of the projector. These will lead to clipping errors and to visible artifacts on the surface. In this article, we present an innovative algorithm that dynamically adjusts the content of the input images before radiometric compensation is carried out. This reduces the perceived visual artifacts while simultaneously preserving a maximum of luminance and contrast. The algorithm is implemented entirely on the GPU and is the first of its kind to run in real-time.

  17. Real time microcontroller implementation of an adaptive myoelectric filter.

    PubMed

    Bagwell, P J; Chappell, P H

    1995-03-01

    This paper describes a real time digital adaptive filter for processing myoelectric signals. The filter time constant is automatically selected by the adaptation algorithm, giving a significant improvement over linear filters for estimating the muscle force and controlling a prosthetic device. Interference from mains sources often produces problems for myoelectric processing, and so 50 Hz and all harmonic frequencies are reduced by an averaging filter and differential process. This makes practical electrode placement and contact less critical and time consuming. An economic real time implementation is essential for a prosthetic controller, and this is achieved using an Intel 80C196KC microcontroller.

  18. Comparing an annual and daily time-step model for predicting field-scale phosphorus loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous models exist for describing phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural fields. The complexity of these models varies considerably ranging from simple empirically-based annual time-step models to more complex process-based daily time step models. While better accuracy is often assumed with more...

  19. "So We Adapt Step by Step": Acculturation experiences affecting diabetes management and perceived health for Chinese American immigrants.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin M; Chesla, Catherine A; Kwan, Christine M L

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how acculturation affects type 2 diabetes management and perceived health for Chinese American immigrants in the U.S. Acculturation experiences or cultural adaptation experiences affecting diabetes management and health were solicited from an informant group of immigrant patients and their spouses (N = 40) during group, couple and individual interviews conducted from 2005 to 2008. A separate respondent group of immigrant patients and their spouses (N = 19) meeting inclusion criteria reviewed and confirmed themes generated by the informant group. Using interpretive phenomenology, three key themes in patients' and spouses' acculturation experiences were identified: a) utilizing health care, b) maintaining family relations and roles, and c) establishing community ties and groundedness in the U.S. Acculturation experiences reflecting these themes were broad in scope and not fully captured by current self-report and proxy acculturation measures. In the current study, shifting family roles and evaluations of diabetes care and physical environment in the U.S. significantly affected diabetes management and health, yet are overlooked in acculturation and health investigations. Furthermore, the salience and impact of specific acculturation experiences respective to diabetes management and perceived health varied across participants due to individual, family, developmental, and environmental factors. In regards to salience, maintaining filial and interdependent family relations in the U.S. was of particular concern for older participants and coping with inadequate health insurance in the U.S. was especially distressing for self-described lower-middle to middle-class participants. In terms of impact, family separation and relocating to ethnically similar neighborhoods in the U.S. differentially affected diabetes management and health due to participants' varied family relations and pre-migration family support levels and diverse cultural and linguistic

  20. Weighted adaptively grouped multilevel space time trellis codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Dharmvir; Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-05-01

    In existing grouped multilevel space-time trellis codes (GMLSTTCs), the groups of transmit antennas are predefined, and the transmit power is equally distributed across all transmit antennas. When the channel parameters are perfectly known at the transmitter, adaptive antenna grouping and beamforming scheme can achieve the better performance by optimum grouping of transmit antennas and properly weighting transmitted signals based on the available channel information. In this paper, we present a new code designed by combining GMLSTTCs, adaptive antenna grouping and beamforming using the channel state information at transmitter (CSIT), henceforth referred to as weighted adaptively grouped multilevel space time trellis codes (WAGMLSTTCs). The CSIT is used to adaptively group the transmitting antennas and provide a beamforming scheme by allocating the different powers to the transmit antennas. Simulation results show that WAGMLSTTCs provide improvement in error performance of 2.6 dB over GMLSTTCs.

  1. A Space/Fast-Time Adaptive Monopulse Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliktar, Yaron; Williams, Douglas B.; Holder, E. Jeff

    2006-12-01

    Mainbeam jamming poses a particularly difficult challenge for conventional monopulse radars. In such cases spatially adaptive processing provides some interference suppression when the target and jammer are not exactly coaligned. However, as the target angle approaches that of the jammer, mitigation performance is increasingly hampered and distortions are introduced into the resulting beam pattern. Both of these factors limit the reliability of a spatially adaptive monopulse processor. The presence of coherent multipath in the form of terrain-scattered interference (TSI), although normally considered a nuisance, can be exploited to suppress mainbeam jamming with space/fast-time processing. A method is presented offering space/fast-time monopulse processing with distortionless spatial array patterns that can achieve improved angle estimation over spatially adaptive monopulse. Performance results for the monopulse processor are obtained for mountaintop data containing a jammer and TSI, which demonstrate a dramatic improvement in performance over conventional monopulse and spatially adaptive monopulse.

  2. How to Keep a Spring in Your Step with Daylight Saving Time

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Spring in Your Step With Daylight Saving Time Expert advice on ways to weather the lost ... Clocks will spring ahead one hour with the time change on Sunday morning, but medical experts have ...

  3. A family of variable step-size affine projection adaptive filter algorithms using statistics of channel impulse response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams Esfand Abadi, Mohammad; AbbasZadeh Arani, Seyed Ali Asghar

    2011-12-01

    This paper extends the recently introduced variable step-size (VSS) approach to the family of adaptive filter algorithms. This method uses prior knowledge of the channel impulse response statistic. Accordingly, optimal step-size vector is obtained by minimizing the mean-square deviation (MSD). The presented algorithms are the VSS affine projection algorithm (VSS-APA), the VSS selective partial update NLMS (VSS-SPU-NLMS), the VSS-SPU-APA, and the VSS selective regressor APA (VSS-SR-APA). In VSS-SPU adaptive algorithms the filter coefficients are partially updated which reduce the computational complexity. In VSS-SR-APA, the optimal selection of input regressors is performed during the adaptation. The presented algorithms have good convergence speed, low steady state mean square error (MSE), and low computational complexity features. We demonstrate the good performance of the proposed algorithms through several simulations in system identification scenario.

  4. hp-Adaptive time integration based on the BDF for viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, A.; Etienne, S.; Pelletier, D.; Garon, A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a procedure based on the Backward Differentiation Formulas of order 1 to 5 to obtain efficient time integration of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The adaptive algorithm performs both stepsize and order selections to control respectively the solution accuracy and the computational efficiency of the time integration process. The stepsize selection (h-adaptivity) is based on a local error estimate and an error controller to guarantee that the numerical solution accuracy is within a user prescribed tolerance. The order selection (p-adaptivity) relies on the idea that low-accuracy solutions can be computed efficiently by low order time integrators while accurate solutions require high order time integrators to keep computational time low. The selection is based on a stability test that detects growing numerical noise and deems a method of order p stable if there is no method of lower order that delivers the same solution accuracy for a larger stepsize. Hence, it guarantees both that (1) the used method of integration operates inside of its stability region and (2) the time integration procedure is computationally efficient. The proposed time integration procedure also features a time-step rejection and quarantine mechanisms, a modified Newton method with a predictor and dense output techniques to compute solution at off-step points.

  5. Sensitivity of a thermodynamic sea ice model with leads to time step size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledley, T. S.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of sea ice models, developed to study the physics of the growth and melt of ice at the ocean surface and the variations in ice extent, depend on the size of the time step. Thus, to study longer-term variations within a reasonable computer budget, a model with a scheme allowing longer time steps has been constructed. However, the results produced by the model can definitely depend on the length of the time step. The sensitivity of a model to time-step size can be reduced by appropriate approaches. The present investigation is concerned with experiments which use a formulation of a lead parameterization that can be considered as a first step toward the development of a lead parameterization suitable for a use in long-term climate studies.

  6. Multirate time-stepping least squares shadowing method for unsteady turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyunji Jane; Moin, Parviz

    2014-11-01

    The recently developed least squares shadowing (LSS) method reformulates unsteady turbulent flow simulations to be well-conditioned time domain boundary value problems. The reformulation can enable scalable parallel-in-time simulation of turbulent flows (Wang et al. Phys. Fluid [2013]). A LSS method with multirate time-stepping was implemented to avoid the necessity of taking small global time-steps (restricted by the largest value of the Courant number on the grid) and therefore result in a more efficient algorithm. We will present the results of the multirate time-stepping LSS compared to a single rate time-stepping LSS and discuss the computational savings. Hyunji Jane Bae acknowledges support from the Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  7. Neural Basis of Adaptive Response Time Adjustment during Saccade Countermanding

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Pierre; Logan, Gordon D.; Palmeri, Thomas J.; Boucher, Leanne; Paré, Martin; Schall, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Humans and macaque monkeys adjust their response time adaptively in stop signal (countermanding) tasks, responding slower after stop-signal trials than after control trials with no stop signal. We investigated the neural mechanism underlying this adaptive response time adjustment in macaque monkeys performing a saccade countermanding task. Earlier research showed that movements are initiated when the random accumulation of presaccadic movement-related activity reaches a fixed threshold. We found that a systematic delay in response time after stop signal trials was accomplished not through a change of threshold, baseline, or accumulation rate, but instead through a change in the time when activity first began to accumulate. The neurons underlying movement initiation have been identified with mathematical accumulator models of response time performance. Therefore, this new result provides surprising new insights into the neural instantiation of stochastic accumulator models and the mechanisms through which executive control can be exerted. PMID:21880921

  8. The Effects of Predator Arrival Timing on Adaptive Radiation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, J.; Knope, M. L.; Fukami, T.

    2009-12-01

    Much of Earth’s biodiversity is thought to have arisen by adaptive radiation, the rapid diversification of a single ancestral species to fill a wide-variety of ecological niches. Both theory and empirical evidence have long supported competition for limited resources as a primary driver of adaptive radiation. While predation has also been postulated to be an important selective force during radiation, empirical evidence is surprisingly scant and its role remains controversial. However, two recent empirical studies suggest that predation can promote divergence during adaptive radiation. Using an experimental laboratory microcosm system, we examined how predator arrival timing affects the rate and extent of diversification during adaptive radiation. We varied the introduction timing of a protozoan predator (Tetrahymena thermophila) into populations of the bacteria Pseudomonas flourescens, which is known for its ability to undergo rapid adaptive radiation in aqueous microcosms. While our results show that predator arrival timing may have a significant impact on the rate, but not extent, of diversification, these results are tenuous and should be interpreted with caution, as the protozoan predators died early in the majority of our treatments, hampering our ability for comparison across treatments. Additionally, the abundance of newly derived bacterial genotypes was markedly lower in all treatments than observed in previous experiments utilizing this microbial experimental evolution system. To address these shortcomings, we will be repeating the experiment in the near future to further explore the impact of predator arrival timing on adaptive radiation. Smooth Morph and small-Wrinkly Spreader Pseudomonas flourescens diversification in the 96 hour treatment. Day 10, diluted to 1e-5.

  9. Time in Redox Adaptation Processes: From Evolution to Hormesis

    PubMed Central

    Sthijns, Mireille M. J. P. E.; Weseler, Antje R.; Bast, Aalt; Haenen, Guido R. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Life on Earth has to adapt to the ever changing environment. For example, due to introduction of oxygen in the atmosphere, an antioxidant network evolved to cope with the exposure to oxygen. The adaptive mechanisms of the antioxidant network, specifically the glutathione (GSH) system, are reviewed with a special focus on the time. The quickest adaptive response to oxidative stress is direct enzyme modification, increasing the GSH levels or activating the GSH-dependent protective enzymes. After several hours, a hormetic response is seen at the transcriptional level by up-regulating Nrf2-mediated expression of enzymes involved in GSH synthesis. In the long run, adaptations occur at the epigenetic and genomic level; for example, the ability to synthesize GSH by phototrophic bacteria. Apparently, in an adaptive hormetic response not only the dose or the compound, but also time, should be considered. This is essential for targeted interventions aimed to prevent diseases by successfully coping with changes in the environment e.g., oxidative stress. PMID:27690013

  10. ADAPTIVE DATA ANALYSIS OF COMPLEX FLUCTUATIONS IN PHYSIOLOGIC TIME SERIES

    PubMed Central

    PENG, C.-K.; COSTA, MADALENA; GOLDBERGER, ARY L.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a generic framework of dynamical complexity to understand and quantify fluctuations of physiologic time series. In particular, we discuss the importance of applying adaptive data analysis techniques, such as the empirical mode decomposition algorithm, to address the challenges of nonlinearity and nonstationarity that are typically exhibited in biological fluctuations. PMID:20041035

  11. Closed loop adaptive control of spectrum-producing step using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.

    1998-11-24

    Characteristics of the plasma in a plasma-based manufacturing process step are monitored directly and in real time by observing the spectrum which it produces. An artificial neural network analyzes the plasma spectrum and generates control signals to control one or more of the process input parameters in response to any deviation of the spectrum beyond a narrow range. In an embodiment, a plasma reaction chamber forms a plasma in response to input parameters such as gas flow, pressure and power. The chamber includes a window through which the electromagnetic spectrum produced by a plasma in the chamber, just above the subject surface, may be viewed. The spectrum is conducted to an optical spectrometer which measures the intensity of the incoming optical spectrum at different wavelengths. The output of optical spectrometer is provided to an analyzer which produces a plurality of error signals, each indicating whether a respective one of the input parameters to the chamber is to be increased or decreased. The microcontroller provides signals to control respective controls, but these lines are intercepted and first added to the error signals, before being provided to the controls for the chamber. The analyzer can include a neural network and an optional spectrum preprocessor to reduce background noise, as well as a comparator which compares the parameter values predicted by the neural network with a set of desired values provided by the microcontroller. 7 figs.

  12. Closed loop adaptive control of spectrum-producing step using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi Yung

    1998-01-01

    Characteristics of the plasma in a plasma-based manufacturing process step are monitored directly and in real time by observing the spectrum which it produces. An artificial neural network analyzes the plasma spectrum and generates control signals to control one or more of the process input parameters in response to any deviation of the spectrum beyond a narrow range. In an embodiment, a plasma reaction chamber forms a plasma in response to input parameters such as gas flow, pressure and power. The chamber includes a window through which the electromagnetic spectrum produced by a plasma in the chamber, just above the subject surface, may be viewed. The spectrum is conducted to an optical spectrometer which measures the intensity of the incoming optical spectrum at different wavelengths. The output of optical spectrometer is provided to an analyzer which produces a plurality of error signals, each indicating whether a respective one of the input parameters to the chamber is to be increased or decreased. The microcontroller provides signals to control respective controls, but these lines are intercepted and first added to the error signals, before being provided to the controls for the chamber. The analyzer can include a neural network and an optional spectrum preprocessor to reduce background noise, as well as a comparator which compares the parameter values predicted by the neural network with a set of desired values provided by the microcontroller.

  13. Step detection in single-molecule real time trajectories embedded in correlated noise.

    PubMed

    Arunajadai, Srikesh G; Cheng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule real time trajectories are embedded in high noise. To extract kinetic or dynamic information of the molecules from these trajectories often requires idealization of the data in steps and dwells. One major premise behind the existing single-molecule data analysis algorithms is the gaussian 'white' noise, which displays no correlation in time and whose amplitude is independent on data sampling frequency. This so-called 'white' noise is widely assumed but its validity has not been critically evaluated. We show that correlated noise exists in single-molecule real time trajectories collected from optical tweezers. The assumption of white noise during analysis of these data can lead to serious over- or underestimation of the number of steps depending on the algorithms employed. We present a statistical method that quantitatively evaluates the structure of the underlying noise, takes the noise structure into account, and identifies steps and dwells in a single-molecule trajectory. Unlike existing data analysis algorithms, this method uses Generalized Least Squares (GLS) to detect steps and dwells. Under the GLS framework, the optimal number of steps is chosen using model selection criteria such as Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Comparison with existing step detection algorithms showed that this GLS method can detect step locations with highest accuracy in the presence of correlated noise. Because this method is automated, and directly works with high bandwidth data without pre-filtering or assumption of gaussian noise, it may be broadly useful for analysis of single-molecule real time trajectories.

  14. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented.

  15. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented. PMID:26581455

  16. Real-time control system for adaptive resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Flath, L; An, J; Brase, J; Hurd, R; Kartz, M; Sawvel, R; Silva, D

    2000-07-24

    Sustained operation of high average power solid-state lasers currently requires an adaptive resonator to produce the optimal beam quality. We describe the architecture of a real-time adaptive control system for correcting intra-cavity aberrations in a heat capacity laser. Image data collected from a wavefront sensor are processed and used to control phase with a high-spatial-resolution deformable mirror. Our controller takes advantage of recent developments in low-cost, high-performance processor technology. A desktop-based computational engine and object-oriented software architecture replaces the high-cost rack-mount embedded computers of previous systems.

  17. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  18. True-Time-Delay Adaptive Array Processing Using Photorefractive Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriehn, G. R.; Wagner, K.

    Radio frequency (RF) signal processing has proven to be a fertile application area when using photorefractive-based, optical processing techniques. This is due to a photorefractive material's capability to record gratings and diffract off these gratings with optically modulated beams that contain a wide RF bandwidth, and include applications such as the bias-free time-integrating correlator [1], adaptive signal processing, and jammer excision, [2, 3, 4]. Photorefractive processing of signals from RF antenna arrays is especially appropriate because of the massive parallelism that is readily achievable in a photorefractive crystal (in which many resolvable beams can be incident on a single crystal simultaneously—each coming from an optical modulator driven by a separate RF antenna element), and because a number of approaches for adaptive array processing using photorefractive crystals have been successfully investigated [5, 6]. In these types of applications, the adaptive weight coefficients are represented by the amplitude and phase of the holographic gratings, and many millions of such adaptive weights can be multiplexed within the volume of a photorefractive crystal. RF modulated optical signals from each array element are diffracted from the adaptively recorded photorefractive gratings (which can be multiplexed either angularly or spatially), and are then coherently combined with the appropriate amplitude weights and phase shifts to effectively steer the angular receptivity pattern of the antenna array toward the desired arriving signal. Likewise, the antenna nulls can also be rotated toward unwanted narrowband jammers for extinction, thereby optimizing the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio.

  19. Speech perception at positive signal-to-noise ratios using adaptive adjustment of time compression.

    PubMed

    Schlueter, Anne; Brand, Thomas; Lemke, Ulrike; Nitzschner, Stefan; Kollmeier, Birger; Holube, Inga

    2015-11-01

    Positive signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) characterize listening situations most relevant for hearing-impaired listeners in daily life and should therefore be considered when evaluating hearing aid algorithms. For this, a speech-in-noise test was developed and evaluated, in which the background noise is presented at fixed positive SNRs and the speech rate (i.e., the time compression of the speech material) is adaptively adjusted. In total, 29 younger and 12 older normal-hearing, as well as 24 older hearing-impaired listeners took part in repeated measurements. Younger normal-hearing and older hearing-impaired listeners conducted one of two adaptive methods which differed in adaptive procedure and step size. Analysis of the measurements with regard to list length and estimation strategy for thresholds resulted in a practical method measuring the time compression for 50% recognition. This method uses time-compression adjustment and step sizes according to Versfeld and Dreschler [(2002). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 401-408], with sentence scoring, lists of 30 sentences, and a maximum likelihood method for threshold estimation. Evaluation of the procedure showed that older participants obtained higher test-retest reliability compared to younger participants. Depending on the group of listeners, one or two lists are required for training prior to data collection.

  20. Frequency Adaptability and Waveform Design for OFDM Radar Space-Time Adaptive Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata; Glover, Charles Wayne

    2012-01-01

    We propose an adaptive waveform design technique for an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar signal employing a space-time adaptive processing (STAP) technique. We observe that there are inherent variabilities of the target and interference responses in the frequency domain. Therefore, the use of an OFDM signal can not only increase the frequency diversity of our system, but also improve the target detectability by adaptively modifying the OFDM coefficients in order to exploit the frequency-variabilities of the scenario. First, we formulate a realistic OFDM-STAP measurement model considering the sparse nature of the target and interference spectra in the spatio-temporal domain. Then, we show that the optimal STAP-filter weight-vector is equal to the generalized eigenvector corresponding to the minimum generalized eigenvalue of the interference and target covariance matrices. With numerical examples we demonstrate that the resultant OFDM-STAP filter-weights are adaptable to the frequency-variabilities of the target and interference responses, in addition to the spatio-temporal variabilities. Hence, by better utilizing the frequency variabilities, we propose an adaptive OFDM-waveform design technique, and consequently gain a significant amount of STAP-performance improvement.

  1. Adaptive Sensing of Time Series with Application to Remote Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Furlong, Michael; Hardgrove, Craig; Low, Bryan K. H.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Wettergreen, David

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of adaptive informationoptimal data collection in time series. Here a remote sensor or explorer agent throttles its sampling rate in order to track anomalous events while obeying constraints on time and power. This problem is challenging because the agent has limited visibility -- all collected datapoints lie in the past, but its resource allocation decisions require predicting far into the future. Our solution is to continually fit a Gaussian process model to the latest data and optimize the sampling plan on line to maximize information gain. We compare the performance characteristics of stationary and nonstationary Gaussian process models. We also describe an application based on geologic analysis during planetary rover exploration. Here adaptive sampling can improve coverage of localized anomalies and potentially benefit mission science yield of long autonomous traverses.

  2. Time Step Rescaling Recovers Continuous-Time Dynamical Properties for Discrete-Time Langevin Integration of Nonequilibrium Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    When simulating molecular systems using deterministic equations of motion (e.g., Newtonian dynamics), such equations are generally numerically integrated according to a well-developed set of algorithms that share commonly agreed-upon desirable properties. However, for stochastic equations of motion (e.g., Langevin dynamics), there is still broad disagreement over which integration algorithms are most appropriate. While multiple desiderata have been proposed throughout the literature, consensus on which criteria are important is absent, and no published integration scheme satisfies all desiderata simultaneously. Additional nontrivial complications stem from simulating systems driven out of equilibrium using existing stochastic integration schemes in conjunction with recently developed nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems. Here, we examine a family of discrete time integration schemes for Langevin dynamics, assessing how each member satisfies a variety of desiderata that have been enumerated in prior efforts to construct suitable Langevin integrators. We show that the incorporation of a novel time step rescaling in the deterministic updates of position and velocity can correct a number of dynamical defects in these integrators. Finally, we identify a particular splitting (related to the velocity Verlet discretization) that has essentially universally appropriate properties for the simulation of Langevin dynamics for molecular systems in equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and path sampling contexts. PMID:24555448

  3. Resuscitator’s perceptions and time for corrective ventilation steps during neonatal resuscitation☆

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vinay; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Carrion, Vivien; Mathew, Bobby

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2010 neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) guidelines incorporate ventilation corrective steps (using the mnemonic – MRSOPA) into the resuscitation algorithm. The perception of neonatal providers, time taken to perform these maneuvers or the effectiveness of these additional steps has not been evaluated. Methods Using two simulated clinical scenarios of varying degrees of cardiovascular compromise –perinatal asphyxia with (i) bradycardia (heart rate – 40 min−1) and (ii) cardiac arrest, 35 NRP certified providers were evaluated for preference to performing these corrective measures, the time taken for performing these steps and time to onset of chest compressions. Results The average time taken to perform ventilation corrective steps (MRSOPA) was 48.9 ± 21.4 s. Providers were less likely to perform corrective steps and proceed directly to endotracheal intubation in the scenario of cardiac arrest as compared to a state of bradycardia. Cardiac compressions were initiated significantly sooner in the scenario of cardiac arrest 89 ± 24 s as compared to severe bradycardia 122 ± 23 s, p < 0.0001. There were no differences in the time taken to initiation of chest compressions between physicians or mid-level care providers or with the level of experience of the provider. Conclusions Effective ventilation of the lungs with corrective steps using a mask is important in most cases of neonatal resuscitation. Neonatal resuscitators prefer early endotracheal intubation and initiation of chest compressions in the presence of asystolic cardiac arrest. Corrective ventilation steps can potentially postpone initiation of chest compressions and may delay return of spontaneous circulation in the presence of severe cardiovascular compromise. PMID:25796996

  4. Robustness via Run-Time Adaptation of Contingent Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresina, John L.; Washington, Richard; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss our approach to making the behavior of planetary rovers more robust for the purpose of increased productivity. Due to the inherent uncertainty in rover exploration, the traditional approach to rover control is conservative, limiting the autonomous operation of the rover and sacrificing performance for safety. Our objective is to increase the science productivity possible within a single uplink by allowing the rover's behavior to be specified with flexible, contingent plans and by employing dynamic plan adaptation during execution. We have deployed a system exhibiting flexible, contingent execution; this paper concentrates on our ongoing efforts on plan adaptation, Plans can be revised in two ways: plan steps may be deleted, with execution continuing with the plan suffix; and the current plan may be merged with an "alternate plan" from an on-board library. The plan revision action is chosen to maximize the expected utility of the plan. Plan merging and action deletion constitute a more conservative general-purpose planning system; in return, our approach is more efficient and more easily verified, two important criteria for deployed rovers.

  5. The hyperbolic step potential: Anti-bound states, SUSY partners and Wigner time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadella, M.; Kuru, Ş.; Negro, J.

    2017-04-01

    We study the scattering produced by a one dimensional hyperbolic step potential, which is exactly solvable and shows an unusual interest because of its asymmetric character. The analytic continuation of the scattering matrix in the momentum representation has a branch cut and an infinite number of simple poles on the negative imaginary axis which are related with the so called anti-bound states. This model does not show resonances. Using the wave functions of the anti-bound states, we obtain supersymmetric (SUSY) partners which are the series of Rosen-Morse II potentials. We have computed the Wigner reflection and transmission time delays for the hyperbolic step and such SUSY partners. Our results show that the more bound states a partner Hamiltonian has the smaller is the time delay. We also have evaluated time delays for the hyperbolic step potential in the classical case and have obtained striking similitudes with the quantum case.

  6. Enabling fast, stable and accurate peridynamic computations using multi-time-step integration

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, P.; Parks, M. L.; Prakash, A.

    2016-04-13

    Peridynamics is a nonlocal extension of classical continuum mechanics that is well-suited for solving problems with discontinuities such as cracks. This paper extends the peridynamic formulation to decompose a problem domain into a number of smaller overlapping subdomains and to enable the use of different time steps in different subdomains. This approach allows regions of interest to be isolated and solved at a small time step for increased accuracy while the rest of the problem domain can be solved at a larger time step for greater computational efficiency. Lastly, performance of the proposed method in terms of stability, accuracy, and computational cost is examined and several numerical examples are presented to corroborate the findings.

  7. Boosting the accuracy and speed of quantum Monte Carlo: Size consistency and time step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Andrea; Sorella, Sandro; Gillan, Michael J.; Michaelides, Angelos; Alfè, Dario

    2016-06-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations for fermions are becoming the standard for providing high-quality reference data in systems that are too large to be investigated via quantum chemical approaches. DMC with the fixed-node approximation relies on modifications of the Green's function to avoid singularities near the nodal surface of the trial wave function. Here we show that these modifications affect the DMC energies in a way that is not size consistent, resulting in large time-step errors. Building on the modifications of Umrigar et al. and DePasquale et al. we propose a simple Green's function modification that restores size consistency to large values of the time step, which substantially reduces time-step errors. This algorithm also yields remarkable speedups of up to two orders of magnitude in the calculation of molecule-molecule binding energies and crystal cohesive energies, thus extending the horizons of what is possible with DMC.

  8. Enabling fast, stable and accurate peridynamic computations using multi-time-step integration

    DOE PAGES

    Lindsay, P.; Parks, M. L.; Prakash, A.

    2016-04-13

    Peridynamics is a nonlocal extension of classical continuum mechanics that is well-suited for solving problems with discontinuities such as cracks. This paper extends the peridynamic formulation to decompose a problem domain into a number of smaller overlapping subdomains and to enable the use of different time steps in different subdomains. This approach allows regions of interest to be isolated and solved at a small time step for increased accuracy while the rest of the problem domain can be solved at a larger time step for greater computational efficiency. Lastly, performance of the proposed method in terms of stability, accuracy, andmore » computational cost is examined and several numerical examples are presented to corroborate the findings.« less

  9. Real-time Adaptive Control Using Neural Generalized Predictive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, Pam; Soloway, Don; Gold, Brian

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a Nonlinear Generalized Predictive Control algorithm by showing real-time adaptive control on a plant with relatively fast time-constants. Generalized Predictive Control has classically been used in process control where linear control laws were formulated for plants with relatively slow time-constants. The plant of interest for this paper is a magnetic levitation device that is nonlinear and open-loop unstable. In this application, the reference model of the plant is a neural network that has an embedded nominal linear model in the network weights. The control based on the linear model provides initial stability at the beginning of network training. In using a neural network the control laws are nonlinear and online adaptation of the model is possible to capture unmodeled or time-varying dynamics. Newton-Raphson is the minimization algorithm. Newton-Raphson requires the calculation of the Hessian, but even with this computational expense the low iteration rate make this a viable algorithm for real-time control.

  10. Treatment of pain in patients with renal insufficiency: the World Health Organization three-step ladder adapted.

    PubMed

    Launay-Vacher, Vincent; Karie, Svetlana; Fau, Jean-Baptiste; Izzedine, Hassane; Deray, Gilbert

    2005-03-01

    The World Health Organization established official recommendations for managing pain in cancer patients. Since then, this stepladder approach has been widely adopted as a conceptual framework to treat all types of pain. However, those guidelines have not been critically evaluated for use in patients with renal insufficiency. In these patients, the questions of drug dosage adjustment and renal toxicity must be considered. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics of major analgesic drugs and data on their use and/or behavior in renal failure and considers their potential nephrotoxicity. Finally, according to available data in the international literature on pharmacokinetics, recommendations for dosage adjustment in patients with renal failure, and their potential nephrotoxicity, the World Health Organization three-step ladder for the treatment of pain was modified and adapted for patients with impaired renal function. Perspective This well-known treatment strategy now adapted for use in patients with renal insufficiency should secure and rationalize pain treatment in those patients.

  11. Adaptive Sampling of Time Series During Remote Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the challenge of online adaptive data collection in a time series. A remote sensor or explorer agent adapts its rate of data collection in order to track anomalous events while obeying constraints on time and power. This problem is challenging because the agent has limited visibility (all its datapoints lie in the past) and limited control (it can only decide when to collect its next datapoint). This problem is treated from an information-theoretic perspective, fitting a probabilistic model to collected data and optimizing the future sampling strategy to maximize information gain. The performance characteristics of stationary and nonstationary Gaussian process models are compared. Self-throttling sensors could benefit environmental sensor networks and monitoring as well as robotic exploration. Explorer agents can improve performance by adjusting their data collection rate, preserving scarce power or bandwidth resources during uninteresting times while fully covering anomalous events of interest. For example, a remote earthquake sensor could conserve power by limiting its measurements during normal conditions and increasing its cadence during rare earthquake events. A similar capability could improve sensor platforms traversing a fixed trajectory, such as an exploration rover transect or a deep space flyby. These agents can adapt observation times to improve sample coverage during moments of rapid change. An adaptive sampling approach couples sensor autonomy, instrument interpretation, and sampling. The challenge is addressed as an active learning problem, which already has extensive theoretical treatment in the statistics and machine learning literature. A statistical Gaussian process (GP) model is employed to guide sample decisions that maximize information gain. Nonsta tion - ary (e.g., time-varying) covariance relationships permit the system to represent and track local anomalies, in contrast with current GP approaches. Most common GP models

  12. Sampling-time effects for persistence and survival in step structural fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, D B; Tao, C; Bondarchuk, O; Cullen, W G; Williams, E D; Constantin, M; Dasgupta, C; Das Sarma, S

    2005-02-01

    The effects of sampling rate and total measurement time have been determined for single-point measurements of step fluctuations within the context of first-passage properties. Time dependent scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to evaluate step fluctuations on Ag(111) films grown on mica as a function of temperature (300-410 K) , on screw dislocations on the facets of Pb crystallites at 320 K , and on Al-terminated Si(111) over the temperature range 770-970 K . Although the fundamental time constant for step fluctuations on Ag and Al/Si varies by orders of magnitude over the temperature ranges of measurement, no dependence of the persistence amplitude on temperature is observed. Instead, the persistence probability is found to scale directly with t/delta t where delta t is the time interval used for sampling. Survival probabilities show a more complex scaling dependence, which includes both the sampling interval and the total measurement time t(m) . Scaling with t/delta t occurs only when delta t/ t(m) is a constant. We show that this observation is equivalent to theoretical predictions that the survival probability will scale as delta t/ L(z) , where L is the effective length of a step. This implies that the survival probability for large systems, when measured with fixed values of t(m) or delta t , should also show little or no temperature dependence.

  13. Time-step Considerations in Particle Simulation Algorithms for Coulomb Collisions in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Dimits, A; Friedman, A; Caflisch, R

    2009-10-29

    The accuracy of first-order Euler and higher-order time-integration algorithms for grid-based Langevin equations collision models in a specific relaxation test problem is assessed. We show that statistical noise errors can overshadow time-step errors and argue that statistical noise errors can be conflated with time-step effects. Using a higher-order integration scheme may not achieve any benefit in accuracy for examples of practical interest. We also investigate the collisional relaxation of an initial electron-ion relative drift and the collisional relaxation to a resistive steady-state in which a quasi-steady current is driven by a constant applied electric field, as functions of the time step used to resolve the collision processes using binary and grid-based, test-particle Langevin equations models. We compare results from two grid-based Langevin equations collision algorithms to results from a binary collision algorithm for modeling electronion collisions. Some guidance is provided regarding how large a time step can be used compared to the inverse of the characteristic collision frequency for specific relaxation processes.

  14. Adaptive stabilization of discrete-time systems using linear periodically time varying controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Romeo; Albertos, Pedro; Lozano, Rogelio

    1988-01-01

    A direct adaptive scheme based on the use of linear time-varying periodic controllers is proposed which estimates online the periodic coefficients of the controller. It is shown that adaptive stabilization is attained for all possibly nonstably invertible plants of known order but unknown delay. Although no appeal is made to persistency of excitation arguments, a provision is needed to avoid the singularity of an estimated matrix, this property being required only for the analysis and not the control calculations.

  15. The large discretization step method for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haras, Zigo; Taasan, Shlomo

    1995-01-01

    A new method for the acceleration of linear and nonlinear time dependent calculations is presented. It is based on the Large Discretization Step (LDS) approximation, defined in this work, which employs an extended system of low accuracy schemes to approximate a high accuracy discrete approximation to a time dependent differential operator. Error bounds on such approximations are derived. These approximations are efficiently implemented in the LDS methods for linear and nonlinear hyperbolic equations, presented here. In these algorithms the high and low accuracy schemes are interpreted as the same discretization of a time dependent operator on fine and coarse grids, respectively. Thus, a system of correction terms and corresponding equations are derived and solved on the coarse grid to yield the fine grid accuracy. These terms are initialized by visiting the fine grid once in many coarse grid time steps. The resulting methods are very general, simple to implement and may be used to accelerate many existing time marching schemes.

  16. A step in time: Changes in standard-frequency and time-signal broadcasts, 1 January 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, A. R.; Fosque, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    An improved coordinated universal time (UTC) system has been adopted by the International Radio Consultative Committee. It was implemented internationally by the standard-frequency and time-broadcast stations on 1 Jan. 1972. The new UTC system eliminates the frequency offset of 300 parts in 10 to the 10th power between the old UTC and atomic time, thus making the broadcast time interval (the UTC second) constant and defined by the resonant frequency of cesium atoms. The new time scale is kept in synchronism with the rotation of the Earth within plus or minus 0.7 s by step-time adjustments of exactly 1 s, when needed. A time code has been added to the disseminated time signals to permit universal time to be obtained from the broadcasts to the nearest 0.1 s for users requiring such precision. The texts of the International Radio Consultative Committee recommendation and report to implement the new UTC system are given. The coding formats used by various standard time broadcast services to transmit the difference between the universal time (UT1) and the UTC are also given. For users' convenience, worldwide primary VLF and HF transmissions stations, frequencies, and schedules of time emissions are also included. Actual time-step adjustments made by various stations on 1 Jan. 1972, are provided for future reference.

  17. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  18. Real time electrocardiogram QRS detection using combined adaptive threshold

    PubMed Central

    Christov, Ivaylo I

    2004-01-01

    Background QRS and ventricular beat detection is a basic procedure for electrocardiogram (ECG) processing and analysis. Large variety of methods have been proposed and used, featuring high percentages of correct detection. Nevertheless, the problem remains open especially with respect to higher detection accuracy in noisy ECGs Methods A real-time detection method is proposed, based on comparison between absolute values of summed differentiated electrocardiograms of one of more ECG leads and adaptive threshold. The threshold combines three parameters: an adaptive slew-rate value, a second value which rises when high-frequency noise occurs, and a third one intended to avoid missing of low amplitude beats. Two algorithms were developed: Algorithm 1 detects at the current beat and Algorithm 2 has an RR interval analysis component in addition. The algorithms are self-adjusting to the thresholds and weighting constants, regardless of resolution and sampling frequency used. They operate with any number L of ECG leads, self-synchronize to QRS or beat slopes and adapt to beat-to-beat intervals. Results The algorithms were tested by an independent expert, thus excluding possible author's influence, using all 48 full-length ECG records of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. The results were: sensitivity Se = 99.69 % and specificity Sp = 99.65 % for Algorithm 1 and Se = 99.74 % and Sp = 99.65 % for Algorithm 2. Conclusion The statistical indices are higher than, or comparable to those, cited in the scientific literature. PMID:15333132

  19. Validation and comparison of shank and lumbar-worn IMUs for step time estimation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, William; Patterson, Matthew; O'Mahony, Niamh; Caulfield, Brian

    2016-12-21

    Gait assessment is frequently used as an outcome measure to determine changes in an individual's mobility and disease processes. Inertial measurement units (IMUs) are quickly becoming commonplace in gait analysis. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the validity of shank and lumbar IMU mounting locations in the estimation of temporal gait features. Thirty-seven adults performed 20 walking trials each over a gold standard force platform while wearing shank and lumbar-mounted IMUs. Data from the IMUs were used to estimate step times using previously published algorithms and were compared with those derived from the force platform. There was an excellent level of correlation between the force platform and shank (r=0.95) and lumbar-mounted (r=0.99) IMUs. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated high levels of agreement between the IMU and the force platform step times. Confidence interval widths were 0.0782 s for the shank and 0.0367 s for the lumbar. Both IMU mounting locations provided accurate step time estimations, with the lumbar demonstrating a marginally superior level of agreement with the force platform. This validation indicates that the IMU system is capable of providing step time estimates within 2% of the gold standard force platform measurement.

  20. Time-Delayed Two-Step Selective Laser Photodamage of Dye-Biomolecule Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreoni, A.; Cubeddu, R.; de Silvestri, S.; Laporta, P.; Svelto, O.

    1980-08-01

    A scheme is proposed for laser-selective photodamage of biological molecules, based on time-delayed two-step photoionization of a dye molecule bound to the biomolecule. The validity of the scheme is experimentally demonstrated in the case of the dye Proflavine, bound to synthetic polynucleotides.

  1. Making Progress in Mental Health Policy in Conservative Times: One Step at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Howard H.

    2006-01-01

    Progress in mental health services has been made incrementally in a sequence of policy steps. In recent years, in spite of political conservatism, progressive changes have advanced new principles of service delivery. Reports from the surgeon general and the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health advanced these principles, including recovery and evidence-based practices. Both of these high-level reports were influenced by the findings of the Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT). The Schizophrenia PORT established the effectiveness of mental health treatments and supports, which provided a scientific foundation for the optimistic focus on recovery and its expectation of improved outcomes for individuals with severe mental disorders. The PORT study also established the gap between treatment recommendations and actual services. Concern about this gap has motivated efforts to transform services by implementing evidence-based practices. Advances in broad mental health and social policy, coupled with continued advances in science, have the potential to improve the care of individuals who experience severe mental disorders, such as schizophrenia. PMID:16436626

  2. Promoting rest using a quiet time innovation in an adult neuroscience step down unit.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and rest are fundamental for the restoration of energy needed to recuperate from illness, trauma and surgery. At present hospitals are too noisy to promote rest for patients. A literature search produced research that described how quiet time interventions addressing noise levels have met with positive patient and staff satisfaction, as well as creating a more peaceful and healing environment. In this paper, a description of the importance of quiet time and how a small butfeasible innovation was carried out in an adult neuroscience step down unit in a large tertiary health care facility in Canada is provided. Anecdotal evidence from patients, families, and staff suggests that quiet time may have positive effects for patients, their families, and the adult neuroscience step down unit staff Future research examining the effect of quiet time on patient, family and staff satisfaction and patient healing is necessary.

  3. Cross-cultural adaptation of research instruments: language, setting, time and statistical considerations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Research questionnaires are not always translated appropriately before they are used in new temporal, cultural or linguistic settings. The results based on such instruments may therefore not accurately reflect what they are supposed to measure. This paper aims to illustrate the process and required steps involved in the cross-cultural adaptation of a research instrument using the adaptation process of an attitudinal instrument as an example. Methods A questionnaire was needed for the implementation of a study in Norway 2007. There was no appropriate instruments available in Norwegian, thus an Australian-English instrument was cross-culturally adapted. Results The adaptation process included investigation of conceptual and item equivalence. Two forward and two back-translations were synthesized and compared by an expert committee. Thereafter the instrument was pretested and adjusted accordingly. The final questionnaire was administered to opioid maintenance treatment staff (n=140) and harm reduction staff (n=180). The overall response rate was 84%. The original instrument failed confirmatory analysis. Instead a new two-factor scale was identified and found valid in the new setting. Conclusions The failure of the original scale highlights the importance of adapting instruments to current research settings. It also emphasizes the importance of ensuring that concepts within an instrument are equal between the original and target language, time and context. If the described stages in the cross-cultural adaptation process had been omitted, the findings would have been misleading, even if presented with apparent precision. Thus, it is important to consider possible barriers when making a direct comparison between different nations, cultures and times. PMID:20144247

  4. Elderly Fallers Enhance Dynamic Stability Through Anticipatory Postural Adjustments during a Choice Stepping Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Tisserand, Romain; Robert, Thomas; Chabaud, Pascal; Bonnefoy, Marc; Chèze, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    In the case of disequilibrium, the capacity to step quickly is critical to avoid falling in elderly. This capacity can be simply assessed through the choice stepping reaction time test (CSRT), where elderly fallers (F) take longer to step than elderly non-fallers (NF). However, the reasons why elderly F elongate their stepping time remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to assess the characteristics of anticipated postural adjustments (APA) that elderly F develop in a stepping context and their consequences on the dynamic stability. Forty-four community-dwelling elderly subjects (20 F and 24 NF) performed a CSRT where kinematics and ground reaction forces were collected. Variables were analyzed using two-way repeated measures ANOVAs. Results for F compared to NF showed that stepping time is elongated, due to a longer APA phase. During APA, they seem to use two distinct balance strategies, depending on the axis: in the anteroposterior direction, we measured a smaller backward movement and slower peak velocity of the center of pressure (CoP); in the mediolateral direction, the CoP movement was similar in amplitude and peak velocity between groups but lasted longer. The biomechanical consequence of both strategies was an increased margin of stability (MoS) at foot-off, in the respective direction. By elongating their APA, elderly F use a safer balance strategy that prioritizes dynamic stability conditions instead of the objective of the task. Such a choice in balance strategy probably comes from muscular limitations and/or a higher fear of falling and paradoxically indicates an increased risk of fall. PMID:27965561

  5. One-step synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposite coatings by novel laser adaptive ablation deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbezov, Valery; Sotirov, Sotir

    2013-03-01

    A novel approach for one-step synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposite coatings by new modification of Pulsed Laser Deposition technology called Laser Adaptive Ablation Deposition (LAAD) is presented. Hybrid nanocomposite coatings including Mg- Rapamycin and Mg- Desoximetasone were produced by UV TEA N2 laser under low vacuum (0.1 Pa) and room temperature onto substrates from SS 316L, KCl and NaCl. The laser fluence for Mg alloy was 1, 8 J/cm2 and for Desoximetasone 0,176 J/cm2 and for Rapamycin 0,118 J/cm2 were respectively. The threedimensional two-segmented single target was used to adapt the interaction of focused laser beam with inorganic and organic material. Magnesium alloy nanoparticles with sizes from 50 nm to 250 nm were obtained in organic matrices. The morphology of nanocomposites films were studied by Bright field / Fluorescence optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements were applied in order to study the functional properties of organic component before and after the LAAD process. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) was used for identification of Mg alloy presence in hybrid nanocomposites coatings. The precise control of process parameters and particularly of the laser fluence adjustment enables transfer on materials with different physical chemical properties and one-step synthesis of complex inorganic- organic nanocomposites coatings.

  6. A multiple time stepping algorithm for efficient multiscale modeling of platelets flowing in blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Na; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-03-01

    We developed a multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithm for multiscale modeling of the dynamics of platelets flowing in viscous blood plasma. This MTS algorithm improves considerably the computational efficiency without significant loss of accuracy. This study of the dynamic properties of flowing platelets employs a combination of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and the coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) methods to describe the dynamic microstructures of deformable platelets in response to extracellular flow-induced stresses. The disparate spatial scales between the two methods are handled by a hybrid force field interface. However, the disparity in temporal scales between the DPD and CGMD that requires time stepping at microseconds and nanoseconds respectively, represents a computational challenge that may become prohibitive. Classical MTS algorithms manage to improve computing efficiency by multi-stepping within DPD or CGMD for up to one order of magnitude of scale differential. In order to handle 3-4 orders of magnitude disparity in the temporal scales between DPD and CGMD, we introduce a new MTS scheme hybridizing DPD and CGMD by utilizing four different time stepping sizes. We advance the fluid system at the largest time step, the fluid-platelet interface at a middle timestep size, and the nonbonded and bonded potentials of the platelet structural system at two smallest timestep sizes. Additionally, we introduce parameters to study the relationship of accuracy versus computational complexities. The numerical experiments demonstrated 3000x reduction in computing time over standard MTS methods for solving the multiscale model. This MTS algorithm establishes a computationally feasible approach for solving a particle-based system at multiple scales for performing efficient multiscale simulations.

  7. A Multiple Time Stepping Algorithm for Efficient Multiscale Modeling of Platelets Flowing in Blood Plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Na; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-03-01

    We developed a multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithm for multiscale modeling of the dynamics of platelets flowing in viscous blood plasma. This MTS algorithm improves considerably the computational efficiency without significant loss of accuracy. This study of the dynamic properties of flowing platelets employs a combination of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and the coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) methods to describe the dynamic microstructures of deformable platelets in response to extracellular flow-induced stresses. The disparate spatial scales between the two methods are handled by a hybrid force field interface. However, the disparity in temporal scales between the DPD and CGMD that requires time stepping at microseconds and nanoseconds respectively, represents a computational challenge that may become prohibitive. Classical MTS algorithms manage to improve computing efficiency by multi-stepping within DPD or CGMD for up to one order of magnitude of scale differential. In order to handle 3-4 orders of magnitude disparity in the temporal scales between DPD and CGMD, we introduce a new MTS scheme hybridizing DPD and CGMD by utilizing four different time stepping sizes. We advance the fluid system at the largest time step, the fluid-platelet interface at a middle timestep size, and the nonbonded and bonded potentials of the platelet structural system at two smallest timestep sizes. Additionally, we introduce parameters to study the relationship of accuracy versus computational complexities. The numerical experiments demonstrated 3000x reduction in computing time over standard MTS methods for solving the multiscale model. This MTS algorithm establishes a computationally feasible approach for solving a particle-based system at multiple scales for performing efficient multiscale simulations.

  8. A Multiple Time Stepping Algorithm for Efficient Multiscale Modeling of Platelets Flowing in Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Na; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithm for multiscale modeling of the dynamics of platelets flowing in viscous blood plasma. This MTS algorithm improves considerably the computational efficiency without significant loss of accuracy. This study of the dynamic properties of flowing platelets employs a combination of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and the coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) methods to describe the dynamic microstructures of deformable platelets in response to extracellular flow-induced stresses. The disparate spatial scales between the two methods are handled by a hybrid force field interface. However, the disparity in temporal scales between the DPD and CGMD that requires time stepping at microseconds and nanoseconds respectively, represents a computational challenge that may become prohibitive. Classical MTS algorithms manage to improve computing efficiency by multi-stepping within DPD or CGMD for up to one order of magnitude of scale differential. In order to handle 3–4 orders of magnitude disparity in the temporal scales between DPD and CGMD, we introduce a new MTS scheme hybridizing DPD and CGMD by utilizing four different time stepping sizes. We advance the fluid system at the largest time step, the fluid-platelet interface at a middle timestep size, and the nonbonded and bonded potentials of the platelet structural system at two smallest timestep sizes. Additionally, we introduce parameters to study the relationship of accuracy versus computational complexities. The numerical experiments demonstrated 3000x reduction in computing time over standard MTS methods for solving the multiscale model. This MTS algorithm establishes a computationally feasible approach for solving a particle-based system at multiple scales for performing efficient multiscale simulations. PMID:25641983

  9. An implicit time-stepping scheme for rigid body dynamics with Coulomb friction

    SciTech Connect

    STEWART,DAVID; TRINKLE,JEFFREY C.

    2000-02-15

    In this paper a new time-stepping method for simulating systems of rigid bodies is given. Unlike methods which take an instantaneous point of view, the method is based on impulse-momentum equations, and so does not need to explicitly resolve impulsive forces. On the other hand, the method is distinct from previous impulsive methods in that it does not require explicit collision checking and it can handle simultaneous impacts. Numerical results are given for one planar and one three-dimensional example, which demonstrate the practicality of the method, and its convergence as the step size becomes small.

  10. Developing a two-step heat treatment for inactivating desiccation-adapted Salmonella spp. in aged chicken litter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao; Wang, Hongye; Jiang, Xiuping

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of a two-step heat treatment for eliminating desiccation-adapted Salmonella spp. in aged chicken litter was evaluated. The aged chicken litter with 20, 30, 40, and 50% moisture contents was inoculated with a mixture of four Salmonella serotypes for a 24-h adaptation. Afterwards, the inoculated chicken litter was added into the chicken litter with the adjusted moisture content for a 1-h moist-heat treatment at 65 °C and 100% relative humidity inside a water bath, followed by a dry-heat treatment in a convection oven at 85 °C for 1 h to the desired moisture level (<10-12%). After moist-heat treatment, the populations of Salmonella in aged chicken litter at 20 and 30% moisture contents declined from ≈6.70 log colony-forming units (CFU)/g to 3.31 and 3.00 log CFU/g, respectively. After subsequent 1-h dry-heat treatment, the populations further decreased to 2.97 and 2.57 log CFU/g, respectively. Salmonella cells in chicken litter with 40% and 50% moisture contents were only detectable by enrichment after 40 and 20 min of moist-heat treatment, respectively. Moisture contents in all samples were reduced to <10% after a 1-h dry-heat process. Our results demonstrated that the two-step heat treatment was effective in reducing >5.5 logs of desiccation-adapted Salmonella in aged chicken litter with moisture content at or above 40%. Clearly, the findings from this study may provide the chicken litter processing industry with an effective heat treatment method for producing Salmonella-free chicken litter.

  11. A fully implicit, fully adaptive time and space discretisation method for phase-field simulation of binary alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosam, J.; Jimack, P. K.; Mullis, A.

    2007-08-01

    A fully implicit numerical method based upon adaptively refined meshes for the simulation of binary alloy solidification in 2D is presented. In addition we combine a second-order fully implicit time discretisation scheme with variable step size control to obtain an adaptive time and space discretisation method. The superiority of this method, compared to widely used fully explicit methods, with respect to CPU time and accuracy, is shown. Due to the high nonlinearity of the governing equations a robust and fast solver for systems of nonlinear algebraic equations is needed to solve the intermediate approximations per time step. We use a nonlinear multigrid solver which shows almost h-independent convergence behaviour.

  12. Robust time and frequency domain estimation methods in adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamaire, Richard Orville

    1987-01-01

    A robust identification method was developed for use in an adaptive control system. The type of estimator is called the robust estimator, since it is robust to the effects of both unmodeled dynamics and an unmeasurable disturbance. The development of the robust estimator was motivated by a need to provide guarantees in the identification part of an adaptive controller. To enable the design of a robust control system, a nominal model as well as a frequency-domain bounding function on the modeling uncertainty associated with this nominal model must be provided. Two estimation methods are presented for finding parameter estimates, and, hence, a nominal model. One of these methods is based on the well developed field of time-domain parameter estimation. In a second method of finding parameter estimates, a type of weighted least-squares fitting to a frequency-domain estimated model is used. The frequency-domain estimator is shown to perform better, in general, than the time-domain parameter estimator. In addition, a methodology for finding a frequency-domain bounding function on the disturbance is used to compute a frequency-domain bounding function on the additive modeling error due to the effects of the disturbance and the use of finite-length data. The performance of the robust estimator in both open-loop and closed-loop situations is examined through the use of simulations.

  13. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a "special divergence-free" (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  14. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGES

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  15. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  16. Priority-progress CPU adaptation for elastic real-time applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasic, Charles; Sinha, Anirban; Kirsh, Lowell

    2007-01-01

    As multimedia-capable, network-enabled devices become ever more abundant, device heterogeneity and resource sharing dynamics remain difficult challenges in networked continuous media applications. These challenges often cause the applications to exhibit very brittle real-time performance. Due to heterogeneity, minor variations in encoding can mean a continuous media item performs well on some devices but very poorly on others. Resource sharing can mean that content can work for some of the time, but real-time delivery is frequently interrupted due to competition for resources. Quality-adaptive approaches seek to preserve real-time performance, by evaluating and executing trade-offs between the quality of application results and the resources required and available to produce them. Since the approach requires the applications to adapt the results they produce, we refer to them as elastic real-time applications. In this paper, we use video as a specific example of an elastic real-time application. We describe a general strategy for CPU adaptation called Priority-Progress adaptation, which compliments and extends previous work on adaptation for network bandwidth. The basic idea of Priority-Progress is to utilize priority and timestamp attributes of the media to reorder execution steps, so that low priority work can be skipped in the event that the CPU is too constrained to otherwise maintain real-time progress. We have implemented this approach in a prototype video application. We will present benchmark results that demonstrate the advantages of Priority-Progress adaptation in comparison to techniques employed in current popular video players. These advantages include better timeliness as CPU utilization approaches saturation, and more user-centric control over quality-adapation (for example to boost the video quality of selected video in a multi-video scenario). Although we focus on video in this paper, we believe that the Priority-Progress technique is applicable to

  17. Adaptive Proactive Inhibitory Control for Embedded Real-Time Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shufan; McGinnity, T. Martin; Wong-Lin, KongFatt

    2012-01-01

    Psychologists have studied the inhibitory control of voluntary movement for many years. In particular, the countermanding of an impending action has been extensively studied. In this work, we propose a neural mechanism for adaptive inhibitory control in a firing-rate type model based on current findings in animal electrophysiological and human psychophysical experiments. We then implement this model on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) prototyping system, using dedicated real-time hardware circuitry. Our results show that the FPGA-based implementation can run in real-time while achieving behavioral performance qualitatively suggestive of the animal experiments. Implementing such biological inhibitory control in an embedded device can lead to the development of control systems that may be used in more realistic cognitive robotics or in neural prosthetic systems aiding human movement control. PMID:22701420

  18. Real-Time Feedback Control of Flow-Induced Cavity Tones. Part 2; Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, M. A.; Cabell, R. H.; Cattafesta, L. N., III

    2006-01-01

    An adaptive generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm was formulated and applied to the cavity flow-tone problem. The algorithm employs gradient descent to update the GPC coefficients at each time step. Past input-output data and an estimate of the open-loop pulse response sequence are all that is needed to implement the algorithm for application at fixed Mach numbers. Transient measurements made during controller adaptation revealed that the controller coefficients converged to a steady state in the mean, and this implies that adaptation can be turned off at some point with no degradation in control performance. When converged, the control algorithm demonstrated multiple Rossiter mode suppression at fixed Mach numbers ranging from 0.275 to 0.38. However, as in the case of fixed-gain GPC, the adaptive GPC performance was limited by spillover in sidebands around the suppressed Rossiter modes. The algorithm was also able to maintain suppression of multiple cavity tones as the freestream Mach number was varied over a modest range (0.275 to 0.29). Beyond this range, stable operation of the control algorithm was not possible due to the fixed plant model in the algorithm.

  19. Development of a real time activity monitoring Android application utilizing SmartStep.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Nagaraj; Melanson, Edward; Sazonov, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Footwear based activity monitoring systems are becoming popular in academic research as well as consumer industry segments. In our previous work, we had presented developmental aspects of an insole based activity and gait monitoring system-SmartStep, which is a socially acceptable, fully wireless and versatile insole. The present work describes the development of an Android application that captures the SmartStep data wirelessly over Bluetooth Low energy (BLE), computes features on the received data, runs activity classification algorithms and provides real time feedback. The development of activity classification methods was based on the the data from a human study involving 4 participants. Participants were asked to perform activities of sitting, standing, walking, and cycling while they wore SmartStep insole system. Multinomial Logistic Discrimination (MLD) was utilized in the development of machine learning model for activity prediction. The resulting classification model was implemented in an Android Smartphone. The Android application was benchmarked for power consumption and CPU loading. Leave one out cross validation resulted in average accuracy of 96.9% during model training phase. The Android application for real time activity classification was tested on a human subject wearing SmartStep resulting in testing accuracy of 95.4%.

  20. Stance time variability during stair stepping before and after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica W.; Marcus, Robin L.; Tracy, Brian L.; Foreman, K. Bo; Christensen, Jesse C.; LaStayo, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The main objectives of this pilot study were to: 1) investigate stance time variability (STV) during stair stepping in older adults with osteoarthritis (OA) before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and compare to an age- and sex-matched group of healthy controls with native knees and 2) evaluate the relationship between quadriceps strength and STV during stair stepping before and after TKA. A prospective, observational, pilot study was carried out on 13 individuals (15% male, mean age 62.71 ± 6.84 years) before and after TKA using an instrumented stairway, patient-reported outcomes, timed stair stepping test, and quadriceps strength measures. At 6-months post-operatively, STV during stair descent was significantly greater in the TKA-GROUP compared to the CONTROL-GROUP, but was not significantly different at 12-months compared to controls. There were no significant differences in STV for stair ascent between the pre- and post-operative visits, or compared to controls. There was a trend toward significance for the relationship between quadriceps strength and STV during stair ascent (P=0.059) and descent (P=0.073). Variability during stair stepping may provide an important, short-term rehabilitation target for individuals following TKA and may represent another parameter to predict declines in functional mobility. PMID:26590484

  1. High-Order Implicit-Explicit Multi-Block Time-stepping Method for Hyperbolic PDEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner B.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Fisher, Travis C.; Frankel, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    This work seeks to explore and improve the current time-stepping schemes used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in order to reduce overall computational time. A high-order scheme has been developed using a combination of implicit and explicit (IMEX) time-stepping Runge-Kutta (RK) schemes which increases numerical stability with respect to the time step size, resulting in decreased computational time. The IMEX scheme alone does not yield the desired increase in numerical stability, but when used in conjunction with an overlapping partitioned (multi-block) domain significant increase in stability is observed. To show this, the Overlapping-Partition IMEX (OP IMEX) scheme is applied to both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) problems, the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation and 2D advection equation, respectively. The method uses two different summation by parts (SBP) derivative approximations, second-order and fourth-order accurate. The Dirichlet boundary conditions are imposed using the Simultaneous Approximation Term (SAT) penalty method. The 6-stage additive Runge-Kutta IMEX time integration schemes are fourth-order accurate in time. An increase in numerical stability 65 times greater than the fully explicit scheme is demonstrated to be achievable with the OP IMEX method applied to 1D Burger's equation. Results from the 2D, purely convective, advection equation show stability increases on the order of 10 times the explicit scheme using the OP IMEX method. Also, the domain partitioning method in this work shows potential for breaking the computational domain into manageable sizes such that implicit solutions for full three-dimensional CFD simulations can be computed using direct solving methods rather than the standard iterative methods currently used.

  2. The Semi-implicit Time-stepping Algorithm in MH4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadlamani, Srinath; Shumlak, Uri; Marklin, George; Meier, Eric; Lionello, Roberto

    2006-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI Center) at the University of Washington is developing MHD codes to accurately model Emerging Concept (EC) devices. Examination of the semi-implicit time stepping algorithm implemented in the tetrahedral mesh MHD simulation code, MH4D, is presented. The time steps for standard explicit methods, which are constrained by the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, are typically small for simulations of EC experiments due to the large Alfven speed. The CFL constraint is more severe with a tetrahedral mesh because of the irregular cell geometry. The semi-implicit algorithm [1] removes the fast waves constraint, thus allowing for larger time steps. We will present the implementation method of this algorithm, and numerical results for test problems in simple geometry. Also, we will present the effectiveness in simulations of complex geometry, similar to the ZaP [2] experiment at the University of Washington. References: [1]Douglas S. Harned and D. D. Schnack, Semi-implicit method for long time scale magnetohy drodynamic computations in three dimensions, JCP, Volume 65, Issue 1, July 1986, Pages 57-70. [2]U. Shumlak, B. A. Nelson, R. P. Golingo, S. L. Jackson, E. A. Crawford, and D. J. Den Hartog, Sheared flow stabilization experiments in the ZaP flow Zpinch, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1683 (2003).

  3. On large time step TVD scheme for hyperbolic conservation laws and its efficiency evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, ZhanSen; Lee, Chun-Hian

    2012-08-01

    A large time step (LTS) TVD scheme originally proposed by Harten is modified and further developed in the present paper and applied to Euler equations in multidimensional problems. By firstly revealing the drawbacks of Harten's original LTS TVD scheme, and reasoning the occurrence of the spurious oscillations, a modified formulation of its characteristic transformation is proposed and a high resolution, strongly robust LTS TVD scheme is formulated. The modified scheme is proven to be capable of taking larger number of time steps than the original one. Following the modified strategy, the LTS TVD schemes for Yee's upwind TVD scheme and Yee-Roe-Davis's symmetric TVD scheme are constructed. The family of the LTS schemes is then extended to multidimensional by time splitting procedure, and the associated boundary condition treatment suitable for the LTS scheme is also imposed. The numerical experiments on Sod's shock tube problem, inviscid flows over NACA0012 airfoil and ONERA M6 wing are performed to validate the developed schemes. Computational efficiencies for the respective schemes under different CFL numbers are also evaluated and compared. The results reveal that the improvement is sizable as compared to the respective single time step schemes, especially for the CFL number ranging from 1.0 to 4.0.

  4. Error correction in short time steps during the application of quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L.A. de Napolitano, R.D.J.

    2016-04-15

    We propose a modification of the standard quantum error-correction method to enable the correction of errors that occur due to the interaction with a noisy environment during quantum gates without modifying the codification used for memory qubits. Using a perturbation treatment of the noise that allows us to separate it from the ideal evolution of the quantum gate, we demonstrate that in certain cases it is necessary to divide the logical operation in short time steps intercalated by correction procedures. A prescription of how these gates can be constructed is provided, as well as a proof that, even for the cases when the division of the quantum gate in short time steps is not necessary, this method may be advantageous for reducing the total duration of the computation.

  5. Explicit large time-step schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.; Zwas, G.

    1979-01-01

    Modifications to explicit finite difference schemes for solving the shallow water equations for meteorological applications by increasing the time step for the fast gravity waves are analyzed. Terms associated with the gravity waves in the shallow water equations are treated on a coarser grid than those associated with the slow Rossby waves, which contain much more of the available energy and must be treated with higher accuracy, enabling a several-fold increase in time step without degrading the accuracy of the solution. The method is presented in Cartesian and spherical coordinates for a rotating earth, using generalized leapfrog, frozen coefficient, and Fourier filtering finite difference schemes. Computational results verify the numerical stability of the approach.

  6. Implementation of variable time step stochastic dynamics for electronically inelastic gas-surface collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Murthy, C. S.; Redmon, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A variable time step algorithm has been implemented for solving the stochastic equations of motion for gas-surface collisions. It has been tested for a simple model of electronically inelastic collisions with an insulator surface in which the phonon manifold acts as a heat bath and electronic states are localized. In addition to reproducing the accurate nuclear dynamics of the surface atoms, numerical calculations have shown the algorithm to yield accurate ensemble averages of physical observables such as electronic transition probabilities and total energy loss of the gas atom to the surface. This new algorithm offers a gain in efficieny of up to an order of magnitude compared to fixed time step integration.

  7. Real-Time Adaptive Least-Squares Drag Minimization for Performance Adaptive Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrier, Yvonne L.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ting, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper contains a simulation study of a real-time adaptive least-squares drag minimization algorithm for an aeroelastic model of a flexible wing aircraft. The aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM). The wing structures incorporate a novel aerodynamic control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF). The drag minimization algorithm uses the Newton-Raphson method to find the optimal VCCTEF deflections for minimum drag in the context of an altitude-hold flight control mode at cruise conditions. The aerodynamic coefficient parameters used in this optimization method are identified in real-time using Recursive Least Squares (RLS). The results demonstrate the potential of the VCCTEF to improve aerodynamic efficiency for drag minimization for transport aircraft.

  8. Multiple Time-Step Dual-Hamiltonian Hybrid Molecular Dynamics — Monte Carlo Canonical Propagation Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Weare, Jonathan; Dinner, Aaron R.; Roux, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    A multiple time-step integrator based on a dual Hamiltonian and a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) is proposed to sample systems in the canonical ensemble. The Dual Hamiltonian Multiple Time-Step (DHMTS) algorithm is based on two similar Hamiltonians: a computationally expensive one that serves as a reference and a computationally inexpensive one to which the workload is shifted. The central assumption is that the difference between the two Hamiltonians is slowly varying. Earlier work has shown that such dual Hamiltonian multiple time-step schemes effectively precondition nonlinear differential equations for dynamics by reformulating them into a recursive root finding problem that can be solved by propagating a correction term through an internal loop, analogous to RESPA. Of special interest in the present context, a hybrid MD-MC version of the DHMTS algorithm is introduced to enforce detailed balance via a Metropolis acceptance criterion and ensure consistency with the Boltzmann distribution. The Metropolis criterion suppresses the discretization errors normally associated with the propagation according to the computationally inexpensive Hamiltonian, treating the discretization error as an external work. Illustrative tests are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. PMID:26918826

  9. Time-resolved detection probe for homogeneous nucleic acid analyses in one-step format.

    PubMed

    Laitala, Ville; Ylikoski, Alice; Raussi, Hanna-Mari; Ollikka, Pia; Hemmilä, Ilkka

    2007-02-01

    We report here an extension of homogeneous assays based on fluorescence intensity and lifetime measuring on DNA hybridization. A novel decay probe that allows simple one-step nucleic acid detection with subnanomolar sensitivity, and is suitable for closed-tube applications, is introduced. The decay probe uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a europium chelate donor and an organic fluorophore acceptor. The substantial change in the acceptor emission decay time on hybridization with the target sequence allows the direct separation of the hybridized and unhybridized probe populations in a time-resolved measurement. No additional sample manipulation or self-hybridization of the probes is required. The wavelength and decay time of a decay probe can be adjusted according to the selection of probe length and acceptor fluorophore, thereby making the probes applicable to multiplexed assays. Here we demonstrate the decay probe principle and decay probe-based, one-step, dual DNA assay using celiac disease-related target oligonucleotides (single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) as model analytes. Decay probes showed specific response for their complementary DNA target and allowed good signal deconvolution based on simultaneous optical and temporal filtering. This technique potentially could be used to further increase the number of simultaneously detected DNA targets in a simple one-step homogeneous assay.

  10. A conservative finite volume scheme with time-accurate local time stepping for scalar transport on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, José Rafael; Dumbser, Michael; Motta-Marques, David da; Fragoso Junior, Carlos Ruberto

    2015-12-01

    In this article we propose a new conservative high resolution TVD (total variation diminishing) finite volume scheme with time-accurate local time stepping (LTS) on unstructured grids for the solution of scalar transport problems, which are typical in the context of water quality simulations. To keep the presentation of the new method as simple as possible, the algorithm is only derived in two space dimensions and for purely convective transport problems, hence neglecting diffusion and reaction terms. The new numerical method for the solution of the scalar transport is directly coupled to the hydrodynamic model of Casulli and Walters (2000) that provides the dynamics of the free surface and the velocity vector field based on a semi-implicit discretization of the shallow water equations. Wetting and drying is handled rigorously by the nonlinear algorithm proposed by Casulli (2009). The new time-accurate LTS algorithm allows a different time step size for each element of the unstructured grid, based on an element-local Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) stability condition. The proposed method does not need any synchronization between different time steps of different elements and is by construction locally and globally conservative. The LTS scheme is based on a piecewise linear polynomial reconstruction in space-time using the MUSCL-Hancock method, to obtain second order of accuracy in both space and time. The new algorithm is first validated on some classical test cases for pure advection problems, for which exact solutions are known. In all cases we obtain a very good level of accuracy, showing also numerical convergence results; we furthermore confirm mass conservation up to machine precision and observe an improved computational efficiency compared to a standard second order TVD scheme for scalar transport with global time stepping (GTS). Then, the new LTS method is applied to some more complex problems, where the new scalar transport scheme has also been coupled to

  11. Real-time, single-step bioassay using nanoplasmonic resonator with ultra-high sensitivity

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Xiang; Ellman, Jonathan A; Chen, Fanqing Frank; Su, Kai-Hang; Wei, Qi-Huo; Sun, Cheng

    2014-04-01

    A nanoplasmonic resonator (NPR) comprising a metallic nanodisk with alternating shielding layer(s), having a tagged biomolecule conjugated or tethered to the surface of the nanoplasmonic resonator for highly sensitive measurement of enzymatic activity. NPRs enhance Raman signals in a highly reproducible manner, enabling fast detection of protease and enzyme activity, such as Prostate Specific Antigen (paPSA), in real-time, at picomolar sensitivity levels. Experiments on extracellular fluid (ECF) from paPSA-positive cells demonstrate specific detection in a complex bio-fluid background in real-time single-step detection in very small sample volumes.

  12. Real-Time, Single-Step Bioassay Using Nanoplasmonic Resonator With Ultra-High Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiang (Inventor); Ellman, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Fanqing Frank (Inventor); Su, Kai-Hang (Inventor); Wei, Qi-Huo (Inventor); Sun, Cheng (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A nanoplasmonic resonator (NPR) comprising a metallic nanodisk with alternating shielding layer(s), having a tagged biomolecule conjugated or tethered to the surface of the nanoplasmonic resonator for highly sensitive measurement of enzymatic activity. NPRs enhance Raman signals in a highly reproducible manner, enabling fast detection of protease and enzyme activity, such as Prostate Specific Antigen (paPSA), in real-time, at picomolar sensitivity levels. Experiments on extracellular fluid (ECF) from paPSA-positive cells demonstrate specific detection in a complex bio-fluid background in real-time single-step detection in very small sample volumes.

  13. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion.

    PubMed

    Fornaciai, Michele; Arrighi, Roberto; Burr, David C

    2016-03-22

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. These results show that adaptation-induced compression of event-time occurs only for uni-directional translational motion, ruling out the possibility that the neural mechanisms of the adaptation occur at early levels of visual processing.

  14. Widespread Genetic Incompatibilities between First-Step Mutations during Parallel Adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a Common Environment

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Sarah P.

    2017-01-01

    Independently evolving populations may adapt to similar selection pressures via different genetic changes. The interactions between such changes, such as in a hybrid individual, can inform us about what course adaptation may follow and allow us to determine whether gene flow would be facilitated or hampered following secondary contact. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to measure the genetic interactions between first-step mutations that independently evolved in the same biosynthetic pathway following exposure to the fungicide nystatin. We found that genetic interactions are prevalent and predominantly negative, with the majority of mutations causing lower growth when combined in a double mutant than when alone as a single mutant (sign epistasis). The prevalence of sign epistasis is surprising given the small number of mutations tested and runs counter to expectations for mutations arising in a single biosynthetic pathway in the face of a simple selective pressure. Furthermore, in one third of pairwise interactions, the double mutant grew less well than either single mutant (reciprocal sign epistasis). The observation of reciprocal sign epistasis among these first adaptive mutations arising in the same genetic background indicates that partial postzygotic reproductive isolation could evolve rapidly between populations under similar selective pressures, even with only a single genetic change in each. The nature of the epistatic relationships was sensitive, however, to the level of drug stress in the assay conditions, as many double mutants became fitter than the single mutants at higher concentrations of nystatin. We discuss the implications of these results both for our understanding of epistatic interactions among beneficial mutations in the same biochemical pathway and for speciation. PMID:28114370

  15. NONINDEPENDENT AND NONSTATIONARY RESPONSE TIMES IN STOPPING AND STEPPING SACCADE TASKS

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Matthew J.; Boucher, Leanne; Logan, Gordon D.; Palmeri, Thomas J.; Schall, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Saccade stop-signal and target-step tasks are used to investigate the mechanisms of cognitive control. Performance of these tasks can be explained as the outcome of a race between stochastic GO and STOP processes. The race-model analyses assume that response times (RTs) measured throughout an experimental session are independent samples from stationary stochastic processes. This article demonstrates that RTs are neither independent nor stationary for humans and monkeys performing saccade stopping and target-step tasks. We investigate the consequences this has on analyses of these data. Nonindependent and nonstationary RTs artificially flatten inhibition functions and account for some of the systematic differences in RTs following different types of trials. However, nonindependent and nonstationary RTs do not bias the estimation of the stop-signal RT. These results demonstrate the robustness of the race model to some aspects of nonindependence and nonstationarity, and point to useful extensions of the model. PMID:20952788

  16. A shorter time step for eco-friendly reservoir operation does not always produce better water availability and ecosystem benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chunxue; Yin, Xin'an; Yang, Zhifeng; Cai, Yanpeng; Sun, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The time step used in the operation of eco-friendly reservoirs has decreased from monthly to daily, and even sub-daily. The shorter time step is considered a better choice for satisfying downstream environmental requirements because it more closely resembles the natural flow regime. However, little consideration has been given to the influence of different time steps on the ability to simultaneously meet human and environmental flow requirements. To analyze this influence, we used an optimization model to explore the relationships among the time step, environmental flow (e-flow) requirements, and human water needs for a wide range of time steps and e-flow scenarios. We used the degree of hydrologic alteration to evaluate the regime's ability to satisfy the e-flow requirements of riverine ecosystems, and used water supply reliability to evaluate the ability to satisfy human needs. We then applied the model to a case study of China's Tanghe Reservoir. We found four efficient time steps (2, 3, 4, and 5 days), with a remarkably high water supply reliability (around 80%) and a low alteration of the flow regime (<35%). Our analysis of the hydrologic alteration revealed the smallest alteration at time steps ranging from 1 to 7 days. However, longer time steps led to higher water supply reliability to meet human needs under several e-flow scenarios. Our results show that adjusting the time step is a simple way to improve reservoir operation performance to balance human and e-flow needs.

  17. Evaluating mallard adaptive management models with time series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, P.B.; Kendall, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Wildlife practitioners concerned with midcontinent mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) management in the United States have instituted a system of adaptive harvest management (AHM) as an objective format for setting harvest regulations. Under the AHM paradigm, predictions from a set of models that reflect key uncertainties about processes underlying population dynamics are used in coordination with optimization software to determine an optimal set of harvest decisions. Managers use comparisons of the predictive abilities of these models to gauge the relative truth of different hypotheses about density-dependent recruitment and survival, with better-predicting models giving more weight to the determination of harvest regulations. We tested the effectiveness of this strategy by examining convergence rates of 'predictor' models when the true model for population dynamics was known a priori. We generated time series for cases when the a priori model was 1 of the predictor models as well as for several cases when the a priori model was not in the model set. We further examined the addition of different levels of uncertainty into the variance structure of predictor models, reflecting different levels of confidence about estimated parameters. We showed that in certain situations, the model-selection process favors a predictor model that incorporates the hypotheses of additive harvest mortality and weakly density-dependent recruitment, even when the model is not used to generate data. Higher levels of predictor model variance led to decreased rates of convergence to the model that generated the data, but model weight trajectories were in general more stable. We suggest that predictive models should incorporate all sources of uncertainty about estimated parameters, that the variance structure should be similar for all predictor models, and that models with different functional forms for population dynamics should be considered for inclusion in predictor model! sets. All of these

  18. Real-Time Adaptive Color Segmentation by Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.

    2004-01-01

    Artificial neural networks that would utilize the cascade error projection (CEP) algorithm have been proposed as means of autonomous, real-time, adaptive color segmentation of images that change with time. In the original intended application, such a neural network would be used to analyze digitized color video images of terrain on a remote planet as viewed from an uninhabited spacecraft approaching the planet. During descent toward the surface of the planet, information on the segmentation of the images into differently colored areas would be updated adaptively in real time to capture changes in contrast, brightness, and resolution, all in an effort to identify a safe and scientifically productive landing site and provide control feedback to steer the spacecraft toward that site. Potential terrestrial applications include monitoring images of crops to detect insect invasions and monitoring of buildings and other facilities to detect intruders. The CEP algorithm is reliable and is well suited to implementation in very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry. It was chosen over other neural-network learning algorithms because it is better suited to realtime learning: It provides a self-evolving neural-network structure, requires fewer iterations to converge and is more tolerant to low resolution (that is, fewer bits) in the quantization of neural-network synaptic weights. Consequently, a CEP neural network learns relatively quickly, and the circuitry needed to implement it is relatively simple. Like other neural networks, a CEP neural network includes an input layer, hidden units, and output units (see figure). As in other neural networks, a CEP network is presented with a succession of input training patterns, giving rise to a set of outputs that are compared with the desired outputs. Also as in other neural networks, the synaptic weights are updated iteratively in an effort to bring the outputs closer to target values. A distinctive feature of the CEP neural

  19. Real‐time monitoring and control of the load phase of a protein A capture step

    PubMed Central

    Rüdt, Matthias; Brestrich, Nina; Rolinger, Laura

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The load phase in preparative Protein A capture steps is commonly not controlled in real‐time. The load volume is generally based on an offline quantification of the monoclonal antibody (mAb) prior to loading and on a conservative column capacity determined by resin‐life time studies. While this results in a reduced productivity in batch mode, the bottleneck of suitable real‐time analytics has to be overcome in order to enable continuous mAb purification. In this study, Partial Least Squares Regression (PLS) modeling on UV/Vis absorption spectra was applied to quantify mAb in the effluent of a Protein A capture step during the load phase. A PLS model based on several breakthrough curves with variable mAb titers in the HCCF was successfully calibrated. The PLS model predicted the mAb concentrations in the effluent of a validation experiment with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.06 mg/mL. The information was applied to automatically terminate the load phase, when a product breakthrough of 1.5 mg/mL was reached. In a second part of the study, the sensitivity of the method was further increased by only considering small mAb concentrations in the calibration and by subtracting an impurity background signal. The resulting PLS model exhibited a RMSE of prediction of 0.01 mg/mL and was successfully applied to terminate the load phase, when a product breakthrough of 0.15 mg/mL was achieved. The proposed method has hence potential for the real‐time monitoring and control of capture steps at large scale production. This might enhance the resin capacity utilization, eliminate time‐consuming offline analytics, and contribute to the realization of continuous processing. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 368–373. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27543789

  20. First Steps School Intervention Module: CLASS-- Contingencies for Learning Academic and Social Skills. (Adapted Preschool Version). An Early School Intervention Program for At-Risk Kindergartners. A Component of the First Steps Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golly, Annemieke; Stiller, Bruce

    This report describes the second module of an early intervention program for at-risk kindergartners who show the early signs of antisocial behavior patterns. The second module of the "First Steps" program describes a school intervention involving the target child, peers, and teachers that teaches an adaptive, prosocial pattern of school…

  1. Kalman Filtered Daily GRACE Gravity Field Solutions in Near Real-Time- First Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvas, Andreas; Mayer-Gurr, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    As part of the EGSIEM (European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management) project, a technology demonstrator for a near real-time (NRT) gravity field service will be established. In preparation of the operational phase, several aspects of the daily gravity field processing chain at Graz University of Technology have been inspected in order to improve the gravity field solutions and move towards NRT. The effect of these adaptions is investigated by comparison with post-processing and forward-only filtered solutions and evaluated using in-situ data.

  2. Sensitivity of The High-resolution Wam Model With Respect To Time Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasemets, K.; Soomere, T.

    The northern part of the Baltic Proper and its subbasins (Bothnian Sea, the Gulf of Finland, Moonsund) serve as a challenge for wave modellers. In difference from the southern and the eastern parts of the Baltic Sea, their coasts are highly irregular and contain many peculiarities with the characteristic horizontal scale of the order of a few kilometres. For example, the northern coast of the Gulf of Finland is extremely ragged and contains a huge number of small islands. Its southern coast is more or less regular but has up to 50m high cliff that is frequently covered by high forests. The area also contains numerous banks that have water depth a couple of meters and that may essentially modify wave properties near the banks owing to topographical effects. This feature suggests that a high-resolution wave model should be applied for the region in question, with a horizontal resolution of an order of 1 km or even less. According to the Courant-Friedrich-Lewy criterion, the integration time step for such models must be of the order of a few tens of seconds. A high-resolution WAM model turns out to be fairly sensitive with respect to the particular choice of the time step. In our experiments, a medium-resolution model for the whole Baltic Sea was used, with the horizontal resolution 3 miles (3' along latitudes and 6' along longitudes) and the angular resolution 12 directions. The model was run with steady wind blowing 20 m/s from different directions and with two time steps (1 and 3 minutes). For most of the wind directions, the rms. difference of significant wave heights calculated with differ- ent time steps did not exceed 10 cm and typically was of the order of a few per cents. The difference arose within a few tens of minutes and generally did not increase in further computations. However, in the case of the north wind, the difference increased nearly monotonously and reached 25-35 cm (10-15%) within three hours of integra- tion whereas mean of significant wave

  3. Large time-step stability of explicit one-dimensional advection schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    1993-01-01

    There is a wide-spread belief that most explicit one-dimensional advection schemes need to satisfy the so-called 'CFL condition' - that the Courant number, c = udelta(t)/delta(x), must be less than or equal to one, for stability in the von Neumann sense. This puts severe limitations on the time-step in high-speed, fine-grid calculations and is an impetus for the development of implicit schemes, which often require less restrictive time-step conditions for stability, but are more expensive per time-step. However, it turns out that, at least in one dimension, if explicit schemes are formulated in a consistent flux-based conservative finite-volume form, von Neumann stability analysis does not place any restriction on the allowable Courant number. Any explicit scheme that is stable for c is less than 1, with a complex amplitude ratio, G(c), can be easily extended to arbitrarily large c. The complex amplitude ratio is then given by exp(- (Iota)(Nu)(Theta)) G(delta(c)), where N is the integer part of c, and delta(c) = c - N (less than 1); this is clearly stable. The CFL condition is, in fact, not a stability condition at all, but, rather, a 'range restriction' on the 'pieces' in a piece-wise polynomial interpolation. When a global view is taken of the interpolation, the need for a CFL condition evaporates. A number of well-known explicit advection schemes are considered and thus extended to large delta(t). The analysis also includes a simple interpretation of (large delta(t)) total-variation-diminishing (TVD) constraints.

  4. A class of large time step Godunov schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, ZhanSen; Lee, Chun-Hian

    2011-08-01

    A large time step (LTS) Godunov scheme firstly proposed by LeVeque is further developed in the present work and applied to Euler equations. Based on the analysis of the computational performances of LeVeque's linear approximation on wave interactions, a multi-wave approximation on rarefaction fan is proposed to avoid the occurrences of rarefaction shocks in computations. The developed LTS scheme is validated using 1-D test cases, manifesting high resolution for discontinuities and the capability of maintaining computational stability when large CFL numbers are imposed. The scheme is then extended to multidimensional problems using dimensional splitting technique; the treatment of boundary condition for this multidimensional LTS scheme is also proposed. As for demonstration problems, inviscid flows over NACA0012 airfoil and ONERA M6 wing with given swept angle are simulated using the developed LTS scheme. The numerical results reveal the high resolution nature of the scheme, where the shock can be captured within 1-2 grid points. The resolution of the scheme would improve gradually along with the increasing of CFL number under an upper bound where the solution becomes severely oscillating across the shock. Computational efficiency comparisons show that the developed scheme is capable of reducing the computational time effectively with increasing the time step (CFL number).

  5. Imaginary Time Step Method to Solve the Dirac Equation with Nonlocal Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ying; Liang Haozhao; Meng Jie

    2009-08-26

    The imaginary time step (ITS) method is applied to solve the Dirac equation with nonlocal potentials in coordinate space. Taking the nucleus {sup 12}C as an example, even with nonlocal potentials, the direct ITS evolution for the Dirac equation still meets the disaster of the Dirac sea. However, following the recipe in our former investigation, the disaster can be avoided by the ITS evolution for the corresponding Schroedinger-like equation without localization, which gives the convergent results exactly the same with those obtained iteratively by the shooting method with localized effective potentials.

  6. Career Adaptability in Adults: A Construct Whose Time Has Come.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Jane

    1994-01-01

    Describes Super's construct of adaptability and reviews research on the construct. Discusses related counseling research that uses the construct and research in area of organizational psychology that addresses concept but does not use the term. Summarizes other approaches to need for adaptability in adult career development and presents…

  7. Adaptive time-variant models for fuzzy-time-series forecasting.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai-Keung; Bai, Enjian; Chu, Alice Wai-Ching

    2010-12-01

    A fuzzy time series has been applied to the prediction of enrollment, temperature, stock indices, and other domains. Related studies mainly focus on three factors, namely, the partition of discourse, the content of forecasting rules, and the methods of defuzzification, all of which greatly influence the prediction accuracy of forecasting models. These studies use fixed analysis window sizes for forecasting. In this paper, an adaptive time-variant fuzzy-time-series forecasting model (ATVF) is proposed to improve forecasting accuracy. The proposed model automatically adapts the analysis window size of fuzzy time series based on the prediction accuracy in the training phase and uses heuristic rules to generate forecasting values in the testing phase. The performance of the ATVF model is tested using both simulated and actual time series including the enrollments at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and the Taiwan Stock Exchange Capitalization Weighted Stock Index (TAIEX). The experiment results show that the proposed ATVF model achieves a significant improvement in forecasting accuracy as compared to other fuzzy-time-series forecasting models.

  8. Real-time feature extraction of P300 component using adaptive nonlinear principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The electroencephalography (EEG) signals are known to involve the firings of neurons in the brain. The P300 wave is a high potential caused by an event-related stimulus. The detection of P300s included in the measured EEG signals is widely investigated. The difficulties in detecting them are that they are mixed with other signals generated over a large brain area and their amplitudes are very small due to the distance and resistivity differences in their transmittance. Methods A novel real-time feature extraction method for detecting P300 waves by combining an adaptive nonlinear principal component analysis (ANPCA) and a multilayer neural network is proposed. The measured EEG signals are first filtered using a sixth-order band-pass filter with cut-off frequencies of 1 Hz and 12 Hz. The proposed ANPCA scheme consists of four steps: pre-separation, whitening, separation, and estimation. In the experiment, four different inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs) are utilized: 325 ms, 350 ms, 375 ms, and 400 ms. Results The developed multi-stage principal component analysis method applied at the pre-separation step has reduced the external noises and artifacts significantly. The introduced adaptive law in the whitening step has made the subsequent algorithm in the separation step to converge fast. The separation performance index has varied from -20 dB to -33 dB due to randomness of source signals. The robustness of the ANPCA against background noises has been evaluated by comparing the separation performance indices of the ANPCA with four algorithms (NPCA, NSS-JD, JADE, and SOBI), in which the ANPCA algorithm demonstrated the shortest iteration time with performance index about 0.03. Upon this, it is asserted that the ANPCA algorithm successfully separates mixed source signals. Conclusions The independent components produced from the observed data using the proposed method illustrated that the extracted signals were clearly the P300 components elicited by task

  9. Adaptive real-time dual-comb spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Poisson, Antonin; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqué, Nathalie; Hänsch, Theodor W.

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of a laser frequency comb consists of several hundred thousand equally spaced lines over a broad spectral bandwidth. Such frequency combs have revolutionized optical frequency metrology and they now hold much promise for significant advances in a growing number of applications including molecular spectroscopy. Despite an intriguing potential for the measurement of molecular spectra spanning tens of nanometres within tens of microseconds at Doppler-limited resolution, the development of dual-comb spectroscopy is hindered by the demanding stability requirements of the laser combs. Here we overcome this difficulty and experimentally demonstrate a concept of real-time dual-comb spectroscopy, which compensates for laser instabilities by electronic signal processing. It only uses free-running mode-locked lasers without any phase-lock electronics. We record spectra spanning the full bandwidth of near-infrared fibre lasers with Doppler-limited line profiles highly suitable for measurements of concentrations or line intensities. Our new technique of adaptive dual-comb spectroscopy offers a powerful transdisciplinary instrument for analytical sciences. PMID:24572636

  10. Wavelet-Based Speech Enhancement Using Time-Frequency Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun-Ching

    2003-12-01

    Wavelet denoising is commonly used for speech enhancement because of the simplicity of its implementation. However, the conventional methods generate the presence of musical residual noise while thresholding the background noise. The unvoiced components of speech are often eliminated from this method. In this paper, a novel algorithm of wavelet coefficient threshold (WCT) based on time-frequency adaptation is proposed. In addition, an unvoiced speech enhancement algorithm is also integrated into the system to improve the intelligibility of speech. The wavelet coefficient threshold (WCT) of each subband is first temporally adjusted according to the value of a posterior signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To prevent the degradation of unvoiced sounds during noise, the algorithm utilizes a simple speech/noise detector (SND) and further divides speech signal into unvoiced and voiced sounds. Then, we apply appropriate wavelet thresholding according to voiced/unvoiced (V/U) decision. Based on the masking properties of human auditory system, a perceptual gain factor is adopted into wavelet thresholding for suppressing musical residual noise. Simulation results show that the proposed method is capable of reducing noise with little speech degradation and the overall performance is superior to several competitive methods.

  11. Personality traits, future time perspective and adaptive behavior in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Gomes Carvalho, Renato Gil; Novo, Rosa Ferreira

    2015-04-24

    Several studies provide evidence of the importance of future time perspective (FTP) for individual success. However, little research addresses the relationship between FTP and personality traits, particularly if FTP can mediate their influence on behavior. In this study we analyze the mediating of FTP in the influence of personality traits on the way adolescents live their life at school. Sample consisted in 351 students, aged from 14 to 18 years-old, at different schooling levels. Instruments were the Portuguese version of the MMPI-A, particularly the PSY-5 dimensions (Aggressiveness, Psychoticism, Disconstraint, Neuroticism, Introversion), a FTP questionnaire, and a survey on school life, involving several indicators of achievement, social integration, and overall satisfaction. With the exception of Neuroticism, the results show significant mediation effects (p < .001) of FTP on most relationships between PSY-5 dimensions and school life variables. Concerning Disconstraint, FTP mediated its influence on overall satisfaction (β = -.125) and school achievement (β = -.106). In the case of Introversion, significant mediation effects occurred for interpersonal difficulties (β = .099) and participation in extracurricular activities (β = -.085). FTP was also a mediator of Psychoticism influence in overall satisfaction (β = -.094), interpersonal difficulties (β = .057), and behavior problems (β = .037). Finally, FTP mediated the influence of Aggressiveness on overall satisfaction (β = -.061), interpersonal difficulties (β = .040), achievement (β = -.052), and behavior problems (β = .023). Results are discussed considering the importance of FTP in the impact of some personality structural characteristics in students' school adaptation.

  12. A simple method for improving the time-stepping accuracy in atmosphere and ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    In contemporary numerical simulations of the atmosphere and ocean, evidence suggests that time-stepping errors may be a significant component of total model error, on both weather and climate time-scales. This presentation will review the available evidence, and will then suggest a simple but effective method for substantially improving the time-stepping numerics at no extra computational expense. A common time-stepping method in atmosphere and ocean models is the leapfrog scheme combined with the Robert-Asselin (RA) filter. This method is used in the following models (and many more): ECHAM, MAECHAM, MM5, CAM, MESO-NH, HIRLAM, KMCM, LIMA, SPEEDY, IGCM, PUMA, COSMO, FSU-GSM, FSU-NRSM, NCEP-GFS, NCEP-RSM, NSEAM, NOGAPS, RAMS, and CCSR/NIES-AGCM. Although the RA filter controls the time-splitting instability, it also introduces non-physical damping and reduces the accuracy. This presentation proposes a simple modification to the RA filter, which has become known as the RAW filter (Williams 2009, 2011). When used in conjunction with the leapfrog scheme, the RAW filter eliminates the non-physical damping and increases the amplitude accuracy by two orders, yielding third-order accuracy. (The phase accuracy remains second-order.) The RAW filter can easily be incorporated into existing models, typically via the insertion of just a single line of code. Better simulations are obtained at no extra computational expense. Results will be shown from recent implementations of the RAW filter in various models, including SPEEDY and COSMO. For example, in SPEEDY, the skill of weather forecasts is found to be significantly improved. In particular, in tropical surface pressure predictions, five-day forecasts made using the RAW filter have approximately the same skill as four-day forecasts made using the RA filter (Amezcua, Kalnay & Williams 2011). These improvements are encouraging for the use of the RAW filter in other atmosphere and ocean models. References PD Williams (2009) A

  13. One-Step Direct Aeroacoustic Simulation Using Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. Y.; Leung, R. C. K.; Zhou, K.; Lam, G. C. Y.; Jiang, Z.

    2011-09-01

    One-step direct aeroacoustic simulation (DAS) has received attention from aerospace and mechanical high-pressure fluid-moving system manufacturers for quite some time. They aim to simulate the unsteady flow and acoustic field in the duct simultaneously in order to investigate the aeroacoustic generation mechanisms. Because of the large length and energy scale disparities between the acoustic far field and the aerodynamic near field, highly accurate and high-resolution simulation scheme is required. This involves the use of high order compact finite difference and time advancement schemes in simulation. However, in this situation, large buffer zones are always needed to suppress the spurious numerical waves emanating from computational boundaries. This further increases the computational resources to yield accurate results. On the other hand, for such problem as supersonic jet noise, the numerical scheme should be able to resolve both strong shock waves and weak acoustic waves simultaneously. Usually numerical aeroa-coustic scheme that is good for low Mach number flow is not able to give satisfactory simulation results for shock wave. Therefore, the aeroacoustic research community has been looking for a more efficient one-step DAS scheme that has the comparable accuracy to the finite-difference approach with smaller buffer regions, yet is able to give accurate solutions from subsonic to supersonic flows. The conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) scheme is one of the possible schemes satisfying the above requirements. This paper aims to report the development of a CE/SE scheme for one-step DAS and illustrate its robustness and effectiveness with two selected benchmark problems.

  14. Exploration of zeroth-order wavefunctions and energies as a first step toward intramolecular symmetry-adapted perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gonthier, Jérôme F.; Corminboeuf, Clémence

    2014-04-21

    Non-covalent interactions occur between and within all molecules and have a profound impact on structural and electronic phenomena in chemistry, biology, and material science. Understanding the nature of inter- and intramolecular interactions is essential not only for establishing the relation between structure and properties, but also for facilitating the rational design of molecules with targeted properties. These objectives have motivated the development of theoretical schemes decomposing intermolecular interactions into physically meaningful terms. Among the various existing energy decomposition schemes, Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT) is one of the most successful as it naturally decomposes the interaction energy into physical and intuitive terms. Unfortunately, analogous approaches for intramolecular energies are theoretically highly challenging and virtually nonexistent. Here, we introduce a zeroth-order wavefunction and energy, which represent the first step toward the development of an intramolecular variant of the SAPT formalism. The proposed energy expression is based on the Chemical Hamiltonian Approach (CHA), which relies upon an asymmetric interpretation of the electronic integrals. The orbitals are optimized with a non-hermitian Fock matrix based on two variants: one using orbitals strictly localized on individual fragments and the other using canonical (delocalized) orbitals. The zeroth-order wavefunction and energy expression are validated on a series of prototypical systems. The computed intramolecular interaction energies demonstrate that our approach combining the CHA with strictly localized orbitals achieves reasonable interaction energies and basis set dependence in addition to producing intuitive energy trends. Our zeroth-order wavefunction is the primary step fundamental to the derivation of any perturbation theory correction, which has the potential to truly transform our understanding and quantification of non

  15. Pseudo-time stepping methods for space time discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of the compressible Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaij, C. M.; van der Vegt, J. J. W.; van der Ven, H.

    2006-12-01

    The space-time discontinuous Galerkin discretization of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations results in a non-linear system of algebraic equations, which we solve with pseudo-time stepping methods. We show that explicit Runge-Kutta methods developed for the Euler equations suffer from a severe stability constraint linked to the viscous part of the equations and propose an alternative to relieve this constraint while preserving locality. To evaluate its effectiveness, we compare with an implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta method which does not suffer from the viscous stability constraint. We analyze the stability of the methods and illustrate their performance by computing the flow around a 2D airfoil and a 3D delta wing at low and moderate Reynolds numbers.

  16. Detection of Zika virus by SYBR green one-step real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Yue; Liu, Si-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has rapidly spread to new areas of Americas, which were the first transmissions outside its traditional endemic areas in Africa and Asia. Due to the link with newborn defects and neurological disorder, numerous infected cases throughout the world and various mosquito vectors, the virus has been considered to be an international public health emergency. In the present study, we developed a SYBR Green based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid detection of ZIKV. Our results revealed that the real-time assay is highly specific and sensitive in detection of ZIKV in cell samples. Importantly, the replication of ZIKV at different time points in infected cells could be rapidly monitored by the real-time RT-PCR assay. Specifically, the real-time RT-PCR showed acceptable performance in measurement of infectious ZIKV RNA. This assay could detect ZIKV at a titer as low as 1PFU/mL. The real-time RT-PCR assay could be a useful tool for further virology surveillance and diagnosis of ZIKV.

  17. Real-Time Adaptive Control of Flow-Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Cattafesta, Louis N.

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm was formulated and applied to the cavity flow-tone problem. The algorithm employs gradient descent to update the GPC coefficients at each time step. The adaptive control algorithm demonstrated multiple Rossiter mode suppression at fixed Mach numbers ranging from 0.275 to 0.38. The algorithm was also able t o maintain suppression of multiple cavity tones as the freestream Mach number was varied over a modest range (0.275 to 0.29). Controller performance was evaluated with a measure of output disturbance rejection and an input sensitivity transfer function. The results suggest that disturbances entering the cavity flow are colocated with the control input at the cavity leading edge. In that case, only tonal components of the cavity wall-pressure fluctuations can be suppressed and arbitrary broadband pressure reduction is not possible. In the control-algorithm development, the cavity dynamics are treated as linear and time invariant (LTI) for a fixed Mach number. The experimental results lend support this treatment.

  18. Adaptive control for a class of MIMO nonlinear time delay systems against time varying actuator failures.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mahnaz; Ghaisari, Jafar; Askari, Javad

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates an adaptive controller for a class of Multi Input Multi Output (MIMO) nonlinear systems with unknown parameters, bounded time delays and in the presence of unknown time varying actuator failures. The type of considered actuator failure is one in which some inputs may be stuck at some time varying values where the values, times and patterns of the failures are unknown. The proposed approach is constructed based on a backstepping design method. The boundedness of all the closed-loop signals is guaranteed and the tracking errors are proved to converge to a small neighborhood of the origin. The proposed approach is employed for a double inverted pendulums benchmark and a chemical reactor system. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Adaptive uniform finite-/fixed-time convergent second-order sliding-mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basin, Michael; Bharath Panathula, Chandrasekhara; Shtessel, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an adaptive gain algorithm for second-order sliding-mode control (2-SMC), specifically a super-twisting (STW)-like controller, with uniform finite/fixed convergence time, that is robust to perturbations with unknown bounds. It is shown that a second-order sliding mode is established as exact finite-time convergence to the origin if the adaptive gain does not have the ability to get reduced and converge to a small vicinity of the origin if the adaptation algorithm does not overestimate the control gain. The estimate of fixed convergence time of the studied adaptive STW-like controller is derived based on the Lyapunov analysis. The efficacy of the proposed adaptive algorithm is illustrated in a tutorial example, where the adaptive STW-like controller with uniform finite/fixed convergence time is compared to the adaptive STW controller with non-uniform finite convergence time.

  20. Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  1. Multi-rate time stepping schemes for hydro-geomechanical model for subsurface methane hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shubhangi; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Helmig, Rainer

    2016-05-01

    We present an extrapolation-based semi-implicit multi-rate time stepping (MRT) scheme and a compound-fast MRT scheme for a naturally partitioned, multi-time-scale hydro-geomechanical hydrate reservoir model. We evaluate the performance of the two MRT methods compared to an iteratively coupled solution scheme and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. The performance of the two MRT methods is evaluated in terms of speed-up and accuracy by comparison to an iteratively coupled solution scheme. We observe that the extrapolation-based semi-implicit method gives a higher speed-up but is strongly dependent on the relative time scales of the latent (slow) and active (fast) components. On the other hand, the compound-fast method is more robust and less sensitive to the relative time scales, but gives lower speed up as compared to the semi-implicit method, especially when the relative time scales of the active and latent components are comparable.

  2. Translation, Validation, and Adaptation of the Time Use Diary from English into the Malay Language for Use in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Asmuri, Siti Noraini; Brown, Ted; Broom, Lisa J

    2016-07-01

    Valid translations of time use scales are needed by occupational therapists for use in different cross-cultural contexts to gather relevant data to inform practice and research. The purpose of this study was to describe the process of translating, adapting, and validating the Time Use Diary from its current English language edition into a Malay language version. Five steps of the cross-cultural adaptation process were completed: (i) translation from English into the Malay language by a qualified translator, (ii) synthesis of the translated Malay version, (iii) backtranslation from Malay to English by three bilingual speakers, (iv) expert committee review and discussion, and (v) pilot testing of the Malay language version with two participant groups. The translated version was found to be a reliable and valid tool identifying changes and potential challenges in the time use of older adults. This provides Malaysian occupational therapists with a useful tool for gathering time use data in practice settings and for research purposes.

  3. Prisms to travel in time: Investigation of time-space association through prismatic adaptation effect on mental time travel.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Filomena; Ciaramelli, Elisa; Arzy, Shahar; Frassinetti, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that humans process time and space in similar veins. Humans represent time along a spatial continuum, and perception of temporal durations can be altered through manipulations of spatial attention by prismatic adaptation (PA). Here, we investigated whether PA-induced manipulations of spatial attention can also influence more conceptual aspects of time, such as humans' ability to travel mentally back and forward in time (mental time travel, MTT). Before and after leftward- and rightward-PA, participants projected themselves in the past, present or future time (i.e., self-projection), and, for each condition, determined whether a series of events were located in the past or the future with respect to that specific self-location in time (i.e., self-reference). The results demonstrated that leftward and rightward shifts of spatial attention facilitated recognition of past and future events, respectively. These findings suggest that spatial attention affects the temporal processing of the human self.

  4. Time-Accurate Local Time Stepping and High-Order Time CESE Methods for Multi-Dimensional Flows Using Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary

    2013-01-01

    With the wide availability of affordable multiple-core parallel supercomputers, next generation numerical simulations of flow physics are being focused on unsteady computations for problems involving multiple time scales and multiple physics. These simulations require higher solution accuracy than most algorithms and computational fluid dynamics codes currently available. This paper focuses on the developmental effort for high-fidelity multi-dimensional, unstructured-mesh flow solvers using the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) framework. Two approaches have been investigated in this research in order to provide high-accuracy, cross-cutting numerical simulations for a variety of flow regimes: 1) time-accurate local time stepping and 2) highorder CESE method. The first approach utilizes consistent numerical formulations in the space-time flux integration to preserve temporal conservation across the cells with different marching time steps. Such approach relieves the stringent time step constraint associated with the smallest time step in the computational domain while preserving temporal accuracy for all the cells. For flows involving multiple scales, both numerical accuracy and efficiency can be significantly enhanced. The second approach extends the current CESE solver to higher-order accuracy. Unlike other existing explicit high-order methods for unstructured meshes, the CESE framework maintains a CFL condition of one for arbitrarily high-order formulations while retaining the same compact stencil as its second-order counterpart. For large-scale unsteady computations, this feature substantially enhances numerical efficiency. Numerical formulations and validations using benchmark problems are discussed in this paper along with realistic examples.

  5. Towards a comprehensive framework for cosimulation of dynamic models with an emphasis on time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoepfer, Matthias

    co-simulation approach to modeling and simulation. It lays out the general approach to dynamic system co-simulation, and gives a comprehensive overview of what co-simulation is and what it is not. It creates a taxonomy of the requirements and limits of co-simulation, and the issues arising with co-simulating sub-models. Possible solutions towards resolving the stated problems are investigated to a certain depth. A particular focus is given to the issue of time stepping. It will be shown that for dynamic models, the selection of the simulation time step is a crucial issue with respect to computational expense, simulation accuracy, and error control. The reasons for this are discussed in depth, and a time stepping algorithm for co-simulation with unknown dynamic sub-models is proposed. Motivations and suggestions for the further treatment of selected issues are presented.

  6. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  7. Two step transfer entropy - An estimator of delayed directional couplings between multivariate EEG time series.

    PubMed

    Songhorzadeh, Maryam; Ansari-Asl, Karim; Mahmoudi, Alimorad

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying delayed directional couplings between electroencephalographic (EEG) time series requires an efficient method of causal network inference. This is especially due to the limited knowledge about the underlying dynamics of the brain activity. Recent methods based on information theoretic measures such as Transfer Entropy (TE) made significant progress on this issue by providing a model-free framework for causality detection. However, TE estimation from observed data is not a trivial task, especially when the number of variables is large which is the case in a highly complex system like human brain. Here we propose a computationally efficient procedure for TE estimation based on using sets of the Most Informative Variables that effectively contribute to resolving the uncertainty of the destination. In the first step of this method, some conditioning sets are determined through a nonlinear state space reconstruction; then in the second step, optimal estimation of TE is done based on these sets. Validation of the proposed method using synthetic data and neurophysiological signals demonstrates computational efficiency in quantifying delayed directional couplings compared with the common TE analysis.

  8. Resource Management for Real-Time Adaptive Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Lonnie; Chelberg, David; Pfarr, Barbara; Fleeman, David; Parrott, David; Tan, Zhen-Yu; Jain, Shikha; Drews, Frank; Bruggeman, Carl; Shuler, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Increased autonomy and automation in onboard flight systems offer numerous potential benefits, including cost reduction and greater flexibility. The existence of generic mechanisms for automation is critical for handling unanticipated science events and anomalies where limitations in traditional control software with fixed, predetermined algorithms can mean loss of science data and missed opportunities for observing important terrestrial events. We have developed such a mechanism by adding a Hierarchical Agent-based ReaLTime technology (HART) extension to our Dynamic Resource Management (DRM) middleware. Traditional DRM provides mechanisms to monitor the realtime performance of distributed applications and to move applications among processors to improve real-time performance. In the HART project we have designed and implemented a performance adaptation mechanism to improve reaktime performance. To use this mechanism, applications are developed that can run at various levels of quality. The DRM can choose a setting for the quality level of an application dynamically at run-time in order to manage satellite resource usage more effectively. A groundbased prototype of a satellite system that captures and processes images has also been developed as part of this project to be used as a benchmark for evaluating the resource management framework A significant enhancement of this generic mission-independent framework allows scientists to specify the utility, or "scientific benefit," of science observations under various conditions like cloud cover and compression method. The resource manager then uses these benefit tables to determine in redtime how to set the quality levels for applications to maximize overall system utility as defined by the scientists running the mission. We also show how maintenance functions llke health and safety data can be integrated into the utility framework. Once thls framework has been certified for missions and successfully flight tested it

  9. Incorporating system latency associated with real-time target tracking radiotherapy in the dose prediction step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Teboh; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Shi, Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-05-01

    System latency introduces geometric errors in the course of real-time target tracking radiotherapy. This effect can be minimized, for example by the use of predictive filters, but cannot be completely avoided. In this work, we present a convolution technique that can incorporate the effect as part of the treatment planning process. The method can be applied independently or in conjunction with the predictive filters to compensate for residual latency effects. The implementation was performed on TrackBeam (Initia Ltd, Israel), a prototype real-time target tracking system assembled and evaluated at our Cancer Institute. For the experimental system settings examined, a Gaussian distribution attributable to the TrackBeam latency was derived with σ = 3.7 mm. The TrackBeam latency, expressed as an average response time, was deduced to be 172 ms. Phantom investigations were further performed to verify the convolution technique. In addition, patient studies involving 4DCT volumes of previously treated lung cancer patients were performed to incorporate the latency effect in the dose prediction step. This also enabled us to effectively quantify the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of the TrackBeam and other higher latency effects on the clinical outcome of a real-time target tracking delivery.

  10. Simulations of precipitation using the Community Earth System Model (CESM): Sensitivity to microphysics time step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthi, A.; Menon, S.; Sednev, I.

    2011-12-01

    An inherent difficulty in the ability of global climate models to accurately simulate precipitation lies in the use of a large time step, Δt (usually 30 minutes), to solve the governing equations. Since microphysical processes are characterized by small time scales compared to Δt, finite difference approximations used to advance microphysics equations suffer from numerical instability and large time truncation errors. With this in mind, the sensitivity of precipitation simulated by the atmospheric component of CESM, namely the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.1), to the microphysics time step (τ) is investigated. Model integrations are carried out for a period of five years with a spin up time of about six months for a horizontal resolution of 2.5 × 1.9 degrees and 30 levels in the vertical, with Δt = 1800 s. The control simulation with τ = 900 s is compared with one using τ = 300 s for accumulated precipitation and radi- ation budgets at the surface and top of the atmosphere (TOA), while keeping Δt fixed. Our choice of τ = 300 s is motivated by previous work on warm rain processes wherein it was shown that a value of τ around 300 s was necessary, but not sufficient, to ensure positive definiteness and numerical stability of the explicit time integration scheme used to integrate the microphysical equations. However, since the entire suite of microphysical processes are represented in our case, we suspect that this might impose additional restrictions on τ. The τ = 300 s case produces differences in large-scale accumulated rainfall from the τ = 900 s case by as large as 200 mm, over certain regions of the globe. The spatial patterns of total accumulated precipitation using τ = 300 s are in closer agreement with satellite observed precipitation, when compared to the τ = 900 s case. Differences are also seen in the radiation budget with the τ = 300 (900) s cases producing surpluses that range between 1-3 W/m2 at both the TOA and surface in the global

  11. Comparison of Fixed and Variable Time Step Trajectory Integration Methods for Cislunar Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, ichael W.; Thrasher, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the nonlinear nature of the Earth-Moon-Sun three-body problem and non-spherical gravity, CEV cislunar targeting algorithms will require many propagations in their search for a desired trajectory. For on-board targeting especially, the algorithm must have a simple, fast, and accurate propagator to calculate a trajectory with reasonable computation time, and still be robust enough to remain stable in the various flight regimes that the CEV will experience. This paper compares Cowell s method with a fourth-order Runge- Kutta integrator (RK4), Encke s method with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta- Nystr m integrator (RKN4), and a method known as Multi-Conic. Additionally, the study includes the Bond-Gottlieb 14-element method (BG14) and extends the investigation of Encke-Nystrom methods to integrators of higher order and with variable step size.

  12. Detection and Correction of Step Discontinuities in Kepler Flux Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, J. J.; Morris, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    PDC 8.0 includes an implementation of a new algorithm to detect and correct step discontinuities appearing in roughly one of every 20 stellar light curves during a given quarter. The majority of such discontinuities are believed to result from high-energy particles (either cosmic or solar in origin) striking the photometer and causing permanent local changes (typically -0.5%) in quantum efficiency, though a partial exponential recovery is often observed [1]. Since these features, dubbed sudden pixel sensitivity dropouts (SPSDs), are uncorrelated across targets they cannot be properly accounted for by the current detrending algorithm. PDC detrending is based on the assumption that features in flux time series are due either to intrinsic stellar phenomena or to systematic errors and that systematics will exhibit measurable correlations across targets. SPSD events violate these assumptions and their successful removal not only rectifies the flux values of affected targets, but demonstrably improves the overall performance of PDC detrending [1].

  13. Effect of the processing steps on compositions of table olive since harvesting time to pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Nasim; Sahari, Mohammad A; Vanak, Zahra Piravi; Safafar, Hamed; Boland-nazar, Seyed A

    2013-08-01

    Weight, oil, fatty acids, tocopherol, polyphenol, and sterol properties of 5 olive cultivars (Zard, Fishomi, Ascolana, Amigdalolia, and Conservalia) during crude, lye treatment, washing, fermentation, and pasteurization steps were studied. Results showed: oil percent was higher and lower in Ascolana (crude step) and in Fishomi (pasteurization step), respectively; during processing steps, in all cultivars, oleic, palmitic, linoleic, and stearic acids were higher; the highest changes in saturated and unsaturated fatty acids were in fermentation step; the highest and the lowest ratios of ω3 / ω6 were in Ascolana (washing step) and in Zard (pasteurization step), respectively; the highest and the lowest tocopherol were in Amigdalolia and Fishomi, respectively, and major damage occurred in lye step; the highest and the lowest polyphenols were in Ascolana (crude step) and in Zard and Ascolana (pasteurization step), respectively; the major damage among cultivars occurred during lye step, in which the polyphenol reduced to 1/10 of first content; sterol did not undergo changes during steps. Reviewing of olive patents shows that many compositions of fruits such as oil quality, fatty acids, quantity and its fraction can be changed by alteration in cultivar and process.

  14. Time-accurate anisotropic mesh adaptation for three-dimensional time-dependent problems with body-fitted moving geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, N.; Olivier, G.; Alauzet, F.

    2017-02-01

    Anisotropic metric-based mesh adaptation has proved its efficiency to reduce the CPU time of steady and unsteady simulations while improving their accuracy. However, its extension to time-dependent problems with body-fitted moving geometries is far from straightforward. This paper establishes a well-founded framework for multiscale mesh adaptation of unsteady problems with moving boundaries. This framework is based on a novel space-time analysis of the interpolation error, within the continuous mesh theory. An optimal metric field, called ALE metric field, is derived, which takes into account the movement of the mesh during the adaptation. Based on this analysis, the global fixed-point adaptation algorithm for time-dependent simulations is extended to moving boundary problems, within the range of body-fitted moving meshes and ALE simulations. Finally, three dimensional adaptive simulations with moving boundaries are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  15. Security: Step by Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetcov, Eric

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a list of the essential steps to keeping a school's or district's network safe and sound. It describes how to establish a security architecture and approach that will continually evolve as the threat environment changes over time. The article discusses the methodology for implementing this approach and then discusses the…

  16. Unified Synthetic Aperture Space Time Adaptive Radar (USASTAR) Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Imaging Imaging before multichannel adaptive clutter cancellationprocessing Estmaption an aer > With widely separate phase centers, Estimation and Phase...ICM spectrum PicM (v) = ’-58 (v) + I PAC (v) r+I r+1 (3.4) Clutter correlatoin P1cM (rt)= f P1,C (v)exp(j2kovzr) dv . One popular model is to employ

  17. Timing of pathogen adaptation to a multicomponent treatment.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Romain; Chaumont, Loïc; Sapoukhina, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The sustainable use of multicomponent treatments such as combination therapies, combination vaccines/chemicals, and plants carrying multigenic resistance requires an understanding of how their population-wide deployment affects the speed of the pathogen adaptation. Here, we develop a stochastic model describing the emergence of a mutant pathogen and its dynamics in a heterogeneous host population split into various types by the management strategy. Based on a multi-type Markov birth and death process, the model can be used to provide a basic understanding of how the life-cycle parameters of the pathogen population, and the controllable parameters of a management strategy affect the speed at which a pathogen adapts to a multicomponent treatment. Our results reveal the importance of coupling stochastic mutation and migration processes, and illustrate how their stochasticity can alter our view of the principles of managing pathogen adaptive dynamics at the population level. In particular, we identify the growth and migration rates that allow pathogens to adapt to a multicomponent treatment even if it is deployed on only small proportions of the host. In contrast to the accepted view, our model suggests that treatment durability should not systematically be identified with mutation cost. We show also that associating a multicomponent treatment with defeated monocomponent treatments can be more durable than associating it with intermediate treatments including only some of the components. We conclude that the explicit modelling of stochastic processes underlying evolutionary dynamics could help to elucidate the principles of the sustainable use of multicomponent treatments in population-wide management strategies intended to impede the evolution of harmful populations.

  18. Sensori-motor adaptation to knee osteoarthritis during stepping-down before and after total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Mouchnino, L; Gueguen, N; Blanchard, C; Boulay, C; Gimet, G; Viton, J-M; Franceschi, J-P; Delarque, A

    2005-01-01

    Background Stepping-down is preceded by a shift of the center of mass towards the supporting side and forward. The ability to control both balance and lower limb movement was investigated in knee osteoarthritis patients before and after surgery. It was hypothesized that pain rather than knee joint mobility affects the coordination between balance and movement control. Methods The experiment was performed with 25 adult individuals. Eleven were osteoarthritic patients with damage restricted to one lower limb (8 right leg and 3 left leg). Subjects were recruited within two weeks before total knee replacement by the same orthopedic surgeon using the same prosthesis and technics of surgery. Osteoarthritic patients were tested before total knee replacement (pre-surgery session) and then, 9 of the 11 patients were tested one year after the surgery when re-educative training was completed (post-surgery session). 14 adult individuals (men: n = 7 and women: n = 7) were tested as the control group. Results The way in which the center of mass shift forward and toward the supporting side is initiated (timing and amplitude) did not vary within patients before and after surgery. In addition knee joint range of motion of the leading leg remained close to normal before and after surgery. However, the relative timing between both postural and movement phases was modified for the osteoarthritis supporting leg (unusual strategy for stepping-down) before surgery. The "coordinated" control of balance and movement turned to be a "sequential" mode of control; once the body weight transfer has been completed, the movement onset is triggered. This strategy could be aimed at shortening the duration-time supporting on the painful limb. However no such compensatory response was observed. Conclusion The change in the strategy used when supporting on the arthritis and painful limb could result from the action of nociceptors that lead to increased proprioceptor thresholds, thus gating the

  19. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion

    PubMed Central

    Fornaciai, Michele; Arrighi, Roberto; Burr, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. These results show that adaptation-induced compression of event-time occurs only for uni-directional translational motion, ruling out the possibility that the neural mechanisms of the adaptation occur at early levels of visual processing. PMID:27003445

  20. Outward Bound to the Galaxies--One Step at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, R. Bruce; Miller-Friedmann, Jaimie; Sienkiewicz, Frank; Antonucci, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Less than a century ago, astronomers began to unlock the cosmic distances within and beyond the Milky Way. Understanding the size and scale of the universe is a continuing, step-by-step process that began with the remarkably accurate measurement of the distance to the Moon made by early Greeks. In part, the authors have ITEAMS (Innovative…

  1. Write a Research Paper One Step at a Time: Research Writing Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Helen, Ed.

    Intended to supplement the textbook series "Houghton Mifflin English Grammar and Composition" and to offer students and classroom teachers in the secondary schools a review of research writing, this guide outlines a step-by-step process allowing for thorough student comprehension and comfort with the application of basic research and…

  2. Seam-based variable-step Bresenham blending method for real-time video mosaicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongru; Shi, Zaifeng; Pang, Ke; Cao, Qingjie; Luo, Tao; Yao, Suying

    2016-09-01

    Image blending plays an important role in video mosaicking, which has a high demand for real-time performance and visual quality. This paper proposes a fast blending method based on Bresenham algorithm, which realizes blending by controlling the storing addresses of source pixels. The starting storing location is accurately computed based on the coordinates of the middle pixel of the seam instead of the first pixel's, reducing the accumulated error along the seam significantly. The other storing addresses are acquired using a variable-step Bresenham method, which takes advantage of burst mode operation of a dynamic memory and can achieve a good trade-off between the operation convenience and memory requirement. By the proposed method, complicated calculations of storing addresses are simplified into integer additions and subtractions, which is more suitable for hardware implementation. A hardware architecture based on field programmable gate array is presented to evaluate the proposed method with clock frequency analysis and resource assessment. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves good performance of high image quality, low computational complexity, and low memory requirement.

  3. Multiple-Time Step Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Based on Two-Electron Integral Screening.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Shervin; Steele, Ryan P

    2015-03-10

    A multiple-timestep ab initio molecular dynamics scheme based on varying the two-electron integral screening method used in Hartree-Fock or density functional theory calculations is presented. Although screening is motivated by numerical considerations, it is also related to separations in the length- and timescales characterizing forces in a molecular system: Loose thresholds are sufficient to describe fast motions over short distances, while tight thresholds may be employed for larger length scales and longer times, leading to a practical acceleration of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Standard screening approaches can lead, however, to significant discontinuities in (and inconsistencies between) the energy and gradient when the screening threshold is loose, making them inappropriate for use in dynamics. To remedy this problem, a consistent window-screening method that smooths these discontinuities is devised. Further algorithmic improvements reuse electronic-structure information within the dynamics step and enhance efficiency relative to a naı̈ve multiple-timestepping protocol. The resulting scheme is shown to realize meaningful reductions in the cost of Hartree-Fock and B3LYP simulations of a moderately large system, the protonated sarcosine/glycine dipeptide embedded in a 19-water cluster.

  4. Time-of-Arrival Measurements of X-ray Emission Associated with Dart-Stepped Leader Steps in Natural and Rocket-and-Wire Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, D. M.; Hill, J. D.; Uman, M. A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2012-12-01

    Time-of-arrival (TOA) techniques were used to determine the three-dimensional locations and emission times of x-ray and dE/dt sources measured at ground level in association with dart-stepped leader steps in natural and rocket-and-wire triggered lightning discharges recorded during summer 2011 at Camp Blanding, FL. The measurement network consisted of ten flat plate dE/dt antennas approximately co-located with eight plastic and two Lanthanum Bromide scintillation detectors arrayed around the launching facility over an area of about 0.25 square kilometers. For two triggered lightning dart-stepped leaders, x-ray sources were emitted from locations separated by average distances of 22.7 m and 29 m, respectively, from the locations of the associated dE/dt pulse peaks. The x-ray sources occurred beneath the dE/dt sources in 88% of the cases. X-rays were emitted from 20 ns to 2.16 μs following the dE/dt pulse peaks, with average temporal separations of 150 ns and 290 ns, respectively, for the two triggered lightning events. For one natural lightning dart-stepped leader, x-ray sources were emitted an average total distance of 39.2 m from the associated dE/dt pulse peak, and occurred beneath the location of the dE/dt source in 86% of the cases. The x-rays were emitted from 10 ns to 1.76 μs following the dE/dt pulse peak with an average temporal separation of 280 ns. In each of the three events, the altitude displacement between the dE/dt and x-ray sources dominated the total separation, accounting for 90%, 63%, and 72%, respectively, of the total separation. X-ray sources were distributed randomly in the lateral directions about the lightning channel in each event. For the triggered lightning events, x-rays were located from 2.5-83.5 μs prior to the return stroke at altitudes ranging from 24-336 m. For the natural lightning event, x-rays were located from 40.4-222.3 μs prior to the return stroke at altitudes ranging from 99-394 m. Cumulatively, 67% of the located x

  5. Long-Lasting Modifications of Saccadic Eye Movements Following Adaptation Induced in the Double-Step Target Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alahyane, Nadia; Pelisson, Denis

    2005-01-01

    The adaptation of saccadic eye movements to environmental changes occurring throughout life is a good model of motor learning and motor memory. Numerous studies have analyzed the behavioral properties and neural substrate of oculomotor learning in short-term saccadic adaptation protocols, but to our knowledge, none have tested the persistence of…

  6. Bounded Linear Stability Analysis - A Time Delay Margin Estimation Approach for Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham K.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinlvas; Bakhtiari-Nejad, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating time delay margin for model-reference adaptive control of systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent the conventional model-reference adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window using the comparison lemma. The locally bounded linear approximation of the combined adaptive system is cast in a form of an input-time-delay differential equation over a small time window. The time delay margin of this system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by a matrix measure method, which provides a simple analytical technique for estimating an upper bound of time delay margin. Based on simulation results for a scalar model-reference adaptive control system, both the bounded linear stability method and the matrix measure method are seen to provide a reasonably accurate and yet not too conservative time delay margin estimation.

  7. Stability of the high-order finite elements for acoustic or elastic wave propagation with high-order time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Basabe, Jonás D.; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the stability of some high-order finite element methods, namely the spectral element method and the interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method (IP-DGM), for acoustic or elastic wave propagation that have become increasingly popular in the recent past. We consider the Lax-Wendroff method (LWM) for time stepping and show that it allows for a larger time step than the classical leap-frog finite difference method, with higher-order accuracy. In particular the fourth-order LWM allows for a time step 73 per cent larger than that of the leap-frog method; the computational cost is approximately double per time step, but the larger time step partially compensates for this additional cost. Necessary, but not sufficient, stability conditions are given for the mentioned methods for orders up to 10 in space and time. The stability conditions for IP-DGM are approximately 20 and 60 per cent more restrictive than those for SEM in the acoustic and elastic cases, respectively.

  8. DECREASING COMPUTING TIME WITH SYMPLECTIC CORRECTORS IN ADAPTIVE TIMESTEPPING ROUTINES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaib, Nathan A.; Quinn, Thomas; Brasser, Ramon

    2011-01-15

    It has previously been shown that varying the numerical timestep during a symplectic orbital integration leads to a random walk in energy and angular momentum, destroying the phase space-conserving property of symplectic integrators. Here we show that when altering the timestep symplectic correctors can be used to reduce this error to a negligible level. Furthermore, these correctors can also be employed to avoid a large error introduction when changing the Hamiltonian's partitioning. We have constructed a numerical integrator using this technique that is nearly as accurate as widely used fixed-step routines. In addition, our algorithm is drastically faster for integrations of highly eccentricitic, large semimajor axis orbits, such as those found in the Oort Cloud.

  9. On Time Delay Margin Estimation for Adaptive Control and Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for estimating time delay margin for adaptive control of input delay systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent an adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window. The time delay margin of this input delay system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by three methods: Pade approximation, Lyapunov-Krasovskii method, and the matrix measure method. These methods are applied to the standard model-reference adaptive control, s-modification adaptive law, and optimal control modification adaptive law. The windowing analysis results in non-unique estimates of the time delay margin since it is dependent on the length of a time window and parameters which vary from one time window to the next. The optimal control modification adaptive law overcomes this limitation in that, as the adaptive gain tends to infinity and if the matched uncertainty is linear, then the closed-loop input delay system tends to a LTI system. A lower bound of the time delay margin of this system can then be estimated uniquely without the need for the windowing analysis. Simulation results demonstrates the feasibility of the bounded linear stability method for time delay margin estimation.

  10. The Influence of Time Spent in Outdoor Play on Daily and Aerobic Step Count in Costa Rican Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morera Castro, Maria del Rocio

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of time spent in outdoor play (i.e., on weekday and weekend days) on daily (i.e., average step count) and aerobic step count (i.e., average moderate to vigorous physical activity [MVPA] during the weekdays and weekend days) in fifth grade Costa Rican children. It was hypothesized that: (a)…

  11. A comparison study between Wiener and adaptive state estimation (STAP-ASE) algorithms for space time adaptive radar processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Obaidul; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios; Anpalagan, Alagan

    2010-08-01

    Space Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) is a multi-dimensional adaptive signal processing technique, which processes the signal in spatial and Doppler domains for which a target detection hypothesis is to be formed. It is a sample based technique and based on the assumption of adequate number of Independent and Identically Distributed (i.i.d.) training data set in the surrounding environment. The principal challenge of the radar processing lies when it violates these underlying assumptions due to severe dynamic heterogeneous clutter (hot clutter) and jammer effects. This in turn degrades the Signal to Interference-plus-Noise Ratio (SINR), hence signal detection performance. Classical Wiener filtering theory is inadequate to deal with nonlinear and nonstationary interferences, however Wiener filtering approach is optimal for stationary and linear systems. But, these challenges can be overcome by Adaptive Sequential State Estimation (ASSE) filtering technique.

  12. Adaptation of an evidence-based intervention for Appalachian women: new STEPS (Strength Through Education, Physical fitness and Support) for breast health.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Nancy R; Corbin, Marilyn; Bencivenga, Marcyann M; Farnan, Michelle; Wiker, Nancy; Bressler, Andrea; Camacho, Fabian; Lengerich, Eugene J

    2013-06-01

    Appalachia is characterized by a high prevalence of individual-level risks for breast cancer, including physical inactivity and postmenopausal obesity. The availability of local, evidence-based programs to improve physical fitness is limited. We adapted an evidence-based intervention, StrongWomen, to improve physical fitness and increase breast cancer knowledge among women 40 years and older in Appalachian Pennsylvania. Utilizing a multi-site, community-based design, we tested the adapted 12-week, supervised program-New STEPS (Strength Through Education, Physical fitness and Support)-among 139 women. The completion rate was 67.6 %. Pre/post scores improved for each of six fitness assessments (P<0.01). We found differences in overall fitness by study site (P<0.001), but no differences by age (P=0.13) or by previous breast cancer diagnosis (P=0.73). New STEPS is an adapted, evidence-based program that can improve physical fitness and breast cancer awareness among women in Appalachian Pennsylvania. New STEPS may help fill a void in local fitness programs for Appalachian women at risk for breast cancer or breast cancer recurrence.

  13. Kinetic Analysis of Parallel-Consecutive First-Order Reactions with a Reversible Step: Concentration-Time Integrals Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mucientes, A. E.; de la Pena, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The concentration-time integrals method has been used to solve kinetic equations of parallel-consecutive first-order reactions with a reversible step. This method involves the determination of the area under the curve for the concentration of a given species against time. Computer techniques are used to integrate experimental curves and the method…

  14. Impact of learning adaptability and time management disposition on study engagement among Chinese baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Ying; Liu, Yan-Hui; Yang, Ji-Peng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationships among study engagement, learning adaptability, and time management disposition in a sample of Chinese baccalaureate nursing students. A convenient sample of 467 baccalaureate nursing students was surveyed in two universities in Tianjin, China. Students completed a questionnaire that included their demographic information, Chinese Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student Questionnaire, Learning Adaptability Scale, and Adolescence Time Management Disposition Scale. One-way analysis of variance tests were used to assess the relationship between certain characteristics of baccalaureate nursing students. Pearson correlation was performed to test the correlation among study engagement, learning adaptability, and time management disposition. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of time management disposition. The results revealed that study engagement (F = 7.20, P < .01) and learning adaptability (F = 4.41, P < .01) differed across grade groups. Learning adaptability (r = 0.382, P < .01) and time management disposition (r = 0.741, P < .01) were positively related with study engagement. Time management disposition had a partially mediating effect on the relationship between study engagement and learning adaptability. The findings implicate that educators should not only promote interventions to increase engagement of baccalaureate nursing students but also focus on development, investment in adaptability, and time management.

  15. Time course of neuromuscular adaptations to knee extensor eccentric training.

    PubMed

    Baroni, B M; Rodrigues, R; Franke, R A; Geremia, J M; Rassier, D E; Vaz, M A

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the chronology of neural and morphological adaptations to knee extensor eccentric training and their contribution to strength gains in isometric, concentric and eccentric muscle actions. 20 male healthy subjects performed a 12-week eccentric training program on an isokinetic dynamometer, and neuromuscular evaluations of knee extensors were performed every 4 weeks. After 12 training weeks, significant increases were observed for: isometric (24%), concentric (15%) and eccentric (29%) torques; isometric (29%) and eccentric (33%) electromyographic activity; muscle thickness (10%) and anatomical cross-sectional area (19%). Eccentric and isometric torques increased progressively until the end of the program. Concentric torque and muscle mass parameters increased until the eighth training week, but did not change from this point to the twelfth training week. Eccentric and isometric activation increased at 4 and 8 training weeks, respectively, while no change was found in concentric activation. These results suggest that: 1) the relative increment in concentric strength was minor and does not relate to neural effects; 2) eccentric and isometric strength gains up to 8 training weeks are explained by the increased neural activation and muscle mass, whereas the increments in the last 4 training weeks seem to be associated with other mechanisms.

  16. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width

    SciTech Connect

    Learn, R.; Feigenbaum, E.

    2016-05-27

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. Furthermore, the second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  17. A Step Response Based Mixed-Signal BIST Approach for Continuous-time Linear Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Alvernon; Lala, P. K.

    2001-01-01

    A new Mixed-Signal Built-in self-test approach that is based upon the step response of a reconfigurable (or multifunction) analog block is presented in this paper. The technique requires the overlapping step response of the Circuit Under Test (CUT) for two circuit configurations. Each configuration can be realized by changing the topology of the CUT or by sampling two CUT nodes with differing step responses. The technique can effectively detect both soft and hard faults and does not require an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and/or digital-to-analog converter(DAC). It also does not require any precision voltage sources or comparators. This approach does not require any additional analog circuits to realize the test signal generator and sample circuits. The paper is concluded with the application of the proposed approach to a circuit found in the work of Epstein et al and two ITC 97 analog benchmark circuits.

  18. Space-time adaptive processing with sum and multiple difference beams for airborne radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, John E.; Zhang, Yuhong; Wang, Hong

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes some new results on a signal processing approach for airborne surveillance radars. This is a space- time adaptive processing technique that simultaneously processes temporal data from sum and difference ((Sigma) (Delta) ) beams to suppress clutter returns. The approach also includes employing spatial adaptive pre- suppression to suppress wideband noise jammers in a two- stage processor.

  19. Transient Crack Growth Behavior Under Cycle/Time-Dependent Step Loading for Pb-Containing and Pb-Free Solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakpan, Kittichai; Otsuka, Yuichi; Miyashita, Yukio; Mutoh, Yoshiharu; Nagata, Kohsoku

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, fatigue crack growth tests of Pb-containing [Sn-37Pb (wt.%)] and Pb-free [Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (wt.%)] solders were performed under cycle/time-dependent step loading at a constant J-integral range (Δ J). The C * parameter was also estimated for discussing time-dependent crack growth behavior. The experimental results indicated that acceleration of the crack growth rate at the beginning of the second loading step was induced when the C * value for the first loading step was high, regardless of time- or cycle-dependent crack growth and for both Sn-37Pb and Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solders. The length of the acceleration region of the crack growth rate for both solders was in good agreement with the creep damage zone size estimated by the creep zone model proposed by Riedel and Rice.

  20. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, J; Hövel, P; Flunkert, V; Guzenko, P Yu; Fradkov, A L; Schöll, E

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions.

  1. Future Arctic climate changes: Adaptation and mitigation time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overland, James E.; Wang, Muyin; Walsh, John E.; Stroeve, Julienne C.

    2014-02-01

    The climate in the Arctic is changing faster than in midlatitudes. This is shown by increased temperatures, loss of summer sea ice, earlier snow melt, impacts on ecosystems, and increased economic access. Arctic sea ice volume has decreased by 75% since the 1980s. Long-lasting global anthropogenic forcing from carbon dioxide has increased over the previous decades and is anticipated to increase over the next decades. Temperature increases in response to greenhouse gases are amplified in the Arctic through feedback processes associated with shifts in albedo, ocean and land heat storage, and near-surface longwave radiation fluxes. Thus, for the next few decades out to 2040, continuing environmental changes in the Arctic are very likely, and the appropriate response is to plan for adaptation to these changes. For example, it is very likely that the Arctic Ocean will become seasonally nearly sea ice free before 2050 and possibly within a decade or two, which in turn will further increase Arctic temperatures, economic access, and ecological shifts. Mitigation becomes an important option to reduce potential Arctic impacts in the second half of the 21st century. Using the most recent set of climate model projections (CMIP5), multimodel mean temperature projections show an Arctic-wide end of century increase of +13°C in late fall and +5°C in late spring for a business-as-usual emission scenario (RCP8.5) in contrast to +7°C in late fall and +3°C in late spring if civilization follows a mitigation scenario (RCP4.5). Such temperature increases demonstrate the heightened sensitivity of the Arctic to greenhouse gas forcing.

  2. Compact Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for in Situ Analyses of Aromatic Organics on Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, Stephanie; Brickerhoff, William; Cornish, Timothy; Ecelberger, Scott; Floyd, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE A miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been adapted to demonstrate two-step laser desorption-ionization (LOI) in a compact instrument package for enhanced organics detection. Two-step LDI decouples the desorption and ionization processes, relative to traditional laser ionization-desorption, in order to produce low-fragmentation conditions for complex organic analytes. Tuning UV ionization laser energy allowed control ofthe degree of fragmentation, which may enable better identification of constituent species. METHODS A reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer prototype measuring 20 cm in length was adapted to a two-laser configuration, with IR (1064 nm) desorption followed by UV (266 nm) postionization. A relatively low ion extraction voltage of 5 kV was applied at the sample inlet. Instrument capabilities and performance were demonstrated with analysis of a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, representing a class of compounds important to the fields of Earth and planetary science. RESULTS L2MS analysis of a model PAH standard, pyrene, has been demonstrated, including parent mass identification and the onset o(tunable fragmentation as a function of ionizing laser energy. Mass resolution m/llm = 380 at full width at half-maximum was achieved which is notable for gas-phase ionization of desorbed neutrals in a highly-compact mass analyzer. CONCLUSIONS Achieving two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) in a highly-miniature instrument enables a powerful approach to the detection and characterization of aromatic organics in remote terrestrial and planetary applications. Tunable detection of parent and fragment ions with high mass resolution, diagnostic of molecular structure, is possible on such a compact L2MS instrument. Selectivity of L2MS against low-mass inorganic salt interferences is a key advantage when working with unprocessed, natural samples, and a mechanism for the observed selectivity is presented.

  3. Cartesian Off-Body Grid Adaption for Viscous Time- Accurate Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An improved solution adaption capability has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid CFD code. Building on the Cartesian off-body approach inherent in OVERFLOW and the original adaptive refinement method developed by Meakin, the new scheme provides for automated creation of multiple levels of finer Cartesian grids. Refinement can be based on the undivided second-difference of the flow solution variables, or on a specific flow quantity such as vorticity. Coupled with load-balancing and an inmemory solution interpolation procedure, the adaption process provides very good performance for time-accurate simulations on parallel compute platforms. A method of using refined, thin body-fitted grids combined with adaption in the off-body grids is presented, which maximizes the part of the domain subject to adaption. Two- and three-dimensional examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the adaption scheme.

  4. Verification and Validation Methodology of Real-Time Adaptive Neural Networks for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pramod; Loparo, Kenneth; Mackall, Dale; Schumann, Johann; Soares, Fola

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has shown that adaptive neural based control systems are very effective in restoring stability and control of an aircraft in the presence of damage or failures. The application of an adaptive neural network with a flight critical control system requires a thorough and proven process to ensure safe and proper flight operation. Unique testing tools have been developed as part of a process to perform verification and validation (V&V) of real time adaptive neural networks used in recent adaptive flight control system, to evaluate the performance of the on line trained neural networks. The tools will help in certification from FAA and will help in the successful deployment of neural network based adaptive controllers in safety-critical applications. The process to perform verification and validation is evaluated against a typical neural adaptive controller and the results are discussed.

  5. Characterization of Energy Conservation in Primary Knock-On Atom Cascades: Ballistic Phase Effects on Variable Time Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Corrales, Louis R.; Devanathan, Ram

    2006-09-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation trajectories must in principle conserve energy along the entire path. Processes exist in high-energy primary knock-on atom cascades that can affect the energy conservation, specifically during the ballistic phase where collisions bring atoms into very close proximities. The solution, in general, is to reduce the time step size of the simulation. This work explores the effects of variable time step algorithms and the effects of specifying a maximum displacement. The period of the ballistic phase can be well characterized by methods developed in this work to monitor the kinetic energy dissipation during a high-energy cascade.

  6. Changing Step or Marking Time? Teacher Education Reforms for the Learning and Skills Sector in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ron; Robinson, Denise

    2008-01-01

    The unprecedented degree of attention given to the learning and skills sector in England by successive New Labour governments has led to a significant increase in what is expected of the teaching workforce. To help meet these expectations, a "step change" in the quality of initial teacher training for the sector is promised, alongside…

  7. Time-sequenced adaptive filtering using a modified P-vector algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert L.

    1996-10-01

    An adaptive algorithm and two stage filter structure were developed for adaptive filtering of certain classes of signals that exhibit cyclostationary characteristics. The new modified P-vector algorithm (mPa) eliminates the need for a separate desired signal which is typically required by conventional adaptive algorithms. It is then implemented in a time-sequenced manner to counteract the nonstationary characteristics typically found in certain radar and bioelectromagnetic signals. Initial algorithm testing is performed on evoked responses generated by the visual cortex of the human brain with the objective, ultimately, to transition the results to radar signals. Each sample of the evoked response is modeled as the sum of three uncorrelated signal components, a time-varying mean (M), a noise component (N), and a random jitter component (Q). A two stage single channel time-sequenced adaptive filter structure was developed which improves convergence characteristics by de coupling the time-varying mean component from the `Q' and noise components in the first stage. The EEG statistics must be known a priori and are adaptively estimated from the pre stimulus data. The performance of the two stage mPa time-sequenced adaptive filter approaches the performance for the ideal case of an adaptive filter having a noiseless desired response.

  8. BIOMAP A Daily Time Step, Mechanistic Model for the Study of Ecosystem Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, J. R.; Neilson, R. P.; Drapek, R. J.; Pitts, B. S.

    2010-12-01

    of both climate and ecosystems must be done at coarse grid resolutions; smaller domains require higher resolution for the simulation of natural resource processes at the landscape scale and that of on-the-ground management practices. Via a combined multi-agency and private conservation effort we have implemented a Nested Scale Experiment (NeScE) that ranges from 1/2 degree resolution (global, ca. 50 km) to ca. 8km (North America) and 800 m (conterminous U.S.). Our first DGVM, MC1, has been implemented at all 3 scales. We are just beginning to implement BIOMAP into NeScE, with its unique features, and daily time step, as a counterpoint to MC1. We believe it will be more accurate at all resolutions providing better simulations of vegetation distribution, carbon balance, runoff, fire regimes and drought impacts.

  9. Social Influences on Executive Functions Development in Children and Adolescents: Steps Toward a Social Neuroscience of Predictive Adaptive Responses.

    PubMed

    Dishion, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    This commentary discusses the findings and implications of four empirical papers that establish a reciprocal, longitudinal link between the social environment and executive functions from childhood to adolescence. Two future directions are suggested by this work. The first is a call for measurement research to clarify the nomological network of various measurements of self-regulation and executive functions across a variety of methods and procedures. The second new direction is to broaden the analysis of executive function to include a wider array of predictive adaptive responses to various environmental conditions, including those where youth are chronically marginalized or otherwise stressed. Findings from these studies suggest that the executive functions within the brain guide adaptation in both deviant as well as competent responses to the social environment. Understanding various forms of adaptation will enhance the potential for prevention as well as avoid iatrogenic intervention strategies with misinformed targets.

  10. Adaptive Haar transforms with arbitrary time and scale splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egiazarian, Karen O.; Astola, Jaakko T.

    2001-05-01

    The Haar transform is generalized to the case of an arbitrary time and scale splitting. To any binary tree we associate an orthogonal system of Haar-type functions - tree-structured Haar (TSH) functions. Unified fast algorithm for computation of the introduced tree-structured Haar transforms is presented. It requires 2(N - 1) additions and 3N - 2 multiplications, where N is transform order or, equivalently, the number of leaves of the binary tree.

  11. The effect of timing electrical stimulation to robotic-assisted stepping on neuromuscular activity and associated kinematics.

    PubMed

    Askari, Sina; Chao, TeKang; de Leon, Ray D; Won, Deborah S

    2013-01-01

    Results of previous studies raise the question of how timing neuromuscular functional electrical stimulation (FES) to limb movements during stepping might alter neuromuscular control differently than patterned stimulation alone. We have developed a prototype FES system for a rodent model of spinal cord injury (SCI) that times FES to robotic treadmill training (RTT). In this study, one group of rats (n = 6) was trained with our FES+RTT system and received stimulation of the ankle flexor (tibialis anterior [TA]) muscle timed according to robot-controlled hind-limb position (FES+RTT group); a second group (n = 5) received a similarly patterned stimulation, randomly timed with respect to the rats' hind-limb movements, while they were in their cages (randomly timed stimulation [RS] group). After 4 wk of training, we tested treadmill stepping ability and compared kinematic measures of hind-limb movement and electromyography (EMG) activity in the TA. The FES+RTT group stepped faster and exhibited TA EMG profiles that better matched the applied stimulation profile during training than the RS group. The shape of the EMG profile was assessed by "gamma," a measure that quantified the concentration of EMG activity during the early swing phase of the gait cycle. This gamma measure was 112% higher for the FES+RTT group than for the RS group. The FES+RTT group exhibited burst-to-step latencies that were 41% shorter and correspondingly exhibited a greater tendency to perform ankle flexion movements during stepping than the RS group, as measured by the percentage of time the hind limb was either dragging or in withdrawal. The results from this study support the hypothesis that locomotor training consisting of FES timed to hind-limb movement improves the activation of hind-limb muscle more so than RS alone. Our rodent FES+RTT system can serve as a tool to help further develop this combined therapy to target appropriate neurophysiological changes for locomotor control.

  12. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence--favorably evaluated in the West--for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The…

  13. Steps Ahead: Adaptation of physical activity and dietary guidelines for reducing unhealthy weight gain in the Lower Misissippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of our study was to test the effectiveness of adapting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) (DG), with and without a physical activity (PA) component, in reducing weight gain in the Lower Mississippi Delta region (LMD) of the United States. A sample of 121 White and African-Americ...

  14. From dinosaurs to modern bird diversity: extending the time scale of adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Moen, Daniel; Morlon, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    What explains why some groups of organisms, like birds, are so species rich? And what explains their extraordinary ecological diversity, ranging from large, flightless birds to small migratory species that fly thousand of kilometers every year? These and similar questions have spurred great interest in adaptive radiation, the diversification of ecological traits in a rapidly speciating group of organisms. Although the initial formulation of modern concepts of adaptive radiation arose from consideration of the fossil record, rigorous attempts to identify adaptive radiation in the fossil record are still uncommon. Moreover, most studies of adaptive radiation concern groups that are less than 50 million years old. Thus, it is unclear how important adaptive radiation is over temporal scales that span much larger portions of the history of life. In this issue, Benson et al. test the idea of a "deep-time" adaptive radiation in dinosaurs, compiling and using one of the most comprehensive phylogenetic and body-size datasets for fossils. Using recent phylogenetic statistical methods, they find that in most clades of dinosaurs there is a strong signal of an "early burst" in body-size evolution, a predicted pattern of adaptive radiation in which rapid trait evolution happens early in a group's history and then slows down. They also find that body-size evolution did not slow down in the lineage leading to birds, hinting at why birds survived to the present day and diversified. This paper represents one of the most convincing attempts at understanding deep-time adaptive radiations.

  15. Peak Muscle Activation, Joint Kinematics, and Kinetics during Elliptical and Stepping Movement Pattern on a Precor Adaptive Motion Trainer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogatzki, Matthew J.; Kernozek, Thomas W.; Willson, John D.; Greany, John F.; Hong, Di-An; Porcari, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Kinematic, kinetic, and electromyography data were collected from the biceps femoris, rectus femoris (RF), gluteus maximus, and erector spinae (ES) during a step and elliptical exercise at a standardized workload with no hand use. Findings depicted 95% greater ankle plantar flexion (p = 0.01), 29% more knee extension (p = 0.003), 101% higher peak…

  16. Adjustment of Adaptive Gain with Bounded Linear Stability Analysis to Improve Time-Delay Margin for Metrics-Driven Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhtiari-Nejad, Maryam; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinvas

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the application of Bounded Linear Stability Analysis (BLSA) method for metrics driven adaptive control. The bounded linear stability analysis method is used for analyzing stability of adaptive control models, without linearizing the adaptive laws. Metrics-driven adaptive control introduces a notion that adaptation should be driven by some stability metrics to achieve robustness. By the application of bounded linear stability analysis method the adaptive gain is adjusted during the adaptation in order to meet certain phase margin requirements. Analysis of metrics-driven adaptive control is evaluated for a linear damaged twin-engine generic transport model of aircraft. The analysis shows that the system with the adjusted adaptive gain becomes more robust to unmodeled dynamics or time delay.

  17. Operational flood control of a low-lying delta system using large time step Model Predictive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xin; van Overloop, Peter-Jules; Negenborn, Rudy R.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The safety of low-lying deltas is threatened not only by riverine flooding but by storm-induced coastal flooding as well. For the purpose of flood control, these deltas are mostly protected in a man-made environment, where dikes, dams and other adjustable infrastructures, such as gates, barriers and pumps are widely constructed. Instead of always reinforcing and heightening these structures, it is worth considering making the most of the existing infrastructure to reduce the damage and manage the delta in an operational and overall way. In this study, an advanced real-time control approach, Model Predictive Control, is proposed to operate these structures in the Dutch delta system (the Rhine-Meuse delta). The application covers non-linearity in the dynamic behavior of the water system and the structures. To deal with the non-linearity, a linearization scheme is applied which directly uses the gate height instead of the structure flow as the control variable. Given the fact that MPC needs to compute control actions in real-time, we address issues regarding computational time. A new large time step scheme is proposed in order to save computation time, in which different control variables can have different control time steps. Simulation experiments demonstrate that Model Predictive Control with the large time step setting is able to control a delta system better and much more efficiently than the conventional operational schemes.

  18. A stabilized Runge-Kutta-Legendre method for explicit super-time-stepping of parabolic and mixed equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Chad D.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Aslam, Tariq D.

    2014-01-01

    Parabolic partial differential equations appear in several physical problems, including problems that have a dominant hyperbolic part coupled to a sub-dominant parabolic component. Explicit methods for their solution are easy to implement but have very restrictive time step constraints. Implicit solution methods can be unconditionally stable but have the disadvantage of being computationally costly or difficult to implement. Super-time-stepping methods for treating parabolic terms in mixed type partial differential equations occupy an intermediate position. In such methods each superstep takes “s” explicit Runge-Kutta-like time-steps to advance the parabolic terms by a time-step that is s2 times larger than a single explicit time-step. The expanded stability is usually obtained by mapping the short recursion relation of the explicit Runge-Kutta scheme to the recursion relation of some well-known, stable polynomial. Prior work has built temporally first- and second-order accurate super-time-stepping methods around the recursion relation associated with Chebyshev polynomials. Since their stability is based on the boundedness of the Chebyshev polynomials, these methods have been called RKC1 and RKC2. In this work we build temporally first- and second-order accurate super-time-stepping methods around the recursion relation associated with Legendre polynomials. We call these methods RKL1 and RKL2. The RKL1 method is first-order accurate in time; the RKL2 method is second-order accurate in time. We verify that the newly-designed RKL1 and RKL2 schemes have a very desirable monotonicity preserving property for one-dimensional problems - a solution that is monotone at the beginning of a time step retains that property at the end of that time step. It is shown that RKL1 and RKL2 methods are stable for all values of the diffusion coefficient up to the maximum value. We call this a convex monotonicity preserving property and show by examples that it is very useful in

  19. A stabilized Runge–Kutta–Legendre method for explicit super-time-stepping of parabolic and mixed equations

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Chad D.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Aslam, Tariq D.

    2014-01-15

    Parabolic partial differential equations appear in several physical problems, including problems that have a dominant hyperbolic part coupled to a sub-dominant parabolic component. Explicit methods for their solution are easy to implement but have very restrictive time step constraints. Implicit solution methods can be unconditionally stable but have the disadvantage of being computationally costly or difficult to implement. Super-time-stepping methods for treating parabolic terms in mixed type partial differential equations occupy an intermediate position. In such methods each superstep takes “s” explicit Runge–Kutta-like time-steps to advance the parabolic terms by a time-step that is s{sup 2} times larger than a single explicit time-step. The expanded stability is usually obtained by mapping the short recursion relation of the explicit Runge–Kutta scheme to the recursion relation of some well-known, stable polynomial. Prior work has built temporally first- and second-order accurate super-time-stepping methods around the recursion relation associated with Chebyshev polynomials. Since their stability is based on the boundedness of the Chebyshev polynomials, these methods have been called RKC1 and RKC2. In this work we build temporally first- and second-order accurate super-time-stepping methods around the recursion relation associated with Legendre polynomials. We call these methods RKL1 and RKL2. The RKL1 method is first-order accurate in time; the RKL2 method is second-order accurate in time. We verify that the newly-designed RKL1 and RKL2 schemes have a very desirable monotonicity preserving property for one-dimensional problems – a solution that is monotone at the beginning of a time step retains that property at the end of that time step. It is shown that RKL1 and RKL2 methods are stable for all values of the diffusion coefficient up to the maximum value. We call this a convex monotonicity preserving property and show by examples that it is very

  20. Real-time, step-wise, electrical detection of protein molecules using dielectrophoretically aligned SWNT-film FET aptasensors.

    PubMed

    An, Taechang; Kim, Ki Su; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Lim, Geunbae

    2010-08-21

    Aptamer functionalized addressable SWNT-film arrays between cantilever electrodes were successfully developed for biosensor applications. Dielectrophoretically aligned SWNT suspended films made possible highly specific and rapid detection of target proteins with a large binding surface area. Thrombin aptamer immobilized SWNT-film FET biosensor resulted in a real-time, label-free, and electrical detection of thrombin molecules down to a concentration of ca. 7 pM with a step-wise rapid response time of several seconds.

  1. First steps toward 3D high resolution imaging using adaptive optics and full-field optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Leonardo; Blavier, Marie; Glanc, Marie; Pouplard, Florence; Tick, Sarah; Maksimovic, Ivan; Chenegros, Guillaume; Mugnier, Laurent; Lacombe, Francois; Rousset, Gérard; Paques, Michel; Le Gargasson, Jean-François; Sahel, Jose-Alain

    2008-09-01

    We describe here two parts of our future 3D fundus camera coupling Adaptive Optics and full-field Optical Coherence Tomography. The first part is an Adaptive Optics flood imager installed at the Quinze-Vingts Hospital, regularly used on healthy and pathological eyes. A posteriori image reconstruction is performed, increasing the final image quality and field of view. The instrument lateral resolution is better than 2 microns. The second part is a full-field Optical Coherence Tomograph, which has demonstrated capability of performing a simple kind of "4 phases" image reconstruction of non biological samples and ex situ retinas. Final aim is to couple both parts in order to achieve 3D high resolution mapping of in vivo retinas.

  2. Development of a time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes solver based on a fractional-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Moshe

    1990-01-01

    The development, validation and application of a fractional step solution method of the time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized coordinate systems are discussed. A solution method that combines a finite-volume discretization with a novel choice of the dependent variables and a fractional step splitting to obtain accurate solutions in arbitrary geometries was previously developed for fixed-grids. In the present research effort, this solution method is extended to include more general situations, including cases with moving grids. The numerical techniques are enhanced to gain efficiency and generality.

  3. A Feature-adaptive Subdivision Method for Real-time 3D Reconstruction of Repeated Topology Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinhua; Wang, Yanjie; Sun, Honghai

    2017-03-01

    It's well known that rendering for a large number of triangles with GPU hardware tessellation has made great progress. However, due to the fixed nature of GPU pipeline, many off-line methods that perform well can not meet the on-line requirements. In this paper, an optimized Feature-adaptive subdivision method is proposed, which is more suitable for reconstructing surfaces with repeated cusps or creases. An Octree primitive is established in irregular regions where there are the same sharp vertices or creases, this method can find the neighbor geometry information quickly. Because of having the same topology structure between Octree primitive and feature region, the Octree feature points can match the arbitrary vertices in feature region more precisely. In the meanwhile, the patches is re-encoded in the Octree primitive by using the breadth-first strategy, resulting in a meta-table which allows for real-time reconstruction by GPU hardware tessellation unit. There is only one feature region needed to be calculated under Octree primitive, other regions with the same repeated feature generate their own meta-table directly, the reconstruction time is saved greatly for this step. With regard to the meshes having a large number of repeated topology feature, our algorithm improves the subdivision time by 17.575% and increases the average frame drawing time by 0.2373 ms compared to the traditional FAS (Feature-adaptive Subdivision), at the same time the model can be reconstructed in a watertight manner.

  4. Time scale matters: genetic analysis does not support adaptation-by-time as the mechanism for adaptive seasonal declines in kokanee reproductive life span

    PubMed Central

    Morbey, Yolanda E; Jensen, Evelyn L; Russello, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal declines of fitness-related traits are often attributed to environmental effects or individual-level decisions about reproductive timing and effort, but genetic variation may also play a role. In populations of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), seasonal declines in reproductive life span have been attributed to adaptation-by-time, in which divergent selection for different traits occurs among reproductively isolated temporal components of a population. We evaluated this hypothesis in kokanee (freshwater obligate Oncorhynchus nerka) by testing for temporal genetic structure in neutral and circadian-linked loci. We detected no genetic differences in presumably neutral loci among kokanee with different arrival and maturation dates within a spawning season. Similarly, we detected no temporal genetic structure in OtsClock1b, Omy1009uw, or OmyFbxw11, candidate loci associated with circadian function. The genetic evidence from this study and others indicates a lack of support for adaptation-by-time as an important evolutionary mechanism underlying seasonal declines in reproductive life span and a need for greater consideration of other mechanisms such as time-dependent, adaptive adjustment of reproductive effort. PMID:25478160

  5. Optimized quantum sensing with a single electron spin using real-time adaptive measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonato, C.; Blok, M. S.; Dinani, H. T.; Berry, D. W.; Markham, M. L.; Twitchen, D. J.; Hanson, R.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum sensors based on single solid-state spins promise a unique combination of sensitivity and spatial resolution. The key challenge in sensing is to achieve minimum estimation uncertainty within a given time and with high dynamic range. Adaptive strategies have been proposed to achieve optimal performance, but their implementation in solid-state systems has been hindered by the demanding experimental requirements. Here, we realize adaptive d.c. sensing by combining single-shot readout of an electron spin in diamond with fast feedback. By adapting the spin readout basis in real time based on previous outcomes, we demonstrate a sensitivity in Ramsey interferometry surpassing the standard measurement limit. Furthermore, we find by simulations and experiments that adaptive protocols offer a distinctive advantage over the best known non-adaptive protocols when overhead and limited estimation time are taken into account. Using an optimized adaptive protocol we achieve a magnetic field sensitivity of 6.1 ± 1.7 nT Hz-1/2 over a wide range of 1.78 mT. These results open up a new class of experiments for solid-state sensors in which real-time knowledge of the measurement history is exploited to obtain optimal performance.

  6. Does it pay to delay? Flesh flies show adaptive plasticity in reproductive timing.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Frank J; Kristal, Ross; Netter, Fleta; Hatle, John D; Hahn, Daniel A

    2011-02-01

    Life-history plasticity is widespread among organisms. However, an important question is whether it is adaptive. Most models for plasticity in life-history timing predict that animals, once they have reached the minimal nutritional threshold under poor conditions, will accelerate development or time to reproduction. Adaptive delays in reproduction are not common, especially in short-lived species. Examples of adaptive reproductive delays exist in mammalian populations experiencing strong interspecific (e.g., predation) and intraspecific (e.g., infanticide) competition. But are there other environmental factors that may trigger an adaptive delay in reproductive timing? We show that the short-lived flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis will delay reproduction under nutrient-poor conditions, even though it has already met the minimal nutritional threshold for reproduction. We test whether this delay strategy is an adaptive response allowing the scavenger time to locate more resources by experimentally providing supplemental protein pulses (early, mid and late) throughout the reproductive delay period. Flies receiving additional protein produced more and larger eggs, demonstrating a benefit of the delay. In addition, by tracking the allocation of carbon from the pulses using stable isotopes, we show that flies receiving earlier pulses incorporated more carbon into eggs and somatic tissue than those given a later pulse. These results indicate that the reproductive delay in S. crassipalpis is consistent with adaptive post-threshold plasticity, a nutritionally linked reproductive strategy that has not been reported previously in an invertebrate species.

  7. Adaptive modified function projective synchronization of multiple time-delayed chaotic Rossler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, K. Sebastian; Sabir, M.

    2011-02-01

    In this Letter we consider modified function projective synchronization of unidirectionally coupled multiple time-delayed Rossler chaotic systems using adaptive controls. Recently, delay differential equations have attracted much attention in the field of nonlinear dynamics. The high complexity of the multiple time-delayed systems can provide a new architecture for enhancing message security in chaos based encryption systems. Adaptive control can be used for synchronization when the parameters of the system are unknown. Based on Lyapunov stability theory, the adaptive control law and the parameter update law are derived to make the state of two chaotic systems are function projective synchronized. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive controllers.

  8. Time domain and frequency domain design techniques for model reference adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1971-01-01

    Some problems associated with the design of model-reference adaptive control systems are considered and solutions to these problems are advanced. The stability of the adapted system is a primary consideration in the development of both the time-domain and the frequency-domain design techniques. Consequentially, the use of Liapunov's direct method forms an integral part of the derivation of the design procedures. The application of sensitivity coefficients to the design of model-reference adaptive control systems is considered. An application of the design techniques is also presented.

  9. Estimation and prediction of noise power based on variational Bayesian and adaptive ARMA time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Li, Yonggui; Zhu, Yonggang; Li, Binwu

    2014-04-01

    Estimation and prediction of noise power are very important for communication anti-jamming and efficient allocation of spectrum resources in adaptive wireless communication and cognitive radio. In order to estimate and predict the time-varying noise power caused by natural factors and jamming in the high frequency channel, Variational Bayesian algorithm and adaptive ARMA time series are proposed. Through establishing the time-varying noise power model, which controlled by the noise variance rate, the noise power can be estimated with Variational Bayesian algorithm, and the results show that the estimation error is related to observation interval. What's more, through the analysis of the correlation characteristics of the estimation power, noise power can be predicted based on adaptive ARMA time series, and the results show that it will be available to predict the noise power in next 5 intervals with the proportional error less than 0.2.

  10. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  11. PHOEBE - step by step manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.

    2016-03-01

    An easy step-by-step manual of PHOEBE is presented. It should serve as a starting point for the first time users of PHOEBE analyzing the eclipsing binary light curve. It is demonstrated on one particular detached system also with the downloadable data and the whole procedure is described easily till the final trustworthy fit is being reached.

  12. Remote mission specialist - A study in real-time, adaptive planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokey, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    A high-level planning architecture for robotic operations is presented. The remote mission specialist integrates high-level directives with low-level primitives executable by a run-time controller for command of autonomous servicing activities. The planner has been designed to address such issues as adaptive plan generation, real-time performance, and operator intervention.

  13. Convergence of a class of semi-implicit time-stepping schemes for nonsmooth rigid multibody dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrea, B. I.; Anitescu, M.; Potra, F. A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Pennsylvania; Univ. of Maryland

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present a framework for the convergence analysis in a measure differential inclusion sense of a class of time-stepping schemes for multibody dynamics with contacts, joints, and friction. This class of methods solves one linear complementarity problem per step and contains the semi-implicit Euler method, as well as trapezoidal-like methods for which second-order convergence was recently proved under certain conditions. By using the concept of a reduced friction cone, the analysis includes, for the first time, a convergence result for the case that includes joints. An unexpected intermediary result is that we are able to define a discrete velocity function of bounded variation, although the natural discrete velocity function produced by our algorithm may have unbounded variation.

  14. Convergence of a Time-Stepping Scheme for Rigid-Body Dynamics and Resolution of Painlevé's Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, David E.

    This paper gives convergence theory for a new implicit time-stepping scheme for general rigid-body dynamics with Coulomb friction and purely inelastic collisions and shocks. An important consequence of this work is the proof of existence of solutions of rigid-body problems which include the famous counterexamples of Painlevé. The mathematical basis for this work is the formulation of the rigid-body problem in terms of measure differential inclusions of Moreau and Monteiro Marques. The implicit time-stepping method is based on complementarity problems, and is essentially a particular case of the algorithm described in Anitescu & Potra [2], which in turn is based on the formulation in Stewart & Trinkle [47].

  15. High temporal frequency adaptation compresses time in the Flash-Lag illusion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Edward; Durant, Szonya

    2014-12-01

    Previous research finds that 20 Hz temporal frequency (TF) adaptation causes a compression of perceived visual event duration. We investigate if this temporal compression affects further time-dependent percepts, implying a further functional role for duration perception mechanisms. We measure the effect of 20 Hz flicker adaptation on Flash-Lag, an illusion whereby an observer perceives a moving object displaced further along its trajectory compared to a spatially localized briefly flashed object. The illusion scales with object speed; therefore, it has a fixed temporal component. By comparing adaptation at 5 Hz and 20 Hz we show that 20 Hz TF adaptation reduces perceived Flash-Lag magnitude significantly, with no effect at 5 Hz, whereas the opposite pattern of adaptation was seen on perceived speed. There is a significant effect of 20 Hz adaptation on the perceived duration of a moving bar. This suggests that 20 Hz TF adaptation has compressed the fixed temporal component of the Flash-Lag illusion, implying the mechanism underlying duration perception also has effects on judging spatial relationships in dynamic stimuli.

  16. Review of RT-LAB and Steps Involved for Implementation of a Simulink Model from MATLAB to REAL-TIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkili, Suresh; Panda, Anup Kumar

    2013-11-01

    In recent days, every researcher wants to develop his/her model in real-time. Simulation tools have been widely used for the design and improvement of electrical systems since the mid-twentieth century. The evolution of simulation tools has progressed in step with the evolution of computing technologies. Now a days, computing technologies have improved dramatically in performance and become widely available at a steadily decreasing cost. Consequently, simulation tools have also seen dramatic performance gains and steady cost decreases. Researchers and engineers now have access to affordable, high-performance simulation tools that were previously too cost prohibitive, except for the largest manufacturers and utilities.This article has introduced a specific class of digital simulator known as a real-time simulator by answering the questions "What is real-time simulation?" "Why is it needed" and "How it works". The latest trend in real-time simulation consists of exporting simulation models to FPGA. In this article, the steps involved for implementation of a model from MATLAB to REAL-TIME are provided in detail. The detailed real-time results are presented to support the feasibility of real-time digital simulator.

  17. High resolution frequency to time domain transformations applied to the stepped carrier MRIS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardalan, Sasan H.

    1992-01-01

    Two narrow-band radar systems are developed for high resolution target range estimation in inhomogeneous media. They are reformulations of two presently existing systems such that high resolution target range estimates may be achieved despite the use of narrow bandwidth radar pulses. A double sideband suppressed carrier radar technique originally derived in 1962, and later abandoned due to its inability to accurately measure target range in the presence of an interfering reflection, is rederived to incorporate the presence of an interfering reflection. The new derivation shows that the interfering reflection causes a period perturbation in the measured phase response. A high resolution spectral estimation technique is used to extract the period of this perturbation leading to accurate target range estimates independent of the signal-to-interference ratio. A non-linear optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for a frequency-stepped continuous wave radar system. The resolution enhancement offered by optimal signal processing of the data over the conventional Fourier Transform technique is clearly demonstrated using measured radar data. A method for modeling plane wave propagation in inhomogeneous media based on transmission line theory is derived and studied. Several simulation results including measurement of non-uniform electron plasma densities that develop near the heat tiles of a space re-entry vehicle are presented which verify the validity of the model.

  18. Perceptual Learning of Time-Compressed Speech: More than Rapid Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Banai, Karen; Lavner, Yizhar

    2012-01-01

    Background Time-compressed speech, a form of rapidly presented speech, is harder to comprehend than natural speech, especially for non-native speakers. Although it is possible to adapt to time-compressed speech after a brief exposure, it is not known whether additional perceptual learning occurs with further practice. Here, we ask whether multiday training on time-compressed speech yields more learning than that observed during the initial adaptation phase and whether the pattern of generalization following successful learning is different than that observed with initial adaptation only. Methodology/Principal Findings Two groups of non-native Hebrew speakers were tested on five different conditions of time-compressed speech identification in two assessments conducted 10–14 days apart. Between those assessments, one group of listeners received five practice sessions on one of the time-compressed conditions. Between the two assessments, trained listeners improved significantly more than untrained listeners on the trained condition. Furthermore, the trained group generalized its learning to two untrained conditions in which different talkers presented the trained speech materials. In addition, when the performance of the non-native speakers was compared to that of a group of naïve native Hebrew speakers, performance of the trained group was equivalent to that of the native speakers on all conditions on which learning occurred, whereas performance of the untrained non-native listeners was substantially poorer. Conclusions/Significance Multiday training on time-compressed speech results in significantly more perceptual learning than brief adaptation. Compared to previous studies of adaptation, the training induced learning is more stimulus specific. Taken together, the perceptual learning of time-compressed speech appears to progress from an initial, rapid adaptation phase to a subsequent prolonged and more stimulus specific phase. These findings are consistent with

  19. LPTA: Location Predictive and Time Adaptive Data Gathering Scheme with Mobile Sink for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper exploits sink mobility to prolong the lifetime of sensor networks while maintaining the data transmission delay relatively low. A location predictive and time adaptive data gathering scheme is proposed. In this paper, we introduce a sink location prediction principle based on loose time synchronization and deduce the time-location formulas of the mobile sink. According to local clocks and the time-location formulas of the mobile sink, nodes in the network are able to calculate the current location of the mobile sink accurately and route data packets timely toward the mobile sink by multihop relay. Considering that data packets generating from different areas may be different greatly, an adaptive dwelling time adjustment method is also proposed to balance energy consumption among nodes in the network. Simulation results show that our data gathering scheme enables data routing with less data transmission time delay and balance energy consumption among nodes. PMID:25302327

  20. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  1. Enhanced link availability for free space optical time-frequency transfer using adaptive optic terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Keith G.; Dennis, Michael L.; Juarez, Juan C.; Souza, Katherine T.; Baumann, Esther; Bergeron, Hugo; Coddington, Ian; Deschenes, Jean-Daniel; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Newbury, Nathan R.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Swann, William C.

    2016-05-01

    Optical time and frequency transfer offers extremely high precision wireless synchronization across multiple platforms for untethered distributed systems. While large apertures provide antenna gain for wireless systems which leads to robust link budgets and operation over increased distance, turbulence disrupts the beam and limits the full realization of the antenna gain. Adaptive optics can correct for phase distortions due to turbulence which potentially increases the total gain of the aperture to that for diffraction-limited operation. Here, we explore the use of adaptive optics terminals for free-space time and frequency transfer. We find that the requirement of reciprocity in a two-way time and frequency transfer link is maintained during the phase compensation of adaptive optics, and that the enhanced link budget due to aperture gain allows for potential system operation over ranges of at least tens of kilometers.

  2. [Adaptation of a sensitive DNA extraction method for detection of Entamoeba histolytica by real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Pınar, Ahmet; Akyön, Yakut; Alp, Alpaslan; Ergüven, Sibel

    2010-07-01

    This study was aimed to adapt a sensitive DNA extraction protocol in stool samples for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of Entamoeba histolytica which causes important morbidity and mortality worldwide. Stool extraction is a problematic step and has direct effects on PCR sensitivity. In order to improve the sensitivity of E.histolytica detection by real-time PCR, "QIAamp DNA stool minikit (Qiagen, Germany)" was modified by adding an overnight incubation step with proteinase K and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in this study. Three different extraction methods [(1) original method, (2) cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) method, (3) modified method] were evaluated for effects on sensitivity in real-time quantitative PCR (Artus RealArt TM E.histolytica RG PCR Kit, Qiagen Diagnostics, Germany). For this purpose, several concentrations of standard E.histolytica DNA were spiked in parasite-free stool samples and three different extraction protocols were performed. Detection sensitivities of "QIAamp DNA stool minikit" was found 5000 copies/ml and of CTAB method was found 500 copies/ml. Detection sensitivity of the extraction was improved to 5 copies/mL by modified "QIAamp DNA stool minikit" protocol. Since detection sensitivities of nucleic acid extraction protocols from stool samples directly affect the sensitivity of PCR amplification, different extraction protocols for different microorganisms should be evaluated.

  3. Phenotypic plasticity of nest timing in a post-glacial landscape: how do reptiles adapt to seasonal time constraints?

    PubMed

    Edge, Christopher B; Rollinson, Njal; Brooks, Ronald J; Congdon, Justin D; Iverson, John B; Janzen, Fredric J; Litzgus, Jacqueline D

    2017-02-01

    Life histories evolve in response to constraints on the time available for growth and development. Nesting date and its plasticity in response to spring temperature may therefore be important components of fitness in oviparous ectotherms near their northern range limit, as reproducing early provides more time for embryos to complete development before winter. We used data collected over several decades to compare air temperature and nest date plasticity in populations of painted turtles and snapping turtles from a relatively warm environment (southeastern Michigan) near the southern extent of the last glacial maximum to a relatively cool environment (central Ontario) near the northern extent of post-glacial recolonization. For painted turtles, population-level differences in reaction norm elevation for two phenological traits were consistent with adaptation to time constraints, but no differences in reaction norm slopes were observed. For snapping turtle populations, the difference in reaction norm elevation for a single phenological trait was in the opposite direction of what was expected under adaptation to time constraints, and no difference in reaction norm slope was observed. Finally, among-individual variation in individual plasticity for nesting date was detected only in the northern population of snapping turtles, suggesting that reaction norms are less canalized in this northern population. Overall, we observed evidence of phenological adaptation, and possibly maladaptation, to time constraints in long-lived reptiles. Where present, (mal)adaptation occurred by virtue of differences in reaction norm elevation, not reaction norm slope. Glacial history, generation time, and genetic constraint may all play an important role in the evolution of phenological timing and its plasticity in long-lived reptiles.

  4. Finite time step and spatial grid effects in δf simulation of warm plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sturdevant, Benjamin J.; Parker, Scott E.

    2016-01-15

    This paper introduces a technique for analyzing time integration methods used with the particle weight equations in δf method particle-in-cell (PIC) schemes. The analysis applies to the simulation of warm, uniform, periodic or infinite plasmas in the linear regime and considers the collective behavior similar to the analysis performed by Langdon for full-f PIC schemes [1,2]. We perform both a time integration analysis and spatial grid analysis for a kinetic ion, adiabatic electron model of ion acoustic waves. An implicit time integration scheme is studied in detail for δf simulations using our weight equation analysis and for full-f simulations using the method of Langdon. It is found that the δf method exhibits a CFL-like stability condition for low temperature ions, which is independent of the parameter characterizing the implicitness of the scheme. The accuracy of the real frequency and damping rate due to the discrete time and spatial schemes is also derived using a perturbative method. The theoretical analysis of numerical error presented here may be useful for the verification of simulations and for providing intuition for the design of new implicit time integration schemes for the δf method, as well as understanding differences between δf and full-f approaches to plasma simulation.

  5. Finite time step and spatial grid effects in δf simulation of warm plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturdevant, Benjamin J.; Parker, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a technique for analyzing time integration methods used with the particle weight equations in δf method particle-in-cell (PIC) schemes. The analysis applies to the simulation of warm, uniform, periodic or infinite plasmas in the linear regime and considers the collective behavior similar to the analysis performed by Langdon for full-f PIC schemes [1,2]. We perform both a time integration analysis and spatial grid analysis for a kinetic ion, adiabatic electron model of ion acoustic waves. An implicit time integration scheme is studied in detail for δf simulations using our weight equation analysis and for full-f simulations using the method of Langdon. It is found that the δf method exhibits a CFL-like stability condition for low temperature ions, which is independent of the parameter characterizing the implicitness of the scheme. The accuracy of the real frequency and damping rate due to the discrete time and spatial schemes is also derived using a perturbative method. The theoretical analysis of numerical error presented here may be useful for the verification of simulations and for providing intuition for the design of new implicit time integration schemes for the δf method, as well as understanding differences between δf and full-f approaches to plasma simulation.

  6. Does it Pay to Delay? Flesh Flies Show Adaptive Plasticity in Reproductive Timing

    PubMed Central

    Kristal, Ross; Netter, Fleta; Hatle, John D.; Hahn, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Life-history plasticity is widespread among organisms. However, an important question is whether this plasticity is adaptive, enhancing the organism’s fitness. Most models for plasticity in life-history timing predict that once they have reached the minimal nutritional threshold animals under poor conditions will accelerate timing to development or reproduction. Adaptive delays in reproductive timing are not common, especially in short-lived species. Examples of adaptive reproductive delays exist in mammalian populations experiencing strong interspecific (e.g. predation) and intraspecific (e.g. infanticide) competition. But are there other environmental factors that may trigger an adaptive delay in reproductive timing? We show that the short-lived flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis will delay reproductive timing under nutrient poor conditions, even though it has already met the minimal nutritional threshold for reproduction. We test if this delay strategy is consistent with an adaptive response allowing the scavenger time to locate more resources by providing additional protein pulses (early, mid and late) throughout the reproductive delay period. Flies receiving additional protein produced more eggs and larger eggs, demonstrating a benefit of the delay. In addition, by tracking the allocation of carbon from the pulses using stable isotopes, we show that flies receiving earlier pulses incorporated more carbon into eggs and somatic tissue than those provided a later pulse. These results indicate that the reproductive delay in S. crassipalpis is consistent with adaptive post-threshold plasticity, a nutritionally-linked reproductive strategy that has not been previously reported in an invertebrate species. PMID:20953961

  7. Parallel machine scheduling with step-deteriorating jobs and setup times by a hybrid discrete cuckoo search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng; Cheng, Wenming; Wang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    This article considers the parallel machine scheduling problem with step-deteriorating jobs and sequence-dependent setup times. The objective is to minimize the total tardiness by determining the allocation and sequence of jobs on identical parallel machines. In this problem, the processing time of each job is a step function dependent upon its starting time. An individual extended time is penalized when the starting time of a job is later than a specific deterioration date. The possibility of deterioration of a job makes the parallel machine scheduling problem more challenging than ordinary ones. A mixed integer programming model for the optimal solution is derived. Due to its NP-hard nature, a hybrid discrete cuckoo search algorithm is proposed to solve this problem. In order to generate a good initial swarm, a modified Biskup-Hermann-Gupta (BHG) heuristic called MBHG is incorporated into the population initialization. Several discrete operators are proposed in the random walk of Lévy flights and the crossover search. Moreover, a local search procedure based on variable neighbourhood descent is integrated into the algorithm as a hybrid strategy in order to improve the quality of elite solutions. Computational experiments are executed on two sets of randomly generated test instances. The results show that the proposed hybrid algorithm can yield better solutions in comparison with the commercial solver CPLEX® with a one hour time limit, the discrete cuckoo search algorithm and the existing variable neighbourhood search algorithm.

  8. Real-Time Robust Adaptive Modeling and Scheduling for an Electronic Commerce Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bing; Ruan, Chun

    With the increasing importance and pervasiveness of Internet services, it is becoming a challenge for the proliferation of electronic commerce services to provide performance guarantees under extreme overload. This paper describes a real-time optimization modeling and scheduling approach for performance guarantee of electronic commerce servers. We show that an electronic commerce server may be simulated as a multi-tank system. A robust adaptive server model is subject to unknown additive load disturbances and uncertain model matching. Overload control techniques are based on adaptive admission control to achieve timing guarantees. We evaluate the performance of the model using a complex simulation that is subjected to varying model parameters and massive overload.

  9. Improvements to Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer Real-time Tropical Cyclone Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlhorn, E. W.; Klotz, B.

    2012-12-01

    With the installation of C-band stepped frequency microwave radiometers (SFMR) on Air Force Reserve Command WC-130J hurricane reconnaissance aircraft, the SFMR has assumed a prominent role for operational measurement of surface winds, and thus, hurricane intensity estimation. The current SFMR wind retrieval algorithm was developed from GPS dropwindsonde surface wind measurements, and has been successfully implemented across all SFMR-equipped aircraft. The algorithm improvements were specifically targeted at improving surface wind accuracy at hurricane force conditions (> 65 kts, 33 m/s), especially within the eyewall, although the SFMR surface wind vs. emissivity geophysical model function was developed over a broad range of wind speeds (10-140 kts, 5-70 m/s) with the expectation that the hurricane wind field could be readily measured in general. Due to the significant microwave absorption by precipitation, a by-product of the wind retrieval process is an estimate of the path-averaged rain rate (in actuality, the rain water content). An SFMR surface wind speed high bias in strong precipitation has recently been quantified and is particularly evident at weak-to-moderate wind speeds (<65 kts, 33 m/s) and large rain rates (>20 mm/hr), which has important implications for identifying tropical systems at the depression and storm stages, and additionally for observing significant outer wind radii. A major reason for this wind bias is due to an inaccurate rain absorption model that was used to develop the current surface emissivity vs. wind speed geophysical model function. Observations now suggest that the rain-induced absorption is significantly overestimated by the model, resulting in underestimated rain rate values. With the wind speed bias identified, the rain absorption component of the SFMR geophysical model function is addressed to provide an improved rain rate product. This new absorption model is developed by relating SFMR excess brightness temperature

  10. Silencing urease: a key evolutionary step that facilitated the adaptation of Yersinia pestis to the flea-borne transmission route.

    PubMed

    Chouikha, Iman; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2014-12-30

    The arthropod-borne transmission route of Yersinia pestis, the bacterial agent of plague, is a recent evolutionary adaptation. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, the closely related food-and water-borne enteric species from which Y. pestis diverged less than 6,400 y ago, exhibits significant oral toxicity to the flea vectors of plague, whereas Y. pestis does not. In this study, we identify the Yersinia urease enzyme as the responsible oral toxin. All Y. pestis strains, including those phylogenetically closest to the Y. pseudotuberculosis progenitor, contain a mutated ureD allele that eliminated urease activity. Restoration of a functional ureD was sufficient to make Y. pestis orally toxic to fleas. Conversely, deletion of the urease operon in Y. pseudotuberculosis rendered it nontoxic. Enzymatic activity was required for toxicity. Because urease-related mortality eliminates 30-40% of infective flea vectors, ureD mutation early in the evolution of Y. pestis was likely subject to strong positive selection because it significantly increased transmission potential.

  11. Stability of adaptive cruise control systems taking account of vehicle response time and delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. C.

    2012-08-01

    The region of string stability of a platoon of adaptive cruise control vehicles, taking into account the delay and response of the vehicle powertrain, is found. An upper bound on the explicit delay time as a function the first-order powertrain response time constant is determined. The system is characterized by a headway time constant, a sensitivity parameter, relative (to the vehicle immediately in front) velocity control, and delayed-velocity feedback or acceleration feedback.

  12. Between-Trial Forgetting Due to Interference and Time in Motor Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungshin; Oh, Youngmin; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Learning a motor task with temporally spaced presentations or with other tasks intermixed between presentations reduces performance during training, but can enhance retention post training. These two effects are known as the spacing and contextual interference effect, respectively. Here, we aimed at testing a unifying hypothesis of the spacing and contextual interference effects in visuomotor adaptation, according to which forgetting between trials due to either spaced presentations or interference by another task will promote between-trial forgetting, which will depress performance during acquisition, but will promote retention. We first performed an experiment with three visuomotor adaptation conditions: a short inter-trial-interval (ITI) condition (SHORT-ITI); a long ITI condition (LONG-ITI); and an alternating condition with two alternated opposite tasks (ALT), with the same single-task ITI as in LONG-ITI. In the SHORT-ITI condition, there was fastest increase in performance during training and largest immediate forgetting in the retention tests. In contrast, in the ALT condition, there was slowest increase in performance during training and little immediate forgetting in the retention tests. Compared to these two conditions, in the LONG-ITI, we found intermediate increase in performance during training and intermediate immediate forgetting. To account for these results, we fitted to the data six possible adaptation models with one or two time scales, and with interference in the fast, or in the slow, or in both time scales. Model comparison confirmed that two time scales and some degree of interferences in either time scale are needed to account for our experimental results. In summary, our results suggest that retention following adaptation is modulated by the degree of between-trial forgetting, which is due to time-based decay in single adaptation task and interferences in multiple adaptation tasks.

  13. An expert system for setting time steps in dynamic finite element programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Martin R.; Belytschko, Ted

    1989-01-01

    An expert system, ETUDES - Expert Time integration control Using Deep and Surface Knowledge System, which addresses the determination of the timestep for time integration of linear structural dynamic equations is described. This timestep may also be applicable for a moderately nonlinear simulation of the same structure. The program also determines whether an explicit or implicit method is most efficient for the particular simulation. A production rule programming system written in OPS5 is used for the implementation of this prototype expert system. Issues relating to the expert system architecture for this application, such as knowledge representation and structure, as well as domain knowledge are discussed. The prototype is evaluated by measuring its performance in various benchmark model problems.

  14. Effect of moisture and drying time on the bond strength of the one-step self-etching adhesive system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of dentin moisture degree and air-drying time on dentin-bond strength of two different one-step self-etching adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Twenty-four human third molars were used for microtensile bond strength testing of G-Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond. The dentin surface was either blot-dried or air-dried before applying these adhesive agents. After application of the adhesive agent, three different air drying times were evaluated: 1, 5, and 10 sec. Composite resin was build up to 4 mm thickness and light cured for 40 sec with 2 separate layers. Then the tooth was sectioned and trimmed to measure the microtensile bond strength using a universal testing machine. The measured bond strengths were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and regression analysis was done (p = 0.05). Results All three factors, materials, dentin wetness and air drying time, showed significant effect on the microtensile bond strength. Clearfil S3 Bond, dry dentin surface and 10 sec air drying time showed higher bond strength. Conclusions Within the limitation of this experiment, air drying time after the application of the one-step self-etching adhesive agent was the most significant factor affecting the bond strength, followed by the material difference and dentin moisture before applying the adhesive agent. PMID:23429228

  15. Leap Frog and Time Step Sub-Cycle Scheme for Coupled Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulic Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.

    2002-07-01

    As the result of the advancing TCP/IP based inter-process communication technology, more and more legacy thermal-hydraulic codes have been coupled with neutronics codes to provide best-estimate capabilities for reactivity related reactor transient analysis. Most of the coupling schemes are based on closely coupled serial or parallel approaches. Therefore, the execution of the coupled codes usually requires significant CPU time, when a complicated system is analyzed. Leap Frog scheme has been used to reduce the run time. The extent of the decoupling is usually determined based on a trial and error process for a specific analysis. It is the intent of this paper to develop a set of general criteria, which can be used to invoke the automatic Leap Frog algorithm. The algorithm will not only provide the run time reduction but also preserve the accuracy. The criteria will also serve as the base of an automatic time step sub-cycle scheme when a sudden reactivity change is introduced and the thermal-hydraulic code is marching with a relatively large time step. (authors)

  16. Higher-order hybrid implicit/explicit FDTD time-stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierens, W.

    2016-12-01

    Both partially implicit FDTD methods, and symplectic FDTD methods of high temporal accuracy (3rd or 4th order), are well documented in the literature. In this paper we combine them: we construct a conservative FDTD method which is fourth order accurate in time and is partially implicit. We show that the stability condition for this method depends exclusively on the explicit part, which makes it suitable for use in e.g. modelling wave propagation in plasmas.

  17. Paper Laser: a step towards a time scale generation from an ensemble of optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C. A.; de Carlos, E.; Lopez, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a simple and innovative technique to combine n optical frequencies with the aim to produce a virtual laser with superior metrological characteristics is introduced. The algorithms to combine a number of clocks to produce a virtual clock, which is also referred as paper clock, are well known. An example of this is the statistical generation of the UTC time scale by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) using a recursive algorithm (ALGOS). A similar algorithm to combine n optical frequencies, all of them with same nominal value, to produce a “paper laser” whose frequency is known through its difference with respect to the optical frequencies of the ensemble is proposed here. As a demonstration of this, three optical frequencies stabilized to the D2 Cs-133 line, all of them with similar frequency stability were experimentally combined. A paper laser has been produced during hours whose frequency stability is about 3-1/2 times with respect to the original optical frequencies. This technique can be applied to combine ultra-stable optical frequencies to produce a paper laser that can be materialized by correcting one of the real optical frequencies of the ensemble. The robustness and stability of a paper laser is very attractive to produce a time scale from its operation.

  18. A novel algorithm for real-time adaptive signal detection and identification

    SciTech Connect

    Sleefe, G.E.; Ladd, M.D.; Gallegos, D.E.; Sicking, C.W.; Erteza, I.A.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a novel digital signal processing algorithm for adaptively detecting and identifying signals buried in noise. The algorithm continually computes and updates the long-term statistics and spectral characteristics of the background noise. Using this noise model, a set of adaptive thresholds and matched digital filters are implemented to enhance and detect signals that are buried in the noise. The algorithm furthermore automatically suppresses coherent noise sources and adapts to time-varying signal conditions. Signal detection is performed in both the time-domain and the frequency-domain, thereby permitting the detection of both broad-band transients and narrow-band signals. The detection algorithm also provides for the computation of important signal features such as amplitude, timing, and phase information. Signal identification is achieved through a combination of frequency-domain template matching and spectral peak picking. The algorithm described herein is well suited for real-time implementation on digital signal processing hardware. This paper presents the theory of the adaptive algorithm, provides an algorithmic block diagram, and demonstrate its implementation and performance with real-world data. The computational efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated through benchmarks on specific DSP hardware. The applications for this algorithm, which range from vibration analysis to real-time image processing, are also discussed.

  19. Adaptive Output-Feedback Neural Control of Switched Uncertain Nonlinear Systems With Average Dwell Time.

    PubMed

    Long, Lijun; Zhao, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of adaptive neural tracking control via output-feedback for a class of switched uncertain nonlinear systems without the measurements of the system states. The unknown control signals are approximated directly by neural networks. A novel adaptive neural control technique for the problem studied is set up by exploiting the average dwell time method and backstepping. A switched filter and different update laws are designed to reduce the conservativeness caused by adoption of a common observer and a common update law for all subsystems. The proposed controllers of subsystems guarantee that all closed-loop signals remain bounded under a class of switching signals with average dwell time, while the output tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. As an application of the proposed design method, adaptive output feedback neural tracking controllers for a mass-spring-damper system are constructed.

  20. Design of a Fat-Based Adaptive Visual Servoing for Robots with Time Varying Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Ming-Chih; Huang, An-Chyau

    2010-05-01

    Most present adaptive control strategies for visual servoing of robots have assumed that the unknown camera parameters, kinematics, and dynamics of visual servoing system should be linearly parameterized in the regressor matrix form. This is because the limitation of the traditional adaptive design in which the uncertainties should be time-invariant such that all time varying terms in the visual servoing system are collected inside the regressor matrix. However, derivation of the regressor matrix is tedious. In this article, a FAT (function approximation technique) based adaptive controller is designed for visual servo robots without the need for the regressor matrix. A Lyapunov-like analysis is used to justify the closed-loop stability and boundedness of internal signals. Moreover, the upper bounds of tracking errors in the transient state are also derived. Computer simulation results are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed scheme.

  1. A Neural Mechanism for Time-Window Separation Resolves Ambiguity of Adaptive Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, K. Jannis; Ronacher, Bernhard; Hennig, R. Matthias; Benda, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The senses of animals are confronted with changing environments and different contexts. Neural adaptation is one important tool to adjust sensitivity to varying intensity ranges. For instance, in a quiet night outdoors, our hearing is more sensitive than when we are confronted with the plurality of sounds in a large city during the day. However, adaptation also removes available information on absolute sound levels and may thus cause ambiguity. Experimental data on the trade-off between benefits and loss through adaptation is scarce and very few mechanisms have been proposed to resolve it. We present an example where adaptation is beneficial for one task—namely, the reliable encoding of the pattern of an acoustic signal—but detrimental for another—the localization of the same acoustic stimulus. With a combination of neurophysiological data, modeling, and behavioral tests, we show that adaptation in the periphery of the auditory pathway of grasshoppers enables intensity-invariant coding of amplitude modulations, but at the same time, degrades information available for sound localization. We demonstrate how focusing the response of localization neurons to the onset of relevant signals separates processing of localization and pattern information temporally. In this way, the ambiguity of adaptive coding can be circumvented and both absolute and relative levels can be processed using the same set of peripheral neurons. PMID:25761097

  2. NIH and WHI: time for a mea culpa and steps beyond.

    PubMed

    Utian, Wulf H

    2007-01-01

    The termination of the estrogen-progestin arm of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) 5 years ago was abrupt and poorly planned. It has also become manifestly clear that the reporting at that time of the balance of risk and benefit for perimenopausal and early postmenopausal women was grossly exaggerated. Subsequent WHI publications including subanalyses of original data suggest a persistent pattern of over-reading of results toward a negative bias. The initial 2002 conclusion of the WHI investigators that harm was greater than benefit appears to be the result of several factors. One was the failure to recognize that initiation of therapy by decade of age or time since menopause was highly relevant; the WHI committee aggregated all outcome data into one group, even though in their demographic description they had the ability to investigate by age. An overhanging question is, therefore, what did they know, and when did they know it? Another factor was the utilization of a nonvalidated index termed the "global health index" that inexplicably assumed for comparison sake that all diseases were equivalent, for example, that a stroke was equivalent to a hip fracture in morbidity, mortality, and impact on quality of life. Although not a study about menopause, the data were extrapolated to all peri- and postmenopausal women. Despite the overall positive outcome of their results for women aged 50 to 60 years, most particularly those receiving estrogen-only therapy, the WHI investigators have irrationally maintained a defense of their misinterpretations of 2002. It is time for the National Institutes of Health and the WHI investigators to issue a final overall report that is clear and based on their actual results and not their personal interpretations. There is too much relevant and important information within the WHI to allow the overall study to continue to be perceived as biased to the detriment of both the National Institutes of Health and the study itself.

  3. One-step Real-time Food Quality Analysis by Simultaneous DSC-FTIR Microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Lin, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses an analytical technique that combines differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared (DSC-FTIR) microspectroscopy, which simulates the accelerated stability test and detects decomposition products simultaneously in real time. We show that the DSC-FTIR technique is a fast, simple and powerful analytical tool with applications in food sciences. This technique has been applied successfully to the simultaneous investigation of: encapsulated squid oil stability; the dehydration and intramolecular condensation of sweetener (aspartame); the dehydration, rehydration and solidification of trehalose; and online monitoring of the Maillard reaction for glucose (Glc)/asparagine (Asn) in the solid state. This technique delivers rapid and appropriate interpretations with food science applications.

  4. Steps Toward Real-Time Atmospheric Phase Fluctuation Correction for a High Resolution Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, Grant R.; Geldzahler, Barry; Birr, Rick; Brown, Robert; Hoblitzell, Richard; Grant, Kevin; Miller, Michael; Woods, Gary; Archuleta, Arby; Ciminera, Michael; Cornish, Timothy; davarian, faramaz; kocz, jonathan; lee, dennis; Morabito, David Dominic; Soriano, Melissa; Tsao, Philip; Vilnrotter, Victor; Jakeman-Flores, Hali; Ott, melanie; Thomes, W. Joe; Soloff, Jason; NASA Kennedy Space Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Metropolitan State University of Denver

    2016-01-01

    NASA is pursuing a demonstration of coherent uplink arraying at 7.145-7.190 GHz (X-band) and 30-31 GHz (Ka-band) using three 12m diameter COTS antennas separated by 60m at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the goal of a high-power, high-resolution radar array that employs real-time correction for tropospheric phase fluctuation. The major uses for this array will be (a) observations of Near Earth Objects, (b) detection and tracking of orbital debris, (c) high power emergency uplink capability for spacecraft, and (d) radio science experiments.

  5. Steps toward thin film metal thermistors with microsecond time response for shock temperature measurements of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. E.; Williamson, D. M.; Jardine, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Equations of state can be used to predict the relationship between pressure, volume and temperature. However, in shock physics, they are usually only constrained by experimental observations of pressure and volume. Direct observation of temperature in a shock is therefore valuable in constraining equations of state. Bloomquist and Sheffield (1980, 1981) and Rosenberg and Partom (1984) have attempted such observations in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). However, their results disagree strongly above 2GPa shock pressure. Here we present an improved fabrication technique, to examine this outstanding issue. We make use of the fact that the electrical resistivity of most metals is a known function of both pressure and temperature. If the change in resistance of a thin metal thermistor gauge is measured during a shock experiment of known pressure, the temperature can be calculated directly. The time response is limited by the time taken for the gauge to reach thermal equilibrium with the medium in which it is embedded. Gold gauges of thickness up to 200 nm have been produced by thermal evaporation, and fully embedded in PMMA. These reach thermal equilibrium with the host material in under 1 us, allowing temperature measurement within the duration of a plate impact experiment.

  6. Acceleration of Ab Initio QM/MM Calculations under Periodic Boundary Conditions by Multiscale and Multiple Time Step Approaches.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kwangho

    2014-10-14

    Development of multiscale ab initio quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (AI-QM/MM) method for periodic boundary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and their acceleration by multiple time step approach are described. The developed method achieves accuracy and efficiency by integrating the AI-QM/MM level of theory and the previously developed semiempirical (SE) QM/MM-Ewald sum method [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2005, 1, 2] extended to the smooth particle-mesh Ewald (PME) summation method. In the developed methods, the total energy of the simulated system is evaluated at the SE-QM/MM-PME level of theory to include long-range QM/MM electrostatic interactions, which is then corrected on the fly using the AI-QM/MM level of theory within the real space cutoff. The resulting energy expression enables decomposition of total forces applied to each atom into forces determined at the low-level SE-QM/MM method and correction forces at the AI-QM/MM level, to integrate the system using the reversible reference system propagator algorithm. The resulting method achieves a substantial speed-up of the entire calculation by minimizing the number of time-consuming energy and gradient evaluations at the AI-QM/MM level. Test calculations show that the developed multiple time step AI-QM/MM method yields MD trajectories and potential of mean force profiles comparable to single time step QM/MM results. The developed method, together with message passing interface (MPI) parallelization, accelerates the present AI-QM/MM MD simulations about 30-fold relative to the speed of single-core AI-QM/MM simulations for the molecular systems tested in the present work, making the method less than one order slower than the SE-QM/MM methods under periodic boundary conditions.

  7. Diversity and disparity through time in the adaptive radiation of Antarctic notothenioid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, M; Damerau, M; Hanel, R; Salzburger, W; Matschiner, M

    2015-01-01

    According to theory, adaptive radiation is triggered by ecological opportunity that can arise through the colonization of new habitats, the extinction of antagonists or the origin of key innovations. In the course of an adaptive radiation, diversification and morphological evolution are expected to slow down after an initial phase of rapid adaptation to vacant ecological niches, followed by speciation. Such ‘early bursts’ of diversification are thought to occur because niche space becomes increasingly filled over time. The diversification of Antarctic notothenioid fishes into over 120 species has become one of the prime examples of adaptive radiation in the marine realm and has likely been triggered by an evolutionary key innovation in the form of the emergence of antifreeze glycoproteins. Here, we test, using a novel time-calibrated phylogeny of 49 species and five traits that characterize notothenioid body size and shape as well as buoyancy adaptations and habitat preferences, whether the notothenioid adaptive radiation is compatible with an early burst scenario. Extensive Bayesian model comparison shows that phylogenetic age estimates are highly dependent on model choice and that models with unlinked gene trees are generally better supported and result in younger age estimates. We find strong evidence for elevated diversification rates in Antarctic notothenioids compared to outgroups, yet no sign of rate heterogeneity in the course of the radiation, except that the notothenioid family Artedidraconidae appears to show secondarily elevated diversification rates. We further observe an early burst in trophic morphology, suggesting that the notothenioid radiation proceeds in stages similar to other prominent examples of adaptive radiation. PMID:25495187

  8. In the time of significant generational diversity - surgical leadership must step up!

    PubMed

    Money, Samuel R; O'Donnell, Mark E; Gray, Richard J

    2014-02-01

    The diverse attitudes and motivations of surgeons and surgical trainees within different age groups present an important challenge for surgical leaders and educators. These challenges to surgical leadership are not unique, and other industries have likewise needed to grapple with how best to manage these various age groups. The authors will herein explore management and leadership for surgeons in a time of age diversity, define generational variations within "Baby-Boomer", "Generation X" and "Generation Y" populations, and identify work ethos concepts amongst these three groups. The surgical community must understand and embrace these concepts in order to continue to attract a stellar pool of applicants from medical school. By not accepting the changing attitudes and motivations of young trainees and medical students, we may disenfranchise a high percentage of potential future surgeons. Surgical training programs will fill, but will they contain the highest quality trainees?

  9. Genomic Evidence of Rapid and Stable Adaptive Oscillations over Seasonal Time Scales in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bergland, Alan O.; Behrman, Emily L.; O'Brien, Katherine R.; Schmidt, Paul S.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    In many species, genomic data have revealed pervasive adaptive evolution indicated by the fixation of beneficial alleles. However, when selection pressures are highly variable along a species' range or through time adaptive alleles may persist at intermediate frequencies for long periods. So called “balanced polymorphisms” have long been understood to be an important component of standing genetic variation, yet direct evidence of the strength of balancing selection and the stability and prevalence of balanced polymorphisms has remained elusive. We hypothesized that environmental fluctuations among seasons in a North American orchard would impose temporally variable selection on Drosophila melanogaster that would drive repeatable adaptive oscillations at balanced polymorphisms. We identified hundreds of polymorphisms whose frequency oscillates among seasons and argue that these loci are subject to strong, temporally variable selection. We show that these polymorphisms respond to acute and persistent changes in climate and are associated in predictable ways with seasonally variable phenotypes. In addition, our results suggest that adaptively oscillating polymorphisms are likely millions of years old, with some possibly predating the divergence between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Taken together, our results are consistent with a model of balancing selection wherein rapid temporal fluctuations in climate over generational time promotes adaptive genetic diversity at loci underlying polygenic variation in fitness related phenotypes. PMID:25375361

  10. Robust control for a biaxial servo with time delay system based on adaptive tuning technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tien-Chi; Yu, Chih-Hsien

    2009-07-01

    A robust control method for synchronizing a biaxial servo system motion is proposed in this paper. A new network based cross-coupled control and adaptive tuning techniques are used together to cancel out the skew error. The conventional fixed gain PID cross-coupled controller (CCC) is replaced with the adaptive cross-coupled controller (ACCC) in the proposed control scheme to maintain biaxial servo system synchronization motion. Adaptive-tuning PID (APID) position and velocity controllers provide the necessary control actions to maintain synchronization while following a variable command trajectory. A delay-time compensator (DTC) with an adaptive controller was augmented to set the time delay element, effectively moving it outside the closed loop, enhancing the stability of the robust controlled system. This scheme provides strong robustness with respect to uncertain dynamics and disturbances. The simulation and experimental results reveal that the proposed control structure adapts to a wide range of operating conditions and provides promising results under parameter variations and load changes.

  11. A Comparative Study of Acousto-Optic Time-Integrating Correlators for Adaptive Jamming Cancellation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    This final report presents a comparative study of the space-integrating and time-integrating configurations of an acousto - optic correlator...systematically evaluate all existing acousto - optic correlator architectures and to determine which would be most suitable for adaptive jamming

  12. Time-of-day-dependent adaptation of the HPA axis to predictable social defeat stress.

    PubMed

    Koch, C E; Bartlang, M S; Kiehn, J T; Lucke, L; Naujokat, N; Helfrich-Förster, C; Reber, S O; Oster, H

    2016-12-01

    In modern societies, the risk of developing a whole array of affective and somatic disorders is associated with the prevalence of frequent psychosocial stress. Therefore, a better understanding of adaptive stress responses and their underlying molecular mechanisms is of high clinical interest. In response to an acute stressor, each organism can either show passive freezing or active fight-or-flight behaviour, with activation of sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis providing the necessary energy for the latter by releasing catecholamines and glucocorticoids (GC). Recent data suggest that stress responses are also regulated by the endogenous circadian clock. In consequence, the timing of stress may critically affect adaptive responses to and/or pathological effects of repetitive stressor exposure. In this article, we characterize the impact of predictable social defeat stress during daytime versus nighttime on bodyweight development and HPA axis activity in mice. While 19 days of social daytime stress led to a transient reduction in bodyweight without altering HPA axis activity at the predicted time of stressor exposure, more detrimental effects were seen in anticipation of nighttime stress. Repeated nighttime stressor exposure led to alterations in food metabolization and reduced HPA axis activity with lower circulating adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and GC concentrations at the time of predicted stressor exposure. Our data reveal a circadian gating of stress adaptation to predictable social defeat stress at the level of the HPA axis with impact on metabolic homeostasis underpinning the importance of timing for the body's adaptability to repetitive stress.

  13. Consequences of Part-Time Work on the Academic and Psychosocial Adaptation of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumont, Michelle; Leclerc, Danielle; McKinnon, Suzie

    2009-01-01

    Part-time work is becoming a common fact of life for high school students. Furthermore, its short and intermediate term impacts on the academic and psychosocial adaptation of students between the middle and end of high school are fairly unknown. To compensate for this lack of information, students in Grades 9 and 11 were consulted and asked to…

  14. Model reference adaptive control for linear time varying and nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abida, L.; Kaufman, H.

    1982-01-01

    Model reference adaptive control is applied to linear time varying systems and to nonlinear systems amenable to virtual linearization. Asymptotic stability is guaranteed even if the perfect model following conditions do not hold, provided that some sufficient conditions are satisfied. Simulations show the scheme to be capable of effectively controlling certain nonlinear systems.

  15. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  16. Multi-channel holographic birfurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Diep, J.; Huang, K.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on multi-channel holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive Earth Observing System (EOS) data analysis are presented. The objective is to research and develop an optical bifurcating neuromorphic pattern recognition system for making optical data array comparisons and to evaluate the use of the system for EOS data classification, reduction, analysis, and other applications.

  17. Future Time Perspective as a Predictor of Adolescents' Adaptive Behavior in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Renato Gil Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Future time perspective (FTP) has been associated with positive outcomes in adolescents' development across different contexts. However, the extent to which FTP influences adaptation needs additional understanding. In this study, we analysed the relationship between FTP and adolescents' behavior in school, as expressed in several indicators of…

  18. Adaptive sliding mode back-stepping pitch angle control of a variable-displacement pump controlled pitch system for wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiu-xing; Lin, Yong-gang; Li, Wei; Liu, Hong-wei; Gu, Ya-jing

    2015-09-01

    A variable-displacement pump controlled pitch system is proposed to mitigate generator power and flap-wise load fluctuations for wind turbines. The pitch system mainly consists of a variable-displacement hydraulic pump, a fixed-displacement hydraulic motor and a gear set. The hydraulic motor can be accurately regulated by controlling the pump displacement and fluid flows to change the pitch angle through the gear set. The detailed mathematical representation and dynamic characteristics of the proposed pitch system are thoroughly analyzed. An adaptive sliding mode pump displacement controller and a back-stepping stroke piston controller are designed for the proposed pitch system such that the resulting pitch angle tracks its desired value regardless of external disturbances and uncertainties. The effectiveness and control efficiency of the proposed pitch system and controllers have been verified by using realistic dataset of a 750 kW research wind turbine.

  19. Multichannel adaptive signal detection in space-time colored compound-gaussian autoregressive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi; Ma, Xiaochuan; Yan, Shefeng; Hao, Chengpeng; Shi, Bo

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we consider the problem of adaptive detection for a multichannel signal in the presence of spatially and temporally colored compound-Gaussian disturbance. By modeling the disturbance as a multichannel autoregressive (AR) process, we first derive a parametric generalized likelihood ratio test against compound-Gaussian disturbance (CG-PGLRT) assuming that the true multichannel AR parameters are perfectly known. For the two-step GLRT design criterion, we combine the multichannel AR parameter estimation algorithm with three covariance matrix estimation strategies for compound-Gaussian environment, then obtain three adaptive CG-PGLRT detectors by replacing the ideal multichannel AR parameters with their estimates. Owing to treating the random texture components of disturbance as deterministic unknown parameters, all of the proposed detectors require no a priori knowledge about the disturbance statistics. The performance assessments are conducted by means of Monte Carlo trials. We focus on the issues of constant false alarm rate (CFAR) behavior, detection and false alarm probabilities. Numerical results show that the proposed adaptive CG-PGLRT detectors have dramatically ease the training and computational burden compared to the generalized likelihood ratio test-linear quadratic (GLRT-LQ) which is referred to as covariance matrix based detector and relies more heavily on training.

  20. Controlling Discrete Time T-S Fuzzy Chaotic Systems via Adaptive Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nian, Yibei; Zheng, Yongai

    In order to overcome typical drawbacks of the OGY control, i.e. the long waiting time for control to be applied and the accessible turning system parameter in advance, this paper presents a new chaos control method based on Takagi- Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model and adaptive adjustment. This method represents a chaotic system by linear models in different state space regions based on T-S fuzzy model and then stabilize the linear models in different state space regions by the adaptive adjustment mechanism. An example for the Henon map is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Adaptive Network Dynamics - Modeling and Control of Time-Dependent Social Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Shaw, Leah B.; Shkarayev, Maxim S.

    2013-01-01

    Real networks consisting of social contacts do not possess static connections. That is, social connections may be time dependent due to a variety of individual behavioral decisions based on current network connections. Examples of adaptive networks occur in epidemics, where information about infectious individuals may change the rewiring of healthy people, or in the recruitment of individuals to a cause or fad, where rewiring may optimize recruitment of susceptible individuals. In this paper, we will review some of the dynamical properties of adaptive networks, and show how they predict novel phenomena as well as yield insight into new controls. The applications will be control of epidemic outbreaks and terrorist recruitment modeling. PMID:25414913

  2. Changing Safety Culture, One Step at a Time: The Value of the DOE-VPP Program at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Patrick A.; Isern, Nancy G.

    2005-02-01

    The primary value of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is the ongoing partnership between management and staff committed to change Laboratory safety culture one step at a time. VPP enables PNNL's safety and health program to transcend a top-down, by-the-book approach to safety, and it also raises grassroots safety consciousness by promoting a commitment to safety and health 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. PNNL VPP is a dynamic, evolving program that fosters innovative approaches to continuous improvement in safety and health performance at the Laboratory.

  3. Adaptive Noise Cancellation to Suppress Electrocardiography Artifacts During Real-time Interventional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vincent; Barbash, Israel M.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Saikus, Christina E.; Sonmez, Merdim; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Lederman, Robert J.; Faranesh, Anthony Z.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To develop a system for artifact suppression in electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings obtained during interventional real-time magnetic resonance imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS We characterized ECG artifacts due to radiofrequency pulses and gradient switching during MRI in terms of frequency content. A combination of analog filters and digital least mean squares adaptive filters were used to filter the ECG during in vivo experiments and the results were compared with those obtained with simple low-pass filtering. The system performance was evaluated in terms of artifact suppression and ability to identify arrhythmias during real-time MRI. RESULTS Analog filters were able to suppress artifacts from high-frequency radiofrequency pulses and gradient switching. Remaining pulse artifacts caused by intermittent preparation sequences or spoiler gradients required adaptive filtering because their bandwidth overlapped with that of the ECG. Using analog and adaptive filtering, a mean improvement of 38dB (n=11, peak QRS signal to pulse artifact noise) was achieved. This filtering system was successful in removing pulse artifacts which obscured arrhythmias such as premature ventricular complexes and complete atrioventricular block. CONCLUSION We have developed an online ECG monitoring system employing digital adaptive filters which enables the identification of cardiac arrhythmias during real-time MRI-guided interventions. PMID:21509878

  4. Digital timing recovery combined with adaptive equalization for optical coherent receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xian; Chen, Xue; Zhou, Weiqing; Fan, Yangyang; Zhu, Hai; Li, Zhiyu

    2009-11-01

    We propose a novel equalization and timing recovery scheme, which adds an adaptive butterfly-structured equalizer in an all-digital timing recovery loop, for polarization multiplexing (POLMUX) coherent receivers. It resolves an incompatible problem that digital equalizer requires the timing recovered (synchronous) signal and Gardner timing-error detection algorithm requires the equalized signal because of its small tolerance on dispersion. This joint module can complete synchronization, equalization and polarization de-multiplexing simultaneously without any extra computational cost. Finally, we demonstrate the good performance of the new scheme in a 112-Gbit/s POLMUX-NRZ-DQPSK digital optical coherent receiver.

  5. A quantitative method for evaluating numerical simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation with its applications to selecting appropriate element size and time step.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Tse, Peter W; Tan, Haihui

    2016-01-01

    Lamb wave technique has been widely used in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). However, due to the multi-mode characteristics and dispersive nature, Lamb wave propagation behavior is much more complex than that of bulk waves. Numerous numerical simulations on Lamb wave propagation have been conducted to study its physical principles. However, few quantitative studies on evaluating the accuracy of these numerical simulations were reported. In this paper, a method based on cross correlation analysis for quantitatively evaluating the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb waves propagation is proposed. Two kinds of error, affecting the position and shape accuracies are firstly identified. Consequently, two quantitative indices, i.e., the GVE (group velocity error) and MACCC (maximum absolute value of cross correlation coefficient) derived from cross correlation analysis between a simulated signal and a reference waveform, are proposed to assess the position and shape errors of the simulated signal. In this way, the simulation accuracy on the position and shape is quantitatively evaluated. In order to apply this proposed method to select appropriate element size and time step, a specialized 2D-FEM program combined with the proposed method is developed. Then, the proper element size considering different element types and time step considering different time integration schemes are selected. These results proved that the proposed method is feasible and effective, and can be used as an efficient tool for quantitatively evaluating and verifying the simulation accuracy of time-transient Lamb wave propagation.

  6. Review of Real-Time Simulator and the Steps Involved for Implementation of a Model from MATLAB/SIMULINK to Real-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkili, Suresh; Panda, Anup Kumar; Prattipati, Jayanthi

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays the researchers want to develop their model in real-time environment. Simulation tools have been widely used for the design and improvement of electrical systems since the mid twentieth century. The evolution of simulation tools has progressed in step with the evolution of computing technologies. In recent years, computing technologies have improved dramatically in performance and become widely available at a steadily decreasing cost. Consequently, simulation tools have also seen dramatic performance gains and steady cost decreases. Researchers and engineers now have the access to affordable, high performance simulation tools that were previously too cost prohibitive, except for the largest manufacturers. This work has introduced a specific class of digital simulator known as a real-time simulator by answering the questions "what is real-time simulation", "why is it needed" and "how it works". The latest trend in real-time simulation consists of exporting simulation models to FPGA. In this article, the Steps involved for implementation of a model from MATLAB to REAL-TIME are provided in detail.

  7. Analysis of Affordance, Time, and Adaptation in the Assessment of Industrial Control System Cybersecurity Risk.

    PubMed

    Busby, J S; Green, B; Hutchison, D

    2017-01-17

    Industrial control systems increasingly use standard communication protocols and are increasingly connected to public networks-creating substantial cybersecurity risks, especially when used in critical infrastructures such as electricity and water distribution systems. Methods of assessing risk in such systems have recognized for some time the way in which the strategies of potential adversaries and risk managers interact in defining the risk to which such systems are exposed. But it is also important to consider the adaptations of the systems' operators and other legitimate users to risk controls, adaptations that often appear to undermine these controls, or shift the risk from one part of a system to another. Unlike the case with adversarial risk analysis, the adaptations of system users are typically orthogonal to the objective of minimizing or maximizing risk in the system. We argue that this need to analyze potential adaptations to risk controls is true for risk problems more generally, and we develop a framework for incorporating such adaptations into an assessment process. The method is based on the principle of affordances, and we show how this can be incorporated in an iterative procedure based on raising the minimum period of risk materialization above some threshold. We apply the method in a case study of a small European utility provider and discuss the observations arising from this.

  8. Length and time for development of laminar flow in tubes following a step increase of volume flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Rafeed A.; Herrmann, Marcus; Frakes, David H.; Adrian, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Laminar flows starting up from rest in round tubes are relevant to numerous industrial and biomedical applications. The two most common types are flows driven by an abruptly imposed constant pressure gradient or by an abruptly imposed constant volume flux. Analytical solutions are available for transient, fully developed flows, wherein streamwise development over the entrance length is absent (Szymanski in J de Mathématiques Pures et Appliquées 11:67-107, 1932; Andersson and Tiseth in Chem Eng Commun 112(1):121-133, 1992, respectively). They represent the transient responses of flows in tubes that are very long compared with the entrance length, a condition that is seldom satisfied in biomedical tube networks. This study establishes the entrance (development) length and development time of starting laminar flow in a round tube of finite length driven by a piston pump that produces a step change from zero flow to a constant volume flux for Reynolds numbers between 500 and 3,000. The flows are examined experimentally, using stereographic particle image velocimetry and computationally using computational fluid dynamics, and are then compared with the known analytical solutions for fully developed flow conditions in infinitely long tubes. Results show that step function volume flux start-up flows reach steady state and fully developed flow five times more quickly than those driven by a step function pressure gradient, a 500 % change when compared with existing estimates. Based on these results, we present new, simple guidelines for achieving experimental flows that are fully developed in space and time in realistic (finite) tube geometries. To a first approximation, the time to achieve steady spatially developing flow is nearly equal to the time needed to achieve steady, fully developed flow. Conversely, the entrance length needed to achieve fully developed transient flow is approximately equal to the length needed to achieve fully developed steady flow. Beyond this

  9. A dosimetric comparison of real-time adaptive and non-adaptive radiotherapy: A multi-institutional study encompassing robotic, gimbaled, multileaf collimator and couch tracking

    PubMed Central

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy; Nill, Simeon; Fast, Martin; Bedford, James; Oelfke, Uwe; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Poulsen, Per; Worm, Esben; Hansen, Rune; Ravkilde, Thomas; Scherman Rydhög, Jonas; Pommer, Tobias; Munck af Rosenschold, Per; Lang, Stephanie; Guckenberger, Matthias; Groh, Christian; Herrmann, Christian; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Wang, Lei; Hadsell, Michael; Sothmann, Thilo; Blanck, Oliver; Keall, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A study of real-time adaptive radiotherapy systems was performed to test the hypothesis that, across delivery systems and institutions, the dosimetric accuracy is improved with adaptive treatments over non-adaptive radiotherapy in the presence of patient-measured tumor motion. Methods and materials Ten institutions with robotic(2), gimbaled(2), MLC(4) or couch tracking(2) used common materials including CT and structure sets, motion traces and planning protocols to create a lung and a prostate plan. For each motion trace, the plan was delivered twice to a moving dosimeter; with and without real-time adaptation. Each measurement was compared to a static measurement and the percentage of failed points for γ-tests recorded. Results For all lung traces all measurement sets show improved dose accuracy with a mean 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate of 1.6% with adaptation and 15.2% without adaptation (p < 0.001). For all prostate the mean 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate was 1.4% with adaptation and 17.3% without adaptation (p < 0.001). The difference between the four systems was small with an average 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate of <3% for all systems with adaptation for lung and prostate. Conclusions The investigated systems all accounted for realistic tumor motion accurately and performed to a similar high standard, with real-time adaptation significantly outperforming non-adaptive delivery methods. PMID:27016171

  10. Long-time simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability using an adaptive vortex method.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sung-Ik; Yoon, Daeki; Hwang, Woonjae

    2010-10-01

    The nonlinear evolution of an interface subject to a parallel shear flow is studied by the vortex sheet model. We perform long-time computations for the vortex sheet in density-stratified fluids by using the point vortex method and investigate late-time dynamics of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. We apply an adaptive point insertion procedure and a high-order shock-capturing scheme to the vortex method to handle the nonuniform distribution of point vortices and enhance the resolution. Our adaptive vortex method successfully simulates chaotically distorted interfaces of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with fine resolutions. The numerical results show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolves a secondary instability at a late time, distorting the internal rollup, and eventually develops to a disordered structure.

  11. The evolutionary time machine: forecasting how populations can adapt to changing environments using dormant propagules

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Luisa; Schwenk, Klaus; De Meester, Luc; Colbourne, John K.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Weider, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary changes are determined by a complex assortment of ecological, demographic and adaptive histories. Predicting how evolution will shape the genetic structures of populations coping with current (and future) environmental challenges has principally relied on investigations through space, in lieu of time, because long-term phenotypic and molecular data are scarce. Yet, dormant propagules in sediments, soils and permafrost are convenient natural archives of population-histories from which to trace adaptive trajectories along extended time periods. DNA sequence data obtained from these natural archives, combined with pioneering methods for analyzing both ecological and population genomic time-series data, are likely to provide predictive models to forecast evolutionary responses of natural populations to environmental changes resulting from natural and anthropogenic stressors, including climate change. PMID:23395434

  12. Adaptive time-domain filtering for real-time spectral discrimination in a Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Bhalotra, Sameer R; Kung, Helen L; Jiao, Yang; Miller, David A B

    2002-07-01

    We present a method of spectral discrimination that employs time-domain processing instead of the typical frequency-domain analysis and implement the method in a Michelson interferometer with a nonlinear mirror scan. The technique yields one analog output value per scan instead of a complete interferogram by directly filtering a measured scan with a reference function in the time domain. Such a procedure drastically reduces data-processing requirements downstream. Additionally, using prerecorded interferograms as references eliminates the need to compensate for scan nonlinearities, which broadens the field of usable components for implementation in miniaturized sensing systems. With our efficient use of known spectral signatures, we demonstrate real-time discrimination of 633- and 663-nm laser sources with a mirror scan length of 1 microm , compared with the Rayleigh criterion of 7 microm.

  13. Seasonal signal capturing in time series of up coordinates by means of adaptive filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalvac, S.; Ustun, A.

    2013-12-01

    Digital filters, is a system that performs mathematical operations on a sampled or discrete time signals. Adaptive filters designed for noise canceling are capable tools of decomposing correlated parts of data sets. This kind of filters which optimize itself using Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm is a powerful tool for understand the truth hidden into the complex data sets like time series in Geosciences. The complex data sets such as CGPS (Continuously operating reference station) station's time series can be understood better with adaptive noise canceling by means of decompose coherent (seasonal effect, tectonic plate motion) and incoherent (noise; site-specific effects) parts of data. In this study, it is aimed to model the subsidence caused by groundwater withdrawal based on the seasonal correlation between consecutive years of CGPS time series. For this purpose, two stations where located into subsidence area of 3 year time series have analyzed with adaptive noise canceling filter. According to the results, the annual movement of these two stations have strong relationship. Also, subsidence behavior are correlated with annual rainfall data. BELD station one year filtered movement KAMN station one year filtered movements

  14. A compact multi-core CPU based adaptive optics real-time controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shanqiu; Zhao, Enyi; Xu, Bing; Ye, Yutang

    2014-09-01

    The performance of Adaptive Optics (AO) real-time controller based on Central Processing Unit (CPU) has significantly progressed due to the introduction of the high speed frame-grabber and a 4-cores CPU, which make it possible to process at frequency over 2000 Hz for 4-meter-class telescope and to integrate the real-time task and the user interface program in this compact device. The detailed architecture of this computation system is demonstrated in this paper, and the performance and suitability of this architecture is also discussed by measuring the latency of the controller processing via an adaptive optics emulator system with 16 times 16 and 32 times 32 sub-aperture, and the overall typical processing time is 61 us and 322 us respectively. Test result turns out that it is well suited for the next generation 4-meter-class adaptive optics system and it is possible to process at frequency over 2000 Hz for a 3000-element AO system in 10- meter-class telescope with one board of art-of-the-state computer and a frame-grabber. Comparison with GPU and FPGA based architecture is also discussed in this paper.

  15. A New Approach to Interference Excision in Radio Astronomy: Real-Time Adaptive Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnbaum, Cecilia; Bradley, Richard F.

    1998-11-01

    Every year, an increasing amount of radio-frequency (RF) spectrum in the VHF, UHF, and microwave bands is being utilized to support new commercial and military ventures, and all have the potential to interfere with radio astronomy observations. Such services already cause problems for radio astronomy even in very remote observing sites, and the potential for this form of light pollution to grow is alarming. Preventive measures to eliminate interference through FCC legislation and ITU agreements can be effective; however, many times this approach is inadequate and interference excision at the receiver is necessary. Conventional techniques such as RF filters, RF shielding, and postprocessing of data have been only somewhat successful, but none has been sufficient. Adaptive interference cancellation is a real-time approach to interference excision that has not been used before in radio astronomy. We describe here, for the first time, adaptive interference cancellation in the context of radio astronomy instrumentation, and we present initial results for our prototype receiver. In the 1960s, analog adaptive interference cancelers were developed that obtain a high degree of cancellation in problems of radio communications and radar. However, analog systems lack the dynamic range, noised performance, and versatility required by radio astronomy. The concept of digital adaptive interference cancellation was introduced in the mid-1960s as a way to reduce unwanted noise in low-frequency (audio) systems. Examples of such systems include the canceling of maternal ECG in fetal electrocardiography and the reduction of engine noise in the passenger compartments of automobiles. These audio-frequency applications require bandwidths of only a few tens of kilohertz. Only recently has high-speed digital filter technology made high dynamic range adaptive canceling possible in a bandwidth as large as a few megahertz, finally opening the door to application in radio astronomy. We have

  16. Contribution of hind limb flexor muscle afferents to the timing of phase transitions in the cat step cycle.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, G W; Whelan, P J; Prochazka, A; Pearson, K G

    1996-03-01

    1. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindle afferents signaling the length of hind-leg flexor muscles are involved in terminating extensor activity and initiating flexion during walking. The hip flexor muscle iliopsoas (IP) and the ankle flexors tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were stretched or vibrated at various phases of the step cycle in spontaneously walking decerebrate cats. Changes in electromyogram amplitude, duration, and timing were then examined. The effects of electrically stimulating group I and II afferents in the nerves to TA and EDL also were examined. 2. Stretch of the individual flexor muscles (IP, TA, or EDL) during the stance phase reduced the duration of extensor activity and promoted the onset of flexor burst activity. The contralateral step cycle also was affected by the stretch, the duration of flexor activity being shortened and extensor activity occurring earlier. Therefore, stretch of the flexor muscles during the stance phase reset the locomotor rhythm to flexion ipsilaterally and extension contralaterally. 3. Results of electrically stimulating the afferents from the TA and EDL muscles suggested that different groups of afferents were responsible for the resetting of the step cycle. Stimulation of the TA nerve reset the locomotor step cycle when the stimulus intensity was in the group II range (2-5 xT). By contrast, stimulation of the EDL nerve generated strong resetting of the step cycle in the range of 1.2-1.4 xT, where primarily the group Ia afferents from the muscle spindles would be activated. 4. Vibration of IP or EDL during stance reduced the duration of the extensor activity by similar amounts to that produced by muscle stretch or by electrical stimulation of EDL at group Ia strengths. This suggests that the group Ia afferents from IP and EDL are capable of resetting the locomotor pattern generator. Vibration of TA did not affect the locomotor rhythm. 5. Stretch of IP or

  17. The STEP model: Characterizing simultaneous time effects on practice for flight simulator performance among middle-aged and older pilots.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome; Lazzeroni, Laura C

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the possible effects of the number of practice sessions (practice) and time between practice sessions (interval) among middle-aged and older adults in real-world tasks has important implications for skill maintenance. Prior training and cognitive ability may impact practice and interval effects on real-world tasks. In this study, we took advantage of existing practice data from 5 simulated flights among 263 middle-aged and older pilots with varying levels of flight expertise (defined by U.S. Federal Aviation Administration proficiency ratings). We developed a new Simultaneous Time Effects on Practice (STEP) model: (a) to model the simultaneous effects of practice and interval on performance of the 5 flights, and (b) to examine the effects of selected covariates (i.e., age, flight expertise, and 3 composite measures of cognitive ability). The STEP model demonstrated consistent positive practice effects, negative interval effects, and predicted covariate effects. Age negatively moderated the beneficial effects of practice. Additionally, cognitive processing speed and intraindividual variability (IIV) in processing speed moderated the benefits of practice and/or the negative influence of interval for particular flight performance measures. Expertise did not interact with practice or interval. Results indicated that practice and interval effects occur in simulated flight tasks. However, processing speed and IIV may influence these effects, even among high-functioning adults. Results have implications for the design and assessment of training interventions targeted at middle-aged and older adults for complex real-world tasks.

  18. The STEP model: Characterizing simultaneous time effects on practice for flight simulator performance among middle-aged and older pilots

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome; Lazzeroni, Laura C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the possible effects of the number of practice sessions (practice) and time between practice sessions (interval) among middle-aged and older adults in real world tasks has important implications for skill maintenance. Prior training and cognitive ability may impact practice and interval effects on real world tasks. In this study, we took advantage of existing practice data from five simulated flights among 263 middle-aged and older pilots with varying levels of flight expertise (defined by FAA proficiency ratings). We developed a new STEP (Simultaneous Time Effects on Practice) model to: (1) model the simultaneous effects of practice and interval on performance of the five flights, and (2) examine the effects of selected covariates (age, flight expertise, and three composite measures of cognitive ability). The STEP model demonstrated consistent positive practice effects, negative interval effects, and predicted covariate effects. Age negatively moderated the beneficial effects of practice. Additionally, cognitive processing speed and intra-individual variability (IIV) in processing speed moderated the benefits of practice and/or the negative influence of interval for particular flight performance measures. Expertise did not interact with either practice or interval. Results indicate that practice and interval effects occur in simulated flight tasks. However, processing speed and IIV may influence these effects, even among high functioning adults. Results have implications for the design and assessment of training interventions targeted at middle-aged and older adults for complex real world tasks. PMID:26280383

  19. Universal steps in quantum dynamics with time-dependent potential-energy surfaces: Beyond the Born-Oppenheimer picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albareda, Guillermo; Abedi, Ali; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rubio, Angel

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown [G. Albareda et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 083003 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.083003 that within the conditional decomposition approach to the coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, the electron-nuclear wave function can be exactly decomposed into an ensemble of nuclear wave packets effectively governed by nuclear conditional time-dependent potential-energy surfaces (C-TDPESs). Employing a one-dimensional model system, we show that for strong nonadiabatic couplings the nuclear C-TDPESs exhibit steps that bridge piecewise adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential-energy surfaces. The nature of these steps is identified as an effect of electron-nuclear correlation. Furthermore, a direct comparison with similar discontinuities recently reported in the context of the exact factorization framework allows us to draw conclusions about the universality of these discontinuities, viz., they are inherent to all nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics approaches based on (exact) time-dependent potential-energy surfaces.

  20. Effect of different air-drying time on the microleakage of single-step self-etch adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Managhebi, Esmatsadat

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three different air-drying times on microleakage of three self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Class I cavities were prepared for 108 extracted sound human premolars. The teeth were divided into three main groups based on three different adhesives: Opti Bond All in One (OBAO), Clearfil S3 Bond (CSB), Bond Force (BF). Each main group divided into three subgroups regarding the air-drying time: without application of air stream, following the manufacturer's instruction, for 10 sec more than manufacturer's instruction. After completion of restorations, specimens were thermocycled and then connected to a fluid filtration system to evaluate microleakage. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey-test (α = 0.05). Results The microleakage of all adhesives decreased when the air-drying time increased from 0 sec to manufacturer's instruction (p < 0.001). The microleakage of BF reached its lowest values after increasing the drying time to 10 sec more than the manufacturer's instruction (p < 0.001). Microleakage of OBAO and CSB was significantly lower compared to BF in all three drying time (p < 0.001). Conclusions Increasing in air-drying time of adhesive layer in one-step self-etch adhesives caused reduction of microleakage, but the amount of this reduction may be dependent on the adhesive components of self-etch adhesives. PMID:23741709

  1. Visualization of Time-Series Sensor Data to Inform the Design of Just-In-Time Adaptive Stress Interventions.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Moushumi; Raij, Andrew; Epstien, David; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Beck, J Gayle; Vhaduri, Sudip; Preston, Kenzie; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-09-01

    We investigate needs, challenges, and opportunities in visualizing time-series sensor data on stress to inform the design of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). We identify seven key challenges: massive volume and variety of data, complexity in identifying stressors, scalability of space, multifaceted relationship between stress and time, a need for representation at multiple granularities, interperson variability, and limited understanding of JITAI design requirements due to its novelty. We propose four new visualizations based on one million minutes of sensor data (n=70). We evaluate our visualizations with stress researchers (n=6) to gain first insights into its usability and usefulness in JITAI design. Our results indicate that spatio-temporal visualizations help identify and explain between- and within-person variability in stress patterns and contextual visualizations enable decisions regarding the timing, content, and modality of intervention. Interestingly, a granular representation is considered informative but noise-prone; an abstract representation is the preferred starting point for designing JITAIs.

  2. An explicit large time step particle-in-cell scheme for nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in the electromagnetic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiber, R.; Hatzky, R.; Könies, A.; Mishchenko, A.; Sonnendrücker, E.

    2016-03-01

    A new algorithm for electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations, the so called "pullback transformation scheme" proposed by Mishchenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 21, 092110 (2014)] is motivated as an explicit time integrator reset after each full timestep and investigated in detail. Using a numerical dispersion relation valid in slab geometry, it is shown that the linear properties of the scheme are comparable to those of an implicit v∥ -scheme. A nonlinear extension of the mixed variable formulation, derived consistently from a field Lagrangian, is proposed. The scheme shows excellent numerical properties with a low statistical noise level and a large time step especially for MHD modes. The example of a nonlinear slab tearing mode simulation is used to illustrate the properties of different formulations of the physical model equations.

  3. Extension of an explicit finite volume method to large time steps (CFL>1): application to shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, J.; García-Navarro, P.; Brufau, P.; Burguete, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the explicit first order upwind scheme is presented under a formalism that enables the extension of the methodology to large time steps. The number of cells in the stencil of the numerical scheme is related to the allowable size of the CFL number for numerical stability. It is shown how to increase both at the same time. The basic idea is proposed for a 1D scalar equation and extended to 1D and 2D non-linear systems with source terms. The importance of the kind of grid used is highlighted and the method is outlined for irregular grids. The good quality of the results is illustrated by means of several examples including shallow water flow test cases. The bed slope source terms are involved in the method through an upwind discretization.

  4. Online adaptive optimal control for continuous-time nonlinear systems with completely unknown dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yongfeng; Na, Jing; Yang, Qinmin; Wu, Xing; Guo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    An online adaptive optimal control is proposed for continuous-time nonlinear systems with completely unknown dynamics, which is achieved by developing a novel identifier-critic-based approximate dynamic programming algorithm with a dual neural network (NN) approximation structure. First, an adaptive NN identifier is designed to obviate the requirement of complete knowledge of system dynamics, and a critic NN is employed to approximate the optimal value function. Then, the optimal control law is computed based on the information from the identifier NN and the critic NN, so that the actor NN is not needed. In particular, a novel adaptive law design method with the parameter estimation error is proposed to online update the weights of both identifier NN and critic NN simultaneously, which converge to small neighbourhoods around their ideal values. The closed-loop system stability and the convergence to small vicinity around the optimal solution are all proved by means of the Lyapunov theory. The proposed adaptation algorithm is also improved to achieve finite-time convergence of the NN weights. Finally, simulation results are provided to exemplify the efficacy of the proposed methods.

  5. Modeling the time--varying subjective quality of HTTP video streams with rate adaptations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Choi, Lark Kwon; de Veciana, Gustavo; Caramanis, Constantine; Heath, Robert W; Bovik, Alan C

    2014-05-01

    Newly developed hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP)-based video streaming technologies enable flexible rate-adaptation under varying channel conditions. Accurately predicting the users' quality of experience (QoE) for rate-adaptive HTTP video streams is thus critical to achieve efficiency. An important aspect of understanding and modeling QoE is predicting the up-to-the-moment subjective quality of a video as it is played, which is difficult due to hysteresis effects and nonlinearities in human behavioral responses. This paper presents a Hammerstein-Wiener model for predicting the time-varying subjective quality (TVSQ) of rate-adaptive videos. To collect data for model parameterization and validation, a database of longer duration videos with time-varying distortions was built and the TVSQs of the videos were measured in a large-scale subjective study. The proposed method is able to reliably predict the TVSQ of rate adaptive videos. Since the Hammerstein-Wiener model has a very simple structure, the proposed method is suitable for online TVSQ prediction in HTTP-based streaming.

  6. Development of a protocol to quantify local bone adaptation over space and time: Quantification of reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongtao; Boudiffa, Maya; Dall'Ara, Enrico; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-07-05

    In vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) scanning of small rodents is a powerful method for longitudinal monitoring of bone adaptation. However, the life-time bone growth in small rodents makes it a challenge to quantify local bone adaptation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol, which can take into account large bone growth, to quantify local bone adaptations over space and time. The entire right tibiae of eight 14-week-old C57BL/6J female mice were consecutively scanned four times in an in vivo µCT scanner using a nominal isotropic image voxel size of 10.4µm. The repeated scan image datasets were aligned to the corresponding baseline (first) scan image dataset using rigid registration. 80% of tibia length (starting from the endpoint of the proximal growth plate) was selected as the volume of interest and partitioned into 40 regions along the tibial long axis (10 divisions) and in the cross-section (4 sectors). The bone mineral content (BMC) was used to quantify bone adaptation and was calculated in each region. All local BMCs have precision errors (PE%CV) of less than 3.5% (24 out of 40 regions have PE%CV of less than 2%), least significant changes (LSCs) of less than 3.8%, and 38 out of 40 regions have intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of over 0.8. The proposed protocol allows to quantify local bone adaptations over an entire tibia in longitudinal studies, with a high reproducibility, an essential requirement to reduce the number of animals to achieve the necessary statistical power.

  7. A simple test of choice stepping reaction time for assessing fall risk in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tijsma, Mylou; Vister, Eva; Hoang, Phu; Lord, Stephen R

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To determine (a) the discriminant validity for established fall risk factors and (b) the predictive validity for falls of a simple test of choice stepping reaction time (CSRT) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Method People with MS (n = 210, 21-74y) performed the CSRT, sensorimotor, balance and neuropsychological tests in a single session. They were then followed up for falls using monthly fall diaries for 6 months. Results The CSRT test had excellent discriminant validity with respect to established fall risk factors. Frequent fallers (≥3 falls) performed significantly worse in the CSRT test than non-frequent fallers (0-2 falls). With the odds of suffering frequent falls increasing 69% with each SD increase in CSRT (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.27-2.26, p = <0.001). In regression analysis, CSRT was best explained by sway, time to complete the 9-Hole Peg test, knee extension strength of the weaker leg, proprioception and the time to complete the Trails B test (multiple R(2  )= ( )0.449, p < 0.001). Conclusions A simple low tech CSRT test has excellent discriminative and predictive validity in relation to falls in people with MS. This test may prove useful in documenting longitudinal changes in fall risk in relation to MS disease progression and effects of interventions. Implications for rehabilitation Good choice stepping reaction time (CSRT) is required for maintaining balance. A simple low-tech CSRT test has excellent discriminative and predictive validity in relation to falls in people with MS. This test may prove useful documenting longitudinal changes in fall risk in relation to MS disease progression and effects of interventions.

  8. Adaptive correction method for an OCXO and investigation of analytical cumulative time error upper bound.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Kunz, Thomas; Schwartz, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Traditional oscillators used in timing modules of CDMA and WiMAX base stations are large and expensive. Applying cheaper and smaller, albeit more inaccurate, oscillators in timing modules is an interesting research challenge. An adaptive control algorithm is presented to enhance the oscillators to meet the requirements of base stations during holdover mode. An oscillator frequency stability model is developed for the adaptive control algorithm. This model takes into account the control loop which creates the correction signal when the timing module is in locked mode. A recursive prediction error method is used to identify the system model parameters. Simulation results show that an oscillator enhanced by our adaptive control algorithm improves the oscillator performance significantly, compared with uncorrected oscillators. Our results also show the benefit of explicitly modeling the control loop. Finally, the cumulative time error upper bound of such enhanced oscillators is investigated analytically and comparison results between the analytical and simulated upper bound are provided. The results show that the analytical upper bound can serve as a practical guide for system designers.

  9. Adaptive Timing of Motor Output in the Mouse: The Role of Movement Oscillations in Eyelid Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Chettih, Selmaan N.; McDougle, Samuel D.; Ruffolo, Luis I.; Medina, Javier F.

    2011-01-01

    To survive, animals must learn to control their movements with millisecond-level precision, and adjust the kinematics if conditions, or task requirements, change. Here, we examine adaptive timing of motor output in mice, using a simple eyelid conditioning task. Mice were trained to blink in response to a light stimulus that was always followed by a corneal air-puff at a constant time interval. Different mice were trained with different intervals of time separating the onset of the light and the air-puff. As in previous work in other animal species, mice learned to control the speed of the blink, such that the time of maximum eyelid closure matched the interval used during training. However, we found that the time of maximum eyelid speed was always in the first 100 ms after movement onset and did not scale with the training interval, indicating that adaptive timing is not accomplished by slowing down (or speeding up) the eyelid movement uniformly throughout the duration of the blink. A new analysis, specifically designed to examine the kinematics of blinks in single trials, revealed that the underlying control signal responsible for the eyelid movement is made up of oscillatory bursts that are time-locked to the light stimulus at the beginning of the blink, becoming desynchronized later on. Furthermore, mice learn to blink at different speeds and time the movement appropriately by adjusting the amplitude, but not the frequency of the bursts in the eyelid oscillation. PMID:22144951

  10. Adaptive optics real time processing design for the advanced technology solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Kit

    2012-07-01

    The four meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) adaptive optics (AO) system will require at least twenty-four times the real time processing power as the Dunn Solar Telescope AO system. An FPGA solution for ATST AO real time processing is being pursued instead of the parallel DSP approach used for the Dunn AO76 system. An analysis shows FPGAs will have lower latency and lower hardware cost than an equivalent DSP solution. Interfacing to the proposed high speed camera and the deformable mirror will be simpler and have lower latency than with DSPs. This paper will discuss the current design and progress toward implementing the FPGA solution.

  11. Model reference adaptive control in fractional order systems using discrete-time approximation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini, Mohammad; Nojoumian, Mohammad Ali; Salarieh, Hassan; Meghdari, Ali

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, model reference control of a fractional order system has been discussed. In order to control the fractional order plant, discrete-time approximation methods have been applied. Plant and reference model are discretized by Grünwald-Letnikov definition of the fractional order derivative using "Short Memory Principle". Unknown parameters of the fractional order system are appeared in the discrete time approximate model as combinations of parameters of the main system. The discrete time MRAC via RLS identification is modified to estimate the parameters and control the fractional order plant. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed method of model reference adaptive control.

  12. A numerical study of adaptive space and time discretisations for Gross-Pitaevskii equations.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Mechthild; Abhau, Jochen

    2012-08-15

    As a basic principle, benefits of adaptive discretisations are an improved balance between required accuracy and efficiency as well as an enhancement of the reliability of numerical computations. In this work, the capacity of locally adaptive space and time discretisations for the numerical solution of low-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations is investigated. The considered model equation is related to the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation arising in the description of Bose-Einstein condensates in dilute gases. The performance of the Fourier-pseudo spectral method constrained to uniform meshes versus the locally adaptive finite element method and of higher-order exponential operator splitting methods with variable time stepsizes is studied. Numerical experiments confirm that a local time stepsize control based on a posteriori local error estimators or embedded splitting pairs, respectively, is effective in different situations with an enhancement either in efficiency or reliability. As expected, adaptive time-splitting schemes combined with fast Fourier transform techniques are favourable regarding accuracy and efficiency when applied to Gross-Pitaevskii equations with a defocusing nonlinearity and a mildly varying regular solution. However, the numerical solution of nonlinear Schrödinger equations in the semi-classical regime becomes a demanding task. Due to the highly oscillatory and nonlinear nature of the problem, the spatial mesh size and the time increments need to be of the size of the decisive parameter [Formula: see text], especially when it is desired to capture correctly the quantitative behaviour of the wave function itself. The required high resolution in space constricts the feasibility of numerical computations for both, the Fourier pseudo-spectral and the finite element method. Nevertheless, for smaller parameter values locally adaptive time discretisations facilitate to determine the time stepsizes sufficiently small in order that

  13. A numerical study of adaptive space and time discretisations for Gross–Pitaevskii equations

    PubMed Central

    Thalhammer, Mechthild; Abhau, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    As a basic principle, benefits of adaptive discretisations are an improved balance between required accuracy and efficiency as well as an enhancement of the reliability of numerical computations. In this work, the capacity of locally adaptive space and time discretisations for the numerical solution of low-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations is investigated. The considered model equation is related to the time-dependent Gross–Pitaevskii equation arising in the description of Bose–Einstein condensates in dilute gases. The performance of the Fourier-pseudo spectral method constrained to uniform meshes versus the locally adaptive finite element method and of higher-order exponential operator splitting methods with variable time stepsizes is studied. Numerical experiments confirm that a local time stepsize control based on a posteriori local error estimators or embedded splitting pairs, respectively, is effective in different situations with an enhancement either in efficiency or reliability. As expected, adaptive time-splitting schemes combined with fast Fourier transform techniques are favourable regarding accuracy and efficiency when applied to Gross–Pitaevskii equations with a defocusing nonlinearity and a mildly varying regular solution. However, the numerical solution of nonlinear Schrödinger equations in the semi-classical regime becomes a demanding task. Due to the highly oscillatory and nonlinear nature of the problem, the spatial mesh size and the time increments need to be of the size of the decisive parameter 0<ε≪1, especially when it is desired to capture correctly the quantitative behaviour of the wave function itself. The required high resolution in space constricts the feasibility of numerical computations for both, the Fourier pseudo-spectral and the finite element method. Nevertheless, for smaller parameter values locally adaptive time discretisations facilitate to determine the time stepsizes sufficiently small in order that the

  14. Local adaptation in the flowering-time gene network of balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera L.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stephen R; Levsen, Nicholas; Olson, Matthew S; Tiffin, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Identifying the signature and targets of local adaptation is an increasingly important goal in empirical population genetics. Using data from 443 balsam poplar Populus balsamifera trees sampled from 31 populations, we tested for evidence of geographically variable selection shaping diversity at 27 homologues of the Arabidopsis flowering-time network. These genes are implicated in the control of seasonal phenology, an important determinant of fitness. Using 335 candidate and 412 reference single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we tested for evidence of local adaptation by searching for elevated population differentiation using F(ST)-based outlier analyses implemented in BayeScan or a Hierarchical Model in Arelquin and by testing for significant associations between allele frequency and environmental variables using BAYENV. A total of 46 SNPs from 14 candidate genes had signatures of local adaptation-either significantly greater population differentiation or significant covariance with one or more environmental variable relative to reference SNP distributions. Only 11 SNPs from two genes exhibited both elevated population differentiation and covariance with one or more environmental variables. Several genes including the abscisic acid gene ABI1B and the circadian clock genes ELF3 and GI5 harbored a large number of SNPs with signatures of local adaptation-with SNPs in GI5 strongly covarying with both latitude and precipitation and SNPs in ABI1B strongly covarying with temperature. In contrast to several other systems, we find little evidence that photoreceptors, including phytochromes, play an important role in local adaptation. Our results additionally show that detecting local adaptation is sensitive to the analytical approaches used and that model-based significance thresholds should be viewed with caution.

  15. Dempster-Shafer regression for multi-step-ahead time-series prediction towards data-driven machinery prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Gang; Yang, Bo-Suk

    2009-04-01

    Predicting a sequence of future values of a time series using the descriptors observed in the past can be regarded as the stand-stone of data-driven machinery prognosis. The purpose of this paper is to develop a novel data-driven machinery prognosis strategy for industry application. First, the collected time-series degradation features are reconstructed based on the theorem of Takens, among which the reconstruction parameters, delay time and embedding dimension are selected by the C-C method and the false nearest neighbor method, respectively. Next, the Dempster-Shafer regression technique is developed to perform the task of time-series prediction. Moreover, the strategy of iterated multi-step-ahead prediction is discussed to keep track with the rapid variation of time-series signals during the data monitoring process in an industrial plant. The proposed scheme is validated using condition monitoring data of a methane compressor to predict the degradation trend. Experimental results show that the proposed methods have a low error rate; hence, it can be regarded as an effective tool for data-driven machinery prognosis applications.

  16. A time-accurate adaptive grid method and the numerical simulation of a shock-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelie, Michael J.; Eiseman, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    A time accurate, general purpose, adaptive grid method is developed that is suitable for multidimensional steady and unsteady numerical simulations. The grid point movement is performed in a manner that generates smooth grids which resolve the severe solution gradients and the sharp transitions in the solution gradients. The temporal coupling of the adaptive grid and the PDE solver is performed with a grid prediction correction method that is simple to implement and ensures the time accuracy of the grid. Time accurate solutions of the 2-D Euler equations for an unsteady shock vortex interaction demonstrate the ability of the adaptive method to accurately adapt the grid to multiple solution features.

  17. Effective learning strategies for real-time image-guided adaptive control of multiple-source hyperthermia applicators

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kung-Shan; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Das, Shiva

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper investigates overall theoretical requirements for reducing the times required for the iterative learning of a real-time image-guided adaptive control routine for multiple-source heat applicators, as used in hyperthermia and thermal ablative therapy for cancer. Methods: Methods for partial reconstruction of the physical system with and without model reduction to find solutions within a clinically practical timeframe were analyzed. A mathematical analysis based on the Fredholm alternative theorem (FAT) was used to compactly analyze the existence and uniqueness of the optimal heating vector under two fundamental situations: (1) noiseless partial reconstruction and (2) noisy partial reconstruction. These results were coupled with a method for further acceleration of the solution using virtual source (VS) model reduction. The matrix approximation theorem (MAT) was used to choose the optimal vectors spanning the reduced-order subspace to reduce the time for system reconstruction and to determine the associated approximation error. Numerical simulations of the adaptive control of hyperthermia using VS were also performed to test the predictions derived from the theoretical analysis. A thigh sarcoma patient model surrounded by a ten-antenna phased-array applicator was retained for this purpose. The impacts of the convective cooling from blood flow and the presence of sudden increase of perfusion in muscle and tumor were also simulated. Results: By FAT, partial system reconstruction directly conducted in the full space of the physical variables such as phases and magnitudes of the heat sources cannot guarantee reconstructing the optimal system to determine the global optimal setting of the heat sources. A remedy for this limitation is to conduct the partial reconstruction within a reduced-order subspace spanned by the first few maximum eigenvectors of the true system matrix. By MAT, this VS subspace is the optimal one when the goal is to maximize the

  18. Adaptation to shift work: physiologically based modeling of the effects of lighting and shifts' start time.

    PubMed

    Postnova, Svetlana; Robinson, Peter A; Postnov, Dmitry D

    2013-01-01

    Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers' sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8) in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers' adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21:00 instead of 00:00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters.

  19. Adaptive mesh refinement for time-domain electromagnetics using vector finite elements :a feasibility study.

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C. David; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2005-12-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of applying Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques to a vector finite element formulation for the wave equation in three dimensions. Possible error estimators are considered first. Next, approaches for refining tetrahedral elements are reviewed. AMR capabilities within the Nevada framework are then evaluated. We summarize our conclusions on the feasibility of AMR for time-domain vector finite elements and identify a path forward.

  20. Adaptation to Shift Work: Physiologically Based Modeling of the Effects of Lighting and Shifts’ Start Time

    PubMed Central

    Postnova, Svetlana; Robinson, Peter A.; Postnov, Dmitry D.

    2013-01-01

    Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers’ sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8) in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers’ adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21∶00 instead of 00∶00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters. PMID:23308206

  1. First generic one step real-time Taqman RT-PCR targeting the RNA1 of betanodaviruses.

    PubMed

    Baud, M; Cabon, J; Salomoni, A; Toffan, A; Panzarin, V; Bigarré, L

    2015-01-01

    The detection of betanodavirus genomic components is a major issue for diagnostics and control of viral nervous necrosis (VNN), a devastating disease affecting fish worldwide. Despite a number of published molecular-based tests, most of them targeting the RNA2 molecule of the virus, diagnostics is still a challenge due to the high genetic diversity within this genus. In the present study, a new one-step real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR), targeting RNA1 of most genotypes of betanodaviruses, was proposed and validated. The test detected successfully various isolates of betanodavirus representatives of the four species RGNNV, SJNNV, TPNNV and BFNNV, either produced on cell culture or from clinical samples. It was specific as shown by the absence of signal on samples from healthy sea bass or from field samples of six other fish species without clinical signs of VNN. The assay detected reliably 50-100 copies of plasmids containing the targeted cloned RNA1 region, as well as an infectious dose of virus of 10(2.5)-10(2.85) TCID50/ml. A set of samples was tested by two different laboratories, with similar results, demonstrating the robustness of the test. This is the first one step generic rRT-PCR method for betanodaviruses. It is simple to perform and may be used for first intention diagnostics as well as for confirmation in case of doubtful results obtained with other published tests targeting RNA2.

  2. Two-step feature selection for predicting survival time of patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Motoki

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is the major cause of death in prostate cancer patients. Even though some options for treatment of mCRPC have been developed, the most effective therapies remain unclear. Thus finding key patient clinical variables related with mCRPC is an important issue for understanding the disease progression mechanism of mCRPC and clinical decision making for these patients. The Prostate Cancer DREAM Challenge is a crowd-based competition to tackle this essential challenge using new large clinical datasets. This paper proposes an effective procedure for predicting global risks and survival times of these patients, aimed at sub-challenge 1a and 1b of the Prostate Cancer DREAM challenge. The procedure implements a two-step feature selection procedure, which first implements sparse feature selection for numerical clinical variables and statistical hypothesis testing of differences between survival curves caused by categorical clinical variables, and then implements a forward feature selection to narrow the list of informative features. Using Cox’s proportional hazards model with these selected features, this method predicted global risk and survival time of patients using a linear model whose input is a median time computed from the hazard model. The challenge results demonstrated that the proposed procedure outperforms the state of the art model by correctly selecting more informative features on both the global risk prediction and the survival time prediction. PMID:27990267

  3. Single step multiplex real-time RT-PCR for H5N1 influenza A virus detection.

    PubMed

    Payungporn, Sunchai; Chutinimitkul, Salin; Chaisingh, Arunee; Damrongwantanapokin, Sudarat; Buranathai, Chantanee; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2006-02-01

    H5N1 influenza A virus causes a rapidly fatal systemic disease in domestic poultry and spreads directly from poultry to mammalian species such as leopards, tigers and humans. The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex real-time RT-PCR for rapid detection of H5N1 influenza A virus. The selected primers and various labeled TaqMan MGB reporter probes corresponding to M, H5 and N1 were used in a single step multiplex real-time RT-PCR to simultaneously detect triple fluorescent signals. In order to validate the method, 75 clinical specimens infected with H5N1 isolated from both poultry and mammals, as well as various specimens of other subtypes and RNA from other viral pathogens of poultry and human were tested. The results showed that the multiplex real-time RT-PCR assays can be applied to detect virus suspensions of H5N1 influenza A virus from a wide host range and demonstrated the sensitivity of the assay amounted to approximately 10(2)-10(3)copies/mul. In conclusion, the highlights of this particular method lie in its rapidity, specificity and sensitivity thus rendering it feasible and effective for large-scale screening at times of H5N1 influenza A virus outbreaks.

  4. Robustness of continuous-time adaptive control algorithms in the presence of unmodeled dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrs, C. E.; Valavani, L.; Athans, M.; Stein, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the robustness properties of existing adaptive control algorithms to unmodeled plant high-frequency dynamics and unmeasurable output disturbances. It is demonstrated that there exist two infinite-gain operators in the nonlinear dynamic system which determines the time-evolution of output and parameter errors. The pragmatic implications of the existence of such infinite-gain operators is that: (1) sinusoidal reference inputs at specific frequencies and/or (2) sinusoidal output disturbances at any frequency (including dc), can cause the loop gain to increase without bound, thereby exciting the unmodeled high-frequency dynamics, and yielding an unstable control system. Hence, it is concluded that existing adaptive control algorithms as they are presented in the literature referenced in this paper, cannot be used with confidence in practical designs where the plant contains unmodeled dynamics because instability is likely to result. Further understanding is required to ascertain how the currently implemented adaptive systems differ from the theoretical systems studied here and how further theoretical development can improve the robustness of adaptive controllers.

  5. Development of a scalable generic platform for adaptive optics real time control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surendran, Avinash; Burse, Mahesh P.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Parihar, Padmakar

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of the present project is to explore the viability of an adaptive optics control system based exclusively on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), making strong use of their parallel processing capability. In an Adaptive Optics (AO) system, the generation of the Deformable Mirror (DM) control voltages from the Wavefront Sensor (WFS) measurements is usually through the multiplication of the wavefront slopes with a predetermined reconstructor matrix. The ability to access several hundred hard multipliers and memories concurrently in an FPGA allows performance far beyond that of a modern CPU or GPU for tasks with a well-defined structure such as Adaptive Optics control. The target of the current project is to generate a signal for a real time wavefront correction, from the signals coming from a Wavefront Sensor, wherein the system would be flexible to accommodate all the current Wavefront Sensing techniques and also the different methods which are used for wavefront compensation. The system should also accommodate for different data transmission protocols (like Ethernet, USB, IEEE 1394 etc.) for transmitting data to and from the FPGA device, thus providing a more flexible platform for Adaptive Optics control. Preliminary simulation results for the formulation of the platform, and a design of a fully scalable slope computer is presented.

  6. Stepped mirrored structures for generating true time delays in stationary optical delay line proof-of-principle experiments for application to optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansz, Paul Vernon; Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Conventional time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) relies on the detection of an interference pattern generated by the interference of backscattered light from the sample and a reference Optical Delay Line (ODL). By referencing the sample interference with the scan depth of the ODL, constructive interference indicates depth in the sample of a reflecting structure. Conventional ODLs used in time domain OCT require some physical movement of a mirror to scan a given depth range. This movement results in instrument degradation. Also in some situations it is necessary to have no moving parts. Stationary ODLs (SODLs) include dual Reflective Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) systems (Type I) and single Transmissive SLM with match-arrayed-waveguide systems (Type II). In this paper, the method of fabrication and characterisation of a number of Stepped Mirrored Structures (SMS) is presented. These structures are intended for later use in proof-of-principle experiments that demonstrate Type II SODL: a six step, 2 mm step depth macro-SMS, an eight step 150 um deep micro-SMS with glue between steps, and a six step 150 um deep micro-SMS with no glue between steps. These SMS are characterized in terms of their fabrication, step alignment and step height increment precision. The degree of alignment of each step was verified using half of a bulk Michelson interferometer. Step height was gauged using a pair of vernier callipers measuring each individual step. A change in notch frequency using an in-fibre Mach-Zhender interferometer was used to gauge the average step height and the result compared to the vernier calliper results. The best aligned SMS was the micro-SMS prepared by method B with no glue between steps. It demonstrated a 95% confidence interval variation of 1% in reflected intensity, with the least variation in intensity within steps. This SMS also had the least absolute variation in step height increment: less than 8 um. Though less variation would be ideal, for

  7. Third-order-accurate numerical methods for efficient, large time-step solutions of mixed linear and nonlinear problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    There is an increasing need for more accurate numerical methods for large-scale nonlinear magneto-fluid turbulence calculations. These methods should not only increase the current state of the art in terms of accuracy, but should also continue to optimize other desired properties such as simplicity, minimized computation, minimized memory requirements, and robust stability. This includes the ability to stably solve stiff problems with long time-steps. This work discusses a general methodology for deriving higher-order numerical methods. It also discusses how the selection of various choices can affect the desired properties. The explicit discussion focuses on third-order Runge-Kutta methods, including general solutions and five examples. The study investigates the linear numerical analysis of these methods, including their accuracy, general stability, and stiff stability. Additional appendices discuss linear multistep methods, discuss directions for further work, and exhibit numerical analysis results for some other commonly used lower-order methods.

  8. A Novel Molten Salt Reactor Concept to Implement the Multi-Step Time-Scheduled Transmutation Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Csom, Gyula; Feher, Sandor; Szieberthj, Mate

    2002-07-01

    Nowadays the molten salt reactor (MSR) concept seems to revive as one of the most promising systems for the realization of transmutation. In the molten salt reactors and subcritical systems the fuel and material to be transmuted circulate dissolved in some molten salt. The main advantage of this reactor type is the possibility of the continuous feed and reprocessing of the fuel. In the present paper a novel molten salt reactor concept is introduced and its transmutation capabilities are studied. The goal is the development of a transmutation technique along with a device implementing it, which yield higher transmutation efficiencies than that of the known procedures and thus results in radioactive waste whose load on the environment is reduced both in magnitude and time length. The procedure is the multi-step time-scheduled transmutation, in which transformation is done in several consecutive steps of different neutron flux and spectrum. In the new MSR concept, named 'multi-region' MSR (MRMSR), the primary circuit is made up of a few separate loops, in which salt-fuel mixtures of different compositions are circulated. The loop sections constituting the core region are only neutronically and thermally coupled. This new concept makes possible the utilization of the spatial dependence of spectrum as well as the advantageous features of liquid fuel such as the possibility of continuous chemical processing etc. In order to compare a 'conventional' MSR and a proposed MRMSR in terms of efficiency, preliminary calculational results are shown. Further calculations in order to find the optimal implementation of this new concept and to emphasize its other advantageous features are going on. (authors)

  9. Just-in-time adaptive classifiers-part II: designing the classifier.

    PubMed

    Alippi, Cesare; Roveri, Manuel

    2008-12-01

    Aging effects, environmental changes, thermal drifts, and soft and hard faults affect physical systems by changing their nature and behavior over time. To cope with a process evolution adaptive solutions must be envisaged to track its dynamics; in this direction, adaptive classifiers are generally designed by assuming the stationary hypothesis for the process generating the data with very few results addressing nonstationary environments. This paper proposes a methodology based on k-nearest neighbor (NN) classifiers for designing adaptive classification systems able to react to changing conditions just-in-time (JIT), i.e., exactly when it is needed. k-NN classifiers have been selected for their computational-free training phase, the possibility to easily estimate the model complexity k and keep under control the computational complexity of the classifier through suitable data reduction mechanisms. A JIT classifier requires a temporal detection of a (possible) process deviation (aspect tackled in a companion paper) followed by an adaptive management of the knowledge base (KB) of the classifier to cope with the process change. The novelty of the proposed approach resides in the general framework supporting the real-time update of the KB of the classification system in response to novel information coming from the process both in stationary conditions (accuracy improvement) and in nonstationary ones (process tracking) and in providing a suitable estimate of k. It is shown that the classification system grants consistency once the change targets the process generating the data in a new stationary state, as it is the case in many real applications.

  10. Coding and decoding with adapting neurons: a population approach to the peri-stimulus time histogram.

    PubMed

    Naud, Richard; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2012-01-01

    The response of a neuron to a time-dependent stimulus, as measured in a Peri-Stimulus-Time-Histogram (PSTH), exhibits an intricate temporal structure that reflects potential temporal coding principles. Here we analyze the encoding and decoding of PSTHs for spiking neurons with arbitrary refractoriness and adaptation. As a modeling framework, we use the spike response model, also known as the generalized linear neuron model. Because of refractoriness, the effect of the most recent spike on the spiking probability a few milliseconds later is very strong. The influence of the last spike needs therefore to be described with high precision, while the rest of the neuronal spiking history merely introduces an average self-inhibition or adaptation that depends on the expected number of past spikes but not on the exact spike timings. Based on these insights, we derive a 'quasi-renewal equation' which is shown to yield an excellent description of the firing rate of adapting neurons. We explore the domain of validity of the quasi-renewal equation and compare it with other rate equations for populations of spiking neurons. The problem of decoding the stimulus from the population response (or PSTH) is addressed analogously. We find that for small levels of activity and weak adaptation, a simple accumulator of the past activity is sufficient to decode the original input, but when refractory effects become large decoding becomes a non-linear function of the past activity. The results presented here can be applied to the mean-field analysis of coupled neuron networks, but also to arbitrary point processes with negative self-interaction.

  11. Model-free adaptive fractional order control of stable linear time-varying systems.

    PubMed

    Yakoub, Z; Amairi, M; Chetoui, M; Saidi, B; Aoun, M

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a new model-free adaptive fractional order control approach for linear time-varying systems. An online algorithm is proposed to determine some frequency characteristics using a selective filtering and to design a fractional PID controller based on the numerical optimization of the frequency-domain criterion. When the system parameters are time-varying, the controller is updated to keep the same desired performances. The main advantage of the proposed approach is that the controller design depends only on the measured input and output signals of the process. The effectiveness of the proposed method is assessed through a numerical example.

  12. Discrete-time adaptive backstepping nonlinear control via high-order neural networks.

    PubMed

    Alanis, Alma Y; Sanchez, Edgar N; Loukianov, Alexander G

    2007-07-01

    This paper deals with adaptive tracking for discrete-time multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) nonlinear systems in presence of bounded disturbances. In this paper, a high-order neural network (HONN) structure is used to approximate a control law designed by the backstepping technique, applied to a block strict feedback form (BSFF). This paper also includes the respective stability analysis, on the basis of the Lyapunov approach, for the whole controlled system, including the extended Kalman filter (EKF)-based NN learning algorithm. Applicability of the scheme is illustrated via simulation for a discrete-time nonlinear model of an electric induction motor.

  13. Changes in cortical activity associated with adaptive behavior during repeated balance perturbation of unpredictable timing

    PubMed Central

    Mierau, Andreas; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Strüder, Heiko K.

    2015-01-01

    The compensation for a sudden balance perturbation, unpracticed and unpredictable in timing and magnitude is accompanied by pronounced postural instability that is suggested to be causal to falls. However, subsequent presentations of an identical perturbation are characterized by a marked decrease of the amplitude of postural reactions; a phenomenon called adaptation or habituation. This study aimed to identify cortical characteristics associated with adaptive behavior during repetitive balance perturbations based on single-trial analyses of the P1 and N1 perturbation-evoked potentials. Thirty-seven young men were exposed to ten transient balance perturbations while balancing on the dominant leg. Thirty two-channel electroencephalography (EEG), surface electromyography (EMG) of the ankle plantar flexor muscles and postural sway (i.e., Euclidean distance of the supporting platform) were recorded simultaneously. The P1 and N1 potentials were localized and the amplitude/latency was analyzed trial by trial. The best match sources for P1 and N1 potentials were located in the parietal (Brodmann area (BA) 5) and midline fronto-central cortex (BA 6), respectively. The amplitude and latency of the P1 potential remained unchanged over trials. In contrast, a significant adaptation of the N1 amplitude was observed. Similar adaptation effects were found with regard to postural sway and ankle plantarflexors EMG activity of the non-dominant (free) leg; i.e., an indicator for reduced muscular co-contraction and/or less temporary bipedal stance to regain stability. Significant but weak correlations were found between N1 amplitude and postural sway as well as EMG activity. These results highlight the important role of the midline fronto-central cortex for adaptive behavior associated with balance control. PMID:26528154

  14. Changes in cortical activity associated with adaptive behavior during repeated balance perturbation of unpredictable timing.

    PubMed

    Mierau, Andreas; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Strüder, Heiko K

    2015-01-01

    The compensation for a sudden balance perturbation, unpracticed and unpredictable in timing and magnitude is accompanied by pronounced postural instability that is suggested to be causal to falls. However, subsequent presentations of an identical perturbation are characterized by a marked decrease of the amplitude of postural reactions; a phenomenon called adaptation or habituation. This study aimed to identify cortical characteristics associated with adaptive behavior during repetitive balance perturbations based on single-trial analyses of the P1 and N1 perturbation-evoked potentials. Thirty-seven young men were exposed to ten transient balance perturbations while balancing on the dominant leg. Thirty two-channel electroencephalography (EEG), surface electromyography (EMG) of the ankle plantar flexor muscles and postural sway (i.e., Euclidean distance of the supporting platform) were recorded simultaneously. The P1 and N1 potentials were localized and the amplitude/latency was analyzed trial by trial. The best match sources for P1 and N1 potentials were located in the parietal (Brodmann area (BA) 5) and midline fronto-central cortex (BA 6), respectively. The amplitude and latency of the P1 potential remained unchanged over trials. In contrast, a significant adaptation of the N1 amplitude was observed. Similar adaptation effects were found with regard to postural sway and ankle plantarflexors EMG activity of the non-dominant (free) leg; i.e., an indicator for reduced muscular co-contraction and/or less temporary bipedal stance to regain stability. Significant but weak correlations were found between N1 amplitude and postural sway as well as EMG activity. These results highlight the important role of the midline fronto-central cortex for adaptive behavior associated with balance control.

  15. Development of one-step real-time PCR assay for titrating trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yang; Du, Dongchuan; Ge, Peng; Xu, Yongqing; Liu, Xintao; Zhang, Yan; Su, Weiheng; Kiseleva, Irina; Rudenko, Larisa; Xu, Fei; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, infectivity of a trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) is titrated by determining the 50% egg infectious dose assay (EID50) or plaque forming units (PFU), which requires specific monoclonal antibodies to neutralize 2 strains while estimating the titer of the non-neutralized strain. Compared to this time-consuming, laborious, subjective and variable process, reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) technology has advantages of rapidity, sensitivity, reproducibility and reduced contamination, thus has been applied widely for detecting pathogens and measuring viral titers. In this study, the critical harvest time was determined to be 18 h post-infection (hpi) for type A influenza and 12 hpi for type B influenza, but no significant difference between titers at 12 hpi and 18 hpi for the type B strain was observed. In conclusion, trivalent LAIVs can be titrated simultaneously within 24 h by this one-step RT-qPCR assay, which yielded titers comparable to those obtained by the traditional EID50 assay. Therefore, the RT-qPCR assay may be used as a highly specific, sensitive, precise and rapid alternative to the EID50 assay for titering LAIVs. PMID:25483696

  16. 20 CFR 655.1114 - Element IV-What are the timely and significant steps an H-1C employer must take to recruit and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... significant steps an H-1C employer must take to recruit and retain U.S. nurses? 655.1114 Section 655.1114... Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1114 Element IV—What are the timely and significant steps an H-1C employer must take to recruit and retain U.S. nurses? (a) The fourth attestation element requires that...

  17. 20 CFR 655.1114 - Element IV-What are the timely and significant steps an H-1C employer must take to recruit and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1114 Element IV—What are the timely and significant steps an H-1C... retain sufficient registered nurses who are United States citizens or immigrants who are authorized to... facility on nonimmigrant registered nurses.” The facility must take at least two such steps, unless...

  18. 20 CFR 655.1114 - Element IV-What are the timely and significant steps an H-1C employer must take to recruit and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1114 Element IV—What are the timely and significant steps an H-1C... retain sufficient registered nurses who are United States citizens or immigrants who are authorized to... facility on nonimmigrant registered nurses.” The facility must take at least two such steps, unless...

  19. Reducing the time complexity of the derandomized evolution strategy with covariance matrix adaptation (CMA-ES).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Nikolaus; Müller, Sibylle D; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a novel evolutionary optimization strategy based on the derandomized evolution strategy with covariance matrix adaptation (CMA-ES). This new approach is intended to reduce the number of generations required for convergence to the optimum. Reducing the number of generations, i.e., the time complexity of the algorithm, is important if a large population size is desired: (1) to reduce the effect of noise; (2) to improve global search properties; and (3) to implement the algorithm on (highly) parallel machines. Our method results in a highly parallel algorithm which scales favorably with large numbers of processors. This is accomplished by efficiently incorporating the available information from a large population, thus significantly reducing the number of generations needed to adapt the covariance matrix. The original version of the CMA-ES was designed to reliably adapt the covariance matrix in small populations but it cannot exploit large populations efficiently. Our modifications scale up the efficiency to population sizes of up to 10n, where n is the problem dimension. This method has been applied to a large number of test problems, demonstrating that in many cases the CMA-ES can be advanced from quadratic to linear time complexity.

  20. Real-Time Adaptive Control Allocation Applied to a High Performance Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Lallman, Frederick J.; Bundick, W. Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the development and application of one approach to the control of aircraft with large numbers of control effectors. This approach, referred to as real-time adaptive control allocation, combines a nonlinear method for control allocation with actuator failure detection and isolation. The control allocator maps moment (or angular acceleration) commands into physical control effector commands as functions of individual control effectiveness and availability. The actuator failure detection and isolation algorithm is a model-based approach that uses models of the actuators to predict actuator behavior and an adaptive decision threshold to achieve acceptable false alarm/missed detection rates. This integrated approach provides control reconfiguration when an aircraft is subjected to actuator failure, thereby improving maneuverability and survivability of the degraded aircraft. This method is demonstrated on a next generation military aircraft Lockheed-Martin Innovative Control Effector) simulation that has been modified to include a novel nonlinear fluid flow control control effector based on passive porosity. Desktop and real-time piloted simulation results demonstrate the performance of this integrated adaptive control allocation approach.

  1. Estimating Model Parameters of Adaptive Software Systems in Real-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Tantawi, Asser; Zhang, Li

    Adaptive software systems have the ability to adapt to changes in workload and execution environment. In order to perform resource management through model based control in such systems, an accurate mechanism for estimating the software system's model parameters is required. This paper deals with real-time estimation of a performance model for adaptive software systems that process multiple classes of transactional workload. First, insights in to the static performance model estimation problem are provided. Then an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) design is combined with an open queueing network model to dynamically estimate the model parameters in real-time. Specific problems that are encountered in the case of multiple classes of workload are analyzed. These problems arise mainly due to the under-deterministic nature of the estimation problem. This motivates us to propose a modified design of the filter. Insights for choosing tuning parameters of the modified design, i.e., number of constraints and sampling intervals are provided. The modified filter design is shown to effectively tackle problems with multiple classes of workload through experiments.

  2. Hydrological time series modeling: A comparison between adaptive neuro-fuzzy, neural network and autoregressive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohani, A. K.; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, R. D.

    2012-06-01

    SummaryTime series modeling is necessary for the planning and management of reservoirs. More recently, the soft computing techniques have been used in hydrological modeling and forecasting. In this study, the potential of artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy system in monthly reservoir inflow forecasting are examined by developing and comparing monthly reservoir inflow prediction models, based on autoregressive (AR), artificial neural networks (ANNs) and adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). To take care the effect of monthly periodicity in the flow data, cyclic terms are also included in the ANN and ANFIS models. Working with time series flow data of the Sutlej River at Bhakra Dam, India, several ANN and adaptive neuro-fuzzy models are trained with different input vectors. To evaluate the performance of the selected ANN and adaptive neural fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models, comparison is made with the autoregressive (AR) models. The ANFIS model trained with the input data vector including previous inflows and cyclic terms of monthly periodicity has shown a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy in comparison with the ANFIS models trained with the input vectors considering only previous inflows. In all cases ANFIS gives more accurate forecast than the AR and ANN models. The proposed ANFIS model coupled with the cyclic terms is shown to provide better representation of the monthly inflow forecasting for planning and operation of reservoir.

  3. Fixed-point vs. floating-point arithmetic comparison for adaptive optics real-time control computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Hernando, Yolanda; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis F.; Garcia-Talavera, Marcos R.

    2008-07-01

    Most computers in the past have been equipped with floating point processing capabilities, allowing an easy and brute-force solution for the machine computation errors, not requiring any specific tailoring of the computation in nearly hundred percent of situations. However, the computation needed for the adaptive optics real-time control in 30-50 meter telescopes is big enough to cause trouble to conventional von-Neumann processors, even if Moore's Law is valid for the next years. Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) have been proposed as a viable alternative to cope with such computation needs[1,2], but--at least today's chips--will require fixed-point arithmetic to be used instead. It is then important to evaluate up to what point the accuracy and stability of the control system will be affected by this limitation. This paper presents the simulation and laboratory results of the comparison between both arithmetics, specifically evaluated in an adaptive optics system. The real-time controller has been modeled as black box having as input the wavefront sensor camera digital output data, providing a digital output to the actuators of the deformable mirror, and with the task of internally computing all outputs from the inputs. MATLAB fixed-point library has been used to evaluate the effect of different precision lengths (5-10 fractional bits) in the computation of the Shack-Hartmann subaperture centroid, in comparison with the reference 64-bit floating-point arithmetic and with the noise floor of the real system, concluding that the effect of the limited precision can be overcome by adequately selecting the number of fractional bits used in the representation, and tailoring that number with the needs at every step of the algorithm.

  4. The adaptive CCCG({eta}) method for efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F.F.; Birkett, N.R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The Controlled Cholesky factorisation has been shown to be a robust preconditioner for the Conjugate Gradient method. In this scheme the amount of fill-in is defined in terms of a parameter {eta}, the number of extra elements allowed per column. It is demonstrated how an optimum value of {eta} can be automatically determined when solving time dependent p.d.e.`s using an implicit time step method. A comparison between CCCG({eta}) and the standard ICCG solving parabolic problems on general grids shows CCCG({eta}) to be an efficient general purpose solver.

  5. Experimental demonstration of real-time adaptive one-qubit quantum-state tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qi; Li, Li; Xiang, Xiao; Xiang, Guo-Yong; Li, Chuang-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-01-01

    Quantum-state tomography plays a pivotal role in quantum computation and information processing. To improve the accuracy in estimating an unknown state, carefully designed measurement schemes, such as adopting an adaptive strategy, are necessarily needed, which have gained great interest recently. In this work, based on the proposal of Sugiyama et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85, 052107 (2012)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.052107, we experimentally realize an adaptive quantum-state tomography for one qubit in an optical system. Since this scheme gives an analytical solution to the optimal measurement basis problem, our experiment is updated in real time and the infidelity between the real state and the estimated state is tracked with the detected photons. We observe an almost 1 /N scaling rule of averaged infidelity against the overall number of photons, N , in our experiment, which outperforms 1 /√{N } of nonadaptive schemes.

  6. Real-Time Tracking Framework with Adaptive Features and Constrained Labels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daqun; Xu, Tingfa; Chen, Shuoyang; Zhang, Jizhou; Jiang, Shenwang

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel tracking framework with adaptive features and constrained labels (AFCL) to handle illumination variation, occlusion and appearance changes caused by the variation of positions. The novel ensemble classifier, including the Forward–Backward error and the location constraint is applied, to get the precise coordinates of the promising bounding boxes. The Forward–Backward error can enhance the adaptation and accuracy of the binary features, whereas the location constraint can overcome the label noise to a certain degree. We use the combiner which can evaluate the online templates and the outputs of the classifier to accommodate the complex situation. Evaluation of the widely used tracking benchmark shows that the proposed framework can significantly improve the tracking accuracy, and thus reduce the processing time. The proposed framework has been tested and implemented on the embedded system using TMS320C6416 and Cyclone Ⅲ kernel processors. The outputs show that achievable and satisfying results can be obtained. PMID:27618052

  7. Cultivating Resilience in Families Who Foster: Understanding How Families Cope and Adapt Over Time.

    PubMed

    Lietz, Cynthia A; Julien-Chinn, Francie J; Geiger, Jennifer M; Hayes Piel, Megan

    2016-12-01

    Families who foster offer essential care for children and youth when their own parents are unable to provide for their safety and well-being. Foster caregivers face many challenges including increased workload, emotional distress, and the difficulties associated with health and mental health problems that are more common in children in foster care. Despite these stressors, many families are able to sustain fostering while maintaining or enhancing functioning of their unit. This qualitative study applied an adaptational process model of family resilience that emerged in previous studies to examine narratives of persistent, long-term, and multiple fostering experiences. Data corroborated previous research in two ways. Family resilience was again described as a transactional process of coping and adaptation that evolves over time. This process was cultivated through the activation of 10 family strengths that are important in different ways, during varied phases.

  8. Pitch Adaptation Patterns in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users: Over Time and After Experience

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Lina A.J.; Ito, Rindy A.; Eggleston, Jessica L.; Liao, Selena; Becker, Jillian J.; Lakin, Carrie E.; Warren, Frank M.; McMenomey, Sean O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pitch plasticity has been observed in Hybrid cochlear implant (CI) users. Does pitch plasticity also occur in bimodal CI users with traditional long-electrode CIs, and is pitch adaptation pattern associated with electrode discrimination or speech recognition performance? Objective Characterize pitch adaptation patterns in long-electrode CI users, correlate these patterns with electrode discrimination and speech perception outcomes, and analyze which subject factors are associated with the different patterns. Methods Electric-to-acoustic pitch matches were obtained in 19 subjects over time from CI activation to at least 12 months after activation, and in a separate group of 18 subjects in a single visit after at least 24 months of CI experience. Audiometric thresholds, electrode discrimination performance, and speech perception scores were also measured. Results Subjects measured over time had pitch adaptation patterns that fit one of the following categories: 1) “Pitch-adapting”, i.e. the mismatch between perceived electrode pitch and the corresponding frequency-to-electrode allocations decreased; 2) “Pitch-dropping”, i.e. the pitches of multiple electrodes dropped and converged to a similar low pitch; 3) “Pitch-unchanging”, i.e. electrode pitches did not change. Subjects measured after CI experience had a parallel set of adaptation patterns: 1) “Matched-pitch”, i.e. the electrode pitch was matched to the frequency allocation; 2) “Low-pitch”, i.e. the pitches of multiple electrodes were all around the lowest frequency allocation; 3) “Nonmatched-pitch”, i.e. the pitch patterns were compressed relative to the frequency allocations and did not fit either the matched-pitch or low-pitch categories. Unlike Hybrid CI users which were mostly in the pitch-adapting/matched-pitch category, the majority of bimodal CI users were in the latter two categories, pitch-dropping/low-pitch or pitch-unchanging/nonmatched-pitch. Subjects with pitch-adapting

  9. Time, complex systems, and public policy: a theoretical foundation for adaptive policy making.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Gus

    2003-01-01

    Can public policy development and implementation be improved by closely tracking and coordinating its timing with that of the regulated sector? Built-in asynchronies between political process and regulated sectors or activities can produce unintended disruptions in rates of economic change and development undermining the original intent of the policy or regulatory action. Such events sometimes lead to unexpected future disruptions as well. A policy approach is needed that adaptively ties the right mix of resources and regulatory activity to the timing of particular stages of economic development or growth associated with a particular industry. These public policy timing problems are explored using a new theory based on the concepts of "time-ecology," "heterochrony," and "temporal signature." The full range of linear and nonlinear time-space web linkages (electronic, selling and buying, technology transfer are examples) in an government-industry cluster between political, economic, and other elements creates an interconnected ecology-a time-ecology-of unique, more or less intense, and often complex rhythmic pulses occuring in parallel or in a punctuated way, and entrained with or influencing each other across multiple time scales flowing into the future. Each organizational structure is situated in its own past, present, and future in a unique way (time signature). Outside linkages mutually influence structuration by varying rates of development and growth (heterochrony). Nonlinear dynamics may be involved in these interactions. This whole process occurs on linked government/industry adaptive landscapes. The approach detailed in this paper may be applicable to organizational and time related issues in other disciplines. The paper ends with suggestions for testing the theory.

  10. Approximation-Based Discrete-Time Adaptive Position Tracking Control for Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinpeng; Shi, Peng; Yu, Haisheng; Chen, Bing; Lin, Chong

    2015-07-01

    This paper considers the problem of discrete-time adaptive position tracking control for a interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) based on fuzzy-approximation. Fuzzy logic systems are used to approximate the nonlinearities of the discrete-time IPMSM drive system which is derived by direct discretization using Euler method, and a discrete-time fuzzy position tracking controller is designed via backstepping approach. In contrast to existing results, the advantage of the scheme is that the number of the adjustable parameters is reduced to two only and the problem of coupling nonlinearity can be overcome. It is shown that the proposed discrete-time fuzzy controller can guarantee the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin and all the signals are bounded. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness and the potentials of the theoretic results obtained.

  11. Development of real-time diagnostics and feedback algorithms for JET in view of the next step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, A.; Joffrin, E.; Felton, R.; Mazon, D.; Zabeo, L.; Albanese, R.; Arena, P.; Ambrosino, G.; Ariola, M.; Barana, O.; Bruno, M.; Laborde, L.; Moreau, D.; Piccolo, F.; Sartori, F.; Crisanti, F.; de la Luna, E.; Sanchez, J.; Contributors, EFDA-JET

    2005-03-01

    Real-time control of many plasma parameters will be an essential aspect in the development of reliable high performance operation of next step tokamaks. The main prerequisites for any feedback scheme are the precise real-time determination of the quantities to be controlled, requiring top quality and highly reliable diagnostics, and the availability of robust control algorithms. A new set of real-time diagnostics was recently implemented on JET to prove the feasibility of determining, with high accuracy and time resolution, the most important plasma quantities. Some of the signals now routinely provided in real time at JET are: (i) the internal inductance and the main confinement quantities obtained by calculating the Shafranov integrals from the pick-up coils with 2 ms time resolution; (ii) the electron temperature profile, from electron cylotron emission every 10 ms; (iii) the ion temperature and plasma toroidal velocity profiles, from charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, provided every 50 ms; and (iv) the safety factor profile, derived from the inversion of the polarimetric line integrals every 2 ms. With regard to feedback algorithms, new model-based controllers were developed to allow a more robust control of several plasma parameters. With these new tools, several real-time schemes were implemented, among which the most significant is the simultaneous control of the safety factor and the plasma pressure profiles using the additional heating systems (LH, NBI, ICRH) as actuators. The control strategy adopted in this case consists of a multi-variable model-based technique, which was implemented as a truncated singular value decomposition of an integral operator. This approach is considered essential for systems like tokamak machines, characterized by a strong mutual dependence of the various parameters and the distributed nature of the quantities, the plasma profiles, to be controlled. First encouraging results were also obtained using non

  12. A new time-adaptive discrete bionic wavelet transform for enhancing speech from adverse noise environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniswamy, Sumithra; Duraisamy, Prakash; Alam, Mohammad Showkat; Yuan, Xiaohui

    2012-04-01

    Automatic speech processing systems are widely used in everyday life such as mobile communication, speech and speaker recognition, and for assisting the hearing impaired. In speech communication systems, the quality and intelligibility of speech is of utmost importance for ease and accuracy of information exchange. To obtain an intelligible speech signal and one that is more pleasant to listen, noise reduction is essential. In this paper a new Time Adaptive Discrete Bionic Wavelet Thresholding (TADBWT) scheme is proposed. The proposed technique uses Daubechies mother wavelet to achieve better enhancement of speech from additive non- stationary noises which occur in real life such as street noise and factory noise. Due to the integration of human auditory system model into the wavelet transform, bionic wavelet transform (BWT) has great potential for speech enhancement which may lead to a new path in speech processing. In the proposed technique, at first, discrete BWT is applied to noisy speech to derive TADBWT coefficients. Then the adaptive nature of the BWT is captured by introducing a time varying linear factor which updates the coefficients at each scale over time. This approach has shown better performance than the existing algorithms at lower input SNR due to modified soft level dependent thresholding on time adaptive coefficients. The objective and subjective test results confirmed the competency of the TADBWT technique. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is also evaluated for speaker recognition task under noisy environment. The recognition results show that the TADWT technique yields better performance when compared to alternate methods specifically at lower input SNR.

  13. Testing the role of phenotypic plasticity for local adaptation: growth and development in time-constrained Rana temporaria populations.

    PubMed

    Lind, M I; Johansson, F

    2011-12-01

    Phenotypic plasticity can be important for local adaptation, because it enables individuals to survive in a novel environment until genetic changes have been accumulated by genetic accommodation. By analysing the relationship between development rate and growth rate, it can be determined whether plasticity in life-history traits is caused by changed physiology or behaviour. We extended this to examine whether plasticity had been aiding local adaptation, by investigating whether the plastic response had been fixed in locally adapted populations. Tadpoles from island populations of Rana temporaria, locally adapted to different pool-drying regimes, were monitored in a common garden. Individual differences in development rate were caused by different foraging efficiency. However, developmental plasticity was physiologically mediated by trading off growth against development rate. Surprisingly, plasticity has not aided local adaptation to time-stressed environments, because local adaptation was not caused by genetic assimilation but on selection on the standing genetic variation in development time.

  14. Dark adaptation time in canine electroretinography using a contact lens electrode with a built-in light source.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Seiya; Itoh, Yoshiki; Hoshino, Sho; Hayashi, Miri; Ito, Yosuke

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dark adaptation time in canine electroretinography (ERG) using a contact lens electrode with a built-in LED. Twelve eyes of six normal laboratory beagle dogs were used and exposed to steady room light at 500 lux for 30 min for light adaption. ERG was recorded at different time points during dark adaptation in sedated and light-adapted beagles. The stimulus intensity was 0.0096 cd/m(2)/sec. The b-wave amplitude increased significantly until 25 min of dark adaptation, whereas no significant changes in amplitudes were observed after 30 min. Dark adaptation for more than 25 min would be necessary for accurate ERG in canine ERG using a contact lens electrode with a built-in LED.

  15. AOS: adaptive offset time scheduling for TCP fairness in optical burst-switched network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hongyun; Zhao, Yongxiang; Chen, Changjia

    2005-11-01

    Optical Burst-switched (OBS) is a promising switching technology and expected to support the future Internet backbone with dramatically increasing bandwidth demand. In an OBS network, burst contention causes burst loss due to bufferless nature of OBS core network. This kind of burst loss will interact with the above TCP layer. In this paper, we study the impact of this interaction on TCP fairness. We find significant unfairness among TCP flows that share the OBS core network, i.e. one flow obtains higher throughput while any others with much lower throughputs. The cause is the phenomenon called "the bigger eats the smaller (BES)", in which a TCP flow with higher rate occasionally will "see" less burst contentions and increase its rate further, while a TCP with lower rate will see more burst contentions and decrease its rate continually. Discuss a simple model to explain BES and verify that a continuous sequence of bursts will enhance BES. Then observe that offset time will be a good choice to control TCP fairness by a curve of unfairness control with offset time adjustment. Finally an adaptive offset time scheduling (AOS) algorithm is proposed. AOS assigns burst offset time value adaptive to the rate of TCP flow. The simulation results show that the fairness can be significantly improved by our AOS scheme.

  16. The genomic basis of circadian and circalunar timing adaptations in a midge.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Tobias S; Poehn, Birgit; Szkiba, David; Preussner, Marco; Sedlazeck, Fritz J; Zrim, Alexander; Neumann, Tobias; Nguyen, Lam-Tung; Betancourt, Andrea J; Hummel, Thomas; Vogel, Heiko; Dorner, Silke; Heyd, Florian; von Haeseler, Arndt; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin

    2016-12-01

    Organisms use endogenous clocks to anticipate regular environmental cycles, such as days and tides. Natural variants resulting in differently timed behaviour or physiology, known as chronotypes in humans, have not been well characterized at the molecular level. We sequenced the genome of Clunio marinus, a marine midge whose reproduction is timed by circadian and circalunar clocks. Midges from different locations show strain-specific genetic timing adaptations. We examined genetic variation in five C. marinus strains from different locations and mapped quantitative trait loci for circalunar and circadian chronotypes. The region most strongly associated with circadian chronotypes generates strain-specific differences in the abundance of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II.1 (CaMKII.1) splice variants. As equivalent variants were shown to alter CaMKII activity in Drosophila melanogaster, and C. marinus (Cma)-CaMKII.1 increases the transcriptional activity of the dimer of the circadian proteins Cma-CLOCK and Cma-CYCLE, we suggest that modulation of alternative splicing is a mechanism for natural adaptation in circadian timing.

  17. Electric and magnetic losses modeled by a stable hybrid with explicit-implicit time-stepping for Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Halleroed, Tomas Rylander, Thomas

    2008-04-20

    A stable hybridization of the finite-element method (FEM) and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme for Maxwell's equations with electric and magnetic losses is presented for two-dimensional problems. The hybrid method combines the flexibility of the FEM with the efficiency of the FDTD scheme and it is based directly on Ampere's and Faraday's law. The electric and magnetic losses can be treated implicitly by the FEM on an unstructured mesh, which allows for local mesh refinement in order to resolve rapid variations in the material parameters and/or the electromagnetic field. It is also feasible to handle larger homogeneous regions with losses by the explicit FDTD scheme connected to an implicitly time-stepped and lossy FEM region. The hybrid method shows second-order convergence for smooth scatterers. The bistatic radar cross section (RCS) for a circular metal cylinder with a lossy coating converges to the analytical solution and an accuracy of 2% is achieved for about 20 points per wavelength. The monostatic RCS for an airfoil that features sharp corners yields a lower order of convergence and it is found to agree well with what can be expected for singular fields at the sharp corners. A careful convergence study with resolutions from 20 to 140 points per wavelength provides accurate extrapolated results for this non-trivial test case, which makes it possible to use as a reference problem for scattering codes that model both electric and magnetic losses.

  18. Webinar Presentation: Environmental Exposures and Health Risks in California Child Care Facilities: First Steps to Improve Environmental Health where Children Spend Time

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Environmental Exposures and Health Risks in California Child Care Facilities: First Steps to Improve Environmental Health where Children Spend Time, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2016 Webinar Series: Exposome.

  19. [Adaptability of mangrove Avicennia marina seedlings to simulated tide-inundated times].

    PubMed

    Liao, Bao-wen; Qiu, Feng-ying; Zhang, Liu-en; Han, Jing; Guan, Wei

    2010-05-01

    A laboratory test on the effects of differents simulated tide-inundated times with 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24 h x d(-1) on the growth of Avicennia marina seedlings was conducted. The ten growth information indices including chlorophyll, root vigor, growth, biomass and photosynthetic rate were mensurated. The principal components analysis was made combining the ten growth information indices. The 210 d experimental results showed that the chlorophyll, root vigor, growth and biomass would rise first and then fall as the extension of the inundate time; and they changed suddenly at the threshold inundate time 16 h x d(-1). The growth and biomass of Avicennia marina seedlings with more than 16 hours tide-inundated time per day were less than them with no more than 16 hours tide-inundated time per day. The maximum value of stem increment each month, leaf blade increment each month, dry weight of stem, dry weight of root and total biomass were under the 10 hours tide-inundated time per day. It concluded that Avicennia marina seedlings would grow adaptively with less than 16 hours tide-inundated time per day, 8-12 hours of tide-inundated time per day is the most suitable for the growth of Avicennia marina seedlings, while 16 h x d(-1) is a critical tide-inundated time when the plant responded to be obviously inadaptable.

  20. OFDM Radar Space-Time Adaptive Processing by Exploiting Spatio-Temporal Sparsity

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    We propose a sparsity-based space-time adaptive processing (STAP) algorithm to detect a slowly-moving target using an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar. We observe that the target and interference spectra are inherently sparse in the spatio-temporal domain. Hence, we exploit that sparsity to develop an efficient STAP technique that utilizes considerably lesser number of secondary data and produces an equivalent performance as the other existing STAP techniques. In addition, the use of an OFDM signal increases the frequency diversity of our system, as different scattering centers of a target resonate at different frequencies, and thus improves the target detectability. First, we formulate a realistic sparse-measurement model for an OFDM radar considering both the clutter and jammer as the interfering sources. Then, we apply a residual sparse-recovery technique based on the LASSO estimator to estimate the target and interference covariance matrices, and subsequently compute the optimal STAP-filter weights. Our numerical results demonstrate a comparative performance analysis of the proposed sparse-STAP algorithm with four other existing STAP methods. Furthermore, we discover that the OFDM-STAP filter-weights are adaptable to the frequency-variabilities of the target and interference responses, in addition to the spatio-temporal variabilities. Hence, by better utilizing the frequency variabilities, we propose an adaptive OFDM-waveform design technique, and consequently gain a significant amount of STAP-performance improvement.

  1. Sequential Insertion Heuristic with Adaptive Bee Colony Optimisation Algorithm for Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows.

    PubMed

    Jawarneh, Sana; Abdullah, Salwani

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a bee colony optimisation (BCO) algorithm to tackle the vehicle routing problem with time window (VRPTW). The VRPTW involves recovering an ideal set of routes for a fleet of vehicles serving a defined number of customers. The BCO algorithm is a population-based algorithm that mimics the social communication patterns of honeybees in solving problems. The performance of the BCO algorithm is dependent on its parameters, so the online (self-adaptive) parameter tuning strategy is used to improve its effectiveness and robustness. Compared with the basic BCO, the adaptive BCO performs better. Diversification is crucial to the performance of the population-based algorithm, but the initial population in the BCO algorithm is generated using a greedy heuristic, which has insufficient diversification. Therefore the ways in which the sequential insertion heuristic (SIH) for the initial population drives the population toward improved solutions are examined. Experimental comparisons indicate that the proposed adaptive BCO-SIH algorithm works well across all instances and is able to obtain 11 best results in comparison with the best-known results in the literature when tested on Solomon's 56 VRPTW 100 customer instances. Also, a statistical test shows that there is a significant difference between the results.

  2. Sequential Insertion Heuristic with Adaptive Bee Colony Optimisation Algorithm for Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

    PubMed Central

    Jawarneh, Sana; Abdullah, Salwani

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a bee colony optimisation (BCO) algorithm to tackle the vehicle routing problem with time window (VRPTW). The VRPTW involves recovering an ideal set of routes for a fleet of vehicles serving a defined number of customers. The BCO algorithm is a population-based algorithm that mimics the social communication patterns of honeybees in solving problems. The performance of the BCO algorithm is dependent on its parameters, so the online (self-adaptive) parameter tuning strategy is used to improve its effectiveness and robustness. Compared with the basic BCO, the adaptive BCO performs better. Diversification is crucial to the performance of the population-based algorithm, but the initial population in the BCO algorithm is generated using a greedy heuristic, which has insufficient diversification. Therefore the ways in which the sequential insertion heuristic (SIH) for the initial population drives the population toward improved solutions are examined. Experimental comparisons indicate that the proposed adaptive BCO-SIH algorithm works well across all instances and is able to obtain 11 best results in comparison with the best-known results in the literature when tested on Solomon’s 56 VRPTW 100 customer instances. Also, a statistical test shows that there is a significant difference between the results. PMID:26132158

  3. Global surface mass time variations by using a two-step inversion for cumulating daily satellite gravity information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, Guillaume; Frappart, Frappart; Seoane, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new method to produce time series of global maps of surface mass variations by progressive integration of daily geopotential variations measured by orbiting satellites. In the case of the GRACE mission (2002 - 2012), these geopotential variations can be determined from very accurate inter-satellite K-Band Range Rate (KBRR) measurements of 5-second daily orbits. In particular, the along-track gravity contribution of hydrology is extracted by removing de-aliasing models for static field, atmosphere, oceans mass variations (including periodical tides), as well as polar movements. Our determination of surface mass sources consists of two successive dependent Kalman filter stages. The first one consists of reducing the satellite-based potential anomalies by adjusting the longest spatial wavelengths (i.e., low-degree spherical harmonics less than 5-6). In the second stage, the residual potential anomalies from the previous stage are used to recover surface mass density changes - in terms of Equivalent-Water Height (EWH) - over a global network of juxtaposed triangular elements. These surface tiles of ~40,000 km x km are imposed to be identical and homogeneously-distributed over the terrestrial sphere, however they can be adapted to the local geometry of the surface mass. Our global approach was tested by inverting simulated hydrology-related geopotential data, and successfully applied to estimate time-varying surface mass densities from real GRACE-based residuals. This strategy of combined Kalman filter-type inversions can also be useful for exploring the possibility of reaching better time and space resolutions for hydrology, that would be hopefully brought by future low altitude geodetic missions.

  4. Real-time, adaptive machine learning for non-stationary, near chaotic gasoline engine combustion time series.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Adam; Bohac, Stanislav V

    2015-10-01

    Fuel efficient Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine combustion timing predictions must contend with non-linear chemistry, non-linear physics, period doubling bifurcation(s), turbulent mixing, model parameters that can drift day-to-day, and air-fuel mixture state information that cannot typically be resolved on a cycle-to-cycle basis, especially during transients. In previous work, an abstract cycle-to-cycle mapping function coupled with ϵ-Support Vector Regression was shown to predict experimentally observed cycle-to-cycle combustion timing over a wide range of engine conditions, despite some of the aforementioned difficulties. The main limitation of the previous approach was that a partially acasual randomly sampled training dataset was used to train proof of concept offline predictions. The objective of this paper is to address this limitation by proposing a new online adaptive Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) extension named Weighted Ring-ELM. This extension enables fully causal combustion timing predictions at randomly chosen engine set points, and is shown to achieve results that are as good as or better than the previous offline method. The broader objective of this approach is to enable a new class of real-time model predictive control strategies for high variability HCCI and, ultimately, to bring HCCI's low engine-out NOx and reduced CO2 emissions to production engines.

  5. Visualization of Time-Series Sensor Data to Inform the Design of Just-In-Time Adaptive Stress Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Moushumi; Raij, Andrew; Epstien, David; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Beck, J. Gayle; Vhaduri, Sudip; Preston, Kenzie; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    We investigate needs, challenges, and opportunities in visualizing time-series sensor data on stress to inform the design of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). We identify seven key challenges: massive volume and variety of data, complexity in identifying stressors, scalability of space, multifaceted relationship between stress and time, a need for representation at multiple granularities, interperson variability, and limited understanding of JITAI design requirements due to its novelty. We propose four new visualizations based on one million minutes of sensor data (n=70). We evaluate our visualizations with stress researchers (n=6) to gain first insights into its usability and usefulness in JITAI design. Our results indicate that spatio-temporal visualizations help identify and explain between- and within-person variability in stress patterns and contextual visualizations enable decisions regarding the timing, content, and modality of intervention. Interestingly, a granular representation is considered informative but noise-prone; an abstract representation is the preferred starting point for designing JITAIs. PMID:26539566

  6. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Omelyan, Igor E-mail: omelyan@icmp.lviv.ua; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-12-28

    We develop efficient handling of solvation forces in the multiscale method of multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of a biomolecule steered by the solvation free energy (effective solvation forces) obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model complemented with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation). To reduce the computational expenses, we calculate the effective solvation forces acting on the biomolecule by using advanced solvation force extrapolation (ASFE) at inner time steps while converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations only at large outer time steps. The idea of ASFE consists in developing a discrete non-Eckart rotational transformation of atomic coordinates that minimizes the distances between the atomic positions of the biomolecule at different time moments. The effective solvation forces for the biomolecule in a current conformation at an inner time step are then extrapolated in the transformed subspace of those at outer time steps by using a modified least square fit approach applied to a relatively small number of the best force-coordinate pairs. The latter are selected from an extended set collecting the effective solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps over a broad time interval. The MTS-MD integration with effective solvation forces obtained by converging 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps and applying ASFE at inner time steps is stabilized by employing the optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) ensemble. Compared to the previous extrapolation schemes used in combination with the Langevin thermostat, the ASFE approach substantially improves the accuracy of evaluation of effective solvation forces and in combination with the OIN thermostat enables a dramatic increase of outer time steps. We demonstrate on a fully flexible model of alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution that the MTS-MD/OIN/ASFE/3D-RISM-KH multiscale method of molecular dynamics

  7. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelyan, Igor; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-12-01

    We develop efficient handling of solvation forces in the multiscale method of multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of a biomolecule steered by the solvation free energy (effective solvation forces) obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model complemented with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation). To reduce the computational expenses, we calculate the effective solvation forces acting on the biomolecule by using advanced solvation force extrapolation (ASFE) at inner time steps while converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations only at large outer time steps. The idea of ASFE consists in developing a discrete non-Eckart rotational transformation of atomic coordinates that minimizes the distances between the atomic positions of the biomolecule at different time moments. The effective solvation forces for the biomolecule in a current conformation at an inner time step are then extrapolated in the transformed subspace of those at outer time steps by using a modified least square fit approach applied to a relatively small number of the best force-coordinate pairs. The latter are selected from an extended set collecting the effective solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps over a broad time interval. The MTS-MD integration with effective solvation forces obtained by converging 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps and applying ASFE at inner time steps is stabilized by employing the optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) ensemble. Compared to the previous extrapolation schemes used in combination with the Langevin thermostat, the ASFE approach substantially improves the accuracy of evaluation of effective solvation forces and in combination with the OIN thermostat enables a dramatic increase of outer time steps. We demonstrate on a fully flexible model of alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution that the MTS-MD/OIN/ASFE/3D-RISM-KH multiscale method of molecular dynamics

  8. Soft sensor modelling by time difference, recursive partial least squares and adaptive model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; Yang, W.; Xu, O.; Zhou, L.; Wang, J.

    2017-04-01

    To investigate time-variant and nonlinear characteristics in industrial processes, a soft sensor modelling method based on time difference, moving-window recursive partial least square (PLS) and adaptive model updating is proposed. In this method, time difference values of input and output variables are used as training samples to construct the model, which can reduce the effects of the nonlinear characteristic on modelling accuracy and retain the advantages of recursive PLS algorithm. To solve the high updating frequency of the model, a confidence value is introduced, which can be updated adaptively according to the results of the model performance assessment. Once the confidence value is updated, the model can be updated. The proposed method has been used to predict the 4-carboxy-benz-aldehyde (CBA) content in the purified terephthalic acid (PTA) oxidation reaction process. The results show that the proposed soft sensor modelling method can reduce computation effectively, improve prediction accuracy by making use of process information and reflect the process characteristics accurately.

  9. Real-time task recognition in cataract surgery videos using adaptive spatiotemporal polynomials.

    PubMed

    Quellec, Gwénolé; Lamard, Mathieu; Cochener, Béatrice; Cazuguel, Guy

    2015-04-01

    This paper introduces a new algorithm for recognizing surgical tasks in real-time in a video stream. The goal is to communicate information to the surgeon in due time during a video-monitored surgery. The proposed algorithm is applied to cataract surgery, which is the most common eye surgery. To compensate for eye motion and zoom level variations, cataract surgery videos are first normalized. Then, the motion content of short video subsequences is characterized with spatiotemporal polynomials: a multiscale motion characterization based on adaptive spatiotemporal polynomials is presented. The proposed solution is particularly suited to characterize deformable moving objects with fuzzy borders, which are typically found in surgical videos. Given a target surgical task, the system is trained to identify which spatiotemporal polynomials are usually extracted from videos when and only when this task is being performed. These key spatiotemporal polynomials are then searched in new videos to recognize the target surgical task. For improved performances, the system jointly adapts the spatiotemporal polynomial basis and identifies the key spatiotemporal polynomials using the multiple-instance learning paradigm. The proposed system runs in real-time and outperforms the previous solution from our group, both for surgical task recognition ( Az = 0.851 on average, as opposed to Az = 0.794 previously) and for the joint segmentation and recognition of surgical tasks ( Az = 0.856 on average, as opposed to Az = 0.832 previously).

  10. Congruency sequence effects and previous response times: conflict adaptation or temporal learning?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, James R; Weissman, Daniel H

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we followed up on a recent report of two experiments in which the congruency sequence effect-the reduction of the congruency effect after incongruent relative to congruent trials in Stroop-like tasks-was observed without feature repetition or contingency learning confounds. Specifically, we further scrutinized these data to determine the plausibility of a temporal learning account as an alternative to the popular conflict adaptation account. To this end, we employed a linear mixed effects model to investigate the role of previous response time in producing the congruency sequence effect, because previous response time is thought to influence temporal learning. Interestingly, slower previous response times were associated with a reduced current-trial congruency effect, but only when the previous trial was congruent. An adapted version of the parallel episodic processing (PEP) model was able to fit these data if it was additionally assumed that attention "wanders" during different parts of the experiment (e.g., due to fatigue or other factors). Consistent with this assumption, the magnitude of the congruency effect was correlated across small blocks of trials. These findings demonstrate that a temporal learning mechanism provides a plausible account of the congruency sequence effect.

  11. Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Palmer, D

    2004-03-22

    Time series analysis techniques are applied to wave-front sensor telemetry data from the Lick Adaptive Optics System. For 28 fully-illuminated subapertures, telemetry data of 4096 consecutive slope estimates for each subaperture are available. The primary problem is performance comparison of alternative wave-front sensing algorithms. Using direct comparison of data in open loop and closed-loop trials, we analyze algorithm performance in terms of gain, noise and residual power. We also explore the benefits of multi-input Wiener filtering and analyze the open-loop and closed-loop spatial correlations of the sensor measurements.

  12. Stability of Wilkinson's linear model of prism adaptation over time for various targets.

    PubMed

    Wallace, B

    1977-01-01

    Prism adaptation as measured by negative aftereffects (NA), proprioceptive shifts (PS), and visual shifts (VS) was assessed as a function of amount of exposure time and target specificity, whether an exposure and a test target background were the same or different, to determine the validity of Wilkinson's linear model (NA = PS + VS). With few exceptions the model was found to hold well up to 40 min of prism viewing regardless of type of exposure background. In addition target specificity affected magnitude of the NA component of adapation but not the PS and the VS components.

  13. Real-time dual-microphone noise classification for environment-adaptive pipelines of cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Mirzahasanloo, Taher; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an improved noise classification in environment-adaptive speech processing pipelines of cochlear implants. This improvement is achieved by using a dual-microphone and by using a computationally efficient feature-level combination approach to achieve real-time operation. A new measure named Suppression Advantage is also defined in order to quantify the noise suppression improvement of an entire pipeline due to noise classification. The noise classification and suppression improvement results are presented for four commonly encountered noise environments.

  14. Discrete-time entropy formulation of optimal and adaptive control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Yweting A.; Casiello, Francisco A.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    1992-01-01

    The discrete-time version of the entropy formulation of optimal control of problems developed by G. N. Saridis (1988) is discussed. Given a dynamical system, the uncertainty in the selection of the control is characterized by the probability distribution (density) function which maximizes the total entropy. The equivalence between the optimal control problem and the optimal entropy problem is established, and the total entropy is decomposed into a term associated with the certainty equivalent control law, the entropy of estimation, and the so-called equivocation of the active transmission of information from the controller to the estimator. This provides a useful framework for studying the certainty equivalent and adaptive control laws.

  15. Real-time artificial intelligence issues in the development of the adaptive tactical navigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Peter E.; Glasson, Douglas P.; Pomarede, Jean-Michel L.; Acharya, Narayan A.

    1987-01-01

    Adaptive Tactical Navigation (ATN) is a laboratory prototype of a knowledge based system to provide navigation system management and decision aiding in the next generation of tactical aircraft. ATN's purpose is to manage a set of multimode navigation equipment, dynamically selecting the best equipment to use in accordance with mission goals and phase, threat environment, equipment malfunction status, and battle damage. ATN encompasses functions as diverse as sensor data interpretation, diagnosis, and planning. Real time issues that were identified in ATN and the approaches used to address them are addressed. Functional requirements and a global architecture for the ATN system are described. Decision making with time constraints are discussed. Two subproblems are identified; making decisions with incomplete information and with limited resources. Approaches used in ATN to address real time performance are described and simulation results are discussed.

  16. Multi-layer holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Huang, K. S.; Diep, J.

    1993-01-01

    Optical data processing techniques have the inherent advantage of high data throughout, low weight and low power requirements. These features are particularly desirable for onboard spacecraft in-situ real-time data analysis and data compression applications. the proposed multi-layer optical holographic neural net pattern recognition technique will utilize the nonlinear photorefractive devices for real-time adaptive learning to classify input data content and recognize unexpected features. Information can be stored either in analog or digital form in a nonlinear photofractive device. The recording can be accomplished in time scales ranging from milliseconds to microseconds. When a system consisting of these devices is organized in a multi-layer structure, a feedforward neural net with bifurcating data classification capability is formed. The interdisciplinary research will involve the collaboration with top digital computer architecture experts at the University of Southern California.

  17. Multi-layer holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Huang, K.; Diep, J.

    1992-01-01

    Optical data processing techniques have the inherent advantage of high data throughout, low weight and low power requirements. These features are particularly desirable for onboard spacecraft in-situ real-time data analysis and data compression applications. The proposed multi-layer optical holographic neural net pattern recognition technique will utilize the nonlinear photorefractive devices for real-time adaptive learning to classify input data content and recognize unexpected features. Information can be stored either in analog or digital form in a nonlinear photorefractive device. The recording can be accomplished in time scales ranging from milliseconds to microseconds. When a system consisting of these devices is organized in a multi-layer structure, a feed forward neural net with bifurcating data classification capability is formed. The interdisciplinary research will involve the collaboration with top digital computer architecture experts at the University of Southern California.

  18. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Postprostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, Hiram A.; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials: Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (D{sub min}) with the planned D{sub min} to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV D{sub min} is at least 95% of the planned CTV D{sub min}. Results: Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: −0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion: Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery.

  19. Photocycles of bacteriorhodopsin in light- and dark-adapted purple membrane studied by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hofrichter, J; Henry, E R; Lozier, R H

    1989-01-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved absorption spectra have been measured throughout the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin in both light-adapted and dark-adapted purple membrane (PM). The data from dark-adapted samples are interpretable as the superposition of two photocycles arising independently from the all-trans and 13-cis retinal isomers that coexist in the dark-adapted state. The presence of a photocycle in dark-adapted PM which is indistinguishable from that observed for light-adapted PM under the same experimental conditions is demonstrated by the observation of the same five relaxation rates associated with essentially identical changes in the photoproduct spectra. This cycle is attributed to the all-trans component. The cycle of the 13-cis component is revealed by scaling the data measured for the light-adapted sample and subtracting it from the data on the dark-adapted mixture. At times less than 1 ms, the resulting difference spectra are nearly time-independent. The peak of the difference spectrum is near 600 nm, although there appears to be a slight (approximately 2 nm) blue-shift in the first few microseconds. Subsequently the amplitude of this spectrum decays and the peak of the difference spectrum shifts in two relaxations. Most of the amplitude of the photoproduct difference spectrum (approximately 80%) decays in a single relaxation having a time constant of approximately 35 ms. The difference spectrum remaining after this relaxation peaks at approximately 590 nm and is indistinguishable from the classical light-dark difference spectrum, which we find, in experiments performed on a much longer time scale, to peak at 588 nm. The decay of this remaining photo-product is not resolvable in the nanosecond kinetic experiments, but dark adaptation of a completely light-adapted sample is found to occur exponentially with a relaxation time of approximately 2,000 s under the conditions of our experiments. PMID:2819234

  20. Invited Commentary: Little Steps Lead to Huge Steps-It's Time to Make Physical Inactivity Our Number 1 Public Health Enemy.

    PubMed

    Church, Timothy S

    2016-11-01

    The analysis plan and article in this issue of the Journal by Evenson et al. (Am J Epidemiol 2016;184(9):621-632) is well-conceived, thoughtfully conducted, and tightly written. The authors utilized the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data set to examine the association between accelerometer-measured physical activity level and mortality and found that meeting the 2013 federal Physical Activity Guidelines resulted in a 35% reduction in risk of mortality. The timing of these findings could not be better, given the ubiquitous nature of personal accelerometer devices. The masses are already equipped to routinely quantify their activity, and now we have the opportunity and responsibility to provide evidenced-based, tailored physical activity goals. We have evidenced-based physical activity guidelines, mass distribution of devices to track activity, and now scientific support indicating that meeting the physical activity goal, as assessed by these devices, has substantial health benefits. All of the pieces are in place to make physical inactivity a national priority, and we now have the opportunity to positively affect the health of millions of Americans.

  1. Application of time-resolved step-scan FTIR to the photodynamics of transition metal complexes and heme proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Richard A.; Plunkett, Susan E.; Dyer, R. B.; Schoonover, Jon; Meyer, Thomas J.; Chao, James L.

    1994-01-01

    Time-resolved step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy is used to monitor two distinct photo-induced processes. In the first, the third harmonic of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355 nm) is used to initiate a metal-to-ligand charge transfer process (MLCT) in a number of Ru(II) and/or Re(I) polypyridyl complexes. Changes in the position and shape of the vibrational signatures of (pi) -backbonding ligands such as CO and/or CN provide information about the changes in oxidation state of the metal resulting from electronic excitation. Changes in the other ligands vibrational bands indicate which is the electron acceptor (radical anion). In the second example demonstrated here, the second harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) pumps into the (beta) -Visible band of carbonmonoxymyoglobin (MbCO). This dissociates the Fe-CO bond of the heme prosthetic group, and the recombination process is observed as indicated by changes in the amide bands of the polypeptide chain. In both cases, these are some of the very few examples of fast (sub-microsecond(s) ) TR FT-IR in the absorbance mode.

  2. A two-step real-time PCR assay for quantitation and genotyping of human parvovirus 4.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, E; Lahtinen, A; Eis-Hübinger, A M; Lappalainen, M; Hedman, K; Söderlund-Venermo, M

    2014-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) of the family Parvoviridae was discovered in a plasma sample of a patient with an undiagnosed acute infection in 2005. Currently, three PARV4 genotypes have been identified, however, with an unknown clinical significance. Interestingly, these genotypes seem to differ in epidemiology. In Northern Europe, USA and Asia, genotypes 1 and 2 have been found to occur mainly in persons with a history of injecting drug use or other parenteral exposure. In contrast, genotype 3 appears to be endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where it infects children and adults without such risk behaviour. In this study, a novel straightforward and cost-efficient molecular assay for both quantitation and genotyping of PARV4 DNA was developed. The two-step method first applies a single-probe pan-PARV4 qPCR for screening and quantitation of this relatively rare virus, and subsequently, only the positive samples undergo a real-time PCR-based multi-probe genotyping. The new qPCR-GT method is highly sensitive and specific regardless of the genotype, and thus being suitable for studying the clinical impact and occurrence of the different PARV4 genotypes.

  3. Capacity planning for electronic waste management facilities under uncertainty: multi-objective multi-time-step model development.

    PubMed

    Poonam Khanijo Ahluwalia; Nema, Arvind K

    2011-07-01

    Selection of optimum locations for locating new facilities and decision regarding capacities at the proposed facilities is a major concern for municipal authorities/managers. The decision as to whether a single facility is preferred over multiple facilities of smaller capacities would vary with varying priorities to cost and associated risks such as environmental or health risk or risk perceived by the society. Currently management of waste streams such as that of computer waste is being done using rudimentary practices and is flourishing as an unorganized sector, mainly as backyard workshops in many cities of developing nations such as India. Uncertainty in the quantification of computer waste generation is another major concern due to the informal setup of present computer waste management scenario. Hence, there is a need to simultaneously address uncertainty in waste generation quantities while analyzing the tradeoffs between cost and associated risks. The present study aimed to address the above-mentioned issues in a multi-time-step, multi-objective decision-support model, which can address multiple objectives of cost, environmental risk, socially perceived risk and health risk, while selecting the optimum configuration of existing and proposed facilities (location and capacities).

  4. Adaptive predictive control using neural network for a class of pure-feedback systems in discrete time.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Yang, Chenguang; Lee, Tong Heng

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, adaptive neural network (NN) control is investigated for a class of nonlinear pure-feedback discrete-time systems. By using prediction functions of future states, the pure-feedback system is transformed into an n-step-ahead predictor, based on which state feedback NN control is synthesized. Next, by investigating the relationship between outputs and states, the system is transformed into an input-output predictor model, and then, output feedback control is constructed. To overcome the difficulty of nonaffine appearance of the control input, implicit function theorem is exploited in the control design and NN is employed to approximate the unknown function in the control. In both state feedback and output feedback control, only a single NN is used and the controller singularity is completely avoided. The closed-loop system achieves semiglobal uniform ultimate boundedness (SGUUB) stability and the output tracking error is made within a neighborhood around zero. Simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  5. Development status on the real-time controller for solar multi-conjugate adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lin; Zhu, Lei; Rao, Changhui

    2016-10-01

    Solar observations are performed over an extended field of view (FoV) and the isoplanatic patch which conventional adaptive optics (AO) provides diffraction limited resolution is a severe limitation. Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) can be used to extend the corrected FoV of AO system. Compared to AO, MCAO which usually utilizes a wide-field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor to control multiple deformable mirrors(DMs) is more complicated. Because the Sun is an extended object, correlation algorithms are applied to detect gradients in solar MCAO system. Moreover, due to the fast evolving daytime seeing conditions and the fact that much science has to be done at visible wavelengths, a very high closed-loop bandwidth is also required. The computation and delay development of the real-time controller (RTC) in solar MCAO system is more challenging than that in night-time MCAO system. This paper reviews the solar MCAO techniques and systems in the world, especially emphasizes the framework and implementation of the RTC. The development of MCAO in China is also introduced. An outlook of the RTC for the solar MCAO system in development is given.

  6. Sample entropy-based adaptive wavelet de-noising approach for meteorologic and hydrologic time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Singh, Vijay P.; Shang, Xiaosan; Ding, Hao; Wu, Jichun; Wang, Lachun; Zou, Xinqing; Chen, Yuanfang; Chen, Xi; Wang, Shicheng; Wang, Zhenlong

    2014-07-01

    De-noising meteorologic and hydrologic time series is important to improve the accuracy and reliability of extraction, analysis, simulation, and forecasting. A hybrid approach, combining sample entropy and wavelet de-noising method, is developed to separate noise from original series and is named as AWDA-SE (adaptive wavelet de-noising approach using sample entropy). The AWDA-SE approach adaptively determines the threshold for wavelet analysis. Two kinds of meteorologic and hydrologic data sets, synthetic data set and 3 representative field measured data sets (one is the annual rainfall data of Jinan station and the other two are annual streamflow series from two typical stations in China, Yingluoxia station on the Heihe River, which is little affected by human activities, and Lijin station on the Yellow River, which is greatly affected by human activities), are used to illustrate the approach. The AWDA-SE approach is compared with three conventional de-noising methods, including fixed-form threshold algorithm, Stein unbiased risk estimation algorithm, and minimax algorithm. Results show that the AWDA-SE approach separates effectively the signal and noise of the data sets and is found to be better than the conventional methods. Measures of assessment standards show that the developed approach can be employed to investigate noisy and short time series and can also be applied to other areas.

  7. SPARTA: the ESO standard platform for adaptive optics real time applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedrigo, Enrico; Donaldson, Robert; Soenke, Christian; Myers, Richard; Goodsell, Stephen; Geng, Deli; Saunter, Chris; Dipper, Nigel

    2006-06-01

    ESO is starting a number of new projects collectively called Second Generation VLT instrumentation. Several of them will use Adaptive Optics (AO). In comparison with today's ESO AO systems, the 2nd Generation VLT AO systems will be much bigger (in terms of degrees of freedom) and faster (in terms of loop frequency). Consequently the Real-Time Computer controlling these AO systems will be significantly bigger and more challenging to build compared with today's AO systems in operation. To support the new requirements ESO started the development of a common flexible platform called SPARTA for Standard Platform for Adaptive optics Real Time Applications. The guidelines along which SPARTA is developed recognize the importance of industry standards over custom development to lower the development costs, ease the maintenance and make the system upgradeable thus delivering the performance required. SPARTA is based on a hybrid architecture that comprises all the major computing architectures available today: the high computational throughput is achieved through the combination of FPGA and DSP usage, where DSP are used as fast coprocessors and FPGA are used as front and as communication infrastructure, thus guaranteeing also the low latency. The flexibility is spread between the usage of both high-end CPUs and again the DSPs. All three technologies are organized in a parallel system interconnected by fast serial fabrics based on standard protocols. External input / output interfaces are also based on industry standard protocols, thus enabling the usage of commercially available tools for development and testing.

  8. Real-time adaptive microstimulation increases reliability of electrically evoked cortical potentials.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Dominik; Butovas, Sergejus; Bogdan, Martin; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2011-05-01

    Cortical neuroprostheses that employ repeated electrical stimulation of cortical areas with fixed stimulus parameters, are faced with the problem of large trial-by-trial variability of evoked potentials. This variability is caused by the ongoing cortical signal processing, but it is an unwanted phenomenon if one aims at imprinting neural activity as precisely as possible. Here, we use local field potentials measured by one microelectrode, located at a distance of 200 microns from the stimulation site, to drive the electrically evoked potential toward a desired target potential by real-time adaptation of the stimulus intensity. The functional relationship between ongoing cortical activity, evoked potential, and stimulus intensity was estimated by standard machine learning techniques (support vector regression with problem-specific kernel function) from a set of stimulation trials with randomly varied stimulus intensities. The smallest deviation from the target potential was achieved for low stimulus intensities. Further, the observed precision effect proved time sensitive, since it was abolished by introducing a delay between data acquisition and stimulation. These results indicate that local field potentials contain sufficient information about ongoing local signal processing to stabilize electrically evoked potentials. We anticipate that adaptive low intensity microstimulation will play an important role in future cortical prosthetic devices that aim at restoring lost sensory functions.

  9. Self-Adaptive Spike-Time-Dependent Plasticity of Metal-Oxide Memristors

    PubMed Central

    Prezioso, M.; Merrikh Bayat, F.; Hoskins, B.; Likharev, K.; Strukov, D.

    2016-01-01

    Metal-oxide memristors have emerged as promising candidates for hardware implementation of artificial synapses – the key components of high-performance, analog neuromorphic networks - due to their excellent scaling prospects. Since some advanced cognitive tasks require spiking neuromorphic networks, which explicitly model individual neural pulses (“spikes”) in biological neural systems, it is crucial for memristive synapses to support the spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). A major challenge for the STDP implementation is that, in contrast to some simplistic models of the plasticity, the elementary change of a synaptic weight in an artificial hardware synapse depends not only on the pre-synaptic and post-synaptic signals, but also on the initial weight (memristor’s conductance) value. Here we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, an STDP behavior that ensures self-adaptation of the average memristor conductance, making the plasticity stable, i.e. insensitive to the initial state of the devices. The experiments have been carried out with 200-nm Al2O3/TiO2−x memristors integrated into 12 × 12 crossbars. The experimentally observed self-adaptive STDP behavior has been complemented with numerical modeling of weight dynamics in a simple system with a leaky-integrate-and-fire neuron with a random spike-train input, using a compact model of memristor plasticity, fitted for quantitatively correct description of our memristors. PMID:26893175

  10. Data rate management and real time operation: recursive adaptive frame integration of limited data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Michael K.

    2006-08-01

    Recursive Limited Frame Integration was proposed as a way to improve frame integration performance and mitigate issues related to high data rate needed to support conventional frame integration. The technique uses two thresholds -one tuned for optimum probability of detection, the other to manage required false alarm rate, and places integration process between those thresholds. This configuration allows a non-linear integration process that, along with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) gain, provides system designers more capability where cost, weight, or power considerations limit system data rate, processing, or memory capability. However, Recursive Frame Integration Limited may have performance issues when single-frame SNR is really low. Recursive Adaptive Limited Frame Integration was proposed as a means to improve limited integration performance with really low single-frame SNR. It combines the benefits of nonlinear recursive limited frame integration and adaptive thresholds with a kind of conventional frame integration. Adding the third threshold may help in managing real time operations. In the paper the Recursive Frame Integration is presented in form of multiple parallel recursive integration. Such an approach can help not only in data rate management but in mitigation of low single frame SNR issue for Recursive Integration as well as in real time operations with frame integration.

  11. Real-Time Adaptive EEG Source Separation Using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Mullen, Tim R; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-03-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has been widely applied to electroencephalographic (EEG) biosignal processing and brain-computer interfaces. The practical use of ICA, however, is limited by its computational complexity, data requirements for convergence, and assumption of data stationarity, especially for high-density data. Here we study and validate an optimized online recursive ICA algorithm (ORICA) with online recursive least squares (RLS) whitening for blind source separation of high-density EEG data, which offers instantaneous incremental convergence upon presentation of new data. Empirical results of this study demonstrate the algorithm's: 1) suitability for accurate and efficient source identification in high-density (64-channel) realistically-simulated EEG data; 2) capability to detect and adapt to nonstationarity in 64-ch simulated EEG data; and 3) utility for rapidly extracting principal brain and artifact sources in real 61-channel EEG data recorded by a dry and wearable EEG system in a cognitive experiment. ORICA was implemented as functions in BCILAB and EEGLAB and was integrated in an open-source Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), supporting applications in ICA-based online artifact rejection, feature extraction for real-time biosignal monitoring in clinical environments, and adaptable classifications in brain-computer interfaces.

  12. Real-time Adaptive EEG Source Separation using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Mullen, Tim; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Independent Component Analysis (ICA) has been widely applied to electroencephalographic (EEG) biosignal processing and brain-computer interfaces. The practical use of ICA, however, is limited by its computational complexity, data requirements for convergence, and assumption of data stationarity, especially for high-density data. Here we study and validate an optimized online recursive ICA algorithm (ORICA) with online recursive least squares (RLS) whitening for blind source separation of high-density EEG data, which offers instantaneous incremental convergence upon presentation of new data. Empirical results of this study demonstrate the algorithm's: (a) suitability for accurate and efficient source identification in high-density (64-channel) realistically-simulated EEG data; (b) capability to detect and adapt to non-stationarity in 64-ch simulated EEG data; and (c) utility for rapidly extracting principal brain and artifact sources in real 61-channel EEG data recorded by a dry and wearable EEG system in a cognitive experiment. ORICA was implemented as functions in BCILAB and EEGLAB and was integrated in an open-source Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), supporting applications in ICA-based online artifact rejection, feature extraction for real-time biosignal monitoring in clinical environments, and adaptable classifications in brain-computer interfaces. PMID:26685257

  13. Optimal adaptive control for quantum metrology with time-dependent Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengshi; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2017-03-01

    Quantum metrology has been studied for a wide range of systems with time-independent Hamiltonians. For systems with time-dependent Hamiltonians, however, due to the complexity of dynamics, little has been known about quantum metrology. Here we investigate quantum metrology with time-dependent Hamiltonians to bridge this gap. We obtain the optimal quantum Fisher information for parameters in time-dependent Hamiltonians, and show proper Hamiltonian control is generally necessary to optimize the Fisher information. We derive the optimal Hamiltonian control, which is generally adaptive, and the measurement scheme to attain the optimal Fisher information. In a minimal example of a qubit in a rotating magnetic field, we find a surprising result that the fundamental limit of T2 time scaling of quantum Fisher information can be broken with time-dependent Hamiltonians, which reaches T4 in estimating the rotation frequency of the field. We conclude by considering level crossings in the derivatives of the Hamiltonians, and point out additional control is necessary for that case.

  14. Optimal adaptive control for quantum metrology with time-dependent Hamiltonians.

    PubMed

    Pang, Shengshi; Jordan, Andrew N

    2017-03-09

    Quantum metrology has been studied for a wide range of systems with time-independent Hamiltonians. For systems with time-dependent Hamiltonians, however, due to the complexity of dynamics, little has been known about quantum metrology. Here we investigate quantum metrology with time-dependent Hamiltonians to bridge this gap. We obtain the optimal quantum Fisher information for parameters in time-dependent Hamiltonians, and show proper Hamiltonian control is generally necessary to optimize the Fisher information. We derive the optimal Hamiltonian control, which is generally adaptive, and the measurement scheme to attain the optimal Fisher information. In a minimal example of a qubit in a rotating magnetic field, we find a surprising result that the fundamental limit of T(2) time scaling of quantum Fisher information can be broken with time-dependent Hamiltonians, which reaches T(4) in estimating the rotation frequency of the field. We conclude by considering level crossings in the derivatives of the Hamiltonians, and point out additional control is necessary for that case.

  15. Dead on Arrival: Adapting Games to Finish at a Given Time or Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Öhsen, Arne; Loviscach, Jörn

    Casual and other games often serve as time-killing applications, be it on the commuter train or in the back seat of a shared car. When one arrives at the destination, the game has to be interrupted or aborted, which is annoying or even frustrating. Hence, we propose to continuously adapt the game’s level of difficulty to the estimated remaining time to arrival. This can be preset as a number of minutes or can continuously be estimated from the player’s position in relation to a predefined destination. Our dungeon-style prototype is based on an automated engine for content placement and can also make use of GPS data. We report on preliminary results from user tests.

  16. Nonlinear adaptive control for teleoperation systems with symmetrical and unsymmetrical time-varying delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, S.; Liu, P. X.; El Saddik, A.

    2015-12-01

    The stability and trajectory tracking control problem of passive teleoperation systems with the presence of the symmetrical and unsymmetrical time-varying communication delay is addressed in this paper. The proposed teleoperator is designed by coupling local and remote sites by delaying position signals of the master and slave manipulator. The design also comprises local proportional and derivative signals with nonlinear adaptive terms to cope with parametric uncertainty associated with the master and slave dynamics. The Lyapunov-Krasovskii function is employed to establish stability conditions for the closed-loop teleoperators under both symmetrical and unsymmetrical time-varying communication delay. These delay-dependent conditions allow the designer to estimate the control gains a priori in order to achieve asymptotic property of the position, velocity and synchronisation errors of the master and slave systems. Finally, simulation results along with comparative studies are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Adaptive Neural Control of MIMO Nonstrict-Feedback Nonlinear Systems With Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yang, Haijiao; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Zhu, Yanzheng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural output-feedback tracking controller is designed for a class of multiple-input and multiple-output nonstrict-feedback nonlinear systems with time delay. The system coefficient and uncertain functions of our considered systems are both unknown. By employing neural networks to approximate the unknown function entries, and constructing a new input-driven filter, a backstepping design method of tracking controller is developed for the systems under consideration. The proposed controller can guarantee that all the signals in the closed-loop systems are ultimately bounded, and the time-varying target signal can be tracked within a small error as well. The main contributions of this paper lie in that the systems under consideration are more general, and an effective design procedure of output-feedback controller is developed for the considered systems, which is more applicable in practice. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  18. Time-reversed adapted-perturbation (TRAP) optical focusing onto dynamic objects inside scattering media

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cheng; Xu, Xiao; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to steer and focus light inside scattering media has long been sought for a multitude of applications. To form optical foci inside scattering media, the only feasible strategy at present is to guide photons by using either implanted1 or virtual2–4 guide stars, which can be inconvenient and limits potential applications. Here, we report a scheme for focusing light inside scattering media by employing intrinsic dynamics as guide stars. By time-reversing the perturbed component of the scattered light adaptively, we show that it is possible to focus light to the origin of the perturbation. Using the approach, we demonstrate non-invasive dynamic light focusing onto moving targets and imaging of a time-variant object obscured by highly scattering media. Anticipated applications include imaging and photoablation of angiogenic vessels in tumours as well as other biomedical uses. PMID:25530797

  19. Multiple time scales of adaptation in the auditory system as revealed by human evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Costa-Faidella, Jordi; Grimm, Sabine; Slabu, Lavinia; Díaz-Santaella, Francisco; Escera, Carles

    2011-06-01

    Single neurons in the primary auditory cortex of the cat show faster adaptation time constants to short- than long-term stimulus history. This ability to encode the complex past auditory stimulation in multiple time scales would enable the auditory system to generate expectations of the incoming stimuli. Here, we tested whether large neural populations exhibit this ability as well, by recording human auditory evoked potentials (AEP) to pure tones in a sequence embedding short- and long-term aspects of stimulus history. Our results yielded dynamic amplitude modulations of the P2 AEP to stimulus repetition spanning from milliseconds to tens of seconds concurrently, as well as amplitude modulations of the mismatch negativity AEP to regularity violations. A simple linear model of expectancy accounting for both short- and long-term stimulus history described our results, paralleling the behavior of neurons in the primary auditory cortex.

  20. Decentralized adaptive fuzzy output feedback control of nonlinear interconnected systems with time-varying delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Chen, Zuwen; Song, Aiguo

    2017-01-01

    A robust adaptive output-feedback control scheme based on K-filters is proposed for a class of nonlinear interconnected time-varying delay systems with immeasurable states. It is difficult to design the controller due to the existence of the immeasurable states and the time-delay couplings among interconnected subsystems. This difficulty is overcome by use of the fuzzy system, the K-filters and the appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. Based on Lyapunov theory, the closed-loop control system is proved to be semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded (SGUUB), and the output tracking error converges to a neighborhood of zero. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  1. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, Steven C.; Swansen, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A stepping motor is microprocessingly controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  2. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  3. A robust adaptive denoising framework for real-time artifact removal in scalp EEG measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicarslan, Atilla; Grossman, Robert G.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Non-invasive measurement of human neural activity based on the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) allows for the development of biomedical devices that interface with the nervous system for scientific, diagnostic, therapeutic, or restorative purposes. However, EEG recordings are often considered as prone to physiological and non-physiological artifacts of different types and frequency characteristics. Among them, ocular artifacts and signal drifts represent major sources of EEG contamination, particularly in real-time closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) applications, which require effective handling of these artifacts across sessions and in natural settings. Approach. We extend the usage of a robust adaptive noise cancelling (ANC) scheme ({H}∞ filtering) for removal of eye blinks, eye motions, amplitude drifts and recording biases simultaneously. We also characterize the volume conduction, by estimating the signal propagation levels across all EEG scalp recording areas due to ocular artifact generators. We find that the amplitude and spatial distribution of ocular artifacts vary greatly depending on the electrode location. Therefore, fixed filtering parameters for all recording areas would naturally hinder the true overall performance of an ANC scheme for artifact removal. We treat each electrode as a separate sub-system to be filtered, and without the loss of generality, they are assumed to be uncorrelated and uncoupled. Main results. Our results show over 95-99.9% correlation between the raw and processed signals at non-ocular artifact regions, and depending on the contamination profile, 40-70% correlation when ocular artifacts are dominant. We also compare our results with the offline independent component analysis and artifact subspace reconstruction methods, and show that some local quantities are handled better by our sample-adaptive real-time framework. Decoding performance is also compared with multi-day experimental data from 2 subjects

  4. Adaptive Kalman filtering for real-time mapping of the visual field.

    PubMed

    Ward, B Douglas; Janik, John; Mazaheri, Yousef; Ma, Yan; DeYoe, Edgar A

    2012-02-15

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of real-time mapping of the visual field for clinical applications. Specifically, three aspects of this problem were considered: (1) experimental design, (2) statistical analysis, and (3) display of results. Proper experimental design is essential to achieving a successful outcome, particularly for real-time applications. A random-block experimental design was shown to have less sensitivity to measurement noise, as well as greater robustness to error in modeling of the hemodynamic impulse response function (IRF) and greater flexibility than common alternatives. In addition, random encoding of the visual field allows for the detection of voxels that are responsive to multiple, not necessarily contiguous, regions of the visual field. Due to its recursive nature, the Kalman filter is ideally suited for real-time statistical analysis of visual field mapping data. An important feature of the Kalman filter is that it can be used for nonstationary time series analysis. The capability of the Kalman filter to adapt, in real time, to abrupt changes in the baseline arising from subject motion inside the scanner and other external system disturbances is important for the success of clinical applications. The clinician needs real-time information to evaluate the success or failure of the imaging run and to decide whether to extend, modify, or terminate the run. Accordingly, the analytical software provides real-time displays of (1) brain activation maps for each stimulus segment, (2) voxel-wise spatial tuning profiles, (3) time plots of the variability of response parameters, and (4) time plots of activated volume.

  5. Designing Adaptive Low-Dissipative High Order Schemes for Long-Time Integrations. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen C.; Sjoegreen, B.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A general framework for the design of adaptive low-dissipative high order schemes is presented. It encompasses a rather complete treatment of the numerical approach based on four integrated design criteria: (1) For stability considerations, condition the governing equations before the application of the appropriate numerical scheme whenever it is possible; (2) For consistency, compatible schemes that possess stability properties, including physical and numerical boundary condition treatments, similar to those of the discrete analogue of the continuum are preferred; (3) For the minimization of numerical dissipation contamination, efficient and adaptive numerical dissipation control to further improve nonlinear stability and accuracy should be used; and (4) For practical considerations, the numerical approach should be efficient and applicable to general geometries, and an efficient and reliable dynamic grid adaptation should be used if necessary. These design criteria are, in general, very useful to a wide spectrum of flow simulations. However, the demand on the overall numerical approach for nonlinear stability and accuracy is much more stringent for long-time integration of complex multiscale viscous shock/shear/turbulence/acoustics interactions and numerical combustion. Robust classical numerical methods for less complex flow physics are not suitable or practical for such applications. The present approach is designed expressly to address such flow problems, especially unsteady flows. The minimization of employing very fine grids to overcome the production of spurious numerical solutions and/or instability due to under-resolved grids is also sought. The incremental studies to illustrate the performance of the approach are summarized. Extensive testing and full implementation of the approach is forthcoming. The results shown so far are very encouraging.

  6. Real-time error detection but not error correction drives automatic visuomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hinder, Mark R; Riek, Stephan; Tresilian, James R; de Rugy, Aymar; Carson, Richard G

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the role of visual feedback of task performance in visuomotor adaptation. Participants produced novel two degrees of freedom movements (elbow flexion-extension, forearm pronation-supination) to move a cursor towards visual targets. Following trials with no rotation, participants were exposed to a 60 degrees visuomotor rotation, before returning to the non-rotated condition. A colour cue on each trial permitted identification of the rotated/non-rotated contexts. Participants could not see their arm but received continuous and concurrent visual feedback (CF) of a cursor representing limb position or post-trial visual feedback (PF) representing the movement trajectory. Separate groups of participants who received CF were instructed that online modifications of their movements either were, or were not, permissible as a means of improving performance. Feedforward-mediated performance improvements occurred for both CF and PF groups in the rotated environment. Furthermore, for CF participants this adaptation occurred regardless of whether feedback modifications of motor commands were permissible. Upon re-exposure to the non-rotated environment participants in the CF, but not PF, groups exhibited post-training aftereffects, manifested as greater angular deviations from a straight initial trajectory, with respect to the pre-rotation trials. Accordingly, the nature of the performance improvements that occurred was dependent upon the timing of the visual feedback of task performance. Continuous visual feedback of task performance during task execution appears critical in realising automatic visuomotor adaptation through a recalibration of the visuomotor mapping that transforms visual inputs into appropriate motor commands.

  7. Automatic target classification of slow moving ground targets using space-time adaptive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malas, John Alexander

    2002-04-01

    Air-to-ground surveillance radar technologies are increasingly being used by theater commanders to detect, track, and identify ground moving targets. New radar automatic target recognition (ATR) technologies are being developed to aid the pilot in assessing the ground combat picture. Most air-to-ground surveillance radars use Doppler filtering techniques to separate target returns from ground clutter. Unfortunately, Doppler filter techniques fall short on performance when target geometry and ground vehicle speed result in low line of sight velocities. New clutter filter techniques compatible with emerging advancements in wideband radar operation are needed to support surveillance modes of radar operation when targets enter this low velocity regime. In this context, space-time adaptive processing (STAP) in conjunction with other algorithms offers a class of signal processing that provide improved target detection, tracking, and classification in the presence of interference through the adaptive nulling of both ground clutter and/or jamming. Of particular interest is the ability of the radar to filter and process the complex target signature data needed to generate high range resolution (HRR) signature profiles on ground targets. A new approach is proposed which will allow air-to-ground target classification of slow moving vehicles in clutter. A wideband STAP approach for clutter suppression is developed which preserves the amplitude integrity of returns from multiple range bins consistent with the HRR ATR approach. The wideband STAP processor utilizes narrowband STAP principles to generate a series of adaptive sub-band filters. Each sub-band filter output is used to construct the complete filtered response of the ground target. The performance of this new approach is demonstrated and quantified through the implementation of a one dimensional template-based minimum mean squared error classifier. Successful minimum velocity identification is defined in terms of

  8. Micro-Randomized Trials: An Experimental Design for Developing Just-in-Time Adaptive Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hekler, Eric B.; Shiffman, Saul; Boruvka, Audrey; Almirall, Daniel; Tewari, Ambuj; Murphy, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper presents an experimental design, the micro-randomized trial, developed to support optimization of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). JITAIs are mHealth technologies that aim to deliver the right intervention components at the right times and locations to optimally support individuals’ health behaviors. Micro-randomized trials offer a way to optimize such interventions by enabling modeling of causal effects and time-varying effect moderation for individual intervention components within a JITAI. Methods The paper describes the micro-randomized trial design, enumerates research questions that this experimental design can help answer, and provides an overview of the data analyses that can be used to assess the causal effects of studied intervention components and investigate time-varying moderation of those effects. Results Micro-randomized trials enable causal modeling of proximal effects of the randomized intervention components and assessment of time-varying moderation of those effects. Conclusions Micro-randomized trials can help researchers understand whether their interventions are having intended effects, when and for whom they are effective, and what factors moderate the interventions’ effects, enabling creation of more effective JITAIs. PMID:26651463

  9. Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming for Adapting to the Change of Stock Prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Mabu, Shingo; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    The key in stock trading model is to take the right actions for trading at the right time, primarily based on the accurate forecast of future stock trends. Since an effective trading with given information of stock prices needs an intelligent strategy for the decision making, we applied Genetic Network Programming (GNP) to creating a stock trading model. In this paper, we propose a new method called Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming (RTU-GNP) for adapting to the change of stock prices. There are three important points in this paper: First, the RTU-GNP method makes a stock trading decision considering both the recommendable information of technical indices and the candlestick charts according to the real time stock prices. Second, we combine RTU-GNP with a Sarsa learning algorithm to create the programs efficiently. Also, sub-nodes are introduced in each judgment and processing node to determine appropriate actions (buying/selling) and to select appropriate stock price information depending on the situation. Third, a Real Time Updating system has been firstly introduced in our paper considering the change of the trend of stock prices. The experimental results on the Japanese stock market show that the trading model with the proposed RTU-GNP method outperforms other models without real time updating. We also compared the experimental results using the proposed method with Buy&Hold method to confirm its effectiveness, and it is clarified that the proposed trading model can obtain much higher profits than Buy&Hold method.

  10. Experimental Results: Detection and Tracking of Low SNR Sinusoids Using Real-Time LMS and RLS Lattice Adaptive Line Enhancers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    DETECTION AND TRACKING OF LOW SNR SINUSOIDS USING REAL-TIMNE LMS AND RI S LATTIICE, ADAPTIVE LINE PR: SSWh ENHANCRS RE: 0300000liN 6 AIJTHCRISI WVl: D68...RESULTS: DETECTION AND TRACKING OF LOW SNR SINUSOIDS USING REAL-TIME LMS AND RLS LATTICE ADAPTIVE LINE ENHANCERS i f. Terence R. Albert, Hana Abusalem...obtained from a real-time custom hardware SNR sinusoids and filter parameters such as system using 32-bit IEEE floating point filter length, and adaption

  11. Maternal Coping Adaptations, Social Support and Transition Difficulties to Parenthood of First-Time Civilian and Military Mothers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Social support and adaptation to the parent role in first-time adolescent mothers. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 18(4), 327...NOV1𔄁s uS Maternal Coping Adaptations, Social Support and Transition Difficulties to Parenthood of First-time Civilian and Military Mothers 6. AUI HOr...Unlimited MICHAEL M. BRL.7KER, SMSgt, USAF Chief Administration S ELECTE JUN07 1993 A k 93-12634 97 !f C MATERNAL COPING ADAPTATIONS. SOCIAL SUPPORT AND

  12. Next Step for STEP

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Claire; Bremner, Brenda

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  13. Robust adaptive extended Kalman filtering for real time MR-thermometry guided HIFU interventions.

    PubMed

    Roujol, Sébastien; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Hey, Silke; Moonen, Chrit; Ries, Mario

    2012-03-01

    Real time magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry is gaining clinical importance for monitoring and guiding high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablations of tumorous tissue. The temperature information can be employed to adjust the position and the power of the HIFU system in real time and to determine the therapy endpoint. The requirement to resolve both physiological motion of mobile organs and the rapid temperature variations induced by state-of-the-art high-power HIFU systems require fast MRI-acquisition schemes, which are generally hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). This directly limits the precision of real time MR-thermometry and thus in many cases the feasibility of sophisticated control algorithms. To overcome these limitations, temporal filtering of the temperature has been suggested in the past, which has generally an adverse impact on the accuracy and latency of the filtered data. Here, we propose a novel filter that aims to improve the precision of MR-thermometry while monitoring and adapting its impact on the accuracy. For this, an adaptive extended Kalman filter using a model describing the heat transfer for acoustic heating in biological tissues was employed together with an additional outlier rejection to address the problem of sparse artifacted temperature points. The filter was compared to an efficient matched FIR filter and outperformed the latter in all tested cases. The filter was first evaluated on simulated data and provided in the worst case (with an approximate configuration of the model) a substantial improvement of the accuracy by a factor 3 and 15 during heat up and cool down periods, respectively. The robustness of the filter was then evaluated during HIFU experiments on a phantom and in vivo in porcine kidney. The presence of strong temperature artifacts did not affect the thermal dose measurement using our filter whereas a high measurement variation of 70% was observed with the FIR filter.

  14. Adaptive Optics Correction in Real-Time for Dynamic Wavefront Errors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-15

    This paper reports on the principles for the use of, and the experimental results obtained from, an adaptive optics system for correcting dynamic...control system. Keywords: Adaptive optics ; Wavefront sensing; Deformable mirror; Chinese translations.

  15. Beyond trial-by-trial adaptation: A quantification of the time scale of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Aben, Bart; Verguts, Tom; Van den Bussche, Eva

    2017-03-01

    The idea that adaptation to stimulus or response conflict can operate over different time scales takes a prominent position in various theories and models of cognitive control. The mechanisms underlying temporal variations in control are nevertheless poorly understood, which is partly due to a lack of appropriate empirical measures. Inspired by reinforcement learning models, we developed a method to quantify the time scale of control behaviorally, by computing trial-by-trial effects that go beyond the preceding trial. Briefly, we extended the congruency sequence effect from 1 trial to multiple trials into the past and quantified the influence of previous trials on current-trial performance as a function of trial distance. The rate at which this influence changes across trials was taken as a measure of the time scale of control. We applied the method to a flanker task with different conflict frequencies and volatility. Results showed that the time scale of control was smaller in rare-conflict and volatile contexts, compared to frequent-conflict and neutral contexts. This is in agreement with theories differentiating transient from sustained control. The method offers new opportunities to reveal temporal differences in control modes and can easily be applied to various empirical paradigms. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Directional selection for flowering time leads to adaptive evolution in Raphanus raphanistrum (Wild radish).

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Michael B; Walsh, Michael J; Flower, Ken C; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Powles, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Herbicides have been the primary tool for controlling large populations of yield depleting weeds from agro-ecosystems, resulting in the evolution of widespread herbicide resistance. In response, nonherbicidal techniques have been developed which intercept weed seeds at harvest before they enter the soil seed bank. However, the efficiency of these techniques allows an intense selection for any trait that enables weeds to evade collection, with early-flowering ecotypes considered likely to result in early seed shedding. Using a field-collected wild radish population, five recurrent generations were selected for early maturity and three generations for late maturity. Phenology associated with flowering time and growth traits were measured. Our results demonstrate the adaptive capacity of wild radish to halve its time to flowering following five generations of early-flowering selection. Early-maturing phenotypes had reduced height and biomass at maturity, leading to less competitive, more prostrate growth forms. Following three generations of late-flowering selection, wild radish doubled its time to flowering time leading to increased biomass and flowering height at maturity. This study demonstrates the potential for the rapid evolution in growth traits in response to highly effective seed collection techniques that imposed a selection on weed populations within agro-ecosystems at harvest.

  17. Sensori-motor integration during stance: time adaptation of control mechanisms on adding or removing vision.

    PubMed

    Sozzi, Stefania; Monti, Alberto; De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Do, Manh-Cuong; Schieppati, Marco

    2011-04-01

    Sudden addition or removal of visual information can be particularly critical to balance control. The promptness of adaptation of stance control mechanisms is quantified by the latency at which body oscillation and postural muscle activity vary after a shift in visual condition. In the present study, volunteers stood on a force platform with feet parallel or in tandem. Shifts in visual condition were produced by electronic spectacles. Ground reaction force (center of foot pressure, CoP) and EMG of leg postural muscles were acquired, and latency of CoP and EMG changes estimated by t-tests on the averaged traces. Time-to-reach steady-state was estimated by means of an exponential model. On allowing or occluding vision, decrements and increments in CoP position and oscillation occurred within about 2s. These were preceded by changes in muscle activity, regardless of visual-shift direction, foot position or front or rear leg in tandem. These time intervals were longer than simple reaction-time responses. The time course of recovery to steady-state was about 3s, shorter for oscillation than position. The capacity of modifying balance control at very short intervals both during quiet standing and under more critical balance conditions speaks in favor of a necessary coupling between vision, postural reference, and postural muscle activity, and of the swiftness of this sensory reweighing process.

  18. The GFZ real-time GNSS precise positioning service system and its adaption for COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maorong; Zhang, Hongping; Nischan, Thomas; Wickert, Jens

    2013-03-01

    Motivated by the IGS real-time Pilot Project, GFZ has been developing its own real-time precise positioning service for various applications. An operational system at GFZ is now broadcasting real-time orbits, clocks, global ionospheric model, uncalibrated phase delays and regional atmospheric corrections for standard PPP, PPP with ambiguity fixing, single-frequency PPP and regional augmented PPP. To avoid developing various algorithms for different applications, we proposed a uniform algorithm and implemented it into our real-time software. In the new processing scheme, we employed un-differenced raw observations with atmospheric delays as parameters, which are properly constrained by real-time derived global ionospheric model or regional atmospheric corrections and by the empirical characteristics of the atmospheric delay variation in time and space. The positioning performance in terms of convergence time and ambiguity fixing depends mainly on the quality of the received atmospheric information and the spatial and temporal constraints. The un-differenced raw observation model can not only integrate PPP and NRTK into a seamless positioning service, but also syncretize these two techniques into a unique model and algorithm. Furthermore, it is suitable for both dual-frequency and sing-frequency receivers. Based on the real-time data streams from IGS, EUREF and SAPOS reference networks, we can provide services of global precise point positioning (PPP) with 5-10 cm accuracy, PPP with ambiguity-fixing of 2-5 cm accuracy, PPP using single-frequency receiver with accuracy of better than 50 cm and PPP with regional augmentation for instantaneous ambiguity resolution of 1-3 cm accuracy. We adapted the system for current COMPASS to provide PPP service. COMPASS observations from a regional network of nine stations are used for precise orbit determination and clock estimation in simulated real-time mode, the orbit and clock products are applied for real-time precise point

  19. Reinforcement learning for adaptive optimal control of unknown continuous-time nonlinear systems with input constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiong; Liu, Derong; Wang, Ding

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an adaptive reinforcement learning-based solution is developed for the infinite-horizon optimal control problem of constrained-input continuous-time nonlinear systems in the presence of nonlinearities with unknown structures. Two different types of neural networks (NNs) are employed to approximate the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. That is, an recurrent NN is constructed to identify the unknown dynamical system, and two feedforward NNs are used as the actor and the critic to approximate the optimal control and the optimal cost, respectively. Based on this framework, the action NN and the critic NN are tuned simultaneously, without the requirement for the knowledge of system drift dynamics. Moreover, by using Lyapunov's direct method, the weights of the action NN and the critic NN are guaranteed to be uniformly ultimately bounded, while keeping the closed-loop system stable. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the present approach, simulation results are illustrated.

  20. Adaptive robust synchronization of Rossler systems in the presence of unknown matched time-varying parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefi, M. M.; Jahed-Motlagh, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of adaptive robust synchronization of chaotic systems based on the Lyapunov theory. A controller is designed for a feedback linearizable error system with matched uncertainties. The proposed method shows that the drive and response systems are synchronized and states of the response system track the states of the drive system as time tends to infinity. Since this approach does not require any information about the bound of uncertainties, this information is not needed in advance. In order to prevent the frequent switching phenomenon in the control signal, the method is modified such that the norm of tracking error is bounded. Numerical simulations on two uncertain Rossler systems with matched uncertainties show fast responses of tracking error, while the errors are Uniformly Ultimately Bounded, and the control signal is reasonably smooth.

  1. Flowering Locus C’s Lessons: Conserved Chromatin Switches Underpinning Developmental Timing and Adaptation1

    PubMed Central

    Hepworth, Jo; Dean, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of how seasonal cues influence the timing of the floral transition has revealed many important principles for how epigenetic regulation can integrate a variety of environmental cues with developmental signals. The study of the pathways that necessitate overwintering in plants and their ability to respond to prolonged cold (the vernalization requirement and response pathways) has elaborated different chromatin regulatory pathways and the involvement of noncoding RNAs. The major target of these vernalization pathways in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is Flowering Locus C (FLC). A relatively simple picture of FLC regulation is emerging of a few core complexes and mechanisms that antagonize each other’s actions. This balance provides a fine degree of control that has nevertheless permitted evolution of a wide range of natural variation in vernalization in Arabidopsis. Similar simple routes of adaptation may underlie life history variation between species. PMID:26149571

  2. Wavelet-Based Speech Enhancement Using Time-Adapted Noise Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sheau-Fang; Tung, Ying-Kai

    Spectral subtraction is commonly used for speech enhancement in a single channel system because of the simplicity of its implementation. However, this algorithm introduces perceptually musical noise while suppressing the background noise. We propose a wavelet-based approach in this paper for suppressing the background noise for speech enhancement in a single channel system. The wavelet packet transform, which emulates the human auditory system, is used to decompose the noisy signal into critical bands. Wavelet thresholding is then temporally adjusted with the noise power by time-adapted noise estimation. The proposed algorithm can efficiently suppress the noise while reducing speech distortion. Experimental results, including several objective measurements, show that the proposed wavelet-based algorithm outperforms spectral subtraction and other wavelet-based denoising approaches for speech enhancement for nonstationary noise environments.

  3. Real-Time Wavefront Control for the PALM-3000 High Order Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Tuan N.; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Dekany, Richard G.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Troy, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    We present a cost-effective scalable real-time wavefront control architecture based on off-the-shelf graphics processing units hosted in an ultra-low latency, high-bandwidth interconnect PC cluster environment composed of modules written in the component-oriented language of nesC. The architecture enables full-matrix reconstruction of the wavefront at up to 2 KHz with latency under 250 us for the PALM-3000 adaptive optics systems, a state-of-the-art upgrade on the 5.1 meter Hale Telescope that consists of a 64 x 64 subaperture Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a 3368 active actuator high order deformable mirror in series with a 241 active actuator tweeter DM. The architecture can easily scale up to support much larger AO systems at higher rates and lower latency.

  4. An Adaptive Learning Rate for RBFNN Using Time-Domain Feedback Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed Saad Azhar; Moinuddin, Muhammad; Raza, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Radial basis function neural networks are used in a variety of applications such as pattern recognition, nonlinear identification, control and time series prediction. In this paper, the learning algorithm of radial basis function neural networks is analyzed in a feedback structure. The robustness of the learning algorithm is discussed in the presence of uncertainties that might be due to noisy perturbations at the input or to modeling mismatch. An intelligent adaptation rule is developed for the learning rate of RBFNN which gives faster convergence via an estimate of error energy while giving guarantee to the l 2 stability governed by the upper bounding via small gain theorem. Simulation results are presented to support our theoretical development. PMID:24987745

  5. Simplified Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion and Emission Rates of Jet-A and Methane Fuel With and Without Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2005-01-01

    A simplified kinetic scheme for Jet-A, and methane fuels with water injection was developed to be used in numerical combustion codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC) or even simple FORTRAN codes. The two time step method is either an initial time averaged value (step one) or an instantaneous value (step two). The switch is based on the water concentration in moles/cc of 1x10(exp -20). The results presented here results in a correlation that gives the chemical kinetic time as two separate functions. This two time step method is used as opposed to a one step time averaged method previously developed to determine the chemical kinetic time with increased accuracy. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times for smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, initial water to fuel mass ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step, to be used with higher water concentrations, gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of instantaneous fuel and water mole concentration, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations would then be compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting rates of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. Chemical kinetic time equations for fuel, carbon monoxide and NOx are obtained for Jet-A fuel and methane with and without water injection to water mass loadings of 2/1 water to fuel. A similar correlation was also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium concentrations of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide as functions of overall equivalence ratio, water to fuel mass ratio, pressure and temperature (T3). The temperature of the gas entering

  6. Adaptive Control for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots Considering Time Delay and Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armah, Stephen Kofi

    Autonomous control of mobile robots has attracted considerable attention of researchers in the areas of robotics and autonomous systems during the past decades. One of the goals in the field of mobile robotics is development of platforms that robustly operate in given, partially unknown, or unpredictable environments and offer desired services to humans. Autonomous mobile robots need to be equipped with effective, robust and/or adaptive, navigation control systems. In spite of enormous reported work on autonomous navigation control systems for mobile robots, achieving the goal above is still an open problem. Robustness and reliability of the controlled system can always be improved. The fundamental issues affecting the stability of the control systems include the undesired nonlinear effects introduced by actuator saturation, time delay in the controlled system, and uncertainty in the model. This research work develops robustly stabilizing control systems by investigating and addressing such nonlinear effects through analytical, simulations, and experiments. The control systems are designed to meet specified transient and steady-state specifications. The systems used for this research are ground (Dr Robot X80SV) and aerial (Parrot AR.Drone 2.0) mobile robots. Firstly, an effective autonomous navigation control system is developed for X80SV using logic control by combining 'go-to-goal', 'avoid-obstacle', and 'follow-wall' controllers. A MATLAB robot simulator is developed to implement this control algorithm and experiments are conducted in a typical office environment. The next stage of the research develops an autonomous position (x, y, and z) and attitude (roll, pitch, and yaw) controllers for a quadrotor, and PD-feedback control is used to achieve stabilization. The quadrotor's nonlinear dynamics and kinematics are implemented using MATLAB S-function to generate the state output. Secondly, the white-box and black-box approaches are used to obtain a linearized

  7. Real-time optimal adaptation for planetary geometry and texture: 4-8 tile hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Lok M; Duchaineau, Mark A; Joy, Kenneth I

    2005-01-01

    The real-time display of huge geometry and imagery databases involves view-dependent approximations, typically through the use of precomputed hierarchies that are selectively refined at runtime. A classic motivating problem is terrain visualization in which planetary databases involving billions of elevation and color values are displayed on PC graphics hardware at high frame rates. This paper introduces a new diamond data structure for the basic selective-refinement processing, which is a streamlined method of representing the well-known hierarchies of right triangles that have enjoyed much success in real-time, view-dependent terrain display. Regular-grid tiles are proposed as the payload data per diamond for both geometry and texture. The use of 4-8 grid refinement and coarsening schemes allows level-of-detail transitions that are twice as gradual as traditional quadtree-based hierarchies, as well as very high-quality low-pass filtering compared to subsampling-based hierarchies. An out-of-core storage organization is introduced based on Sierpinski indices per diamond, along with a tile preprocessing framework based on fine-to-coarse, same-level, and coarse-to-fine gathering operations. To attain optimal frame-to-frame coherence and processing-order priorities, dual split and merge queues are developed similar to the Realtime Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM) Algorithm, as well as an adaptation of the ROAM frustum culling technique. Example applications of lake-detection and procedural terrain generation demonstrate the flexibility of the tile processing framework.

  8. Manipulation of visual biofeedback during gait with a time delayed adaptive Virtual Mirror Box

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A mirror placed in the mid-sagittal plane of the body has been used to reduce phantom limb pain and improve movement function in medical conditions characterised by asymmetrical movement control. The mirrored illusion of unimpaired limb movement during gait might enhance the effect, but a physical mirror is only capable of showing parallel movement of limbs in real time typically while sitting. We aimed to overcome the limitations of physical mirrors by developing and evaluating a Virtual Mirror Box which delays the mirrored image of limbs during gait to ensure temporal congruency with the impaired physical limb. Methods An application was developed in the CAREN system’s D-Flow software which mirrors selected limbs recorded by real-time motion capture to the contralateral side. To achieve phase shifted movement of limbs during gait, the mirrored virtual limbs are also delayed by a continuously calculated amount derived from past gait events. In order to accommodate non-normal proportions and offsets of pathological gait, the movements are morphed so that the physical and virtual contact events match on the mirrored side. Our method was tested with a trans-femoral amputee walking on a treadmill using his artificial limb. Joint angles of the elbow and knee were compared between the intact and mirrored side using cross correlation, root mean squared difference and correlation coefficients. Results The time delayed adaptive virtual mirror box produced a symmetrical looking gait of the avatar coupled with a reduction of the difference between the intact and virtual knee and elbow angles (10.86° and 5.34° reduced to 4.99° and 2.54° respectively). Dynamic morphing of the delay caused a non-significant change of toe-off events when compared to delaying by 50% of the previous gait cycle, as opposed to the initial contact events which showed a practically negligible but statistically significant increase (p < 0.05). Conclusions Adding an adaptive time

  9. Influence of the time-step on the production of free nucleons and pions from heavy-ion collisions around 1 GeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, LiYan; Li, Miao; Guo, ChenChen; Wang, YongJia; Li, QingFeng; Liu, Ling

    2016-12-01

    By considering different values of the time-step for the potential updates in the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model, we examine its influence on observables, such as the yield and collective flow of nucleons and pions from heavyion collisions around 1 GeV/nucleon. It is found that these observables are affected to some extent by the choice of the time-step, and the impact of the time-step on the pion-related observables is more visible than that on the nucleon-related ones. However, its effect on the π -/ π + yield ratio and elliptic flow difference between neutrons and protons, which have been taken as sensitive observables for probing the density-dependent nuclear symmetry energy at high densities, is fairly weak.

  10. New Reduced Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion and Emission Rates of Jet-A and Methane Fuel With and Without Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2004-01-01

    A simplified kinetic scheme for Jet-A, and methane fuels with water injection was developed to be used in numerical combustion codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC) or even simple FORTRAN codes that are being developed at Glenn. The two time step method is either an initial time averaged value (step one) or an instantaneous value (step two). The switch is based on the water concentration in moles/cc of 1x10(exp -20). The results presented here results in a correlation that gives the chemical kinetic time as two separate functions. This two step method is used as opposed to a one step time averaged method previously developed to determine the chemical kinetic time with increased accuracy. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times for smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, initial water to fuel mass ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step, to be used with higher water concentrations, gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of instantaneous fuel and water mole concentration, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations would then be compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates were then used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. Chemical kinetic time equations for fuel, carbon monoxide and NOx were obtained for Jet-A fuel and methane with and without water injection to water mass loadings of 2/1 water to fuel. A similar correlation was also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium concentrations of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide as functions of overall equivalence ratio, water to fuel mass ratio, pressure and temperature (T3

  11. Gait analysis of slope walking: a study on step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, K; Tokuhiro, A; Takechi, H

    1991-06-01

    Determination was made of step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure during up- and downslope walking in 17 healthy men between the ages of 19 and 34 using a force plate. Slope inclinations were set at 3, 6, 9 and 12 degrees. At 12 degrees, walking speed, the product of step length and cadence, decreased significantly (p less than 0.01) in both up- and downslope walking. The most conspicuous phenomenon in upslope walking was in cadence. The steeper the slope, the smaller was the cadence. The most conspicuous phenomenon in downslope walking was in step length. The steeper the slope, the shorter was the step length.

  12. Policy iteration adaptive dynamic programming algorithm for discrete-time nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a new discrete-time policy iteration adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) method for solving the infinite horizon optimal control problem of nonlinear systems. The idea is to use an iterative ADP technique to obtain the iterative control law, which optimizes the iterative performance index function. The main contribution of this paper is to analyze the convergence and stability properties of policy iteration method for discrete-time nonlinear systems for the first time. It shows that the iterative performance index function is nonincreasingly convergent to the optimal solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. It is also proven that any of the iterative control laws can stabilize the nonlinear systems. Neural networks are used to approximate the performance index function and compute the optimal control law, respectively, for facilitating the implementation of the iterative ADP algorithm, where the convergence of the weight matrices is analyzed. Finally, the numerical results and analysis are presented to illustrate the performance of the developed method.

  13. Robust adaptive feedforward control and achievable tracking for systems with time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehner, Michael R.; Young, Peter M.

    2015-04-01

    A feedback/feedforward controller architecture is developed that characterises the achievable reference tracking of real time inputs for both minimum phase and non-minimum phase systems with time delays, when there are no modelling errors or external disturbances. This characterisation is obtained by factoring the plant into its minimum phase, non-minimum phase, and time delay components, which are used to design two feedforward controllers that inject signals into two points of the feedback loop. Design constraints are provided that determine both the types of signals that may be achieved, and the feedforward controllers that will generate that output. Of course, in practice, both modelling errors and external disturbances will be present. In this case, we develop robust analysis tools that both guide the feedback controller design process, and provide rigorous robust tracking performance that guarantees for the overall resulting closed-loop system. Robust methods for designing the feedforward controllers are presented, and numerical examples are provided. The performance of this architecture depends strongly on the choice of design parameters, and the accuracy of the plant model used. Hence, the use of adaptation methods is also considered, and it is shown that they can readily be employed to improve the performance of this control methodology.

  14. Adaptive timing of detachment in a tick parasitizing hole-nesting birds.

    PubMed

    White, J; Heylen, D J A; Matthysen, E

    2012-02-01

    In non-permanent parasites with low intrinsic mobility such as ticks, dispersal is highly dependent on host movements as well as the timing of separation from the hosts. Optimal detachment behaviour is all the more crucial in nidicolous ticks as the risk of detaching in non-suitable habitat is high. In this study, we experimentally investigated the detachment behaviour of Ixodes arboricola, a nidicolous tick that primarily infests birds roosting in tree-holes. We infested great tits with I. arboricola larvae or nymphs, and submitted the birds to 2 experimental treatments, a control treatment in which birds had normal access to nest boxes and an experimental treatment, in which the birds were prevented access to their nest boxes for varying lengths of time. In the control group, most ticks detached within 5 days, whereas in the experimental group, ticks remained on the bird for as long as the bird was prevented access (up to 14 days). This prolonged attachment caused a decrease in survival and engorgement weight in nymphs, but not in larvae. The capacity of I. arboricola larvae to extend the duration of attachment in non-suitable environments with no apparent costs, may be an adaptation to unpredictable use of cavities by roosting hosts during winter, and at the same time may facilitate dispersal of the larval instars.

  15. DRAGON, the Durham real-time, tomographic adaptive optics test bench: progress and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Andrew P.; Myers, Richard M.; Morris, Timothy J.; Basden, Alastair G.; Bharmal, Nazim A.; Rolt, Stephen; Bramall, David G.; Dipper, Nigel A.; Younger, Edward J.

    2014-08-01

    DRAGON is a real-time, tomographic Adaptive Optics test bench currently under development at Durham University. Optical and mechanical design work for DRAGON is now complete, and the system is close to becoming fully operational. DRAGON emulates current 4.2 m and 8 m telescopes, and can also be used to investigate ELT scale issues. The full system features 4 Laser Guide Star (LGS) Wavefront Sensors (WFS), 3 Natural Guide Star (NGS) WFSs and one Truth Sensor, all of which are 31 × 31 sub-aperture Shack-Hartmann WFS. Two Deformable Mirrors (DMs), a Boston MEMS Kilo DM and a Xinetics 97 actuator DM, correct for turbulence induced aberrations and these can be configured to be either open or closed loop of the WFS. A novel method of LGS emulation is implemented which includes the effects of uplink turbulence and elongation in real-time. The atmosphere is emulated by 4 rotating phase screens which can be translated in real-time to replicate altitude evolution of turbulent layers. DRAGON will be used to extensively study tomographic AO algorithms, such as those required for Multi-Object AO. As DRAGON has been designed to be compatible with CANARY, the MOAO demonstrator, results can be compared to those from the CANARY MOAO demonstrator on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. We present here an overview of the current status of DRAGON and some early results, including investigations into the validity of the LGS emulation method.

  16. A Time-Adaptive Integrator Based on Radau Methods for Advection Diffusion Reaction PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Pinto, S.; Perez-Rodriguez, S.

    2009-09-01

    The numerical integration of time-dependent PDEs, especially of Advection Diffusion Reaction type, for two and three spatial variables (in short, 2D and 3D problems) in the MoL framework is considered. The spatial discretization is made by using Finite Differences and the time integration is carried out by means of the L-stable, third order formula known as the two stage Radau IIA method. The main point for the solution of the large dimensional ODEs is not to solve the stage values of the Radau method until convergence (because the convergence is very slow on the stiff components), but only giving a very few iterations and take as advancing solution the latter stage value computed. The iterations are carried out by using the Approximate Matrix Factorization (AMF) coupled to a Newton-type iteration (SNI) as indicated in [5], which turns out in an acceptably cheap iteration, like Alternating Directions Methods (ADI) of Peaceman and Rachford (1955). Some stability results for the whole process (AMF)-(SNI) and a local error estimate for an adaptive time-integration are also given. Numerical results on two standard PDEs are presented and some conclusions about our method and other well-known solvers are drawn.

  17. Real-time detection of generic objects using objectness estimation and locally adaptive regression kernels matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhihui; Gao, Lei; Xiao, Liping; Zhou, Bin; Gao, Shibo

    2015-12-01

    Our purpose is to develop a detection algorithm capable of searching for generic interest objects in real time without large training sets and long-time training stages. Instead of the classical sliding window object detection paradigm, we employ an objectness measure to produce a small set of candidate windows efficiently using Binarized Normed Gradients and a Laplacian of Gaussian-like filter. We then extract Locally Adaptive Regression Kernels (LARKs) as descriptors both from a model image and the candidate windows which measure the likeness of a pixel to its surroundings. Using a matrix cosine similarity measure, the algorithm yields a scalar resemblance map, indicating the likelihood of similarity between the model and the candidate windows. By employing nonparametric significance tests and non-maxima suppression, we detect the presence of objects similar to the given model. Experiments show that the proposed detection paradigm can automatically detect the presence, the number, as well as location of similar objects to the given model. The high quality and efficiency of our method make it suitable for real time multi-category object detection applications.

  18. A high-order solver for unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the flux reconstruction method on unstructured grids with implicit dual time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher; Liang, Chunlei; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    We report development of a high-order compact flux reconstruction method for solving unsteady incompressible flow on unstructured grids with implicit dual time stepping. The method falls under the class of methods now referred to as flux reconstruction/correction procedure via reconstruction. The governing equations employ Chorin's classic artificial compressibility formulation with dual time stepping to solve unsteady flow problems. An implicit non-linear lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel scheme with backward Euler discretization is used to efficiently march the solution in pseudo time, while a second-order backward Euler discretization is used to march in physical time. We verify and validate implementation of the high-order method coupled with our implicit time stepping scheme using both steady and unsteady incompressible flow problems. The current implicit time stepping scheme is proven effective in satisfying the divergence-free constraint on the velocity field in the artificial compressibility formulation within the context of the high-order flux reconstruction method. This compact high-order method is very suitable for parallel computing and can easily be extended to moving and deforming grids.

  19. A high-order solver for unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the flux reconstruction method on unstructured grids with implicit dual time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher; Liang, Chunlei; Plesniak, Michael

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports development of a high-order compact method for solving unsteady incompressible flow on unstructured grids with implicit time stepping. The method falls under the class of methods now referred to as flux reconstruction/correction procedure via reconstruction. The governing equations employ the classical artificial compressibility treatment, where dual time stepping is needed to solve unsteady flow problems. An implicit non-linear lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel scheme with backward Euler discretization is used to efficiently march the solution in pseudo time, while a second-order backward Euler discretization is used to march in physical time. We verify and validate implementation of the high-order method coupled with our implicit time-stepping scheme. Three-dimensional results computed on many processing elements will be presented. The high-order method is very suitable for parallel computing and can easily be extended to moving and deforming grids. The current implicit time stepping scheme is proven effective in satisfying the divergence-free constraint on the velocity field in the artificial compressibility formulation within the context of the high-order flux reconstruction method. Financial support provided under the GW Presidential Merit Fellowship.

  20. Adaptive Anchoring Model: How Static and Dynamic Presentations of Time Series Influence Judgments and Predictions.

    PubMed

    Kusev, Petko; van Schaik, Paul; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Juliusson, Asgeir; Chater, Nick

    2017-04-06

    When attempting to predict future events, people commonly rely on historical data. One psychological characteristic of judgmental forecasting of time series, established by research, is that when people make forecasts from series, they tend to underestimate future values for upward trends and overestimate them for downward ones, so-called trend-damping (modeled by anchoring on, and insufficient adjustment from, the average of recent time series values). Events in a time series can be experienced sequentially (dynamic mode), or they can also be retrospectively viewed simultaneously (static mode), not experienced individually in real time. In one experiment, we studied the influence of presentation mode (dynamic and static) on two sorts of judgment: (a) predictions of the next event (forecast) and (b) estimation of the average value of all the events in the presented series (average estimation). Participants' responses in dynamic mode were anchored on more recent events than in static mode for all types of judgment but with different consequences; hence, dynamic presentation improved prediction accuracy, but not estimation. These results are not anticipated by existing theoretical accounts; we develop and present an agent-based model-the adaptive anchoring model (ADAM)-to account for the difference between processing sequences of dynamically and statically presented stimuli (visually presented data). ADAM captures how variation in presentation mode produces variation in responses (and the accuracy of these responses) in both forecasting and judgment tasks. ADAM's model predictions for the forecasting and judgment tasks fit better with the response data than a linear-regression time series model. Moreover, ADAM outperformed autoregressive-integrated-moving-average (ARIMA) and exponential-smoothing models, while neither of these models accounts for people's responses on the average estimation task.

  1. RARtool: A MATLAB Software Package for Designing Response-Adaptive Randomized Clinical Trials with Time-to-Event Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ryeznik, Yevgen; Sverdlov, Oleksandr; Wong, Weng Kee

    2015-08-01

    Response-adaptive randomization designs are becoming increasingly popular in clinical trial practice. In this paper, we present RARtool, a user interface software developed in MATLAB for designing response-adaptive randomized comparative clinical trials with censored time-to-event outcomes. The RARtool software can compute different types of optimal treatment allocation designs, and it can simulate response-adaptive randomization procedures targeting selected optimal allocations. Through simulations, an investigator can assess design characteristics under a variety of experimental scenarios and select the best procedure for practical implementation. We illustrate the utility of our RARtool software by redesigning a survival trial from the literature.

  2. Neuronal Spike Timing Adaptation Described with a Fractional Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Model

    PubMed Central

    Teka, Wondimu; Marinov, Toma M.; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    The voltage trace of neuronal activities can follow multiple timescale dynamics that arise from correlated membrane conductances. Such processes can result in power-law behavior in which the membrane voltage cannot be characterized with a single time constant. The emergent effect of these membrane correlations is a non-Markovian process that can be modeled with a fractional derivative. A fractional derivative is a non-local process in which the value of the variable is determined by integrating a temporal weighted voltage trace, also called the memory trace. Here we developed and analyzed a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model in which the exponent of the fractional derivative can vary from 0 to 1, with 1 representing the normal derivative. As the exponent of the fractional derivative decreases, the weights of the voltage trace increase. Thus, the value of the voltage is increasingly correlated with the trajectory of the voltage in the past. By varying only the fractional exponent, our model can reproduce upward and downward spike adaptations found experimentally in neocortical pyramidal cells and tectal neurons in vitro. The model also produces spikes with longer first-spike latency and high inter-spike variability with power-law distribution. We further analyze spike adaptation and the responses to noisy and oscillatory input. The fractional model generates reliable spike patterns in response to noisy input. Overall, the spiking activity of the fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model deviates from the spiking activity of the Markovian model and reflects the temporal accumulated intrinsic membrane dynamics that affect the response of the neuron to external stimulation. PMID:24675903

  3. Neuronal spike timing adaptation described with a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model.

    PubMed

    Teka, Wondimu; Marinov, Toma M; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-03-01

    The voltage trace of neuronal activities can follow multiple timescale dynamics that arise from correlated membrane conductances. Such processes can result in power-law behavior in which the membrane voltage cannot be characterized with a single time constant. The emergent effect of these membrane correlations is a non-Markovian process that can be modeled with a fractional derivative. A fractional derivative is a non-local process in which the value of the variable is determined by integrating a temporal weighted voltage trace, also called the memory trace. Here we developed and analyzed a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model in which the exponent of the fractional derivative can vary from 0 to 1, with 1 representing the normal derivative. As the exponent of the fractional derivative decreases, the weights of the voltage trace increase. Thus, the value of the voltage is increasingly correlated with the trajectory of the voltage in the past. By varying only the fractional exponent, our model can reproduce upward and downward spike adaptations found experimentally in neocortical pyramidal cells and tectal neurons in vitro. The model also produces spikes with longer first-spike latency and high inter-spike variability with power-law distribution. We further analyze spike adaptation and the responses to noisy and oscillatory input. The fractional model generates reliable spike patterns in response to noisy input. Overall, the spiking activity of the fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model deviates from the spiking activity of the Markovian model and reflects the temporal accumulated intrinsic membrane dynamics that affect the response of the neuron to external stimulation.

  4. Real-time nutrient monitoring in rivers: adaptive sampling strategies, technological challenges and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaen, Phillip; Khamis, Kieran; Lloyd, Charlotte; Bradley, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Excessive nutrient concentrations in river waters threaten aquatic ecosystem functioning and can pose substantial risks to human health. Robust monitoring strategies are therefore required to generate reliable estimates of river nutrient loads and to improve understanding of the catchment processes that drive spatiotemporal patterns in nutrient fluxes. Furthermore, these data are vital for prediction of future trends under changing environmental conditions and thus the development of appropriate mitigation measures. In recent years, technological developments have led to an increase in the use of continuous in-situ nutrient analysers, which enable measurements at far higher temporal resolutions than can be achieved with discrete sampling and subsequent laboratory analysis. However, such instruments can be costly to run and difficult to maintain (e.g. due to high power consumption and memory requirements), leading to trade-offs between temporal and spatial monitoring resolutions. Here, we highlight how adaptive monitoring strategies, comprising a mixture of temporal sample frequencies controlled by one or more 'trigger variables' (e.g. river stage, turbidity, or nutrient concentration), can advance our understanding of catchment nutrient dynamics while simultaneously overcoming many of the practical and economic challenges encountered in typical in-situ river nutrient monitoring applications. We present examples of short-term variability in river nutrient dynamics, driven by complex catchment behaviour, which support our case for the development of monitoring systems that can adapt in real-time to rapid environmental changes. In addition, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of current nutrient monitoring techniques, and suggest new research directions based on emerging technologies and highlight how these might improve: 1) monitoring strategies, and 2) understanding of linkages between catchment processes and river nutrient fluxes.

  5. A new Control Volume Finite Element Method with Discontinuous Pressure Representation for Multi-phase Flow with Implicit Adaptive time Integration and Dynamic Unstructured mesh Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Pablo; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Adam, Alexander; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Christopher; Jackson, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We present a new, high-order, control-volume-finite-element (CVFE) method with discontinuous representation for pressure and velocity to simulate multiphase flow in heterogeneous porous media. Time is discretized using an adaptive, fully implicit method. Heterogeneous geologic features are represented as volumes bounded by surfaces. Our approach conserves mass and does not require the use of CVs that span domain boundaries. Computational efficiency is increased by use of dynamic mesh optimization. We demonstrate that the approach, amongst other features, accurately preserves sharp saturation changes associated with high aspect ratio geologic domains, allowing efficient simulation of flow in highly heterogeneous models. Moreover, accurate solutions are obtained at lower cost than an equivalent fine, fixed mesh and conventional CVFE methods. The use of implicit time integration allows the method to efficiently converge using highly anisotropic meshes without having to reduce the time-step. The work is significant for two key reasons. First, it resolves a long-standing problem associated with the use of classical CVFE methods. Second, it reduces computational cost/increases solution accuracy through the use of dynamic mesh optimization and time-stepping with large Courant number. Funding for Dr P. Salinas from ExxonMobil is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. An SDR-Based Real-Time Testbed for GNSS Adaptive Array Anti-Jamming Algorithms Accelerated by GPU.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hailong; Cui, Xiaowei; Lu, Mingquan

    2016-03-11

    Nowadays, software-defined radio (SDR) has become a common approach to evaluate new algorithms. However, in the field of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) adaptive array anti-jamming, previous work has been limited due to the high computational power demanded by adaptive algorithms, and often lack flexibility and configurability. In this paper, the design and implementation of an SDR-based real-time testbed for GNSS adaptive array anti-jamming accelerated by a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) are documented. This testbed highlights itself as a feature-rich and extendible platform with great flexibility and configurability, as well as high computational performance. Both Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) and Space-Frequency Adaptive Processing (SFAP) are implemented with a wide range of parameters. Raw data from as many as eight antenna elements can be processed in real-time in either an adaptive nulling or beamforming mode. To fully take advantage of the parallelism resource provided by the GPU, a batched method in programming is proposed. Tests and experiments are conducted to evaluate both the computational and anti-jamming performance. This platform can be used for research and prototyping, as well as a real product in certain applications.

  7. An SDR-Based Real-Time Testbed for GNSS Adaptive Array Anti-Jamming Algorithms Accelerated by GPU

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hailong; Cui, Xiaowei; Lu, Mingquan

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, software-defined radio (SDR) has become a common approach to evaluate new algorithms. However, in the field of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) adaptive array anti-jamming, previous work has been limited due to the high computational power demanded by adaptive algorithms, and often lack flexibility and configurability. In this paper, the design and implementation of an SDR-based real-time testbed for GNSS adaptive array anti-jamming accelerated by a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) are documented. This testbed highlights itself as a feature-rich and extendible platform with great flexibility and configurability, as well as high computational performance. Both Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) and Space-Frequency Adaptive Processing (SFAP) are implemented with a wide range of parameters. Raw data from as many as eight antenna elements can be processed in real-time in either an adaptive nulling or beamforming mode. To fully take advantage of the parallelism resource provided by the GPU, a batched method in programming is proposed. Tests and experimen