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Sample records for adaptive transcriptional response

  1. Transcription Factor ADS-4 Regulates Adaptive Responses and Resistance to Antifungal Azole Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kangji; Zhang, Zhenying; Chen, Xi; Sun, Xianyun; Jin, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Azoles are commonly used as antifungal drugs or pesticides to control fungal infections in medicine and agriculture. Fungi adapt to azole stress by rapidly activating the transcription of a number of genes, and transcriptional increases in some azole-responsive genes can elevate azole resistance. The regulatory mechanisms that control transcriptional responses to azole stress in filamentous fungi are not well understood. This study identified a bZIP transcription factor, ADS-4 (antifungal drug sensitive-4), as a new regulator of adaptive responses and resistance to antifungal azoles. Transcription of ads-4 in Neurospora crassa cells increased when they were subjected to ketoconazole treatment, whereas the deletion of ads-4 resulted in hypersensitivity to ketoconazole and fluconazole. In contrast, the overexpression of ads-4 increased resistance to fluconazole and ketoconazole in N. crassa. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis, followed by quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR confirmation, showed that ADS-4 positively regulated the transcriptional responses of at least six genes to ketoconazole stress in N. crassa. The gene products of four ADS-4-regulated genes are known contributors to azole resistance, including the major efflux pump CDR4 (Pdr5p ortholog), an ABC multidrug transporter (NcAbcB), sterol C-22 desaturase (ERG5), and a lipid transporter (NcRTA2) that is involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance. Deletion of the ads-4-homologous gene Afads-4 in Aspergillus fumigatus caused hypersensitivity to itraconazole and ketoconazole, which suggested that ADS-4 is a functionally conserved regulator of adaptive responses to azoles. This study provides important information on a new azole resistance factor that could be targeted by a new range of antifungal pesticides and drugs. PMID:26100701

  2. Global transcriptional, physiological and metabolite analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough responses to salt adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Zhou, A.; Baidoo, E.; He, Q.; Joachimiak, M. P.; Benke, P.; Phan, R.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wall, J.; Stahl, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Zhou, J.

    2009-12-01

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to salt adaptation (long-term NaCl exposure) was examined by physiological, global transcriptional, and metabolite analyses. The growth of D. vulgaris was inhibited by high levels of NaCl, and the growth inhibition could be relieved by the addition of exogenous amino acids (e.g., glutamate, alanine, tryptophan) or yeast extract. Salt adaptation induced the expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, electron transfer, hydrogen oxidation, and general stress responses (e.g., heat shock proteins, phage shock proteins, and oxidative stress response proteins). Genes involved in carbon metabolism, cell motility, and phage structures were repressed. Comparison of transcriptomic profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt adaptation with those of salt shock (short-term NaCl exposure) showed some similarity as well as a significant difference. Metabolite assays showed that glutamate and alanine were accumulated under salt adaptation, suggesting that they may be used as osmoprotectants in D. vulgaris. A conceptual model is proposed to link the observed results to currently available knowledge for further understanding the mechanisms of D. vulgaris adaptation to elevated NaCl.

  3. Adaptation of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator to activate transcription in plants.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Verner, Eva; Salem, Tarek A; Gurley, William B

    2016-02-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator of the VirA/VirG two-component system was adapted to function in tobacco protoplasts. The subcellular localization of VirG and VirA proteins transiently expressed in onion cells was determined using GFP fusions. Preliminary studies using Gal4DBD-VP16 fusions with VirG and Escherichia coli UhpA, and NarL response regulators indicated compatibility of these bacterial proteins with the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus. A strong transcriptional activator based on tandem activation domains from the Drosophila fushi tarazu and Herpes simplex VP16 was created. Selected configurations of the two-site Gal4-vir box GUS reporters were activated by chimeric effectors dependent on either the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain or that of VirG. Transcriptional induction of the GUS reporter was highest for the VirE19-element promoter with both constitutive and wild-type VirG-tandem activation domain effectors. Multiple VirE19 elements increased the reporter activity proportionately, indicating that the VirG DNA binding domain was functional in plants. The VirG constitutive-Q-VP16 effector was more active than the VirG wild-type. In both the constitutive and wild-type forms of VirG, Q-VP16 activated transcription of the GUS reporter best when located at the C-terminus, i.e. juxtaposed to the VirG DNA binding domain. These results demonstrate the possibility of using DNA binding domains from bacterial response regulators and their cognate binding elements in the engineering of plant gene expression. PMID:26646288

  4. Transcriptional Analysis of The Adaptive Digestive System of The Migratory Locust in Response to Plant Defensive Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Spit, Jornt; Holtof, Michiel; Badisco, Liesbet; Vergauwen, Lucia; Vogel, Elise; Knapen, Dries; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Herbivorous insects evolved adaptive mechanisms to compensate for the presence of plant defensive protease inhibitors (PI) in their food. The underlying regulatory mechanisms of these compensatory responses remain largely elusive. In the current study, we investigated the initiation of this adaptive response in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, via microarray analysis of gut tissues. Four hours after dietary uptake of PIs, 114 and 150 transcripts were respectively found up- or downregulated. The results suggest a quick trade-off between compensating for potential loss of digestive activity on the one hand, and stress tolerance, defense, and structural integrity of the gut on the other hand. We additionally addressed the role of a group of related upregulated hexamerin-like proteins in the PI-induced response. Simultaneous knockdown of corresponding transcripts by means of RNA interference resulted in a reduced capacity of the locust nymphs to cope with the effects of PI. Moreover, since insect hexamerins have been shown to bind Juvenile Hormone (JH), we also investigated the effect of JH on the proteolytic digestion in L. migratoria. Our results indicate that JH has a stimulatory effect on the expression of three homologous chymotrypsin genes, while knocking down the JH receptor (methoprene tolerant) led to opposite effects. PMID:27581362

  5. Transcriptional Analysis of The Adaptive Digestive System of The Migratory Locust in Response to Plant Defensive Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Spit, Jornt; Holtof, Michiel; Badisco, Liesbet; Vergauwen, Lucia; Vogel, Elise; Knapen, Dries; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Herbivorous insects evolved adaptive mechanisms to compensate for the presence of plant defensive protease inhibitors (PI) in their food. The underlying regulatory mechanisms of these compensatory responses remain largely elusive. In the current study, we investigated the initiation of this adaptive response in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, via microarray analysis of gut tissues. Four hours after dietary uptake of PIs, 114 and 150 transcripts were respectively found up- or downregulated. The results suggest a quick trade-off between compensating for potential loss of digestive activity on the one hand, and stress tolerance, defense, and structural integrity of the gut on the other hand. We additionally addressed the role of a group of related upregulated hexamerin-like proteins in the PI-induced response. Simultaneous knockdown of corresponding transcripts by means of RNA interference resulted in a reduced capacity of the locust nymphs to cope with the effects of PI. Moreover, since insect hexamerins have been shown to bind Juvenile Hormone (JH), we also investigated the effect of JH on the proteolytic digestion in L. migratoria. Our results indicate that JH has a stimulatory effect on the expression of three homologous chymotrypsin genes, while knocking down the JH receptor (methoprene tolerant) led to opposite effects. PMID:27581362

  6. Macrophage Transcriptional Response to Species-Adapted Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis Isolates: The Role of Pathogen Genotype in Host Response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcriptional response of human and bovine macrophages to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) isolates from cattle and sheep were examined using DNA microarrays. M. paratuberculosis is the etiologic agent of Johne’s Disease, a chronic infection of ruminant anima...

  7. Transcriptional responses of invasive and indigenous whiteflies to different host plants reveal their disparate capacity of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Xing; Hong, Yue; Zhang, Min-Zhu; Wang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci contains more than 35 cryptic species. The higher adaptability of Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) cryptic species has been recognized as one important factor for its invasion and displacement of other indigenous species worldwide. Here we compared the performance of the invasive MEAM1 and the indigenous Asia II 3 whitefly species following host plant transfer from a suitable host (cotton) to an unsuitable host (tobacco) and analyzed their transcriptional responses. After transfer to tobacco for 24 h, MEAM1 performed much better than Asia II 3. Transcriptional analysis showed that the patterns of gene regulation were very different with most of the genes up-regulated in MEAM1 but down-regulated in Asia II 3. Whereas carbohydrate and energy metabolisms were repressed in Asia II 3, the gene expression and protein metabolisms were activated in MEAM1. Compared to the constitutive high expression of detoxification genes in MEAM1, most of the detoxification genes were down-regulated in Asia II 3. Enzymatic activities of P450, GST and esterase further verified that the detoxification of MEAM1 was much higher than that of Asia II 3. These results reveal obvious differences in responses of MEAM1 and Asia II 3 to host transfer. PMID:26041313

  8. Phenotypic and transcriptional profiling in Entamoeba histolytica reveal costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with metronidazole resistance

    PubMed Central

    Penuliar, Gil M.; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy is critical in the fight against infectious diseases caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Among the drugs available for the treatment of amebiasis, metronidazole (MTZ) is considered the drug of choice. Recently, in vitro studies have described MTZ resistance and the potential mechanisms involved. Costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with resistance, however, have not been investigated. In this study we generated an HM-1 derived strain resistant to 12 μM MTZ (MTZR). We examined its phenotypic and transcriptional profile to determine the consequences and mRNA level changes associated with MTZ resistance. Our results indicated increased cell size and granularity, and decreased rates in cell division, adhesion, phagocytosis, cytopathogenicity, and glucose consumption. Transcriptome analysis revealed 142 differentially expressed genes in MTZR. In contrast to other MTZ resistant parasites, MTZR did not down-regulate pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, but showed increased expression of genes for a hypothetical protein (HP1) and several iron-sulfur flavoproteins, and downregulation of genes for leucine-rich proteins. Fisher's exact test showed 24 significantly enriched GO terms in MTZR, and a 3-way comparison of modulated genes in MTZR against those of MTZR cultured without MTZ and HM-1 cultured with MTZ, showed that 88 genes were specific to MTZR. Overall, our findings suggested that MTZ resistance is associated with specific transcriptional changes and decreased parasite virulence. PMID:25999919

  9. A Cotton MYB Transcription Factor, GbMYB5, is Positively Involved in Plant Adaptive Response to Drought Stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianzi; Li, Wenjuan; Hu, Xuehong; Guo, Jiaru; Liu, Aimin; Zhang, Baolong

    2015-05-01

    Drought stress negatively affects plant growth and limits plant productivity. Genes functioning in plant responses to drought stress are essential for the development of drought-tolerant crops. Here, we report that an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor gene in Gossypium barbadense, GbMYB5, confers drought tolerance in cotton and transgenic tobacco. Virus-induced gene silencing of GbMYB5 compromised the tolerance of cotton plantlets to drought stress and reduced the post-rewatering water recovery survival rate to 50% as compared with the 90% survival rate in the wild type (WT). Silencing GbMYB5 decreased proline content and antioxidant enzyme activities and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content in cotton under drought stress. The expression levels of drought-inducible genes NCED3, RD22 and RD26 were not affected by the silencing of GbMYB5. However, GbMYB5-overexpressing tobacco lines displayed hypersensitivity to ABA and improved survival rates as well as reduced water loss rates under drought stress. Furthermore, stomatal size and the rate of opening of stomata were markedly decreased in transgenic tobacco. The overexpression of GbMYB5 enhanced the accumulation of proline and antioxidant enzymes while it reduced production of MDA in transgenic tobacco as compared with the WT under drought stress. The transcript levels of the antioxidant genes SOD, CAT and GST, polyamine biosynthesis genes ADC1 and SAMDC, the late embryogenesis abundant protein-encoding gene ERD10D and drought-responsive genes NCED3, BG and RD26 were generally higher in GbMYB5-overexpressing tobacco than in the WT under drought stress. Collectively, our data suggested that GbMYB5 was positively involved in the plant adaptive response to drought stress. PMID:25657343

  10. Diverse Mechanisms of Sp1-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation Potentially Involved in the Adaptive Response of Cancer Cells to Oxygen-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    The inside of a tumor often contains a hypoxic area caused by a limited supply of molecular oxygen due to aberrant vasculature. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are major transcription factors that are required for cancer cells to adapt to such stress conditions. HIFs, complexed with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator, bind to and activate target genes as enhancers of transcription. In addition to this common mechanism, the induction of the unfolded protein response and mTOR signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress is also known to be involved in the adaptation to hypoxia conditions. Sp1 is a ubiquitously-expressed transcription factor that plays a vital role in the regulation of numerous genes required for normal cell function. In addition to the well-characterized stress response mechanisms described above, increasing experimental evidence suggests that Sp1 and HIFs collaborate to drive gene expression in cancer cells in response to hypoxia, thereby regulating additional adaptive responses to cellular oxygen deficiency. However, these characteristics of Sp1 and their biological merits have not been summarized. In this review, we will discuss the diverse mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by Sp1 and their potential involvement in the adaptive response of cancer cells to hypoxic tumor microenvironments. PMID:26703734

  11. Role of x-ray-induced transcripts in adaptive responses following x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and sublethal damage repair, may be the same manifestations of a series of common enzymatic steps. PLDR, has two distinct phases based upon DNA lesion repair and survival recovery studies. The first phase of PLDR occurs very quickly (t{sub {1/2}}:2--20 mins) to increase the survival of X-irradiated cells by mending the vast array of DNA lesions created by ionizing radiation. The second slower phase of PLDR proceeds much later (i.e., >1--2 hrs) following X-irradiation, during which the remaining double-stranded DNA breaks are completely repaired. This second phase of repair closely corresponds to the restructuring of gross chromosomal damage, and can be partially blocked in some human cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. This slower phase of PLDR correlated with a rapid decline in X-ray-induced transformation of normal cells. The fast component of PLDR may be due to constitutively synthesized DNA ligases, topoisomerases, or polymerases, which act immediately to repair damaged, DNA. In contrast, the slow phase of PLDR in human cells may require the induction of specific genes and gene product's involved in the repair of potentially lethal or carcinogenic DNA lesions. Induced gene products (i.e., proteins) specifically synthesized in response to physiological doses of ionizing radiation in radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells, and in a variety of other human normal and cancer-prone cells, were identified using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We identified and partially characterized ten proteins synthesized by U1-Mel cells. The synthesis of eight of these proteins were specifically induced by ionizing radiation and two proteins were repressed Neither heat shock, UV-irradiation, nor bifunctional alkylating agent treatments resulted in the induction of these proteins. The expression of one protein, XIP269, correlated very well with PLDR capacity.

  12. Adaptive and Specialised Transcriptional Responses to Xenobiotic Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans Are Regulated by Nuclear Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Laura M.; Rayson, Samantha J.; Flemming, Anthony J.; Urwin, Peter E.

    2013-01-01

    Characterisation of the pathways by which xenobiotics are metabolised and excreted in both target and non-target organisms is crucial for the rational design of effective and specific novel bioactive molecules. Consequently, we have investigated the induced responses of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to a variety of xenobiotics which represent a range of putative modes of action. The majority of genes that were specifically induced in preliminary microarray analyses encoded enzymes from Phase I and II metabolism, including cytochrome P450s, short chain dehydrogenases, UDP-glucuronosyl transferases and glutathione transferases. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by quantitative PCR and GFP induction in reporter strains driven by promoters for transcription of twelve induced enzymes was investigated. The particular complement of metabolic genes induced was found to be highly contingent on the xenobiotic applied. The known regulators of responses to applied chemicals ahr-1, hif-1, mdt-15 and nhr-8 were not required for any of these inducible responses and skn-1 regulated GFP expression from only two of the promoters. Reporter strains were used in conjunction with systematic RNAi screens to identify transcription factors which drive expression of these genes under xenobiotic exposure. These transcription factors appeared to regulate specific xenobiotic responses and have no reported phenotypes under standard conditions. Focussing on nhr-176 we demonstrate the role of this transcription factor in mediating the resistance to thiabendazole. PMID:23922869

  13. Topologies for perfect adaptation in gene transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenjia; Tang, Chao

    2014-03-01

    Adaptation is commonly used in sensory systems and signaling networks to allow the detection of further stimuli. Despite enzymatic network topologies for adaptation have been investigated systematically, the topology of transcriptional network that could perform adaptation still remains unclear, due to the complexity of transcriptional regulation. Here, we systematically investigated all three-node transcriptional networks, and found the topologies of transcriptional networks for adaptation are different from that of enzymatic ones. While both negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed forward loop (IFFL) are capable of performing adaptation analytically, a positive self-regulation on buffer node is necessary for NFBL topology and more flexible structures emerge for IFFL than that of enzymatic networks. Most of the simulation results agree with analytical predictions. This study may explain the mechanism of adapted gene regulation behavior and supply a design table for gene regulatory adaptation.

  14. Different Transcriptional Responses from Slow and Fast Growth Rate Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Adapted to Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Ninoska; Maza, Felipe; Navea-Perez, Helen; Aravena, Andrés; Marquez-Fontt, Bárbara; Navarrete, Paola; Figueroa, Guillermo; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8°C of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8°C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature. PMID:26973610

  15. Different Transcriptional Responses from Slow and Fast Growth Rate Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Adapted to Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Ninoska; Maza, Felipe; Navea-Perez, Helen; Aravena, Andrés; Marquez-Fontt, Bárbara; Navarrete, Paola; Figueroa, Guillermo; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8°C of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8°C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature. PMID:26973610

  16. Role of x-ray-induced transcripts in adaptive responses following x-rays. Progress report, Year 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    I will describe our recent data in which we have extracted and purified a sufficient amount of RNA from primed and unprimed U1-Mel cells to begin the search for new genes which are modulated by priming or high dose irradiation during the establishment and/or challenge of adapted cells, respectively. Gene transcripts which are altered during ASRs now include alterations in xip5 (a gene with homology to human growth hormone), xipl2 (a gene with homology to human angiogenesis factor and a gene which may be involved in apoptosis due to its possible RNase activity), cyclin A (which is altered in primed cells only after a high dose of ionizing radiation), cyclin B (which is also altered in a similar manner as cyclin A), p53 (a tumor suppressor gene involved in cell division control in G{sub 1} following ionizing radiation), and glutathionine S transferase-pi (a gene product which has been demonstrated to be involved in DNA repair and redox cycling). In contrast, the remaining xip CDNA clones [i.e., xip1-4,6-11, which were isolated following high dose ionizing radiation exposure to human U1-Mel cells], Prad-1 (a gene involved in cell cycle controlling events at the G{sub 1} portion of the cell cycle), 36B4 (a gene involved in homeostasis), and cdc2 (a gene involved in the regulation of the S-phase portion of the cell cycle), were not altered following ionizing radiation, either during the establishment or challenge of adapted human cells.

  17. The Transcriptional Response of Listeria monocytogenes during Adaptation to Growth on Lactate and Diacetate Includes Synergistic Changes That Increase Fermentative Acetoin Production▿†

    PubMed Central

    Stasiewicz, Matthew J.; Wiedmann, Martin; Bergholz, Teresa M.

    2011-01-01

    The organic acids lactate and diacetate are commonly used in combination in ready-to-eat foods because they show synergistic ability to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Full-genome microarrays were used to investigate the synergistic transcriptomic responses of two L. monocytogenes strains, H7858 (serotype 4b) and F6854 (serotype 1/2a), to these two organic acids under conditions representing osmotic and cold stress encountered in foods. Strains were exposed to brain heart infusion (BHI) broth at 7°C with 4.65% water-phase (w.p.) NaCl at pH 6.1 with (i) 2% w.p. potassium lactate, (ii) 0.14% w.p. sodium diacetate, (iii) the combination of both at the same levels, or (iv) no organic acids as a control. RNA was extracted 8 h after exposure, during lag phase, to capture gene transcription changes during adaptation to the organic acid stress. Significant differential transcription of 1,041 genes in H7858 and 640 genes in F6854 was observed in at least one pair of the 4 different treatments. The effects of combined treatment with lactate and diacetate included (i) synergistic transcription differences for 474 and 209 genes in H7858 and F6854, respectively, (ii) differential transcription of genes encoding cation transporters and ABC transporters of metals, and (iii) altered metabolism, including induction of a nutrient-limiting stress response, reduction of menaquinone biosynthesis, and a shift from fermentative production of acetate and lactate to energetically less favorable, neutral acetoin. These data suggest that additional treatments that interfere with cellular energy generation processes could more efficiently inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes. PMID:21666015

  18. AtRAV and AtbZIP transcription factors positively regulate ABA responses: Overexpression in cotton enhances drought stress adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought tolerance is an important trait being pursued by the agbiotech industry. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a stress hormone that mediates a multitude of processes in growth and development, water use efficiency, and gene expression during seed development and in response to environmental stresses. Ar...

  19. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Testori, Alessandro

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  20. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, J.; Testori, A.

    1999-10-12

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  1. Role of x-ray-induced transcripts in adaptive responses following x-rays. Progress report, year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.

    1992-09-01

    Potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and sublethal damage repair, may be the same manifestations of a series of common enzymatic steps. PLDR, has two distinct phases based upon DNA lesion repair and survival recovery studies. The first phase of PLDR occurs very quickly (t{sub {1/2}}:2--20 mins) to increase the survival of X-irradiated cells by mending the vast array of DNA lesions created by ionizing radiation. The second slower phase of PLDR proceeds much later (i.e., >1--2 hrs) following X-irradiation, during which the remaining double-stranded DNA breaks are completely repaired. This second phase of repair closely corresponds to the restructuring of gross chromosomal damage, and can be partially blocked in some human cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. This slower phase of PLDR correlated with a rapid decline in X-ray-induced transformation of normal cells. The fast component of PLDR may be due to constitutively synthesized DNA ligases, topoisomerases, or polymerases, which act immediately to repair damaged, DNA. In contrast, the slow phase of PLDR in human cells may require the induction of specific genes and gene product`s involved in the repair of potentially lethal or carcinogenic DNA lesions. Induced gene products (i.e., proteins) specifically synthesized in response to physiological doses of ionizing radiation in radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells, and in a variety of other human normal and cancer-prone cells, were identified using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We identified and partially characterized ten proteins synthesized by U1-Mel cells. The synthesis of eight of these proteins were specifically induced by ionizing radiation and two proteins were repressed Neither heat shock, UV-irradiation, nor bifunctional alkylating agent treatments resulted in the induction of these proteins. The expression of one protein, XIP269, correlated very well with PLDR capacity.

  2. Gene 33/Mig-6, a transcriptionally inducible adapter protein that binds GTP-Cdc42 and activates SAPK/JNK. A potential marker transcript for chronic pathologic conditions, such as diabetic nephropathy. Possible role in the response to persistent stress.

    PubMed

    Makkinje, A; Quinn, D A; Chen, A; Cadilla, C L; Force, T; Bonventre, J V; Kyriakis, J M

    2000-06-01

    Chronic stresses, including the mechanical strain caused by hypertension or excess pulmonary ventilation pressure, lead to important clinical consequences, including hypertrophy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pathologic hypertrophy contributes to decreased organ function and, ultimately, organ failure; and cardiac and diabetic renal hypertrophy are major causes of morbidity and morality in the developed world. Likewise, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious potential side effect of mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Whereas the deleterious effects of chronic stress are well established, the molecular mechanisms by which these stresses affect cell function are still poorly characterized. gene 33 (also called mitogen-inducible gene-6, mig-6) is an immediate early gene that is transcriptionally induced by a divergent array of extracellular stimuli. The physiologic function of Gene 33 is unknown. Here we show that gene 33 mRNA levels increase sharply in response to a set of commonly occurring chronic stress stimuli: mechanical strain, vasoactive peptides, and diabetic nephropathy. Induction of gene 33 requires the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. This expression pattern suggests that gene 33 is a potential marker for diabetic nephropathy and other pathologic responses to persistent sublethal stress. The structure of Gene 33 indicates an adapter protein capable of binding monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily. Consistent with this, Gene 33 interacts in vivo and, in a GTP-dependent manner, in vitro with Cdc42Hs; and transient expression of Gene 33 results in the selective activation of the SAPKs. These results imply a reciprocal, positive feedback relationship between Gene 33 expression and SAPK activation. Expression of Gene 33 at sufficient levels may enable a compensatory reprogramming of cellular function in response to chronic stress, which may have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:10749885

  3. The Transcriptional Response of Cryptococcus neoformans to Ingestion by Acanthamoeba castellanii and Macrophages Provides Insights into the Evolutionary Adaptation to the Mammalian Host

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Hugo Costa; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Tavares, Aldo Henrique F. P.; Fernandes, Larissa; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Casadevall, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans for mammals, and in particular its intracellular style, was proposed to emerge from evolutionary pressures on its natural environment by protozoan predation, which promoted the selection of strategies that allow intracellular survival in macrophages. In fact, Acanthamoeba castellanii ingests yeast cells, which then can replicate intracellularly. In addition, most fungal factors needed to establish infection in the mammalian host are also important for survival within the amoeba. To better understand the origin of C. neoformans virulence, we compared the transcriptional profile of yeast cells internalized by amoebae and murine macrophages after 6 h of infection. Our results showed 656 and 293 genes whose expression changed at least 2-fold in response to the intracellular environments of amoebae and macrophages, respectively. Among the genes that were found in both groups, we focused on open reading frame (ORF) CNAG_05662, which was potentially related to sugar transport but had no determined biological function. To characterize its function, we constructed a mutant strain and evaluated its ability to grow on various carbon sources. The results showed that this gene, named PTP1 (polyol transporter protein 1), is involved in the transport of 5- and 6-carbon polyols such as mannitol and sorbitol, but its presence or absence had no effect on cryptococcal virulence for mice or moth larvae. Overall, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the capacity for mammalian virulence originated from fungus-protozoan interactions in the environment and provide a better understanding of how C. neoformans adapts to the mammalian host. PMID:23524994

  4. Legionella pneumophila transcriptional response to chlorine treatment.

    PubMed

    Bodet, Charles; Sahr, Tobias; Dupuy, Mathieu; Buchrieser, Carmen; Héchard, Yann

    2012-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental microorganism found in freshwater that can cause an acute form of pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Despite widespread use of chlorine to ensure drinking water quality and awareness that L. pneumophila may escape these treatments, little is known about its effects on L. pneumophila. The aim of this study was to investigate the L. pneumophila transcriptional response induced by chlorine treatment. Transcriptome analysis, using DNA arrays, showed that a sublethal dose of chlorine induces a differential expression of 391 genes involved in stress response, virulence, general metabolism, information pathways and transport. Many of the stress response genes were significantly upregulated, whereas a significant number of virulence genes were repressed. In particular, exposure of L. pneumophila to chlorine induced the expression of cellular antioxidant proteins, stress proteins and transcriptional regulators. In addition, glutathione S-transferase specific activity was enhanced following chlorine treatment. Our results clearly indicate that chlorine induces expression of proteins involved in cellular defence mechanisms against oxidative stress that might be involved in adaptation or resistance to chlorine treatment. PMID:22192759

  5. Transcription factor Nrf2 mediates an adaptive response to sulforaphane that protects fibroblasts in vitro against the cytotoxic effects of electrophiles, peroxides and redox-cycling agents

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Larry G.; Kelleher, Michael O.; Eggleston, Ian M.; Itoh, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hayes, John D.

    2009-06-15

    Sulforaphane can stimulate cellular adaptation to redox stressors through transcription factor Nrf2. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as a model, we show herein that the normal homeostatic level of glutathione in Nrf2{sup -/-} MEFs was only 20% of that in their wild-type counterparts. Furthermore, the rate of glutathione synthesis following its acute depletion upon treatment with 3 {mu}mol/l sulforaphane was very substantially lower in Nrf2{sup -/-} MEFs than in wild-type cells, and the rebound leading to a {approx} 1.9-fold increase in glutathione that occurred 12-24 h after Nrf2{sup +/+} MEFs were treated with sulforaphane was not observed in Nrf2{sup -/-} fibroblasts. Wild-type MEFs that had been pre-treated for 24 h with 3 {mu}mol/l sulforaphane exhibited between 1.4- and 3.2-fold resistance against thiol-reactive electrophiles, including isothiocyanates, {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carbonyl compounds (e.g. acrolein), aryl halides and alkene epoxides. Pre-treatment of Nrf2{sup +/+} MEFs with sulforaphane also protected against hydroperoxides (e.g. cumene hydroperoxide, CuOOH), free radical-generating compounds (e.g. menadione), and genotoxic electrophiles (e.g. chlorambucil). By contrast, Nrf2{sup -/-} MEFs were typically {approx} 50% less tolerant of these agents than wild-type fibroblasts, and sulforaphane pre-treatment did not protect the mutant cells against xenobiotics. To test whether Nrf2-mediated up-regulation of glutathione represents the major cytoprotective mechanism stimulated by sulforaphane, 5 {mu}mol/l buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) was used to inhibit glutathione synthesis. In Nrf2{sup +/+} MEFs pre-treated with sulforaphane, BSO diminished intrinsic resistance and abolished inducible resistance to acrolein, CuOOH and chlorambucil, but not menadione. Thus Nrf2-dependent up-regulation of GSH is the principal mechanism by which sulforaphane pre-treatment induced resistance to acrolein, CuOOH and chlorambucil, but not menadione.

  6. Regulated cell death and adaptive stress responses.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells react to potentially dangerous perturbations of the intracellular or extracellular microenvironment by activating rapid (transcription-independent) mechanisms that attempt to restore homeostasis. If such perturbations persist, cells may still try to cope with stress by activating delayed and robust (transcription-dependent) adaptive systems, or they may actively engage in cellular suicide. This regulated form of cell death can manifest with various morphological, biochemical and immunological correlates, and constitutes an ultimate attempt of stressed cells to maintain organismal homeostasis. Here, we dissect the general organization of adaptive cellular responses to stress, their intimate connection with regulated cell death, and how the latter operates for the preservation of organismal homeostasis. PMID:27048813

  7. Graded Proteasome Dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans Activates an Adaptive Response Involving the Conserved SKN-1 and ELT-2 Transcription Factors and the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chinchankar, Meghna N.; Ferguson, Annabel A.; Ghazi, Arjumand; Fisher, Alfred L.

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cellular proteins in a biologically active and structurally stable state is a vital endeavor involving multiple cellular pathways. One such pathway is the ubiquitin-proteasome system that represents a major route for protein degradation, and reductions in this pathway usually have adverse effects on the health of cells and tissues. Here, we demonstrate that loss-of-function mutants of the Caenorhabditis elegans proteasome subunit, RPN-10, exhibit moderate proteasome dysfunction and unexpectedly develop both increased longevity and enhanced resistance to multiple threats to the proteome, including heat, oxidative stress, and the presence of aggregation prone proteins. The rpn-10 mutant animals survive through the activation of compensatory mechanisms regulated by the conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 and ELT-2/GATA transcription factors that mediate the increased expression of genes encoding proteasome subunits as well as those mediating oxidative- and heat-stress responses. Additionally, we find that the rpn-10 mutant also shows enhanced activity of the autophagy-lysosome pathway as evidenced by increased expression of the multiple autophagy genes including atg-16.2, lgg-1, and bec-1, and also by an increase in GFP::LGG-1 puncta. Consistent with a critical role for this pathway, the enhanced resistance of the rpn-10 mutant to aggregation prone proteins depends on autophagy genes atg-13, atg-16.2, and prmt-1. Furthermore, the rpn-10 mutant is particularly sensitive to the inhibition of lysosome activity via either RNAi or chemical means. We also find that the rpn-10 mutant shows a reduction in the numbers of intestinal lysosomes, and that the elt-2 gene also plays a novel and vital role in controlling the production of functional lysosomes by the intestine. Overall, these experiments suggest that moderate proteasome dysfunction could be leveraged to improve protein homeostasis and organismal health and longevity, and that the rpn-10 mutant provides a unique

  8. Graded Proteasome Dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans Activates an Adaptive Response Involving the Conserved SKN-1 and ELT-2 Transcription Factors and the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway.

    PubMed

    Keith, Scott A; Maddux, Sarah K; Zhong, Yayu; Chinchankar, Meghna N; Ferguson, Annabel A; Ghazi, Arjumand; Fisher, Alfred L

    2016-02-01

    The maintenance of cellular proteins in a biologically active and structurally stable state is a vital endeavor involving multiple cellular pathways. One such pathway is the ubiquitin-proteasome system that represents a major route for protein degradation, and reductions in this pathway usually have adverse effects on the health of cells and tissues. Here, we demonstrate that loss-of-function mutants of the Caenorhabditis elegans proteasome subunit, RPN-10, exhibit moderate proteasome dysfunction and unexpectedly develop both increased longevity and enhanced resistance to multiple threats to the proteome, including heat, oxidative stress, and the presence of aggregation prone proteins. The rpn-10 mutant animals survive through the activation of compensatory mechanisms regulated by the conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 and ELT-2/GATA transcription factors that mediate the increased expression of genes encoding proteasome subunits as well as those mediating oxidative- and heat-stress responses. Additionally, we find that the rpn-10 mutant also shows enhanced activity of the autophagy-lysosome pathway as evidenced by increased expression of the multiple autophagy genes including atg-16.2, lgg-1, and bec-1, and also by an increase in GFP::LGG-1 puncta. Consistent with a critical role for this pathway, the enhanced resistance of the rpn-10 mutant to aggregation prone proteins depends on autophagy genes atg-13, atg-16.2, and prmt-1. Furthermore, the rpn-10 mutant is particularly sensitive to the inhibition of lysosome activity via either RNAi or chemical means. We also find that the rpn-10 mutant shows a reduction in the numbers of intestinal lysosomes, and that the elt-2 gene also plays a novel and vital role in controlling the production of functional lysosomes by the intestine. Overall, these experiments suggest that moderate proteasome dysfunction could be leveraged to improve protein homeostasis and organismal health and longevity, and that the rpn-10 mutant provides a unique

  9. Environmental associations with gene transcription in Babine Lake rainbow trout: evidence for local adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Wellband, Kyle W; Heath, Daniel D

    2013-01-01

    The molecular genetic mechanisms facilitating local adaptation in salmonids continue to be poorly characterized. Gene transcription is a highly regulated step in the expression of a phenotype and it has been shown to respond to selection and thus may be one mechanism that facilitates the development of local adaptation. Advances in molecular genetic tools and an increased understanding of the functional roles of specific genes allow us to test hypotheses concerning the role of variable environments in shaping transcription at known-function candidate loci. To address these hypotheses, wild rainbow trout were collected in their first summer and subjected to metabolic and immune challenges. We assayed gene transcription at candidate loci that play a role in the molecular genetic response to these stresses, and correlated transcription with temperature data from the streams and the abundance and diversity of bacteria as characterized by massively parallel pyrosequencing. Patterns of transcriptional regulation from resting to induced levels varied among populations for both treatments. Co-inertia analysis demonstrated significant associations between resting levels of metabolic gene transcription and thermal regime (R2 = 0.19, P = 0.013) as well as in response to challenge (R2 = 0.39, P = 0.001) and resting state and challenged levels of cytokine gene transcription with relative abundances of bacteria (resting: R2 = 0.25, P = 0.009, challenged: R2 = 0.65, P = 0.001). These results show that variable environments, even within a small geographic range (<250 km), can drive divergent selection among populations for transcription of genes related to surviving stress. PMID:23762507

  10. Plant MYB Transcription Factors: Their Role in Drought Response Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baldoni, Elena; Genga, Annamaria; Cominelli, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is one of the major causes of poor plant performance and limited crop yields worldwide and it is the single most common cause of severe food shortage in developing countries. Several molecular networks involved in stress perception, signal transduction and stress responses in plants have been elucidated so far. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling. In recent years, different MYB transcription factors, mainly in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. but also in some crops, have been characterized for their involvement in drought response. For some of them there is evidence supporting a specific role in response to water stress, such as the regulation of stomatal movement, the control of suberin and cuticular waxes synthesis and the regulation of flower development. Moreover, some of these genes have also been characterized for their involvement in other abiotic or biotic stresses, an important feature considering that in nature, plants are often simultaneously subjected to multiple rather than single environmental perturbations. This review summarizes recent studies highlighting the role of the MYB family of transcription factors in the adaptive responses to drought stress. The practical application value of MYBs in crop improvement, such as stress tolerance engineering, is also discussed. PMID:26184177

  11. Plant MYB Transcription Factors: Their Role in Drought Response Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Baldoni, Elena; Genga, Annamaria; Cominelli, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is one of the major causes of poor plant performance and limited crop yields worldwide and it is the single most common cause of severe food shortage in developing countries. Several molecular networks involved in stress perception, signal transduction and stress responses in plants have been elucidated so far. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling. In recent years, different MYB transcription factors, mainly in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. but also in some crops, have been characterized for their involvement in drought response. For some of them there is evidence supporting a specific role in response to water stress, such as the regulation of stomatal movement, the control of suberin and cuticular waxes synthesis and the regulation of flower development. Moreover, some of these genes have also been characterized for their involvement in other abiotic or biotic stresses, an important feature considering that in nature, plants are often simultaneously subjected to multiple rather than single environmental perturbations. This review summarizes recent studies highlighting the role of the MYB family of transcription factors in the adaptive responses to drought stress. The practical application value of MYBs in crop improvement, such as stress tolerance engineering, is also discussed. PMID:26184177

  12. Computational design of genomic transcriptional networks with adaptation to varying environments.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Javier; Elena, Santiago F; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2012-09-18

    Transcriptional profiling has been widely used as a tool for unveiling the coregulations of genes in response to genetic and environmental perturbations. These coregulations have been used, in a few instances, to infer global transcriptional regulatory models. Here, using the large amount of transcriptomic information available for the bacterium Escherichia coli, we seek to understand the design principles determining the regulation of its transcriptome. Combining transcriptomic and signaling data, we develop an evolutionary computational procedure that allows obtaining alternative genomic transcriptional regulatory network (GTRN) that still maintains its adaptability to dynamic environments. We apply our methodology to an E. coli GTRN and show that it could be rewired to simpler transcriptional regulatory structures. These rewired GTRNs still maintain the global physiological response to fluctuating environments. Rewired GTRNs contain 73% fewer regulated operons. Genes with similar functions and coordinated patterns of expression across environments are clustered into longer regulated operons. These synthetic GTRNs are more sensitive and show a more robust response to challenging environments. This result illustrates that the natural configuration of E. coli GTRN does not necessarily result from selection for robustness to environmental perturbations, but that evolutionary contingencies may have been important as well. We also discuss the limitations of our methodology in the context of the demand theory. Our procedure will be useful as a novel way to analyze global transcription regulation networks and in synthetic biology for the de novo design of genomes. PMID:22927389

  13. Adaptive Responses Limited by Intrinsic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Prabhat; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems have mechanisms to respond to the external environment and adapt to them. Such adaptive responses are effective for a wide dynamic range of sensing and perception of temporal change in stimulus. However, noise generated by the adaptation system itself as well as extrinsic noise in sensory inputs may impose a limit on the ability of adaptation systems. The relation between response and noise is well understood for equilibrium systems in the form of fluctuation response relation. However, the relation for nonequilibrium systems, including adaptive systems, are poorly understood. Here, we systematically explore such a relation between response and fluctuation in adaptation systems. We study the two network motifs, incoherent feedforward loops (iFFL) and negative feedback loops (nFBL), that can achieve perfect adaptation. We find that the response magnitude in adaption systems is limited by its intrinsic noise, implying that higher response would have higher noise component as well. Comparing the relation of response and noise in iFFL and nFBL, we show that whereas iFFL exhibits adaptation over a wider parameter range, nFBL offers higher response to noise ratio than iFFL. We also identify the condition that yields the upper limit of response for both network motifs. These results may explain the reason of why nFBL seems to be more abundant in nature for the implementation of adaption systems. PMID:26305221

  14. Frequency Modulated Translocational Oscillations of Nrf2 Mediate the Antioxidant Response Element Cytoprotective Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mingzhan; Momiji, Hiroshi; Rabbani, Naila; Barker, Guy; Bretschneider, Till; Shmygol, Anatoly; Rand, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Stress responsive signaling coordinated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) provides an adaptive response for protection of cells against toxic insults, oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction. Nrf2 regulates a battery of protective genes by binding to regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). The aim of this study was to examine how Nrf2 signals cell stress status and regulates transcription to maintain homeostasis. Results: In live cell microscopy we observed that Nrf2 undergoes autonomous translocational frequency-modulated oscillations between cytoplasm and nucleus. Oscillations occurred in quiescence and when cells were stimulated at physiological levels of activators, they decrease in period and amplitude and then evoke a cytoprotective transcriptional response. We propose a mechanism whereby oscillations are produced by negative feedback involving successive de-phosphorylation and phosphorylation steps. Nrf2 was inactivated in the nucleus and reactivated on return to the cytoplasm. Increased frequency of Nrf2 on return to the cytoplasm with increased reactivation or refresh-rate under stress conditions activated the transcriptional response mediating cytoprotective effects. The serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5, member of the Nrf2 interactome, was a key regulatory component. Innovation: We found that Nrf2 is activated in cells without change in total cellular Nrf2 protein concentration. Regulation of ARE-linked protective gene transcription occurs rather through translocational oscillations of Nrf2. We discovered cytoplasmic refresh rate of Nrf2 is important in maintaining and regulating the transcriptional response and links stress challenge to increased cytoplasmic surveillance. We found silencing and inhibition of PGAM5 provides potent activation of Nrf2. Conclusion: Frequency modulated translocational oscillations of Nrf2 mediate the ARE-linked cytoprotective transcriptional response. Antioxid. Redox

  15. Plastidial metabolite MEcPP induces a transcriptionally centered stress-response hub via the transcription factor CAMTA3.

    PubMed

    Benn, Geoffrey; Bjornson, Marta; Ke, Haiyan; De Souza, Amancio; Balmond, Edward I; Shaw, Jared T; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-08-01

    The general stress response (GSR) is an evolutionarily conserved rapid and transient transcriptional reprograming of genes central for transducing environmental signals into cellular responses, leading to metabolic and physiological readjustments to cope with prevailing conditions. Defining the regulatory components of the GSR will provide crucial insight into the design principles of early stress-response modules and their role in orchestrating master regulators of adaptive responses. Overaccumulation of methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate (MEcPP), a bifunctional chemical entity serving as both a precursor of isoprenoids produced by the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway and a stress-specific retrograde signal, in ceh1 (constitutively expressing hydroperoxide lyase1)-mutant plants leads to large-scale transcriptional alterations. Bioinformatic analyses of microarray data in ceh1 plants established the overrepresentation of a stress-responsive cis element and key GSR marker, the rapid stress response element (RSRE), in the promoters of robustly induced genes. ceh1 plants carrying an established 4×RSRE:Luciferase reporter for monitoring the GSR support constitutive activation of the response in this mutant background. Genetics and pharmacological approaches confirmed the specificity of MEcPP in RSRE induction via the transcription factor CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR 3 (CAMTA3), in a calcium-dependent manner. Moreover, CAMTA3-dependent activation of IRE1a (inositol-requiring protein-1) and bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60), two RSRE containing unfolded protein-response genes, bridges MEcPP-mediated GSR induction to the potentiation of protein-folding homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings introduce the notion of transcriptional regulation by a key plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite that induces nuclear GSR, thereby offering a window into the role of interorgannellar communication in shaping cellular adaptive

  16. Global transcriptional response of Lactobacillus reuteri to the sourdough environment.

    PubMed

    Hüfner, Eric; Britton, Robert A; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Hertel, Christian

    2008-10-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is a lactic acid bacterium that is highly adapted to the sourdough environment. It is a dominant member of industrial type II sourdoughs, and is also able to colonize the intestinal tract of mammals, including humans, and birds. In this study, the transcriptional response of L. reuteri ATCC 55730 was investigated during sourdough fermentation by using whole-genome microarrays. Significant changes of mRNA levels were found for 101 genes involved in diverse cellular processes, such as carbohydrate and energy metabolism, cell envelope biosynthesis, exopolysaccharide production, stress responses, signal transduction and cobalamin biosynthesis. The results showed extensive changes of the organism's gene expression during growth in sourdough as compared with growth in chemically defined medium, and, thus, revealed pathways involved in the adaptation of L. reuteri to the ecological niche of sourdough. The utilization of starch and non-starch carbohydrates, the remodelling of the cell wall, characterized by reduced D-alanylation, and increased amounts of cell wall-associated polysaccharides, as well as the regulatory function of two component systems for cell wall biogenesis and metabolism were suggested by the gene expression data as being important for growth in sourdough. The impact of several L. reuteri genes for effective growth in sourdough was shown by implementation of mutant strains in sourdough fermentation. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular fundamentals of L. reuteri's ecological competitiveness, and provides a basis for further exploration of genetic traits involved in adaptation to the food environment. PMID:18762399

  17. Genome scale transcriptional response diversity among ten ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana during heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh D.; Mundy, John; Bones, Atle M.

    2013-01-01

    In the scenario of global warming and climate change, heat stress is a serious threat to crop production worldwide. Being sessile, plants cannot escape from heat. Plants have developed various adaptive mechanisms to survive heat stress. Several studies have focused on diversity of heat tolerance levels in divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, but comprehensive genome scale understanding of heat stress response in plants is still lacking. Here we report the genome scale transcript responses to heat stress of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes (Col, Ler, C24, Cvi, Kas1, An1, Sha, Kyo2, Eri, and Kond) originated from different geographical locations. During the experiment, A. thaliana plants were subjected to heat stress (38°C) and transcript responses were monitored using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. The responses of A. thaliana ecotypes exhibited considerable variation in the transcript abundance levels. In total, 3644 transcripts were significantly heat regulated (p < 0.01) in the 10 ecotypes, including 244 transcription factors and 203 transposable elements. By employing a systems genetics approach- Network Component Analysis (NCA), we have constructed an in silico transcript regulatory network model for 35 heat responsive transcription factors during cellular responses to heat stress in A. thaliana. The computed activities of the 35 transcription factors showed ecotype specific responses to the heat treatment. PMID:24409190

  18. WRKY Transcription Factors: Molecular Regulation and Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Phukan, Ujjal J.; Jeena, Gajendra S.; Shukla, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants in their natural habitat have to face multiple stresses simultaneously. Evolutionary adaptation of developmental, physiological, and biochemical parameters give advantage over a single window of stress but not multiple. On the other hand transcription factors like WRKY can regulate diverse responses through a complicated network of genes. So molecular orchestration of WRKYs in plant may provide the most anticipated outcome of simultaneous multiple responses. Activation or repression through W-box and W-box like sequences is regulated at transcriptional, translational, and domain level. Because of the tight regulation involved in specific recognition and binding of WRKYs to downstream promoters, they have become promising candidate for crop improvement. Epigenetic, retrograde and proteasome mediated regulation enable WRKYs to attain the dynamic cellular homeostatic reprograming. Overexpression of several WRKYs face the paradox of having several beneficial affects but with some unwanted traits. These overexpression-associated undesirable phenotypes need to be identified and removed for proper growth, development and yeild. Taken together, we have highlighted the diverse regulation and multiple stress response of WRKYs in plants along with the future prospects in this field of research. PMID:27375634

  19. Niche adaptation by expansion and reprogramming of general transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J; Gibbins, Goodwin; Su, Wan Lin; Pan, Min; Bare, J Christopher; Plaisier, Christopher L; Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-01-01

    Numerous lineage-specific expansions of the transcription factor B (TFB) family in archaea suggests an important role for expanded TFBs in encoding environment-specific gene regulatory programs. Given the characteristics of hypersaline lakes, the unusually large numbers of TFBs in halophilic archaea further suggests that they might be especially important in rapid adaptation to the challenges of a dynamically changing environment. Motivated by these observations, we have investigated the implications of TFB expansions by correlating sequence variations, regulation, and physical interactions of all seven TFBs in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 to their fitness landscapes, functional hierarchies, and genetic interactions across 2488 experiments covering combinatorial variations in salt, pH, temperature, and Cu stress. This systems analysis has revealed an elegant scheme in which completely novel fitness landscapes are generated by gene conversion events that introduce subtle changes to the regulation or physical interactions of duplicated TFBs. Based on these insights, we have introduced a synthetically redesigned TFB and altered the regulation of existing TFBs to illustrate how archaea can rapidly generate novel phenotypes by simply reprogramming their TFB regulatory network. PMID:22108796

  20. Niche adaptation by expansion and reprogramming of general transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J; Gibbins, Goodwin; Su, Wan Lin; Pan, Min; Bare, J Christopher; Plaisier, Christopher L; Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-01-01

    Numerous lineage-specific expansions of the transcription factor B (TFB) family in archaea suggests an important role for expanded TFBs in encoding environment-specific gene regulatory programs. Given the characteristics of hypersaline lakes, the unusually large numbers of TFBs in halophilic archaea further suggests that they might be especially important in rapid adaptation to the challenges of a dynamically changing environment. Motivated by these observations, we have investigated the implications of TFB expansions by correlating sequence variations, regulation, and physical interactions of all seven TFBs in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 to their fitness landscapes, functional hierarchies, and genetic interactions across 2488 experiments covering combinatorial variations in salt, pH, temperature, and Cu stress. This systems analysis has revealed an elegant scheme in which completely novel fitness landscapes are generated by gene conversion events that introduce subtle changes to the regulation or physical interactions of duplicated TFBs. Based on these insights, we have introduced a synthetically redesigned TFB and altered the regulation of existing TFBs to illustrate how archaea can rapidly generate novel phenotypes by simply reprogramming their TFB regulatory network. PMID:22108796

  1. Transcriptional responses to complex mixtures: a review.

    PubMed

    Sen, Banalata; Mahadevan, Brinda; DeMarini, David M

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of people to hazardous compounds is primarily through complex environmental mixtures, those that occur through media such as air, soil, water, food, cigarette smoke, and combustion emissions. Microarray technology offers the ability to query the entire genome after exposure to such an array of compounds, permitting a characterization of the biological effects of such exposures. This review summarizes the published literature on the transcriptional profiles resulting from exposure of cells or organisms to complex environmental mixtures such as cigarette smoke, diesel emissions, urban air, motorcycle exhaust, carbon black, jet fuel, and metal ore and fumes. The majority of the mixtures generally up-regulate gene expression, with heme oxygenase 1 and CYP1A1 being up-regulated by all of the mixtures. Most of the mixtures altered the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response (OH-1, metallothioneins), immune/inflammation response (IL-1b, protein kinase), xenobiotic metabolism (CYP1A1, CYP1B1), coagulation and fibrinolysis (plasminogen activator/inhibitor), proto-oncogenes (FUS1, JUN), heat-shock response (HSP60, HSP70), DNA repair (PCNA, GADD45), structural unit of condensed DNA (Crf15Orf16, DUSP 15), and extracellular matrix degradation (MMP1, 8, 9, 11, 12). Genes involved in aldehyde metabolism, such as ALDH3, appeared to be uniquely modulated by cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke-exposed populations have been successfully distinguished from control nonexposed populations based on the expression pattern of a subset of genes, thereby demonstrating the utility of this approach in identifying biomarkers of exposure and susceptibility. The analysis of gene-expression data at the pathway and functional level, along with a systems biology approach, will provide a more comprehensive insight into the biological effects of complex mixtures and will improve risk assessment of the same. We suggest critical components of study design and reporting that will

  2. Transcriptional and Proteomic Responses to Carbon Starvation in Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Casaletti, Luciana; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Paracoccidioides comprises human thermal dimorphic fungi, which cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an important mycosis in Latin America. Adaptation to environmental conditions is key to fungal survival during human host infection. The adaptability of carbon metabolism is a vital fitness attribute during pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings The fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides spp. is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, in the human host. In this study, a comprehensive response of Paracoccidioides, Pb01, under carbon starvation was investigated using high-resolution transcriptomic (RNAseq) and proteomic (NanoUPLC-MSE) approaches. A total of 1,063 transcripts and 421 proteins were differentially regulated, providing a global view of metabolic reprogramming during carbon starvation. The main changes were those related to cells shifting to gluconeogenesis and ethanol production, supported by the degradation of amino acids and fatty acids and by the modulation of the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic cycles. This proposed carbon flow hypothesis was supported by gene and protein expression profiles assessed using qRT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, as well as using enzymatic, cell dry weight and fungus-macrophage interaction assays. The carbon source provides a survival advantage to Paracoccidioides inside macrophages. Conclusions/Significance For a complete understanding of the physiological processes in an organism, the integration of approaches addressing different levels of regulation is important. To the best of our knowledge, this report presents the first description of the responses of Paracoccidioides spp. to host-like conditions using large-scale expression approaches. The alternative metabolic pathways that could be adopted by the organism during carbon starvation can be important for a better understanding of the fungal adaptation to the host, because systems for detecting and responding

  3. Cellular adaptation to hypoxia and p53 transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Chen, Xue-qun; Du, Ji-zeng

    2009-05-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors. Meanwhile, under stress conditions, p53 also acts as a transcription factor, regulating the expression of a series of target genes to maintain the integrity of genome. The target genes of p53 can be classified into genes regulating cell cycle arrest, genes involved in apoptosis, and genes inhibiting angiogenesis. p53 protein contains a transactivation domain, a sequence-specific DNA binding domain, a tetramerization domain, a non-specific DNA binding domain that recognizes damaged DNA, and a later identified proline-rich domain. Under stress, p53 proteins accumulate and are activated through two mechanisms. One, involving ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM), is that the interaction between p53 and its down-regulation factor murine double minute 2 (MDM2) decreases, leading to p53 phosphorylation on Ser15, as determined by the post-translational mechanism; the other holds that p53 increases and is activated through the binding of ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) or nucleolin to p53 mRNA 5( untranslated region (UTR), regulating p53 translation. Under hypoxia, p53 decreases transactivation and increases transrepression. The mutations outside the DNA binding domain of p53 also contribute to tumor progress, so further studies on p53 should also be focused on this direction. The subterranean blind mole rat Spalax in Israel is a good model for hypoxia-adaptation. The p53 of Spalax mutated in residue 172 and residue 207 from arginine to lysine, conferring it the ability to survive hypoxic conditions. This model indicates that p53 acts as a master gene of diversity formation during evolution. PMID:19434769

  4. Transcriptional profile of glucose-shocked and acid-adapted strains of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Baker, J L; Abranches, J; Faustoferri, R C; Hubbard, C J; Lemos, J A; Courtney, M A; Quivey, R

    2015-12-01

    The aciduricity of Streptococcus mutans is an important virulence factor of the organism, required to both out-compete commensal oral microorganisms and cause dental caries. In this study, we monitored transcriptional changes that occurred as a continuous culture of either an acid-tolerant strain (UA159) or an acid-sensitive strain (fabM::Erm) moved from steady-state growth at neutral pH, experienced glucose-shock and acidification of the culture, and transitioned to steady-state growth at low pH. Hence, the timing of elements of the acid tolerance response (ATR) could be observed and categorized as acute vs. adaptive ATR mechanisms. Modulation of branched chain amino acid biosynthesis, DNA/protein repair mechanisms, reactive oxygen species metabolizers and phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase systems occurred in the initial acute phase, immediately following glucose-shock, while upregulation of F1 F0 -ATPase did not occur until the adaptive phase, after steady-state growth had been re-established. In addition to the archetypal ATR pathways mentioned above, glucose-shock led to differential expression of genes suggesting a re-routing of resources away from the synthesis of fatty acids and proteins, and towards synthesis of purines, pyrimidines and amino acids. These adjustments were largely transient, as upon establishment of steady-state growth at acidic pH, transcripts returned to basal expression levels. During growth at steady-state pH 7, fabM::Erm had a transcriptional profile analogous to that of UA159 during glucose-shock, indicating that even during growth in rich media at neutral pH, the cells were stressed. These results, coupled with a recently established collection of deletion strains, provide a starting point for elucidation of the acid tolerance response in S. mutans. PMID:26042838

  5. Adaptive divergence of a transcriptional enhancer between populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Glaser-Schmitt, Amanda; Catalán, Ana; Parsch, John

    2013-01-01

    As species colonize new habitats they must adapt to the local environment. Much of this adaptation is thought to occur at the regulatory level; however, the relationships among genetic polymorphism, expression variation and adaptation are poorly understood. Drosophila melanogaster, which expanded from an ancestral range in sub-Saharan Africa around 15 000 years ago, represents an excellent model system for studying regulatory evolution. Here, we focus on the gene CG9509, which differs in expression between an African and a European population of D. melanogaster. The expression difference is caused by variation within a transcriptional enhancer adjacent to the CG9509 coding sequence. Patterns of sequence variation indicate that this enhancer was the target of recent positive selection, suggesting that the expression difference is adaptive. Analysis of the CG9509 enhancer in new population samples from Europe, Asia, northern Africa and sub-Saharan Africa revealed that sequence polymorphism is greatly reduced outside the ancestral range. A derived haplotype absent in sub-Saharan Africa is at high frequency in all other populations. These observations are consistent with a selective sweep accompanying the range expansion of the species. The new data help identify the sequence changes responsible for the difference in enhancer activity. PMID:24218636

  6. Transcriptional profiling of Haemophilus parasuis SH0165 response to tilmicosin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingyu; Chen, Pin; Wang, Yang; Li, Wentao; Cheng, Shuang; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Anding; He, Qigai

    2012-12-01

    The Haemophilus parasuis respiratory tract pathogen poses a severe threat to the swine industry despite available antimicrobial therapies. To gain a more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying H. parasuis response to tilmicosin treatment, microarray technology was applied to analyze the variation in gene expression of isolated H. parasuis SH0165 treated in vitro with subinhibitory (0.25 μg/ml) and inhibitory (8 μg/ml) concentrations. Tilmicosin treatment induced differential expression of 405 genes, the encoded products of which are mainly involved in the heat shock response, protein synthesis, and intracellular transportation. The subinhibitory and inhibitory concentrations of tilmicosin induced distinctive gene expression profiles of shared and unique changes, respectively. These changes included 302 genes mainly involved in protein export and the phosphotransferase system to sustain cell growth, and 198 genes mainly related to RNA polymerase, recombination, and repair to inhibit cell growth. In silico analysis of functions related to the differentially expressed genes suggested that adaptation of H. parasuis SH0165 to tilmicosin involves modulation of protein synthesis and membrane transport. Collectively, the genes comprising each transcriptional profile of H. parasuis response to tilmicosin provide novel insights into the physiological functions of this economically significant bacterium and may represent targets of future molecular therapeutic strategies. PMID:22935051

  7. Regulated Formation of lncRNA-DNA Hybrids Enables Faster Transcriptional Induction and Environmental Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Sara C; Wang, Siwen; Ma, Wai Kit; Al Husini, Nadra; Dhoondia, Zuzer; Ansari, Athar; Pascuzzi, Pete E; Tran, Elizabeth J

    2016-02-01

    Long non-coding (lnc)RNAs, once thought to merely represent noise from imprecise transcription initiation, have now emerged as major regulatory entities in all eukaryotes. In contrast to the rapidly expanding identification of individual lncRNAs, mechanistic characterization has lagged behind. Here we provide evidence that the GAL lncRNAs in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae promote transcriptional induction in trans by formation of lncRNA-DNA hybrids or R-loops. The evolutionarily conserved RNA helicase Dbp2 regulates formation of these R-loops as genomic deletion or nuclear depletion results in accumulation of these structures across the GAL cluster gene promoters and coding regions. Enhanced transcriptional induction is manifested by lncRNA-dependent displacement of the Cyc8 co-repressor and subsequent gene looping, suggesting that these lncRNAs promote induction by altering chromatin architecture. Moreover, the GAL lncRNAs confer a competitive fitness advantage to yeast cells because expression of these non-coding molecules correlates with faster adaptation in response to an environmental switch. PMID:26833086

  8. Constitutively expressed ERF-VII transcription factors redundantly activate the core anaerobic response in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bui, Liem T; Giuntoli, Beatrice; Kosmacz, Monika; Parlanti, Sandro; Licausi, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    Plant adaptation to hypoxic conditions is mediated by the transcriptional activation of genes involved in the metabolic reprogramming of plant cells to cope with reduced oxygen availability. Recent studies indicated that members of the group VII of the Ethylene Responsive Transcription Factor (ERFs) family act as positive regulators of this molecular response. In the current study, the five ERF-VII transcription factors of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared to infer a hierarchy in their role with respect to the anaerobic response. When the activity of each transcription factor was tested on a set of hypoxia-responsive promoters, RAP2.2, RAP2.3 and RAP2.12 appeared to be the most powerful activators. RAP2.12 was further dissected in transactivation assays in Arabidopsis protoplasts to identify responsible regions for transcriptional activation. An ultimate C-terminal motif was identified as sufficient to drive gene transcription. Finally, using realtime RT-PCR in single and double mutants for the corresponding genes, we confirmed that RAP2.2 and RAP2.12 exert major control upon the anaerobic response. PMID:26025519

  9. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  10. Transcriptional and metabolic adaptation of human neurons to the mitochondrial toxicant MPP(+).

    PubMed

    Krug, A K; Gutbier, S; Zhao, L; Pöltl, D; Kullmann, C; Ivanova, V; Förster, S; Jagtap, S; Meiser, J; Leparc, G; Schildknecht, S; Adam, M; Hiller, K; Farhan, H; Brunner, T; Hartung, T; Sachinidis, A; Leist, M

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of the network of toxicity pathways by Omics technologies and bioinformatic data processing paves the road toward a new toxicology for the twenty-first century. Especially, the upstream network of responses, taking place in toxicant-treated cells before a point of no return is reached, is still little explored. We studied the effects of the model neurotoxicant 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) by a combined metabolomics (mass spectrometry) and transcriptomics (microarrays and deep sequencing) approach to provide unbiased data on earliest cellular adaptations to stress. Neural precursor cells (LUHMES) were differentiated to homogeneous cultures of fully postmitotic human dopaminergic neurons, and then exposed to the mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitor MPP(+) (5 μM). At 18-24 h after treatment, intracellular ATP and mitochondrial integrity were still close to control levels, but pronounced transcriptome and metabolome changes were seen. Data on altered glucose flux, depletion of phosphocreatine and oxidative stress (e.g., methionine sulfoxide formation) confirmed the validity of the approach. New findings were related to nuclear paraspeckle depletion, as well as an early activation of branches of the transsulfuration pathway to increase glutathione. Bioinformatic analysis of our data identified the transcription factor ATF-4 as an upstream regulator of early responses. Findings on this signaling pathway and on adaptive increases of glutathione production were confirmed biochemically. Metabolic and transcriptional profiling contributed complementary information on multiple primary and secondary changes that contribute to the cellular response to MPP(+). Thus, combined 'Omics' analysis is a new unbiased approach to unravel earliest metabolic changes, whose balance decides on the final cell fate. PMID:24810058

  11. Transcriptional and metabolic adaptation of human neurons to the mitochondrial toxicant MPP+

    PubMed Central

    Krug, A K; Gutbier, S; Zhao, L; Pöltl, D; Kullmann, C; Ivanova, V; Förster, S; Jagtap, S; Meiser, J; Leparc, G; Schildknecht, S; Adam, M; Hiller, K; Farhan, H; Brunner, T; Hartung, T; Sachinidis, A; Leist, M

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of the network of toxicity pathways by Omics technologies and bioinformatic data processing paves the road toward a new toxicology for the twenty-first century. Especially, the upstream network of responses, taking place in toxicant-treated cells before a point of no return is reached, is still little explored. We studied the effects of the model neurotoxicant 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) by a combined metabolomics (mass spectrometry) and transcriptomics (microarrays and deep sequencing) approach to provide unbiased data on earliest cellular adaptations to stress. Neural precursor cells (LUHMES) were differentiated to homogeneous cultures of fully postmitotic human dopaminergic neurons, and then exposed to the mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitor MPP+ (5 μM). At 18–24 h after treatment, intracellular ATP and mitochondrial integrity were still close to control levels, but pronounced transcriptome and metabolome changes were seen. Data on altered glucose flux, depletion of phosphocreatine and oxidative stress (e.g., methionine sulfoxide formation) confirmed the validity of the approach. New findings were related to nuclear paraspeckle depletion, as well as an early activation of branches of the transsulfuration pathway to increase glutathione. Bioinformatic analysis of our data identified the transcription factor ATF-4 as an upstream regulator of early responses. Findings on this signaling pathway and on adaptive increases of glutathione production were confirmed biochemically. Metabolic and transcriptional profiling contributed complementary information on multiple primary and secondary changes that contribute to the cellular response to MPP+. Thus, combined ‘Omics' analysis is a new unbiased approach to unravel earliest metabolic changes, whose balance decides on the final cell fate. PMID:24810058

  12. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Martin, Bronwen; Chadwick, Wayne; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Becker, Kevin G.; WoodIII, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Maudsley, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db) and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6) animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds. PMID:22934110

  13. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C; Selfridge, Andrew C; Keogh, Ciara E; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C; Nolan, Karen A; Rocha, Liliane M A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  14. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cavadas, Miguel A. S.; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C.; Selfridge, Andrew C.; Keogh, Ciara E.; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C.; Nolan, Karen A.; Rocha, Liliane M. A.; Tambuwala, Murtaza M.; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J.; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  15. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael M; Olivieri, Isabelle; Waller, Donald M; Nielsen, Einar E

    2012-03-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how to use genetic monitoring to study adaptive responses via repeated analysis of the same populations over time, distinguishing between phenotypic and molecular genetics approaches. After describing monitoring designs, we develop explicit criteria for demonstrating adaptive responses, which include testing for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We further review a broader set of 44 studies to assess how well they meet the proposed criteria, and conclude that only 23% fulfill all criteria. Approximately half (43%) of these studies failed to rule out the alternative hypothesis of replacement by a different, better-adapted population. Likewise, 34% of the studies based on phenotypic variation did not test for selection as opposed to drift. These shortcomings can be addressed via improved experimental designs and statistical testing. We foresee monitoring of adaptive responses as a future valuable tool in conservation biology, for identifying populations unable to evolve at sufficiently high rates and for identifying possible donor populations for genetic rescue. Technological advances will further augment the realization of this potential, especially next-generation sequencing technologies that allow for monitoring at the level of whole genomes. PMID:22269082

  16. Transcriptional 'memory' of a stress: transient chromatin and memory (epigenetic) marks at stress-response genes.

    PubMed

    Avramova, Zoya

    2015-07-01

    Drought, salinity, extreme temperature variations, pathogen and herbivory attacks are recurring environmental stresses experienced by plants throughout their life. To survive repeated stresses, plants provide responses that may be different from their response during the first encounter with the stress. A different response to a similar stress represents the concept of 'stress memory'. A coordinated reaction at the organismal, cellular and gene/genome levels is thought to increase survival chances by improving the plant's tolerance/avoidance abilities. Ultimately, stress memory may provide a mechanism for acclimation and adaptation. At the molecular level, the concept of stress memory indicates that the mechanisms responsible for memory-type transcription during repeated stresses are not based on repetitive activation of the same response pathways activated by the first stress. Some recent advances in the search for transcription 'memory factors' are discussed with an emphasis on super-induced dehydration stress memory response genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:25788029

  17. Adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; Little, Gerald R.; Scott, Robert C.

    1996-05-01

    The Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program is a joint research and development effort conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) under a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). The purpose of the MOA is to cooperatively develop the smart structure technologies necessary for alleviating undesirable vibration and aeroelastic response associated with highly flexible structures. Adaptive control can reduce aeroelastic response associated with buffet and atmospheric turbulence, it can increase flutter margins, and it may be able to reduce response associated with nonlinear phenomenon like limit cycle oscillations. By reducing vibration levels and loads, aircraft structures can have lower acquisition cost, reduced maintenance, and extended lifetimes. Phase I of the ANCAR program involved development and demonstration of a neural network-based semi-adaptive flutter suppression system which used a neural network for scheduling control laws as a function of Mach number and dynamic pressure. This controller was tested along with a robust fixed-gain control law in NASA's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) utilizing the Benchmark Active Controls Testing (BACT) wing. During Phase II, a fully adaptive on-line learning neural network control system has been developed for flutter suppression which will be tested in 1996. This paper presents the results of Phase I testing as well as the development progress of Phase II.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of drought response: a tortuous network of transcriptional factors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dhriti; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Drought is one of the leading factors responsible for the reduction in crop yield worldwide. Due to climate change, in future, more areas are going to be affected by drought and for prolonged periods. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the drought response is one of the major scientific concerns for improving crop yield. Plants deploy diverse strategies and mechanisms to respond and tolerate drought stress. Expression of numerous genes is modulated in different plants under drought stress that help them to optimize their growth and development. Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in plant response and tolerance by regulating the expression of many genes under drought stress. Transcription factors being the major regulator of gene expression play a crucial role in stress response. ABA regulates the expression of most of the target genes through ABA-responsive element (ABRE) binding protein/ABRE binding factor (AREB/ABF) transcription factors. Genes regulated by AREB/ABFs constitute a regulon termed as AREB/ABF regulon. In addition to this, drought responsive genes are also regulated by ABA-independent mechanisms. In ABA-independent regulation, dehydration-responsive element binding protein (DREB), NAM, ATAF, and CUC regulons play an important role by regulating many drought-responsive genes. Apart from these major regulons, MYB/MYC, WRKY, and nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factors are also involved in drought response and tolerance. Our understanding about transcriptional regulation of drought is still evolving. Recent reports have suggested the existence of crosstalk between different transcription factors operating under drought stress. In this article, we have reviewed various regulons working under drought stress and their crosstalk with each other. PMID:26579147

  19. Untangling the brain's neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Karpagam; Friedman, Brad A; Larson, Jessica L; Lauffer, Benjamin E; Goldstein, Leonard D; Appling, Laurie L; Borneo, Jovencio; Poon, Chungkee; Ho, Terence; Cai, Fang; Steiner, Pascal; van der Brug, Marcel P; Modrusan, Zora; Kaminker, Joshua S; Hansen, David V

    2016-01-01

    A common approach to understanding neurodegenerative disease is comparing gene expression in diseased versus healthy tissues. We illustrate that expression profiles derived from whole tissue RNA highly reflect the degenerating tissues' altered cellular composition, not necessarily transcriptional regulation. To accurately understand transcriptional changes that accompany neuropathology, we acutely purify neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single adult mouse brains and analyse their transcriptomes by RNA sequencing. Using peripheral endotoxemia to establish the method, we reveal highly specific transcriptional responses and altered RNA processing in each cell type, with Tnfr1 required for the astrocytic response. Extending the method to an Alzheimer's disease model, we confirm that transcriptomic changes observed in whole tissue are driven primarily by cell type composition, not transcriptional regulation, and identify hundreds of cell type-specific changes undetected in whole tissue RNA. Applying similar methods to additional models and patient tissues will transform our understanding of aberrant gene expression in neurological disease. PMID:27097852

  20. Untangling the brain's neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative transcriptional responses

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Karpagam; Friedman, Brad A.; Larson, Jessica L.; Lauffer, Benjamin E.; Goldstein, Leonard D.; Appling, Laurie L.; Borneo, Jovencio; Poon, Chungkee; Ho, Terence; Cai, Fang; Steiner, Pascal; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Modrusan, Zora; Kaminker, Joshua S.; Hansen, David V.

    2016-01-01

    A common approach to understanding neurodegenerative disease is comparing gene expression in diseased versus healthy tissues. We illustrate that expression profiles derived from whole tissue RNA highly reflect the degenerating tissues' altered cellular composition, not necessarily transcriptional regulation. To accurately understand transcriptional changes that accompany neuropathology, we acutely purify neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single adult mouse brains and analyse their transcriptomes by RNA sequencing. Using peripheral endotoxemia to establish the method, we reveal highly specific transcriptional responses and altered RNA processing in each cell type, with Tnfr1 required for the astrocytic response. Extending the method to an Alzheimer's disease model, we confirm that transcriptomic changes observed in whole tissue are driven primarily by cell type composition, not transcriptional regulation, and identify hundreds of cell type-specific changes undetected in whole tissue RNA. Applying similar methods to additional models and patient tissues will transform our understanding of aberrant gene expression in neurological disease. PMID:27097852

  1. Global transcriptional responses of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Wenelen under different sulfide minerals.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Mauricio; Ehrenfeld, Nicole; Cortés, María Paz; Travisany, Dante; Budinich, Marko; Aravena, Andrés; González, Mauricio; Bobadilla-Fazzini, Roberto A; Parada, Pilar; Maass, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide new information about the adaptation of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans during the bioleaching process, the current analysis presents the first report of the global transcriptional response of the native copper mine strain Wenelen (DSM 16786) oxidized under different sulfide minerals. Microarrays were used to measure the response of At. ferrooxidans Wenelen to shifts from iron supplemented liquid cultures (reference state) to the addition of solid substrates enriched in pyrite or chalcopyrite. Genes encoding for energy metabolism showed a similar transcriptional profile for the two sulfide minerals. Interestingly, four operons related to sulfur metabolism were over-expressed during growth on a reduced sulfur source. Genes associated with metal tolerance (RND and ATPases type P) were up-regulated in the presence of pyrite or chalcopyrite. These results suggest that At. ferrooxidans Wenelen presents an efficient transcriptional system developed to respond to environmental conditions, namely the ability to withstand high copper concentrations. PMID:26476161

  2. Transcriptional specialization of human dendritic cell subsets in response to microbial vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Banchereau, Romain; Baldwin, Nicole; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Athale, Shruti; Xue, Yaming; Yu, Chun I; Metang, Patrick; Cheruku, Abhilasha; Berthier, Isabelle; Gayet, Ingrid; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ohouo, Marina; Snipes, LuAnn; Xu, Hui; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Oh, Sangkon; Ramilo, Octavio; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial vaccines interact with human APCs remain elusive. Herein, we describe the transcriptional programs induced in human DCs by pathogens, innate receptor ligands and vaccines. Exposure of DCs to influenza, Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus allows us to build a modular framework containing 204 transcript clusters. We use this framework to characterize the responses of human monocytes, monocyte-derived DCs and blood DC subsets to 13 vaccines. Different vaccines induce distinct transcriptional programs based on pathogen type, adjuvant formulation and APC targeted. Fluzone, Pneumovax and Gardasil, respectively, activate monocyte-derived DCs, monocytes and CD1c+ blood DCs, highlighting APC specialization in response to vaccines. Finally, the blood signatures from individuals vaccinated with Fluzone or infected with influenza reveal a signature of adaptive immunity activation following vaccination and symptomatic infections, but not asymptomatic infections. These data, offered with a web interface, may guide the development of improved vaccines. PMID:25335753

  3. The Adaptive Calibration Model of stress responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Adaptive Calibration Model (ACM), an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in the functioning of the stress response system. The stress response system has three main biological functions: (1) to coordinate the organism’s allostatic response to physical and psychosocial challenges; (2) to encode and filter information about the organism’s social and physical environment, mediating the organism’s openness to environmental inputs; and (3) to regulate the organism’s physiology and behavior in a broad range of fitness-relevant areas including defensive behaviors, competitive risk-taking, learning, attachment, affiliation and reproductive functioning. The information encoded by the system during development feeds back on the long-term calibration of the system itself, resulting in adaptive patterns of responsivity and individual differences in behavior. Drawing on evolutionary life history theory, we build a model of the development of stress responsivity across life stages, describe four prototypical responsivity patterns, and discuss the emergence and meaning of sex differences. The ACM extends the theory of biological sensitivity to context (BSC) and provides an integrative framework for future research in the field. PMID:21145350

  4. Transcriptional profiling suggests that multiple metabolic adaptations are required for effective proliferation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Thusitha S; Striebich, Richard C; Mueller, Susan S; Strobel, Ellen M; Ruiz, Oscar N

    2013-01-01

    Fuel is a harsh environment for microbial growth. However, some bacteria can grow well due to their adaptive mechanisms. Our goal was to characterize the adaptations required for Pseudomonas aeruginosa proliferation in fuel. We have used DNA-microarrays and RT-PCR to characterize the transcriptional response of P. aeruginosa to fuel. Transcriptomics revealed that genes essential for medium- and long-chain n-alkane degradation including alkB1 and alkB2 were transcriptionally induced. Gas chromatography confirmed that P. aeruginosa possesses pathways to degrade different length n-alkanes, favoring the use of n-C11-18. Furthermore, a gamut of synergistic metabolic pathways, including porins, efflux pumps, biofilm formation, and iron transport, were transcriptionally regulated. Bioassays confirmed that efflux pumps and biofilm formation were required for growth in jet fuel. Furthermore, cell homeostasis appeared to be carefully maintained by the regulation of porins and efflux pumps. The Mex RND efflux pumps were required for fuel tolerance; blockage of these pumps precluded growth in fuel. This study provides a global understanding of the multiple metabolic adaptations required by bacteria for survival and proliferation in fuel-containing environments. This information can be applied to improve the fuel bioremediation properties of bacteria. PMID:24164330

  5. Adaptive and injury response of bone to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Sarah H; Silva, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Bone responds to supraphysiological mechanical loads by increasing bone formation. Depending on the applied strain magnitude (and other loading parameters) the response can be either adaptive (mostly lamellar bone) or injury (mostly woven bone). Seminal studies of Hert, Lanyon and Rubin originally established the basic 'rules' of bone mechanosensitivity. These were reinforced by subsequent studies using noninvasive rodent loading models, most notably by Turner et al. More recent works with these models have been able to explore the structural, transcriptional and molecular mechanisms which distinguish the two responses (lamellar vs woven). Wnt/Lrp signaling has emerged as a key mechanoresponsive pathway for lamellar bone. However, there is still much to study with regard to effects of ageing, osteocytes, other signaling pathways, and the molecular regulation that modulates lamellar vs woven bone formation. This review summarizes not only the historical findings but also the current data for these topics. PMID:23505338

  6. Thermotolerant yeasts selected by adaptive evolution express heat stress response at 30 °C

    PubMed Central

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to long-term environmental changes across >100s of generations results in adapted phenotypes, but little is known about how metabolic and transcriptional responses are optimized in these processes. Here, we show that thermotolerant yeast strains selected by adaptive laboratory evolution to grow at increased temperature, activated a constitutive heat stress response when grown at the optimal ancestral temperature, and that this is associated with a reduced growth rate. This preventive response was perfected by additional transcriptional changes activated when the cultivation temperature is increased. Remarkably, the sum of global transcriptional changes activated in the thermotolerant strains when transferred from the optimal to the high temperature, corresponded, in magnitude and direction, to the global changes observed in the ancestral strain exposed to the same transition. This demonstrates robustness of the yeast transcriptional program when exposed to heat, and that the thermotolerant strains streamlined their path to rapidly and optimally reach post-stress transcriptional and metabolic levels. Thus, long-term adaptation to heat improved yeasts ability to rapidly adapt to increased temperatures, but this also causes a trade-off in the growth rate at the optimal ancestral temperature. PMID:27229477

  7. Thermotolerant yeasts selected by adaptive evolution express heat stress response at 30 °C.

    PubMed

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to long-term environmental changes across >100s of generations results in adapted phenotypes, but little is known about how metabolic and transcriptional responses are optimized in these processes. Here, we show that thermotolerant yeast strains selected by adaptive laboratory evolution to grow at increased temperature, activated a constitutive heat stress response when grown at the optimal ancestral temperature, and that this is associated with a reduced growth rate. This preventive response was perfected by additional transcriptional changes activated when the cultivation temperature is increased. Remarkably, the sum of global transcriptional changes activated in the thermotolerant strains when transferred from the optimal to the high temperature, corresponded, in magnitude and direction, to the global changes observed in the ancestral strain exposed to the same transition. This demonstrates robustness of the yeast transcriptional program when exposed to heat, and that the thermotolerant strains streamlined their path to rapidly and optimally reach post-stress transcriptional and metabolic levels. Thus, long-term adaptation to heat improved yeasts ability to rapidly adapt to increased temperatures, but this also causes a trade-off in the growth rate at the optimal ancestral temperature. PMID:27229477

  8. Transcriptional variation associated with cactus host plant adaptation in Drosophila mettleri populations.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Kim; Matzkin, Luciano M; Bono, Jeremy M

    2015-10-01

    Although the importance of host plant chemistry in plant-insect interactions is widely accepted, the genetic basis of adaptation to host plants is not well understood. Here, we investigate transcriptional changes associated with a host plant shift in Drosophila mettleri. While D. mettleri is distributed mainly throughout the Sonoran Desert where it specializes on columnar cacti (Carnegiea gigantea and Pachycereus pringleii), a population on Santa Catalina Island has shifted to chemically divergent coastal prickly pear cactus (Opuntia littoralis). We compared gene expression of larvae from the Sonoran Desert and Santa Catalina Island when reared on saguaro (C. gigantea), coastal prickly pear and laboratory food. Consistent with expectations based on the complexity and toxicity of cactus relative to laboratory food, within-population comparisons between larvae reared on these food sources revealed transcriptional differences in detoxification and other metabolic pathways. The majority of transcriptional differences between populations on the cactus hosts were independent of the rearing environment and included a disproportionate number of genes involved in processes relevant to host plant adaptation (e.g. detoxification, central metabolism and chemosensory pathways). Comparisons of transcriptional reaction norms between the two populations revealed extensive shared plasticity that likely allowed colonization of coastal prickly pear on Santa Catalina Island. We also found that while plasticity may have facilitated subsequent adaptive divergence in gene expression between populations, the majority of genes that differed in expression on the novel host were not transcriptionally plastic in the presumed ancestral state. PMID:26384860

  9. Contributions of transcription and mRNA decay to gene expression dynamics of fission yeast in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Marguerat, Samuel; Lawler, Katherine; Brazma, Alvis; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels of control to shape gene regulation is only partially understood. Here we show that a combination of two simple and non-invasive genomic techniques, coupled with kinetic mathematical modeling, affords insight into the intricate dynamics of RNA regulation in response to oxidative stress in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study reveals a dominant role of transcriptional regulation in response to stress, but also points to the first minutes after stress induction as a critical time when the coordinated control of mRNA turnover can support the control of transcription for rapid gene regulation. In addition, we uncover specialized gene expression strategies associated with distinct functional gene groups, such as simultaneous transcriptional repression and mRNA destabilization for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, delayed mRNA destabilization with varying contribution of transcription for ribosome biogenesis genes, dominant roles of mRNA stabilization for genes functioning in protein degradation, and adjustment of both transcription and mRNA turnover during the adaptation to stress. We also show that genes regulated independently of the bZIP transcription factor Atf1p are predominantly controlled by mRNA turnover, and identify putative cis-regulatory sequences that are associated with different gene expression strategies during the stress response. This study highlights the intricate and multi-faceted interplay between transcription and RNA turnover during the dynamic regulatory response to stress. PMID:25007214

  10. Reshuffling transcriptional circuits: how microorganisms adapt to colonize the human body

    PubMed Central

    De, Sonakshi; Pérez, J Christian

    2014-01-01

    Several hundred taxa of microorganisms—including bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes—inhabit the human body. What did it take for these species to become stable residents of humans? Recent reports illustrate how evolutionary changes in transcriptional circuits played a pivotal role in the adaptation of single-celled eukaryotes to colonize mammals. PMID:25483603

  11. Recognition of voice commands using adaptation of foreign language speech recognizer via selection of phonetic transcriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskeliunas, Rytis; Rudzionis, Vytautas

    2011-06-01

    In recent years various commercial speech recognizers have become available. These recognizers provide the possibility to develop applications incorporating various speech recognition techniques easily and quickly. All of these commercial recognizers are typically targeted to widely spoken languages having large market potential; however, it may be possible to adapt available commercial recognizers for use in environments where less widely spoken languages are used. Since most commercial recognition engines are closed systems the single avenue for the adaptation is to try set ways for the selection of proper phonetic transcription methods between the two languages. This paper deals with the methods to find the phonetic transcriptions for Lithuanian voice commands to be recognized using English speech engines. The experimental evaluation showed that it is possible to find phonetic transcriptions that will enable the recognition of Lithuanian voice commands with recognition accuracy of over 90%.

  12. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiate between O3 and herbicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using published data based on Affymetrix ATH1 Gene-Chips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia to O3 and a few other major environmental stresses including oxidative stress . A set of 101 markers could be extracted which provided a compo...

  13. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF MOUSE EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transcriptional responses of mouse embryo cultures exposed to bromochloroacetic acid

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid* and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and *Reproductive Tox...

  14. Resistance Training: Physiological Responses and Adaptations (Part 3 of 4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, Steven J.; Kraemer, William J.

    1988-01-01

    The physiological responses and adaptations which occur as a result of resistance training, such as cardiovascular responses, serum lipid count, body composition, and neural adaptations are discussed. Changes in the endocrine system are also described. (JL)

  15. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during osmotic stress responses by the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Ortells, M Carmen; Morancho, Beatriz; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Viollet, Benoit; Laderoute, Keith R; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2012-05-01

    Although stress can suppress growth and proliferation, cells can induce adaptive responses that allow them to maintain these functions under stress. While numerous studies have focused on the inhibitory effects of stress on cell growth, less is known on how growth-promoting pathways influence stress responses. We have approached this question by analyzing the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central growth controller, on the osmotic stress response. Our results showed that mammalian cells exposed to moderate hypertonicity maintained active mTOR, which was required to sustain their cell size and proliferative capacity. Moreover, mTOR regulated the induction of diverse osmostress response genes, including targets of the tonicity-responsive transcription factor NFAT5 as well as NFAT5-independent genes. Genes sensitive to mTOR-included regulators of stress responses, growth and proliferation. Among them, we identified REDD1 and REDD2, which had been previously characterized as mTOR inhibitors in other stress contexts. We observed that mTOR facilitated transcription-permissive conditions for several osmoresponsive genes by enhancing histone H4 acetylation and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Altogether, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of mTOR in regulating transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression during cellular stress responses. PMID:22287635

  16. Protein phosphorylation and regulation of adaptive responses in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stock, J B; Ninfa, A J; Stock, A M

    1989-01-01

    Bacteria continuously adapt to changes in their environment. Responses are largely controlled by signal transduction systems that contain two central enzymatic components, a protein kinase that uses adenosine triphosphate to phosphorylate itself at a histidine residue and a response regulator that accepts phosphoryl groups from the kinase. This conserved phosphotransfer chemistry is found in a wide range of bacterial species and operates in diverse systems to provide different regulatory outputs. The histidine kinases are frequently membrane receptor proteins that respond to environmental signals and phosphorylate response regulators that control transcription. Four specific regulatory systems are discussed in detail: chemotaxis in response to attractant and repellent stimuli (Che), regulation of gene expression in response to nitrogen deprivation (Ntr), control of the expression of enzymes and transport systems that assimilate phosphorus (Pho), and regulation of outer membrane porin expression in response to osmolarity and other culture conditions (Omp). Several additional systems are also examined, including systems that control complex developmental processes such as sporulation and fruiting-body formation, systems required for virulent infections of plant or animal host tissues, and systems that regulate transport and metabolism. Finally, an attempt is made to understand how cross-talk between parallel phosphotransfer pathways can provide a global regulatory curcuitry. PMID:2556636

  17. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  18. Fetal asphyctic preconditioning alters the transcriptional response to perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic reprogramming is thought to be, at least in part, responsible for the protective effect of brain preconditioning. Unraveling mechanisms of this endogenous neuroprotection, activated by preconditioning, is an important step towards new clinical strategies for treating asphyctic neonates. Therefore, we investigated whole-genome transcriptional changes in the brain of rats which underwent perinatal asphyxia (PA), and rats where PA was preceded by fetal asphyctic preconditioning (FAPA). Offspring were sacrificed 6 h and 96 h after birth, and whole-genome transcription was investigated using the Affymetrix Gene1.0ST chip. Microarray data were analyzed with the Bioconductor Limma package. In addition to univariate analysis, we performed Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) in order to derive results with maximum biological relevance. Results We observed minimal, 25% or less, overlap of differentially regulated transcripts across different experimental groups which leads us to conclude that the transcriptional phenotype of these groups is largely unique. In both the PA and FAPA group we observe an upregulation of transcripts involved in cellular stress. Contrastingly, transcripts with a function in the cell nucleus were mostly downregulated in PA animals, while we see considerable upregulation in the FAPA group. Furthermore, we observed that histone deacetylases (HDACs) are exclusively regulated in FAPA animals. Conclusions This study is the first to investigate whole-genome transcription in the neonatal brain after PA alone, and after perinatal asphyxia preceded by preconditioning (FAPA). We describe several genes/pathways, such as ubiquitination and proteolysis, which were not previously linked to preconditioning-induced neuroprotection. Furthermore, we observed that the majority of upregulated genes in preconditioned animals have a function in the cell nucleus, including several epigenetic players such as HDACs, which suggests that epigenetic

  19. Differential Transcriptional Responses to Interferon-α and Interferon-γ in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Santosh; Ji, Xuhuai; Calderon-Rodriguez, Gloria M.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Liang, T. Jake

    2010-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) plays a central role in the innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses. While IFN-α is currently approved for treating chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C, in limited studies, IFN-γ has not been shown to be effective for chronic hepatitis B or C. To identify the potential mechanism underlying the differential antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-γ, we used cDNA microarray to profile the global transcriptional response to IFN-α and IFN-γ in primary human hepatocytes, the target cell population of hepatitis viruses. Our results reveal distinct patterns of gene expression induced by these 2 cytokines. Overall, IFN-α induces more genes than IFN-γ at the transcriptional level. Distinct sets of genes were induced by IFN-α and IFN-γ with limited overlaps. IFN-α induces gene transcription at an early time point (6 h) but not at a later time point (18 h), while the effects of IFN-γ are more prominent at 18 h than at 6 h, suggesting a delayed transcriptional response to IFN-γ in the hepatocytes. These findings indicate differential actions of IFN-α and IFN-γ in the context of therapeutic intervention for chronic viral infections in the liver. PMID:20038212

  20. Adaptive regulation of human intestinal thiamine uptake by extracellular substrate level: a role for THTR-2 transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nabokina, Svetlana M.; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Valle, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal thiamine uptake process is adaptively regulated by the level of vitamin in the diet, but the molecular mechanism involved is not fully understood. Here we used the human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells exposed to different levels of extracellular thiamine to delineate the molecular mechanism involved. Our results showed that maintaining Caco-2 cells in a thiamine-deficient medium resulted in a specific and significant increase of [3H]thiamine uptake compared with cell exposure to a high level of thiamine (1 mM). This adaptive regulation was also associated with a higher level of mRNA expression of thiamine transporter-2 (THTR-2), but not thiamine transporter-1 (THTR-1), in the deficient condition and a higher level of promoter activity of gene encoding THTR-2 (SLC19A3). Using 5′-truncated promoter-luciferase constructs, we identified the thiamine level-responsive region in the SLC19A3 promoter to be between −77 and −29 (using transcriptional start site as +1). By means of mutational analysis, a key role for a stimulating protein-1 (SP1)/guanosine cytidine box in mediating the effect of extracellular thiamine level on SLC19A3 promoter was established. Furthermore, extracellular level of thiamine was found to affect SP1 protein expression and binding pattern to the thiamine level-responsive region of SLC19A3 promoter in Caco-2 cells as shown by Western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay analysis, respectively. These studies demonstrate that the human intestinal thiamine uptake is adaptively regulated by the extracellular substrate level via transcriptional regulation of the THTR-2 system, and report that SP1 transcriptional factor is involved in this regulation. PMID:23989004

  1. Transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally regulated microRNAs in heat stress response in barley

    PubMed Central

    Kruszka, Katarzyna; Pacak, Andrzej; Swida-Barteczka, Aleksandra; Nuc, Przemyslaw; Alaba, Sylwia; Wroblewska, Zuzanna; Karlowski, Wojciech; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is one of the major abiotic factors that can induce severe plant damage, leading to a decrease in crop plant productivity. Despite barley being a cereal of great economic importance, few data are available concerning its thermotolerance mechanisms. In this work microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in heat stress response in barley were investigated. The level of selected barley mature miRNAs was examined by hybridization. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to monitor the changes in the expression profiles of primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) precursors, as well as novel and conserved target genes during heat stress. The miRNA-mediated cleavage sites in the target transcripts were confirmed by degradome analysis and the 5’ RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) approach. Four barley miRNAs (miR160a, 166a, 167h, and 5175a) were found which are heat stress up-regulated at the level of both mature miRNAs and precursor pri-miRNAs. Moreover, the splicing of introns hosting miR160a and miR5175a is also heat induced. The results demonstrate transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of heat-responsive miRNAs in barley. The observed induction of miRNA expression is correlated with the down-regulation of the expression level of their experimentally identified new and conservative target genes. PMID:25183744

  2. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP–RNA complexes known as “riboclusters.” These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  3. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP-RNA complexes known as "riboclusters." These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  4. FnrP and NNR of Paracoccus denitrificans are both members of the FNR family of transcriptional activators but have distinct roles in respiratory adaptation in response to oxygen limitation.

    PubMed

    Van Spanning, R J; De Boer, A P; Reijnders, W N; Westerhoff, H V; Stouthamer, A H; Van Der Oost, J

    1997-03-01

    The Paracoccus denitrificans fnrP gene encoding a homologue of the Escherichia coli FNR protein was localized upstream of the gene cluster that encodes the high-affinity cbb3-type oxidase. FnrP harbours the invariant cysteine residues that are supposed to be the ligands of the redox-sensitive [4Fe-4S] cluster in FNR. NNR, another FNR-like transcriptional regulator in P. denitrificans, does not. Analysis of FnrP and NNR single and double mutants revealed that the two regulators each exert exclusive control on the expression of a discrete set of target genes. In FnrP mutants, the expression of cytochrome c peroxidase was blocked, that of membrane-bound nitrate reductase and the cbb3-type oxidase was significantly reduced, whilst the activity of the bb3-type quinol oxidase was increased. The amounts of the nitrite and nitric oxide reductases in these FnrP mutants were the same as in the wild type. NNR mutants, on the other hand, were disturbed exclusively in the concentrations of nitrite reductase and nitric oxide reductase. An FnrP.NNR double mutant combined the phenotypes of the single mutant strains. In all three mutants, the concentrations and/or activities of the aa3-type oxidase, cytochrome C550, cytochrome C552, and nitrous oxide reductase equalled those in the wild type. As the FNR boxes in front of the FnrP- and NNR-regulated genes are highly similar to or even identical to each other, the absence of cross-talk between the regulation by FnrP and NNR implies that as yet unidentified factors are important in the control. It is proposed that the redox state of an intracellular redox couple other than the oxygen/water couple is one of the factors that modulates the activity of FnrP. PMID:9076727

  5. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    simulated microgravity and temperature elevation have different effects on the small HSP genes belonging to subfamilies with different subcellular localization: cytosol/nucleus - PsHSP17.1-СІІ and PsHSP18.1-СІ, cloroplasts - PsHSP26.2-Cl, endoplasmatic reticulum - PsHSP22.7-ER and mitochondria - PsHSP22.9-M: unlike high temperature, clinorotation does not cause denaturation of cell proteins, that confirms the sHSP chaperone function. Dynamics of investigated gene expression in pea seedlings growing 5 days after seed germination under clinorotation was similar to that in the stationary control. Similar patterns in dynamics of sHSP gene expression in the stationary control and under clinorotation may be one of mechanisms providing plant adaptation to simulated microgravity. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in cell organelle functional load. Thus, next certain changes in the structure and function of plant cells may be considered as adaptive: 1) an increase in the unsaturated fatty acid content in the plasmalemma, 2) rearrangements of organelle ultrastructure and an increase in their functional load, 3) an increase in cortical F-actin under destabilization of tubulin microtubules, 4) the level of gene expression and synthesis of heat shock proteins, 5) alterations of the enzyme and antioxidant system activity. The dynamics of these patterns demonstrated that the adaptation occurs on the principle of self-regulating systems in the limits of physiological norm reaction. The very importance of changed expression of genes involved in different cellular processes, especially HSP genes, in cell adaptation to altered gravity is discussed.

  6. Dynamic transition of transcription and chromatin landscape during fission yeast adaptation to glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Oda, Arisa; Takemata, Naomichi; Hirata, Yoshito; Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2015-05-01

    Shortage of glucose, the primary energy source for all organisms, is one of the most critical stresses influencing cell viability. Glucose starvation promptly induces changes in mRNA and noncoding RNA (ncRNA) transcription. We previously reported that glucose starvation induces long ncRNA (lncRNA) transcription in the 5' segment of a fission yeast gluconeogenesis gene (fbp1+), which leads to stepwise chromatin alteration around the fbp1+ promoter and to subsequent robust gene activation. Here, we analyzed genomewide transcription by strand-specific RNA sequencing, together with chromatin landscape by immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Clustering analysis showed that distinct mRNAs and ncRNAs are induced at the early, middle and later stages of cellular response to glucose starvation. The starvation-induced transcription depends substantially on the stress-responsive transcription factor Atf1. Using a new computer program that examines dynamic changes in expression patterns, we identified ncRNAs with similar behavior to the fbp1+ lncRNA. We confirmed that there are continuous lncRNAs associated with local reduction of histone density. Overlapping with the regions for transcription of these lncRNAs, antisense RNAs are antagonistically transcribed under glucose-rich conditions. These results suggest that Atf1-dependent integrated networks of mRNA and lncRNA govern drastic changes in cell physiology in response to glucose starvation. PMID:25728061

  7. Radio-Adaptive Responses of Mouse Myocardiocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seawright, John W.; Westby, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant occupational hazards to an astronaut is the frequent exposure to radiation. Commonly associated with increased risk for cancer related morbidity and mortality, radiation is also known to increase the risk for cardiovascular related disorders including: pericarditis, hypertension, and heart failure. It is believed that these radiation-induced disorders are a result of abnormal tissue remodeling. It is unknown whether radiation exposure promotes remodeling through fibrotic changes alone or in combination with programmed cell death. Furthermore, it is not known whether it is possible to mitigate the hazardous effects of radiation exposure. As such, we assessed the expression and mechanisms of radiation-induced tissue remodeling and potential radio-adaptive responses of p53-mediated apoptosis and fibrosis pathways along with markers for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice myocardium. 7 week old, male, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 6Gy (H) or 5cGy followed 24hr later with 6Gy (LH) Cs-137 gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed and their hearts extirpated 4, 24, or 72hr after final irradiation. Real Time - Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to evaluate target genes. Pro-apoptotic genes Bad and Bax, pro-cell survival genes Bcl2 and Bcl2l2, fibrosis gene Vegfa, and oxidative stress genes Sod2 and GPx4 showed a reduced fold regulation change (Bad,-6.18; Bax,-6.94; Bcl2,-5.09; Bcl2l2,-4.03; Vegfa, -11.84; Sod2,-5.97; GPx4*,-28.72; * = Bonferroni adjusted p-value . 0.003) 4hr after H, but not after 4hr LH when compared to control. Other p53-mediated apoptosis genes Casp3, Casp9, Trp53, and Myc exhibited down-regulation but did not achieve a notable level of significance 4hr after H. 24hr after H, genetic down-regulation was no longer present compared to 24hr control. These data suggest a general reduction in genetic expression 4hrs after a high dose of gamma radiation. However, pre-exposure to 5cGy gamma radiation appears to facilitate a radio-adaptive

  8. Transcriptional Profiling of the Immune Response to Marburg Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Judy; Caballero, Ignacio S.; Garamszegi, Sara; Malhotra, Shikha; Lin, Kenny; Hensley, Lisa; Goff, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marburg virus is a genetically simple RNA virus that causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The mechanism of pathogenesis of the infection is not well understood, but it is well accepted that pathogenesis is appreciably driven by a hyperactive immune response. To better understand the overall response to Marburg virus challenge, we undertook a transcriptomic analysis of immune cells circulating in the blood following aerosol exposure of rhesus macaques to a lethal dose of Marburg virus. Using two-color microarrays, we analyzed the transcriptomes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were collected throughout the course of infection from 1 to 9 days postexposure, representing the full course of the infection. The response followed a 3-stage induction (early infection, 1 to 3 days postexposure; midinfection, 5 days postexposure; late infection, 7 to 9 days postexposure) that was led by a robust innate immune response. The host response to aerosolized Marburg virus was evident at 1 day postexposure. Analysis of cytokine transcripts that were overexpressed during infection indicated that previously unanalyzed cytokines are likely induced in response to exposure to Marburg virus and further suggested that the early immune response is skewed toward a Th2 response that would hamper the development of an effective antiviral immune response early in disease. Late infection events included the upregulation of coagulation-associated factors. These findings demonstrate very early host responses to Marburg virus infection and provide a rich data set for identification of factors expressed throughout the course of infection that can be investigated as markers of infection and targets for therapy. IMPORTANCE Marburg virus causes a severe infection that is associated with high mortality and hemorrhage. The disease is associated with an immune response that contributes to the lethality of the disease. In this study, we investigated how the

  9. In silico Analysis of Transcription Factor Repertoire and Prediction of Stress Responsive Transcription Factors in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Mochida, Keiichi; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are often termed as ‘master regulators’ which bind to DNA and either activate or repress gene transcription. We have computationally analysed the soybean genome sequence data and constructed a proper set of TFs based on the Hidden Markov Model profiles of DNA-binding domain families. Within the soybean genome, we identified 4342 loci encoding 5035 TF models which grouped into 61 families. We constructed a database named SoybeanTFDB (http://soybeantfdb.psc.riken.jp) containing the full compilation of soybean TFs and significant information such as: functional motifs, full-length cDNAs, domain alignments, promoter regions, genomic organization and putative regulatory functions based on annotations of gene ontology (GO) inferred by comparative analysis with Arabidopsis. With particular interest in abiotic stress signalling, we analysed the promoter regions for all of the TF encoding genes as a means to identify abiotic stress responsive cis-elements as well as all types of cis-motifs provided by the PLACE database. SoybeanTFDB enables scientists to easily access cis-element and GO annotations to aid in the prediction of TF function and selection of TFs with functions of interest. This study provides a basic framework and an important user-friendly public information resource which enables analyses of transcriptional regulation in soybean. PMID:19884168

  10. Transcript changes in Vibrio cholerae in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiuping; Liang, Weili; Du, Pengcheng; Yan, Meiying; Kan, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, which is a serious human intestinal pathogen, often resides and thrives in estuaries but requires major self-regulation to overcome intestinal hyperosmotic stress or high salt stress in water and food. In the present study, we selected multiple O1 and O139 group V. cholerae strains that were isolated from different regions and during different years to study their salt tolerance. Based on the mechanisms that other bacteria use to respond to high salt stress, we selected salt stress-response related genes to study the mechanisms which V. cholerae responds to high salt stress. V. cholerae strains showed salt-resistance characteristics that varied in salt concentrations from 4% to 6%. However, group O1 and group O139 showed no significant difference in the degree of salt tolerance. The primary responses of bacteria to salt stress, including Na(+) exclusion, K(+) uptake and glutamate biosynthesis, were observed in V. cholerae strains. In addition, some sigma factors were up-regulated in V. cholerae strains, suggesting that V. cholerae may recruit common sigma factors to achieve an active salt stress response. However, some changes in gene transcript levels in response to salt stress in V. cholerae were strain-specific. In particular, hierarchical clustering of differentially expressed genes indicated that transcript levels of these genes were correlated with the degree of salt tolerance. Therefore, elevated transcript levels of some genes, including sigma factors and genes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, may be due to the salt tolerance of strains. In addition, high salt-tolerant strains may recruit common as well as additional sigma factors to activate the salt stress response. PMID:25589902

  11. Transcriptional responses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to lung surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Ute; Rohde, Kyle H.; Wang, Zhengdong; Chess, Patricia R.; Notter, Robert H.; Russell, David G.

    2009-01-01

    This study uses microarray analyses to examine gene expression profiles for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induced by exposure in vitro to bovine lung surfactant preparations that vary in apoprotein content: (i) whole lung surfactant (WLS) containing the complete mix of endogenous lipids and surfactant proteins (SP)-A, -B, -C, and -D; (ii) extracted lung surfactant (CLSE) containing lipids plus SP-B and -C; (iii) column-purified surfactant lipids (PPL) containing no apoproteins, and (iv) purified human SP-A. Exposure to WLS evoked a multitude of transcriptional responses in Mtb, with 52 genes up-regulated and 23 genes down-regulated at 30 min exposure, plus 146 genes up-regulated and 27 genes down-regulated at 2 h. Notably, WLS rapidly induced several membrane-associated lipases that presumptively act on surfactant lipids as substrates, and a large number of genes involved in the synthesis of phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM), a cell wall component known to be important in macrophage interactions and Mtb virulence. Exposure of Mtb to CLSE, PPL, or purified SP-A caused a substantially weaker transcriptional response (≤20 genes were induced) suggesting that interactions among multiple lipid-protein components of WLS may contribute to its effects on Mtb transcription. PMID:19272305

  12. Transcriptional response to hypoxia in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Camilo, César M; Gomes, Suely L

    2010-06-01

    Global gene expression analysis was carried out with Blastocladiella emersonii cells subjected to oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) using cDNA microarrays. In experiments of gradual hypoxia (gradual decrease in dissolved oxygen) and direct hypoxia (direct decrease in dissolved oxygen), about 650 differentially expressed genes were observed. A total of 534 genes were affected directly or indirectly by oxygen availability, as they showed recovery to normal expression levels or a tendency to recover when cells were reoxygenated. In addition to modulating many genes with no putative assigned function, B. emersonii cells respond to hypoxia by readjusting the expression levels of genes responsible for energy production and consumption. At least transcriptionally, this fungus seems to favor anaerobic metabolism through the upregulation of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase and the downregulation of most genes coding for tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Furthermore, genes involved in energy-costly processes, like protein synthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, protein folding, and transport, had their expression profiles predominantly downregulated during oxygen deprivation, indicating an energy-saving effort. Data also revealed similarities between the transcriptional profiles of cells under hypoxia and under iron(II) deprivation, suggesting that Fe(2+) ion could have a role in oxygen sensing and/or response to hypoxia in B. emersonii. Additionally, treatment of fungal cells prior to hypoxia with the antibiotic geldanamycin, which negatively affects the stability of mammalian hypoxia transcription factor HIF-1alpha, caused a significant decrease in the levels of certain upregulated hypoxic genes. PMID:20418381

  13. Adaptation of health care for migrants: whose responsibility?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a context of increasing ethnic diversity, culturally competent strategies have been recommended to improve care quality and access to health care for ethnic minorities and migrants; their implementation by health professionals, however, has remained patchy. Most programs of cultural competence assume that health professionals accept that they have a responsibility to adapt to migrants, but this assumption has often remained at the level of theory. In this paper, we surveyed health professionals’ views on their responsibility to adapt. Methods Five hundred-and-sixty-nine health professionals from twenty-four inpatient and outpatient health services were selected according to their geographic location. All health care professionals were requested to complete a questionnaire about who should adapt to ethnic diversity: health professionals or patients. After a factorial analysis to identify the underlying responsibility dimensions, we performed a multilevel regression model in order to investigate individual and service covariates of responsibility attribution. Results Three dimensions emerged from the factor analysis: responsibility for the adaptation of communication, responsibility for the adaptation to the negotiation of values, and responsibility for the adaptation to health beliefs. Our results showed that the sense of responsibility for the adaptation of health care depended on the nature of the adaptation required: when the adaptation directly concerned communication with the patient, health professionals declared that they should be the ones to adapt; in relation to cultural preferences, however, the responsibility felt on the patient’s shoulders. Most respondents were unclear in relation to adaptation to health beliefs. Regression indicated that being Belgian, not being a physician, and working in a primary-care service were associated with placing the burden of responsibility on the patient. Conclusions Health care professionals do not

  14. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively. PMID:27343191

  15. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy. PMID:26808665

  16. Acetaminophen Modulates the Transcriptional Response to Recombinant Interferon-β

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Flaman, Anathea S.; Prasad, Shiv S.; Gravel, Caroline; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant interferon treatment can result in several common side effects including fever and injection-site pain. Patients are often advised to use acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain medications as needed. Little is known regarding the transcriptional changes induced by such co-administration. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the administration of acetaminophen causes a change in the response normally induced by interferon-β treatment. CD-1 mice were administered acetaminophen (APAP), interferon-β (IFN-β) or a combination of IFN-β+APAP and liver and serum samples were collected for analysis. Differential gene expression was determined using an Agilent 22 k whole mouse genome microarray. Data were analyzed by several methods including Gene Ontology term clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. We observed a significant change in the transcription profile of hepatic cells when APAP was co-administered with IFN-β. These transcriptional changes included a marked up-regulation of genes involved in signal transduction and cell differentiation and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular metabolism, trafficking and the IκBK/NF-κB cascade. Additionally, we observed a large decrease in the expression of several IFN-induced genes including Ifit-3, Isg-15, Oasl1, Zbp1 and predicted gene EG634650 at both early and late time points. Conclusions/Significance A significant change in the transcriptional response was observed following co-administration of IFN-β+APAP relative to IFN-β treatment alone. These results suggest that administration of acetaminophen has the potential to modify the efficacy of IFN-β treatment. PMID:20544007

  17. Transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to As (V) stress

    PubMed Central

    Abercrombie, Jason M; Halfhill, Matthew D; Ranjan, Priya; Rao, Murali R; Saxton, Arnold M; Yuan, Joshua S; Stewart, C Neal

    2008-01-01

    Background Arsenic is toxic to plants and a common environmental pollutant. There is a strong chemical similarity between arsenate [As (V)] and phosphate (Pi). Whole genome oligonucleotide microarrays were employed to investigate the transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to As (V) stress. Results Antioxidant-related genes (i.e. coding for superoxide dismutases and peroxidases) play prominent roles in response to arsenate. The microarray experiment revealed induction of chloroplast Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) (at2g28190), Cu/Zn SOD (at1g08830), as well as an SOD copper chaperone (at1g12520). On the other hand, Fe SODs were strongly repressed in response to As (V) stress. Non-parametric rank product statistics were used to detect differentially expressed genes. Arsenate stress resulted in the repression of numerous genes known to be induced by phosphate starvation. These observations were confirmed with qRT-PCR and SOD activity assays. Conclusion Microarray data suggest that As (V) induces genes involved in response to oxidative stress and represses transcription of genes induced by phosphate starvation. This study implicates As (V) as a phosphate mimic in the cell by repressing genes normally induced when available phosphate is scarce. Most importantly, these data reveal that arsenate stress affects the expression of several genes with little or unknown biological functions, thereby providing new putative gene targets for future research. PMID:18684332

  18. Functions of heat shock transcription factors involved in response to photooxidative stresses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yabuta, Yukinori

    2016-07-01

    Because plants are continually exposed to various environmental stresses, they possess numerous transcription factors that regulate metabolism to adapt and acclimate to those conditions. To clarify the gene regulation systems activated in response to photooxidative stress, we isolated 76 high light and heat shock stress-inducible genes, including heat shock transcription factor (Hsf) A2 from Arabidopsis. Unlike yeast or animals, more than 20 genes encoding putative Hsfs are present in the genomes of higher plants, and they are categorized into three classes based on their structural characterization. However, the multiplicity of Hsfs in plants remains unknown. Furthermore, the individual functions of Hsfs are also largely unknown because of their genetic redundancy. Recently, the developments of T-DNA insertion knockout mutant lines and chimeric repressor gene-silencing technology have provided effective tools for exploring the individual functions of Hsfs. This review describes the current knowledge on the individual functions and activation mechanisms of Hsfs. PMID:27095030

  19. Genome-wide transcriptional responses to carbon starvation in nongrowing Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Onur; Wels, Michiel; Smid, Eddy J; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (μ = 0.0001 h(-1)) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a recovery period of another 24 h by reinitiating the medium supply to the retentostat culture. During starvation, the viability of the culture was largely retained, and the expression of genes involved in transcription and translational machineries, cell division, and cell membrane energy metabolism was strongly repressed. Expression of these genes was largely recovered following the reinitiation of the medium supply. Starvation triggered the elevated expression of genes associated with synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, histidine, purine, and riboflavin. The expression of these biosynthesis genes was found to remain at an elevated level after reinitiation of the medium supply. In addition, starvation induced the complete gene set predicted to be involved in natural competence in L. lactis KF147, and the elevated expression of these genes was sustained during the subsequent recovery period, but our attempts to experimentally demonstrate natural transformation in these cells failed. Mining the starvation response gene set identified a conserved cis-acting element that resembles the lactococcal CodY motif in the upstream regions of genes associated with transcription and translational machineries, purine biosynthesis, and natural transformation in L. lactis, suggesting a role for CodY in the observed transcriptome adaptations to starvation in nongrowing cells. PMID:25636846

  20. Modeling the Transcriptional Regulatory Network That Controls the Early Hypoxic Response in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    van het Hoog, Marco; Tebbji, Faiza; Beaurepaire, Cécile; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    We determined the changes in transcriptional profiles that occur in the first hour following the transfer of Candida albicans to hypoxic growth conditions. The impressive speed of this response is not compatible with current models of fungal adaptation to hypoxia that depend on the depletion of sterol and heme. Functional analysis using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) identified the Sit4 phosphatase, Ccr4 mRNA deacetylase, and Sko1 transcription factor (TF) as potential regulators of the early hypoxic response. Cells mutated in these and other regulators exhibit a delay in their transcriptional responses to hypoxia. Promoter occupancy data for 29 TFs were combined with the transcriptional profiles of 3,111 in vivo target genes in a Network Component Analysis (NCA) to produce a model of the dynamic and highly interconnected TF network that controls this process. With data from the TF network obtained from a variety of sources, we generated an edge and node model that was capable of separating many of the hypoxia-upregulated and -downregulated genes. Upregulated genes are centered on Tye7, Upc2, and Mrr1, which are associated with many of the gene promoters that exhibit the strongest activations. The connectivity of the model illustrates the high redundancy of this response system and the challenges that lie in determining the individual contributions of specific TFs. Finally, treating cells with an inhibitor of the oxidative phosphorylation chain mimics most of the early hypoxic profile, which suggests that this response may be initiated by a drop in ATP production. PMID:24681685

  1. Transcription Profiling of the Stringent Response in Escherichia coli▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Durfee, Tim; Hansen, Anne-Marie; Zhi, Huijun; Blattner, Frederick R.; Jin, Ding Jun

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response serves as a paradigm for understanding global regulatory processes. It can be triggered by nutrient downshifts or starvation and is characterized by a rapid RelA-dependent increase in the alarmone (p)ppGpp. One hallmark of the response is the switch from maximum-growth-promoting to biosynthesis-related gene expression. However, the global transcription patterns accompanying the stringent response in Escherichia coli have not been analyzed comprehensively. Here, we present a time series of gene expression profiles for two serine hydroxymate-treated cultures: (i) MG1655, a wild-type E. coli K-12 strain, and (ii) an isogenic relAΔ251 derivative defective in the stringent response. The stringent response in MG1655 develops in a hierarchical manner, ultimately involving almost 500 differentially expressed genes, while the relAΔ251 mutant response is both delayed and limited in scope. We show that in addition to the down-regulation of stable RNA-encoding genes, flagellar and chemotaxis gene expression is also under stringent control. Reduced transcription of these systems, as well as metabolic and transporter-encoding genes, constitutes much of the down-regulated expression pattern. Conversely, a significantly larger number of genes are up-regulated. Under the conditions used, induction of amino acid biosynthetic genes is limited to the leader sequences of attenuator-regulated operons. Instead, up-regulated genes with known functions, including both regulators (e.g., rpoE, rpoH, and rpoS) and effectors, are largely involved in stress responses. However, one-half of the up-regulated genes have unknown functions. How these results are correlated with the various effects of (p)ppGpp (in particular, RNA polymerase redistribution) is discussed. PMID:18039766

  2. Neuroendocrine transcriptional programs adapt dynamically to the supply and demand for neuropeptides as revealed in NSF mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kurrasch, Deborah M; Nevin, Linda M; Wong, Jinny S; Baier, Herwig; Ingraham, Holly A

    2009-01-01

    role for NSF in hypothalamic development, with mutant 5 days post-fertilization larvae exhibiting a stage-dependent loss of neuroendocrine transcripts and a corresponding accumulation of neuropeptides in the soma. Based on our collective findings, we speculate that neuroendocrine transcriptional programs adapt dynamically to both the supply and demand for neuropeptides to ensure adequate homeostatic responses. PMID:19549326

  3. Antiviral response dictated by choreographed cascade of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Zaslavsky, Elena; Hershberg, Uri; Seto, Jeremy; Pham, Alissa M.; Marquez, Susanna; Duke, Jamie L.; Wetmur, James G.; tenOever, Benjamin R.; Sealfon, Stuart C.; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    The dendritic cell (DC) is a master regulator of immune responses. Pathogenic viruses subvert normal immune function in DCs through the expression of immune antagonists. Understanding how these antagonists interact with the host immune system requires knowledge of the underlying genetic regulatory network that operates during an uninhibited antiviral response. In order to isolate and identify this network, we studied DCs infected with Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), which is able to stimulate innate immunity and DC maturation through activation of RIG-I signaling, but lacks the ability to evade the human interferon response. To analyze this experimental model, we developed a new approach integrating genome-wide expression kinetics and time-dependent promoter analysis. We found that the genetic program underlying the antiviral cell-state transition during the first 18-hours post-infection could be explained by a single convergent regulatory network. Gene expression changes were driven by a step-wise multi-factor cascading control mechanism, where the specific transcription factors controlling expression changed over time. Within this network, most individual genes are regulated by multiple factors, indicating robustness against virus-encoded immune evasion genes. In addition to effectively recapitulating current biological knowledge, we predicted, and validated experimentally, antiviral roles for several novel transcription factors. More generally, our results show how a genetic program can be temporally controlled through a single regulatory network to achieve the large-scale genetic reprogramming characteristic of cell state transitions. PMID:20164420

  4. A transcriptional reference map of defence hormone responses in potato.

    PubMed

    Wiesel, Lea; Davis, Jayne L; Milne, Linda; Redondo Fernandez, Vanesa; Herold, Miriam B; Middlefell Williams, Jill; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E; Harrower, Brian; Newton, Adrian C; Birch, Paul R J; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Hein, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones are involved in diverse aspects of plant life including the regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction, as well as governing biotic and abiotic stress responses. We have generated a comprehensive transcriptional reference map of the early potato responses to exogenous application of the defence hormones abscisic acid, brassinolides (applied as epibrassinolide), ethylene (applied as the ethylene precursor aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid), salicylic acid and jasmonic acid (applied as methyl jasmonate). Of the 39000 predicted genes on the microarray, a total of 2677 and 2473 genes were significantly differentially expressed at 1 h and 6 h after hormone treatment, respectively. Specific marker genes newly identified for the early hormone responses in potato include: a homeodomain 20 transcription factor (DMG400000248) for abscisic acid; a SAUR gene (DMG400016561) induced in epibrassinolide treated plants; an osmotin gene (DMG400003057) specifically enhanced by aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid; a gene weakly similar to AtWRKY40 (DMG402007388) that was induced by salicylic acid; and a jasmonate ZIM-domain protein 1 (DMG400002930) which was specifically activated by methyl jasmonate. An online database has been set up to query the expression patterns of potato genes represented on the microarray that can also incorporate future microarray or RNAseq-based expression studies. PMID:26477733

  5. A transcriptional reference map of defence hormone responses in potato

    PubMed Central

    Wiesel, Lea; Davis, Jayne L.; Milne, Linda; Redondo Fernandez, Vanesa; Herold, Miriam B.; Middlefell Williams, Jill; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E.; Harrower, Brian; Newton, Adrian C.; Birch, Paul R. J.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Hein, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones are involved in diverse aspects of plant life including the regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction, as well as governing biotic and abiotic stress responses. We have generated a comprehensive transcriptional reference map of the early potato responses to exogenous application of the defence hormones abscisic acid, brassinolides (applied as epibrassinolide), ethylene (applied as the ethylene precursor aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid), salicylic acid and jasmonic acid (applied as methyl jasmonate). Of the 39000 predicted genes on the microarray, a total of 2677 and 2473 genes were significantly differentially expressed at 1 h and 6 h after hormone treatment, respectively. Specific marker genes newly identified for the early hormone responses in potato include: a homeodomain 20 transcription factor (DMG400000248) for abscisic acid; a SAUR gene (DMG400016561) induced in epibrassinolide treated plants; an osmotin gene (DMG400003057) specifically enhanced by aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid; a gene weakly similar to AtWRKY40 (DMG402007388) that was induced by salicylic acid; and a jasmonate ZIM-domain protein 1 (DMG400002930) which was specifically activated by methyl jasmonate. An online database has been set up to query the expression patterns of potato genes represented on the microarray that can also incorporate future microarray or RNAseq-based expression studies. PMID:26477733

  6. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F) and lrpA1 (OE2621R), were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3. PMID:20509863

  7. Bayesian response adaptive randomization using longitudinal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, Tomoyoshi; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamaki, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    The response adaptive randomization (RAR) method is used to increase the number of patients assigned to more efficacious treatment arms in clinical trials. In many trials evaluating longitudinal patient outcomes, RAR methods based only on the final measurement may not benefit significantly from RAR because of its delayed initiation. We propose a Bayesian RAR method to improve RAR performance by accounting for longitudinal patient outcomes (longitudinal RAR). We use a Bayesian linear mixed effects model to analyze longitudinal continuous patient outcomes for calculating a patient allocation probability. In addition, we aim to mitigate the loss of statistical power because of large patient allocation imbalances by embedding adjusters into the patient allocation probability calculation. Using extensive simulation we compared the operating characteristics of our proposed longitudinal RAR method with those of the RAR method based only on the final measurement and with an equal randomization method. Simulation results showed that our proposed longitudinal RAR method assigned more patients to the presumably superior treatment arm compared with the other two methods. In addition, the embedded adjuster effectively worked to prevent extreme patient allocation imbalances. However, our proposed method may not function adequately when the treatment effect difference is moderate or less, and still needs to be modified to deal with unexpectedly large departures from the presumed longitudinal data model. PMID:26099995

  8. Molecular characterization of an adaptive response to alkylating agents in the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    O’Hanlon, Karen A.; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Hatch, Amy; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Owens, Rebecca A.; Doyle, Sean; Jones, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive response to alkylating agents based upon the conformational change of a methylphosphotriester (MPT) DNA repair protein to a transcriptional activator has been demonstrated in a number of bacterial species, but this mechanism appears largely absent from eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus elicits an adaptive response to sub-lethal doses of the mono-functional alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We have identified genes that encode MPT and O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) DNA repair proteins; deletions of either of these genes abolish the adaptive response and sensitize the organism to MNNG. In vitro DNA repair assays confirm the ability of MPT and AGT to repair methylphosphotriester and O6-methylguanine lesions respectively. In eukaryotes, the MPT protein is confined to a select group of fungal species, some of which are major mammalian and plant pathogens. The evolutionary origin of the adaptive response is bacterial and rooted within the Firmicutes phylum. Inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer between Firmicutes and Ascomycete ancestors introduced the adaptive response into the Fungal kingdom. Our data constitute the first detailed characterization of the molecular mechanism of the adaptive response in a lower eukaryote and has applications for development of novel fungal therapeutics targeting this DNA repair system. PMID:22669901

  9. Where does transcription start? 5′-RACE adapted to next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Leenen, Fleur A.D.; Vernocchi, Sara; Hunewald, Oliver E.; Schmitz, Stephanie; Molitor, Anne M.; Muller, Claude P.; Turner, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    The variability and complexity of the transcription initiation process was examined by adapting RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5′ cDNA ends (5′-RACE) to Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS). We oligo-labelled 5′-m7G-capped mRNA from two genes, the simple mono-exonic Beta-2-Adrenoceptor (ADRB2R) and the complex multi-exonic Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR, NR3C1), and detected a variability in TSS location that has received little attention up to now. Transcription was not initiated at a fixed TSS, but from loci of 4 to 10 adjacent nucleotides. Individual TSSs had frequencies from <0.001% to 38.5% of the total gene-specific 5′ m7G-capped transcripts. ADRB2R used a single locus consisting of 4 adjacent TSSs. Unstimulated, the GR used a total of 358 TSSs distributed throughout 38 loci, that were principally in the 5′ UTRs and were spliced using established donor and acceptor sites. Complete demethylation of the epigenetically sensitive GR promoter with 5-azacytidine induced one new locus and 127 TSSs, 12 of which were unique. We induced GR transcription with dexamethasone and Interferon-γ, adding one new locus and 185 additional TSSs distributed throughout the promoter region. In-vitro the TSS microvariability regulated mRNA translation efficiency and the relative abundance of the different GR N-terminal protein isoform levels. PMID:26615195

  10. Mga2 Transcription Factor Regulates an Oxygen-responsive Lipid Homeostasis Pathway in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Burr, Risa; Stewart, Emerson V; Shao, Wei; Zhao, Shan; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Ejsing, Christer S; Espenshade, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic lipid synthesis is oxygen-dependent with cholesterol synthesis requiring 11 oxygen molecules and fatty acid desaturation requiring 1 oxygen molecule per double bond. Accordingly, organisms evaluate oxygen availability to control lipid homeostasis. The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipid homeostasis. In mammals, SREBP-2 controls cholesterol biosynthesis, whereas SREBP-1 controls triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the SREBP-2 homolog Sre1 regulates sterol homeostasis in response to changing sterol and oxygen levels. However, notably missing is an SREBP-1 analog that regulates triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis in response to low oxygen. Consistent with this, studies have shown that the Sre1 transcription factor regulates only a fraction of all genes up-regulated under low oxygen. To identify new regulators of low oxygen adaptation, we screened the S. pombe nonessential haploid deletion collection and identified 27 gene deletions sensitive to both low oxygen and cobalt chloride, a hypoxia mimetic. One of these genes, mga2, is a putative transcriptional activator. In the absence of mga2, fission yeast exhibited growth defects under both normoxia and low oxygen conditions. Mga2 transcriptional targets were enriched for lipid metabolism genes, and mga2Δ cells showed disrupted triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis, most notably with an increase in fatty acid saturation. Indeed, addition of exogenous oleic acid to mga2Δ cells rescued the observed growth defects. Together, these results establish Mga2 as a transcriptional regulator of triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis in S. pombe, analogous to mammalian SREBP-1. PMID:27053105

  11. EXB1/WRKY71 transcription factor regulates both shoot branching and responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongshu; Qin, Genji

    2016-03-01

    As the sessile organisms, plants evolve different strategies to survive in adverse environmental conditions. The elaborate regulation of shoot branching is an important strategy for plant morphological adaptation to various environments, while the regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) is pivotal for plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Recently, we have demonstrated that Arabidopsis EXB1, a WRKY transcription factor, is a positive regulator of shoot branching as a cover story in Plant Cell. Here we show that WRKY23, an EXB1 close member, has a redundant role in control of shoot branching. We further show that EXB1 is induced by H2O2, ABA or mannitol treatments, suggesting that EXB1 may also play roles in plant responses to abiotic stresses. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis using 4EnhpEXB1-EXB1GR inducible line indicates that the genes involved in oxidative stress, oxidation reduction, SA or JA signaling pathway are regulated by EXB1 induction in a short time. We suggest that EXB1/WRKY71 transcription factor may play pivotal roles in plant adaptation to environments by both morphological and physiological ways. PMID:26914912

  12. Transcriptional Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Desiccation and Rehydration†

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jatinder; Kumar, Deept; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Singhal, Vibha; Jervis, Jody; Garst, James F.; Slaughter, Stephen M.; DeSantis, Andrea M.; Potts, Malcolm; Helm, Richard F.

    2005-01-01

    A transcriptional analysis of the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4743 to controlled air-drying (desiccation) and subsequent rehydration under minimal glucose conditions was performed. Expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle was observed to increase during drying and remained in this state during the rehydration phase. When the BY4743 expression profile for the dried sample was compared to that of a commercially prepared dry active yeast, strikingly similar expression changes were observed. The fact that these two samples, dried by different means, possessed very similar transcriptional profiles supports the hypothesis that the response to desiccation is a coordinated event independent of the particular conditions involved in water removal. Similarities between “stationary-phase-essential genes” and those upregulated during desiccation were also noted, suggesting commonalities in different routes to reduced metabolic states. Trends in extracellular and intracellular glucose and trehalose levels suggested that the cells were in a “holding pattern” during the rehydration phase, a concept that was reinforced by cell cycle analyses. Application of a “redescription mining” algorithm suggested that sulfur metabolism is important for cell survival during desiccation and rehydration. PMID:16332871

  13. Transcriptional profiling of Medicago truncatula under salt stress identified a novel CBF transcription factor MtCBF4 that plays an important role in abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Salt stress hinders the growth of plants and reduces crop production worldwide. However, different plant species might possess different adaptive mechanisms to mitigate salt stress. We conducted a detailed pathway analysis of transcriptional dynamics in the roots of Medicago truncatula seedlings under salt stress and selected a transcription factor gene, MtCBF4, for experimental validation. Results A microarray experiment was conducted using root samples collected 6, 24, and 48 h after application of 180 mM NaCl. Analysis of 11 statistically significant expression profiles revealed different behaviors between primary and secondary metabolism pathways in response to external stress. Secondary metabolism that helps to maintain osmotic balance was induced. One of the highly induced transcription factor genes was successfully cloned, and was named MtCBF4. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MtCBF4, which belongs to the AP2-EREBP transcription factor family, is a novel member of the CBF transcription factor in M. truncatula. MtCBF4 is shown to be a nuclear-localized protein. Expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula was induced by most of the abiotic stresses, including salt, drought, cold, and abscisic acid, suggesting crosstalk between these abiotic stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis over-expressing MtCBF4 enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress, and activated expression of downstream genes that contain DRE elements. Over-expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula also enhanced salt tolerance and induced expression level of corresponding downstream genes. Conclusion Comprehensive transcriptomic analysis revealed complex mechanisms exist in plants in response to salt stress. The novel transcription factor gene MtCBF4 identified here played an important role in response to abiotic stresses, indicating that it might be a good candidate gene for genetic improvement to produce stress-tolerant plants. PMID:21718548

  14. Jasmonate-responsive transcription factors regulating plant secondary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meiliang; Memelink, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce a large variety of secondary metabolites including alkaloids, glucosinolates, terpenoids and phenylpropanoids. These compounds play key roles in plant-environment interactions and many of them have pharmacological activity in humans. Jasmonates (JAs) are plant hormones which induce biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites. JAs-responsive transcription factors (TFs) that regulate the JAs-induced accumulation of secondary metabolites belong to different families including AP2/ERF, bHLH, MYB and WRKY. Here, we give an overview of the types and functions of TFs that have been identified in JAs-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and highlight their similarities and differences in regulating various biosynthetic pathways. We review major recent developments regarding JAs-responsive TFs mediating secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and provide suggestions for further studies. PMID:26876016

  15. The metal-responsive transcription factor-1 contributes to HIF-1 activation during hypoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Brian J. . E-mail: brian.murphy@sri.com; Sato, Barbara G.; Dalton, Timothy P.; Laderoute, Keith R.

    2005-11-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), the major transcriptional regulator of the mammalian cellular response to low oxygen (hypoxia), is embedded within a complex network of signaling pathways. We have been investigating the importance of another stress-responsive transcription factor, MTF-1, for the adaptation of cells to hypoxia. This article reports that MTF-1 plays a central role in hypoxic cells by contributing to HIF-1 activity. Loss of MTF-1 in transformed Mtf1 null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) results in an attenuation of nuclear HIF-1{alpha} protein accumulation, HIF-1 transcriptional activity, and expression of an established HIF-1 target gene, glucose transporter-1 (Glut1). Mtf1 null (Mtf1 KO) MEFs also have constitutively higher levels of both glutathione (GSH) and the rate-limiting enzyme involved in GSH synthesis-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit-than wild type cells. The altered cellular redox state arising from increased GSH may perturb oxygen-sensing mechanisms in hypoxic Mtf1 KO cells and decrease the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. Together, these novel findings define a role for MTF-1 in the regulation of HIF-1 activity.

  16. Transcriptional profiling in response to terminal drought stress reveals differential responses along the wheat genome

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Alessio; Mastrangelo, Anna M; De Leonardis, Anna M; Galiba, Gabor; Roncaglia, Enrica; Ferrari, Francesco; De Bellis, Luigi; Turchi, Luana; Giuliano, Giovanni; Cattivelli, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Background Water stress during grain filling has a marked effect on grain yield, leading to a reduced endosperm cell number and thus sink capacity to accumulate dry matter. The bread wheat cultivar Chinese Spring (CS), a Chinese Spring terminal deletion line (CS_5AL-10) and the durum wheat cultivar Creso were subjected to transcriptional profiling after exposure to mild and severe drought stress at the grain filling stage to find evidences of differential stress responses associated to different wheat genome regions. Results The transcriptome analysis of Creso, CS and its deletion line revealed 8,552 non redundant probe sets with different expression levels, mainly due to the comparisons between the two species. The drought treatments modified the expression of 3,056 probe sets. Besides a set of genes showing a similar drought response in Creso and CS, cluster analysis revealed several drought response features that can be associated to the different genomic structure of Creso, CS and CS_5AL-10. Some drought-related genes were expressed at lower level (or not expressed) in Creso (which lacks the D genome) or in the CS_5AL-10 deletion line compared to CS. The chromosome location of a set of these genes was confirmed by PCR-based mapping on the D genome (or the 5AL-10 region). Many clusters were characterized by different level of expression in Creso, CS and CS_AL-10, suggesting that the different genome organization of the three genotypes may affect plant adaptation to stress. Clusters with similar expression trend were grouped and functional classified to mine the biological mean of their activation or repression. Genes involved in ABA, proline, glycine-betaine and sorbitol pathways were found up-regulated by drought stress. Furthermore, the enhanced expression of a set of transposons and retrotransposons was detected in CS_5AL-10. Conclusion Bread and durum wheat genotypes were characterized by a different physiological reaction to water stress and by a

  17. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  18. MicroRNA as Type I Interferon-Regulated Transcripts and Modulators of the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Samuel C.; Tate, Michelle D.; Hertzog, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are an important family of cytokines that regulate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens, in cancer and inflammatory diseases. While the regulation and role of protein-coding genes involved in these responses are well characterized, the role of non-coding microRNAs in the IFN responses is less developed. We review the emerging picture of microRNA regulation of the IFN response at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. This response forms an important regulatory loop; several microRNAs target transcripts encoding components at many steps of the type I IFN response, both production and action, at the receptor, signaling, transcription factor, and regulated gene level. Not only do IFNs regulate positive signaling molecules but also negative regulators such as SOCS1. In total, 36 microRNA are reported as IFN regulated. Given this apparent multipronged targeting of the IFN response by microRNAs and their well-characterized capacity to “buffer” responses in other situations, the prospects of improved sequencing and microRNA targeting technologies will facilitate the elucidation of the broader regulatory networks of microRNA in this important biological context, and their therapeutic and diagnostic potential. PMID:26217335

  19. Secretome analysis revealed adaptive and non-adaptive responses of the Staphylococcus carnosus femB mutant

    PubMed Central

    Nega, Mulugeta; Dube, Linda; Kull, Melanie; Ziebandt, Anne-Kathrin; Ebner, Patrick; Albrecht, Dirk; Krismer, Bernhard; Rosenstein, Ralf; Hecker, Michael; Götz, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    FemABX peptidyl transferases are involved in non-ribosomal pentaglycine interpeptide bridge biosynthesis. Here, we characterized the phenotype of a Staphylococcus carnosus femB deletion mutant, which was affected in growth and showed pleiotropic effects such as enhanced methicillin sensitivity, lysostaphin resistance, cell clustering, and decreased peptidoglycan cross-linking. However, comparative secretome analysis revealed a most striking difference in the massive secretion or release of proteins into the culture supernatant in the femB mutant than the wild type. The secreted proteins can be categorized into typical cytosolic proteins and various murein hydrolases. As the transcription of the murein hydrolase genes was up-regulated in the mutant, they most likely represent an adaption response to the life threatening mutation. Even though the transcription of the cytosolic protein genes was unaltered, their high abundance in the supernatant of the mutant is most likely due to membrane leakage triggered by the weakened murein sacculus and enhanced autolysins. PMID:25430637

  20. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor’s p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles’ LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90–300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  1. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor's p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles' LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90-300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  2. Transcriptional Adaptation of Drug-tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis During Treatment of Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Nicholas D.; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Worodria, William; Andama, Alfred; Musisi, Emmanuel; Ayakaka, Irene; Van, Tran T.; Voskuil, Martin I.; de Jong, Bouke C.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Kechris, Katerina; Palmer, Claire; Nahid, Payam; Daley, Charles L.; Geraci, Mark; Huang, Laurence; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Strong, Michael; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Davis, John Lucian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treatment initiation rapidly kills most drug-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but a bacterial subpopulation tolerates prolonged drug exposure. We evaluated drug-tolerant bacilli in human sputum by comparing messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of drug-tolerant bacilli that survive the early bactericidal phase with treatment-naive bacilli. Methods. M. tuberculosis gene expression was quantified via reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in serial sputa from 17 Ugandans treated for drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis. Results. Within 4 days, bacterial mRNA abundance declined >98%, indicating rapid killing. Thereafter, the rate of decline slowed >94%, indicating drug tolerance. After 14 days, 16S ribosomal RNA transcripts/genome declined 96%, indicating slow growth. Drug-tolerant bacilli displayed marked downregulation of genes associated with growth, metabolism, and lipid synthesis and upregulation in stress responses and key regulatory categories—including stress-associated sigma factors, transcription factors, and toxin-antitoxin genes. Drug efflux pumps were upregulated. The isoniazid stress signature was induced by initial drug exposure, then disappeared after 4 days. Conclusions. Transcriptional patterns suggest that drug-tolerant bacilli in sputum are in a slow-growing, metabolically and synthetically downregulated state. Absence of the isoniazid stress signature in drug-tolerant bacilli indicates that physiological state influences drug responsiveness in vivo. These results identify novel drug targets that should aid in development of novel shorter tuberculosis treatment regimens. PMID:25762787

  3. Early Transcriptional Signatures of the Immune Response to a Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Candidate in Non-human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Strouts, Fiona R.; Popper, Stephen J.; Partidos, Charalambos D.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Relman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of a vaccine against dengue faces unique challenges, including the complexity of the immune responses to the four antigenically distinct serotypes. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling provides insight into the pathways and molecular features that underlie responses to immune system stimulation, and may facilitate predictions of immune protection. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we measured early transcriptional responses in the peripheral blood of cynomolgus macaques following vaccination with a live, attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate, TDV, which is based on a DENV-2 backbone. Different doses and routes of vaccine administration were used, and viral load and neutralizing antibody titers were measured at different time-points following vaccination. All 30 vaccinated animals developed a neutralizing antibody response to each of the four dengue serotypes, and only 3 of these animals had detectable serum viral RNA after challenge with wild-type dengue virus (DENV), suggesting protection of vaccinated animals to DENV infection. The vaccine induced statistically significant changes in 595 gene transcripts on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 as compared with baseline and placebo-treated animals. Genes involved in the type I interferon (IFN) response, including IFI44, DDX58, MX1 and OASL, exhibited the highest fold-change in transcript abundance, and this response was strongest following double dose and subcutaneous (versus intradermal) vaccine administration. In addition, modules of genes involved in antigen presentation, dendritic cell activation, and T cell activation and signaling were enriched following vaccination. Increased abundance of gene transcripts related to T cell activation on day 5, and the type I IFN response on day 7, were significantly correlated with the development of high neutralizing antibody titers on day 30. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that early transcriptional responses may be

  4. Dissecting the Transcriptional Response to Elicitors in Vitis vinifera Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Bru, Roque; Martínez-Zapater, José M.; Lijavetzky, Diego; Pedreño, María A.

    2014-01-01

    The high effectiveness of cyclic oligosaccharides like cyclodextrins in the production of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera cell cultures is enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate. In order to dissect the basis of the interactions among the elicitation responses triggered by these two compounds, a transcriptional analysis of grapevine cell cultures treated with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate separately or in combination was carried out. The results showed that the activation of genes encoding enzymes from phenylpropanoid and stilbene biosynthesis induced by cyclodextrins alone was partially enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate, which correlated with their effects on trans-resveratrol production. In addition, protein translation and cell cycle regulation were more highly repressed in cells treated with cyclodextrins than in those treated with methyl jasmonate, and this response was enhanced in the combined treatment. Ethylene signalling was activated by all treatments, while jasmonate signalling and salicylic acid conjugation were activated only in the presence of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, respectively. Moreover, the combined treatment resulted in a crosstalk between the signalling cascades activated by cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate, which, in turn, provoked the activation of additional regulatory pathways involving the up-regulation of MYB15, NAC and WRKY transcription factors, protein kinases and calcium signal transducers. All these results suggest that both elicitors cause an activation of the secondary metabolism in detriment of basic cell processes like the primary metabolism or cell division. Crosstalk between cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate-induced signalling provokes an intensification of these responses resulting in a greater trans-resveratrol production. PMID:25314001

  5. Genome-wide transcriptional response of an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) pst mutant

    PubMed Central

    Crépin, Sébastien; Lamarche, Martin G; Garneau, Philippe; Séguin, Julie; Proulx, Julie; Dozois, Charles M; Harel, Josée

    2008-01-01

    Background Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) are associated with extraintestinal diseases in poultry. The pstSCAB-phoU operon belongs to the Pho regulon and encodes the phosphate specific transport (Pst) system. A functional Pst system is required for full virulence in APEC and other bacteria and contributes to resistance of APEC to serum, to cationic antimicrobial peptides and acid shock. The global mechanisms contributing to the attenuation and decreased resistance of the APEC pst mutant to environmental stresses have not been investigated at the transcriptional level. To determine the global effect of a pst mutation on gene expression, we compared the transcriptomes of APEC strain χ7122 and its isogenic pst mutant (K3) grown in phosphate-rich medium. Results Overall, 470 genes were differentially expressed by at least 1.5-fold. Interestingly, the pst mutant not only induced systems involved in phosphate acquisition and metabolism, despite phosphate availability, but also modulated stress response mechanisms. Indeed, transcriptional changes in genes associated with the general stress responses, including the oxidative stress response were among the major differences observed. Accordingly, the K3 strain was less resistant to reactive oxygen species (ROS) than the wild-type strain. In addition, the pst mutant demonstrated reduced expression of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide modifications and coding for cell surface components such as type 1 and F9 fimbriae. Phenotypic tests also established that the pst mutant was impaired in its capacity to produce type 1 fimbriae, as demonstrated by western blotting and agglutination of yeast cells, when compared to wild-type APEC strain χ7122. Conclusion Overall, our data elucidated the effects of a pst mutation on the transcriptional response, and further support the role of the Pho regulon as part of a complex network contributing to phosphate homeostasis, adaptive stress responses, and E. coli virulence. PMID:19038054

  6. Adaptation potential of European agriculture in response to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Frances C.; Lobell, David B.

    2014-07-01

    Projecting the impacts of climate change on agriculture requires knowing or assuming how farmers will adapt. However, empirical estimates of the effectiveness of this private adaptation are scarce and the sensitivity of impact assessments to adaptation assumptions is not well understood. Here we assess the potential effectiveness of private farmer adaptation in Europe by jointly estimating both short-run and long-run response functions using time-series and cross-sectional variation in subnational yield and profit data. The difference between the impacts of climate change projected using the short-run (limited adaptation) and long-run (substantial adaptation) response curves can be interpreted as the private adaptation potential. We find high adaptation potential for maize to future warming but large negative effects and only limited adaptation potential for wheat and barley. Overall, agricultural profits could increase slightly under climate change if farmers adapt but could decrease in many areas if there is no adaptation. Decomposing the variance in 2040 projected yields and farm profits using an ensemble of 13 climate model runs, we find that the rate at which farmers will adapt to rising temperatures is an important source of uncertainty.

  7. Computational Discovery of Transcription Factors Associated With Drug Response

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Casey; Cairns, Junmei; Wang, Liewei; Sinha, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    This study integrates gene expression, genotype, and drug response data in lymphoblastoid cell lines with transcription factor (TF) binding sites from ENCODE, in a novel methodology that elucidates regulatory contexts associated with cytotoxicity. The method, GENMi, postulates that SNPs within TF binding sites putatively modulate its regulatory activity, and the resulting variation in gene expression leads to variation in drug response. Analysis of 161 TFs and 24 treatments revealed 334 significantly associated TF-treatment pairs. Investigation of 20 selected pairs yielded literature support for 13 of these associations, often from studies where perturbation of the TF’s expression changes drug response. Experimental validation of significant GENMi associations in taxanes and anthracyclines across two triple negative breast cancer cell lines corroborates our findings. The method is shown to be more sensitive than an alternative, GWAS-based approach that does not use gene expression. These results demonstrate GENMi’s utility in identifying TFs that influence drug response and provide a number of candidates for further testing. PMID:26503816

  8. Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses from copepod hosts.

    PubMed

    Almada, Amalia A; Tarrant, Ann M

    2016-06-01

    Copepods are abundant crustaceans that harbor diverse bacterial communities, yet the nature of their interactions with microbiota are poorly understood. Here, we report that Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses in the estuarine copepod Eurytemora affinis We pre-treated E. affinis with an antibiotic cocktail and exposed them to either a zooplankton specialist (Vibrio sp. F10 9ZB36) or a free-living species (Vibrio ordalii 12B09) for 24 h. We then identified via RNA-Seq a total of 78 genes that were differentially expressed following Vibrio exposure, including homologs of C-type lectins, chitin-binding proteins and saposins. The response differed between the two Vibrio treatments, with the greatest changes elicited upon inoculation with V. sp. F10 We suggest that these differentially regulated genes play important roles in cuticle integrity, the innate immune response, and general stress response, and that their expression may enable E. affinis to recognize and regulate symbiotic vibrios. We further report that V. sp. F10 culturability is specifically altered upon colonization of E. affinis These findings suggest that rather than acting as passive environmental vectors, copepods discriminately interact with vibrios, which may ultimately impact the abundance and activity of copepod-associated bacteria. PMID:27056917

  9. Binding of Transcription Factors Adapts to Resolve Information-Energy Tradeoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savir, Yonatan; Kagan, Jacob; Tlusty, Tsvi

    2016-03-01

    We examine the binding of transcription factors to DNA in terms of an information transfer problem. The input of the noisy channel is the biophysical signal of a factor bound to a DNA site, and the output is a distribution of probable DNA sequences at this site. This task involves an inherent tradeoff between the information gain and the energetics of the binding interaction—high binding energies provide higher information gain but hinder the dynamics of the system as factors are bound too tightly. We show that adaptation of the binding interaction towards increasing information transfer under a general energy constraint implies that the information gain per specific binding energy at each base-pair is maximized. We analyze hundreds of prokaryote and eukaryote transcription factors from various organisms to evaluate the discrimination energies. We find that, in accordance with our theoretical argument, binding energies nearly maximize the information gain per energy. This work suggests the adaptation of information gain as a generic design principle of molecular recognition systems.

  10. Furospinosulin-1, Marine Spongean Furanosesterterpene, Suppresses the Growth of Hypoxia-Adapted Cancer Cells by Binding to Transcriptional Regulators p54(nrb) and LEDGF/p75.

    PubMed

    Arai, Masayoshi; Kawachi, Takashi; Kotoku, Naoyuki; Nakata, Chiaki; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Endo, Hiroko; Inoue, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-adapted cancer cells in tumors contribute to the pathological progression of cancer. Cancer research has therefore focused on the identification of molecules responsible for hypoxia adaptation in cancer cells, as well as the development of new compounds with action against hypoxia-adapted cancer cells. The marine natural product furospinosulin-1 (1) has displayed hypoxia-selective growth inhibition against cultured cancer cells, and has shown in vivo anti-tumor activity, although its precise mode of action and molecular targets remain unclear. In this study, we found that 1 is selectively effective against hypoxic regions of tumors, and that it directly binds to the transcriptional regulators p54(nrb) and LEDGF/p75, which have not been previously identified as mediators of hypoxia adaptation in cancer cells. PMID:26561285

  11. Transcriptional response to petiole heat girdling in cassava

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Zehong; Ma, Fangfang; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Allen, Doug K.; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming; Li, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    To examine the interactions of starch and sugar metabolism on photosynthesis in cassava, a heat-girdling treatment was applied to petioles of cassava leaves at the end of the light cycle to inhibit starch remobilization during the night. The inhibition of starch remobilization caused significant starch accumulation at the beginning of the light cycle, inhibited photosynthesis, and affected intracellular sugar levels. RNA-seq analysis of heat-treated and control plants revealed significantly decreased expression of genes related to photosynthesis, as well as N-metabolism and chlorophyll biosynthesis. However, expression of genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondria electron transport components, and flavonoid biosynthetic pathway enzymes were induced. These studies reveal a dynamic transcriptional response to perturbation of sink demand in a single leaf, and provide useful information for understanding the regulations of cassava under sink or source limitation. PMID:25672661

  12. Transcriptional response to petiole heat girdling in cassava.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Zehong; Ma, Fangfang; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Allen, Doug K; Brutnell, Thomas P; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming; Li, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    To examine the interactions of starch and sugar metabolism on photosynthesis in cassava, a heat-girdling treatment was applied to petioles of cassava leaves at the end of the light cycle to inhibit starch remobilization during the night. The inhibition of starch remobilization caused significant starch accumulation at the beginning of the light cycle, inhibited photosynthesis, and affected intracellular sugar levels. RNA-seq analysis of heat-treated and control plants revealed significantly decreased expression of genes related to photosynthesis, as well as N-metabolism and chlorophyll biosynthesis. However, expression of genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondria electron transport components, and flavonoid biosynthetic pathway enzymes were induced. These studies reveal a dynamic transcriptional response to perturbation of sink demand in a single leaf, and provide useful information for understanding the regulations of cassava under sink or source limitation. PMID:25672661

  13. MHC class II transcription is associated with inflammatory responses in a wild marine mammal.

    PubMed

    Montano-Frías, Jorge E; Vera-Massieu, Camila; Álvarez-Martínez, Roberto; Flores-Morán, Adriana; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important non-specific and rapid responses that a vertebrate can elicit in response to damage or a foreign insult. To date, despite increasing evidence that the innate and adaptive branches of immunity are more intricately related than previously thought, few have examined interactions between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, a polymorphic region of the vertebrate genome that is involved with antigen presentation) and inflammation, and even less is known about these interactions in an eco-immunological context. Here, we examined the effect of MHC class II DRB gene multiplicity and transcription on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced inflammation during the early stages of development of California sea lions. Neither constitutive nor expressed ZacaDRB diversity was found to be associated with pup responses to PHA at any of the stages of pup development. However, for two-month-old pups, those with a specific MHC-DRB locus (ZacaDRB-A) tended to have less efficient responsive inflammation. Transcription of distinct MHC-DRB loci was also linked to PHA-induced inflammation, with patterns that varied markedly between ages, and that suggested that ongoing infectious processes could limit the capacity to respond to a secondary challenge. Life history constraints and physiological processes associated with development of California sea lions, in conjunction with their changing pathogenic environment could explain the observed effects of MHC class II transcription on PHA-induced inflammation. To our knowledge, ours is the first study to examine the importance of expressed vs. constitutive MHC loci on inflammation in a natural population. PMID:27137083

  14. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Stress-Induced Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Taymaz-Nikerel, Hilal; Cankorur-Cetinkaya, Ayca; Kirdar, Betul

    2016-01-01

    Cells respond to environmental and/or genetic perturbations in order to survive and proliferate. Characterization of the changes after various stimuli at different -omics levels is crucial to comprehend the adaptation of cells to the changing conditions. Genome-wide quantification and analysis of transcript levels, the genes affected by perturbations, extends our understanding of cellular metabolism by pointing out the mechanisms that play role in sensing the stress caused by those perturbations and related signaling pathways, and in this way guides us to achieve endeavors, such as rational engineering of cells or interpretation of disease mechanisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system has been studied in response to different perturbations and corresponding transcriptional profiles were followed either statically or/and dynamically, short and long term. This review focuses on response of yeast cells to diverse stress inducing perturbations, including nutritional changes, ionic stress, salt stress, oxidative stress, osmotic shock, and to genetic interventions such as deletion and overexpression of genes. It is aimed to conclude on common regulatory phenomena that allow yeast to organize its transcriptomic response after any perturbation under different external conditions. PMID:26925399

  15. Transcriptional profiling of Petunia seedlings reveals candidate regulators of the cold stress response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Ning, Luyun; Zhang, Junwei; Bao, Manzhu; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Petunias are important ornamentals with the capacity for cold acclimation. So far, there is limited information concerning gene regulation and signaling pathways associated with the cold stress response in petunias. A custom-designed petunia microarray representing 24816 genes was used to perform transcriptome profiling in petunia seedlings subjected to cold at 2°C for 0.5 h, 2 h, 24 h, and 5 d. A total of 2071 transcripts displayed differential expression patterns under cold stress, of which 1149 were up-regulated and 922 were down-regulated. Gene ontology enrichment analysis demarcated related biological processes, suggesting a possible link between flavonoid metabolism and plant adaptation to low temperatures. Many novel stress-responsive regulators were revealed, suggesting that diverse regulatory pathways may exist in petunias in addition to the well-characterized CBF pathway. The expression changes of selected genes under cold and other abiotic stress conditions were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, weighted gene co-expression network analysis divided the petunia genes on the array into 65 modules that showed high co-expression and identified stress-specific hub genes with high connectivity. Our identification of these transcriptional responses and groups of differentially expressed regulators will facilitate the functional dissection of the molecular mechanism in petunias responding to environment stresses and extend our ability to improve cold tolerance in plants. PMID:25784921

  16. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling of the Escherichia coli Responses to Superoxide Stress and Sodium Salicylate

    PubMed Central

    Pomposiello, Pablo J.; Bennik, Marjon H. J.; Demple, Bruce

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli responds to oxidative stress by activating sets of coregulated genes that help the cell to maintain homeostasis. Identified previously by genetic and biochemical approaches, the soxRS system mediates the induction of 18 of these redox-inducible genes (including the soxS gene itself). An overlapping set of genes is activated by an assortment of structurally unrelated molecules with antibiotic activities; many genes in this response are controlled by the marRAB system. The activation of either the soxRS or the marRAB system results in enhanced resistance to both superoxide-generating agents and multiple antibiotics. In order to probe the extent of these regulatory networks, we have measured whole-genome transcriptional profiles of the E. coli response to the superoxide-generating agent paraquat (PQ), an inducer of the soxRS system, and to the weak acid salt sodium salicylate (NaSal), an inducer of the marRA system. A total of 112 genes was modulated in response to PQ, while 134 genes were modulated in response to NaSal. We have also obtained transcriptional profiles of the SoxS and MarA regulons in the absence of global stress, in order to establish the regulatory hierarchies within the global responses. Several previously unrelated genes were shown to be under SoxS or MarA control. The genetic responses to both environmental insults revealed several common themes, including the activation of genes coding for functions that replenish reducing potential; regulate iron transport and storage; and participate in sugar and amino acid transport, detoxification, protein modification, osmotic protection, and peptidoglycan synthesis. A large number of PQ- and NaSal-responsive genes have no known function, suggesting that many adaptive metabolic changes that ensue after stress remain uncharacterized. PMID:11395452

  17. A Sharing Item Response Theory Model for Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2004-01-01

    A new sharing item response theory (SIRT) model is presented that explicitly models the effects of sharing item content between informants and test takers. This model is used to construct adaptive item selection and scoring rules that provide increased precision and reduced score gains in instances where sharing occurs. The adaptive item selection…

  18. Responsiveness-to-Intervention: A "Systems" Approach to Instructional Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Douglas; Fuchs, Lynn S.

    2016-01-01

    Classroom research on adaptive teaching indicates few teachers modify instruction for at-risk students in a manner that benefits them. Responsiveness-To-Intervention, with its tiers of increasingly intensive instruction, represents an alternative approach to adaptive instruction that may prove more workable in today's schools.

  19. Physiological and transcriptional responses and cross protection of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 under acid stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renhui; Pan, Mingfang; Wan, Cuixiang; Shah, Nagendra P; Tao, Xueying; Wei, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Acid tolerance responses (ATR) in Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 were investigated at physiological and molecular levels. A comparison of composition of cell membrane fatty acids (CMFA) between acid-challenged and unchallenged cells showed that acid adaptation evoked a significantly higher percentage of saturated fatty acids and cyclopropane fatty acids in acid-challenged than in unchallenged cells. In addition, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR analysis in acid-adapted cells at different pH values (ranging from 3.0 to 4.0) indicated that several genes were differently regulated, including those related to proton pumps, amino acid metabolism, sugar metabolism, and class I and class III stress response pathways. Expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and production of alkali was significantly upregulated. Upon exposure to pH 4.5 for 2 h, a higher survival rate (higher viable cell count) of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 was achieved following an additional challenge to 40 mM hydrogen peroxide for 60 min, but no difference in survival rate of cells was found with further challenge to heat, ethanol, or salt. Therefore, we concluded that the physiological and metabolic changes of acid-treated cells of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 help the cells resist damage caused by acid, and further initiated global response signals to bring the whole cell into a state of defense to other stress factors, especially hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26627851

  20. Transcriptional profiling of foam cells in response to hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Goo, Young-Hwa; Yechoor, Vijay K; Paul, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a main risk factor for atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophages, or foam cells, take-up and process lipoprotein particles deposited in arteries, and store much of the cholesterol carried by these particles in their cytoplasm. However, the effects of exposure to different cholesterol levels on foam cells remain poorly understood. Given the remarkable plasticity of macrophages in response to environmental variables, studies on macrophage biology should ideally be performed in the environment where they exert their physiological functions, namely atherosclerotic lesions in the case of foam cells. We used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse, to study in vivo the transcriptional response of foam cells to short- and long-term elevations in plasma cholesterol, induced by feeding mice a western type diet. The microarray data sets from this study have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus under the accession number GSE70619. Here we provide detailed information on the experimental set-up, on the isolation of RNA by laser capture microdissection, and on the methodology used for RNA amplification and analysis by microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. PMID:27408807

  1. Dynamic Mechanism for the Transcription Apparatus Orchestrating Reliable Responses to Activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaolai; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2012-05-01

    The transcription apparatus (TA) is a huge molecular machine. It detects the time-varying concentrations of transcriptional activators and initiates mRNA transcripts at appropriate rates. Based on the general structural organizations of the TA, we propose how the TA dynamically orchestrates transcriptional responses. The activators rapidly cycle in and out of a clamp-like space temporarily formed between the enhancer and the Mediator, with the concentration of activators encoded as their temporal occupancy rate (RTOR) within the space. The entry of activators into this space induces allostery in the Mediator, resulting in a facilitated circumstance for transcriptional reinitiation. The reinitiation rate is much larger than the cycling rate of activators, thereby RTOR guiding the amount of transcripts. Based on this mechanism, stochastic simulations can qualitatively reproduce and interpret multiple features of gene expression, e.g., transcriptional bursting is not mere noise as traditionally believed, but rather the basis of reliable transcriptional responses.

  2. Transcriptional response of yellow perch to changes in ambient metal concentrations-A reciprocal field transplantation experiment.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Bérénice; Normandeau, Eric; Grasset, Julie; Defo, Michel A; Campbell, Peter G C; Couture, Patrice; Bernatchez, Louis

    2016-04-01

    Recent local adaptation to pollution has been evidenced in several organisms inhabiting environments heavily contaminated by metals. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation to high metal concentrations are poorly understood, especially in fishes. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) populations from lakes in the mining area of Rouyn-Noranda (QC, Canada) have been faced with metal contamination for about 90 years. Here, we examine gene transcription patterns of fish reciprocally transplanted between a reference and a metal-contaminated lake and also fish caged in their native lake. After four weeks, 111 genes were differentially transcribed in metal-naïve fish transferred to the metal-contaminated lake, revealing a plastic response to metal exposure. Genes involved in the citric cycle and beta-oxidation pathways were under-transcribed, suggesting a potential strategy to mitigate the effects of metal stress by reducing energy turnover. However, metal-contaminated fish transplanted to the reference lake did not show any transcriptomic response, indicating a reduced plastic response capability to sudden reduction in metal concentrations. Moreover, the transcription of other genes, especially ones involved in energy metabolism, was affected by caging. Overall, our results highlight environmental stress response mechanisms in yellow perch at the transcriptomic level and support a rapid adaptive response to metal exposure through genetic assimilation. PMID:26867186

  3. Contribution of transcript stability to a conserved procyanidin-induced cytokine response in γδT cells1

    PubMed Central

    Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Holderness, Jeff; Graff, Jill C.; Hedges, Jodi F.; Freedman, Brett; Graff, Joel W.; Jutila, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells function in innate and adaptive immunity and are primed for secondary responses by procyanidin components of unripe apple peel (APP). Here we investigate the effects of APP and purified procyanidins on γ δ T cell gene expression. A microarray analysis was performed on bovine γ δ T cells treated with APP; increases in transcripts encoding GM-CSF, IL-8, and IL-17, but not markers of TCR stimulation such as IFNγ , were observed. Key responses were confirmed in human, mouse, and bovine cells by RT-PCR and/or ELISA, indicating a conserved response to procyanidins. In vivo relevance of the cytokine response was shown in mice following intraperitoneal injection of APP, which induced production of CXCL1/KC and resulted in neutrophil influx to the blood and peritoneum. In the human γ δ T cell-line, MOLT-14, GM-CSF and IL-8 transcripts were increased and stabilized in cells treated with crude APP or purified procyanidins. The ERK1/2 MAPK pathway was activated in APP-treated cells, and necessary for transcript stabilization. Our data describe a unique γ δ T cell inflammatory response during procyanidin treatment and suggest that transcript stability mechanisms could account, at least in part, for the priming phenotype. PMID:21307878

  4. Using Response Times for Item Selection in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Response times on items can be used to improve item selection in adaptive testing provided that a probabilistic model for their distribution is available. In this research, the author used a hierarchical modeling framework with separate first-level models for the responses and response times and a second-level model for the distribution of the…

  5. MULTIPASS, a rice R2R3-type MYB transcription factor, regulates adaptive growth by integrating multiple hormonal pathways.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Romy; Schippers, Jos H M; Mieulet, Delphine; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Growth regulation is an important aspect of plant adaptation during environmental perturbations. Here, the role of MULTIPASS (OsMPS), an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor of rice, was explored. OsMPS is induced by salt stress and expressed in vegetative and reproductive tissues. Over-expression of OsMPS reduces growth under non-stress conditions, while knockdown plants display increased biomass. OsMPS expression is induced by abscisic acid and cytokinin, but is repressed by auxin, gibberellin and brassinolide. Growth retardation caused by OsMPS over-expression is partially restored by auxin application. Expression profiling revealed that OsMPS negatively regulates the expression of EXPANSIN (EXP) and cell-wall biosynthesis as well as phytohormone signaling genes. Furthermore, the expression of OsMPS-dependent genes is regulated by auxin, cytokinin and abscisic acid. Moreover, we show that OsMPS is a direct upstream regulator of OsEXPA4, OsEXPA8, OsEXPB2, OsEXPB3, OsEXPB6 and the endoglucanase genes OsGLU5 and OsGLU14. The multiple responses of OsMPS and its target genes to various hormones suggest an integrative function of OsMPS in the cross-talk between phytohormones and the environment to regulate adaptive growth. PMID:23855375

  6. Transcriptional reprogramming and phenotypic switching associated with the adaptation of Lactobacillus plantarum C2 to plant niches

    PubMed Central

    Filannino, Pasquale; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Crecchio, Carmine; De Virgilio, Caterina; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum has been isolated from a large variety of ecological niches, thus highlighting its remarkable environmental adaptability as a generalist. Plant fermentation conditions markedly affect the functional features of L. plantarum strains. We investigated the plant niche-specific traits of L. plantarum through whole-transcriptome and phenotypic microarray profiles. Carrot (CJ) and pineapple (PJ) juices were chosen as model systems, and MRS broth was used as a control. A set of 3,122 genes was expressed, and 21 to 31% of genes were differentially expressed depending on the plant niche and cell physiological state. L. plantarum C2 seemed to specifically respond to plant media conditions. When L. plantarum was cultured in CJ, useful pathways were activated, which were aimed to sense the environment, save energy and adopt alternative routes for NAD+ regeneration. In PJ the acidic environment caused a transcriptional switching, which was network-linked to an acid tolerance response involving carbohydrate flow, amino acid and protein metabolism, pH homeostasis and membrane fluidity. The most prominent phenotypic dissimilarities observed in cells grown in CJ and PJ were related to carbon and nitrogen metabolism, respectively. Summarising, a snapshot of a carrot and pineapple sensing and adaptive regulation model for L. plantarum C2 was proposed. PMID:27273017

  7. Transcriptional reprogramming and phenotypic switching associated with the adaptation of Lactobacillus plantarum C2 to plant niches.

    PubMed

    Filannino, Pasquale; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Crecchio, Carmine; De Virgilio, Caterina; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum has been isolated from a large variety of ecological niches, thus highlighting its remarkable environmental adaptability as a generalist. Plant fermentation conditions markedly affect the functional features of L. plantarum strains. We investigated the plant niche-specific traits of L. plantarum through whole-transcriptome and phenotypic microarray profiles. Carrot (CJ) and pineapple (PJ) juices were chosen as model systems, and MRS broth was used as a control. A set of 3,122 genes was expressed, and 21 to 31% of genes were differentially expressed depending on the plant niche and cell physiological state. L. plantarum C2 seemed to specifically respond to plant media conditions. When L. plantarum was cultured in CJ, useful pathways were activated, which were aimed to sense the environment, save energy and adopt alternative routes for NAD(+) regeneration. In PJ the acidic environment caused a transcriptional switching, which was network-linked to an acid tolerance response involving carbohydrate flow, amino acid and protein metabolism, pH homeostasis and membrane fluidity. The most prominent phenotypic dissimilarities observed in cells grown in CJ and PJ were related to carbon and nitrogen metabolism, respectively. Summarising, a snapshot of a carrot and pineapple sensing and adaptive regulation model for L. plantarum C2 was proposed. PMID:27273017

  8. Static and dynamic responses of an ultrathin adaptive secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Vecchio, Ciro; Brusa, Guido; Gallieni, Daniele; Lloyd-Hart, Michael; Davison, Warren B.

    1999-09-01

    We present the results of a compete set of static and dynamic runs of the FEA model of the MMT adaptive secondary. The thin mirror is the most delicate component of the MMT adaptive secondary unit, as it provides the deformable optical surface able to correct the incoming wavefront. The static performances are evaluated as a function of the various load cases arising form gravitational loads and from the forces deriving from the magnetic interactions between actuators. In addition, computations were performed to assess the dynamic response to the high bandwidth, adaptive correcting force.s In both cases, the performances of the adaptive mirror design are able to accommodate the severe specifications.

  9. Exposure to stressful environments - Strategy of adaptive responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhi, Leon E.

    1991-01-01

    Stresses such as hypoxia, water lack, and heat exposure can produce strains in more than a single organ system, in turn stimulating the body to adapt in multiple ways. Nevertheless, a general strategy of the various adaptive responses emerges when the challenges are divided into three groups: (1) conditions that affect the supply of essential molecules, (2) stresses that prevent the body from regulating properly the output of waste products such as CO2 and heat, and (3) environments that disrupt body transport systems. Problems may arise when there is a conflict between two stresses requiring conflicting adaptive changes. An alternative to adaptation, creation of microenvironment, is often favored by the animal.

  10. Transcriptional responses of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) to low temperature.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinwei; You, Feng; Wang, Qian; Weng, Shenda; Liu, Hui; Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Pei-Jun; Tan, Xungang

    2014-01-01

    The olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is an economically important flatfish in marine aquaculture with a broad thermal tolerance ranging from 14 to 23°C. Cold-tolerant flounder that can survive during the winter season at a temperature of less than 14°C might facilitate the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the response to cold stress. In this study, the transcriptional response of flounder to cold stress (0.7±0.05°C) was characterized using RNA sequencing. Transcriptome sequencing was performed using the Illumina MiSeq platform for the cold-tolerant (CT) group, which survived under the cold stress; the cold-sensitive (CS) group, which could barely survive at the low temperature; and control group, which was not subjected to cold treatment. In all, 29,021 unigenes were generated. Compared with the unigene expression profile of the control group, 410 unigenes were up-regulated and 255 unigenes were down-regulated in the CT group, whereas 593 unigenes were up-regulated and 289 unigenes were down-regulated in the CS group. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses revealed that signal transduction, lipid metabolism, digestive system, and signaling molecules and interaction were the most highly enriched pathways for the genes that were differentially expressed under cold stress. All these pathways could be assigned to the following four biological functions for flounder that can survive under cold stress: signal response to cold stress, cell repair/regeneration, energy production, and cell membrane construction and fluidity. PMID:25279944

  11. Transcriptional Responses of Olive Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) to Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinwei; You, Feng; Wang, Qian; Weng, Shenda; Liu, Hui; Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Pei-Jun; Tan, Xungang

    2014-01-01

    The olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is an economically important flatfish in marine aquaculture with a broad thermal tolerance ranging from 14 to 23°C. Cold-tolerant flounder that can survive during the winter season at a temperature of less than 14°C might facilitate the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the response to cold stress. In this study, the transcriptional response of flounder to cold stress (0.7±0.05°C) was characterized using RNA sequencing. Transcriptome sequencing was performed using the Illumina MiSeq platform for the cold-tolerant (CT) group, which survived under the cold stress; the cold-sensitive (CS) group, which could barely survive at the low temperature; and control group, which was not subjected to cold treatment. In all, 29,021 unigenes were generated. Compared with the unigene expression profile of the control group, 410 unigenes were up-regulated and 255 unigenes were down-regulated in the CT group, whereas 593 unigenes were up-regulated and 289 unigenes were down-regulated in the CS group. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses revealed that signal transduction, lipid metabolism, digestive system, and signaling molecules and interaction were the most highly enriched pathways for the genes that were differentially expressed under cold stress. All these pathways could be assigned to the following four biological functions for flounder that can survive under cold stress: signal response to cold stress, cell repair/regeneration, energy production, and cell membrane construction and fluidity. PMID:25279944

  12. E. coli 6S RNA: a universal transcriptional regulator within the centre of growth adaptation.

    PubMed

    Geissen, René; Steuten, Benedikt; Polen, Tino; Wagner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial 6S RNA has been shown to bind with high affinity to σ(70)-containing RNA polymerase, suppressing σ(70)-dependent transcription during stationary phase, when 6S RNA concentrations are highest. We recently reported a genome-wide transcriptional comparison of wild-type and 6S RNA deficient E. coli strains. Contrary to the expected σ(70)- and stationary phase-specific regulatory effect of 6S RNA it turned out that mRNA levels derived from many alternative sigma factors, including σ(38) or σ(32), were affected during exponential and stationary growth. Among the most noticeably down-regulated genes at stationary growth are ribosomal proteins and factors involved in translation. In addition, a striking number of mRNA levels coding for enzymes involved in the purine metabolism, for transporters and stress regulators are altered both during log- and stationary phase. During the study we discovered a link between 6S RNA and the general stress alarmone ppGpp, which has a higher basal level in cells deficient in 6S RNA. This finding points to a functional interrelation of 6S RNA and the global network of stress and growth adaptation. PMID:20930516

  13. Post-transcriptional methylation of transfer and ribosomal RNA in stress response pathways, cell differentiation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review Significant advances have been made in understanding the functional roles of evolutionary conserved chemical modifications in RNA. By focusing on cytosine-5 methylation, we will highlight the latest insight into the mechanisms how post-transcriptional methylation contributes cell fate decisions, with implications for cancer development. Recent findings Several mutations in RNA-modifying enzymes have been identified to cause complex human diseases, and linked post-transcriptional modifications to fundamental cellular processes. Distinct post-transcriptional modifications are implicated in the regulation of stem cell maintenance and cellular differentiation. The dynamic deposition of a methyl mark into non-coding RNAs modulates the adaptive cellular responses to stress and alterations of methylation levels may lead to cancer. PMID:26599292

  14. Transcriptional cross talk between orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ and transmembrane transcription factor ATF6α coordinates endoplasmic reticulum stress response

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Jagannath; Kim, Don-Kyu; Choi, Woogyun; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Lee, Chul-Ho; Back, Sung-Hoon; Kaufman, Randal J.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ is a member of nuclear receptor superfamily that regulates several important cellular processes including hepatic glucose and alcohol metabolism. However, mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation of the ERRγ gene remains to be elucidated. Here, we report that activating transcription factor 6α (ATF6α), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-membrane–bound basic leucine zipper (bZip) transcription factor, directly regulates ERRγ gene expression in response to ER stress. ATF6α binds to ATF6α responsive element in the ERRγ promoter. The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α) is required for this transactivation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay confirmed the binding of both ATF6α and PGC1α on the ERRγ promoter. ChIP assay demonstrated histone H3 and H4 acetylation occurs at the ATF6α and PGC1α binding site. Of interest, ERRγ along with PGC1α induce ATF6α gene transcription upon ER stress. ERRγ binds to an ERRγ responsive element in the ATF6α promoter. ChIP assay confirmed that both ERRγ and PGC1α bind to a site in the ATF6α promoter that exhibits histone H3 and H4 acetylation. Overall, for the first time our data show a novel pathway of cross talk between nuclear receptors and ER-membrane–bound transcription factors and suggest a positive feed-forward loop regulates ERRγ and ATF6α gene transcription. PMID:23716639

  15. Transcriptional cross talk between orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ and transmembrane transcription factor ATF6α coordinates endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    PubMed

    Misra, Jagannath; Kim, Don-Kyu; Choi, Woogyun; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Lee, Chul-Ho; Back, Sung-Hoon; Kaufman, Randal J; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-08-01

    Orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ is a member of nuclear receptor superfamily that regulates several important cellular processes including hepatic glucose and alcohol metabolism. However, mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation of the ERRγ gene remains to be elucidated. Here, we report that activating transcription factor 6α (ATF6α), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-membrane-bound basic leucine zipper (bZip) transcription factor, directly regulates ERRγ gene expression in response to ER stress. ATF6α binds to ATF6α responsive element in the ERRγ promoter. The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α) is required for this transactivation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay confirmed the binding of both ATF6α and PGC1α on the ERRγ promoter. ChIP assay demonstrated histone H3 and H4 acetylation occurs at the ATF6α and PGC1α binding site. Of interest, ERRγ along with PGC1α induce ATF6α gene transcription upon ER stress. ERRγ binds to an ERRγ responsive element in the ATF6α promoter. ChIP assay confirmed that both ERRγ and PGC1α bind to a site in the ATF6α promoter that exhibits histone H3 and H4 acetylation. Overall, for the first time our data show a novel pathway of cross talk between nuclear receptors and ER-membrane-bound transcription factors and suggest a positive feed-forward loop regulates ERRγ and ATF6α gene transcription. PMID:23716639

  16. A Shoot-Specific Hypoxic Response of Arabidopsis Sheds Light on the Role of the Phosphate-Responsive Transcription Factor PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE11[W

    PubMed Central

    Klecker, Maria; Gasch, Philipp; Peisker, Helga; Dörmann, Peter; Schlicke, Hagen; Grimm, Bernhard; Mustroph, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses are often very specific, but signal transduction pathways can partially or completely overlap. Here, we demonstrate that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the transcriptional responses to phosphate starvation and oxygen deficiency stress comprise a set of commonly induced genes. While the phosphate deficiency response is systemic, under oxygen deficiency, most of the commonly induced genes are found only in illuminated shoots. This jointly induced response to the two stresses is under control of the transcription factor PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE1 (PHR1), but not of the oxygen-sensing N-end rule pathway, and includes genes encoding proteins for the synthesis of galactolipids, which replace phospholipids in plant membranes under phosphate starvation. Despite the induction of galactolipid synthesis genes, total galactolipid content and plant survival are not severely affected by the up-regulation of galactolipid gene expression in illuminated leaves during hypoxia. However, changes in galactolipid molecular species composition point to an adaptation of lipid fluxes through the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplast pathways during hypoxia. PHR1-mediated signaling of phosphate deprivation was also light dependent. Because a photoreceptor-mediated PHR1 activation was not detectable under hypoxia, our data suggest that a chloroplast-derived retrograde signal, potentially arising from metabolic changes, regulates PHR1 activity under both oxygen and phosphate deficiency. PMID:24753539

  17. Light and dark adaptation in Phycomyces light-growth response.

    PubMed

    Lipson, E D; Block, S M

    1983-06-01

    Sporangiophores of the fungus Phycomyces exhibit adaptation to light stimuli over a dynamic range of 10(10). This range applies to both phototropism and the closely related light-growth response; in the latter response, the elongation rate is modulated transiently by changes in the light intensity. We have performed light- and dark-adaptation experiments on growing sporangiophores using an automated tracking machine that allows a continuous measurement of growth velocity under controlled conditions. The results are examined in terms of the adaptation model of Delbrück and Reichardt (1956, Cellular Mechanisms in Differentiation and Growth, 3-44). The "level of adaptation," A, was inferred from responses to test pulses of light by means of a series of intensity-response curves. For dark adaptation to steps down in the normal intensity range (10(-6)-10(-2) W/m2), A decays exponentially with a time constant b = 6.1 +/- 0.3 min. This result is in agreement with the model. Higher-order kinetics are indicated, however, for dark adaptation in the high-intensity range (10(-2)-1 W/m2). Adaptation in this range is compared with predictions of a model relating changes in A to the inactivation and recovery of a receptor pigment. In response to steps up in intensity in the normal range, A was found to increase rapidly, overshoot the applied intensity level, and then relax to that level within 40 min. These results are incompatible with the Delbrück-Reichardt model or any simple generalizations of it. The asymmetry and overshoot are similar to adaptation phenomena observed in systems as diverse as bacterial chemotaxis and human vision. It appears likely that light and dark adaptation in Phycomyces are mediated by altogether different processes. PMID:6875507

  18. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J.; Gray, Jason D.; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K.; Seifert, Erin L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism’s multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal–medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  19. Transcriptional Response of Candida parapsilosis following Exposure to Farnesol▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Tristan; Logue, Mary E.; Reynolds, Kieran; Grenon, Muriel; Lowndes, Noel F.; Butler, Geraldine

    2007-01-01

    In Candida albicans, the quorum-sensing molecule farnesol inhibits the transition from yeast to hyphae but has no effect on cellular growth. We show that the addition of exogenous farnesol to cultures of Candida parapsilosis causes the cells to arrest, but not at a specific stage in the cell cycle. The cells are not susceptible to additional farnesol. However, the cells do eventually recover from arrest. Unlike in C. albicans, in C. parapsilosis sterols are localized to the tips of budding cells, and this polarization is disrupted by the addition of farnesol. We used the results of a genome sequence survey to design and manufacture partial genomic microarrays that were applied to determining the transcriptional response of C. parapsilosis to the presence of exogenous farnesol. In both C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, exposure to farnesol results in increased expression of the oxidoreductases GRP2 and ADH7 and altered expression of genes involved in sterol metabolism. There is no effect on expression of C. parapsilosis orthologs of genes involved in hyphal growth in C. albicans. Farnesol therefore differs significantly in its effects on C. parapsilosis and C. albicans. PMID:17684006

  20. Transcriptional Response of Musca domestica Larvae to Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ting; Li, Xiang; Yang, Xue; Yu, Xue; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Fengsong; Huang, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    The house fly Musca domestica, a cosmopolitan dipteran insect, is a significant vector for human and animal bacterial pathogens, but little is known about its immune response to these pathogens. To address this issue, we inoculated the larvae with a mixture of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and profiled the transcriptome 6, 24, and 48 h thereafter. Many genes known to controlling innate immunity in insects were induced following infection, including genes encoding pattern recognition proteins (PGRPs), various components of the Toll and IMD signaling pathways and of the proPO-activating and redox systems, and multiple antimicrobial peptides. Interestingly, we also uncovered a large set of novel immune response genes including two broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides (muscin and domesticin), which might have evolved to adapt to house-fly's unique ecological environments. Finally, genes mediating oxidative phosphorylation were repressed at 48 h post-infection, suggesting disruption of energy homeostasis and mitochondrial function at the late stages of infection. Collectively, our data reveal dynamic changes in gene expression following bacterial infection in the house fly, paving the way for future in-depth analysis of M. domestica's immune system. PMID:25137050

  1. Transcriptional response of Musca domestica larvae to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ting; Li, Xiang; Yang, Xue; Yu, Xue; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Fengsong; Huang, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    The house fly Musca domestica, a cosmopolitan dipteran insect, is a significant vector for human and animal bacterial pathogens, but little is known about its immune response to these pathogens. To address this issue, we inoculated the larvae with a mixture of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and profiled the transcriptome 6, 24, and 48 h thereafter. Many genes known to controlling innate immunity in insects were induced following infection, including genes encoding pattern recognition proteins (PGRPs), various components of the Toll and IMD signaling pathways and of the proPO-activating and redox systems, and multiple antimicrobial peptides. Interestingly, we also uncovered a large set of novel immune response genes including two broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides (muscin and domesticin), which might have evolved to adapt to house-fly's unique ecological environments. Finally, genes mediating oxidative phosphorylation were repressed at 48 h post-infection, suggesting disruption of energy homeostasis and mitochondrial function at the late stages of infection. Collectively, our data reveal dynamic changes in gene expression following bacterial infection in the house fly, paving the way for future in-depth analysis of M. domestica's immune system. PMID:25137050

  2. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Leliefeld, Pieter H. C.; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell–cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  3. RNase L Attenuates Mitogen-stimulated Gene Expression via Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Mechanisms to Limit the Proliferative Response*

    PubMed Central

    Brennan-Laun, Sarah E.; Li, Xiao-Ling; Ezelle, Heather J.; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Blackshear, Perry J.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Hassel, Bret A.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular response to mitogens is tightly regulated via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to rapidly induce genes that promote proliferation and efficiently attenuate their expression to prevent malignant growth. RNase L is an endoribonuclease that mediates diverse antiproliferative activities, and tristetraprolin (TTP) is a mitogen-induced RNA-binding protein that directs the decay of proliferation-stimulatory mRNAs. In light of their roles as endogenous proliferative constraints, we examined the mechanisms and functional interactions of RNase L and TTP to attenuate a mitogenic response. Mitogen stimulation of RNase L-deficient cells significantly increased TTP transcription and the induction of other mitogen-induced mRNAs. This regulation corresponded with elevated expression of serum-response factor (SRF), a master regulator of mitogen-induced transcription. RNase L destabilized the SRF transcript and formed a complex with SRF mRNA in cells providing a mechanism by which RNase L down-regulates SRF-induced genes. TTP and RNase L proteins interacted in cells suggesting that RNase L is directed to cleave TTP-bound RNAs as a mechanism of substrate specificity. Consistent with their concerted function in RNA turnover, the absence of either RNase L or TTP stabilized SRF mRNA, and a subset of established TTP targets was also regulated by RNase L. RNase L deficiency enhanced mitogen-induced proliferation demonstrating its functional role in limiting the mitogenic response. Our findings support a model of feedback regulation in which RNase L and TTP target SRF mRNA and SRF-induced transcripts. Accordingly, meta-analysis revealed an enrichment of RNase L and TTP targets among SRF-regulated genes suggesting that the RNase L/TTP axis represents a viable target to inhibit SRF-driven proliferation in neoplastic diseases. PMID:25301952

  4. RNase L attenuates mitogen-stimulated gene expression via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to limit the proliferative response.

    PubMed

    Brennan-Laun, Sarah E; Li, Xiao-Ling; Ezelle, Heather J; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Blackshear, Perry J; Wilson, Gerald M; Hassel, Bret A

    2014-11-28

    The cellular response to mitogens is tightly regulated via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to rapidly induce genes that promote proliferation and efficiently attenuate their expression to prevent malignant growth. RNase L is an endoribonuclease that mediates diverse antiproliferative activities, and tristetraprolin (TTP) is a mitogen-induced RNA-binding protein that directs the decay of proliferation-stimulatory mRNAs. In light of their roles as endogenous proliferative constraints, we examined the mechanisms and functional interactions of RNase L and TTP to attenuate a mitogenic response. Mitogen stimulation of RNase L-deficient cells significantly increased TTP transcription and the induction of other mitogen-induced mRNAs. This regulation corresponded with elevated expression of serum-response factor (SRF), a master regulator of mitogen-induced transcription. RNase L destabilized the SRF transcript and formed a complex with SRF mRNA in cells providing a mechanism by which RNase L down-regulates SRF-induced genes. TTP and RNase L proteins interacted in cells suggesting that RNase L is directed to cleave TTP-bound RNAs as a mechanism of substrate specificity. Consistent with their concerted function in RNA turnover, the absence of either RNase L or TTP stabilized SRF mRNA, and a subset of established TTP targets was also regulated by RNase L. RNase L deficiency enhanced mitogen-induced proliferation demonstrating its functional role in limiting the mitogenic response. Our findings support a model of feedback regulation in which RNase L and TTP target SRF mRNA and SRF-induced transcripts. Accordingly, meta-analysis revealed an enrichment of RNase L and TTP targets among SRF-regulated genes suggesting that the RNase L/TTP axis represents a viable target to inhibit SRF-driven proliferation in neoplastic diseases. PMID:25301952

  5. Sources of adaptation of inferior temporal cortical responses.

    PubMed

    Vogels, Rufin

    2016-07-01

    Neurons of different brain regions change their response when a stimulus is repeated. In inferior temporal cortex (IT), stimulus repetition typically reduces the responses of single neurons, i.e., IT neurons show repetition suppression. Single unit recordings in IT showed that individual neurons vary in their degree of adaptation effects, ranging from strong suppression to slight enhancement of the response to the repeated stimulus. The suppression is maximal after the peak of the response and then reduces during the further course of the response. Repetition suppression in IT is still present for interstimulus intervals of at least 900 msec. I discuss the contribution of mechanisms that have been proposed to explain adaptation effects of IT responses. Firing-rate dependent response fatigue, e.g., a prolonged hyperpolarization, intrinsic to the recorded neuron cannot explain the stimulus specificity of the adaptation effect. The latter can be explained by synaptic depression or an adapted input from other IT neurons. We observed repetition suppression of IT neurons when adapter and test stimuli were presented at locations that differed by 8 degree of visual angle, suggesting that at least part of the adaptation effect is not inherited from retinotopic visual areas with small receptive fields. We observed no effect of repetition probability on repetition suppression in macaque IT using images of various categories, suggesting a dissociation between top-down expectation effects and repetition suppression. Together, our data agree with the hypothesis that adaptation in IT serves to reduce the saliency of recently seen stimuli, highlighting stimuli that differ from recently presented ones. PMID:26518166

  6. The Nominal Response Model in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Ayala, R. J.

    One important and promising application of item response theory (IRT) is computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The implementation of a nominal response model-based CAT (NRCAT) was studied. Item pool characteristics for the NRCAT as well as the comparative performance of the NRCAT and a CAT based on the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model were…

  7. Plasticity versus Adaptation of Ambient-Temperature Flowering Response.

    PubMed

    Pajoro, Alice; Verhage, Leonie; Immink, Richard G H

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to understand how plants adapt flowering time to novel environmental conditions, such as global warming, while maintaining plasticity in response to daily fluctuating temperatures. A recent study shows a role for transposons and highlights the need to investigate how these different responses evolved. PMID:26698930

  8. Patterns of Transcriptional Response to 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide in Primary Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kariuki, Silvia N; Blischak, John D; Nakagome, Shigeki; Witonsky, David B; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), plays an important immunomodulatory role, regulating transcription of genes in the innate and adaptive immune system. The present study examines patterns of transcriptome-wide response to 1,25D, and the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in primary human monocytes, to elucidate pathways underlying the effects of 1,25D on the immune system. Monocytes obtained from healthy individuals of African-American and European-American ancestry were treated with 1,25D, LPS, or both, simultaneously. The addition of 1,25D during stimulation with LPS induced significant upregulation of genes in the antimicrobial and autophagy pathways, and downregulation of proinflammatory response genes compared to LPS treatment alone. A joint Bayesian analysis enabled clustering of genes into patterns of shared transcriptional response across treatments. The biological pathways enriched within these expression patterns highlighted several mechanisms through which 1,25D could exert its immunomodulatory role. Pathways such as mTOR signaling, EIF2 signaling, IL-8 signaling, and Tec Kinase signaling were enriched among genes with opposite transcriptional responses to 1,25D and LPS, respectively, highlighting the important roles of these pathways in mediating the immunomodulatory activity of 1,25D. Furthermore, a subset of genes with evidence of interethnic differences in transcriptional response was also identified, suggesting that in addition to the well-established interethnic variation in circulating levels of vitamin D, the intensity of transcriptional response to 1,25D and LPS also varies between ethnic groups. We propose that dysregulation of the pathways identified in this study could contribute to immune-mediated disease risk. PMID:26976439

  9. Patterns of Transcriptional Response to 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide in Primary Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Silvia N.; Blischak, John D.; Nakagome, Shigeki; Witonsky, David B.; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), plays an important immunomodulatory role, regulating transcription of genes in the innate and adaptive immune system. The present study examines patterns of transcriptome-wide response to 1,25D, and the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in primary human monocytes, to elucidate pathways underlying the effects of 1,25D on the immune system. Monocytes obtained from healthy individuals of African-American and European-American ancestry were treated with 1,25D, LPS, or both, simultaneously. The addition of 1,25D during stimulation with LPS induced significant upregulation of genes in the antimicrobial and autophagy pathways, and downregulation of proinflammatory response genes compared to LPS treatment alone. A joint Bayesian analysis enabled clustering of genes into patterns of shared transcriptional response across treatments. The biological pathways enriched within these expression patterns highlighted several mechanisms through which 1,25D could exert its immunomodulatory role. Pathways such as mTOR signaling, EIF2 signaling, IL-8 signaling, and Tec Kinase signaling were enriched among genes with opposite transcriptional responses to 1,25D and LPS, respectively, highlighting the important roles of these pathways in mediating the immunomodulatory activity of 1,25D. Furthermore, a subset of genes with evidence of interethnic differences in transcriptional response was also identified, suggesting that in addition to the well-established interethnic variation in circulating levels of vitamin D, the intensity of transcriptional response to 1,25D and LPS also varies between ethnic groups. We propose that dysregulation of the pathways identified in this study could contribute to immune-mediated disease risk. PMID:26976439

  10. Transcriptional and antioxidative responses to endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acid accumulation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Andrisic, Luka; Collinson, Emma J; Tehlivets, Oksana; Perak, Eleonora; Zarkovic, Tomislav; Dawes, Ian W; Zarkovic, Neven; Cipak Gasparovic, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiology of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is associated with aberrant lipid and oxygen metabolism. In particular, under oxidative stress, PUFAs are prone to autocatalytic degradation via peroxidation, leading to formation of reactive aldehydes with numerous potentially harmful effects. However, the pathological and compensatory mechanisms induced by lipid peroxidation are very complex and not sufficiently understood. In our study, we have used yeast capable of endogenous PUFA synthesis in order to understand the effects triggered by PUFA accumulation on cellular physiology of a eukaryotic organism. The mechanisms induced by PUFA accumulation in S. cerevisiae expressing Hevea brasiliensis Δ12-fatty acid desaturase include down-regulation of components of electron transport chain in mitochondria as well as up-regulation of pentose-phosphate pathway and fatty acid β-oxidation at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, while no changes were observed at the transcriptional level, activities of two important enzymatic antioxidants, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase, were altered in response to PUFA accumulation. Increased intracellular glutathione levels further suggest an endogenous oxidative stress and activation of antioxidative defense mechanisms under conditions of PUFA accumulation. Finally, our data suggest that PUFA in cell membrane causes metabolic changes which in turn lead to adaptation to endogenous oxidative stress. PMID:25280400

  11. Cross-species transcriptional network analysis reveals conservation and variation in response to metal stress in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As one of the most dominant bacterial groups on Earth, cyanobacteria play a pivotal role in the global carbon cycling and the Earth atmosphere composition. Understanding their molecular responses to environmental perturbations has important scientific and environmental values. Since important biological processes or networks are often evolutionarily conserved, the cross-species transcriptional network analysis offers a useful strategy to decipher conserved and species-specific transcriptional mechanisms that cells utilize to deal with various biotic and abiotic disturbances, and it will eventually lead to a better understanding of associated adaptation and regulatory networks. Results In this study, the Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) approach was used to establish transcriptional networks for four important cyanobacteria species under metal stress, including iron depletion and high copper conditions. Cross-species network comparison led to discovery of several core response modules and genes possibly essential to metal stress, as well as species-specific hub genes for metal stresses in different cyanobacteria species, shedding light on survival strategies of cyanobacteria responding to different environmental perturbations. Conclusions The WGCNA analysis demonstrated that the application of cross-species transcriptional network analysis will lead to novel insights to molecular response to environmental changes which will otherwise not be achieved by analyzing data from a single species. PMID:23421563

  12. Exposure to Stressful Environments: Strategy of Adaptive Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhi, Leon E.

    1991-01-01

    Any new natural environment may generate a number of stresses (such as hypoxia, water lack, and heat exposure), each of which can produce strains in more than a single organ system. Every strain may in turn stimulate the body to adapt in multiple ways. Nevertheless, a general strategy of the various adaptive responses emerges when the challenges are divided into three groups. The first category includes conditions that affect the supply of essential molecules, while the second is made up by those stresses that prevent the body from regulating properly the output of waste products, such as CO2 and heat. In both classes, there is a small number of responses, similar in principle, regardless of the specific situation. The third unit is created by environments that disrupt body transport systems. Problems may arise when there is a conflict between two stresses requiring conflicting adaptive changes. An alternative to adaptation, creation of micro-environment, is often favored by the animal.

  13. Identification and transcriptional profiling of differentially expressed genes associated with response to UVA radiation in Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Jun; Zhu, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Ma, Wei-Hua; Desneux, Nicolas; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2013-10-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation, the major component of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the earth's surface, leads to negative effects in insects, such as oxidative stress, photoreceptor damage, and cell death. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of insect response to UVA radiation, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction approaches were combined to reveal differential transcript expression in Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 (Diptera: Drosophilidae). In this study, two subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed and sequenced, obtaining 131 high-quality unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that were up- or downregulated in D. melanogaster exposed to UVA radiation for 0.5 h. Of the 131 ESTs, 102 unique ESTs were differentially expressed and classified into 10 functional categories. The results showed that UVA radiation induces expression of genes related to stress and defense response and metabolism. Potential transcription factor binding motifs upstream of these genes are associated with multiple signaling pathways that may help the insect cope with the stress of UVA radiation. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis of insect response to UVA radiation at the transcriptional level. Our results reveal that UVA radiation influences the expression profiles of stress-responsive genes and provide further insights into the mechanisms of adaptive response to UVA radiation stress. PMID:24331622

  14. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) PvTIFY orchestrates global changes in transcript profile response to jasmonate and phosphorus deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background TIFY is a large plant-specific transcription factor gene family. A subgroup of TIFY genes named JAZ (Jasmonate-ZIM domain) has been identified as repressors of jasmonate (JA)-regulated transcription in Arabidopsis and other plants. JA signaling is involved in many aspects of plant growth/development and in defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we identified the TIFY genes (designated PvTIFY) from the legume common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and functionally characterized PvTIFY10C as a transcriptional regulator. Results Nineteen genes from the PvTIFY gene family were identified through whole-genome sequence analysis. Most of these were induced upon methyl-JA elicitation. We selected PvTIFY10C as a representative JA-responsive PvTIFY gene for further functional analysis. Transcriptome analysis via microarray hybridization using the newly designed Bean Custom Array 90 K was performed on transgenic roots of composite plants with modulated (RNAi-silencing or over-expression) PvTIFY10C gene expression. Data were interpreted using Gene Ontology and MapMan adapted to common bean. Microarray differential gene expression data were validated by real-time qRT-PCR expression analysis. Comparative global gene expression analysis revealed opposite regulatory changes in processes such as RNA and protein regulation, stress responses and metabolism in PvTIFY10C silenced vs. over-expressing roots. These data point to transcript reprogramming (mainly repression) orchestrated by PvTIFY10C. In addition, we found that several PvTIFY genes, as well as genes from the JA biosynthetic pathway, responded to P-deficiency. Relevant P-responsive genes that participate in carbon metabolic pathways, cell wall synthesis, lipid metabolism, transport, DNA, RNA and protein regulation, and signaling were oppositely-regulated in control vs. PvTIFY10C-silenced roots of composite plants under P-stress. These data indicate that PvTIFY10C regulates, directly or indirectly, the

  15. An adaptive response surface method for crashworthiness optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Ren-Jye; Zhu, Ping

    2013-11-01

    Response surface-based design optimization has been commonly used for optimizing large-scale design problems in the automotive industry. However, most response surface models are built by a limited number of design points without considering data uncertainty. In addition, the selection of a response surface in the literature is often arbitrary. This article uses a Bayesian metric to systematically select the best available response surface among several candidates in a library while considering data uncertainty. An adaptive, efficient response surface strategy, which minimizes the number of computationally intensive simulations, was developed for design optimization of large-scale complex problems. This methodology was demonstrated by a crashworthiness optimization example.

  16. A Manganese Superoxide Dismutase (SOD2)-Mediated Adaptive Response

    PubMed Central

    Grdina, David J.; Murley, Jeffrey S.; Miller, Richard C.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Sutton, Harold G.; Thirman, Michael J.; Li, Jian Jian; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Very low doses of ionizing radiation, 5 to 100 mGy, can induce adaptive responses characterized by elevation in cell survival and reduction in micronuclei formation. Utilizing these end points, RKO human colon carcinoma and transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), wild-type or knockout cells missing TNF receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1−R2−), and C57BL/6 and TNFR1−R2− knockout mice, we demonstrate that intact TNF signaling is required for induction of elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) activity (P < 0.001) and the subsequent expression of these SOD2-mediated adaptive responses when cells are challenged at a later time with 2 Gy. In contrast, amifostine’s free thiol form WR1065 can directly activate NF-κB giving rise to elevated SOD2 activity 24 h later and induce an adaptive response in both MEF wild-type and TNF signaling defective TNFR1−R2− cells. Transfection of cells with SOD2 siRNA completely abolishes both the elevation in SOD2 activity and expression of the adaptive responses. These results were confirmed in vivo using a micronucleus assay in splenocytes derived from C57BL/6 and TNFR1−R2− knockout mice that were exposed to 100 mGy or 400 mg/kg amifostine 24 h prior to exposure to a 2 Gy whole-body dose. A dose of 100 mGy also conferred enhanced protection to C57BL/6 mice exposed 24 h later to 100 mg/kg of N-Ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). While very low radiation doses require an intact TNF signaling process to induce a SOD2-mediated adaptive response, amifostine can induce a similar adaptive response in both TNF receptor competent and knockout cells, respectively. PMID:23237540

  17. Adaptive shaping of cortical response selectivity in the vibrissa pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He J. V.; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    One embodiment of context-dependent sensory processing is bottom-up adaptation, where persistent stimuli decrease neuronal firing rate over hundreds of milliseconds. Adaptation is not, however, simply the fatigue of the sensory pathway, but shapes the information flow and selectivity to stimulus features. Adaptation enhances spatial discriminability (distinguishing stimulus location) while degrading detectability (reporting presence of the stimulus), for both the ideal observer of the cortex and awake, behaving animals. However, how the dynamics of the adaptation shape the cortical response and this detection and discrimination tradeoff is unknown, as is to what degree this phenomenon occurs on a continuum as opposed to a switching of processing modes. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in anesthetized rats to capture the temporal and spatial characteristics of the cortical response to tactile inputs, we showed that the suppression of the cortical response, in both magnitude and spatial spread, is continuously modulated by the increasing amount of energy in the adapting stimulus, which is nonuniquely determined by its frequency and velocity. Single-trial ideal observer analysis demonstrated a tradeoff between detectability and spatial discriminability up to a moderate amount of adaptation, which corresponds to the frequency range in natural whisking. This was accompanied by a decrease in both detectability and discriminability with high-energy adaptation, which indicates a more complex coupling between detection and discrimination than a simple switching of modes. Taken together, the results suggest that adaptation operates on a continuum and modulates the tradeoff between detectability and discriminability that has implications for information processing in ethological contexts. PMID:25787959

  18. PTRF/Cavin-1 promotes efficient ribosomal RNA transcription in response to metabolic challenges.

    PubMed

    Liu, Libin; Pilch, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA transcription mediated by RNA polymerase I represents the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis. In eukaryotic cells, nutrients and growth factors regulate ribosomal RNA transcription through various key factors coupled to cell growth. We show here in mature adipocytes, ribosomal transcription can be acutely regulated in response to metabolic challenges. This acute response is mediated by PTRF (polymerase I transcription and release factor, also known as cavin-1), which has previously been shown to play a critical role in caveolae formation. The caveolae-independent rDNA transcriptional role of PTRF not only explains the lipodystrophy phenotype observed in PTRF deficient mice and humans, but also highlights its crucial physiological role in maintaining adipocyte allostasis. Multiple post-translational modifications of PTRF provide mechanistic bases for its regulation. The role of PTRF in ribosomal transcriptional efficiency is likely relevant to many additional physiological situations of cell growth and organismal metabolism. PMID:27528195

  19. Adaptation of Musca domestica L. Field Population to Laboratory Breeding Causes Transcriptional Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Højland, Dorte H.; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn; Kristensen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background The housefly, Musca domestica, has developed resistance to most insecticides applied for its control. Expression of genes coding for detoxification enzymes play a role in the response of the housefly when encountered by a xenobiotic. The highest level of constitutive gene expression of nine P450 genes was previously found in a newly-collected susceptible field population in comparison to three insecticide-resistant laboratory strains and a laboratory reference strain. Results We compared gene expression of five P450s by qPCR as well as global gene expression by RNAseq in the newly-acquired field population (845b) in generation F1, F13 and F29 to test how gene expression changes following laboratory adaption. Four (CYP6A1, CYP6A36, CYP6D3, CYP6G4) of five investigated P450 genes adapted to breeding by decreasing expression. CYP6D1 showed higher female expression in F29 than in F1. For males, about half of the genes accessed in the global gene expression were up-regulated in F13 and F29 in comparison with the F1 population. In females, 60% of the genes were up-regulated in F13 in comparison with F1, while 33% were up-regulated in F29. Forty potential P450 genes were identified. In most cases, P450 gene expression was decreased in F13 flies in comparison with F1. Gene expression then increased from F13 to F29 in males and decreased further in females. Conclusion The global gene expression changes massively during adaptation to laboratory breeding. In general, global expression decreased as a result of laboratory adaption in males, while female expression was not unidirectional. Expression of P450 genes was in general down-regulated as a result of laboratory adaption. Expression of hexamerin, coding for a storage protein was increased, while gene expression of genes coding for amylases decreased. This suggests a major impact of the surrounding environment on gene response to xenobiotics and genetic composition of housefly strains. PMID:24489682

  20. Adaptation responses of crops to climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Seino, Hiroshi

    1993-12-31

    Appreciable global climatic responses to increasing levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and other trace gases are expected to take place over the next 50 to 80 years. Increasing atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are producing or will produce changes in the climate of the Earth. In particular, numerous efforts of climate modeling project very substantial increase of surface air temperature. In addition to a general warming of the atmosphere, the possibility of increased summer dryness in the continental mid-latitudes has been suggested on the basis of both historical analogues and some General Circulation Model (GCM) studies. There are three types of effect of climatic change on agriculture: (1) the physiological (direct) effect of elevated levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} on crop plants and weeds, (2) the effect of changes in parameters of climate (e.g., temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation) on plants and animals, and (3) the effects of climate-related rises in sea-level on land use. The direct effects of elevated CO{sub 2} are on photosynthesis and respiration and thereby on growth, and there are additional effects of increased CO{sub 2} on development, yield quality and stomatal aperture and water use. A doubling of CO{sub 2} increases the instantaneous photosynthetic rate by 30% to 100%, depending on the other environmental conditions, and reduce water requirements of plants by reducing transpiration (per unit leaf area) through reductions in stomatal aperture. A doubling of CO{sub 2} causes partial stomatal closure on both C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} plants (approximately a 40% decrease in aperture). In many experiments this results in reductions of transpiration of about 23% to 46%. However. there is considerable uncertainty over the magnitude of this in natural conditions.

  1. Temporal kinetics of the transcriptional response to carbon depletion and sucrose readdition in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Sarah Jane; Yadav, Umesh Prasad; Klie, Sebastian; Morcuende, Rosa; Usadel, Björn; Lunn, John Edward; Stitt, Mark

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether the transcriptional response to carbon (C) depletion and sucrose resupply depends on the duration and severity of the C depletion, Arabidopsis seedlings were grown in liquid culture and harvested 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after removing sucrose from the medium and 30 min after resupplying sucrose at each time. Expression profiling revealed early transcriptional inhibition of cell wall synthesis and remodelling of signalling, followed by induction of C recycling and photosynthesis and general inhibition of growth. The temporal sequence differed from the published response to progressive exhaustion of C during a night and extended night in vegetatively growing plants. The response to sucrose readdition was conserved across the C-depletion time course. Intriguingly, the vast majority of rapidly responding transcripts decreased rather than increased. The majority of transcripts that respond rapidly to sucrose and many transcripts that respond during C depletion also decrease after treating seedlings with the transcriptional inhibitor cordycepin A. Comparison with published responses to overexpression of otsA, AKIN10 and bZIP11 revealed that many genes that respond to C depletion, and especially sucrose resupply, respond to one or more of these C-signalling components. Thus, multiple factors contribute to C responsiveness, including many signalling components, transcriptional regulation and transcript turnover. PMID:26386165

  2. Local potentiation of stress-responsive genes by upstream noncoding transcription

    PubMed Central

    Takemata, Naomichi; Oda, Arisa; Yamada, Takatomi; Galipon, Josephine; Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Hoffman, Charles S.; Hirota, Kouji; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    It has been postulated that a myriad of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) contribute to gene regulation. In fission yeast, glucose starvation triggers lncRNA transcription across promoter regions of stress-responsive genes including fbp1 (fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase1). At the fbp1 promoter, this transcription promotes chromatin remodeling and fbp1 mRNA expression. Here, we demonstrate that such upstream noncoding transcription facilitates promoter association of the stress-responsive transcriptional activator Atf1 at the sites of transcription, leading to activation of the downstream stress genes. Genome-wide analyses revealed that ∼50 Atf1-binding sites show marked decrease in Atf1 occupancy when cells are treated with a transcription inhibitor. Most of these transcription-enhanced Atf1-binding sites are associated with stress-dependent induction of the adjacent mRNAs or lncRNAs, as observed in fbp1. These Atf1-binding sites exhibit low Atf1 occupancy and high histone density in glucose-rich conditions, and undergo dramatic changes in chromatin status after glucose depletion: enhanced Atf1 binding, histone eviction, and histone H3 acetylation. We also found that upstream transcripts bind to the Groucho-Tup1 type transcriptional corepressors Tup11 and Tup12, and locally antagonize their repressive functions on Atf1 binding. These results reveal a new mechanism in which upstream noncoding transcription locally magnifies the specific activation of stress-inducible genes via counteraction of corepressors. PMID:26945040

  3. Local potentiation of stress-responsive genes by upstream noncoding transcription.

    PubMed

    Takemata, Naomichi; Oda, Arisa; Yamada, Takatomi; Galipon, Josephine; Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Hoffman, Charles S; Hirota, Kouji; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2016-06-20

    It has been postulated that a myriad of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) contribute to gene regulation. In fission yeast, glucose starvation triggers lncRNA transcription across promoter regions of stress-responsive genes including fbp1 (fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase1). At the fbp1 promoter, this transcription promotes chromatin remodeling and fbp1 mRNA expression. Here, we demonstrate that such upstream noncoding transcription facilitates promoter association of the stress-responsive transcriptional activator Atf1 at the sites of transcription, leading to activation of the downstream stress genes. Genome-wide analyses revealed that ∼50 Atf1-binding sites show marked decrease in Atf1 occupancy when cells are treated with a transcription inhibitor. Most of these transcription-enhanced Atf1-binding sites are associated with stress-dependent induction of the adjacent mRNAs or lncRNAs, as observed in fbp1 These Atf1-binding sites exhibit low Atf1 occupancy and high histone density in glucose-rich conditions, and undergo dramatic changes in chromatin status after glucose depletion: enhanced Atf1 binding, histone eviction, and histone H3 acetylation. We also found that upstream transcripts bind to the Groucho-Tup1 type transcriptional corepressors Tup11 and Tup12, and locally antagonize their repressive functions on Atf1 binding. These results reveal a new mechanism in which upstream noncoding transcription locally magnifies the specific activation of stress-inducible genes via counteraction of corepressors. PMID:26945040

  4. Minimal Peroxide Exposure of Neuronal Cells Induces Multifaceted Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Wayne; Zhou, Yu; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Mitchell, Nicholas; Stone, Matthew D.; Becker, Kevin G.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative exposure of cells occurs naturally and may be associated with cellular damage and dysfunction. Protracted low level oxidative exposure can induce accumulated cell disruption, affecting multiple cellular functions. Accumulated oxidative exposure has also been proposed as one of the potential hallmarks of the physiological/pathophysiological aging process. We investigated the multifactorial effects of long-term minimal peroxide exposure upon SH-SY5Y neural cells to understand how they respond to the continued presence of oxidative stressors. We show that minimal protracted oxidative stresses induce complex molecular and physiological alterations in cell functionality. Upon chronic exposure to minimal doses of hydrogen peroxide, SH-SY5Y cells displayed a multifactorial response to the stressor. To fully appreciate the peroxide-mediated cellular effects, we assessed these adaptive effects at the genomic, proteomic and cellular signal processing level. Combined analyses of these multiple levels of investigation revealed a complex cellular adaptive response to the protracted peroxide exposure. This adaptive response involved changes in cytoskeletal structure, energy metabolic shifts towards glycolysis and selective alterations in transmembrane receptor activity. Our analyses of the global responses to chronic stressor exposure, at multiple biological levels, revealed a viable neural phenotype in-part reminiscent of aged or damaged neural tissue. Our paradigm indicates how cellular physiology can subtly change in different contexts and potentially aid the appreciation of stress response adaptations. PMID:21179406

  5. Beyond Adapting to Climate Change: Embedding Adaptation in Responses to Multiple Threats and Stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, Thomas J; Kates, Dr. Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change impacts are already being experienced in every region of the United States and every part of the world most severely in Arctic regions and adaptation is needed now. Although climate change adaptation research is still in its infancy, significant adaptation planning in the United States has already begun in a number of localities. This article seeks to broaden the adaptation effort by integrating it with broader frameworks of hazards research, sustainability science, and community and regional resilience. To extend the range of experience, we draw from ongoing case studies in the Southeastern United States and the environmental history of New Orleans to consider the multiple threats and stresses that all communities and regions experience. Embedding climate adaptation in responses to multiple threats and stresses helps us to understand climate change impacts, themselves often products of multiple stresses, to achieve community acceptance of needed adaptations as co-benefits of addressing multiple threats, and to mainstream the process of climate adaptation through the larger envelope of social relationships, communication channels, and broad-based awareness of needs for risk management that accompany community resilience.

  6. Adaptation responses to climate change differ between global megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgeson, Lucien; Maslin, Mark; Poessinouw, Martyn; Howard, Steve

    2016-06-01

    Urban areas are increasingly at risk from climate change, with negative impacts predicted for human health, the economy and ecosystems. These risks require responses from cities to improve their resilience. Policymakers need to understand current adaptation spend to plan comprehensively and effectively. Through the measurement of spend in the newly defined `adaptation economy', we analyse current climate change adaptation efforts in ten megacities. In all cases, the adaptation economy remains a small part of the overall economy, representing a maximum of 0.33% of a city's gross domestic product (here referred to as GDPc). Differences in total spend are significant between cities in developed, emerging and developing countries, ranging from #15 million to #1,600 million. Comparing key subsectors, we demonstrate the differences in adaptation profiles. Developing cities have higher proportional spend on health and agriculture, whereas developed cities have higher spend on energy and water. Spend per capita and percentage of GDPc comparisons more clearly show disparities between cities. Developing country cities spend half the proportion of GDPc and significantly less per capita, suggesting that adaptation spend is driven by wealth rather than the number of vulnerable people. This indicates that current adaptation activities are insufficient in major population centres in developing and emerging economies.

  7. Gene 33/Mig-6, a Transcriptionally Inducible Adapter Protein That Binds GTP-Cdc42 and Activates SAPK/JNK*

    PubMed Central

    Makkinje, Anthony; Quinn, Deborah A.; Chen, Ang; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Force, Thomas; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Kyriakis, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic stresses, including the mechanical strain caused by hypertension or excess pulmonary ventilation pressure, lead to important clinical consequences, including hypertrophy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pathologic hypertrophy contributes to decreased organ function and, ultimately, organ failure; and cardiac and diabetic renal hypertrophy are major causes of morbidity and morality in the developed world. Likewise, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious potential side effect of mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Whereas the deleterious effects of chronic stress are well established, the molecular mechanisms by which these stresses affect cell function are still poorly characterized. gene 33 (also called mitogen-inducible gene-6, mig-6) is an immediate early gene that is transcriptionally induced by a divergent array of extra-cellular stimuli. The physiologic function of Gene 33 is unknown. Here we show that gene 33 mRNA levels increase sharply in response to a set of commonly occurring chronic stress stimuli: mechanical strain, vasoactive peptides, and diabetic nephropathy. Induction of gene 33 requires the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases. This expression pattern suggests that gene 33 is a potential marker for diabetic nephropathy and other pathologic responses to persistent sublethal stress. The structure of Gene 33 indicates an adapter protein capable of binding monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily. Consistent with this, Gene 33 interacts in vivo and, in a GTP-dependent manner, in vitro with Cdc42Hs; and transient expression of Gene 33 results in the selective activation of the SAPKs. These results imply a reciprocal, positive feedback relationship between Gene 33 expression and SAPK activation. Expression of Gene 33 at sufficient levels may enable a compensatory reprogramming of cellular function in response to chronic stress, which may have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:10749885

  8. Cloning and characterization of aquaglyceroporin genes from rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) and transcript expression in response to cold temperature.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer R; Clow, Kathy A; Rise, Matthew L; Driedzic, William R

    2015-09-01

    Aquaglyceroporins (GLPs) are integral membrane proteins that facilitate passive movement of water, glycerol and urea across cellular membranes. In this study, GLP-encoding genes were characterized in rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax mordax), an anadromous teleost that accumulates high glycerol and modest urea levels in plasma and tissues as an adaptive cryoprotectant mechanism in sub-zero temperatures. We report the gene and promoter sequences for two aqp10b paralogs (aqp10ba, aqp10bb) that are 82% identical at the predicted amino acid level, and aqp9b. Aqp10bb and aqp9b have the 6 exon structure common to vertebrate GLPs. Aqp10ba has 8 exons; there are two additional exons at the 5' end, and the promoter sequence is different from aqp10bb. Molecular phylogenetic analysis suggests that the aqp10b paralogs arose from a gene duplication event specific to the smelt lineage. Smelt GLP transcripts are ubiquitously expressed; however, aqp10ba transcripts were highest in kidney, aqp10bb transcripts were highest in kidney, intestine, pyloric caeca and brain, and aqp9b transcripts were highest in spleen, liver, red blood cells and kidney. In cold-temperature challenge experiments, plasma glycerol and urea levels were significantly higher in cold- compared to warm-acclimated smelt; however, GLP transcript levels were generally either significantly lower or remained constant. The exception was significantly higher aqp10ba transcript levels in kidney. High aqp10ba transcripts in smelt kidney that increase significantly in response to cold temperature in congruence with plasma urea suggest that this gene duplicate may have evolved to allow the re-absorption of urea to concomitantly conserve nitrogen and prevent freezing. PMID:25981700

  9. The Pupillary Orienting Response Predicts Adaptive Behavioral Adjustment after Errors

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Peter R.; van Moort, Marianne L.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) is commonly observed to slow down after an error. This post-error slowing (PES) has been thought to arise from the strategic adoption of a more cautious response mode following deployment of cognitive control. Recently, an alternative account has suggested that PES results from interference due to an error-evoked orienting response. We investigated whether error-related orienting may in fact be a pre-cursor to adaptive post-error behavioral adjustment when the orienting response resolves before subsequent trial onset. We measured pupil dilation, a prototypical measure of autonomic orienting, during performance of a choice RT task with long inter-stimulus intervals, and found that the trial-by-trial magnitude of the error-evoked pupil response positively predicted both PES magnitude and the likelihood that the following response would be correct. These combined findings suggest that the magnitude of the error-related orienting response predicts an adaptive change of response strategy following errors, and thereby promote a reconciliation of the orienting and adaptive control accounts of PES. PMID:27010472

  10. Transcriptional and functional studies of a Cd(II)/Pb(II)-responsive transcriptional regulator(CmtR) from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunli; Li, Yanjun; Nie, Li; Qian, Lin; Cai, Lu; Liu, Jianshe

    2012-08-01

    The acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can resist exceptionally high cadmium (Cd) concentrations. This property is important for its use in biomining processes, where Cd and other metal levels range usually between 15 and 100 mM. To learn about the mechanisms that allow A. ferrooxidans cells to survive in this environment, a bioinformatic search of its genome showed the presence of that a Cd(II)/Pb(II)-responsive transcriptional regulator (CmtR) was possibly related to Cd homeostasis. The expression of the CmtR was studied by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR using A. ferrooxidans cells adapted for growth in the presence of high concentrations of Cd. The putative A. ferrooxidans Cd resistance determinant was found to be upregulated when this bacterium was exposed to Cd in the range of 15-30 mM. The CmtR from A. ferrooxidans was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, the soluble protein was purified by one-step affinity chromatography to apparent homogeneity. UV-Vis spectroscopic measurements showed that the reconstruction CmtR was able to bind Cd(II) forming Cd(II)-CmtR complex in vitro. The sequence alignment and molecular modeling showed that the crucial residues for CmtR binding were likely to be Cys77, Cys112, and Cys121. The results reported here strongly suggest that the high resistance of the extremophilic A. ferrooxidans to Cd including the Cd(II)/Pb(II)-responsive transcriptional regulator. PMID:22555344

  11. Physiological and proteomic analysis of Lactobacillus casei in response to acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; He, Guiqiang; Zhang, Juan

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acid tolerance response (ATR) in Lactobacillus casei by a combined physiological and proteomic analysis. To optimize the ATR induction, cells were acid adapted for 1 h at different pHs, and then acid challenged at pH 3.5. The result showed that acid adaptation improved acid tolerance, and the highest survival was observed in cells adapted at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the acid-adapted cells exhibited higher intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular NH4 (+) content, and lower inner permeability compared with the cells without adaptation. Proteomic analysis was performed upon acid adaptation to different pHs (pH 6.5 vs. pH 4.5) using two-dimensional electrophoresis. A total of 24 proteins that exhibited at least 1.5-fold differential expression were identified. Four proteins (Pgk, LacD, Hpr, and Galm) involved in carbohydrate catabolism and five classic stress response proteins (GroEL, GrpE, Dnak, Hspl, and LCAZH_2811) were up-regulated after acid adaptation at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Validation of the proteomic data was performed by quantitative RT-PCR, and transcriptional regulation of all selected genes showed a positive correlation with the proteomic patterns of the identified proteins. Results presented in this study may be useful for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and may help in formulating new strategies to improve the industrial performance of this species during acid stress. PMID:25062817

  12. Adaptive cycles of floodplain vegetation response to flooding and drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, R.; Thoms, M. C.; Parsons, M.; Reid, M.

    2016-02-01

    Flooding is a key driver of floodplain vegetation productivity. Adaptive cycles provide a model for examining the productivity of semi-arid floodplain vegetation in response to hydrology. We examined the response of vegetation productivity (measured as NDVI) through a hypothesised adaptive cycle to determine whether the cycle repeats over time and how it is affected by differently sized flood events. The area of floodplain inundation was associated with an adaptive cycle that repeated in four flood events through the following phases: wetting (exploitation phase), wet (conservation phase), drying (release phase) and dry (reorganisation phase). Vegetation productivity responses corresponded to these phases. The area and quality of floodplain vegetation productivity followed the hypothesised pattern of higher-quality vegetation vigour in the wetting and wet phases, lower vigour in the drying phase and lowest vigour in the dry phase. There were more transitions between NDVI classes in the wet phase, which was dominated by two-way transitions. Overall, the wetting, wet and drying phases were dominated by smaller-probability class changes, whereas in the dry phase, higher-probability class changes were more prominent. Although the four flood events exhibited an adaptive cycle the duration of the adaptive-cycle phases, and the nature of vegetation productivity response, differed with the character of the flood event. Vegetation response in two of the adaptive-cycle phases - the release and reorganisation phases - were as hypothesised, but in the exploitation and conservation phases, changes in vegetation productivity were more dynamic. The character of vegetation response through the adaptive cycle also indicates that semi-arid floodplain vegetation productivity is more vulnerable to changing state during the conservation and release phases and not during the exploitation and reorganisation phases as resilience theory suggests. Overall, the adaptive cycle represents a

  13. Adaptive Patterns of Stress Responsivity: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giudice, Marco; Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Ellis, Bruce J.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2012-01-01

    The adaptive calibration model (ACM) is an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in stress responsivity. In this article, we tested some key predictions of the ACM in a middle childhood sample (N = 256). Measures of autonomic nervous system activity across the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches validated the 4-pattern…

  14. Dynamic Nature of Noncoding RNA Regulation of Adaptive Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Curtale, Graziella; Citarella, Franca

    2013-01-01

    Immune response plays a fundamental role in protecting the organism from infections; however, dysregulation often occurs and can be detrimental for the organism, leading to a variety of immune-mediated diseases. Recently our understanding of the molecular and cellular networks regulating the immune response, and, in particular, adaptive immunity, has improved dramatically. For many years, much of the focus has been on the study of protein regulators; nevertheless, recent evidence points to a fundamental role for specific classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in regulating development, activation and homeostasis of the immune system. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are the most comprehensive and well-studied, a number of reports suggest the exciting possibility that long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) could mediate host response and immune function. Finally, evidence is also accumulating that suggests a role for miRNAs and other small ncRNAs in autocrine, paracrine and exocrine signaling events, thus highlighting an elaborate network of regulatory interactions mediated by different classes of ncRNAs during immune response. This review will explore the multifaceted roles of ncRNAs in the adaptive immune response. In particular, we will focus on the well-established role of miRNAs and on the emerging role of lncRNAs and circulating ncRNAs, which all make indispensable contributions to the understanding of the multilayered modulation of the adaptive immune response. PMID:23975170

  15. The human milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose augments the adaptive response to extensive intestinal.

    PubMed

    Mezoff, Ethan A; Hawkins, Jennifer A; Ollberding, Nicholas J; Karns, Rebekah; Morrow, Ardythe L; Helmrath, Michael A

    2016-03-15

    Intestinal resection resulting in short bowel syndrome (SBS) carries a heavy burden of long-term morbidity, mortality, and cost of care, which can be attenuated with strategies that improve intestinal adaptation. SBS infants fed human milk, compared with formula, have more rapid intestinal adaptation. We tested the hypothesis that the major noncaloric human milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose (2'-FL) contributes to the adaptive response after intestinal resection. Using a previously described murine model of intestinal adaptation, we demonstrated increased weight gain from 21 to 56 days (P < 0.001) and crypt depth at 56 days (P < 0.0095) with 2'-FL supplementation after ileocecal resection. Furthermore, 2'-FL increased small bowel luminal content microbial alpha diversity following resection (P < 0.005) and stimulated a bloom in organisms of the genus Parabacteroides (log2-fold = 4.1, P = 0.035). Finally, transcriptional analysis of the intestine revealed enriched ontologies and pathways related to antimicrobial peptides, metabolism, and energy processing. We conclude that 2'-FL supplementation following ileocecal resection increases weight gain, energy availability through microbial community modulation, and histological changes consistent with improved adaptation. PMID:26702137

  16. RFX Transcription Factor DAF-19 Regulates 5-HT and Innate Immune Responses to Pathogenic Bacteria in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sunju; Xu, Lu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2013-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans the Toll-interleukin receptor domain adaptor protein TIR-1 via a conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade induces innate immunity and upregulates serotonin (5-HT) biosynthesis gene tph-1 in a pair of ADF chemosensory neurons in response to infection. Here, we identify transcription factors downstream of the TIR-1 signaling pathway. We show that common transcription factors control the innate immunity and 5-HT biosynthesis. We demonstrate that a cysteine to tyrosine substitution in an ARM motif of the HEAT/Arm repeat region of the TIR-1 protein confers TIR-1 hyperactivation, leading to constitutive tph-1 upregulation in the ADF neurons, increased expression of intestinal antimicrobial genes, and enhanced resistance to killing by the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. A forward genetic screen for suppressors of the hyperactive TIR-1 led to the identification of DAF-19, an ortholog of regulatory factor X (RFX) transcription factors that are required for human adaptive immunity. We show that DAF-19 concerts with ATF-7, a member of the activating transcription factor (ATF)/cAMP response element-binding B (CREB) family of transcription factors, to regulate tph-1 and antimicrobial genes, reminiscent of RFX-CREB interaction in human immune cells. daf-19 mutants display heightened susceptibility to killing by PA14. Remarkably, whereas the TIR-1-MAPK-DAF-19/ATF-7 pathway in the intestinal immunity is regulated by DKF-2/protein kinase D, we found that the regulation of tph-1 expression is independent of DKF-2 but requires UNC-43/Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II. Our results suggest that pathogenic cues trigger a common core-signaling pathway via tissue-specific mechanisms and demonstrate a novel role for RFX factors in neuronal and innate immune responses to infection. PMID:23505381

  17. The molecular biology and nomenclature of the activating transcription factor/cAMP responsive element binding family of transcription factors: activating transcription factor proteins and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hai, T; Hartman, M G

    2001-07-25

    The mammalian ATF/CREB family of transcription factors represents a large group of basic region-leucine zipper (bZip) proteins which was originally defined in the late 1980s by their ability to bind to the consensus ATF/CRE site 'TGACGTCA'. Over the past decade, cDNA clones encoding identical or homologous proteins have been isolated by different laboratories and given different names. These proteins can be grouped into subgroups according to their amino acid similarity. In this review, we will briefly describe the classification of these proteins with a historical perspective of their nomenclature. We will then review three members of the ATF/CREB family of proteins: ATF3, ATF4 and ATF6. We will address four issues for each protein: (a) homologous proteins and alternative names, (b) dimer formation with other bZip proteins, (c) transcriptional activity, and (d) potential physiological functions. Although the name Activating Transcription Factor (ATF) implies that they are transcriptional activators, some of these proteins are transcriptional repressors. ATF3 homodimer is a transcriptional repressor and ATF4 has been reported to be either an activator or a repressor. We will review the reports on the transcriptional activities of ATF4, and propose potential explanations for the discrepancy. Although the physiological functions of these proteins are not well understood, some clues can be gained from studies with different approaches. When the data are available, we will address the following questions. (a) How is the expression (at the mRNA level or protein level) regulated? (b) How are the transcriptional activities regulated? (c) What are the interacting proteins (other than bZip partners)? (d) What are the consequences of ectopically expressing the gene (gain-of-function) or deleting the gene (loss-of-function)? Although answers to these questions are far from being complete, together they provide clues to the functions of these ATF proteins. Despite the

  18. Analysis of global transcriptional responses of chicken following primary and secondary Eimeria acervulina infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characterization of host transcriptional responses during coccidia infections can provide new clues for the development of alternative disease control strategies against these complex protozoan pathogens. In the current study, we compared chicken duodenal transcriptome profiles following primary and...

  19. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  20. INO80-dependent regression of ecdysone-induced transcriptional responses regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Sarah D; Ihry, Robert J; Gruetzmacher, Kelly M; Bashirullah, Arash

    2014-03-15

    Sequential pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone regulate the major developmental transitions in Drosophila, and the duration of each developmental stage is determined by the length of time between ecdysone pulses. Ecdysone regulates biological responses by directly initiating target gene transcription. In turn, these transcriptional responses are known to be self-limiting, with mechanisms in place to ensure regression of hormone-dependent transcription. However, the biological significance of these transcriptional repression mechanisms remains unclear. Here we show that the chromatin remodeling protein INO80 facilitates transcriptional repression of ecdysone-regulated genes during prepupal development. In ino80 mutant animals, inefficient repression of transcriptional responses to the late larval ecdysone pulse delays the onset of the subsequent prepupal ecdysone pulse, resulting in a significantly longer prepupal stage. Conversely, increased expression of ino80 is sufficient to shorten the prepupal stage by increasing the rate of transcriptional repression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing the rate of regression of the mid-prepupal competence factor βFTZ-F1 is sufficient to determine the timing of head eversion and thus the duration of prepupal development. Although ino80 is conserved from yeast to humans, this study represents the first characterization of a bona fide ino80 mutation in any metazoan, raising the possibility that the functions of ino80 in transcriptional repression and developmental timing are evolutionarily conserved. PMID:24468295

  1. Dual involvement of a Medicago truncatula NAC transcription factor in root abiotic stress response and symbiotic nodule senescence.

    PubMed

    de Zélicourt, Axel; Diet, Anouck; Marion, Jessica; Laffont, Carole; Ariel, Federico; Moison, Michaël; Zahaf, Ons; Crespi, Martin; Gruber, Véronique; Frugier, Florian

    2012-04-01

    Legume crops related to the model plant Medicago truncatula can adapt their root architecture to environmental conditions, both by branching and by establishing a symbiosis with rhizobial bacteria to form nitrogen-fixing nodules. Soil salinity is a major abiotic stress affecting plant yield and root growth. Previous transcriptomic analyses identified several transcription factors linked to the M. truncatula response to salt stress in roots, including NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC)-encoding genes. Over-expression of one of these transcription factors, MtNAC969, induced formation of a shorter and less-branched root system, whereas RNAi-mediated MtNAC969 inactivation promoted lateral root formation. The altered root system of over-expressing plants was able to maintain its growth under high salinity, and roots in which MtNAC969 was down-regulated showed improved growth under salt stress. Accordingly, expression of salt stress markers was decreased or induced in MtNAC969 over-expressing or RNAi roots, respectively, suggesting a repressive function for this transcription factor in the salt-stress response. Expression of MtNAC969 in central symbiotic nodule tissues was induced by nitrate treatment, and antagonistically affected by salt in roots and nodules, similarly to senescence markers. MtNAC969 RNAi nodules accumulated amyloplasts in the nitrogen-fixing zone, and were prematurely senescent. Therefore, the MtNAC969 transcription factor, which is differentially affected by environmental cues in root and nodules, participates in several pathways controlling adaptation of the M. truncatula root system to the environment. PMID:22098255

  2. Phosphate Starvation Responses and Gibberellic Acid Biosynthesis Are Regulated by the MYB62 Transcription Factor in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Devaiah, Ballachanda N.; Madhuvanthi, Ramaiah; Karthikeyan, Athikkattuvalasu S.; Raghothama, Kashchandra G.

    2009-01-01

    The limited availability of phosphate (Pi) in most soils results in the manifestation of Pi starvation responses in plants. To dissect the transcriptional regulation of Pi stress-response mechanisms, we have characterized the biological role of MYB62, an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor that is induced in response to Pi deficiency. The induction of MYB62 is a specific response in the leaves during Pi deprivation. The MYB62 protein localizes to the nucleus. The overexpression of MYB62 resulted in altered root architecture, Pi uptake, and acid phosphatase activity, leading to decreased total Pi content in the shoots. The expression of several Pi starvation-induced (PSI) genes was also suppressed in the MYB62 overexpressing plants. Overexpression of MYB62 resulted in a characteristic gibberellic acid (GA)-deficient phenotype that could be partially reversed by exogenous application of GA. In addition, the expression of SOC1 and SUPERMAN, molecular regulators of flowering, was suppressed in the MYB62 overexpressing plants. Interestingly, the expression of these genes was also reduced during Pi deprivation in wild-type plants, suggesting a role for GA biosynthetic and floral regulatory genes in Pi starvation responses. Thus, this study highlights the role of MYB62 in the regulation of phosphate starvation responses via changes in GA metabolism and signaling. Such cross-talk between Pi homeostasis and GA might have broader implications on flowering, root development and adaptive mechanisms during nutrient stress. PMID:19529828

  3. Infinite impulse response modal filtering in visible adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapito, G.; Arcidiacono, C.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.

    2012-07-01

    Diffraction limited resolution adaptive optics (AO) correction in visible wavelengths requires a high performance control. In this paper we investigate infinite impulse response filters that optimize the wavefront correction: we tested these algorithms through full numerical simulations of a single-conjugate AO system comprising an adaptive secondary mirror with 1127 actuators and a pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS). The actual practicability of the algorithms depends on both robustness and knowledge of the real system: errors in the system model may even worsen the performance. In particular we checked the robustness of the algorithms in different conditions, proving that the proposed method can reject both disturbance and calibration errors.

  4. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    welfare can be very good when it is occurring. Other adaptation is difficult and may involve lower or higher level emergency physiological responses or abnormal behaviour, often with bad feelings such as pain or fear. In that case, welfare is poor or very poor even if complete adaptation eventually occurs and there is no long-term threat to the life of the individual. In some circumstances, adaptation may be unsuccessful, the individual is not able to cope, stress occurs and welfare is ultimately very poor. PMID:16450701

  5. Systems Analysis of Adaptive Responses to MAP Kinase Pathway Blockade in BRAF Mutant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Brian J.; Roller, Devin; Axelrod, Mark J.; Koeppel, Alex F.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Slingluff, Craig L.; Weber, Michael J.; Mackey, Aaron J.; Gioeli, Daniel; Bekiranov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Fifty percent of cutaneous melanomas are driven by activated BRAFV600E, but tumors treated with RAF inhibitors, even when they respond dramatically, rapidly adapt and develop resistance. Thus, there is a pressing need to identify the major mechanisms of intrinsic and adaptive resistance and develop drug combinations that target these resistance mechanisms. In a combinatorial drug screen on a panel of 12 treatment-naïve BRAFV600E mutant melanoma cell lines of varying levels of resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibition, we identified the combination of PLX4720, a targeted inhibitor of mutated BRaf, and lapatinib, an inhibitor of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, as synergistically cytotoxic in the subset of cell lines that displayed the most resistance to PLX4720. To identify potential mechanisms of resistance to PLX4720 treatment and synergy with lapatinib treatment, we performed a multi-platform functional genomics analysis to profile the genome as well as the transcriptional and proteomic responses of these cell lines to treatment with PLX4720. We found modest levels of resistance correlated with the zygosity of the BRAF V600E allele and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) mutational status. Layered over base-line resistance was substantial upregulation of many ErbB pathway genes in response to BRaf inhibition, thus generating the vulnerability to combination with lapatinib. The transcriptional responses of ErbB pathway genes are associated with a number of transcription factors, including ETS2 and its associated cofactors that represent a convergent regulatory mechanism conferring synergistic drug susceptibility in the context of diverse mutational landscapes. PMID:26405815

  6. Systems Analysis of Adaptive Responses to MAP Kinase Pathway Blockade in BRAF Mutant Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Capaldo, Brian J; Roller, Devin; Axelrod, Mark J; Koeppel, Alex F; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Slingluff, Craig L; Weber, Michael J; Mackey, Aaron J; Gioeli, Daniel; Bekiranov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Fifty percent of cutaneous melanomas are driven by activated BRAFV600E, but tumors treated with RAF inhibitors, even when they respond dramatically, rapidly adapt and develop resistance. Thus, there is a pressing need to identify the major mechanisms of intrinsic and adaptive resistance and develop drug combinations that target these resistance mechanisms. In a combinatorial drug screen on a panel of 12 treatment-naïve BRAFV600E mutant melanoma cell lines of varying levels of resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibition, we identified the combination of PLX4720, a targeted inhibitor of mutated BRaf, and lapatinib, an inhibitor of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, as synergistically cytotoxic in the subset of cell lines that displayed the most resistance to PLX4720. To identify potential mechanisms of resistance to PLX4720 treatment and synergy with lapatinib treatment, we performed a multi-platform functional genomics analysis to profile the genome as well as the transcriptional and proteomic responses of these cell lines to treatment with PLX4720. We found modest levels of resistance correlated with the zygosity of the BRAF V600E allele and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) mutational status. Layered over base-line resistance was substantial upregulation of many ErbB pathway genes in response to BRaf inhibition, thus generating the vulnerability to combination with lapatinib. The transcriptional responses of ErbB pathway genes are associated with a number of transcription factors, including ETS2 and its associated cofactors that represent a convergent regulatory mechanism conferring synergistic drug susceptibility in the context of diverse mutational landscapes. PMID:26405815

  7. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Adaptive Responses of an Enterobacteriaceae Strain LSJC7 to Arsenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingjiao; Chen, Songcan; Hao, Xiuli; Su, Jian-Qiang; Xue, Ximei; Yan, Yu; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) resistance determinant ars operon is present in many bacteria and has been demonstrated to enhance As(V) resistance of bacteria. However, whole molecular mechanism adaptations of bacteria in response to As(V) stress remain largely unknown. In this study, transcriptional profiles of Enterobacteriaceae strain LSJC7 responding to As(V) stress were analyzed using RNA-seq and qRT-PCR. As expected, genes involved in As(V) uptake were down-regulated, those involved in As(V) reduction and As(III) efflux were up-regulated, which avoided cellular As accumulation. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO) were induced, which caused cellular damages including DNA, protein, and Fe–S cluster damage in LSJC7. The expression of specific genes encoding transcriptional regulators, such as nsrR and soxRS were also induced. NsrR and SoxRS modulated many critical metabolic activities in As(V) stressed LSJC7 cells, including reactive species scavenging and repairing damaged DNA, proteins, and Fe–S clusters. Therefore, besides As uptake, reduction, and efflux; oxidative stress defense and damage repair were the main cellular adaptive responses of LSJC7 to As(V) stress. PMID:27199962

  8. Filoviruses and the balance of innate, adaptive, and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Chen, Lieping; Olinger, Gene G; Pratt, William D; Schmaljohn, Alan L

    2006-01-01

    The Filoviruses Marburg virus and Ebola virus are among the deadliest of human pathogens, causing fulminant hemorrhagic fevers typified by overmatched specific immune responses and profuse inflammatory responses. Keys to both vaccination and treatment may reside, first, in the understanding of immune dysfunctions that parallel Filoviral disease and, second, in devising ways to redirect and restore normal immune function as well as to mitigate inflammation. Here, we describe how Filoviral infections may subvert innate immune responses through perturbances of dendritic cells and neutrophils, with particular emphasis on the downstream effects on adaptive immunity and inflammation. We suggest that pivotal events may be subject to therapeutic intervention as Filoviruses encounter immune processes. PMID:17201655

  9. Comparison of Transcriptional Changes to Chloroplast and Mitochondrial Perturbations Reveals Common and Specific Responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Van Aken, Olivier; Whelan, James

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the life of a plant, the biogenesis and fine-tuning of energy organelles is essential both under normal growth and stress conditions. Communication from organelle to nucleus is essential to adapt gene regulation and protein synthesis specifically to the current needs of the plant. This organelle-to-nuclear communication is termed retrograde signaling and has been studied extensively over the last decades. In this study we have used large-scale gene expression data sets relating to perturbations of chloroplast and mitochondrial function to gain further insights into plant retrograde signaling and how mitochondrial and chloroplast retrograde pathways interact and differ. Twenty seven studies were included that assess transcript profiles in response to chemical inhibition as well as genetic mutations of organellar proteins. The results show a highly significant overlap between gene expression changes triggered by chloroplast and mitochondrial perturbations. These overlapping gene expression changes appear to be common with general abiotic, biotic, and nutrient stresses. However, retrograde signaling pathways are capable of distinguishing the source of the perturbation as indicated by a statistical overrepresentation of changes in genes encoding proteins of the affected organelle. Organelle-specific overrepresented functional categories among others relate to energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Our analysis also suggests that WRKY transcription factors play a coordinating role on the interface of both organellar signaling pathways. Global comparison of the expression profiles for each experiment revealed that the recently identified chloroplast retrograde pathway using phospho-adenosine phosphate is possibly more related to mitochondrial than chloroplast perturbations. Furthermore, new marker genes have been identified that respond specifically to mitochondrial and/or chloroplast dysfunction. PMID:23269925

  10. Transcriptional and cellular responses to defective mitochondrial proteolysis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Guha, Suranjana; López-Maury, Luis; Shaw, Michael; Bähler, Jürg; Norbury, Chris J; Agashe, Vishwas R

    2011-04-29

    Lon and m-AAA are the principal, regulated proteases required for protein maturation and turnover in the mitochondrial matrix of diverse species. To understand their roles in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) mitochondria, we generated deletion strains lacking Lon and m-AAA, individually (Δlon1 and Δm-AAA) or together, Δlon1Δm-AAA (Δ/Δ). All three strains were viable but incapable of respiratory growth on a non-fermentable carbon source due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Confocal and electron microscopy revealed a decrease in membrane potential and ultrastructural changes in Δlon1, Δm-AAA and Δ/Δ mitochondria, consistent with a respiratory defect and aggregation of proteins in the mitochondrial matrix. To understand the global adaptations required for cell survival in the absence of Lon and m-AAA proteases, we compared genome-wide gene expression signatures of the deletion strains with the isogenic wild-type strain. Deletion of lon1 caused a distinctive transcriptional footprint of just 12 differentially expressed genes, 9 of which were up-regulated genes located on the proximal mitochondrial genome (mitochondrial DNA). In contrast, m-AAA deletion caused a much larger transcriptional response involving 268 almost exclusively nuclear genes. Genes ameliorating stress and iron assimilation were up-regulated, while diverse mitochondrial genes and other metabolic enzymes were down-regulated. The connection with iron dysregulation was further explored using biochemical, chemical and cellular assays. Although Δm-AAA and Δ/Δ contained more cellular iron than the wild-type strain, their transcriptomes strongly resembled a signature normally evoked by iron insufficiency or disrupted assembly of iron-sulfur clusters in mitochondria. Based on these findings, we posit that excess iron accumulation could contribute to the pathology of human neurodegenerative disorders arising from defects in m-AAA function. PMID:21354177

  11. Adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mark William; Wick, David Victor

    2004-11-01

    The combination of phase diversity and adaptive optics offers great flexibility. Phase diverse images can be used to diagnose aberrations and then provide feedback control to the optics to correct the aberrations. Alternatively, phase diversity can be used to partially compensate for aberrations during post-detection image processing. The adaptive optic can produce simple defocus or more complex types of phase diversity. This report presents an analysis, based on numerical simulations, of the efficiency of different modes of phase diversity with respect to compensating for specific aberrations during post-processing. It also comments on the efficiency of post-processing versus direct aberration correction. The construction of a bench top optical system that uses a membrane mirror as an active optic is described. The results of characterization tests performed on the bench top optical system are presented. The work described in this report was conducted to explore the use of adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

  12. Transcriptional profile of Paracoccidioides spp. in response to itraconazole

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Itraconazole is currently used to treat paracoccidioidomycosis. The mechanism of action of azoles has been elucidated in some fungi, although little is known regarding its mechanism of action in Paracoccidioides spp. The present work focused on identification of regulated transcripts using representational difference analysis of Paracoccidioides spp. yeast cells treated with itraconazole for 1 and 2 h. Results Paracoccidioides Pb01 genes up-regulated by itraconazole included genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism/energy, transcription, cell rescue, defense and virulence. ERG11, ERG6, ERG3, ERG5 and ERG25 were up-regulated at multiple time points. In vivo infection experiments in mice corroborated the in vitro results. Ergosterol levels and distribution were evaluated in Paracoccidioides Pb18 yeast cells, and the results demonstrate that both factors were changed in the fungus treated with itraconazole. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first transcriptional analysis of Paracoccidioides spp. exposed to a triazole drug. Here acetyl seems to be intensively produced from different metabolic pathways to produce ergosterol by the action of ergosterol synthesis related enzymes, which were also affected in other fungi. Among the genes affected, we identified genes in common with other fungi, as well as genes unique to Paracoccidioides Pb01. Those genes could be considered target to new drugs. Voltage-gated Ca2+ alpha subunit (CAV), Tetracycline resistance protein (TETA) and Hemolisyn-iii channel protein (HLYiii) were found only here and a probably involvement with resistence to itraconazole could be investigated in the future. However our findings do not permit inference to current clinical practice. PMID:24690401

  13. Transcriptional responses to teflubenzuron exposure in European lobster (Homarus gammarus).

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Samuelsen, Ole B; Agnalt, Ann-Lisbeth; Lunestad, Bjørn T

    2015-10-01

    Increasing use of pharmaceutical drugs to delouse farmed salmon raises environmental concerns. This study describes an experiment carried out to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the antiparasitic drug teflubenzuron on a non-target species, the European lobster. Juvenile lobsters (10.3±0.9 mm carapace length) were fed two environmentally relevant doses of teflubenzuron, corresponding to 5 and 20% of a standard salmon medication (10 mg/kg day), termed low and high dose in this study. After 114 days of dietary exposure, whole-animal accumulation of teflubenzuron was determined. One claw from each animal was collected for transcriptional analysis. Overall, exposed animals showed low cumulative mortality. Six animals, two from the low dose treatment and four from the high dose, showed exoskeletal abnormalities (claw deformities or stiff walking legs). Residual levels of teflubenzuron in juvenile lobster were 2.7-fold higher in the high dose (282 ng/g) compared to the low dose treatment (103 ng/g). The transcriptional examination showed significant effects of teflubenzuron on 21 out of 39 studied genes. At the transcriptional level, environmentally relevant levels of the anti-salmon lice drug impacted genes linked to drug detoxification (cyp3a, cyp6a2, cyp302a, sult1b1, abcc4), cellular stress (hsp70, hsp90, chh), oxidative stress (cat, gpx3) and DNA damage (p53), as well as molting and exoskeleton regulation (chi3l1, ecr, jhl1, chs1, ctbs, gap65, jhel-ces1) in claw tissue (muscle and exoskeleton). In conclusion, teflubenzuron at sub-lethal levels can affect many molecular mechanisms in European lobster claws. PMID:26318677

  14. Lung glutathione adaptive responses to cigarette smoke exposure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Smoking tobacco is a leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but although the majority of COPD cases can be directly related to smoking, only a quarter of smokers actually develop the disease. A potential reason for the disparity between smoking and COPD may involve an individual's ability to mount a protective adaptive response to cigarette smoke (CS). Glutathione (GSH) is highly concentrated in the lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and protects against many inhaled oxidants. The changes in GSH that occur with CS are not well investigated; therefore the GSH adaptive response that occurs with a commonly utilized CS exposure was examined in mice. Methods Mice were exposed to CS for 5 h after which they were rested in filtered air for up to 16 h. GSH levels were measured in the ELF, bronchoalveolar lavage cells, plasma, and tissues. GSH synthesis was assessed by measuring γ-glutamylcysteine ligase (GCL) activity in lung and liver tissue. Results GSH levels in the ELF, plasma, and liver were decreased by as much as 50% during the 5 h CS exposure period whereas the lung GSH levels were unchanged. Next, the time course of rebound in GSH levels after the CS exposure was examined. CS exposure initially decreased ELF GSH levels by 50% but within 2 h GSH levels rebound to about 3 times basal levels and peaked at 16 h with a 6-fold increase and over repeat exposures were maintained at a 3-fold elevation for up to 2 months. Similar changes were observed in tissue GCL activity which is the rate limiting step in GSH synthesis. Furthermore, elevation in ELF GSH levels was not arbitrary since the CS induced GSH adaptive response after a 3d exposure period prevented GSH levels from dropping below basal levels. Conclusions CS exposures evoke a powerful GSH adaptive response in the lung and systemically. These data suggests there may be a sensor that sets the ELF GSH adaptive response to prevent GSH levels from dipping below basal levels. Factors

  15. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-Dose
    Cancer Responses
    .
    There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellular
    responses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  16. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J; Ouwehand, A C; Hansen, E Bech; Romero, D A; Rautonen, N

    2010-09-01

    The complex microbial population residing in the human gastrointestinal tract consists of commensal, potential pathogenic and beneficial species, which are probably perceived differently by the host and consequently could be expected to trigger specific transcriptional responses. Here, we provide a comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33 DCE-induced changes were overall more similar to those of B. lactis 420 than to L. acidophilus NCFM™, which is consistent with previously observed in vivo immunomodulation properties. In the gene ontology and pathway analyses both specific and unspecific changes were observed. Common to all was the regulation of apoptosis and adipogenesis, and lipid-metabolism related regulation by the probiotics. Specific changes such as regulation of cell-cell adhesion by B. lactis 420, superoxide metabolism by L. salivarius Ls-33, and regulation of MAPK pathway by L. acidophilus NCFM™ were noted. Furthermore, fundamental differences were observed between the pathogenic and probiotic treatments in the Toll-like receptor pathway, especially for adapter molecules with a lowered level of transcriptional activation of MyD88, TRIF, IRAK1 and TRAF6 by probiotics compared to EHEC. The results in this study provide insights into the relationship between probiotics and human intestinal epithelial cells, notably with regard to strain-specific responses, and highlight the differences between transcriptional responses to pathogenic and probiotic bacteria. PMID:21831765

  17. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  18. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E.

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  19. Transcriptional response to stress in the dynamic chromatin environment of cycling and mitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Vihervaara, Anniina; Sergelius, Christian; Vasara, Jenni; Blom, Malin A. H.; Elsing, Alexandra N.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia; Sistonen, Lea

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock factors (HSFs) are the master regulators of transcription under protein-damaging conditions, acting in an environment where the overall transcription is silenced. We determined the genomewide transcriptional program that is rapidly provoked by HSF1 and HSF2 under acute stress in human cells. Our results revealed the molecular mechanisms that maintain cellular homeostasis, including HSF1-driven induction of polyubiquitin genes, as well as HSF1- and HSF2-mediated expression patterns of cochaperones, transcriptional regulators, and signaling molecules. We characterized the genomewide transcriptional response to stress also in mitotic cells where the chromatin is tightly compacted. We found a radically limited binding and transactivating capacity of HSF1, leaving mitotic cells highly susceptible to proteotoxicity. In contrast, HSF2 occupied hundreds of loci in the mitotic cells and localized to the condensed chromatin also in meiosis. These results highlight the importance of the cell cycle phase in transcriptional responses and identify the specific mechanisms for HSF1 and HSF2 in transcriptional orchestration. Moreover, we propose that HSF2 is an epigenetic regulator directing transcription throughout cell cycle progression. PMID:23959860

  20. A NAP-Family Histone Chaperone Functions in Abiotic Stress Response and Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Amit K; Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata

    2016-08-01

    Modulation of gene expression is one of the most significant molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress response in plants. Via altering DNA accessibility, histone chaperones affect the transcriptional competence of genomic loci. However, in contrast to other factors affecting chromatin dynamics, the role of plant histone chaperones in abiotic stress response and adaptation remains elusive. Here, we studied the physiological function of a stress-responsive putative rice (Oryza sativa) histone chaperone of the NAP superfamily: OsNAPL6. We show that OsNAPL6 is a nuclear-localized H3/H4 histone chaperone capable of assembling a nucleosome-like structure. Utilizing overexpression and knockdown approaches, we found a positive correlation between OsNAPL6 expression levels and adaptation to multiple abiotic stresses. Results of comparative transcriptome profiling and promoter-recruitment studies indicate that OsNAPL6 functions during stress response via modulation of expression of various genes involved in diverse functions. For instance, we show that OsNAPL6 is recruited to OsRad51 promoter, activating its expression and leading to more efficient DNA repair and abrogation of programmed cell death under salinity and genotoxic stress conditions. These results suggest that the histone chaperone OsNAPL6 may serve a regulatory role in abiotic stress physiology possibly via modulating nucleosome dynamics at various stress-associated genomic loci. Taken together, our findings establish a hitherto unknown link between histone chaperones and abiotic stress response in plants. PMID:27342307

  1. A NAP-Family Histone Chaperone Functions in Abiotic Stress Response and Adaptation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of gene expression is one of the most significant molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress response in plants. Via altering DNA accessibility, histone chaperones affect the transcriptional competence of genomic loci. However, in contrast to other factors affecting chromatin dynamics, the role of plant histone chaperones in abiotic stress response and adaptation remains elusive. Here, we studied the physiological function of a stress-responsive putative rice (Oryza sativa) histone chaperone of the NAP superfamily: OsNAPL6. We show that OsNAPL6 is a nuclear-localized H3/H4 histone chaperone capable of assembling a nucleosome-like structure. Utilizing overexpression and knockdown approaches, we found a positive correlation between OsNAPL6 expression levels and adaptation to multiple abiotic stresses. Results of comparative transcriptome profiling and promoter-recruitment studies indicate that OsNAPL6 functions during stress response via modulation of expression of various genes involved in diverse functions. For instance, we show that OsNAPL6 is recruited to OsRad51 promoter, activating its expression and leading to more efficient DNA repair and abrogation of programmed cell death under salinity and genotoxic stress conditions. These results suggest that the histone chaperone OsNAPL6 may serve a regulatory role in abiotic stress physiology possibly via modulating nucleosome dynamics at various stress-associated genomic loci. Taken together, our findings establish a hitherto unknown link between histone chaperones and abiotic stress response in plants. PMID:27342307

  2. Unbiased reconstruction of a mammalian transcriptional network mediating the differential response to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Ido; Garber, Manuel; Chevrier, Nicolas; Leite, Ana Paula; Donner, Yoni; Eisenhaure, Thomas; Guttman, Mitchell; Grenier, Jennifer K.; Li, Weibo; Zuk, Or; Schubert, Lisa A.; Birditt, Brian; Shay, Tal; Goren, Alon; Zhang, Xiaolan; Smith, Zachary; Deering, Raquel; McDonald, Rebecca C.; Cabili, Moran; Bernstein, Bradley E; Rinn, John L.; Meissner, Alex; Root, David E.; Hacohen, Nir; Regev, Aviv

    2010-01-01

    Models of mammalian regulatory networks controlling gene expression have been inferred from genomic data, yet have largely not been validated. We present an unbiased strategy to systematically perturb candidate regulators and monitor cellular transcriptional responses. We apply this approach to derive regulatory networks that control the transcriptional response of mouse primary dendritic cells (DCs) to pathogens. Our approach revealed the regulatory functions of 125 transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, and RNA binding proteins and constructed a network model consisting of two dozen core regulators and 76 fine-tuners that help explain how pathogen-sensing pathways achieve specificity. This study establishes a broadly-applicable, comprehensive and unbiased approach to reveal the wiring and functions of a regulatory network controlling a major transcriptional response in primary mammalian cells. PMID:19729616

  3. Innate and adaptive immune responses in migrating spring-run adult chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolan, Brian P.; Fisher, Kathleen M.; Colvin, Michael E.; Benda, Susan E.; Peterson, James T.; Kent, Michael L.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    Adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrate from salt water to freshwater streams to spawn. Immune responses in migrating adult salmon are thought to diminish in the run up to spawning, though the exact mechanisms for diminished immune responses remain unknown. Here we examine both adaptive and innate immune responses as well as pathogen burdens in migrating adult Chinook salmon in the Upper Willamette River basin. Messenger RNA transcripts encoding antibody heavy chain molecules slightly diminish as a function of time, but are still present even after fish have successfully spawned. In contrast, the innate anti-bacterial effector proteins present in fish plasma rapidly decrease as spawning approaches. Fish also were examined for the presence and severity of eight different pathogens in different organs. While pathogen burden tended to increase during the migration, no specific pathogen signature was associated with diminished immune responses. Transcript levels of the immunosuppressive cytokines IL-10 and TGF beta were measured and did not change during the migration. These results suggest that loss of immune functions in adult migrating salmon are not due to pathogen infection or cytokine-mediated immune suppression, but is rather part of the life history of Chinook salmon likely induced by diminished energy reserves or hormonal changes which accompany spawning.

  4. Innate and adaptive immune responses in migrating spring-run adult chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Brian P; Fisher, Kathleen M; Colvin, Michael E; Benda, Susan E; Peterson, James T; Kent, Michael L; Schreck, Carl B

    2016-01-01

    Adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrate from salt water to freshwater streams to spawn. Immune responses in migrating adult salmon are thought to diminish in the run up to spawning, though the exact mechanisms for diminished immune responses remain unknown. Here we examine both adaptive and innate immune responses as well as pathogen burdens in migrating adult Chinook salmon in the Upper Willamette River basin. Messenger RNA transcripts encoding antibody heavy chain molecules slightly diminish as a function of time, but are still present even after fish have successfully spawned. In contrast, the innate anti-bacterial effector proteins present in fish plasma rapidly decrease as spawning approaches. Fish also were examined for the presence and severity of eight different pathogens in different organs. While pathogen burden tended to increase during the migration, no specific pathogen signature was associated with diminished immune responses. Transcript levels of the immunosuppressive cytokines IL-10 and TGF beta were measured and did not change during the migration. These results suggest that loss of immune functions in adult migrating salmon are not due to pathogen infection or cytokine-mediated immune suppression, but is rather part of the life history of Chinook salmon likely induced by diminished energy reserves or hormonal changes which accompany spawning. PMID:26581919

  5. Landowner response to wildfire risk: Adaptation, mitigation or doing nothing.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jianbang; Jarrett, Adam; Johnson Gaither, Cassandra

    2015-08-15

    Wildfire has brought about ecological, economic, and social consequences that engender human responses in many parts of the world. How to respond to wildfire risk is a common challenge across the globe particularly in areas where lands are controlled by many small private owners because effective wildfire prevention and protection require coordinated efforts of neighboring stakeholders. We explore (i) wildfire response strategies adopted by family forestland owners in the southern United States, one of the most important and productive forest regions in the world, through a landowner survey; and (ii) linkages between the responses of these landowners and their characteristics via multinomial logistic regression. We find that landowners used diverse strategies to respond to wildfire risk, with the most popular responses being "doing nothing" and combined adaptation and mitigation, followed by adaptation or mitigation alone. Landowners who had lost properties to wildfire, lived on their forestlands, had a forest management plan, and were better educated were more likely to proactively respond to wildfire risk. Our results indicate the possibility to enhance the effectiveness of collective action of wildfire risk response by private forestland owners and to coordinate wildfire response with forest conservation and certification efforts. These findings shed new light on engaging private landowners in wildfire management in the study region and beyond. PMID:26074470

  6. Involvement of estrogen-related receptors in transcriptional response to hypoxia and growth of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Ao, Ada; Wang, Heiman; Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Lu, Jianrong

    2008-06-01

    The development of intratumoral hypoxia is a universal hallmark of rapidly growing solid tumors. Adaptation to the hypoxic environment, which is critical for tumor cell survival and growth, is mediated primarily through a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent transcriptional program. HIF activates genes that facilitate crucial adaptive mechanisms including increased glucose uptake and glycolysis and tumor angiogenesis, making it an important therapeutic target. However, the HIF-dependent transcriptional mechanism remains incompletely understood, and targeting HIF is a difficult endeavor. Here, we show that the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) physically interact with HIF and stimulate HIF-induced transcription. Importantly, ERRs appear to be essential for HIF's function. Transcriptional activation of hypoxic genes in cells cultured under hypoxia is largely blocked by suppression of ERRs through expression of a dominant negative form of ERR or treatment with a pharmacological ERR inhibitor, diethylstilbestrol. Systematic administration of diethylstilbestrol severely diminished growth and angiogenesis of tumor xenografts in vivo. Because nuclear receptors are outstanding targets for drug discovery, the findings not only may offer mechanistic insights into HIF-mediated transcription but also may open new avenues for targeting the HIF pathway for cancer therapy. PMID:18509053

  7. Host Transcription Factors in the Immediate Pro-Inflammatory Response to the Parasitic Mite Psoroptes ovis

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Stewart T. G.; McNeilly, Tom N.; Watkins, Craig A.; Nisbet, Alasdair J.; Huntley, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sheep scab, caused by infestation with the ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis, results in the rapid development of cutaneous inflammation and leads to the crusted skin lesions characteristic of the disease. We described previously the global host transcriptional response to infestation with P. ovis, elucidating elements of the inflammatory processes which lead to the development of a rapid and profound immune response. However, the mechanisms by which this response is instigated remain unclear. To identify novel methods of intervention a better understanding of the early events involved in triggering the immune response is essential. The objective of this study was to gain a clearer understanding of the mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in the instigation of the immediate pro-inflammatory response. Results Through a combination of transcription factor binding site enrichment and pathway analysis we identified key roles for a number of transcription factors in the instigation of cutaneous inflammation. In particular, defined roles were elucidated for the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1 in the orchestration of the early pro-inflammatory response, with these factors being implicated in the activation of a suite of inflammatory mediators. Conclusions Interrogation of the host temporal response to P. ovis infestation has enabled the further identification of the mechanisms underlying the development of the immediate host pro-inflammatory response. This response involves key regulatory roles for the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1. Pathway analysis demonstrated that the activation of these transcription factors may be triggered following a host LPS-type response, potentially involving TLR4-signalling and also lead to the intriguing possibility that this could be triggered by a P. ovis allergen. PMID:21915322

  8. Plant adaptation to dynamically changing environment: the shade avoidance response.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, I; Sessa, G; Ciolfi, A; Possenti, M; Carabelli, M; Morelli, G

    2012-01-01

    The success of competitive interactions between plants determines the chance of survival of individuals and eventually of whole plant species. Shade-tolerant plants have adapted their photosynthesis to function optimally under low-light conditions. These plants are therefore capable of long-term survival under a canopy shade. In contrast, shade-avoiding plants adapt their growth to perceive maximum sunlight and therefore rapidly dominate gaps in a canopy. Daylight contains roughly equal proportions of red and far-red light, but within vegetation that ratio is lowered as a result of red absorption by photosynthetic pigments. This light quality change is perceived through the phytochrome system as an unambiguous signal of the proximity of neighbors resulting in a suite of developmental responses (termed the shade avoidance response) that, when successful, result in the overgrowth of those neighbors. Shoot elongation induced by low red/far-red light may confer high relative fitness in natural dense communities. However, since elongation is often achieved at the expense of leaf and root growth, shade avoidance may lead to reduction in crop plant productivity. Over the past decade, major progresses have been achieved in the understanding of the molecular basis of shade avoidance. However, uncovering the mechanisms underpinning plant response and adaptation to changes in the ratio of red to far-red light is key to design new strategies to precise modulate shade avoidance in time and space without impairing the overall crop ability to compete for light. PMID:21888962

  9. Transcriptional profile of immediate response to ionizing radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Rouchka, Eric C; Flight, Robert M; Fasciotto, Brigitte H; Estrada, Rosendo; Eaton, John W; Patibandla, Phani K; Waigel, Sabine J; Li, Dazhuo; Kirtley, John K; Sethu, Palaniappan; Keynton, Robert S

    2016-03-01

    Astronauts participating in long duration space missions are likely to be exposed to ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy particles. Previously proposed gene biomarkers for radiation exposure include phosphorylated H2A Histone Family, Member X (γH2AX), Tumor Protein 53 (TP53), and Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A). However, transcripts of these genes may not be the most suitable biomarkers for radiation exposure due to a lack of sensitivity or specificity. As part of a larger effort to develop lab-on-a-chip methods for detecting radiation exposure events using blood samples, we designed a dose-course microarray study in order to determine coding and non-coding RNA transcripts undergoing differential expression immediately following radiation exposure. The main goal was to elicit a small set of sensitive and specific radiation exposure biomarkers at low, medium, and high levels of ionizing radiation exposure. Four separate levels of radiation were considered: 0 Gray (Gy) control; 0.3 Gy; 1.5 Gy; and 3.0 Gy with four replicates at each radiation level. This report includes raw gene expression data files from the resulting microarray experiments from all three radiation levels ranging from a lower, typical exposure than an astronaut might see (0.3 Gy) to high, potentially lethal, levels of radiation (3.0 Gy). The data described here is available in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), accession GSE64375. PMID:26981369

  10. Transcriptional profile of immediate response to ionizing radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rouchka, Eric C.; Flight, Robert M.; Fasciotto, Brigitte H.; Estrada, Rosendo; Eaton, John W.; Patibandla, Phani K.; Waigel, Sabine J.; Li, Dazhuo; Kirtley, John K.; Sethu, Palaniappan; Keynton, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts participating in long duration space missions are likely to be exposed to ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy particles. Previously proposed gene biomarkers for radiation exposure include phosphorylated H2A Histone Family, Member X (γH2AX), Tumor Protein 53 (TP53), and Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A). However, transcripts of these genes may not be the most suitable biomarkers for radiation exposure due to a lack of sensitivity or specificity. As part of a larger effort to develop lab-on-a-chip methods for detecting radiation exposure events using blood samples, we designed a dose–course microarray study in order to determine coding and non-coding RNA transcripts undergoing differential expression immediately following radiation exposure. The main goal was to elicit a small set of sensitive and specific radiation exposure biomarkers at low, medium, and high levels of ionizing radiation exposure. Four separate levels of radiation were considered: 0 Gray (Gy) control; 0.3 Gy; 1.5 Gy; and 3.0 Gy with four replicates at each radiation level. This report includes raw gene expression data files from the resulting microarray experiments from all three radiation levels ranging from a lower, typical exposure than an astronaut might see (0.3 Gy) to high, potentially lethal, levels of radiation (3.0 Gy). The data described here is available in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), accession GSE64375. PMID:26981369

  11. Transcriptional responses to fluctuating thermal regimes underpinning differences in survival in the solitary bee Megachile rotundata.

    PubMed

    Torson, Alex S; Yocum, George D; Rinehart, Joseph P; Kemp, William P; Bowsher, Julia H

    2015-04-01

    The transcriptional responses of insects to long-term, ecologically relevant temperature stress are poorly understood. Long-term exposure to low temperatures, commonly referred to as chilling, can lead to physiological effects collectively known as chill injury. Periodically increasing temperatures during long-term chilling has been shown to increase survival in many insects. However, the transcripts responsible for this increase in survival have never been characterized. Here, we present the first transcriptome-level analysis of increased longevity under fluctuating temperatures during chilling. Overwintering post-diapause quiescent alfalfa leafcutting bees (Megachile rotundata) were exposed to a constant temperature of 6°C, or 6°C with a daily fluctuation to 20°C. RNA was collected at two different time points, before and after mortality rates began to diverge between temperature treatments. Expression analysis identified differentially regulated transcripts between pairwise comparisons of both treatments and time points. Transcripts functioning in ion homeostasis, metabolic pathways and oxidative stress response were up-regulated in individuals exposed to periodic temperature fluctuations during chilling. The differential expression of these transcripts provides support for the hypotheses that fluctuating temperatures protect against chill injury by reducing oxidative stress and returning ion concentrations and metabolic function to more favorable levels. Additionally, exposure to fluctuating temperatures leads to increased expression of transcripts functioning in the immune response and neurogenesis, providing evidence for additional mechanisms associated with increased survival during chilling in M. rotundata. PMID:25657206

  12. Adaptive response of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle to length change.

    PubMed

    Syyong, Harley; Cheung, Christine; Solomon, Dennis; Seow, Chun Y; Kuo, Kuo H

    2008-04-01

    Hypervasoconstriction is associated with pulmonary hypertension and dysfunction of the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle (PASM) is implicated. However, relatively little is known about the mechanical properties of PASM. Recent advances in our understanding of plastic adaptation in smooth muscle may shed light on the disease mechanism. In this study, we determined whether PASM is capable of adapting to length changes (especially shortening) and regain its contractile force. We examined the time course of length adaptation in PASM in response to step changes in length and to length oscillations mimicking the periodic stretches due to pulsatile arterial pressure. Rings from sheep pulmonary artery were mounted on myograph and stimulated using electrical field stimulation (12-16 s, 20 V, 60 Hz). The length-force relationship was determined at L(ref) to 0.6 L(ref), where L(ref) was a reference length close to the in situ length of PASM. The response to length oscillations was determined at L(ref), after the muscle was subjected to length oscillation of various amplitudes for 200 s at 1.5 Hz. Release (or stretch) of resting PASM from L(ref) to 0.6 (and vice versa) was followed by a significant force recovery (73 and 63%, respectively), characteristic of length adaptation. All recoveries of force followed a monoexponential time course. Length oscillations with amplitudes ranging from 5 to 20% L(ref) caused no significant change in force generation in subsequent contractions. It is concluded that, like many smooth muscles, PASM possesses substantial capability to adapt to changes in length. Under pathological conditions, this could contribute to hypervasoconstriction in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:18218913

  13. Adaptive immune response during hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Larrubia, Juan Ramón; Moreno-Cubero, Elia; Lokhande, Megha Uttam; García-Garzón, Silvia; Lázaro, Alicia; Miquel, Joaquín; Perna, Cristian; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects about 170 million people worldwide and it is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is a hepatotropic non-cytopathic virus able to persist in a great percentage of infected hosts due to its ability to escape from the immune control. Liver damage and disease progression during HCV infection are driven by both viral and host factors. Specifically, adaptive immune response carries out an essential task in controlling non-cytopathic viruses because of its ability to recognize infected cells and to destroy them by cytopathic mechanisms and to eliminate the virus by non-cytolytic machinery. HCV is able to impair this response by several means such as developing escape mutations in neutralizing antibodies and in T cell receptor viral epitope recognition sites and inducing HCV-specific cytotoxic T cell anergy and deletion. To impair HCV-specific T cell reactivity, HCV affects effector T cell regulation by modulating T helper and Treg response and by impairing the balance between positive and negative co-stimulatory molecules and between pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. In this review, the role of adaptive immune response in controlling HCV infection and the HCV mechanisms to evade this response are reviewed. PMID:24707125

  14. Mechanical Strain Causes Adaptive Change in Bronchial Fibroblasts Enhancing Profibrotic and Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Smart, David E.; Noto, Antonio; Bucchieri, Fabio; Haitchi, Hans Michael; Holgate, Stephen T.; Howarth, Peter H.; Davies, Donna E.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by periodic episodes of bronchoconstriction and reversible airway obstruction; these symptoms are attributable to a number of factors including increased mass and reactivity of bronchial smooth muscle and extracellular matrix (ECM) in asthmatic airways. Literature has suggested changes in cell responses and signaling can be elicited via modulation of mechanical stress acting upon them, potentially affecting the microenvironment of the cell. In this study, we hypothesized that mechanical strain directly affects the (myo)fibroblast phenotype in asthma. Therefore, we characterized responses of bronchial fibroblasts, from 6 normal and 11 asthmatic non-smoking volunteers, exposed to cyclical mechanical strain using flexible silastic membranes. Samples were analyzed for proteoglycans, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), collagens I and III, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 & 9 and interleukin-8 (IL-8) by qRT-PCR, Western blot, zymography and ELISA. Mechanical strain caused a decrease in αSMA mRNA but no change in either αSMA protein or proteoglycan expression. In contrast the inflammatory mediator IL-8, MMPs and interstitial collagens were increased at both the transcriptional and protein level. The results demonstrate an adaptive response of bronchial fibroblasts to mechanical strain, irrespective of donor. The adaptation involves cytoskeletal rearrangement, matrix remodelling and inflammatory cytokine release. These results suggest that mechanical strain could contribute to disease progression in asthma by promoting inflammation and remodelling responses. PMID:27101406

  15. Overlapping Podospora anserina Transcriptional Responses to Bacterial and Fungal Non Self Indicate a Multilayered Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Lamacchia, Marina; Dyrka, Witold; Breton, Annick; Saupe, Sven J.; Paoletti, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Recognition and response to non self is essential to development and survival of all organisms. It can occur between individuals of the same species or between different organisms. Fungi are established models for conspecific non self recognition in the form of vegetative incompatibility (VI), a genetically controlled process initiating a programmed cell death (PCD) leading to the rejection of a fusion cell between genetically different isolates of the same species. In Podospora anserina VI is controlled by members of the hnwd gene family encoding for proteins analogous to NOD Like Receptors (NLR) immune receptors in eukaryotes. It was hypothesized that the hnwd controlled VI reaction was derived from the fungal innate immune response. Here we analyze the P. anserina transcriptional responses to two bacterial species, Serratia fonticola to which P. anserina survives and S. marcescens to which P. anserina succumbs, and compare these to the transcriptional response induced under VI conditions. Transcriptional responses to both bacteria largely overlap, however the number of genes regulated and magnitude of regulation is more important when P. anserina survives. Transcriptional responses to bacteria also overlap with the VI reaction for both up or down regulated gene sets. Genes up regulated tend to be clustered in the genome, and display limited phylogenetic distribution. In all three responses we observed genes related to autophagy to be up-regulated. Autophagy contributes to the fungal survival in all three conditions. Genes encoding for secondary metabolites and histidine kinase signaling are also up regulated in all three conditions. Transcriptional responses also display differences. Genes involved in response to oxidative stress, or encoding small secreted proteins are essentially expressed in response to bacteria, while genes encoding NLR proteins are expressed during VI. Most functions encoded in response to bacteria favor survival of the fungus while most

  16. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  17. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  18. Genome Wide Binding Site Analysis Reveals Transcriptional Coactivation of Cytokinin-Responsive Genes by DELLA Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marín-de la Rosa, Nora; Pfeiffer, Anne; Hill, Kristine; Locascio, Antonella; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P.; Miskolczi, Pal; Grønlund, Anne L.; Wanchoo-Kohli, Aakriti; Thomas, Stephen G.; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Lohmann, Jan U.; Blázquez, Miguel A.; Alabadí, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability of plants to provide a plastic response to environmental cues relies on the connectivity between signaling pathways. DELLA proteins act as hubs that relay environmental information to the multiple transcriptional circuits that control growth and development through physical interaction with transcription factors from different families. We have analyzed the presence of one DELLA protein at the Arabidopsis genome by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to large-scale sequencing and we find that it binds at the promoters of multiple genes. Enrichment analysis shows a strong preference for cis elements recognized by specific transcription factor families. In particular, we demonstrate that DELLA proteins are recruited by type-B ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATORS (ARR) to the promoters of cytokinin-regulated genes, where they act as transcriptional co-activators. The biological relevance of this mechanism is underpinned by the necessity of simultaneous presence of DELLAs and ARRs to restrict root meristem growth and to promote photomorphogenesis. PMID:26134422

  19. Conserved enhancer and silencer elements responsible for differential Adh transcription in Drosophila cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, S; Benyajati, C

    1990-01-01

    The distal promoter of Adh is differentially expressed in Drosophila tissue culture cell lines. After transfection with an exogenous Adh gene, there was a specific increase in distal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) transcripts in ADH-expressing (ADH+) cells above the levels observed in transfected ADH-nonexpressing (ADH-) cells. We used deletion mutations and a comparative transient-expression assay to identify the cis-acting elements responsible for enhanced Adh distal transcription in ADH+ cells. DNA sequences controlling high levels of distal transcription were localized to a 15-base-pair (bp) region nearly 500 bp upstream of the distal RNA start site. In addition, a 61-bp negative cis-acting element was found upstream from and adjacent to the enhancer. When this silencer element was deleted, distal transcription increased only in the ADH+ cell line. These distant upstream elements must interact with the promoter elements, the Adf-1-binding site and the TATA box, as they only influenced transcription when at least one of these two positive distal promoter elements was present. Internal deletions targeted to the Adf-1-binding site or the TATA box reduced transcription in both cell types but did not affect the transcription initiation site. Distal transcription in transfected ADH- cells appears to be controlled primarily through these promoter elements and does not involve the upstream regulatory elements. Evolutionary conservation in distantly related Drosophila species suggests the importance of these upstream elements in correct developmental and tissue-specific expression of ADH. Images PMID:1694013

  20. Ubiquitin ligase activity of TFIIH and the transcriptional response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yuichiro; Masuda, Claudio A; Chang, Wei-Hau; Komori, Hirofumi; Wang, Dong; Hunter, Tony; Joazeiro, Claudio A P; Kornberg, Roger D

    2005-04-15

    Core transcription factor (TF) IIH purified from yeast possesses an E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase activity, which resides, at least in part, in a RING finger (RNF) domain of the Ssl1 subunit. Yeast strains mutated in the Ssl1 RNF domain are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). This increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents does not reflect a deficiency in nucleotide excision repair. Rather, it correlates with reduced transcriptional induction of genes involved in DNA repair, suggesting that the E3 Ub ligase activity of TFIIH mediates the transcriptional response to DNA damage. PMID:15837426

  1. Stress and adaptation responses to repeated acute acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Study in which groups of adult male chickens (single-comb white leghorn) were exposed daily to acceleration (centrifugation) of 2 or 3 G for 10 min, 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hr (continuously), or 0 time (controls). After approximately five months of this intermittent treatment (training), the birds were exposed to continuous accelerations of the same G force (intensity). The degree of stress and adaptation of each bird was determined by survival and relative lymphocyte count criteria. Intermittent training exposures of 2 G developed levels of adaptation in birds directly proportional to the duration of their daily exposure. Intermittent training periods at 3 G, however, produced a physiological deterioration in birds receiving daily exposures of 8 hr or more. Adaptive benefits were found only in the 1- and 4-hr-daily intermittent 3-G exposure groups. Exposure to 3 G produced an immediate stress response as indicated by a low relative lymphocyte count which returned to control (preexposed) values prior to the next daily acceleration period in the 10-min, 1-hr, and 4-hr groups. This daily recovery period from stress appeared to be necessary for adaptation as opposed to deterioration for the more severe environmental (3 G) alteration.

  2. Transcriptional profiling of recall responses to Francisella live vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Paranavitana, Chrysanthi; DaSilva, Luis; Vladimirova, Antoaneta; Pittman, Phillip R; Velauthapillai, Mahendran; Nikolich, Mikeljon

    2014-03-01

    Global gene expression profile changes were monitored in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after challenge with the live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella tularensis. Because these PBMCs were from individuals previously immunized with LVS, stimulating these cells with LVS should activate memory responses. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool identified pathways, functions, and networks associated with this in vitro recall response, including novel pathways triggered by the memory response. Dendritic cell (DC) maturation was the most significant among the more than 25 relevant pathways discovered. Interleukin 15, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 signaling pathways were also significant. Pathway analysis indicated that Class 1 antigen presentation may not be optimal with LVS vaccination. The top three biological functions were antigen presentation, cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. Network analysis revealed that the top network associated with these functions had IFNγ and TNFα in central interactive positions. Our results suggest that DC maturation is a key factor in the recall responses and that more effective antigen processing and presentation is needed for cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Taken together, these considerations are critical for future tularemia vaccine development studies. PMID:24453125

  3. Abiotic and Biotic Stressors Causing Equivalent Mortality Induce Highly Variable Transcriptional Responses in the Soybean Aphid

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Laramy S.; Bickel, Ryan D.; Brisson, Jennifer A.; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Siegfried, Blair D.; Zera, Anthony J.; Miller, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental stress affects basic organismal functioning and can cause physiological, developmental, and reproductive impairment. However, in many nonmodel organisms, the core molecular stress response remains poorly characterized and the extent to which stress-induced transcriptional changes differ across qualitatively different stress types is largely unexplored. The current study examines the molecular stress response of the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) using RNA sequencing and compares transcriptional responses to multiple stressors (heat, starvation, and plant defenses) at a standardized stress level (27% adult mortality). Stress-induced transcriptional changes showed remarkable variation, with starvation, heat, and plant defensive stress altering the expression of 3985, 510, and 12 genes, respectively. Molecular responses showed little overlap across all three stressors. However, a common transcriptional stress response was identified under heat and starvation, involved with up-regulation of glycogen biosynthesis and molecular chaperones and down-regulation of bacterial endosymbiont cellular and insect cuticular components. Stressor-specific responses indicated heat affected expression of heat shock proteins and cuticular components, whereas starvation altered a diverse set of genes involved in primary metabolism, oxidative reductive processes, nucleosome and histone assembly, and the regulation of DNA repair and replication. Exposure to host plant defenses elicited the weakest response, of which half of the genes were of unknown function. This study highlights the need for standardizing stress levels when comparing across stress types and provides a basis for understanding the role of general vs. stressor specific molecular responses in aphids. PMID:25538100

  4. Natural antisense transcripts regulate the neuronal stress response and excitability

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xingguo; Valakh, Vera; DiAntonio, Aaron; Ben-Shahar, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    Neurons regulate ionic fluxes across their plasma membrane to maintain their excitable properties under varying environmental conditions. However, the mechanisms that regulate ion channels abundance remain poorly understood. Here we show that pickpocket 29 (ppk29), a gene that encodes a Drosophila degenerin/epithelial sodium channel (DEG/ENaC), regulates neuronal excitability via a protein-independent mechanism. We demonstrate that the mRNA 3′UTR of ppk29 affects neuronal firing rates and associated heat-induced seizures by acting as a natural antisense transcript (NAT) that regulates the neuronal mRNA levels of seizure (sei), the Drosophila homolog of the human Ether-à-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel. We find that the regulatory impact of ppk29 mRNA on sei is independent of the sodium channel it encodes. Thus, our studies reveal a novel mRNA dependent mechanism for the regulation of neuronal excitability that is independent of protein-coding capacity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01849.001 PMID:24642409

  5. Transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the plasma membrane-perturbing compound chitosan.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Anna; Boorsma, Andre; Brul, Stanley; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Klis, Frans M

    2005-04-01

    Chitosan is a plasma membrane-perturbing compound consisting of linear chains of beta-1,4-linked glucosamine residues, which at acidic pHs become positively charged. It is extensively used as an antimicrobial compound, yet its mode of action is still unresolved. Chitosan strongly affected the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and two human-pathogenic yeasts, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Microarray analysis of yeast cells treated with sublethal concentrations of chitosan revealed induction of the environmental stress response and three more major transcriptional responses. The first was a rapid and stable Cin5p-mediated response. Cin5p/Yap4p is a transcription factor involved in various stress responses. Deletion of CIN5 led to increased chitosan sensitivity. The second was a Crz1p-mediated response, which is delayed compared to the Cin5p response. Crz1p is a transcription factor of the calcineurin pathway. Cells deleted for CRZ1 or treated with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 became hypersensitive to chitosan, supporting the notion that the Crz1p-controlled response offers protection against chitosan. The third was a strong Rlm1p-mediated response which ran parallel in time with the Crz1p-regulated response. Rlm1p is a transcription factor of the cell wall integrity pathway, which is activated by cell wall stress. Importantly, chitosan-treated cells became more resistant to beta-1,3-glucanase, which is a well-known response to cell wall stress. We propose that the transcriptional response to chitosan may be representative of other plasma membrane-perturbing compounds. PMID:15821130

  6. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  7. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  8. Adaptation of the repellency response to DEET in Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Sfara, Valeria; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Zerba, Eduardo N; Alzogaray, Raúl A

    2011-10-01

    For many years it has been accepted that DEET interferes with the detection of odours from the host instead of having a repellent effect. However, recent work showed that DEET acts as an odorant molecule and elicits a behavioural response in the absence of other stimuli. Therefore, DEET must promote some phenomenon connected with the stimuli-sensory system interaction, such as a sensory adaptation, where the sensory system regulates its sensitivity to different stimuli intensities during continuous or repetitive exposure. In this work, we studied different aspects of the insect-DEET interaction through behavioural observations. Previous exposure of fifth instar Rhodnius prolixus nymphs to DEET decreased the behavioural response to this repellent. We observed a decrease in repellence after different times of continuous stimulation with DEET in a time-dependent manner. The response to DEET was recovered 10 min after exposure, when insects were continuously stimulated during 5 or 10 min; maximum repellence was recovered 20 min after exposure when insects were stimulated for 20 min. DEET produced a repellent effect when nymphs were exposed only to its vapours. These results suggest that exposure to DEET produces adaptation in R. prolixus nymphs, and that the behavioural response elicited by DEET occurs via olfaction when no other stimuli are present. PMID:21801727

  9. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  10. Dynamic Transcriptional Response of Escherichia coli to Inclusion Body Formation

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Faraz; Fernando, Lawrence P.; Salazar, Mary Alice; Powell, Rhonda R.; Bruce, Terri F.; Harcum, Sarah W.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is used intensively for recombinant protein production, but one key challenge with recombinant E. coli is the tendency of recombinant proteins to misfold and aggregate into insoluble inclusion bodies (IBs). IBs contain high concentrations of inactive recombinant protein that require recovery steps to salvage a functional recombinant protein. Currently, no universally effective method exists to prevent IB formation in recombinant E. coli. In this study, DNA microarrays were used to compare the E. coli gene expression response dynamics to soluble and insoluble recombinant protein production. As expected and previously reported, the classical heat-shock genes had increased expression due to IB formation, including protein folding chaperones and proteases. Gene expression levels for protein synthesis-related and energy-synthesis pathways were also increased. Many transmembrane transporter and corresponding catabolic pathways genes had decreased expression for substrates not present in the culture medium. Additionally, putative genes represented over one-third of the genes identified to have significant expression changes due to IB formation, indicating many important cellular responses to IB formation still need to be characterized. Interestingly, cells grown in 3% ethanol had significantly reduced gene expression responses due to IB formation. Taken together, these results indicate that IB formation is complex, stimulates the heat-shock response, increases protein and energy synthesis needs, and streamlines transport and catabolic processes, while ethanol diminished all of these responses. PMID:24338599

  11. Loss of adaptive variation during evolutionary responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Buckley, James; Bridle, Jon R

    2014-10-01

    The changes in species' geographical distribution demanded by climate change are often critically limited by the availability of key interacting species. In such cases, species' persistence will depend on the rapid evolution of biotic interactions. Understanding evolutionary limits to such adaptation is therefore crucial for predicting biological responses to environmental change. The recent poleward range expansion of the UK brown argus butterfly has been associated with a shift in female preference from its main host plant, rockrose (Cistaceae), onto Geraniaceae host plants throughout its new distribution. Using reciprocal transplants onto natural host plants across the UK range, we demonstrate reduced fitness of females from recently colonised Geraniaceae-dominated habitat when moved to ancestral rockrose habitats. By contrast, individuals from ancestral rockrose habitats show no reduction in fitness on Geraniaceae. Climate-driven range expansion in this species is therefore associated with the rapid evolution of biotic interactions and a significant loss of adaptive variation. PMID:25104062

  12. Response and adaptation of bone cells to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lifang; Li, Runzhi; Su, Peihong; Arfat, Yasir; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Airong

    2014-11-01

    Bone loss induced by microgravity during space flight is one of the most deleterious factors on astronaut's health and is mainly attributed to an unbalance in the process of bone remodeling. Studies from the space microgravity have demonstrated that the disruption of bone remodeling is associated with the changes of four main functional bone cells, including osteoblast, osteoclast, osteocyte, and mesenchymal stem cells. For the limited availability, expensive costs and confined experiment conditions for conducting space microgravity studies, the mechanism of bone cells response and adaptation to microgravity is still unclear. Therefore, some ground-based simulated microgravity methods have been developed to investigate the bioeffects of microgravity and the mechanisms. Here, based on our studies and others, we review how bone cells (osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and mesenchymal stem cells) respond and adapt to simulated microgravity.

  13. The genomewide transcriptional response underlying the pea aphid wing polyphenism.

    PubMed

    Vellichirammal, Neetha N; Madayiputhiya, Nandakumar; Brisson, Jennifer A

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is a key life history strategy used by many plants and animals living in heterogeneous environments. A multitude of studies have investigated the costs and limits of plasticity, as well as the conditions under which it evolves. Much less well understood are the molecular genetic mechanisms that enable an organism to sense its environment and respond in a plastic manner. The pea aphid wing polyphenism is a compelling laboratory model to study these mechanisms. In this polyphenism, environmental stressors like high density cause asexual, viviparous adult female aphids to change the development of their embryos from wingless to winged morphs. The life history trade-offs between the two morphs have been intensively studied, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain largely unknown. We therefore performed a genomewide study of the maternal transcriptome at two time points with and without a crowding stress to discover the maternal molecular changes that lead to the development of winged vs. wingless offspring. We observed significant transcriptional changes in genes associated with odorant binding, neurotransmitter transport, hormonal activity and chromatin remodelling in the maternal transcriptome. We also found that titres of serotonin, dopamine and octopamine were higher in solitary compared to crowded aphids. We use these results to posit a model for how maternal signals inform a developing embryo to be winged or wingless. Our findings add significant insights into the identity of the molecular mechanisms that underlie environmentally induced morph determination and suggest a possible role for biogenic amine regulation in polyphenisms generally. PMID:27393739

  14. Transcriptional response in apple to fire blight disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a destructive disease of apple, pear, and other plants in the subfamily Maloideae of the Rosaceae. The goal of this study was to use a global analysis of gene expression to characterize the temporal response of apple to infection by E. amyl...

  15. Rapid transcriptional response of Malus to Erwinia amylovora infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suppression subtractive cDNA hybridization (SSH) was used to identify genes that are differentially up- and down-regulated in apple (Malus X domestica) in response to challenge with Erwinia amylovora (Ea). cDNA libraries were constructed from Ea- and mock-challenged 'Gale Gala' apple leaf tissue at...

  16. Adaptive Patterns of Stress Responsivity: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Del Giudice, Marco; Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Ellis, Bruce J.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive calibration model (ACM) is an evolutionary–developmental theory of individual differences in stress responsivity. In this article, we tested some key predictions of the ACM in a middle childhood sample (N = 256). Measures of autonomic nervous system activity across the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches validated the 4-pattern taxonomy of the ACM via finite mixture modeling. Moreover, the 4 patterns of responsivity showed the predicted associations with family stress levels but no association with measures of ecological stress. Our hypotheses concerning sex differences in responsivity were only partly confirmed. This preliminary study provides initial support for the key predictions of the ACM and highlights some of the methodological challenges that will need to be considered in future research on this topic. PMID:22148947

  17. Transcriptional Responses to Sucrose Mimic the Plant-Associated Life Style of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638

    SciTech Connect

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Wu, Xiao; Ouyang, Liming; Zhang, Yian Biao; Stadler, Andrea; McCorkle, Sean; Zhu, Wei; Maslov, Sergei; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2015-01-21

    Growth in sucrose medium was previously found to trigger the expression of functions involved in the plant associated life style of the endophytic bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638. Therefore, comparative transcriptome analysis between cultures grown in sucrose or lactate medium was used to gain insights in the expression levels of bacterial functions involved in the endophytic life style of strain 638. Growth on sucrose as a carbon source resulted in major changes in cell physiology, including a shift from a planktonic life style to the formation of bacterial aggregates. This shift was accompanied by a decrease in transcription of genes involved in motility (e.g. flagella biosynthesis) and an increase in the transcription of genes involved in colonization, adhesion and biofilm formation. The transcription levels of functions previously suggested as being involved in endophytic behavior and functions responsible for plant growth promoting properties, including the synthesis of indole-acetic acid, acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, also increased significantly for cultures grown in sucrose medium. Interestingly, despite an abundance of essential nutrients transcription levels of functions related to uptake and processing of nitrogen and iron became increased for cultures grown on sucrose as sole carbon source. Transcriptome data were also used to analyze putative regulatory relationships. In addition to the small RNA csrABCD regulon, which seems to play a role in the physiological adaptation and possibly the shift between free-living and plant-associated endophytic life style of Enterobacter sp. 638, our results also pointed to the involvement of rcsAB in controlling responses by Enterobacter sp. 638 to a plant-associated life style. Lastly, targeted mutagenesis was used to confirm this role and showed that compared to wild-type Enterobacter sp. 638 a ΔrcsB mutant was affected in its plant growth promoting ability.

  18. Transcriptional Responses to Sucrose Mimic the Plant-Associated Life Style of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Wu, Xiao; Ouyang, Liming; Zhang, Yian Biao; Stadler, Andrea; McCorkle, Sean; Zhu, Wei; Maslov, Sergei; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2015-01-21

    Growth in sucrose medium was previously found to trigger the expression of functions involved in the plant associated life style of the endophytic bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638. Therefore, comparative transcriptome analysis between cultures grown in sucrose or lactate medium was used to gain insights in the expression levels of bacterial functions involved in the endophytic life style of strain 638. Growth on sucrose as a carbon source resulted in major changes in cell physiology, including a shift from a planktonic life style to the formation of bacterial aggregates. This shift was accompanied by a decrease in transcription of genes involvedmore » in motility (e.g. flagella biosynthesis) and an increase in the transcription of genes involved in colonization, adhesion and biofilm formation. The transcription levels of functions previously suggested as being involved in endophytic behavior and functions responsible for plant growth promoting properties, including the synthesis of indole-acetic acid, acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, also increased significantly for cultures grown in sucrose medium. Interestingly, despite an abundance of essential nutrients transcription levels of functions related to uptake and processing of nitrogen and iron became increased for cultures grown on sucrose as sole carbon source. Transcriptome data were also used to analyze putative regulatory relationships. In addition to the small RNA csrABCD regulon, which seems to play a role in the physiological adaptation and possibly the shift between free-living and plant-associated endophytic life style of Enterobacter sp. 638, our results also pointed to the involvement of rcsAB in controlling responses by Enterobacter sp. 638 to a plant-associated life style. Lastly, targeted mutagenesis was used to confirm this role and showed that compared to wild-type Enterobacter sp. 638 a ΔrcsB mutant was affected in its plant growth promoting ability.« less

  19. Transcriptional Responses to Sucrose Mimic the Plant-Associated Life Style of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Wu, Xiao; Ouyang, Liming; Stadler, Andrea; McCorkle, Sean; Zhu, Wei; Maslov, Sergei; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Growth in sucrose medium was previously found to trigger the expression of functions involved in the plant associated life style of the endophytic bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638. Therefore, comparative transcriptome analysis between cultures grown in sucrose or lactate medium was used to gain insights in the expression levels of bacterial functions involved in the endophytic life style of strain 638. Growth on sucrose as a carbon source resulted in major changes in cell physiology, including a shift from a planktonic life style to the formation of bacterial aggregates. This shift was accompanied by a decrease in transcription of genes involved in motility (e.g. flagella biosynthesis) and an increase in the transcription of genes involved in colonization, adhesion and biofilm formation. The transcription levels of functions previously suggested as being involved in endophytic behavior and functions responsible for plant growth promoting properties, including the synthesis of indole-acetic acid, acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, also increased significantly for cultures grown in sucrose medium. Interestingly, despite an abundance of essential nutrients transcription levels of functions related to uptake and processing of nitrogen and iron became increased for cultures grown on sucrose as sole carbon source. Transcriptome data were also used to analyze putative regulatory relationships. In addition to the small RNA csrABCD regulon, which seems to play a role in the physiological adaptation and possibly the shift between free-living and plant-associated endophytic life style of Enterobacter sp. 638, our results also pointed to the involvement of rcsAB in controlling responses by Enterobacter sp. 638 to a plant-associated life style. Targeted mutagenesis was used to confirm this role and showed that compared to wild-type Enterobacter sp. 638 a ΔrcsB mutant was affected in its plant growth promoting ability. PMID:25607953

  20. Transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes with different glucosinolate profiles after attack by polyphagous Myzus persicae and oligophagous Brevicoryne brassicae.

    PubMed

    Kusnierczyk, Anna; Winge, Per; Midelfart, Herman; Armbruster, W Scott; Rossiter, John T; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2007-01-01

    Plants are equipped with a range of defence mechanisms against herbivorous insects. In cruciferous species, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, and ethylene along with glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products play important roles in plant protection and plant-insect communication. In turn, a number of herbivores have adapted to plants that contain glucosinolates. As a result of adaptation to their host plants, specialized insects may elicit different plant-inducible responses than generalists. Oligonucleotide microarrays and qRT-PCR analysis were used to characterize transcriptional profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana plants in response to infestation with a generalist aphid, Myzus persicae, or a cruciferous plant specialist, Brevicoryne brassicae. To find possible differences and similarities in molecular responses between plants differing in predominant glucosinolate hydrolysis products, three ecotypes of A. thaliana were chosen: Wassilewskija (Ws), Cape Verde Islands (Cvi), and Landsberg erecta (Ler), which, respectively, produce mainly isothiocyanates, epithionitriles, and nitriles. In all three ecotypes, general stress-responsive genes, genes belonging to octadecanoid and indole glucosinolate synthesis pathways were induced upon both generalist and specialist attack. By contrast, transcription of myrosinases, enzymes hydrolysing glucosinolates, was suppressed. The induction of the jasmonic acid synthesis pathway was strongest in Cvi, while the up-regulation of the indole glucosinolate synthesis pathway was highest in Ler, suggesting a slightly different defence strategy in these two ecotypes. Specialist and generalist infestations caused statistically significant differential regulation of 60 genes in Ws and 21 in Cvi. Among these were jasmonic acid and tryptophan synthesis pathway enzymes, and pathogenesis related protein (PR1). Insect no-choice experiments revealed lowered fitness of B. brassicae on Ler and Cvi in comparison to Ws, but no ecotype

  1. Transcription Regulation in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Alexandra M; Walker, Julie E; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2016-07-15

    The known diversity of metabolic strategies and physiological adaptations of archaeal species to extreme environments is extraordinary. Accurate and responsive mechanisms to ensure that gene expression patterns match the needs of the cell necessitate regulatory strategies that control the activities and output of the archaeal transcription apparatus. Archaea are reliant on a single RNA polymerase for all transcription, and many of the known regulatory mechanisms employed for archaeal transcription mimic strategies also employed for eukaryotic and bacterial species. Novel mechanisms of transcription regulation have become apparent by increasingly sophisticated in vivo and in vitro investigations of archaeal species. This review emphasizes recent progress in understanding archaeal transcription regulatory mechanisms and highlights insights gained from studies of the influence of archaeal chromatin on transcription. PMID:27137495

  2. Steering tumor progression through the transcriptional response to growth factors and stroma.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Morris E; Yarden, Yosef

    2014-08-01

    Tumor progression can be understood as a collaborative effort of mutations and growth factors, which propels cell proliferation and matrix invasion, and also enables evasion of drug-induced apoptosis. Concentrating on EGFR, we discuss downstream signaling and the initiation of transcriptional events in response to growth factors. Specifically, we portray a wave-like program, which initiates by rapid disappearance of two-dozen microRNAs, followed by an abrupt rise of immediate early genes (IEGs), relatively short transcripts encoding transcriptional regulators. Concurrent with the fall of IEGs, some 30-60 min after stimulation, a larger group, the delayed early genes, is up-regulated and its own fall overlaps the rise of the final wave of late response genes. This late wave persists and determines long-term phenotype acquisition, such as invasiveness. Key regulatory steps in the orderly response to growth factors provide a trove of potential oncogenes and tumor suppressors. PMID:24873881

  3. Transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to chewing and sucking insect herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Heidi M.; Fescemyer, Howard; Ehlting, Juergen; Weston, David; Rehrig, Erin; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Bohlmann, Joerg; Schultz, Jack

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Arabidopsis can recognize and respond differentially to insect species at the transcriptional level using a genome wide microarray. Transcriptional reprogramming was characterized using co-expression analysis in damaged and undamaged leaves at two times in response to mechanical wounding and four insect species. In all, 2778 (10.6%) of annotated genes on the array were differentially expressed in at least one treatment. Responses differed mainly between aphid and caterpillar and sampling times. Responses to aphids and caterpillars shared only 10% of up-regulated and 8% of down-regulated genes. Responses to two caterpillars shared 21 and 12% of up- and down-regulated genes, whereas responses to the two aphids shared only 7 and 4% of up-regulated and down-regulated genes. Overlap in genes expressed between 6 and 24 h was 3–15%, and depended on the insect species. Responses in attacked and unattacked leaves differed at 6 h but converged by 24 h. Genes responding to the insects are also responsive to many stressors and included primary metabolism. Aphids down-regulated amino acid catabolism; caterpillars stimulated production of amino acids involved in glucosinolate synthesis. Co-expression analysis revealed 17 response networks. Transcription factors were a major portion of differentially expressed genes throughout and responsive genes shared most of the known or postulated binding sites. However, cis-element composition of genes down regulated by the aphid M. persicae was unique, as were those of genes down-regulated by caterpillars. As many as 20 cis-elements were over-represented in one or more treatments, including some from well-characterized classes and others as yet uncharacterized. We suggest that transcriptional changes elicited by wounding and insects are heavily influenced by transcription factors and involve both enrichment of a common set of cis-elements and a unique enrichment of a few cis-elements in responding genes

  4. Transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to chewing and sucking insect herbivores

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Heidi M.; Fescemyer, Howard; Ehlting, Juergen; Weston, David; Rehrig, Erin; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Bohlmann, Joerg; Schultz, Jack

    2014-11-14

    We tested the hypothesis that Arabidopsis can recognize and respond differentially to insect species at the transcriptional level using a genome wide microarray. Transcriptional reprogramming was characterized using co-expression analysis in damaged and undamaged leaves at two times in response to mechanical wounding and four insect species. In all, 2778 (10.6%) of annotated genes on the array were differentially expressed in at least one treatment. Responses differed mainly between aphid and caterpillar and sampling times. Responses to aphids and caterpillars shared only 10% of up-regulated and 8% of down-regulated genes. Responses to two caterpillars shared 21 and 12% of up- and down-regulated genes, whereas responses to the two aphids shared only 7 and 4% of up-regulated and down-regulated genes. Overlap in genes expressed between 6 and 24 h was 3–15%, and depended on the insect species. Responses in attacked and unattacked leaves differed at 6 h but converged by 24 h. Genes responding to the insects are also responsive to many stressors and included primary metabolism. Aphids down-regulated amino acid catabolism; caterpillars stimulated production of amino acids involved in glucosinolate synthesis. Co-expression analysis revealed 17 response networks. Transcription factors were a major portion of differentially expressed genes throughout and responsive genes shared most of the known or postulated binding sites. However, cis-element composition of genes down regulated by the aphid M. persicae was unique, as were those of genes down-regulated by caterpillars. As many as 20 cis-elements were over-represented in one or more treatments, including some from well-characterized classes and others as yet uncharacterized. We suggest that transcriptional changes elicited by wounding and insects are heavily influenced by transcription factors and involve both enrichment of a common set of cis-elements and a unique enrichment of a few cis-elements in responding genes.

  5. Transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to chewing and sucking insect herbivores

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Appel, Heidi M.; Fescemyer, Howard; Ehlting, Juergen; Weston, David; Rehrig, Erin; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Bohlmann, Joerg; Schultz, Jack

    2014-11-14

    We tested the hypothesis that Arabidopsis can recognize and respond differentially to insect species at the transcriptional level using a genome wide microarray. Transcriptional reprogramming was characterized using co-expression analysis in damaged and undamaged leaves at two times in response to mechanical wounding and four insect species. In all, 2778 (10.6%) of annotated genes on the array were differentially expressed in at least one treatment. Responses differed mainly between aphid and caterpillar and sampling times. Responses to aphids and caterpillars shared only 10% of up-regulated and 8% of down-regulated genes. Responses to two caterpillars shared 21 and 12% of up-more » and down-regulated genes, whereas responses to the two aphids shared only 7 and 4% of up-regulated and down-regulated genes. Overlap in genes expressed between 6 and 24 h was 3–15%, and depended on the insect species. Responses in attacked and unattacked leaves differed at 6 h but converged by 24 h. Genes responding to the insects are also responsive to many stressors and included primary metabolism. Aphids down-regulated amino acid catabolism; caterpillars stimulated production of amino acids involved in glucosinolate synthesis. Co-expression analysis revealed 17 response networks. Transcription factors were a major portion of differentially expressed genes throughout and responsive genes shared most of the known or postulated binding sites. However, cis-element composition of genes down regulated by the aphid M. persicae was unique, as were those of genes down-regulated by caterpillars. As many as 20 cis-elements were over-represented in one or more treatments, including some from well-characterized classes and others as yet uncharacterized. We suggest that transcriptional changes elicited by wounding and insects are heavily influenced by transcription factors and involve both enrichment of a common set of cis-elements and a unique enrichment of a few cis-elements in responding

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of the Beta-Synuclein 5′-Promoter Metal Response Element by Metal Transcription Factor-1

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Patrick C.; Wright, Josephine A.; Brown, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The progression of many human neurodegenerative disorders is associated with an accumulation of alpha-synuclein. Alpha-synuclein belongs to the homologous synuclein family, which includes beta-synuclein. It has been proposed that beta-synuclein may be a natural regulator of alpha-synuclein. Therefore controlling beta-synuclein expression may control the accumulation of alpha-synuclein and ultimately prevent disease progression. The regulation of synucleins is poorly understood. We investigated the transcriptional regulation of beta-synuclein, with the aim of identifying molecules that differentially control beta-synuclein expression levels. To investigate transcriptional regulation of beta-synuclein, we used reporter gene assays and bioinformatics. We identified a region −1.1/−0.6 kb upstream of the beta-synuclein translational start site to be a key regulatory region of beta-synuclein 5′-promoter activity in human dopaminergic cells (SH-SY5Y). Within this key promoter region we identified a metal response element pertaining to a putative Metal Transcription Factor-1 (MTF-1) binding site. We demonstrated that MTF-1 binds to this 5′-promoter region using EMSA analysis. Moreover, we showed that MTF-1 differentially regulates beta-synuclein promoter binding site, as well as beta-synuclein mRNA and protein expression. This effect of MTF-1 on expression was found to be specific to beta-synuclein when compared to alpha-synuclein. Understanding the regulation of synucleins and how they interact may point to molecular targets that could be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. In this study we showed that MTF-1 differentially controls the expression of beta-synuclein when compared to its homolog alpha-synuclein. This could potentially provide a novel targets or pathways for therapeutic intervention and/or treatment of synucleinopathies. PMID:21386983

  7. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-01-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes. PMID:26387537

  8. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B.; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments.

  9. Aeroelastic Response of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Transtition Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Lung, Shun-fat

    2016-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator was a joint task under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory and FlexSys, Inc. (Ann Arbor, Michigan), chartered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop advanced technologies that enable environmentally friendly aircraft, such as continuous mold-line technologies. The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator encompassed replacing the Fowler flaps on the SubsoniC Aircraft Testbed, a Gulfstream III (Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, Georgia) aircraft, with control surfaces developed by FlexSys, Inc., a pair of uniquely-designed, unconventional flaps to be used as lifting surfaces during flight-testing to substantiate their structural effectiveness. The unconventional flaps consisted of a main flap section and two transition sections, inboard and outboard, which demonstrated the continuous mold-line technology. Unique characteristics of the transition sections provided a challenge to the airworthiness assessment for this part of the structure. A series of build-up tests and analyses were conducted to ensure the data required to support the airworthiness assessment were acquired and applied accurately. The transition sections were analyzed both as individual components and as part of the flight-test article assembly. Instrumentation was installed in the transition sections based on the analysis to best capture the in-flight aeroelastic response. Flight-testing was conducted and flight data were acquired to validate the analyses. This paper documents the details of the aeroelastic assessment and in-flight response of the transition sections of the unconventional Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge flaps.

  10. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Lisa; Pinheiro, Marco T; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G; Zeef, Leo A H; Donaldson, Ian J; Ashe, Hilary L

    2016-07-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates. PMID:27379389

  11. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G.; Zeef, Leo A. H.; Donaldson, Ian J.; Ashe, Hilary L.

    2016-01-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates. PMID:27379389

  12. PTRF/Cavin-1 promotes efficient ribosomal RNA transcription in response to metabolic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Libin; Pilch, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA transcription mediated by RNA polymerase I represents the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis. In eukaryotic cells, nutrients and growth factors regulate ribosomal RNA transcription through various key factors coupled to cell growth. We show here in mature adipocytes, ribosomal transcription can be acutely regulated in response to metabolic challenges. This acute response is mediated by PTRF (polymerase I transcription and release factor, also known as cavin-1), which has previously been shown to play a critical role in caveolae formation. The caveolae–independent rDNA transcriptional role of PTRF not only explains the lipodystrophy phenotype observed in PTRF deficient mice and humans, but also highlights its crucial physiological role in maintaining adipocyte allostasis. Multiple post-translational modifications of PTRF provide mechanistic bases for its regulation. The role of PTRF in ribosomal transcriptional efficiency is likely relevant to many additional physiological situations of cell growth and organismal metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17508.001 PMID:27528195

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lsr2 Is a Global Transcriptional Regulator Required for Adaptation to Changing Oxygen Levels and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bartek, I. L.; Woolhiser, L. K.; Baughn, A. D.; Basaraba, R. J.; Jacobs, W. R.; Lenaerts, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To survive a dynamic host environment, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must endure a series of challenges, from reactive oxygen and nitrogen stress to drastic shifts in oxygen availability. The mycobacterial Lsr2 protein has been implicated in reactive oxygen defense via direct protection of DNA. To examine the role of Lsr2 in pathogenesis and physiology of M. tuberculosis, we generated a strain deleted for lsr2. Analysis of the M. tuberculosis Δlsr2 strain demonstrated that Lsr2 is not required for DNA protection, as this strain was equally susceptible as the wild type to DNA-damaging agents. The lsr2 mutant did display severe growth defects under normoxic and hyperoxic conditions, but it was not required for growth under low-oxygen conditions. However, it was also required for adaptation to anaerobiosis. The defect in anaerobic adaptation led to a marked decrease in viability during anaerobiosis, as well as a lag in recovery from it. Gene expression profiling of the Δlsr2 mutant under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in conjunction with published DNA binding-site data indicates that Lsr2 is a global transcriptional regulator controlling adaptation to changing oxygen levels. The Δlsr2 strain was capable of establishing an early infection in the BALB/c mouse model; however, it was severely defective in persisting in the lungs and caused no discernible lung pathology. These findings demonstrate M. tuberculosis Lsr2 is a global transcriptional regulator required for control of genes involved in adaptation to extremes in oxygen availability and is required for persistent infection. PMID:24895305

  14. Hypercapnia Suppresses the HIF-dependent Adaptive Response to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Selfridge, Andrew C; Cavadas, Miguel A S; Scholz, Carsten C; Campbell, Eric L; Welch, Lynn C; Lecuona, Emilia; Colgan, Sean P; Barrett, Kim E; Sporn, Peter H S; Sznajder, Jacob I; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T

    2016-05-27

    Molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide are the primary gaseous substrate and product of oxidative metabolism, respectively. Hypoxia (low oxygen) and hypercapnia (high carbon dioxide) are co-incidental features of the tissue microenvironment in a range of pathophysiologic states, including acute and chronic respiratory diseases. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is the master regulator of the transcriptional response to hypoxia; however, little is known about the impact of hypercapnia on gene transcription. Because of the relationship between hypoxia and hypercapnia, we investigated the effect of hypercapnia on the HIF pathway. Hypercapnia suppressed HIF-α protein stability and HIF target gene expression both in mice and cultured cells in a manner that was at least in part independent of the canonical O2-dependent HIF degradation pathway. The suppressive effects of hypercapnia on HIF-α protein stability could be mimicked by reducing intracellular pH at a constant level of partial pressure of CO2 Bafilomycin A1, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase that blocks lysosomal degradation, prevented the hypercapnic suppression of HIF-α protein. Based on these results, we hypothesize that hypercapnia counter-regulates activation of the HIF pathway by reducing intracellular pH and promoting lysosomal degradation of HIF-α subunits. Therefore, hypercapnia may play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases where HIF is implicated. PMID:27044749

  15. Metabolic and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms underlying the anoxic adaptation of rice coleoptile.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Ha, Sun-Hwa; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2014-01-01

    The ability of rice to germinate under anoxia by extending the coleoptile is a highly unusual characteristic and a key feature underpinning the ability of rice seeds to establish in such a stressful environment. The process has been a focal point for research for many years. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the anoxic growth of the coleoptile still remain largely unknown. To unravel the key regulatory mechanisms of rice germination under anoxic stress, we combined in silico modelling with gene expression data analysis. Our initial modelling analysis via random flux sampling revealed numerous changes in rice primary metabolism in the absence of oxygen. In particular, several reactions associated with sucrose metabolism and fermentation showed a significant increase in flux levels, whereas reaction fluxes across oxidative phosphorylation, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the pentose phosphate pathway were down-regulated. The subsequent comparative analysis of the differences in calculated fluxes with previously published gene expression data under air and anoxia identified at least 37 reactions from rice central metabolism that are transcriptionally regulated. Additionally, cis-regulatory content analyses of these transcriptionally controlled enzymes indicate a regulatory role for transcription factors such as MYB, bZIP, ERF and ZnF in transcriptional control of genes that are up-regulated during rice germination and coleoptile elongation under anoxia. PMID:24894389

  16. DIFFERENCES IN THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE TO FULVESTRANT AND OESTROGEN DEPRIVATION IN ER-POSITIVE BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Patani, Neill; Dunbier, Anita; Anderson, Helen; Ghazoui, Zara; Ribas, Ricardo; Anderson, Elizabeth; Gao, Qiong; A’hern, Roger; Mackay, Alan; Lindemann, Justin; Wellings, Robert; Walker, Jill; Kuter, Irene; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Dowsett, Mitch

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Endocrine therapies include aromatase inhibitors and the selective oestrogen receptor (ER) down-regulator fulvestrant. This study aimed to determine if the reported efficacy of fulvestrant over anastrozole, and high- over low-dose fulvestrant, reflect distinct transcriptional responses. Experimental design Global gene expression profiles from ERα-positive breast carcinomas before and during pre-surgical treatment with fulvestrant (n=22) or anastrozole (n=81), and corresponding in vitro models, were compared. Transcripts responding differently to fulvestrant and oestrogen (E) deprivation were identified and integrated using gene ontology (GO), pathway and network analyses to evaluate their potential significance. Results The overall transcriptional response to fulvestrant and E-deprivation was correlated (r=0.61 in pre-surgical studies, r=0.87 in vitro), involving down-regulation of E-regulated and proliferation-associated genes. The transcriptional response to fulvestrant was of greater magnitude than E-deprivation (slope=0.62 in pre-surgical studies, slope=0.63 in vitro). Comparative analyses identified 28 genes and 40 GO categories affected specifically by fulvestrant. Seventeen fulvestrant-specific genes, including CAV1/2, SNAI2 and NRP1, associated with ERα, androgen receptor (AR) and TP53, in a network regulating cell cycle, death, survival, and tumour morphology. Eighteen genes responding differently to fulvestrant specifically predicted anti-proliferative response to fulvestrant, but not anastrozole. Transcriptional effects of low-dose fulvestrant correlated with high-dose treatment, but were of lower magnitude (ratio=0.29). Conclusions The transcriptional response to fulvestrant has much in common with E-deprivation, but is stronger with distinctions potentially attributable to arrest of E-independent ERα activity and involvement of AR signalling. Genes responding differently to fulvestrant may have predictive utility. These data are consistent

  17. Characterization of the Pinus massoniana transcriptional response to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus infection using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Kai; Lu, Quan; Liang, Jun; Zhang, Xing-Yao

    2013-01-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) caused by pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is the most destructive diseases of pine and poses a threat of serious economic losses worldwide. Although several of the mechanisms involved in disease progression have been discovered, the molecular response of Pinus massoniana to PWN infection has not been explored. We constructed four subtractive suppression hybridization cDNA libraries by taking time-course samples from PWN-inoculated Masson pine trees. One-hundred forty-four significantly differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified, and 124 high-quality sequences with transcriptional features were selected for gene ontology (GO) and individual gene analyses. There were marked differences in the types of transcripts, as well as in the timing and levels of transcript expression in the pine trees following PWN inoculation. Genes involved in signal transduction, transcription and translation and secondary metabolism were highly expressed after 24 h and 72 h, while stress response genes were highly expressed only after 72 h. Certain transcripts responding to PWN infection were discriminative; pathogenesis and cell wall-related genes were more abundant, while detoxification or redox process-related genes were less abundant. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the biochemical and physiological responses of pine trees to PWN infection, particularly during the initial stage of infection. PMID:23759987

  18. Characterization of the Pinus massoniana Transcriptional Response to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus Infection Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Kai; Lu, Quan; Liang, Jun; Zhang, Xing-Yao

    2013-01-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) caused by pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is the most destructive diseases of pine and poses a threat of serious economic losses worldwide. Although several of the mechanisms involved in disease progression have been discovered, the molecular response of Pinus massoniana to PWN infection has not been explored. We constructed four subtractive suppression hybridization cDNA libraries by taking time-course samples from PWN-inoculated Masson pine trees. One-hundred forty-four significantly differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified, and 124 high-quality sequences with transcriptional features were selected for gene ontology (GO) and individual gene analyses. There were marked differences in the types of transcripts, as well as in the timing and levels of transcript expression in the pine trees following PWN inoculation. Genes involved in signal transduction, transcription and translation and secondary metabolism were highly expressed after 24 h and 72 h, while stress response genes were highly expressed only after 72 h. Certain transcripts responding to PWN infection were discriminative; pathogenesis and cell wall-related genes were more abundant, while detoxification or redox process-related genes were less abundant. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the biochemical and physiological responses of pine trees to PWN infection, particularly during the initial stage of infection. PMID:23759987

  19. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention. PMID:26904076

  20. FDG-PET/CT based response-adapted treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vriens, Dennis; Arens, Anne I.J.; Hutchings, Martin; Oyen, Wim J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract It has been shown that [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) provides robust and reproducible data for early metabolic response assessment in various malignancies. This led to the initiation of several prospective multicenter trials in malignant lymphoma and adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction, in order to investigate whether the use of PET-guided treatment individualization results in a survival benefit. In Hodgkin lymphoma and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, several trials are ongoing. Some studies aim to investigate the use of PET in early identification of metabolic non-responders in order to intensify treatment to improve survival. Other studies aim at reducing toxicity without adversely affecting cure rates by safely de-escalating therapy in metabolic responders. In solid tumors the first PET response-adjusted treatment trials have been realized in adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. These trials showed that patients with an early metabolic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy benefit from this treatment, whereas metabolic non-responders should switch early to surgery, thus reducing the risk of tumor progression during chemotherapy and the risk of toxic death. The trials provide a model for designing response-guided treatment algorithms in other malignancies. PET-guided treatment algorithms are the promise of the near future; the choice of therapy, its intensity, and its duration will become better adjusted to the biology of the individual patient. Today’s major challenge is to investigate the impact on patient outcome of personalized response-adapted treatment concepts. PMID:23023063

  1. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Earl, David J.; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-09-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self-antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely, gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system’s search for antibodies, a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity.

  2. The Janus transcription factor HapX controls fungal adaptation to both iron starvation and iron excess

    PubMed Central

    Gsaller, Fabio; Hortschansky, Peter; Beattie, Sarah R; Klammer, Veronika; Tuppatsch, Katja; Lechner, Beatrix E; Rietzschel, Nicole; Werner, Ernst R; Vogan, Aaron A; Chung, Dawoon; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Kato, Masashi; Cramer, Robert A; Brakhage, Axel A; Haas, Hubertus

    2014-01-01

    Balance of physiological levels of iron is essential for every organism. In Aspergillus fumigatus and other fungal pathogens, the transcription factor HapX mediates adaptation to iron limitation and consequently virulence by repressing iron consumption and activating iron uptake. Here, we demonstrate that HapX is also essential for iron resistance via activating vacuolar iron storage. We identified HapX protein domains that are essential for HapX functions during either iron starvation or high-iron conditions. The evolutionary conservation of these domains indicates their wide-spread role in iron sensing. We further demonstrate that a HapX homodimer and the CCAAT-binding complex (CBC) cooperatively bind an evolutionary conserved DNA motif in a target promoter. The latter reveals the mode of discrimination between general CBC and specific HapX/CBC target genes. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel regulatory mechanism mediating both iron resistance and adaptation to iron starvation by the same transcription factor complex with activating and repressing functions depending on ambient iron availability. PMID:25092765

  3. The evolution of predictive adaptive responses in human life history

    PubMed Central

    Nettle, Daniel; Frankenhuis, Willem E.; Rickard, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies in humans have shown that adverse experience in early life is associated with accelerated reproductive timing, and there is comparative evidence for similar effects in other animals. There are two different classes of adaptive explanation for associations between early-life adversity and accelerated reproduction, both based on the idea of predictive adaptive responses (PARs). According to external PAR hypotheses, early-life adversity provides a ‘weather forecast’ of the environmental conditions into which the individual will mature, and it is adaptive for the individual to develop an appropriate phenotype for this anticipated environment. In internal PAR hypotheses, early-life adversity has a lasting negative impact on the individual's somatic state, such that her health is likely to fail more rapidly as she gets older, and there is an advantage to adjusting her reproductive schedule accordingly. We use a model of fluctuating environments to derive evolveability conditions for acceleration of reproductive timing in response to early-life adversity in a long-lived organism. For acceleration to evolve via the external PAR process, early-life cues must have a high degree of validity and the level of annual autocorrelation in the individual's environment must be almost perfect. For acceleration to evolve via the internal PAR process requires that early-life experience must determine a significant fraction of the variance in survival prospects in adulthood. The two processes are not mutually exclusive, and mechanisms for calibrating reproductive timing on the basis of early experience could evolve through a combination of the predictive value of early-life adversity for the later environment and its negative impact on somatic state. PMID:23843395

  4. Transcriptional Changes Caused by Bisphenol A in Oryzias javanicus, a Fish Species Highly Adaptable to Environmental Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seonock; Denis, Vianney; Yum, Seungshic

    2014-01-01

    The Javanese medaka, Oryzias javanicus, is a fish highly adaptable to various environmental salinities. Here, we investigated the effects of the environmental pollutant bisphenol A (BPA; an endocrine disrupting chemical) on gene expression levels in this species acclimated to different salinities. Using cDNA microarrays, we detected the induction of differential expression of genes by BPA, and compared the transcriptional changes caused by chemical exposure at different salinities. There were marked transcriptional changes induced by BPA between treatments. While 533 genes were induced by a factor of more than two when O. javanicus was exposed to BPA in seawater, only 215 genes were induced in freshwater. Among those genes, only 78 were shared and changed significantly their expression in both seawater and freshwater. Those genes were mainly involved in cellular processes and signaling pathway. We then categorized by functional group genes specifically induced by BPA exposure in seawater or freshwater. Gene expression changes were further confirmed in O. javanicus exposed to various concentrations of BPA, using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR based on primer sets for 28 selected genes. PMID:24534842

  5. Autophagy suppresses host adaptive immune responses toward Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Buffen, Kathrin; Oosting, Marije; Li, Yang; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy increased the Borrelia burgdorferi induced innate cytokine production in vitro, but little is known regarding the effect of autophagy on in vivo models of Borrelia infection. Here, we showed that ATG7-deficient mice that were intra-articular injected with Borrelia spirochetes displayed increased joint swelling, cell influx, and enhanced interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 production by inflamed synovial tissue. Because both interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 are linked to the development of adaptive immune responses, we examine the function of autophagy on Borrelia induced adaptive immunity. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells treated with autophagy inhibitors showed an increase in interleukin-17, interleukin-22, and interferon-γ production in response to exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi. Increased IL-17 production was dependent on IL-1β release but, interestingly, not on interleukin-23 production. In addition, cytokine quantitative trait loci in ATG9B modulate the Borrelia induced interleukin-17 production. Because high levels of IL-17 have been found in patients with confirmed, severe, chronic borreliosis, we propose that the modulation of autophagy may be a potential target for anti-inflammatory therapy in patients with persistent Lyme disease. PMID:27101991

  6. Radio-Adaptive Response to Environmental Exposures at Chernobyl

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Brenda E.; Holmes, Kristen M.

    2008-01-01

    The genetic consequences resulting from environmental exposure to ionizing radiation have a significant impact on both radiation regulatory policies and the comprehension of the human health risks associated with radiation exposure. The primary objectives of the study were to assess 1) genotoxicity of exposure to radiation as a function of absorbed dose and dose rate, and 2) induction of a radio-adaptive response following a priming dose at varying dose rates. Results demonstrated that sub-acute environmental exposures of 10cGy gamma radiation resulted in indistinguishable levels of chromosomal damage as compared to controls. A radio-adaptive response was observed in all experimental groups, exposed to a subsequent acute challenge dose of 1.5 Gy, demonstrating that low dose rates of low energy transfer (LET) radiation are effective in reducing genetic damage from a subsequent acute low-LET radiation exposure. Furthermore, the data presented herein demonstrate a potential beneficial effect of sub-chronic exposure to low levels of low-LET radiation in an environmental setting and do not support the Linear No Threshold (LNT) hypothesis. PMID:18648577

  7. Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Fungal Products and Allergens.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Brock; Barnes, Charles S; Portnoy, Jay M

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to fungi and their products is practically ubiquitous, yet most of this is of little consequence to most healthy individuals. This is because there are a number of elaborate mechanisms to deal with these exposures. Most of these mechanisms are designed to recognize and neutralize such exposures. However, in understanding these mechanisms it has become clear that many of them overlap with our ability to respond to disruptions in tissue function caused by trauma or deterioration. These responses involve the innate and adaptive immune systems usually through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and the production of cytokines that are considered inflammatory accompanied by other factors that can moderate these reactivities. Depending on different genetic backgrounds and the extent of activation of these mechanisms, various pathologies with resulting symptoms can ensue. Complicating this is the fact that these mechanisms can bias toward type 2 innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, to understand what we refer to as allergens from fungal sources, we must first understand how they influence these innate mechanisms. In doing so it has become clear that many of the proteins that are described as fungal allergens are essentially homologues of our own proteins that signal or cause tissue disruptions. PMID:26755096

  8. A Conserved Structural Module Regulates Transcriptional Responses to Diverse Stress Signals in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Greenwell, Roger; Anthony, Jennifer R.; Wang, Sheng; Lim, Lionel; Das, Kalyan; Sofia, Heidi J.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Darst, Seth A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A transcriptional response to singlet oxygen in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is controlled by the group IV σ factor σE and its cognate anti-σ ChrR. Crystal structures of the σE/ChrR complex reveal a modular, two-domain architecture for ChrR. The ChrR N-terminal anti-σ domain (ASD) binds a Zn2+ ion, contacts σE, and is sufficient to inhibit σE-dependent transcription. The ChrR C-terminal domain adopts a cupin fold, can coordinate an additional Zn2+, and is required for the transcriptional response to singlet oxygen. Structure-based sequence analyses predict that the ASD defines a common structural fold among predicted group IV antiσs. These ASDs are fused to diverse C-terminal domains that are likely involved in responding to specific environmental signals that control the activity of their cognate σ factor. PMID:17803943

  9. Synergy and Antagonism of Active Constituents of ADAPT-232 on Transcriptional Level of Metabolic Regulation of Isolated Neuroglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Panossian, Alexander; Hamm, Rebecca; Kadioglu, Onat; Wikman, Georg; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiling was performed on the human neuroglial cell line T98G after treatment with adaptogen ADAPT-232 and its constituents – extracts of Eleutherococcus senticosus root, Schisandra chinensis berry, and Rhodiola rosea root as well as several constituents individually, namely, eleutheroside E, schizandrin B, salidroside, triandrin, and tyrosol. A common feature for all tested adaptogens was their effect on G-protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways, i.e., cAMP, phospholipase C (PLC), and phosphatidylinositol signal transduction pathways. Adaptogens may reduce the cAMP level in brain cells by down-regulation of adenylate cyclase gene ADC2Y and up-regulation of phosphodiesterase gene PDE4D that is essential for energy homeostasis as well as for switching from catabolic to anabolic states and vice versa. Down-regulation of cAMP by adaptogens may decrease cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activity in various cells resulting in inhibition stress-induced catabolic transformations and saving of ATP for many ATP-dependant metabolic transformations. All tested adaptogens up-regulated the PLCB1 gene, which encodes phosphoinositide-specific PLC and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks), key players for the regulation of NF-κB-mediated defense responses. Other common targets of adaptogens included genes encoding ERα estrogen receptor (2.9–22.6 fold down-regulation), cholesterol ester transfer protein (5.1–10.6 fold down-regulation), heat shock protein Hsp70 (3.0–45.0 fold up-regulation), serpin peptidase inhibitor (neuroserpin), and 5-HT3 receptor of serotonin (2.2–6.6 fold down-regulation). These findings can be reconciled with the observed beneficial effects of adaptogens in behavioral, mental, and aging-associated disorders. Combining two or more active substances in one mixture significantly changes deregulated genes profiles: synergetic interactions result in activation of genes that none of the individual substances affected, while

  10. Covariate-adjusted response-adaptive designs for longitudinal treatment responses: PEMF trial revisited.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Atanu; Park, Eunsik; Bhattacharya, Rahul

    2012-08-01

    Response-adaptive designs have become popular for allocation of the entering patients among two or more competing treatments in a phase III clinical trial. Although there are a lot of designs for binary treatment responses, the number of designs involving covariates is very small. Sometimes the patients give repeated responses. The only available response-adaptive allocation design for repeated binary responses is the urn design by Biswas and Dewanji [Biswas A and Dewanji AA. Randomized longitudinal play-the-winner design for repeated binary data. ANZJS 2004; 46: 675-684; Biswas A and Dewanji A. Inference for a RPW-type clinical trial with repeated monitoring for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Biometr J 2004; 46: 769-779.], although it does not take care of the covariates of the patients in the allocation design. In this article, a covariate-adjusted response-adaptive randomisation procedure is developed using the log-odds ratio within the Bayesian framework for longitudinal binary responses. The small sample performance of the proposed allocation procedure is assessed through a simulation study. The proposed procedure is illustrated using some real data set. PMID:20974667

  11. MUTATIONAL AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF SAMMONELLA TO MX: CORRELATION OF MUTATIONAL DOSE RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured the mutational and transcriptional response of Salmonella TA 100 to 3 concentrations of a drinking water mutagen -chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy2(5H)-furanone (MX). The mutagenicity of MX in strain TA100 was evaluated in a 30min suspension assay, and the mutageni...

  12. MUTATIONAL AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF SALMONELLA TO MX: CORRELATION OF MUTATIONAL DOSE RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured the mutational and transcriptional response of Salmonella TA100 to 3 concentrations of the drinking water mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy2(5H)-furanone (MX). The mutagenicity of MX in strain TA100 was evaluated in a 30min suspension assay, and the mutage...

  13. The MazF-regulon: a toolbox for the post-transcriptional stress response in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sauert, Martina; Wolfinger, Michael T; Vesper, Oliver; Müller, Christian; Byrgazov, Konstantin; Moll, Isabella

    2016-08-19

    Flexible adaptation to environmental stress is vital for bacteria. An energy-efficient post-transcriptional stress response mechanism in Escherichia coli is governed by the toxin MazF. After stress-induced activation the endoribonuclease MazF processes a distinct subset of transcripts as well as the 16S ribosomal RNA in the context of mature ribosomes. As these 'stress-ribosomes' are specific for the MazF-processed mRNAs, the translational program is changed. To identify this 'MazF-regulon' we employed Poly-seq (polysome fractionation coupled with RNA-seq analysis) and analyzed alterations introduced into the transcriptome and translatome after mazF overexpression. Unexpectedly, our results reveal that the corresponding protein products are involved in all cellular processes and do not particularly contribute to the general stress response. Moreover, our findings suggest that translational reprogramming serves as a fast-track reaction to harsh stress and highlight the so far underestimated significance of selective translation as a global regulatory mechanism in gene expression. Considering the reported implication of toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems in persistence, our results indicate that MazF acts as a prime effector during harsh stress that potentially introduces translational heterogeneity within a bacterial population thereby stimulating persister cell formation. PMID:26908653

  14. Distinct transcriptional responses of RNA polymerases I, II and III to aptamers that bind TBP

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaochun; Shi, Hua; Lis, John T.

    2005-01-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a general factor that is involved in transcription by all three types of nuclear RNA polymerase. To delineate the roles played by the DNA-binding surface of TBP in these transcription reactions, we used a set of RNA aptamers directed against TBP and examined their ability to perturb transcription in vitro by the different RNA polymerases. Distinct responses to the TBP aptamers were observed for transcription by different types of polymerase at either the initiation, reinitiation or both stages of the transcription cycle. We further probed the TBP interactions in the TFIIIB•DNA complex to elucidate the mechanism for the different sensitivity of Pol III dependent transcription before and after preinitiation complex (PIC) formation. Lastly, the aptamers were employed to measure the time required for Pol III PIC formation in vitro. This approach can be generalized to define the involvement of a particular region on the surface of a protein at particular stages in a biological process. PMID:15701755

  15. The transcriptional response of microbial communities in thawing Alaskan permafrost soils.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Marco J L; Orsi, William D

    2015-01-01

    Thawing of permafrost soils is expected to stimulate microbial decomposition and respiration of sequestered carbon. This could, in turn, increase atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses, such as carbon dioxide and methane, and create a positive feedback to climate warming. Recent metagenomic studies suggest that permafrost has a large metabolic potential for carbon processing, including pathways for fermentation and methanogenesis. Here, we performed a pilot study using ultrahigh throughput Illumina HiSeq sequencing of reverse transcribed messenger RNA to obtain a detailed overview of active metabolic pathways and responsible organisms in up to 70 cm deep permafrost soils at a moist acidic tundra location in Arctic Alaska. The transcriptional response of the permafrost microbial community was compared before and after 11 days of thaw. In general, the transcriptional profile under frozen conditions suggests a dominance of stress responses, survival strategies, and maintenance processes, whereas upon thaw a rapid enzymatic response to decomposing soil organic matter (SOM) was observed. Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, ascomycete fungi, and methanogens were responsible for largest transcriptional response upon thaw. Transcripts indicative of heterotrophic methanogenic pathways utilizing acetate, methanol, and methylamine were found predominantly in the permafrost table after thaw. Furthermore, transcripts involved in acetogenesis were expressed exclusively after thaw suggesting that acetogenic bacteria are a potential source of acetate for acetoclastic methanogenesis in freshly thawed permafrost. Metatranscriptomics is shown here to be a useful approach for inferring the activity of permafrost microbes that has potential to improve our understanding of permafrost SOM bioavailability and biogeochemical mechanisms contributing to greenhouse gas emissions as a result of permafrost thaw. PMID:25852660

  16. Sex-related differences in murine hepatic transcriptional and proteomic responses to TCDD.

    PubMed

    Prokopec, Stephenie D; Watson, John D; Lee, Jamie; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C

    2015-04-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that produces myriad toxicities in most mammals. In rodents alone, there is a huge divergence in the toxicological response across species, as well as among different strains within a species. But there are also significant differences between males and females animals of a single strain. These differences are inconsistent across model systems: the severity of toxicity is greater in female rats than males, while male mice and guinea pigs are more sensitive than females. Because the specific events that underlie this difference remain unclear, we characterized the hepatic transcriptional response of adult male and female C57BL/6 mice to 500μg/kg TCDD at multiple time-points. The transcriptional profile diverged significantly between the sexes. Female mice demonstrated a large number of altered transcripts as early as 6h following treatment, suggesting a large primary response. Conversely, male animals showed the greatest TCDD-mediated response 144h following exposure, potentially implicating significant secondary responses. Nr1i3 was statistically significantly induced at all time-points in the sensitive male animals. This mRNA encodes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis. Surprisingly though, changes at the protein level (aside from the positive control, CYP1A1) were modest, with only FMO3 showing clear induction, and no genes with sex-differences. Thus, while male and female mice show transcriptional differences in their response to TCDD, their association with TCDD-induced toxicities remains unclear. PMID:25703434

  17. The transcriptional response of microbial communities in thawing Alaskan permafrost soils

    PubMed Central

    Coolen, Marco J. L.; Orsi, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Thawing of permafrost soils is expected to stimulate microbial decomposition and respiration of sequestered carbon. This could, in turn, increase atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses, such as carbon dioxide and methane, and create a positive feedback to climate warming. Recent metagenomic studies suggest that permafrost has a large metabolic potential for carbon processing, including pathways for fermentation and methanogenesis. Here, we performed a pilot study using ultrahigh throughput Illumina HiSeq sequencing of reverse transcribed messenger RNA to obtain a detailed overview of active metabolic pathways and responsible organisms in up to 70 cm deep permafrost soils at a moist acidic tundra location in Arctic Alaska. The transcriptional response of the permafrost microbial community was compared before and after 11 days of thaw. In general, the transcriptional profile under frozen conditions suggests a dominance of stress responses, survival strategies, and maintenance processes, whereas upon thaw a rapid enzymatic response to decomposing soil organic matter (SOM) was observed. Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, ascomycete fungi, and methanogens were responsible for largest transcriptional response upon thaw. Transcripts indicative of heterotrophic methanogenic pathways utilizing acetate, methanol, and methylamine were found predominantly in the permafrost table after thaw. Furthermore, transcripts involved in acetogenesis were expressed exclusively after thaw suggesting that acetogenic bacteria are a potential source of acetate for acetoclastic methanogenesis in freshly thawed permafrost. Metatranscriptomics is shown here to be a useful approach for inferring the activity of permafrost microbes that has potential to improve our understanding of permafrost SOM bioavailability and biogeochemical mechanisms contributing to greenhouse gas emissions as a result of permafrost thaw. PMID:25852660

  18. A consensus insulin response element is activated by an Ets-related transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Jacob, K K; Ouyang, L; Stanley, F M

    1995-11-17

    Insulin increases expression of somatostatin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) constructs 10-fold and thymidine kinase-CAT constructs 5-fold in GH4 cells. These responses are similar to our previously reported data on insulin-increased prolactin-CAT expression. They are also observed in HeLa cells and are thus not cell type specific. The evidence suggests that the insulin responsiveness of these genes is mediated by an Ets-related transcription factor. First, linker-scanning mutations and/or deletions of the prolactin, somatostatin, and thymidine kinase promoters suggest that their insulin responsiveness is mediated by the sequence CGGA. This sequence is identical with the response element of the Ets-related transcription factors. Second, CGGA-containing sequences placed at -88 in the delta MTV-CAT reporter plasmid conferred insulin responsiveness to the mammary tumor virus promoter. Third, expression of the DNA-binding domain of c-Ets-2, which acts by blocking effects mediated by Ets-related transcription factors, inhibits the response of these promoters to insulin. Finally, the Ets-related proteins Sap and Elk-1 bind to the prolactin, somatostatin, and thymidine kinase insulin-response elements. An Ets-like element was found in all insulin-sensitive promoters examined and may serve a similar function in those promoters. PMID:7499246

  19. Developing a Gene Biomarker at the Tipping Point of Adaptive and Adverse Responses in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Currier, Jenna M; Cheng, Wan-Yun; Menendez, Daniel; Conolly, Rory; Chorley, Brian N

    2016-01-01

    Determining mechanism-based biomarkers that distinguish adaptive and adverse cellular processes is critical to understanding the health effects of environmental exposures. Shifting from in vivo, low-throughput toxicity studies to high-throughput screening (HTS) paradigms and risk assessment based on in vitro and in silico testing requires utilizing toxicity pathway information to distinguish adverse outcomes from recoverable adaptive events. Little work has focused on oxidative stresses in human airway for the purposes of predicting adverse responses. We hypothesize that early gene expression-mediated molecular changes could be used to delineate adaptive and adverse responses to environmentally-based perturbations. Here, we examined cellular responses of the tracheobronchial airway to zinc (Zn) exposure, a model oxidant. Airway derived BEAS-2B cells exposed to 2-10 μM Zn2+ elicited concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. Normal, adaptive, and cytotoxic Zn2+ exposure conditions were determined with traditional apical endpoints, and differences in global gene expression around the tipping point of the responses were used to delineate underlying molecular mechanisms. Bioinformatic analyses of differentially expressed genes indicate early enrichment of stress signaling pathways, including those mediated by the transcription factors p53 and NRF2. After 4 h, 154 genes were differentially expressed (p < 0.01) between the adaptive and cytotoxic Zn2+ concentrations. Nearly 40% of the biomarker genes were related to the p53 signaling pathway with 30 genes identified as likely direct targets using a database of p53 ChIP-seq studies. Despite similar p53 activation profiles, these data revealed widespread dampening of p53 and NRF2-related genes as early as 4 h after exposure at higher, unrecoverable Zn2+ exposures. Thus, in our model early increased activation of stress response pathways indicated a recoverable adaptive event. Overall, this study highlights the

  20. Developing a Gene Biomarker at the Tipping Point of Adaptive and Adverse Responses in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Currier, Jenna M.; Cheng, Wan-Yun; Menendez, Daniel; Conolly, Rory; Chorley, Brian N.

    2016-01-01

    Determining mechanism-based biomarkers that distinguish adaptive and adverse cellular processes is critical to understanding the health effects of environmental exposures. Shifting from in vivo, low-throughput toxicity studies to high-throughput screening (HTS) paradigms and risk assessment based on in vitro and in silico testing requires utilizing toxicity pathway information to distinguish adverse outcomes from recoverable adaptive events. Little work has focused on oxidative stresses in human airway for the purposes of predicting adverse responses. We hypothesize that early gene expression-mediated molecular changes could be used to delineate adaptive and adverse responses to environmentally-based perturbations. Here, we examined cellular responses of the tracheobronchial airway to zinc (Zn) exposure, a model oxidant. Airway derived BEAS-2B cells exposed to 2–10 μM Zn2+ elicited concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. Normal, adaptive, and cytotoxic Zn2+ exposure conditions were determined with traditional apical endpoints, and differences in global gene expression around the tipping point of the responses were used to delineate underlying molecular mechanisms. Bioinformatic analyses of differentially expressed genes indicate early enrichment of stress signaling pathways, including those mediated by the transcription factors p53 and NRF2. After 4 h, 154 genes were differentially expressed (p < 0.01) between the adaptive and cytotoxic Zn2+ concentrations. Nearly 40% of the biomarker genes were related to the p53 signaling pathway with 30 genes identified as likely direct targets using a database of p53 ChIP-seq studies. Despite similar p53 activation profiles, these data revealed widespread dampening of p53 and NRF2-related genes as early as 4 h after exposure at higher, unrecoverable Zn2+ exposures. Thus, in our model early increased activation of stress response pathways indicated a recoverable adaptive event. Overall, this study highlights the

  1. GLOBAL TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF PORCINE MESENTERIC LYMPH NODES TO SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR TYPHIMURIUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonellosis is prevalent worldwide and is both a food safety and animal production problem. To understand the host transcriptional response to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the Affymetrix GeneChip® porcine genome array was used to identify differentially expressed (DE) genes in mesente...

  2. Transcriptional analysis of the innate immune response using the avian innate immunity microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The avian innate immunity microarray (AIIM) is a genomics tool designed to study the transcriptional activity of the avian immune response (Cytogenet. Genome Res. 117:139-145, 2007). It is an avian cDNA microarray representing 4,959 avian genes spotted in triplicate. The AIIM contains 25 avian int...

  3. Transcriptional responses to fluctuating thermal regimes underpinning differences in survival in the solitary bee Megachile rotundata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcriptional responses of insects to long-term, ecologically relevant temperature stress are poorly understood. Long-term exposure to low temperatures, commonly referred to as chilling, can lead to physiological effects collectively known as chill injury. Periodically increasing temperatures ...

  4. Root-specific transcript profiling of contrasting rice genotypes in response to salinity stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated salinity imposes osmotic and ion toxicity stresses on living cells and requires a multitude of responses in order to enable plant survival. Building on earlier work profiling transcript levels in rice (Oryza sativa) shoots of FL478, a salt-tolerant indica recombinant inbred line, and IR29, ...

  5. ALTERED TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF MOUSE EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BISINDOLYLMALEIMIDE (BIS L)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered transcriptional responses in mouse embryos exposed to bisindolylmaleimide I (Bis I) in whole embryo culture

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid*, Maria R. Blanton*and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, ...

  6. Adaptive response of bacteria: Multiple hurdles, cross-tolerance and tools to illustrate underlying mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramythiotis, Spyridon; Skandamis, Panagiotis N.

    2015-01-01

    A basic principle in the bacterial resistance against lethal stresses is that exposure of microbial cells to a sublethal hurdle (e.g., pH 5.0, 3% NaCl, or 48°C) may induce resistance to lethal level of the same or different stress. The latter is called "cross-tolerance" and the bacteria experiencing such situations are termed "stress-hardened". The majority of scientific reports on the adaptive responses of bacteria to stresses have recently addressed the need to elucidate the underlying mechanisms controlling bacterial stress response. This in turn, will assist in the efficient application of the multiple hurdle approach, e.g., by selecting specific sanitizers, combining stress treatments or antimicrobials, especially in mild processing, against specific cellular targets, eliminating the possibility of the development of stress adapted cells. Common scientific approaches for studying the link between phenotype (e.g., inactivation, survival, or growth) and physiology is the assessment of global transcriptional changes (up- or down-regulation) or those of certain genes, as well as of proteins involved in certain metabolic pathways, occurring during exposure to stress. This may also be performed in parallel to comparative evaluation of the phenotypic response of wild and mutant strains. The post-genomics research on foodborne pathogens has extended our knowledge beyond their phenotypic behavior and may offer mechanistic insights in the following: (i) the top-down approach (induction), which is the search of the underlying mechanisms (low level) responsible for a specific phenotype based on "-omic" studies; and (ii) the bottom-up approach (deduction), which starts from intracellular level and forms a mechanistic (functional) basis for the cellular response. All these may eventually enable the development of mechanistic microbial models and efficient strategies for controlling survival and growth of pathogens in foods.

  7. Transcription of interferon stimulated genes in response to Porcine rubulavirus infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Ocelotl, María del Rosario; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora Hilda; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Santos-López, Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus (PoRV) is an emerging virus causing meningo-encephalitis and reproductive failures in pigs. Little is known about the pathogenesis and immune evasion of this virus; therefore research on the mechanisms underlying tissue damage during infection is essential. To explore these mechanisms, the effect of PoRV on the transcription of interferon (IFN) pathway members was analyzed in vitro by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Ten TCID50 of PoRV stimulated transcription of IFNα, IFNβ, STAT1, STAT2, p48 and OAS genes in neuroblastoma cells, whereas infection with 100 TCID50 did not stimulate transcription levels more than non-infected cells. When the cells were primed with IFNα, infection with 1 TCDI50 of PoRV sufficed to stimulate the transcription of the same genes, but 10 and 100 TCID50 did not modify the transcription level of those genes as compared with non-infected and primed controls. MxA gene transcription was observed only when the cells were primed with IFNα and stimulated with 10 TCID50, whereas 100 TCID50 of PoRV did not modify the MxA transcription level as compared to non-infected and primed cells. Our results show that PoRV replication at low titers stimulates the expression of IFN-responsive genes in neuroblastoma cells, and suggest that replication of PoRV at higher titers inhibits the transcription of several members of the IFN pathway. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of PoRV. PMID:24031738

  8. Biological Stress Response Terminology: Integrating the Concepts of Adaptive Response and Preconditioning Stress Within a Hormetic Dose-Response Framework

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stres...

  9. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1. PMID:26149570

  10. Coordinate Transcriptional and Translational Repression of p53 by TGFβ1 Impairs the Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    López-Díaz, Fernando J.; Gascard, Philippe; Balakrishnan, Sri Kripa; Zhao, Jianxin; del Rincon, Sonia V.; Spruck, Charles; Tlsty, Thea D.; Emerson, Beverly M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cellular stress results in profound changes in RNA and protein synthesis. How cells integrate this intrinsic, p53-centered program with extracellular signals is largely unknown. We demonstrate that TGFβ1 signaling interferes with the stress response through coordinate transcriptional and translational repression of p53 levels, which reduces p53-activated transcription, and apoptosis in precancerous cells. Mechanistically, E2F4 binds constitutively to the TP53 gene and induces transcription. TGFβ1-activated Smads are recruited to a composite Smad/E2F4 element by an E2F4/p107 complex that switches to a Smad co-repressor, which represses TP53 transcription. TGFβ1 also causes dissociation of ribosomal protein RPL26 and elongation factor eEF1A from p53 mRNA, thereby reducing p53 mRNA association with polyribosomes and p53 translation. TGFβ1-signalling is dominant over stress-induced transcription and translation of p53 and prevents stress-imposed downregulation of Smad proteins. Thus, crosstalk between the TGFβ and p53 pathways defines a major node of regulation in the cellular stress response, enhancing drug resistance. PMID:23706820

  11. The elongation factor Spt5 facilitates transcription initiation for rapid induction of inflammatory-response genes

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Gil; Bahat, Anat; Dikstein, Rivka

    2016-01-01

    A subset of inflammatory-response NF-κB target genes is activated immediately following pro-inflammatory signal. Here we followed the kinetics of primary transcript accumulation after NF-κB activation when the elongation factor Spt5 is knocked down. While elongation rate is unchanged, the transcript synthesis at the 5′-end and at the earliest time points is delayed and reduced, suggesting an unexpected role in early transcription. Investigating the underlying mechanism reveals that the induced TFIID–promoter association is practically abolished by Spt5 depletion. This effect is associated with a decrease in promoter-proximal H3K4me3 and H4K5Ac histone modifications that are differentially required for rapid transcriptional induction. In contrast, the displacement of TFIIE and Mediator, which occurs during promoter escape, is attenuated in the absence of Spt5. Our findings are consistent with a central role of Spt5 in maintenance of TFIID–promoter association and promoter escape to support rapid transcriptional induction and re-initiation of inflammatory-response genes. PMID:27180651

  12. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1. PMID:26149570

  13. Development and Standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of Item Response Theory to the Assessment of Adaptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tassé, Marc J.; Schalock, Robert L.; Thissen, David; Balboni, Giulia; Bersani, Henry, Jr.; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon A.; Spreat, Scott; Widaman, Keith F.; Zhang, Dalun; Navas, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (DABS) was developed using item response theory (IRT) methods and was constructed to provide the most precise and valid adaptive behavior information at or near the cutoff point of making a decision regarding a diagnosis of intellectual disability. The DABS initial item pool consisted of 260 items. Using IRT…

  14. Transcriptome Analysis of Enterococcus faecalis during Mammalian Infection Shows Cells Undergo Adaptation and Exist in a Stringent Response State

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kristi L.; Colomer-Winter, Cristina; Grindle, Suzanne M.; Lemos, José A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Dunny, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    As both a commensal and a major cause of healthcare-associated infections in humans, Enterococcus faecalis is a remarkably adaptable organism. We investigated how E. faecalis adapts in a mammalian host as a pathogen by characterizing changes in the transcriptome during infection in a rabbit model of subdermal abscess formation using transcriptional microarrays. The microarray experiments detected 222 and 291 differentially regulated genes in E. faecalis OG1RF at two and eight hours after subdermal chamber inoculation, respectively. The profile of significantly regulated genes at two hours post-inoculation included genes involved in stress response, metabolism, nutrient acquisition, and cell surface components, suggesting genome-wide adaptation to growth in an altered environment. At eight hours post-inoculation, 88% of the differentially expressed genes were down-regulated and matched a transcriptional profile consistent with a (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response. Subsequent subdermal abscess infections with E. faecalis mutants lacking the (p)ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase RSH, the small synthetase RelQ, or both enzymes, suggest that intracellular (p)ppGpp levels, but not stringent response activation, influence persistence in the model. The ability of cells to synthesize (p)ppGpp was also found to be important for growth in human serum and whole blood. The data presented in this report provide the first genome-wide insights on E. faecalis in vivo gene expression and regulation measured by transcriptional profiling during infection in a mammalian host and show that (p)ppGpp levels affect viability of E. faecalis in multiple conditions relevant to mammalian infection. The subdermal abscess model can serve as a novel experimental system for studying the E. faecalis stringent response in the context of the mammalian immune system. PMID:25545155

  15. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTIONAL DATA PROVIDES INSIGHTS INTO MUSCLE’S BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO BOTULINUM TOXIN

    PubMed Central

    MUKUND, KAVITHA; MATHEWSON, MARGIE; MINAMOTO, VIVIANE; WARD, SAMUEL R.; SUBRAMANIAM, SHANKAR; LIEBER, RICHARD L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this study we provide global transcriptomic profiling and analysis of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A)–treated muscle over a 1-year period. Methods Microarray analysis was performed on rat tibialis anterior muscles from 4 groups (n =4/group) at 1, 4, 12, and 52 weeks after BoNT-A injection compared with saline-injected rats at 12 weeks. Results Dramatic transcriptional adaptation occurred at 1 week with a paradoxical increase in expression of slow and immature isoforms, activation of genes in competing pathways of repair and atrophy, impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased metal ion imbalance. Adaptations of the basal lamina and fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM) occurred by 4 weeks. The muscle transcriptome returned to its unperturbed state 12 weeks after injection. Conclusion Acute transcriptional adaptations resemble denervated muscle with some subtle differences, but resolved more quickly compared with denervation. Overall, gene expression, across time, correlates with the generally accepted BoNT-A time course and suggests that the direct action of BoNT-A in skeletal muscle is relatively rapid. PMID:24536034

  16. The Vibrio cholerae Cpx Envelope Stress Response Senses and Mediates Adaptation to Low Iron

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Nicole; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The Cpx pathway, a two-component system that employs the sensor histidine kinase CpxA and the response regulator CpxR, regulates crucial envelope stress responses across bacterial species and affects antibiotic resistance. To characterize the CpxR regulon in Vibrio cholerae, the transcriptional profile of the pandemic V. cholerae El Tor C6706 strain was examined upon overexpression of cpxR. Our data show that the Cpx regulon of V. cholerae is enriched in genes encoding membrane-localized and transport proteins, including a large number of genes known or predicted to be iron regulated. Activation of the Cpx pathway further led to the expression of TolC, the major outer membrane pore, and of components of two RND efflux systems in V. cholerae. We show that iron chelation, toxic compounds, or deletion of specific RND efflux components leads to Cpx pathway activation. Furthermore, mutations that eliminate the Cpx response or members of its regulon result in growth phenotypes in the presence of these inducers that, together with Cpx pathway activation, are partially suppressed by iron. Cumulatively, our results suggest that a major function of the Cpx response in V. cholerae is to mediate adaptation to envelope perturbations caused by toxic compounds and the depletion of iron. PMID:25368298

  17. Transcriptional analysis and adaptive evolution of Escherichia coli strains growing on acetate.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Eashwar; Agarwal, Ankit; Crigler, Jacob; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca; Altman, Elliot; Eiteman, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    Eighteen strains of Escherichia coli were compared for maximum specific growth rate (μ MAX) on 85 mM acetate as the sole carbon source. The C strain ATCC8739 had the greatest growth rate (0.41 h(-1)) while SCS-1 had the slowest growth rate (0.15 h(-1)). Transcriptional analysis of three of the strains (ATCC8739, BL21, SMS-3-5) was conducted to elucidate why ATCC8739 had the greatest maximum growth rate. Seventy-one genes were upregulated 2-fold or greater in ATCC8739, while 128 genes were downregulated 2-fold or greater in ATCC8739 compared to BL21 and SMS-3-5. To generate a strain that could grow more quickly on acetate, ATCC8739 was cultured in a chemostat using a progressively increasing dilution rate. When the dilution rate reached 0.50 h(-1), three isolated colonies each grew faster than ATCC8739 on 85 mM acetate, with MEC136 growing the fastest with a growth rate of 0.51 h(-1), about 25 % greater than ATCC8739. Transcriptional analysis of MEC136 showed that eight genes were downregulated 2-fold or greater and one gene was upregulated 2-fold or greater compared to ATCC8739. Genomic sequencing revealed that MEC136 contained a single mutation, causing a serine to proline change in amino acid 266 of RpoA, the α subunit of the RNA polymerase core enzyme. The 260-270 amino acid region of RpoA has been shown to be a key region of the protein that affects the interaction of the α subunit of the RNA polymerase core enzyme with several global transcriptional activators, such as CRP and FNR. PMID:27448288

  18. AtERF71/HRE2 transcription factor mediates osmotic stress response as well as hypoxia response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Yeon; Seok, Hye-Yeon; Woo, Dong-Hyuk; Lee, Sun-Young; Tarte, Vaishali N; Lee, Eun-Hye; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Moon, Yong-Hwan

    2011-10-14

    Various transcription factors are involved in the response to environmental stresses in plants. In this study, we characterized AtERF71/HRE2, a member of the Arabidopsis AP2/ERF family, as an important regulator of the osmotic and hypoxic stress responses in plants. Transcript level of AtERF71/HRE2 was highly increased by anoxia, NaCl, mannitol, ABA, and MV treatments. aterf71/hre2 loss-of-function mutants displayed higher sensitivity to osmotic stress such as high salt and mannitol, accumulating higher levels of ROS under high salt treatment. In contrast, AtERF71/HRE2-overexpressing transgenic plants showed tolerance to salt and mannitol as well as flooding and MV stresses, exhibiting lower levels of ROS under high salt treatment. AtERF71/HRE2 protein was localized in the nucleus, and the C-terminal region of AtERF71/HRE2 was required for transcription activation activity. Taken together, our results suggest that AtERF71/HRE2 might function as a transcription factor involved in the response to osmotic stress as well as hypoxia. PMID:21946064

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-responsive Transcription Factor ATF6α Directs Recruitment of the Mediator of RNA Polymerase II Transcription and Multiple Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Dotan; Chen, Lu; Martin-Brown, Skylar; Washburn, Michael P.; Florens, Laurence; Conaway, Joan Weliky; Conaway, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper transcription factor ATF6α functions as a master regulator of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response genes. Previous studies have established that, in response to ER stress, ATF6α translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of ER stress response genes upon binding sequence specifically to ER stress response enhancer elements in their promoters. In this study, we investigate the biochemical mechanism by which ATF6α activates transcription. By exploiting a combination of biochemical and multidimensional protein identification technology-based mass spectrometry approaches, we have obtained evidence that ATF6α functions at least in part by recruiting to the ER stress response enhancer elements of ER stress response genes a collection of RNA polymerase II coregulatory complexes, including the Mediator and multiple histone acetyltransferase complexes, among which are the Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) and Ada-Two-A-containing (ATAC) complexes. Our findings shed new light on the mechanism of action of ATF6α, and they outline a straightforward strategy for applying multidimensional protein identification technology mass spectrometry to determine which RNA polymerase II transcription factors and coregulators are recruited to promoters and other regulatory elements to control transcription. PMID:22577136

  20. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J. . E-mail: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu; Bachmann, Kenneth A.; Bailer, A. John; Bolger, P. Michael; Borak, Jonathan; Cai, Lu; Cedergreen, Nina; Cherian, M. George; Chiueh, Chuang C.; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Cook, Ralph R.; Diamond, David M.; Doolittle, David J.; Dorato, Michael A.; Duke, Stephen O.; Feinendegen, Ludwig; Gardner, Donald E.; Hart, Ronald W.; Hastings, Kenneth L.; Hayes, A. Wallace; Hoffmann, George R.; Ives, John A.; Jaworowski, Zbigniew; Johnson, Thomas E.; Jonas, Wayne B.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2007-07-01

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines.

  1. Transcriptional response to fluconazole and amphotericin B in Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nailis, Heleen; Vandenbosch, Davy; Deforce, Dieter; Nelis, Hans J; Coenye, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Biofilm formation is often associated with persistent Candida albicans infections. Treatment of these infections is difficult, since sessile C. albicans cells show increased resistance towards antifungal agents. The molecular mechanisms behind biofilm resistance in C. albicans are not yet understood. In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional response in young and mature in vitro-grown biofilms after a short and longer exposure time to high doses of fluconazole or amphotericin B. Treatment of biofilms with high doses of antifungal agents resulted in a drug-specific transcriptional response. Exposure of biofilms to fluconazole induced upregulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis (ERG1, ERG3, ERG11 and ERG25). Treatment of biofilms with amphotericin B resulted in an overexpression of KRE1 and SKN1, two genes encoding proteins involved in beta-1,6-glucan biosynthesis. Our data indicate that sessile C. albicans cells show controlled regulation of gene expression, as they quickly mount a drug-specific transcriptional response in the presence of high doses of antifungal agents. These transcriptional changes suggest upregulation of ergosterol biosynthesis (fluconazole) and upregulation of beta-1,6-glucan biosynthesis (amphotericin B) in sessile C. albicans cells that might contribute to a resistant biofilm phenotype. PMID:20170727

  2. Chk2 regulates transcription-independent p53-mediated apoptosis in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Chen; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Motoyama, Noboru . E-mail: motoyama@nils.go.jp

    2005-07-29

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a central role in the induction of apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. The protein kinase Chk2 is an important regulator of p53 function in mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Cells derived from Chk2-deficient mice are resistant to the induction of apoptosis by IR, and this resistance has been thought to be a result of the defective transcriptional activation of p53 target genes. It was recently shown, however, that p53 itself and histone H1.2 translocate to mitochondria and thereby induces apoptosis in a transcription-independent manner in response to IR. We have now examined whether Chk2 also regulates the transcription-independent induction of apoptosis by p53 and histone H1.2. The reduced ability of IR to induce p53 stabilization in Chk2-deficient thymocytes was associated with a marked impairment of p53 and histone H1 translocation to mitochondria. These results suggest that Chk2 regulates the transcription-independent mechanism of p53-mediated apoptosis by inducing stabilization of p53 in response to IR.

  3. Offspring's hydromineral adaptive responses to maternal undernutrition during lactation.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, P; Arguelles, J; Perillan, C

    2015-12-01

    Early development, throughout gestation and lactation, represents a period of extreme vulnerability during which susceptibility to later metabolic and cardiovascular injuries increases. Maternal diet is a major determinant of the foetal and newborn developmental environment; maternal undernutrition may result in adaptive responses leading to structural and molecular alterations in various organs and tissues, such as the brain and kidney. New nephron anlages appear in the renal cortex up to postnatal day 4 and the last anlages to be formed develop into functional nephrons by postnatal day 10 in rodents. We used a model of undernutrition in rat dams that were food-restricted during the first half of the lactation period in order to study the long-term effects of maternal diet on renal development, behaviour and neural hydromineral control mechanisms. The study showed that after 40% food restriction in maternal dietary intake, the dipsogenic responses for both water and salt intake were not altered; Fos expression in brain areas investigated involved in hydromineral homeostasis control was always higher in the offspring in response to isoproterenol. This was accompanied by normal plasma osmolality changes and typical renal histology. These results suggest that the mechanisms for the control of hydromineral balance were unaffected in the offspring of these 40% food-restricted mothers. Undernutrition of the pups may not be as drastic as suggested by dams' restriction. PMID:26234469

  4. Plant Heat Adaptation: priming in response to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Bäurle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a major threat to crop yield stability. Plants can be primed by heat stress, which enables them to subsequently survive temperatures that are lethal to a plant in the naïve state. This is a rapid response that has been known for many years and that is highly conserved across kingdoms. Interestingly, recent studies in Arabidopsis and rice show that this thermo-priming lasts for several days at normal growth temperatures and that it is an active process that is genetically separable from the priming itself. This is referred to as maintenance of acquired thermotolerance or heat stress memory. Such a memory conceivably has adaptive advantages under natural conditions, where heat stress often is chronic or recurring. In this review, I will focus on recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of heat stress memory. PMID:27134736

  5. Identification of heat stress-responsive genes in heat-adapted thermal Agrostis scabra by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiang; Belanger, Faith C; Huang, Bingru

    2009-04-01

    To gain insights into molecular mechanisms of grass tolerance to heat stress, we constructed a suppression subtractive cDNA library to identify heat-responsive genes for a C(3) grass species, thermal Agrostis scabra adapted to heat stress in geothermal areas in Yellowstone National Park. Plants were exposed to 20 degrees C (control) or 35 degrees C for 12d. The SSH analysis was performed with control samples as the driver and heat-stressed samples as the tester. Differentially expressed cDNA fragments were cloned to screen the heat up-regulated library. The SSH analysis identified 120 non-redundant putative heat-responsive cDNAs out of 1180 clones. Genes with homology to known proteins were categorized into six functional groups, with the largest group of genes involved in stress/defense, followed by the group of genes related to protein metabolism. Immunoblot analysis confirmed increases in transcripts of selected genes under heat stress. Transcripts of seven and eight genes were strongly enhanced or induced in shoots and roots, respectively, while two genes were only induced in roots under heat stress. The heat up-regulated genes in thermal A. scabra adapted to long-term heat stress are potential candidate genes for engineering stress-tolerant grasses and for revealing molecular mechanisms of grass adaptation to heat stress. PMID:18950897

  6. Innate immune responses: Crosstalk of signaling and regulation of gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Bo; Tien Po; Shu Hongbing . E-mail: shuh@whu.edu.cn

    2006-08-15

    Innate immune responses to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses are triggered by recognition of specific structures of invading pathogens called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that are located at plasma membrane or inside cells. Stimulation of different PAMPs activates Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent and -independent signaling pathways that lead to activation of transcription factors nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B), interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF3/7) and/or activator protein-1 (AP-1), which collaborate to induce transcription of a large number of downstream genes. This review focuses on the rapid progress that has recently improved our understanding of the crosstalk among the pathways and the precise regulation of transcription of the downstream genes.

  7. A LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulator, RovM, Senses Nutritional Cues Suggesting that It Is Involved in Metabolic Adaptation of Yersinia pestis to the Flea Gut

    PubMed Central

    Vadyvaloo, Viveka; Hinz, Angela K.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis has evolved as a clonal variant of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to cause flea-borne biofilm–mediated transmission of the bubonic plague. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator, RovM, is highly induced only during Y. pestis infection of the flea host. RovM homologs in other pathogens regulate biofilm formation, nutrient sensing, and virulence; including in Y. pseudotuberculosis, where RovM represses the major virulence factor, RovA. Here the role that RovM plays during flea infection was investigated using a Y. pestis KIM6+ strain deleted of rovM, ΔrovM. The ΔrovM mutant strain was not affected in characteristic biofilm gut blockage, growth, or survival during single infection of fleas. Nonetheless, during a co-infection of fleas, the ΔrovM mutant exhibited a significant competitive fitness defect relative to the wild type strain. This competitive fitness defect was restored as a fitness advantage relative to the wild type in a ΔrovM mutant complemented in trans to over-express rovM. Consistent with this, Y. pestis strains, producing elevated transcriptional levels of rovM, displayed higher growth rates, and differential ability to form biofilm in response to specific nutrients in comparison to the wild type. In addition, we demonstrated that rovA was not repressed by RovM in fleas, but that elevated transcriptional levels of rovM in vitro correlated with repression of rovA under specific nutritional conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that RovM likely senses specific nutrient cues in the flea gut environment, and accordingly directs metabolic adaptation to enhance flea gut colonization by Y. pestis. PMID:26348850

  8. High-Resolution Transcriptomic Analysis of the Adaptive Response of Staphylococcus aureus during Acute and Chronic Phases of Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Szafranska, Anna K.; Oxley, Andrew P. A.; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Horst, Sarah A.; Roßlenbroich, Steffen; Peters, Georg; Goldmann, Oliver; Rohde, Manfred; Sinha, Bhanu; Pieper, Dietmar H.; Löffler, Bettina; Jauregui, Ruy; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteomyelitis is a difficult-to-eradicate bone infection typically caused by Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we investigated the in vivo transcriptional adaptation of S. aureus during bone infection. To this end, we determined the transcriptome of S. aureus during the acute (day 7) and chronic (day 28) phases of experimental murine osteomyelitis using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified a total of 180 genes significantly more highly expressed by S. aureus during acute or chronic in vivo infection than under in vitro growth conditions. These genes encoded proteins involved in gluconeogenesis, proteolysis of host proteins, iron acquisition, evasion of host immune defenses, and stress responses. At the regulatory level, sarA and -R and saeR and -S as well as the small RNA RsaC were predominantly expressed by S. aureus during in vivo infection. Only nine genes, including the genes encoding the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway and those involved in the stringent response, were significantly more highly expressed by S. aureus during the chronic than the acute stage of infection. Analysis by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) of a subset of these in vivo-expressed genes in clinical specimens yielded the same results as those observed in the murine system. Collectively, our results show that during acute osteomyelitis, S. aureus induced the transcription of genes that mediate metabolic adaptation, immune evasion, and replication. During the chronic phase, however, S. aureus switched its transcriptional response from a proliferative to a persistence mode, probably driven by the severe deficiency in nutrient supplies. Interfering with the survival strategies of S. aureus during chronic infection could lead to more effective treatments. PMID:25538190

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Transcription Elongation Mutants Are Defective in PUR5 Induction in Response to Nucleotide Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Randal J.; Reines, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides. It is a target of therapeutically useful drugs and is implicated in the regulation of cell growth rate. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mutations in components of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription elongation machinery confer increased sensitivity to a drug that inhibits IMPDH, 6-azauracil (6AU), by a mechanism that is poorly understood. This phenotype is thought to reflect the need for an optimally functioning transcription machinery under conditions of lowered intracellular GTP levels. Here we show that in response to the application of IMPDH inhibitors such as 6AU, wild-type yeast strains induce transcription of PUR5, one of four genes encoding IMPDH-related enzymes. Yeast elongation mutants sensitive to 6AU, such as those with a disrupted gene encoding elongation factor SII or those containing amino acid substitutions in Pol II subunits, are defective in PUR5 induction. The inability to fully induce PUR5 correlates with mutations that effect transcription elongation since 6AU-sensitive strains deleted for genes not related to transcription elongation are competent to induce PUR5. DNA encompassing the PUR5 promoter and 5′ untranslated region supports 6AU induction of a luciferase reporter gene in wild-type cells. Thus, yeast sense and respond to nucleotide depletion via a mechanism of transcriptional induction that restores nucleotides to levels required for normal growth. An optimally functioning elongation machinery is critical for this response. PMID:11003640

  10. The Unfolded Protein Response in the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii Features Translational and Transcriptional Control

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Bradley R.; Tampaki, Zoi; Kim, Kami

    2013-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an important regulatory network that responds to perturbations in protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In mammalian cells, the UPR features translational and transcriptional mechanisms of gene expression aimed at restoring proteostatic control. A central feature of the UPR is phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2) by PERK (EIF2AK3/PEK), which reduces the influx of nascent proteins into the ER by lowering global protein synthesis, coincident with preferential translation of key transcription activators of genes that function to expand the processing capacity of this secretory organelle. Upon ER stress, the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to induce phosphorylation of Toxoplasma eIF2α and lower translation initiation. To characterize the nature of the ensuing UPR in this parasite, we carried out microarray analyses to measure the changes in the transcriptome and in translational control during ER stress. We determined that a collection of transcripts linked with the secretory process are induced in response to ER stress, supporting the idea that a transcriptional induction phase of the UPR occurs in Toxoplasma. Furthermore, we determined that about 500 gene transcripts showed enhanced association with translating ribosomes during ER stress. Many of these target genes are suggested to be involved in gene expression, including JmjC5, which continues to be actively translated during ER stress. This study indicates that Toxoplasma triggers a UPR during ER stress that features both translational and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, which is likely to be important for parasite invasion and development. PMID:23666622

  11. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  12. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  13. Transcriptional Responses in the Hemiparasitic Plant Triphysaria versicolor to Host Plant Signals1[w

    PubMed Central

    Matvienko, Marta; Torres, Manuel J.; Yoder, John I.

    2001-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Scrophulariaceae use chemicals released by host plant roots to signal developmental processes critical for heterotrophy. Haustoria, parasitic plant structures that attach to and invade host roots, develop on roots of the hemiparasitic plant Triphysaria versicolor within a few hours of exposure to either maize (Zea mays) root exudate or purified haustoria-inducing factors. We prepared a normalized, subtractive cDNA library enriched for transcripts differentially abundant in T. versicolor root tips treated with the allelopathic quinone 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone (DMBQ). Northern analyses estimated that about 10% of the cDNAs represent transcripts strongly up-regulated in roots exposed to DMBQ. Northern and reverse northern analyses demonstrated that most DMBQ-responsive messages were similarly up-regulated in T. versicolor roots exposed to maize root exudates. From the cDNA sequences we assembled a unigene set of 137 distinct transcripts and assigned functions by homology comparisons. Many of the proteins encoded by the transcripts are predicted to function in quinone detoxification, whereas others are more likely associated with haustorium development. The identification of genes transcriptionally regulated by haustorium-inducing factors provides a framework for dissecting genetic pathways recruited by parasitic plants during the transition to heterotrophic growth. PMID:11553755

  14. The Sch9 kinase is a chromatin-associated transcriptional activator of osmostress-responsive genes

    PubMed Central

    Pascual-Ahuir, Amparo; Proft, Markus

    2007-01-01

    The yeast Sch9 kinase has been implicated in the cellular adjustment to nutrient availability and in the regulation of aging. Here, we define a novel role for Sch9 in the transcriptional activation of osmostress inducible genes. Loss-of-function mutants sch9 are sensitive to hyperosmotic stress and show an impaired transcriptional response upon osmotic shock of several defense genes. We show that Sch9 is required for gene expression regulated by Sko1, a transcription factor, which is directly targeted by the Hog1 MAP kinase. Sch9 interacts in vitro with both Sko1 and Hog1. Additionally, Sch9 phosphorylates Sko1 in vitro. When artificially tethered to promoter DNA, Sch9 strongly activates transcription independently of osmotic stress. Using in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that Sch9 is recruited to the GRE2 and CTT1 genes exclusively under osmostress conditions, and that this recruitment is dependent on Hog1 and Sko1. Furthermore, Sch9 is required for the proper recruitment of Hog1 at the same genes. Our data reveal the complexity of stress-induced transcription by the regulated association of signaling kinases to chromatin. PMID:17568771

  15. Spatiotemporal control of estrogen-responsive transcription in ERα-positive breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, P-Y; Hsu, H-K; Hsiao, T-H; Ye, Z; Wang, E; Profit, A L; Jatoi, I; Chen, Y; Kirma, N B; Jin, V X; Sharp, Z D; Huang, T H-M

    2016-01-01

    Recruitment of transcription machinery to target promoters for aberrant gene expression has been well studied, but underlying control directed by distant-acting enhancers remains unclear in cancer development. Our previous study demonstrated that distant estrogen response elements (DEREs) located on chromosome 20q13 are frequently amplified and translocated to other chromosomes in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. In this study, we used three-dimensional interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization to decipher spatiotemporal gathering of multiple DEREs in the nucleus. Upon estrogen stimulation, scattered 20q13 DEREs were mobilized to form regulatory depots for synchronized gene expression of target loci. A chromosome conformation capture assay coupled with chromatin immunoprecipitation further uncovered that ERα-bound regulatory depots are tethered to heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) for coordinated chromatin movement and histone modifications of target loci, resulting in transcription repression. Neutralizing HP1 function dysregulated the formation of DERE-involved regulatory depots and transcription inactivation of candidate tumor-suppressor genes. Deletion of amplified DEREs using the CRISPR/Cas9 genomic-editing system profoundly altered transcriptional profiles of proliferation-associated signaling networks, resulting in reduction of cancer cell growth. These findings reveal a formerly uncharacterized feature wherein multiple copies of the amplicon congregate as transcriptional units in the nucleus for synchronous regulation of function-related loci in tumorigenesis. Disruption of their assembly can be a new strategy for treating breast cancers and other malignancies. PMID:26300005

  16. A Trihelix DNA Binding Protein Counterbalances Hypoxia-Responsive Transcriptional Activation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T.; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule–insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein–protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  17. A trihelix DNA binding protein counterbalances hypoxia-responsive transcriptional activation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Giuntoli, Beatrice; Lee, Seung Cho; Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-09-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule-insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein-protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  18. Administration of DNA Encoding the Interleukin-27 Gene Augments Antitumour Responses through Non-adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Sato, A; Shimozato, O; Shingyoji, M; Tada, Y; Tatsumi, K; Shimada, H; Hiroshima, K; Tagawa, M

    2015-10-01

    DNA-mediated immunization of a tumour antigen is a possible immunotherapy for cancer, and interleukin (IL)-27 has diverse functions in adaptive immunity. In this study, we examined whether IL-27 DNA administration enhanced antitumour effects in mice vaccinated with DNA encoding a putative tumour antigen, β-galactosidase (β-gal). An intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin before DNA administration facilitated the exogenous gene expression. In mice received β-gal and IL-27 DNA, growth of β-gal-positive P815 tumours was retarded and survival of the mice was prolonged. Development of β-gal-positive Colon 26 tumours was suppressed by vaccination of β-gal DNA and further inhibited by additional IL-27 DNA administration or IL-12 family cytokines. Nevertheless, a population of β-gal-specific CD8(+) T cells did not increase, and production of anti-β-gal antibody was not enhanced by IL-27 DNA administration. Spleen cells from mice bearing IL-27-expressing Colon 26 tumours showed greater YAC-1-targeted cytotoxicity although CD3(-)/DX5(+) natural killer (NK) cell numbers remained unchanged. Recombinant IL-27 enhanced YAC-1-targeted cytotoxicity of IL-2-primed splenic NK cells and augmented a phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and an expression of perforin. These data collectively indicate that IL-27 DNA administration activates NK cells and augments vaccination effects of DNA encoding a tumour antigen through non-adaptive immune responses. PMID:26095954

  19. Adaptation of Organisms by Resonance of RNA Transcription with the Cellular Redox Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Sequence variation in organisms differs across the genome and the majority of mutations are caused by oxidation, yet its origin is not fully understood. It has also been shown that the reduction-oxidation reaction cycle is the fundamental biochemical cycle that coordinates the timing of all biochemical processes in that cell, including energy production, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. It is shown that the temporal resonance of transcriptome biosynthesis with the oscillating binary state of the reduction-oxidation reaction cycle serves as a basis for non-random sequence variation at specific genome-wide coordinates that change faster than by accumulation of chance mutations. This work demonstrates evidence for a universal, persistent and iterative feedback mechanism between the environment and heredity, whereby acquired variation between cell divisions can outweigh inherited variation.

  20. Physiological and transcriptional response of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 to acid stress.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Jeff R; Larsen, Rebecca L; Deibel, Virginia; Steele, James L

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated features of the acid tolerance response (ATR) in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334. To optimize ATR induction, cells were acid adapted for 10 or 20 min at different pH values (range, 3.0 to 5.0) and then acid challenged at pH 2.0. Adaptation over a broad range of pHs improved acid tolerance, but the highest survival was noted in cells acid adapted for 10 or 20 min at pH 4.5. Analysis of cytoplasmic membrane fatty acids (CMFAs) in acid-adapted cells showed that they had significantly (P < 0.05) higher total percentages of saturated and cyclopropane fatty acids than did control cells. Specifically, large increases in the percentages of C(14:0), C(16:1n(9)), C(16:0), and C(19:0(11c)) were noted in the CMFAs of acid-adapted and acid-adapted, acid-challenged cells, while C(18:1n(9)) and C(18:1n(11)) showed the greatest decrease. Comparison of the transcriptome from control cells (grown at pH 6.0) against that from cells acid adapted for 20 min at pH 4.5 indicated that acid adaption invoked a stringent-type response that was accompanied by other functions which likely helped these cells resist acid damage, including malolactic fermentation and intracellular accumulation of His. Validation of microarray data was provided by experiments that showed that L. casei survival at pH 2.5 was improved at least 100-fold by chemical induction of the stringent response or by the addition of 30 mM malate or 30 mM histidine to the acid challenge medium. To our knowledge, this is the first report that intracellular histidine accumulation may be involved in bacterial acid resistance. PMID:20207759

  1. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of adaptive response in the regenerating limb of the Cynops orientalis newt.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiao-Fang; Guo, Jian-Lin; Zang, Xia-Yan; Sun, Jing-Yan; Li, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Xu, Cun-Shuan

    2015-01-01

    The newt has the powerful capacity to regenerate lost limbs following amputation, and represents an excellent model organism to study regenerative processes. However, the molecular basis of the adaptive response in the regenerating limb of the Chinese fire-bellied newt Cynops orientalis immediately after amputation remains unclear. To better understand the adaptive response immediately after limb amputation at the protein level, we used isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) coupled with LC-MS/MS methods to analyze changes in the proteome of the regenerating newt limb that occurred 2 h and 8 h after amputation. We identified 152 proteins with more than 1.5-fold change in expression compared to control. GO annotation analysis classified these proteins into several categories such as signaling, Ca(2+) binding and translocation, transcription and translation, immune response, cell death, cytoskeleton, metabolism, etc. Further ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) showed that several signaling pathways were significantly changed at 2 h and 8 h after amputation, including EIF2 signaling, acute phase response signaling, tight junction signaling and calcium signaling, suggesting these pathways may be closely related to the adaptive response immediately after limb amputation. This work provides novel insights into understanding the molecular processes related to newt limb regeneration immediately after amputation, and a basis for further study of regenerative medicine. PMID:26864489

  2. Adaptive Physiological Response to Perceived Scarcity as a Mechanism of Sensory Modulation of Life Span.

    PubMed

    Waterson, Michael J; Chan, Tammy P; Pletcher, Scott D

    2015-09-01

    Chemosensation is a potent modulator of organismal physiology and longevity. In Drosophila, loss of recognition of diverse tastants has significant and bidirectional life-span effects. Recently published results revealed that when flies were unable to taste water, they increased its internal generation, which may have subsequently altered life span. To determine whether similar adaptive responses occur in other contexts, we explored the impact of sensory deficiency of other metabolically important molecules. Trehalose is a major circulating carbohydrate in the fly that is recognized by the gustatory receptor Gr5a. Gr5a mutant flies are short lived, and we found that they specifically increased whole-body and circulating levels of trehalose, but not other carbohydrates, likely through upregulation of de novo synthesis. dILP2 transcript levels were increased in Gr5a mutants, a possible response intended to reduce hypertrehalosemia, and likely a contributing factor to their reduced life span. Together, these data suggest that compensatory physiological responses to perceived environmental scarcity, which are designed to alleviate the ostensive shortage, may be a common outcome of sensory manipulation. We suggest that future investigations into the mechanisms underlying sensory modulation of aging may benefit by focusing on direct or indirect consequences of physiological changes that are designed to correct perceived disparity with the environment. PMID:25878032

  3. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Liu, Chengzhi; Lu, Huizhi; Liu, Mengjia; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998), Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974), NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506), thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531), the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819), PprA (dra0346), and RecN (dr1447), are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways. PMID:27182600

  4. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Deem, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross-reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity in the mechanism for searching the amino acid sequence space of antibodies. Our model predicts that chronic infection may lead to autoimmune disease as well due to cross-reactivity and suggests a broad distribution for the time of onset of autoimmune disease due to chronic exposure. The slow search of antibody sequence space by point mutation leads to the broad of distribution times.

  5. Control of the Adaptive Immune Response by Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Mauge, Laetitia; Terme, Magali; Tartour, Eric; Helley, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is nowadays described as an entire organ that regulates various processes: vascular tone, coagulation, inflammation, and immune cell trafficking, depending on the vascular site and its specific microenvironment as well as on endothelial cell-intrinsic mechanisms like epigenetic changes. In this review, we will focus on the control of the adaptive immune response by the tumor vasculature. In physiological conditions, the endothelium acts as a barrier regulating cell trafficking by specific expression of adhesion molecules enabling adhesion of immune cells on the vessel, and subsequent extravasation. This process is also dependent on chemokine and integrin expression, and on the type of junctions defining the permeability of the endothelium. Endothelial cells can also regulate immune cell activation. In fact, the endothelial layer can constitute immunological synapses due to its close interactions with immune cells, and the delivery of co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory signals. In tumor conditions, the vasculature is characterized by an abnormal vessel structure and permeability, and by a specific phenotype of endothelial cells. All these abnormalities lead to a modulation of intra-tumoral immune responses and contribute to the development of intra-tumoral immunosuppression, which is a major mechanism for promoting the development, progression, and treatment resistance of tumors. The in-depth analysis of these various abnormalities will help defining novel targets for the development of anti-tumoral treatments. Furthermore, eventual changes of the endothelial cell phenotype identified by plasma biomarkers could secondarily be selected to monitor treatment efficacy. PMID:24734218

  6. Analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome for the distributions of stress-response elements potentially affecting gene expression by transcriptional interference.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunkai; Ye, Sujuan; Erkine, Alexandre M

    2009-01-01

    Cellular stress responses are characterized by coordinated transcriptional induction of genes encoding a group of conserved proteins known as molecular chaperones, most of which are also known as heat shock proteins (HSPs). In S. cerevisiae, transcriptional responses to stress are mediated via two trans-regulatory activators: heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) that bind to heat shock elements (HSEs), and the Msn2 and Msn4 transcription factors that bind to stress response elements (STREs). Recent studies in S. cerevisiae demonstrated that a significant portion of the non-coding region in the genome is transcribed and this intergenic transcription could regulate the transcription of adjacent genes by transcription interference. The goal of this study was to analyze the genomic distribution of HSF and Msn2/4 binding sites and to study the potential for transcription interference regulated by stress response systems. Our genome-wide analysis revealed that 297 genes have STREs in their promoter region, whereas 310 genes contained HSEs. Twenty-five genes had both HSEs and STREs in their promoters. The first set of genes is potentially regulated by the Msn2/Msn4/STRE interaction. For the second set of genes, regulation by heat shock could be mediated through HSF/HSE regulatory mechanisms. The overlap between these groups suggests a co-regulation by the two pathways. Our study yielded 239 candidate genes, whose regulation could potentially be affected by heat-shock via transcription interference directed both from upstream and downstream areas relative to the native promoters. In addition we have categorized 924 genes containing HSE and/or STRE elements within the Open Reading Frames (ORFs), which may also affect normal transcription. Our study revealed a widespread possibility for the regulation of genes via transcriptional interference initiated by stress response. We provided a categorization of genes potentially affected at the transcriptional level by known

  7. Transcriptional Profiling Uncovers a Network of Cholesterol-Responsive Atherosclerosis Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Roland; Noori, Peri; Maleki, Shohreh; Köhler, Marina; Hamsten, Anders; Tegnér, Jesper; Björkegren, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Despite the well-documented effects of plasma lipid lowering regimes halting atherosclerosis lesion development and reducing morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease and stroke, the transcriptional response in the atherosclerotic lesion mediating these beneficial effects has not yet been carefully investigated. We performed transcriptional profiling at 10-week intervals in atherosclerosis-prone mice with human-like hypercholesterolemia and a genetic switch to lower plasma lipoproteins (Ldlr−/−Apo100/100 Mttpflox/flox Mx1-Cre). Atherosclerotic lesions progressed slowly at first, then expanded rapidly, and plateaued after advanced lesions formed. Analysis of lesion expression profiles indicated that accumulation of lipid-poor macrophages reached a point that led to the rapid expansion phase with accelerated foam-cell formation and inflammation, an interpretation supported by lesion histology. Genetic lowering of plasma cholesterol (e.g., lipoproteins) at this point all together prevented the formation of advanced plaques and parallel transcriptional profiling of the atherosclerotic arterial wall identified 37 cholesterol-responsive genes mediating this effect. Validation by siRNA-inhibition in macrophages incubated with acetylated-LDL revealed a network of eight cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis genes regulating cholesterol-ester accumulation. Taken together, we have identified a network of atherosclerosis genes that in response to plasma cholesterol-lowering prevents the formation of advanced plaques. This network should be of interest for the development of novel atherosclerosis therapies. PMID:18369455

  8. Transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to low temperature during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Deed, Rebecca C; Deed, Nathan K; Gardner, Richard C

    2015-04-01

    Although the yeast response to low temperature has industrial significance for baking, lager brewing and white wine fermentation, the molecular response of yeast cells to low temperature remains poorly characterised. Transcriptional changes were quantified in a commercial wine yeast, Enoferm M2, fermented at optimal (25 °C) and low temperature (12.5 °C), at two time points during fermentation of Sauvignon blanc grape juice. The transition from early to mid-late fermentation was notably less severe in the cold than at 25 °C, and the Rim15p-Gis1p pathway was involved in effecting this transition. Genes for three key nutrients were strongly influenced by low temperature fermentation: nitrogen, sulfur and iron/copper, along with changes in the cell wall and stress response. Transcriptional analyses during wine fermentation at 12.5 °C in four F1 hybrids of M2 also highlighted the importance of genes involved in nutrient utilisation and the stress response. We identified transcription factors that may be important for these differences between genetic backgrounds. Since low fermentation temperatures cause fundamental changes in membrane kinetics and cellular metabolism, an understanding of the physiological and genetic limitations on cellular performance will assist breeding of improved industrial strains. PMID:25645433

  9. Sex-related differences in murine hepatic transcriptional and proteomic responses to TCDD

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D.; Lee, Jamie; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C.

    2015-04-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that produces myriad toxicities in most mammals. In rodents alone, there is a huge divergence in the toxicological response across species, as well as among different strains within a species. But there are also significant differences between males and females animals of a single strain. These differences are inconsistent across model systems: the severity of toxicity is greater in female rats than males, while male mice and guinea pigs are more sensitive than females. Because the specific events that underlie this difference remain unclear, we characterized the hepatic transcriptional response of adult male and female C57BL/6 mice to 500 μg/kg TCDD at multiple time-points. The transcriptional profile diverged significantly between the sexes. Female mice demonstrated a large number of altered transcripts as early as 6 h following treatment, suggesting a large primary response. Conversely, male animals showed the greatest TCDD-mediated response 144 h following exposure, potentially implicating significant secondary responses. Nr1i3 was statistically significantly induced at all time-points in the sensitive male animals. This mRNA encodes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis. Surprisingly though, changes at the protein level (aside from the positive control, CYP1A1) were modest, with only FMO3 showing clear induction, and no genes with sex-differences. Thus, while male and female mice show transcriptional differences in their response to TCDD, their association with TCDD-induced toxicities remains unclear. - Highlights: • Differences exist between the toxicity phenotypes to TCDD in male and female mice. • TCDD-mediated transcriptomic differences were identified between the sexes. • Resistant female mice displayed a large, early-onset, transcriptomic response.

  10. Extratropical Transitions in Atlantic Canada: Impacts and Adaptive Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Athena; Catto, Norm

    2013-04-01

    . Storm surge damage occurred along the north shore of the Bonavista Peninsula. Similar effects, differing only in the size of the affected areas, have resulted from several extratropical transitions which have impacted Atlantic Canada since July 1989. Extratropical transition "Leslie" impacted Newfoundland on 10-11 September 2012. Although the area affected was comparable to "Igor", wind velocities and rainfall totals were less, fortunately limiting damage. Preparation, advance warning to the population, proaction, and response efforts all showed significant improvement, however, indicating that the experience gained from coping with "Igor" had been successfully applied in adaptation to "Leslie". Extratropical transitions pose a significantly different set of challenges for adaptation in comparison to purely tropical hurricanes, and responses and adaptation strategies should be tailored to address these specific events. Calculating the frequency, magnitude and intensity of potential shifts is important for accurate forecasting and public awareness, safety management, preparedness, and adaptation. Available data indicate an increase in extratropical frequency and severity in Atlantic Canada since 1991, but there are difficulties in establishing the extent and nature of transition for previous storm events. A cautionary policy would assume no significant changes in extratropical transition frequency for Atlantic Canada, but would also acknowledge that large events remain probable.

  11. Adaptive acid tolerance response of Vibrio parahaemolyticus as affected by acid adaptation conditions, growth phase, and bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Lun; Chou, Cheng-Chun; Chen, Hsi-Chia; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Ming-Ju

    2012-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain 690 was isolated from gastroenteritis patients. Its thermal and ethanol stress responses have been reported in our previous studies. In this study, we further investigated the effects of various acid adaptation conditions including pH (5.0-6.0) and time (30-90 min) on the acid tolerance in different growth phases of V. parahaemolyticus 690. Additionally, the adaptive acid tolerance among different V. parahaemolyticus strains was compared. Results indicated that the acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus 690 was significantly increased after acid adaptation at pH 5.5 and 6.0 for 30-90 min. Among the various acid adaptation conditions examined, V. parahaemolyticus 690 acid-adapted at pH 5.5 for 90 min exhibited the highest acid tolerance. The acid adaptation also influenced the acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus 690 in different growth phases with late-exponential phase demonstrating the greatest acid tolerance response (ATR) than other phases. Additionally, the results also showed that the induction of adaptive ATR varied with different strains of V. parahaemolyticus. An increase in acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus was observed after prior acid adaptation in five strains (556, 690, BCRC 13023, BCRC 13025, and BCRC 12864), but not in strains 405 and BCRC 12863. PMID:22827515

  12. Transcriptional profiling of the age-related response to genotoxic stress points to differential DNA damage response with age.

    PubMed

    Simon, Kirk; Mukundan, Anju; Dewundara, Samantha; Van Remmen, Holly; Dombkowski, Alan A; Cabelof, Diane C

    2009-09-01

    The p53 DNA damage response attenuated with age and we have evaluated downstream factors in the DNA damage response. In old animals p21 protein accumulates in the whole cell fraction but significantly declines in the nucleus, which may alter cell cycle and apoptotic programs in response to DNA damage. We evaluated the transcriptional response to DNA damage in young and old and find 2692 genes are differentially regulated in old compared to young in response to oxidative stress (p<0.005). As anticipated, the transcriptional profile of young mice is consistent with DNA damage induced cell cycle arrest while the profile of old mice is consistent with cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA damage, suggesting the potential for catastrophic accumulation of DNA damage at the replication fork. Unique sets of DNA repair genes are induced in response to damage in old and young, suggesting the types of damage accumulating differs between young and old. The DNA repair genes upregulated in old animals point to accumulation of replication-dependent DNA double strand breaks (DSB). Expression data is consistent with loss of apoptosis following DNA damage in old animals. These data suggest DNA damage responses differ greatly in young and old animals. PMID:19679149

  13. Pancreatic adaptive responses in alcohol abuse: Role of the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T; Pandol, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The majority of those who drink excessive amounts of alcohol do not develop pancreatic disease. One overarching hypothesis is that alcohol abuse requires additional risk factors, either environmental or genetic, for disease to occur. However, another reason be a result of alcohol-induced activation of adaptive systems that protect the pancreas from the toxic effects of alcohol. We show that mechanisms within the unfolded protein response (UPR) of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can lead to protection of the pancreas from pancreatic diseases with alcohol abuse. The remarkable ability of the pancreas to adapt its machinery to alcohol abuse using UPR systems and continue functioning is the likely reason that pancreatitis from alcohol abuse does not occur in the majority of heavy drinkers. These findings indicate that methods to enhance the protective responses of the UPR can provide opportunities for prevention and treatment of pancreatic diseases. PMID:25736240

  14. The roles of RelA/(p)ppGpp in glucose-starvation induced adaptive response in the zoonotic Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tengfei; Zhu, Jiawen; Wei, Shun; Luo, Qingping; Li, Lu; Li, Shengqing; Tucker, Alexander; Shao, Huabin; Zhou, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The (p)ppGpp signal molecules play a central role in the stringent response (SR) to adapt to nutrient starvation in bacteria, yet the carbohydrate starvation induced adaptive response and the roles of SR in this response is not well characterized, especially in Gram-positives. Here, two (p)ppGpp synthetases RelA and RelQ are identified in Streptococcus suis, an important emerging zoonotic Gram-positive bacterium, while only RelA is functional under glucose starvation. To characterize the roles of RelA/(p)ppGpp in glucose starvation response in S. suis, the growth curves and transcriptional profiles were compared between the mutant strain ΔrelA [a (p)ppGpp0 strain under glucose starvation] and its parental strain SC-19 [(p)ppGpp+]. The results showed great difference between SC-19 and ΔrelA on adaptive responses when suffering glucose starvation, and demonstrated that RelA/(p)ppGpp plays important roles in adaptation to glucose starvation. Besides the classic SR including inhibition of growth and related macromolecular synthesis, the extended adaptive response also includes inhibited glycolysis, and carbon catabolite repression (CCR)-mediated carbohydrate-dependent metabolic switches. Collectively, the pheno- and genotypic characterization of the glucose starvation induced adaptive response in S. suis makes a great contribution to understanding better the mechanism of SR. PMID:27255540

  15. The roles of RelA/(p)ppGpp in glucose-starvation induced adaptive response in the zoonotic Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tengfei; Zhu, Jiawen; Wei, Shun; Luo, Qingping; Li, Lu; Li, Shengqing; Tucker, Alexander; Shao, Huabin; Zhou, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The (p)ppGpp signal molecules play a central role in the stringent response (SR) to adapt to nutrient starvation in bacteria, yet the carbohydrate starvation induced adaptive response and the roles of SR in this response is not well characterized, especially in Gram-positives. Here, two (p)ppGpp synthetases RelA and RelQ are identified in Streptococcus suis, an important emerging zoonotic Gram-positive bacterium, while only RelA is functional under glucose starvation. To characterize the roles of RelA/(p)ppGpp in glucose starvation response in S. suis, the growth curves and transcriptional profiles were compared between the mutant strain ΔrelA [a (p)ppGpp(0) strain under glucose starvation] and its parental strain SC-19 [(p)ppGpp(+)]. The results showed great difference between SC-19 and ΔrelA on adaptive responses when suffering glucose starvation, and demonstrated that RelA/(p)ppGpp plays important roles in adaptation to glucose starvation. Besides the classic SR including inhibition of growth and related macromolecular synthesis, the extended adaptive response also includes inhibited glycolysis, and carbon catabolite repression (CCR)-mediated carbohydrate-dependent metabolic switches. Collectively, the pheno- and genotypic characterization of the glucose starvation induced adaptive response in S. suis makes a great contribution to understanding better the mechanism of SR. PMID:27255540

  16. Histone ubiquitylation and its roles in transcription and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Meas, Rithy; Mao, Peng

    2015-12-01

    DNA in human cells is constantly assaulted by endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. It is vital for the cell to respond rapidly and precisely to DNA damage to maintain genome integrity and reduce the risk of mutagenesis. Sophisticated reactions occur in chromatin surrounding the damaged site leading to the activation of DNA damage response (DDR), including transcription reprogramming, cell cycle checkpoint, and DNA repair. Histone proteins around the DNA damage play essential roles in DDR, through extensive post-translational modifications (PTMs) by a variety of modifying enzymes. One PTM on histones, mono-ubiquitylation, has emerged as a key player in cellular response to DNA damage. In this review, we will (1) briefly summarize the history of histone H2A and H2B ubiquitylation (H2Aub and H2Bub, respectively), (2) discuss their roles in transcription, and (3) their functions in DDR. PMID:26422137

  17. Transcriptional Response of the Sulfur Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena to Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Dobrinski, Kimberly P.; Enkemann, Steven A.; Yoder, Sean J.; Haller, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The hydrothermal vent gammaproteobacterium Thiomicrospira crunogena inhabits an unstable environment and must endure dramatic changes in habitat chemistry. This sulfur chemolithoautotroph responds to changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (DIC = CO2 + HCO3− + CO3−2) availability with a carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in which whole-cell affinity for DIC, as well as the intracellular DIC concentration, increases substantially under DIC limitation. To determine whether this CCM is regulated at the level of transcription, we resuspended cells that were cultivated under high-DIC conditions in chemostats in growth medium with low concentrations of DIC and tracked CCM development in the presence and absence of the RNA polymerase inhibitor rifampin. Induction of the CCM, as measured by silicone oil centrifugation, was hindered in the presence of rifampin. Similar results were observed for carboxysome gene transcription and assembly, as assayed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Genome-wide transcription patterns for cells grown under DIC limitation and those grown under ammonia limitation were assayed via microarrays and compared. In addition to carboxysome genes, two novel genes (Tcr_1019 and Tcr_1315) present in other organisms, including chemolithoautotrophs, but whose function(s) has not been elucidated in any organism were found to be upregulated under low-DIC conditions. Likewise, under ammonia limitation, in addition to the expected enhancement of ammonia transporter and PII gene transcription, the transcription of two novel genes (Tcr_0466 and Tcr_2018) was measurably enhanced. Upregulation of all four genes (Tcr_1019, 4-fold; Tcr_131, ∼7-fold; Tcr_0466, >200-fold; Tcr_2018, 7-fold), which suggests that novel components are part of the response to nutrient limitation by this organism, was verified via qRT-PCR. PMID:22328671

  18. Response of a Rice Paddy Soil Methanogen to Syntrophic Growth as Revealed by Transcriptional Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Yanxiang; Lü, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Members of Methanocellales are widespread in paddy field soils and play the key role in methane production. These methanogens feature largely in these organisms' adaptation to low H2 and syntrophic growth with anaerobic fatty acid oxidizers. The adaptive mechanisms, however, remain unknown. In the present study, we determined the transcripts of 21 genes involved in the key steps of methanogenesis and acetate assimilation of Methanocella conradii HZ254, a strain recently isolated from paddy field soil. M. conradii was grown in monoculture and syntrophically with Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum (a propionate syntroph) or Syntrophothermus lipocalidus (a butyrate syntroph). Comparison of the relative transcript abundances showed that three hydrogenase-encoding genes and all methanogenesis-related genes tested were upregulated in cocultures relative to monoculture. The genes encoding formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (Fwd), heterodisulfide reductase (Hdr), and the membrane-bound energy-converting hydrogenase (Ech) were the most upregulated among the evaluated genes. The expression of the formate dehydrogenase (Fdh)-encoding gene also was significantly upregulated. In contrast, an acetate assimilation gene was downregulated in cocultures. The genes coding for Fwd, Hdr, and the D subunit of F420-nonreducing hydrogenase (Mvh) form a large predicted transcription unit; therefore, the Mvh/Hdr/Fwd complex, capable of mediating the electron bifurcation and connecting the first and last steps of methanogenesis, was predicted to be formed in M. conradii. We propose that Methanocella methanogens cope with low H2 and syntrophic growth by (i) stabilizing the Mvh/Hdr/Fwd complex and (ii) activating formate-dependent methanogenesis. PMID:24837392

  19. Impaired Transcriptional Response of the Murine Heart to Cigarette Smoke in the Setting of High Fat Diet and Obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Lee, K. M.; Corley, Richard A.; Pounds, Joel G.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2013-07-01

    Smoking and obesity are each well-established risk factors for cardiovascular heart disease, which together impose earlier onset and greater severity of disease. To identify early signaling events in the response of the heart to cigarette smoke exposure within the setting of obesity, we exposed normal weight and high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice to repeated inhaled doses of mainstream (MS) or sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke administered over a two week period, monitoring effects on both cardiac and pulmonary transcriptomes. MS smoke (250 μg wet total particulate matter (WTPM)/L, 5 h/day) exposures elicited robust cellular and molecular inflammatory responses in the lung with 1466 differentially expressed pulmonary genes (p < 0.01) in normal weight animals and a much-attenuated response (463 genes) in the hearts of the same animals. In contrast, exposures to SS smoke (85 μg WTPM/L) with a CO concentration equivalent to that of MS smoke (250 CO ppm) induced a weak pulmonary response (328 genes) but an extensive cardiac response (1590 genes). SS smoke and to a lesser extent MS smoke preferentially elicited hypoxia- and stress-responsive genes as well as genes predicting early changes of vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, precursors of cardiovascular disease. The most sensitive smoke-induced cardiac transcriptional changes of normal weight mice were largely absent in DIO mice after smoke exposure, while genes involved in fatty acid utilization were unaffected. At the same time, smoke exposure suppressed multiple proteome maintenance genes induced in the hearts of DIO mice. Together, these results underscore the sensitivity of the heart to SS smoke and reveal adaptive responses in healthy individuals that are absent in the setting of high fat diet and obesity.

  20. A Semi-Supervised Approach for Refining Transcriptional Signatures of Drug Response and Repositioning Predictions.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Francesco; Shrestha, Roshan L; Levin, Nicolas; Boilot, Viviane; Garnett, Mathew J; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Draviam, Viji M

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel strategy to identify drug-repositioning opportunities. The starting point of our method is the generation of a signature summarising the consensual transcriptional response of multiple human cell lines to a compound of interest (namely the seed compound). This signature can be derived from data in existing databases, such as the connectivity-map, and it is used at first instance to query a network interlinking all the connectivity-map compounds, based on the similarity of their transcriptional responses. This provides a drug neighbourhood, composed of compounds predicted to share some effects with the seed one. The original signature is then refined by systematically reducing its overlap with the transcriptional responses induced by drugs in this neighbourhood that are known to share a secondary effect with the seed compound. Finally, the drug network is queried again with the resulting refined signatures and the whole process is carried on for a number of iterations. Drugs in the final refined neighbourhood are then predicted to exert the principal mode of action of the seed compound. We illustrate our approach using paclitaxel (a microtubule stabilising agent) as seed compound. Our method predicts that glipizide and splitomicin perturb microtubule function in human cells: a result that could not be obtained through standard signature matching methods. In agreement, we find that glipizide and splitomicin reduce interphase microtubule growth rates and transiently increase the percentage of mitotic cells-consistent with our prediction. Finally, we validated the refined signatures of paclitaxel response by mining a large drug screening dataset, showing that human cancer cell lines whose basal transcriptional profile is anti-correlated to them are significantly more sensitive to paclitaxel and docetaxel. PMID:26452147

  1. A Simple Auxin Transcriptional Response System Regulates Multiple Morphogenetic Processes in the Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Flores-Sandoval, Eduardo; Eklund, D Magnus; Bowman, John L

    2015-05-01

    In land plants comparative genomics has revealed that members of basal lineages share a common set of transcription factors with the derived flowering plants, despite sharing few homologous structures. The plant hormone auxin has been implicated in many facets of development in both basal and derived lineages of land plants. We functionally characterized the auxin transcriptional response machinery in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, a member of the basal lineage of extant land plants. All components known from flowering plant systems are present in M. polymorpha, but they exist as single orthologs: a single MpTOPLESS (TPL) corepressor, a single MpTRANSPORT inhibitor response 1 auxin receptor, single orthologs of each class of auxin response factor (ARF; MpARF1, MpARF2, MpARF3), and a single negative regulator auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (MpIAA). Phylogenetic analyses suggest this simple system is the ancestral condition for land plants. We experimentally demonstrate that these genes act in an auxin response pathway--chimeric fusions of the MpTPL corepressor with heterodimerization domains of MpARF1, MpARF2, or their negative regulator, MpIAA, generate auxin insensitive plants that lack the capacity to pattern and transition into mature stages of development. Our results indicate auxin mediated transcriptional regulation acts as a facilitator of branching, differentiation and growth, rather than acting to determine or specify tissues during the haploid stage of the M. polymorpha life cycle. We hypothesize that the ancestral role of auxin is to modulate a balance of differentiated and pluri- or totipotent cell states, whose fates are determined by interactions with combinations of unrelated transcription factors. PMID:26020649

  2. Roles of Arabidopsis WRKY3 and WRKY4 Transcription Factors in Plant Responses to Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhibing; Vinod, KM; Zheng, Zuyu; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2008-01-01

    Background Plant WRKY DNA-binding transcription factors are involved in plant responses to biotic and abiotic responses. It has been previously shown that Arabidopsis WRKY3 and WRKY4, which encode two structurally similar WRKY transcription factors, are induced by pathogen infection and salicylic acid (SA). However, the role of the two WRKY transcription factors in plant disease resistance has not been directly analyzed. Results Both WRKY3 and WRKY4 are nuclear-localized and specifically recognize the TTGACC W-box sequences in vitro. Expression of WRKY3 and WRKY4 was induced rapidly by stress conditions generated by liquid infiltration or spraying. Stress-induced expression of WRKY4 was further elevated by pathogen infection and SA treatment. To determine directly their role in plant disease resistance, we have isolated T-DNA insertion mutants and generated transgenic overexpression lines for WRKY3 and WRKY4. Both the loss-of-function mutants and transgenic overexpression lines were examined for responses to the biotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. The wrky3 and wrky4 single and double mutants exhibited more severe disease symptoms and support higher fungal growth than wild-type plants after Botrytis infection. Although disruption of WRKY3 and WRKY4 did not have a major effect on plant response to P. syringae, overexpression of WRKY4 greatly enhanced plant susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen and suppressed pathogen-induced PR1 gene expression. Conclusion The nuclear localization and sequence-specific DNA-binding activity support that WRKY3 and WRKY4 function as transcription factors. Functional analysis based on T-DNA insertion mutants and transgenic overexpression lines indicates that WRKY3 and WRKY4 have a positive role in plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens and WRKY4 has a negative effect on plant resistance to biotrophic pathogens. PMID:18570649

  3. A Simple Auxin Transcriptional Response System Regulates Multiple Morphogenetic Processes in the Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Sandoval, Eduardo; Eklund, D. Magnus; Bowman, John L.

    2015-01-01

    In land plants comparative genomics has revealed that members of basal lineages share a common set of transcription factors with the derived flowering plants, despite sharing few homologous structures. The plant hormone auxin has been implicated in many facets of development in both basal and derived lineages of land plants. We functionally characterized the auxin transcriptional response machinery in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, a member of the basal lineage of extant land plants. All components known from flowering plant systems are present in M. polymorpha, but they exist as single orthologs: a single MpTOPLESS (TPL) corepressor, a single MpTRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1 auxin receptor, single orthologs of each class of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF; MpARF1, MpARF2, MpARF3), and a single negative regulator AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (MpIAA). Phylogenetic analyses suggest this simple system is the ancestral condition for land plants. We experimentally demonstrate that these genes act in an auxin response pathway — chimeric fusions of the MpTPL corepressor with heterodimerization domains of MpARF1, MpARF2, or their negative regulator, MpIAA, generate auxin insensitive plants that lack the capacity to pattern and transition into mature stages of development. Our results indicate auxin mediated transcriptional regulation acts as a facilitator of branching, differentiation and growth, rather than acting to determine or specify tissues during the haploid stage of the M. polymorpha life cycle. We hypothesize that the ancestral role of auxin is to modulate a balance of differentiated and pluri- or totipotent cell states, whose fates are determined by interactions with combinations of unrelated transcription factors. PMID:26020649

  4. A Semi-Supervised Approach for Refining Transcriptional Signatures of Drug Response and Repositioning Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Francesco; Shrestha, Roshan L.; Levin, Nicolas; Boilot, Viviane; Garnett, Mathew J.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Draviam, Viji M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel strategy to identify drug-repositioning opportunities. The starting point of our method is the generation of a signature summarising the consensual transcriptional response of multiple human cell lines to a compound of interest (namely the seed compound). This signature can be derived from data in existing databases, such as the connectivity-map, and it is used at first instance to query a network interlinking all the connectivity-map compounds, based on the similarity of their transcriptional responses. This provides a drug neighbourhood, composed of compounds predicted to share some effects with the seed one. The original signature is then refined by systematically reducing its overlap with the transcriptional responses induced by drugs in this neighbourhood that are known to share a secondary effect with the seed compound. Finally, the drug network is queried again with the resulting refined signatures and the whole process is carried on for a number of iterations. Drugs in the final refined neighbourhood are then predicted to exert the principal mode of action of the seed compound. We illustrate our approach using paclitaxel (a microtubule stabilising agent) as seed compound. Our method predicts that glipizide and splitomicin perturb microtubule function in human cells: a result that could not be obtained through standard signature matching methods. In agreement, we find that glipizide and splitomicin reduce interphase microtubule growth rates and transiently increase the percentage of mitotic cells–consistent with our prediction. Finally, we validated the refined signatures of paclitaxel response by mining a large drug screening dataset, showing that human cancer cell lines whose basal transcriptional profile is anti-correlated to them are significantly more sensitive to paclitaxel and docetaxel. PMID:26452147

  5. Adaptation or Malignant Transformation: The Two Faces of Epigenetically Mediated Response to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive response to stress is a fundamental property of living systems. At the cellular level, many different types of stress elicit an essentially limited repertoire of adaptive responses. Epigenetic changes are the main mechanism for medium- to long-term adaptation to accumulated (intense, long-term, or repeated) stress. We propose the adaptive deregulation of the epigenome in response to stress (ADERS) hypothesis which assumes that the unspecific adaptive stress response grows stronger with the increasing stress level, epigenetically activating response gene clusters while progressively deregulating other cellular processes. The balance between the unspecific adaptive response and the general epigenetic deregulation is critical because a strong response can lead to pathology, particularly to malignant transformation. The main idea of our hypothesis is the continuum traversed by a cell subjected to accumulated stress, which lies between an unspecific adaptive response and pathological deregulation—the two extremes sharing the same underlying cause, which is a manifestation of a unified epigenetically mediated adaptive response to stress. The evolutionary potential of epigenetic regulation in multigenerational adaptation is speculatively discussed in the light of neo-Lamarckism. Finally, an approach to testing the proposed hypothesis is presented, relying on either the publicly available datasets or on conducting new experiments. PMID:24187667

  6. Adaptation or malignant transformation: the two faces of epigenetically mediated response to stress.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Aleksandar; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive response to stress is a fundamental property of living systems. At the cellular level, many different types of stress elicit an essentially limited repertoire of adaptive responses. Epigenetic changes are the main mechanism for medium- to long-term adaptation to accumulated (intense, long-term, or repeated) stress. We propose the adaptive deregulation of the epigenome in response to stress (ADERS) hypothesis which assumes that the unspecific adaptive stress response grows stronger with the increasing stress level, epigenetically activating response gene clusters while progressively deregulating other cellular processes. The balance between the unspecific adaptive response and the general epigenetic deregulation is critical because a strong response can lead to pathology, particularly to malignant transformation. The main idea of our hypothesis is the continuum traversed by a cell subjected to accumulated stress, which lies between an unspecific adaptive response and pathological deregulation--the two extremes sharing the same underlying cause, which is a manifestation of a unified epigenetically mediated adaptive response to stress. The evolutionary potential of epigenetic regulation in multigenerational adaptation is speculatively discussed in the light of neo-Lamarckism. Finally, an approach to testing the proposed hypothesis is presented, relying on either the publicly available datasets or on conducting new experiments. PMID:24187667

  7. Mammalian Heat Shock Response and Mechanisms Underlying Its Genome-wide Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Mahat, Dig B; Salamanca, H Hans; Duarte, Fabiana M; Danko, Charles G; Lis, John T

    2016-04-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is critical for survival of all organisms. However, its scope, extent, and the molecular mechanism of regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that the genome-wide transcriptional response to heat shock in mammals is rapid and dynamic and results in induction of several hundred and repression of several thousand genes. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), the "master regulator" of the HSR, controls only a fraction of heat shock-induced genes and does so by increasing RNA polymerase II release from promoter-proximal pause. Notably, HSF2 does not compensate for the lack of HSF1. However, serum response factor appears to transiently induce cytoskeletal genes independently of HSF1. The pervasive repression of transcription is predominantly HSF1-independent and is mediated through reduction of RNA polymerase II pause release. Overall, mammalian cells orchestrate rapid, dynamic, and extensive changes in transcription upon heat shock that are largely modulated at pause release, and HSF1 plays a limited and specialized role. PMID:27052732

  8. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  9. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase activity-responsive transcription factors: From hydroxylation to gene expression and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Ambreena; Aminova, Leila R; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2008-01-01

    Most homeostatic processes including gene transcription occur as a result of deviations in physiological tone that threatens the survival of the organism. A prototypical homeostatic stress response includes changes in gene expression following alterations in oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate levels. Each of these cofactors plays an important role in cellular metabolism. Accordingly, a family of enzymes known as the Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes are a group of dioxygenases that have evolved to sense changes in 2-oxoglutarate, oxygen and iron via changes in enzyme activity. Indeed, PHDs are a part of an established oxygen sensor system that regulates transcriptional regulation of hypoxia/stress-regulated genes and thus are an important component of events leading to cellular rescue from oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate deprivations. The ability of PHD activity to regulate homeostatic responses to oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate metabolism has led to the development of small molecule inhibitors of the PHDs as a strategy for activating or augmenting cellular stress responses. These small molecules are proving effective in preclinical models of stroke and Parkinson's disease. However the precise protective pathways engaged by PHD inhibition are only beginning to be defined. In the current review, we summarize the role of iron, 2-oxoglutarate and oxygen in the PHD catalyzed hydroxylation reaction and provide a brief discussion of some of the transcription factors that play an effective role in neuroprotection against oxidative stress as a result of changes in PHD activity. PMID:17981760

  10. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  11. The Streptococcus suis transcriptional landscape reveals adaptation mechanisms in pig blood and cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zongfu; Wu, Chunyan; Shao, Jing; Zhu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Weixue; Zhang, Wenwei; Tang, Min; Pei, Na; Fan, Hongjie; Li, Jiguang; Yao, Huochun; Gu, Hongwei; Xu, Xun; Lu, Chengping

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is an important pathogen of pigs, and it is also recognized as a zoonotic agent for humans. SS infection may result in septicemia or meningitis in the host. However, little is known about genes that contribute to the virulence process and survival within host blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Small RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as key regulators of virulence in several bacteria, but they have not been investigated in SS. Here, using a differential RNA-sequencing approach and RNAs from SS strain P1/7 grown in rich medium, pig blood, or CSF, we present the SS genome-wide map of 793 transcriptional start sites and 370 operons. In addition to identifying 29 sRNAs, we show that five sRNA deletion mutants attenuate SS virulence in a zebrafish infection model. Homology searches revealed that 10 sRNAs were predicted to be present in other pathogenic Streptococcus species. Compared with wild-type strain P1/7, sRNAs rss03, rss05, and rss06 deletion mutants were significantly more sensitive to killing by pig blood. It is possible that rss06 contributes to SS virulence by indirectly activating expression of SSU0308, a virulence gene encoding a zinc-binding lipoprotein. In blood, genes involved in the synthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and subversion of host defenses were up-regulated. In contrast, in CSF, genes for CPS synthesis were down-regulated. Our study is the first analysis of SS sRNAs involved in virulence and has both improved our understanding of SS pathogenesis and increased the number of sRNAs known to play definitive roles in bacterial virulence. PMID:24759092

  12. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor NAC016 Promotes Drought Stress Responses by Repressing AREB1 Transcription through a Trifurcate Feed-Forward Regulatory Loop Involving NAP[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Kim, Ye-Sol; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Doo; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-01-01

    Drought and other abiotic stresses negatively affect plant growth and development and thus reduce productivity. The plant-specific NAM/ATAF1/2/CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors have important roles in abiotic stress-responsive signaling. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana NAC016 is involved in drought stress responses; nac016 mutants have high drought tolerance, and NAC016-overexpressing (NAC016-OX) plants have low drought tolerance. Using genome-wide gene expression microarray analysis and MEME motif searches, we identified the NAC016-specific binding motif (NAC16BM), GATTGGAT[AT]CA, in the promoters of genes downregulated in nac016-1 mutants. The NAC16BM sequence does not contain the core NAC binding motif CACG (or its reverse complement CGTG). NAC016 directly binds to the NAC16BM in the promoter of ABSCISIC ACID-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN1 (AREB1), which encodes a central transcription factor in the stress-responsive abscisic acid signaling pathway and represses AREB1 transcription. We found that knockout mutants of the NAC016 target gene NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI (NAP) also exhibited strong drought tolerance; moreover, NAP binds to the AREB1 promoter and suppresses AREB1 transcription. Taking these results together, we propose that a trifurcate feed-forward pathway involving NAC016, NAP, and AREB1 functions in the drought stress response, in addition to affecting leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. PMID:26059204

  13. Characterization of a novel Medicago sativa NAC transcription factor gene involved in response to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Xin

    2013-11-01

    Relying on the regulation of transcription factors, plants resist to various abiotic and biotic stresses. NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2, CUC2) are one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors and known to play important roles in plant development and response to environmental stresses. A new NAC gene was cloned on the basis of 503 bp EST fragment from the SSH cDNA library of Medicago sativa. It was 1,115 bp including an 816 bp ORF and encodes 271 amino acids. A highly conserved region is located from the 7th amino acid to the 315th amino acid in its N-terminal domain. The NAC protein is subcellularly localized in the nucleus of onion epidemical cells and possible functions as a transcription factor. The relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed at different stress time. The results revealed that the transcription expression of NAC gene could be induced by drought, high salinity and ABA. The transgenic Arabidopsis with NAC gene has the drought tolerance better than the wild-type. PMID:24057250

  14. REM Sleep Rebound as an Adaptive Response to Stressful Situations.

    PubMed

    Suchecki, Deborah; Tiba, Paula Ayako; Machado, Ricardo Borges

    2012-01-01

    Stress and sleep are related to each other in a bidirectional way. If on one hand poor or inadequate sleep exacerbates emotional, behavioral, and stress-related responses, on the other hand acute stress induces sleep rebound, most likely as a way to cope with the adverse stimuli. Chronic, as opposed to acute, stress impairs sleep and has been claimed to be one of the triggering factors of emotional-related sleep disorders, such as insomnia, depressive- and anxiety-disorders. These outcomes are dependent on individual psychobiological characteristics, conferring even more complexity to the stress-sleep relationship. Its neurobiology has only recently begun to be explored, through animal models, which are also valuable for the development of potential therapeutic agents and preventive actions. This review seeks to present data on the effects of stress on sleep and the different approaches used to study this relationship as well as possible neurobiological underpinnings and mechanisms involved. The results of numerous studies in humans and animals indicate that increased sleep, especially the rapid eye movement phase, following a stressful situation is an important adaptive behavior for recovery. However, this endogenous advantage appears to be impaired in human beings and rodent strains that exhibit high levels of anxiety and anxiety-like behavior. PMID:22485105

  15. Mitochondrial role in adaptive response to stress conditions in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakova, Polina A; Volodina, Maria A; Tarasova, Nadezhda V; Marey, Maria V; Tsvirkun, Daria V; Vavina, Olga V; Khodzhaeva, Zulfiya S; Kan, Natalya E; Menon, Ramkumar; Vysokikh, Mikhail Yu; Sukhikh, Gennady T

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome, characterized in general by hypertension with proteinuria or other systemic disturbances. PE is the major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, the etiology of PE still remains unclear. Our study involved 38 patients: 14 with uncomplicated pregnancy; 13 with early-onset PE (eoPE); and 11 with late-onset PE (loPE). We characterized the immunophenotype of cells isolated from the placenta and all biopsy samples were stained positive for Cytokeratin 7, SOX2, Nestin, Vimentin, and CD44. We obtained a significant increase in OPA1 mRNA and protein expression in the eoPE placentas. Moreover, TFAM expression was down-regulated in comparison to the control (p < 0.01). Mitochondrial DNA copy number in eoPE placentas was significantly higher than in samples from normal pregnancies. We observed an increase of maximum coupled state 3 respiration rate in mitochondria isolated from the placenta in the presence of complex I substrates in the eoPE group and an increase of P/O ratio, citrate synthase activity and decrease of Ca(2+)-induced depolarization rate in both PE groups. Our results suggest an essential role of mitochondrial activity changes in an adaptive response to the development of PE. PMID:27573305

  16. Distributed reinforcement learning for adaptive and robust network intrusion response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malialis, Kleanthis; Devlin, Sam; Kudenko, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks constitute a rapidly evolving threat in the current Internet. Multiagent Router Throttling is a novel approach to defend against DDoS attacks where multiple reinforcement learning agents are installed on a set of routers and learn to rate-limit or throttle traffic towards a victim server. The focus of this paper is on online learning and scalability. We propose an approach that incorporates task decomposition, team rewards and a form of reward shaping called difference rewards. One of the novel characteristics of the proposed system is that it provides a decentralised coordinated response to the DDoS problem, thus being resilient to DDoS attacks themselves. The proposed system learns remarkably fast, thus being suitable for online learning. Furthermore, its scalability is successfully demonstrated in experiments involving 1000 learning agents. We compare our approach against a baseline and a popular state-of-the-art throttling technique from the network security literature and show that the proposed approach is more effective, adaptive to sophisticated attack rate dynamics and robust to agent failures.

  17. REM Sleep Rebound as an Adaptive Response to Stressful Situations

    PubMed Central

    Suchecki, Deborah; Tiba, Paula Ayako; Machado, Ricardo Borges

    2011-01-01

    Stress and sleep are related to each other in a bidirectional way. If on one hand poor or inadequate sleep exacerbates emotional, behavioral, and stress-related responses, on the other hand acute stress induces sleep rebound, most likely as a way to cope with the adverse stimuli. Chronic, as opposed to acute, stress impairs sleep and has been claimed to be one of the triggering factors of emotional-related sleep disorders, such as insomnia, depressive- and anxiety-disorders. These outcomes are dependent on individual psychobiological characteristics, conferring even more complexity to the stress-sleep relationship. Its neurobiology has only recently begun to be explored, through animal models, which are also valuable for the development of potential therapeutic agents and preventive actions. This review seeks to present data on the effects of stress on sleep and the different approaches used to study this relationship as well as possible neurobiological underpinnings and mechanisms involved. The results of numerous studies in humans and animals indicate that increased sleep, especially the rapid eye movement phase, following a stressful situation is an important adaptive behavior for recovery. However, this endogenous advantage appears to be impaired in human beings and rodent strains that exhibit high levels of anxiety and anxiety-like behavior. PMID:22485105

  18. Cardiac adaptations of bullfrog tadpoles in response to chytrid infection.

    PubMed

    Salla, Raquel Fernanda; Gamero, Fernando Urban; Ribeiro, Larissa Rodrigues; Rizzi, Gisele Miglioranza; Medico, Samuel Espinosa Dal; Rissoli, Rafael Zanelli; Vieira, Conrado Augusto; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine Cristina Mathias; Leite, Domingos Silva; Abdalla, Fábio Camargo; Toledo, Luis Felipe; Costa, Monica Jones

    2015-08-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can result in heart failure in Bd-susceptible species. Since Bd infection generally does not cause mortality in North American bullfrogs, the aim of this work was to verify whether this species presents any cardiac adaptation that could improve the tolerance to the fungus. Thus, we analyzed tadpoles' activity level, relative ventricular mass, ventricle morphology, in loco heart frequency, and in vitro cardiac function. The results indicate that infected animals present an increase in both ventricular relative mass and in myofibrils' incidence, which accompanied the increase in myocytes' diameter. Such morphological alterations enabled an increase in the in vitro twitch force that, in vivo, would result in elevation of the cardiac stroke volume. This response requires much less energy expenditure than an elevation in heart frequency, but still enables the heart to pump a higher volume of blood per minute (i.e., an increase in cardiac output). As a consequence, the energy saved in the regulation of the cardiac function of Bd-infected tadpoles can be employed in other homeostatic adjustments to avoid the lethal effect of the fungus. Whether other species present this ability, and to what extent, remains uncertain, but such possible interspecific variability might explain different mortality rates among different species of Bd-infected amphibians. PMID:26055358

  19. Blood pressure regulation IV: adaptive responses to weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Norsk, Peter

    2014-03-01

    During weightlessness, blood and fluids are immediately shifted from the lower to the upper body segments, and within the initial 2 weeks of spaceflight, brachial diastolic arterial pressure is reduced by 5 mmHg and even more so by some 10 mmHg from the first to the sixth month of flight. Blood pressure thus adapts in space to a level very similar to that of being supine on the ground. At the same time, stroke volume and cardiac output are increased and systemic vascular resistance decreased, whereas sympathetic nerve activity is kept surprisingly high and similar to when ground-based upright seated. This was not predicted from simulation models and indicates that dilatation of the arteriolar resistance vessels is caused by mechanisms other than a baroreflex-induced decrease in sympathetic nervous activity. Results of baroreflex studies in space indicate that compared to being ground-based supine, the carotid (vagal)-cardiac interaction is reduced and sympathetic nerve activity, heart rate and systemic vascular resistance response more pronounced during baroreflex inhibition by lower body negative pressure. The future challenge is to identify which spaceflight mechanism induces peripheral arteriolar dilatation, which could explain the decrease in blood pressure, the high sympathetic nerve activity and associated cardiovascular changes. It is also a challenge to determine the cardiovascular risk profile of astronauts during future long-duration deep space missions. PMID:24390686

  20. Mitochondrial role in adaptive response to stress conditions in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Vishnyakova, Polina A.; Volodina, Maria A.; Tarasova, Nadezhda V.; Marey, Maria V.; Tsvirkun, Daria V.; Vavina, Olga V.; Khodzhaeva, Zulfiya S.; Kan, Natalya E.; Menon, Ramkumar; Vysokikh, Mikhail Yu.; Sukhikh, Gennady T.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome, characterized in general by hypertension with proteinuria or other systemic disturbances. PE is the major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, the etiology of PE still remains unclear. Our study involved 38 patients: 14 with uncomplicated pregnancy; 13 with early-onset PE (eoPE); and 11 with late-onset PE (loPE). We characterized the immunophenotype of cells isolated from the placenta and all biopsy samples were stained positive for Cytokeratin 7, SOX2, Nestin, Vimentin, and CD44. We obtained a significant increase in OPA1 mRNA and protein expression in the eoPE placentas. Moreover, TFAM expression was down-regulated in comparison to the control (p < 0.01). Mitochondrial DNA copy number in eoPE placentas was significantly higher than in samples from normal pregnancies. We observed an increase of maximum coupled state 3 respiration rate in mitochondria isolated from the placenta in the presence of complex I substrates in the eoPE group and an increase of P/O ratio, citrate synthase activity and decrease of Ca2+-induced depolarization rate in both PE groups. Our results suggest an essential role of mitochondrial activity changes in an adaptive response to the development of PE. PMID:27573305

  1. Adaptive Response of T and B Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is initiated by the retention and accumulation of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins, particularly low-density lipoprotein, in the artery wall. In the arterial intima, lipoprotein components that are generated through oxidative, lipolytic, and proteolytic activities lead to the formation of several danger-associated molecular patterns, which can activate innate immune cells as well as vascular cells. Moreover, self- and non-self-antigens, such as apolipoprotein B-100 and heat shock proteins, can contribute to vascular inflammation by triggering the response of T and B cells locally. This process can influence the initiation, progression, and stability of plaques. Substantial clinical and experimental data support that the modulation of adaptive immune system may be used for treating and preventing atherosclerosis. This may lead to the development of more selective and less harmful interventions, while keeping host defense mechanisms against infections and tumors intact. Approaches such as vaccination might become a realistic option for cardiovascular disease, especially if they can elicit regulatory T and B cells and the secretion of atheroprotective antibodies. Nevertheless, difficulties in translating certain experimental data into new clinical therapies remain a challenge. In this review, we discuss important studies on the function of T- and B-cell immunity in atherosclerosis and their manipulation to develop novel therapeutic strategies against cardiovascular disease. PMID:26892965

  2. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Ryohei; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-12-15

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 10}) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 2.5}) and ultrafine particles (0.1 {mu}m or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-{kappa}B pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  3. Characterizing the transcriptional adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to stationary phase growth.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Andy; Broach, William H; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that causes life-threatening infections, and is resistant to the majority of our antibiotic arsenal. This resistance is complicated by the observation that most antibacterial agents target actively growing cells, thus, proving ineffective against slow growing populations, such as cells within a biofilm or in stationary phase. Recently, our group generated updated genome annotation files for S. aureus that not only include protein-coding genes but also regulatory and small RNAs. As such, these annotation files were used to perform a transcriptomic analysis in order to understand the metabolic and physiological changes that occur during transition from active growth to stationary phase; with a focus on sRNAs. We observed ∼24% of protein-coding and 34% of sRNA genes displaying changes in expression by ≥3-fold. Collectively, this study adds to our understanding of S. aureus adaptation to nutrient-limiting conditions, and sheds new light onto the contribution of sRNAs to this process. PMID:27162210

  4. Dynamic Antagonism between Phytochromes and PIF Family Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Factors Induces Selective Reciprocal Responses to Light and Shade in a Rapidly Responsive Transcriptional Network in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; Tepperman, James M.; Cohn, Megan M.; Monte, Elena; Al-Sady, Bassem; Erickson, Erika; Quail, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Plants respond to shade-modulated light signals via phytochrome (phy)-induced adaptive changes, termed shade avoidance. To examine the roles of Phytochrome-Interacting basic helix-loop-helix Factors, PIF1, 3, 4, and 5, in relaying such signals to the transcriptional network, we compared the shade-responsive transcriptome profiles of wild-type and quadruple pif (pifq) mutants. We identify a subset of genes, enriched in transcription factor–encoding loci, that respond rapidly to shade, in a PIF-dependent manner, and contain promoter G-box motifs, known to bind PIFs. These genes are potential direct targets of phy-PIF signaling that regulate the primary downstream transcriptional circuitry. A second subset of PIF-dependent, early response genes, lacking G-box motifs, are enriched for auxin-responsive loci, and are thus potentially indirect targets of phy-PIF signaling, mediating the rapid cell expansion induced by shade. Comparing deetiolation- and shade-responsive transcriptomes identifies another subset of G-box–containing genes that reciprocally display rapid repression and induction in response to light and shade signals. These data define a core set of transcriptional and hormonal processes that appear to be dynamically poised to react rapidly to light-environment changes via perturbations in the mutually antagonistic actions of the phys and PIFs. Comparing the responsiveness of the pifq and triple pif mutants to light and shade confirms that the PIFs act with overlapping redundancy on seedling morphogenesis and transcriptional regulation but that each PIF contributes differentially to these responses. PMID:22517317

  5. Laser Microdissection of Grapevine Leaves Reveals Site-Specific Regulation of Transcriptional Response to Plasmopara viticola.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Luisa; Caruso, Carla; Bianchedi, Pier Luigi; Pertot, Ilaria; Perazzolli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine is one of the most important fruit crops in the world, and it is highly susceptible to downy mildew caused by the biotrophic oomycete Plasmopara viticola. Gene expression profiling has been used extensively to investigate the regulation processes of grapevine-P. viticola interaction, but all studies to date have involved the use of whole leaves. However, only a small fraction of host cells is in contact with the pathogen, so highly localized transcriptional changes of infected cells may be masked by the large portion of non-infected cells when analyzing the whole leaf. In order to understand the transcriptional regulation of the plant reaction at the sites of pathogen infection, we optimized a laser microdissection protocol and analyzed the transcriptional changes in stomata cells and surrounding areas of grapevine leaves at early stages of P. viticola infection. The results indicate that the expression levels of seven P. viticola-responsive genes were greater in microdissected cells than in whole leaves, highlighting the site-specific transcriptional regulation of the host response. The gene modulation was restricted to the stomata cells and to the surrounding areas of infected tissues, indicating that the host response is mainly located at the infection sites and that short-distance signals are implicated. In addition, due to the high sensitivity of the laser microdissection technique, significant modulations of three genes that were completely masked in the whole tissue analysis were detected. The protocol validated in this study could greatly increase the sensitivity of further transcriptomic studies of the grapevine-P. viticola interaction. PMID:26546320

  6. Inhibition of transferrin receptor 1 transcription by a cell density response element

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    TfR1 (transferrin receptor 1) mediates the uptake of transferrin-bound iron and thereby plays a critical role in cellular iron metabolism. Its expression is coupled to cell proliferation/differentiation and controlled in response to iron levels and other signals by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. It is well established that TfR1 levels decline when cultured cells reach a high density and in the present study we have investigated the underlying mechanisms. Consistent with previous findings, we demonstrate that TfR1 expression is attenuated in a cell-density-dependent manner in human lung cancer H1299 cells and in murine B6 fibroblasts as the result of a marked decrease in mRNA content. This response is not associated with alterations in the RNA-binding activity of iron regulatory proteins that are indicative of a transcriptional mechanism. Reporter assays reveal that the human TfR1 promoters contains sequences mediating cell-density-dependent transcriptional inhibition. Mapping of the human and mouse TfR1 promoters identified a conserved hexa-nucleotide 5′-GAGGGC-3′ motif with notable sequence similarity to a previously described element within the IGF-2 (insulin-like growth factor-2) promoter. We show that this motif is necessary for the formation of specific complexes with nuclear extracts and for cell-density-dependent regulation in reporter gene assays. Thus the TfR1 promoter contains a functional ‘cell density response element’ (CDRE). PMID:16092918

  7. Zap1p, a metalloregulatory protein involved in zinc-responsive transcriptional regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Eide, D J

    1997-09-01

    Zinc ion homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is controlled primarily through the transcriptional regulation of zinc uptake systems in response to intracellular zinc levels. A high-affinity uptake system is encoded by the ZRT1 gene, and its expression is induced more than 30-fold in zinc-limited cells. A low-affinity transporter is encoded by the ZRT2 gene, and this system is also regulated by zinc. We used a genetic approach to isolate mutants whose ZRT1 expression is no longer repressed in zinc-replete cells, and a new gene, ZAP1, was identified. ZAP1 encodes a 93-kDa protein with sequence similarity to transcriptional activators; the C-terminal 174 amino acids contains five C2H2 zinc finger domains, and the N terminus (residues 1 to 706) has two potential acidic activation domains. The N-terminal region also contains 12% histidine and cysteine residues. The mutant allele isolated, ZAP1-1up, is semidominant and caused high-level expression of ZRT1 and ZRT2 in both zinc-limited and zinc-replete cells. This phenotype is the result of a mutation that substitutes a serine for a cysteine residue in the N-terminal region. A zap1 deletion mutant grew well on zinc-replete media but poorly on zinc-limiting media. This mutant had low-level ZRT1 and ZRT2 expression in zinc-limited as well as zinc-replete cells. These data indicate that Zap1p plays a central role in zinc ion homeostasis by regulating transcription of the zinc uptake system genes in response to zinc. Finally, we present evidence that Zap1p regulates transcription of its own promoter in response to zinc through a positive autoregulatory mechanism. PMID:9271382

  8. The Transcriptional Response of Caenorhabditis elegans to Ivermectin Exposure Identifies Novel Genes Involved in the Response to Reduced Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Steven T.; Ivens, Al; Butler, Victoria; Ravikumar, Sai P.; Laing, Roz; Woods, Debra J.; Gilleard, John S.

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the transcriptional response of Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to the anthelmintic drug ivermectin (IVM) using whole genome microarrays and real-time QPCR. Our original aim was to identify candidate molecules involved in IVM metabolism and/or excretion. For this reason the IVM tolerant strain, DA1316, was used to minimise transcriptomic changes related to the phenotype of drug exposure. However, unlike equivalent work with benzimidazole drugs, very few of the induced genes were members of xenobiotic metabolising enzyme families. Instead, the transcriptional response was dominated by genes associated with fat mobilization and fatty acid metabolism including catalase, esterase, and fatty acid CoA synthetase genes. This is consistent with the reduction in pharyngeal pumping, and consequential reduction in food intake, upon exposure of DA1316 worms to IVM. Genes with the highest fold change in response to IVM exposure, cyp-37B1, mtl-1 and scl-2, were comparably up-regulated in response to short–term food withdrawal (4 hr) independent of IVM exposure, and GFP reporter constructs confirm their expression in tissues associated with fat storage (intestine and hypodermis). These experiments have serendipitously identified novel genes involved in an early response of C. elegans to reduced food intake and may provide insight into similar processes in higher organisms. PMID:22348077

  9. Tomato Whole Genome Transcriptional Response to Tetranychus urticae Identifies Divergence of Spider Mite-Induced Responses Between Tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Martel, Catherine; Zhurov, Vladimir; Navarro, Marie; Martinez, Manuel; Cazaux, Marc; Auger, Philippe; Migeon, Alain; Santamaria, M Estrella; Wybouw, Nicky; Diaz, Isabel; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Navajas, Maria; Grbic, Miodrag; Grbic, Vojislava

    2015-03-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is one of the most significant mite pests in agriculture, feeding on more than 1,100 plant hosts, including model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Here, we describe timecourse tomato transcriptional responses to spider mite feeding and compare them with Arabidopsis in order to determine conserved and divergent defense responses to this pest. To refine the involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in mite-induced responses and to improve tomato Gene Ontology annotations, we analyzed transcriptional changes in the tomato JA-signaling mutant defenseless1 (def-1) upon JA treatment and spider mite herbivory. Overlay of differentially expressed genes (DEG) identified in def-1 onto those from the timecourse experiment established that JA controls expression of the majority of genes differentially regulated by herbivory. Comparison of defense responses between tomato and Arabidopsis highlighted 96 orthologous genes (of 2,133 DEG) that were recruited for defense against spider mites in both species. These genes, involved in biosynthesis of JA, phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, and terpenoids, represent the conserved core of induced defenses. The remaining tomato DEG support the establishment of tomato-specific defenses, indicating profound divergence of spider mite-induced responses between tomato and Arabidopsis. PMID:25679539

  10. The Adaptive Significance of Natural Genetic Variation in the DNA Damage Response of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Svetec, Nicolas; Cridland, Julie M.; Zhao, Li; Begun, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of work, our understanding of the distribution of fitness effects of segregating genetic variants in natural populations remains largely incomplete. One form of selection that can maintain genetic variation is spatially varying selection, such as that leading to latitudinal clines. While the introduction of population genomic approaches to understanding spatially varying selection has generated much excitement, little successful effort has been devoted to moving beyond genome scans for selection to experimental analysis of the relevant biology and the development of experimentally motivated hypotheses regarding the agents of selection; it remains an interesting question as to whether the vast majority of population genomic work will lead to satisfying biological insights. Here, motivated by population genomic results, we investigate how spatially varying selection in the genetic model system, Drosophila melanogaster, has led to genetic differences between populations in several components of the DNA damage response. UVB incidence, which is negatively correlated with latitude, is an important agent of DNA damage. We show that sensitivity of early embryos to UVB exposure is strongly correlated with latitude such that low latitude populations show much lower sensitivity to UVB. We then show that lines with lower embryo UVB sensitivity also exhibit increased capacity for repair of damaged sperm DNA by the oocyte. A comparison of the early embryo transcriptome in high and low latitude embryos provides evidence that one mechanism of adaptive DNA repair differences between populations is the greater abundance of DNA repair transcripts in the eggs of low latitude females. Finally, we use population genomic comparisons of high and low latitude samples to reveal evidence that multiple components of the DNA damage response and both coding and non-coding variation likely contribute to adaptive differences in DNA repair between populations. PMID:26950216

  11. The Adaptive Significance of Natural Genetic Variation in the DNA Damage Response of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Svetec, Nicolas; Cridland, Julie M; Zhao, Li; Begun, David J

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of work, our understanding of the distribution of fitness effects of segregating genetic variants in natural populations remains largely incomplete. One form of selection that can maintain genetic variation is spatially varying selection, such as that leading to latitudinal clines. While the introduction of population genomic approaches to understanding spatially varying selection has generated much excitement, little successful effort has been devoted to moving beyond genome scans for selection to experimental analysis of the relevant biology and the development of experimentally motivated hypotheses regarding the agents of selection; it remains an interesting question as to whether the vast majority of population genomic work will lead to satisfying biological insights. Here, motivated by population genomic results, we investigate how spatially varying selection in the genetic model system, Drosophila melanogaster, has led to genetic differences between populations in several components of the DNA damage response. UVB incidence, which is negatively correlated with latitude, is an important agent of DNA damage. We show that sensitivity of early embryos to UVB exposure is strongly correlated with latitude such that low latitude populations show much lower sensitivity to UVB. We then show that lines with lower embryo UVB sensitivity also exhibit increased capacity for repair of damaged sperm DNA by the oocyte. A comparison of the early embryo transcriptome in high and low latitude embryos provides evidence that one mechanism of adaptive DNA repair differences between populations is the greater abundance of DNA repair transcripts in the eggs of low latitude females. Finally, we use population genomic comparisons of high and low latitude samples to reveal evidence that multiple components of the DNA damage response and both coding and non-coding variation likely contribute to adaptive differences in DNA repair between populations. PMID:26950216

  12. Tomato genome-wide transcriptional responses to Fusarium wilt and Tomato Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ferriello, Francesca; Tardella, Luca; Ferrarini, Alberto; Sigillo, Loredana; Frusciante, Luigi; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Since gene expression approaches constitute a starting point for investigating plant-pathogen systems, we performed a transcriptional analysis to identify a set of genes of interest in tomato plants infected with F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV). Differentially expressed tomato genes upon inoculation with Fol and ToMV were identified at two days post-inoculation. A large overlap was found in differentially expressed genes throughout the two incompatible interactions. However, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis evidenced specific categories in both interactions. Response to ToMV seems more multifaceted, since more than 70 specific categories were enriched versus the 30 detected in Fol interaction. In particular, the virus stimulated the production of an invertase enzyme that is able to redirect the flux of carbohydrates, whereas Fol induced a homeostatic response to prevent the fungus from killing cells. Genomic mapping of transcripts suggested that specific genomic regions are involved in resistance response to pathogen. Coordinated machinery could play an important role in prompting the response, since 60% of pathogen receptor genes (NB-ARC-LRR, RLP, RLK) were differentially regulated during both interactions. Assessment of genomic gene expression patterns could help in building up models of mediated resistance responses. PMID:24804963

  13. Comprehensive Analysis Suggests Overlapping Expression of Rice ONAC Transcription Factors in Abiotic and Biotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lijun; Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Fengming; Li, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC) transcription factors comprise a large plant-specific gene family that contains more than 149 members in rice. Extensive studies have revealed that NAC transcription factors not only play important roles in plant growth and development, but also have functions in regulation of responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, biological functions for most of the members in the NAC family remain unknown. In this study, microarray data analyses revealed that a total of 63 ONAC genes exhibited overlapping expression patterns in rice under various abiotic (salt, drought, and cold) and biotic (infection by fungal, bacterial, viral pathogens, and parasitic plants) stresses. Thirty-eight ONAC genes exhibited overlapping expression in response to any two abiotic stresses, among which 16 of 30 selected ONAC genes were upregulated in response to exogenous ABA. Sixty-five ONAC genes showed overlapping expression patterns in response to any two biotic stresses. Results from the present study suggested that members of the ONAC genes with overlapping expression pattern may have pleiotropic biological functions in regulation of defense response against different abiotic and biotic stresses, which provide clues for further functional analysis of the ONAC genes in stress tolerance and pathogen resistance. PMID:25690040

  14. Portrait of transcriptional responses to ultraviolet and ionizing radiation in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Kerri E.; Chu, Gilbert

    2004-01-01

    To understand the human response to DNA damage, we used microarrays to measure transcriptional responses of 10 000 genes to ionizing radiation (IR) and ultraviolet radiation (UV). To identify bona fide responses, we used cell lines from 15 individuals and a rigorous statistical method, Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). By exploring how sample number affects SAM, we rendered a portrait of the human damage response with a degree of accuracy unmatched by previous studies. By showing how SAM can be used to estimate the total number of responsive genes, we discovered that 24% of all genes respond to IR and 32% respond to UV, although most responses were less than 2-fold. Many genes were involved in known damage-response pathways for cell cycling and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair or the stress response. However, the majority of genes were involved in unexpected pathways, with functions in signal transduction, RNA binding and editing, protein synthesis and degradation, energy metabolism, metabolism of macromolecular precursors, cell structure and adhesion, vesicle transport, or lysosomal metabolism. Although these functions were not previously associated with the damage response in mammals, many were conserved in yeast. These insights reveal new directions for studying the human response to DNA damage. PMID:15356296

  15. Identification of the transcriptional response of human intestinal mucosa to Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Troost, Freddy J; van Baarlen, Peter; Lindsey, Patrick; Kodde, Andrea; de Vos, Willem M; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Brummer, Robert-Jan M

    2008-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge on the extent and dynamics of the mucosal response to commensal and probiotic species in the human intestinal lumen. This study aimed to identify the acute, time-dependent responses of intestinal mucosa to commensal Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in vivo in two placebo-controlled human intervention studies in healthy volunteers. Transcriptional changes in duodenal mucosa upon continuous intraduodenal infusion of L. plantarum WCFS1 for one- and six h, respectively, were studied using oro- and nasogastric intubations with dedicated orogastric catheters and tissue sampling by standard flexible gastroduodenoscopy. Results One- and six-h exposure of small intestinal mucosa to L. plantarum WCFS1 induced differential expression of 669 and 424 gene reporters, respectively. While short-term exposure to L. plantarum WCFS1 inhibited fatty acid metabolism and cell cycle progression, cells switched to a more proliferative phase after prolonged exposure with an overall expression profile characterized by upregulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism, cellular growth and development. Cell death and immune responses were triggered, but cell death-executing genes or inflammatory signals were not expressed. Proteome analysis showed differential expression of several proteins. Only the microsomal protein 'microsomal triglyceride transfer protein' was regulated on both the transcriptional and the protein level in all subjects. Conclusion Overall, this study showed that intestinal exposure to L. plantarum WCFS1 induced consistent, time-dependent transcriptional responses in healthy intestinal mucosa. This extensive exploration of the human response to L. plantarum WCFS1 could eventually provide molecular support for specific or probiotic activity of this strain or species, and exemplifies the strength of the applied technology to identify the potential bio-activity of microbes in the human intestine. PMID:18681965

  16. Endothelial Inflammatory Transcriptional Responses Induced by Plasma Following Inhalation of Diesel Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Ronnebaum, Sarah M.; Madden, Michael; Channell, Meghan M.; Campen, Matthew J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Air pollution, especially emissions derived from traffic sources, is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, it remains unclear how inhaled factors drive extrapulmonary pathology. Objectives Previously, we found that canonical inflammatory response transcripts were elevated in cultured endothelial cells treated with plasma obtained after exposure compared with pre-exposure samples or filtered air (sham) exposures. While the findings confirmed the presence of bioactive factor(s) in the plasma after diesel inhalation, we wanted to better examine the complete genomic response to investigate 1) major responsive transcripts and 2) collected response pathways and ontogeny that may help to refine this method and inform the pathogenesis. Methods We assayed endothelial RNA with gene expression microarrays, examining the responses of cultured endothelial cells to plasma obtained from 6 healthy human subjects exposed to 100 μg/m3 diesel exhaust or filtered air for 2 h on separate occasions. In addition to pre-exposure baseline samples, we investigated samples obtained immediately-post and 24h-post exposure. Results Microarray analysis of the coronary artery endothelial cells challenged with plasma identified 855 probes that changed over time following diesel exhaust exposure. Over-representation analysis identified inflammatory cytokine pathways were upregulated both at the 2 and 24 h condition. Novel pathways related to FOX transcription factors and secreted extracellular factors were also identified in the microarray analysis. Conclusions These outcomes are consistent with our recent findings that plasma contains bioactive and inflammatory factors following pollutant inhalation. The specific study design implicates a novel pathway related to inflammatory blood borne components that may drive the extrapulmonary toxicity of ambient air pollutants. PMID:25942053

  17. Physiological and transcriptional responses to high temperature in Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis C1.

    PubMed

    Panyakampol, Jaruta; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Sutheeworapong, Sawannee; Chaijaruwanich, Jeerayut; Senachak, Jittisak; Siangdung, Wipawan; Jeamton, Wattana; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Paithoonrangsarid, Kalyanee

    2015-03-01

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis is a well-known commercial cyanobacterium that is used as a food and in feed supplements. In this study, we examined the physiological changes and whole-genome expression in A. platensis C1 exposed to high temperature. We found that photosynthetic activity was significantly decreased after the temperature was shifted from 35°C to 42°C for 2 h. A reduction in biomass production and protein content, concomitant with the accumulation of carbohydrate content, was observed after prolonged exposure to high temperatures for 24 h. Moreover, the results of the expression profiling in response to high temperature at the designated time points (8 h) revealed two distinct phases of the responses. The first was the immediate response phase, in which the transcript levels of genes involved in different mechanisms, including genes for heat shock proteins; genes involved in signal transduction and carbon and nitrogen metabolism; and genes encoding inorganic ion transporters for magnesium, nitrite and nitrate, were either transiently induced or repressed by the high temperature. In the second phase, the long-term response phase, both the induction and repression of the expression of genes with important roles in translation and photosynthesis were observed. Taken together, the results of our physiological and transcriptional studies suggest that dynamic changes in the transcriptional profiles of these thermal-responsive genes might play a role in maintaining cell homeostasis under high temperatures, as reflected in the growth and biochemical composition, particularly the protein and carbohydrate content, of A. platensis C1. PMID:25524069

  18. Design of artificial genetic regulatory networks with multiple delayed adaptive responses*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluza, Pablo; Inoue, Masayo

    2016-06-01

    Genetic regulatory networks with adaptive responses are widely studied in biology. Usually, models consisting only of a few nodes have been considered. They present one input receptor for activation and one output node where the adaptive response is computed. In this work, we design genetic regulatory networks with many receptors and many output nodes able to produce delayed adaptive responses. This design is performed by using an evolutionary algorithm of mutations and selections that minimizes an error function defined by the adaptive response in signal shapes. We present several examples of network constructions with a predefined required set of adaptive delayed responses. We show that an output node can have different kinds of responses as a function of the activated receptor. Additionally, complex network structures are presented since processing nodes can be involved in several input-output pathways.

  19. Dimer formation and transcription activation in the sporulation response regulator Spo0A.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard J; Scott, David J; Brannigan, James A; Ladds, Joanne C; Cervin, Marguerite A; Spiegelman, George B; Hoggett, James G; Barák, Imrich; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2002-02-15

    The response regulator Spo0A is the master control element in the initiation of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. Like many other multi-domain response regulators, the latent activity of the effector, C-terminal domain is stimulated by phosphorylation on a conserved aspartic acid residue in the regulatory, N-terminal domain. If a threshold concentration of phosphorylated Spo0A is achieved, the transcription of genes required for sporulation is activated, whereas the genes encoding stationary phase sentinels are repressed, and sporulation proceeds. Despite detailed genetic, biochemical and structural characterisation, it is not understood how the phosphorylation signal in the receiver domain is transduced into DNA binding and transcription activation in the distal effector domain. An obstacle to our understanding of Spo0A function is the uncertainty concerning changes in quaternary structure that accompany phosphorylation. Here we have revisited this question and shown unequivocally that Spo0A forms dimers upon phosphorylation and that the subunit interactions in the dimer are mediated principally by the receiver domain. Purified dimers of two mutants of Spo0A, in which the phosphorylatable aspartic acid residue has been substituted, activate transcription from the spoIIG promoter in vitro, whereas monomers do not. This suggests that dimers represent the activated form of Spo0A. PMID:11851334

  20. Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia in the Aquatic Fungus Blastocladiella emersonii▿†

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, César M.; Gomes, Suely L.

    2010-01-01

    Global gene expression analysis was carried out with Blastocladiella emersonii cells subjected to oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) using cDNA microarrays. In experiments of gradual hypoxia (gradual decrease in dissolved oxygen) and direct hypoxia (direct decrease in dissolved oxygen), about 650 differentially expressed genes were observed. A total of 534 genes were affected directly or indirectly by oxygen availability, as they showed recovery to normal expression levels or a tendency to recover when cells were reoxygenated. In addition to modulating many genes with no putative assigned function, B. emersonii cells respond to hypoxia by readjusting the expression levels of genes responsible for energy production and consumption. At least transcriptionally, this fungus seems to favor anaerobic metabolism through the upregulation of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase and the downregulation of most genes coding for tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Furthermore, genes involved in energy-costly processes, like protein synthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, protein folding, and transport, had their expression profiles predominantly downregulated during oxygen deprivation, indicating an energy-saving effort. Data also revealed similarities between the transcriptional profiles of cells under hypoxia and under iron(II) deprivation, suggesting that Fe2+ ion could have a role in oxygen sensing and/or response to hypoxia in B. emersonii. Additionally, treatment of fungal cells prior to hypoxia with the antibiotic geldanamycin, which negatively affects the stability of mammalian hypoxia transcription factor HIF-1α, caused a significant decrease in the levels of certain upregulated hypoxic genes. PMID:20418381

  1. A Conserved Structural Module Regulates Transcriptional Responses to Diverse Stress Signals in Eubacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell,E.; Greenwell, R.; Anthony, J.; Wang, S.; Lim, L.; Das, K.; Sofia, H.; Donohue, T.; Darst, S.

    2007-01-01

    A transcriptional response to singlet oxygen in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is controlled by the group IV {sigma} factor {sigma}{sup E} and its cognate anti-{sigma} ChrR. Crystal structures of the {sigma}{sup E}/ChrR complex reveal a modular, two-domain architecture for ChrR. The ChrR N-terminal anti-{sigma} domain (ASD) binds a Zn{sup 2+} ion, contacts {sigma}{sup E}, and is sufficient to inhibit {sigma}{sup E}-dependent transcription. The ChrR C-terminal domain adopts a cupin fold, can coordinate an additional Zn{sup 2+}, and is required for the transcriptional response to singlet oxygen. Structure-based sequence analyses predict that the ASD defines a common structural fold among predicted group IV anti-{sigma}s. These ASDs are fused to diverse C-terminal domains that are likely involved in responding to specific environmental signals that control the activity of their cognate {sigma} factor.

  2. Cold tolerance in thiourea primed capsicum seedlings is associated with transcript regulation of stress responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Patade, Vikas Yadav; Khatri, Deepti; Manoj, Kamble; Kumari, Maya; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2012-12-01

    Benefits of seed priming in seedling establishment and tolerance to subsequent stress exposure are well reported. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the priming mediated benefits are not much discovered. Results of our earlier experiments established that thiourea (TU) seed priming imparts cold tolerance to capsicum seedlings. Therefore, to understand molecular mechanisms underlying priming mediated cold stress tolerance, quantitative transcript expression of stress responsive genes involved in transcript regulation (CaCBF1A, CaCBF1B, Zinc Finger protein, CaWRKY30), osmotic adjustment (PROX1, P5CS, Osmotin), antioxidant defence (CAT2, APX, GST, GR1, Cu/Zn SOD, Mn SOD, Fe SOD), signaling (Annexin), movement of solutes and water (CaPIP1), and metabolite biosynthesis through phenylpropanoid pathway (CAH) was studied in response to cold (4 °C; 4 and 24 h) stress in seedlings grown from the TU primed, hydroprimed and unsoaked seeds. The transcript expression of CaWRKY30, PROX1, Osmotin, Cu/Zn SOD and CAH genes was either higher or induced earlier on cold exposure in thiourea priming than that of hydroprimed and unsoaked over the respective unstressed controls. The results thus suggest that the TU priming modulate expression of these genes thereby imparting cold tolerance in capsicum seedlings. PMID:23053959

  3. PITX1, a specificity determinant in the HIF-1α-mediated transcriptional response to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Mudie, Sharon; Bandarra, Daniel; Batie, Michael; Biddlestone, John; Moniz, Sonia; Ortmann, Brian; Shmakova, Alena; Rocha, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important developmental cue for multicellular organisms but it is also a contributing factor for several human pathologies, such as stroke, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In cells, hypoxia activates a major transcriptional program coordinated by the Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) family. HIF can activate more than one hundred targets but not all of them are activated at the same time, and there is considerable cell type variability. In this report we identified the paired-like homeodomain pituitary transcription factor (PITX1), as a transcription factor that helps promote specificity in HIF-1α dependent target gene activation. Mechanistically, PITX1 associates with HIF-1β and it is important for the induction of certain HIF-1 dependent genes but not all. In particular, PITX1 controls the HIF-1α-dependent expression of the histone demethylases; JMJD2B, JMJD2A, JMJD2C and JMJD1B. Functionally, PITX1 is required for the survival and proliferation responses in hypoxia, as PITX1 depleted cells have higher levels of apoptotic markers and reduced proliferation. Overall, our study identified PITX1 as a key specificity factor in HIF-1α dependent responses, suggesting PITX1 as a protein to target in hypoxic cancers. PMID:25558831

  4. Jasmonate-Responsive ERF Transcription Factors Regulate Steroidal Glycoalkaloid Biosynthesis in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Thagun, Chonprakun; Imanishi, Shunsuke; Kudo, Toru; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Mori, Tetsuya; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nakamura, Yukino; Katayama, Minami; Nonaka, Satoko; Matsukura, Chiaki; Yano, Kentaro; Ezura, Hiroshi; Saito, Kazuki; Hashimoto, Takashi; Shoji, Tsubasa

    2016-05-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived specialized metabolites produced in species of the Solanaceae. Here, we report that a group of jasmonate-responsive transcription factors of the ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF) family (JREs) are close homologs of alkaloid regulators in Cathranthus roseus and tobacco, and regulate production of SGAs in tomato. In transgenic tomato, overexpression and dominant suppression of JRE genes caused drastic changes in SGA accumulation and in the expression of genes for metabolic enzymes involved in the multistep pathway leading to SGA biosynthesis, including the upstream mevalonate pathway. Transactivation and DNA-protein binding assays demonstrate that JRE4 activates the transcription of SGA biosynthetic genes by binding to GCC box-like elements in their promoters. These JRE-binding elements occur at significantly higher frequencies in proximal promoter regions of the genes regulated by JRE genes, supporting the conclusion that JREs mediate transcriptional co-ordination of a series of metabolic genes involved in SGA biosynthesis. PMID:27084593

  5. The basic leucine zipper transcription factor ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR2 is an important transcriptional regulator of abscisic acid-dependent grape berry ripening processes.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Philippe; Lecourieux, David; Kappel, Christian; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Cramer, Grant; Delrot, Serge; Lecourieux, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    In grape (Vitis vinifera), abscisic acid (ABA) accumulates during fruit ripening and is thought to play a pivotal role in this process, but the molecular basis of this control is poorly understood. This work characterizes ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR2 (VvABF2), a grape basic leucine zipper transcription factor belonging to a phylogenetic subgroup previously shown to be involved in ABA and abiotic stress signaling in other plant species. VvABF2 transcripts mainly accumulated in the berry, from the onset of ripening to the harvesting stage, and were up-regulated by ABA. Microarray analysis of transgenic grape cells overexpressing VvABF2 showed that this transcription factor up-regulates and/or modifies existing networks related to ABA responses. In addition, grape cells overexpressing VvABF2 exhibited enhanced responses to ABA treatment compared with control cells. Among the VvABF2-mediated responses highlighted in this study, the synthesis of phenolic compounds and cell wall softening were the most strongly affected. VvABF2 overexpression strongly increased the accumulation of stilbenes that play a role in plant defense and human health (resveratrol and piceid). In addition, the firmness of fruits from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants overexpressing VvABF2 was strongly reduced. These data indicate that VvABF2 is an important transcriptional regulator of ABA-dependent grape berry ripening. PMID:24276949

  6. Evolutionary responses of innate Immunity to adaptive immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innate immunity is present in all metazoans, whereas the evolutionarily more novel adaptive immunity is limited to jawed fishes and their descendants (gnathostomes). We observe that the organisms that possess adaptive immunity lack diversity in their innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), rais...

  7. A response regulator that represses transcription of several virulence operons in the group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Federle, M J; McIver, K S; Scott, J R

    1999-06-01

    A search for homologs of the Bacillus subtilis PhoP response regulator in the group A streptococcus (GAS) genome revealed three good candidates. Inactivation of one of these, recently identified as csrR (J. C. Levin and M. R. Wessels, Mol. Microbiol. 30:209-219, 1998), caused the strain to produce mucoid colonies and to increase transcription of hasA, the first gene in the operon for capsule synthesis. We report here that a nonpolar insertion in this gene also increased transcription of ska (encoding streptokinase), sagA (streptolysin S), and speMF (mitogenic factor) but did not affect transcription of slo (streptolysin O), mga (multiple gene regulator of GAS), emm (M protein), scpA (complement C5a peptidase), or speB or speC (pyrogenic exotoxins B and C). The amounts of streptokinase, streptolysin S, and capsule paralleled the levels of transcription of their genes in all cases. Because CsrR represses genes unrelated to those for capsule synthesis, and because CsrA-CsrB is a global regulatory system in Escherichia coli whose mechanism is unrelated to that of these genes in GAS, the locus has been renamed covR, for "control of virulence genes" in GAS. Transcription of the covR operon was also increased in the nonpolar insertion mutant, indicating that CovR represses its own synthesis as well. All phenotypes of the covR nonpolar insertion mutant were complemented by the covR gene on a plasmid. CovR acts on operons expressed both in exponential and in stationary phase, demonstrating that the CovR-CovS pathway is separate from growth phase-dependent regulation in GAS. Therefore, CovR is the first multiple-gene repressor of virulence factors described for this important human pathogen. PMID:10368137

  8. A Response Regulator That Represses Transcription of Several Virulence Operons in the Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Federle, Michael J.; McIver, Kevin S.; Scott, June R.

    1999-01-01

    A search for homologs of the Bacillus subtilis PhoP response regulator in the group A streptococcus (GAS) genome revealed three good candidates. Inactivation of one of these, recently identified as csrR (J. C. Levin and M. R. Wessels, Mol. Microbiol. 30:209–219, 1998), caused the strain to produce mucoid colonies and to increase transcription of hasA, the first gene in the operon for capsule synthesis. We report here that a nonpolar insertion in this gene also increased transcription of ska (encoding streptokinase), sagA (streptolysin S), and speMF (mitogenic factor) but did not affect transcription of slo (streptolysin O), mga (multiple gene regulator of GAS), emm (M protein), scpA (complement C5a peptidase), or speB or speC (pyrogenic exotoxins B and C). The amounts of streptokinase, streptolysin S, and capsule paralleled the levels of transcription of their genes in all cases. Because CsrR represses genes unrelated to those for capsule synthesis, and because CsrA-CsrB is a global regulatory system in Escherichia coli whose mechanism is unrelated to that of these genes in GAS, the locus has been renamed covR, for “control of virulence genes” in GAS. Transcription of the covR operon was also increased in the nonpolar insertion mutant, indicating that CovR represses its own synthesis as well. All phenotypes of the covR nonpolar insertion mutant were complemented by the covR gene on a plasmid. CovR acts on operons expressed both in exponential and in stationary phase, demonstrating that the CovR-CovS pathway is separate from growth phase-dependent regulation in GAS. Therefore, CovR is the first multiple-gene repressor of virulence factors described for this important human pathogen. PMID:10368137

  9. The estrogen receptor-α-induced microRNA signature regulates itself and its transcriptional response

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Leandro; Giamas, Georgios; Jacob, Jimmy; Coombes, R. Charles; Lucchesi, Walter; Thiruchelvam, Paul; Barton, Geraint; Jiao, Long R.; Wait, Robin; Waxman, Jonathan; Hannon, Gregory J.; Stebbing, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Following estrogenic activation, the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) directly regulates the transcription of target genes via DNA binding. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) modulated by ERα have the potential to fine tune these regulatory systems and also provide an alternate mechanism that could impact on estrogen-dependent developmental and pathological systems. Through a microarray approach, we identify the subset of microRNAs (miRNAs) modulated by ERα, which include upregulation of miRNAs derived from the processing of the paralogous primary transcripts (pri-) mir-17–92 and mir-106a-363. Characterization of the mir-17–92 locus confirms that the ERα target protein c-MYC binds its promoter in an estrogen-dependent manner. We observe that levels of pri-mir-17–92 increase earlier than the mature miRNAs derived from it, implicating precursor cleavage modulation after transcription. Pri-mir-17–92 is immediately cleaved by DROSHA to pre-miR-18a, indicating that its regulation occurs during the formation of the mature molecule from the precursor. The clinical implications of this novel regulatory system were confirmed by demonstrating that pre-miR-18a was significantly upregulated in ERα-positive compared to ERα-negative breast cancers. Mechanistically, miRNAs derived from these paralogous pri-miRNAs (miR-18a, miR-19b, and miR-20b) target and downregulate ERα, while a subset of pri-miRNA-derived miRNAs inhibit protein translation of the ERα transcriptional p160 coactivator, AIB1. Therefore, different subsets of miRNAs identified act as part of a negative autoregulatory feedback loop. We propose that ERα, c-MYC, and miRNA transcriptional programs invoke a sophisticated network of interactions able to provide the wide range of coordinated cellular responses to estrogen. PMID:19706389

  10. Human Adaptation Genetic Response Suites: Toward New Interventions and Countermeasures for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N. R.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic response suites in human lymphocytes in response to microgravity are important to identify and further study in order to augment human physiological adaptation to novel environments. Emerging technologies, such as DNA micro array profiling, have the potential to identify novel genes that are involved in mediating adaptation to these environments. These genes may prove to be therapeutically valuable as new targets for countermeasures, or as predictive biomarkers of response to these new environments. Human lymphocytes cultured in lg and microgravity analog culture were analyzed for their differential gene expression response. Different groups of genes related to the immune response, cardiovascular system and stress response were then analyzed. Analysis of cells from multiple donors reveals a small shared set that are likely to be essential to adaptation. These three groups focus on human adaptation to new environments. The shared set contains genes related to T cell activation, immune response and stress response to analog microgravity.

  11. A Novel Peroxisome Proliferator Response Element Modulates Hepatic Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Transcription in Response to PPARδ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Vikram R.; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    The hepatic expression of LDLR gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative PPAR-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at −768 to −752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin mediated transactivation. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression. PMID:26443862

  12. Adhesin competence repressor (AdcR) from Streptococcus pyogenes controls adaptive responses to zinc limitation and contributes to virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sanson, Misu; Makthal, Nishanth; Flores, Anthony R.; Olsen, Randall J.; Musser, James M.; Kumaraswami, Muthiah

    2015-01-01

    Altering zinc bioavailability to bacterial pathogens is a key component of host innate immunity. Thus, the ability to sense and adapt to the alterations in zinc concentrations is critical for bacterial survival and pathogenesis. To understand the adaptive responses of group A Streptococcus (GAS) to zinc limitation and its regulation by AdcR, we characterized gene regulation by AdcR. AdcR regulates the expression of 70 genes involved in zinc acquisition and virulence. Zinc-bound AdcR interacts with operator sequences in the negatively regulated promoters and mediates differential regulation of target genes in response to zinc deficiency. Genes involved in zinc mobilization and conservation are derepressed during mild zinc deficiency, whereas the energy-dependent zinc importers are upregulated during severe zinc deficiency. Further, we demonstrated that transcription activation by AdcR occurs by direct binding to the promoter. However, the repression and activation by AdcR is mediated by its interactions with two distinct operator sequences. Finally, mutational analysis of the metal ligands of AdcR caused impaired DNA binding and attenuated virulence, indicating that zinc sensing by AdcR is critical for GAS pathogenesis. Together, we demonstrate that AdcR regulates GAS adaptive responses to zinc limitation and identify molecular components required for GAS survival during zinc deficiency. PMID:25510500

  13. Switch from Stress Response to Homeobox Transcription Factors in Adipose Tissue After Profound Fat Loss

    PubMed Central

    Stavrum, Anne-Kristin; Stansberg, Christine; Holdhus, Rita; Hoang, Tuyen; Veum, Vivian L.; Christensen, Bjørn Jostein; Våge, Villy; Sagen, Jørn V.; Steen, Vidar M.; Mellgren, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Background In obesity, impaired adipose tissue function may promote secondary disease through ectopic lipid accumulation and excess release of adipokines, resulting in systemic low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and organ dysfunction. However, several of the genes regulating adipose tissue function in obesity are yet to be identified. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to identify novel candidate genes that may regulate adipose tissue function, we analyzed global gene expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue before and one year after bariatric surgery (biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, BPD/DS) (n = 16). Adipose tissue from lean healthy individuals was also analyzed (n = 13). Two different microarray platforms (AB 1700 and Illumina) were used to measure the differential gene expression, and the results were further validated by qPCR. Surgery reduced BMI from 53.3 to 33.1 kg/m2. The majority of differentially expressed genes were down-regulated after profound fat loss, including transcription factors involved in stress response, inflammation, and immune cell function (e.g., FOS, JUN, ETS, C/EBPB, C/EBPD). Interestingly, a distinct set of genes was up-regulated after fat loss, including homeobox transcription factors (IRX3, IRX5, HOXA5, HOXA9, HOXB5, HOXC6, EMX2, PRRX1) and extracellular matrix structural proteins (COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, COL5A1, COL6A3). Conclusions/Significance The data demonstrate a marked switch of transcription factors in adipose tissue after profound fat loss, providing new molecular insight into a dichotomy between stress response and metabolically favorable tissue development. Our findings implicate homeobox transcription factors as important regulators of adipose tissue function. PMID:20543949

  14. Transcriptional response of chicken embryo cells to Newcastle disease virus (D58 strain) infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kirubaharan, J John; Chandran, N Daniel Joy; Gnanapriya, N

    2013-09-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the causative agent of Newcastle disease (ND) in chicken causes significant economic loss for the poultry industry worldwide. The mechanism involved in host response to NDV infection is not well understood. For better understanding of the virus-host interaction; transcriptional profile of some genes of chicken embryo (CE) cells infected with NDV vaccine strain D58 was established using quantitative RT-PCR SYBR Green method. The relative standard curve method was used to measure the level of transcripts of the cellular genes against an endogenous control (β actin) gene. Among the genes studied, IFN α, IFN γ, MHC I and DDX 1 were up-regulated while IL 6 was down regulated. The expression of viral genes (M and F) in the infected CE cells was also confirmed by relative quantification. The host cellular genes involved in pro-inflammatory response, interferon-regulated proteins and the cellular immune response were affected by NDV infection, indicating involvement of complex signaling pathways of host cell responses to the infection. Thus, this study contributes to the understanding of the pathogenesis of ND and provides an insight into the virus-host interaction. PMID:24426287

  15. Transcriptome-wide identification of bread wheat WRKY transcription factors in response to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Okay, Sezer; Derelli, Ebru; Unver, Turgay

    2014-10-01

    The WRKY superfamily of transcription factors was shown to be involved in biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants such as wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), one of the major crops largely cultivated and consumed all over the world. Drought is an important abiotic stress resulting in a considerable amount of loss in agronomical yield. Therefore, identification of drought responsive WRKY members in wheat has a profound significance. Here, a total of 160 TaWRKY proteins were characterized according to sequence similarity, motif varieties, and their phylogenetic relationships. The conserved sequences of the TaWRKYs were aligned and classified into three main groups and five subgroups. A novel motif in wheat, WRKYGQR, was identified. To putatively determine the drought responsive TaWRKY members, publicly available RNA-Seq data were analyzed for the first time in this study. Through in silico searches, 35 transcripts were detected having an identity to ten known TaWRKY genes. Furthermore, relative expression levels of TaWRKY16/TaWRKY16-A, TaWRKY17, TaWRKY19-C, TaWRKY24, TaWRKY59, TaWRKY61, and TaWRKY82 were measured in root and leaf tissues of drought-tolerant Sivas 111/33 and susceptible Atay 85 cultivars. All of the quantified TaWRKY transcripts were found to be up-regulated in root tissue of Sivas 111/33. Differential expression of TaWRKY16, TaWRKY24, TaWRKY59, TaWRKY61 and TaWRKY82 genes was discovered for the first time upon drought stress in wheat. These comprehensive analyses bestow a better understanding about the WRKY TFs in bread wheat under water deficit, and increased number of drought responsive WRKYs would contribute to the molecular breeding of tolerant wheat cultivars. PMID:24748053

  16. The Pho4 transcription factor mediates the response to arsenate and arsenite in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Urrialde, Verónica; Prieto, Daniel; Pla, Jesús; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca

    2015-01-01

    Arsenate (As (V)) is the dominant form of the toxic metalloid arsenic (As). Microorganisms have consequently developed mechanisms to detoxify and tolerate this kind of compounds. In the present work, we have explored the arsenate sensing and signaling mechanisms in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Although mutants impaired in the Hog1 or Mkc1-mediated pathways did not show significant sensitivity to this compound, both Hog1 and Mkc1 became phosphorylated upon addition of sodium arsenate to growing cells. Hog1 phosphorylation upon arsenate challenge was shown to be Ssk1-dependent. A screening designed for the identification of transcription factors involved in the arsenate response identified Pho4, a transcription factor of the myc-family, as pho4 mutants were susceptible to As (V). The expression of PHO4 was shortly induced in the presence of sodium arsenate in a Hog1-independent manner. Pho4 level affects Hog1 phosphorylation upon As (V) challenge, suggesting an indirect relationship between Pho4 activity and signaling in C. albicans. Pho4 also mediates the response to arsenite as revealed by the fact that pho4 defective mutants are sensitive to arsenite and Pho4 becomes phosphorylated upon sodium arsenite addition. Arsenite also triggers Hog1 phosphorylation by a process that is, in this case, independent of the Ssk1 kinase. These results indicate that the HOG pathway mediates the response to arsenate and arsenite in C. albicans and that the Pho4 transcription factor can differentiate among As (III), As (V) and Pi, triggering presumably specific responses. PMID:25717325

  17. Transcriptional and antagonistic responses of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to phylogenetically different bacterial competitors.

    PubMed

    Garbeva, Paolina; Silby, Mark W; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Levy, Stuart B; Boer, Wietse de

    2011-06-01

    The ability of soil bacteria to successfully compete with a range of other microbial species is crucial for their growth and survival in the nutrient-limited soil environment. In the present work, we studied the behavior and transcriptional responses of soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf0-1 on nutrient-poor agar to confrontation with strains of three phylogenetically different bacterial genera, that is, Bacillus, Brevundimonas and Pedobacter. Competition for nutrients was apparent as all three bacterial genera had a negative effect on the density of P. fluorescens Pf0-1; this effect was most strong during the interaction with Bacillus. Microarray-based analyses indicated strong differences in the transcriptional responses of Pf0-1 to the different competitors. There was higher similarity in the gene expression response of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 to the Gram-negative bacteria as compared with the Gram-positive strain. The Gram-negative strains did also trigger the production of an unknown broad-spectrum antibiotic in Pf0-1. More detailed analysis indicated that expression of specific Pf0-1 genes involved in signal transduction and secondary metabolite production was strongly affected by the competitors' identity, suggesting that Pf0-1 can distinguish among different competitors and fine-tune its competitive strategies. The results presented here demonstrate that P. fluorescens Pf0-1 shows a species-specific transcriptional and metabolic response to bacterial competitors and provide new leads in the identification of specific cues in bacteria-bacteria interactions and of novel competitive strategies, antimicrobial traits and genes. PMID:21228890

  18. The transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to proapoptotic concentrations of Pichia membranifaciens killer toxin.

    PubMed

    Santos, A; Marquina, D

    2011-10-01

    PMKT (Pichia membranifaciens killer toxin) reportedly has antimicrobial activity against yeasts and filamentous fungi. In previous research we posited that high PMKT concentrations pose a serious challenge for cell survival by disrupting plasma membrane electrochemical gradients, inducing a transcriptional response similar to that of certain stimuli such as hyperosmotic shock. This response was related to the HOG-pathway with Hog1p phosphorylation and a transitional increase in intracellular glycerol accumulation. Such a response was consistent with the notion that the effect induced by high PMKT concentrations lies in an alteration to the ionic homeostasis of the sensitive cell. By contrast, the evidence presented here shows that low PMKT doses lead to a cell death process in Saccharomyces cerevisiae accompanied by cytological and biochemical indicators of apoptotic programmed cell death, namely, the production of reactive oxygen species, DNA strand breaks, metacaspase activation and cytochrome c release. Furthermore, dying cells progressed from an apoptotic state to a secondary necrotic state, and the rate at which this change occurred was proportional to the intensity of the stimulus. We have explored the global gene expression response of S. cerevisiae during that stimulus. The results obtained from DNA microarrays indicate that genes related with an oxidative stress response were induced in response to proapoptotic concentrations of PMKT, showing that the coordinated transcriptional response is not coincident with that obtained when ionophoric concentrations of PMKT are used. By contrast, cwp2Δ mutants showed no signs of apoptosis, indicating that the initial steps of the killer mechanism coincide when proapoptotic (low) or ionophoric (high) PMKT concentrations are used. Additionally, low dosages of PMKT promoted Hog1p phosphorylation and glycerol accumulation. PMID:21801845

  19. Deciphering Adaptation Strategies of the Epidemic Clostridium difficile 027 Strain during Infection through In Vivo Transcriptional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kansau, Imad; Barketi-Klai, Amira; Monot, Marc; Hoys, Sandra; Dupuy, Bruno; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for a wide spectrum of infection from asymptomatic carriage to severe, relapsing colitis. Since 2003, C. difficile infections have increased with a higher morbidity and mortality due to the emergence of epidemic and hypervirulent C. difficile strains such as those of the epidemic lineage 027/BI/NAP1. To decipher the hypervirulence and epidemicity of 027 strains, we analyzed gene expression profiles of the R20291 027 strain using a monoxenic mouse model during the first 38h of infection. A total of 741 genes were differentially expressed during the course of infection. They are mainly distributed in functional categories involved in host adaptation. Several genes of PTS and ABC transporters were significantly regulated during the infection, underlying the ability of strain R20291 to adapt its metabolism according to nutrient availability in the digestive tract. In this animal model, despite the early sporulation process, sporulation efficiency seems to indicate that growth of R20291 vegetative cells versus spores were favored during infection. The bacterial mechanisms associated to adaptability and flexibility within the gut environment, in addition to the virulence factor expression and antibiotic resistance, should contribute to the epidemicity and hypervirulence of the C. difficile 027 strains. PMID:27351947

  20. Myonuclear transcription is responsive to mechanical load and DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Tyler J.; Patel, Rooshil M.; McClintock, Timothy S.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.; McCarthy, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Myofibers increase size and DNA content in response to a hypertrophic stimulus, thus providing a physiological model with which to study how these factors affect global transcription. Using 5-ethynyl uridine (EU) to metabolically label nascent RNA, we measured a sevenfold increase in myofiber transcription during early hypertrophy before a change in cell size and DNA content. The typical increase in myofiber DNA content observed at the later stage of hypertrophy was associated with a significant decrease in the percentage of EU-positive myonuclei; however, when DNA content was held constant by preventing myonuclear accretion via satellite cell depletion, both the number of transcriptionally active myonuclei and the amount of RNA generated by each myonucleus increased. During late hypertrophy, transcription did not scale with cell size, as smaller myofibers (<1000 μm2) demonstrated the highest transcriptional activity. Finally, transcription was primarily responsible for changes in the expression of genes known to regulate myofiber size. These findings show that resident myonuclei possess a significant reserve capacity to up-regulate transcription during hypertrophy and that myofiber transcription is responsive to DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy. PMID:26764089

  1. A Nonsynonymous Mutation in the Transcriptional Regulator lbh Is Associated with Cichlid Craniofacial Adaptation and Neural Crest Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Powder, Kara E.; Cousin, Hélène; McLinden, Gretchen P.; Craig Albertson, R.

    2014-01-01

    Since the time of Darwin, biologists have sought to understand the origins and maintenance of life’s diversity of form. However, the nature of the exact DNA mutations and molecular mechanisms that result in morphological differences between species remains unclear. Here, we characterize a nonsynonymous mutation in a transcriptional coactivator, limb bud and heart homolog (lbh), which is associated with adaptive variation in the lower jaw of cichlid fishes. Using both zebrafish and Xenopus, we demonstrate that lbh mediates migration of cranial neural crest cells, the cellular source of the craniofacial skeleton. A single amino acid change that is alternatively fixed in cichlids with differing facial morphologies results in discrete shifts in migration patterns of this multipotent cell type that are consistent with both embryological and adult craniofacial phenotypes. Among animals, this polymorphism in lbh represents a rare example of a coding change that is associated with continuous morphological variation. This work offers novel insights into the development and evolution of the craniofacial skeleton, underscores the evolutionary potential of neural crest cells, and extends our understanding of the genetic nature of mutations that underlie divergence in complex phenotypes. PMID:25234704

  2. De-repression of CSP-1 activates adaptive responses to antifungal azoles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Xue, Wei; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Zhenying; Wei, Shiping; Liu, Xingyu; Sun, Xianyun; Wang, Wenzhao; Li, Shaojie

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal azoles are the major drugs that are used to treat fungal infections. This study found that in response to antifungal azole stress, Neurospora crassa could activate the transcriptional responses of many genes and increase azole resistance by reducing the level of conidial separation 1 (CSP-1), a global transcription repressor, at azole-responsive genes. The expression of csp-1 was directly activated by the transcription factors WC-1 and WC-2. Upon ketoconazole (KTC) stress, the transcript levels of wc-1 and wc-2 were not changed, but csp-1 transcription rapidly declined. A chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed a rapid reduction in the WC-2 enrichment at the csp-1 promoter upon KTC treatment, which might be responsible for the KTC-induced csp-1 downregulation. Deletion of csp-1 increased resistance to KTC and voriconazole, while csp-1 overexpression increased KTC susceptibility. CSP-1 transcriptionally repressed a number of azole-responsive genes, including genes encoding the azole target ERG11, the azole efflux pump CDR4, and the sterol C-22 desaturase ERG5. Deletion of csp-1 also reduced the KTC-induced accumulation of ergosterol intermediates, eburicol, and 14α-methyl-3,6-diol. CSP-1 orthologs are widely present in filamentous fungi, and an Aspergillus fumigatus mutant in which the csp-1 was deleted was resistant to itraconazole. PMID:26781458

  3. Transcriptional Responses Associated with Virulence and Defence in the Interaction between Heterobasidion annosum s.s. and Norway Spruce

    PubMed Central

    Lundén, Karl; Danielsson, Marie; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Ihrmark, Katarina; Gorriz, Miguel Nemesio; Stenlid, Jan; Asiegbu, Frederick O.; Elfstrand, Malin

    2015-01-01

    Heterobasidion annosum sensu lato is a serious pathogen causing root and stem rot to conifers in the northern hemisphere and rendering the timber defective for sawing and pulping. In this study we applied next-generation sequencing to i) identify transcriptional responses unique to Heterobasidion-inoculated Norway spruce and ii) investigate the H. annosum transcripts to identify putative virulence factors. To address these objectives we wounded or inoculated 30-year-old Norway spruce clones with H. annosum and 454-sequenced the transcriptome of the interaction at 0, 5 and 15 days post inoculation. The 491860 high-quality reads were de novo assembled and the relative expression was analysed. Overall, very few H. annosum transcripts were represented in our dataset. Three delta-12 fatty acid desaturase transcripts and one Clavaminate synthase-like transcript, both associated with virulence in other pathosystems, were found among the significantly induced transcripts. The analysis of the Norway spruce transcriptional responses produced a handful of differentially expressed transcripts. Most of these transcripts originated from genes known to respond to H. annosum. However, three genes that had not previously been reported to respond to H. annosum showed specific induction to inoculation: an oxophytodienoic acid–reductase (OPR), a beta–glucosidase and a germin-like protein (GLP2) gene. Even in a small data set like ours, five novel highly expressed Norway spruce transcripts without significant alignment to any previously annotated protein in Genbank but present in the P. abies (v1.0) gene catalogue were identified. Their expression pattern suggests a role in defence. Therefore a more complete survey of the transcriptional responses in the interactions between Norway spruce and its major pathogen H. annosum would probably provide a better understanding of gymnosperm defence than accumulated until now. PMID:26151363

  4. Recognition of the disordered p53 transactivation domain by the transcriptional adapter zinc finger domains of CREB-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Krois, Alexander S; Ferreon, Josephine C; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2016-03-29

    An important component of the activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor is its interaction with the transcriptional coactivators cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300, which activate transcription of p53-regulated stress response genes and stabilize p53 against ubiquitin-mediated degradation. The highest affinity interactions are between the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains of CBP/p300. The NMR spectra of simple binary complexes of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains with the p53TAD suffer from exchange broadening, but innovations in construct design and isotopic labeling have enabled us to obtain high-resolution structures using fusion proteins, uniformly labeled in the case of the TAZ2-p53TAD fusion and segmentally labeled through transintein splicing for the TAZ1-p53TAD fusion. The p53TAD is bipartite, with two interaction motifs, termed AD1 and AD2, which fold to form short amphipathic helices upon binding to TAZ1 and TAZ2 whereas intervening regions of the p53TAD remain flexible. Both the AD1 and AD2 motifs bind to hydrophobic surfaces of the TAZ domains, with AD2 making more extensive hydrophobic contacts consistent with its greater contribution to the binding affinity. Binding of AD1 and AD2 is synergistic, and structural studies performed with isolated motifs can be misleading. The present structures of the full-length p53TAD complexes demonstrate the versatility of the interactions available to an intrinsically disordered domain containing bipartite interaction motifs and provide valuable insights into the structural basis of the affinity changes that occur upon stress-related posttranslational modification. PMID:26976603

  5. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Wilson, Glenn; Corvi, Margaret M.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and-independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 hours post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC-MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures. PMID:23656968

  6. Tissue contaminants and associated transcriptional response in trout liver from high elevation lakes of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, P.W.; Aluru, N.; Black, R.W.; Vijayan, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    The consistent cold temperatures and large amount of precipitation in the Olympic and Cascade ranges of Washington State are thought to enhance atmospheric deposition of contaminants. However, little is known about contaminant levels in organisms residing in these remote high elevation lakes. We measured total mercury and 28 organochlorine compounds in trout collected from 14 remote lakes in the Olympic, Mt. Rainer, and North Cascades National Parks. Mercury was detected in trout from all lakes sampled (15 to 262 ??g/kg ww), while two organochlorines, total polychlorinated biphenyls (tPCB) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), were also detected in these fish tissues (<25 ??g/kg ww). In sediments, organochlorine levels were below detection, while median total and methyl mercury were 30.4 and 0.34 ??g/ kg dry weight (ww), respectively. Using fish from two lakes, representing different contaminant loading levels (Wilcox lake: high; Skymo lake: low), we examined transcriptional response in the liver using a custom-made low-density targeted rainbow trout cDNA microarray. We detected significant differences in liver transcriptional response, including significant changes in metabolic, endocrine, and immune-related genes, in fish collected from Wilcox Lake compared to Skymo Lake. Overall, our results suggest that local urban areas contribute to the observed contaminant patterns in these high elevation lakes, while the transcriptional changes point to a biological response associated with exposure to these contaminants in fish. Specifically, the gene expression pattern leads us to hypothesize a role for mercury in disrupting the metabolic and reproductive pathways in fish from high elevation lakes in western Washington. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  7. Tissue contaminants and associated transcriptional response in trout liver from high elevation lakes of Washington.

    PubMed

    Moran, Patrick W; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Black, Robert W; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2007-09-15

    The consistent cold temperatures and large amount of precipitation in the Olympic and Cascade ranges of Washington State are thought to enhance atmospheric deposition of contaminants. However, little is known about contaminant levels in organisms residing in these remote high elevation lakes. We measured total mercury and 28 organochlorine compounds in trout collected from 14 remote lakes in the Olympic, Mt. Rainer, and North Cascades National Parks. Mercury was detected in trout from all lakes sampled (15 to 262 microg/kg ww), while two organochlorines, total polychlorinated biphenyls (tPCB) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), were also detected in these fish tissues (<25 microg/kg ww). In sediments, organochlorine levels were below detection, while median total and methyl mercury were 30.4 and 0.34 microg/kg dry weight (ww), respectively. Using fish from two lakes, representing different contaminant loading levels (Wilcox lake: high; Skymo lake: low), we examined transcriptional response in the liver using a custom-made low-density targeted rainbow trout cDNA microarray. We detected significant differences in liver transcriptional response, including significant changes in metabolic, endocrine, and immune-related genes, in fish collected from Wilcox Lake compared to Skymo Lake. Overall, our results suggest that local urban areas contribute to the observed contaminant patterns in these high elevation lakes, while the transcriptional changes point to a biological response associated with exposure to these contaminants in fish. Specifically, the gene expression pattern leads us to hypothesize a role for mercury in disrupting the metabolic and reproductive pathways in fish from high elevation lakes in western Washington. PMID:17948813

  8. Global transcriptional profiles of the copper responses in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquin; López-Maury, Luis; Florencio, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential element involved in fundamental processes like respiration and photosynthesis. However, it becomes toxic at high concentration, which has forced organisms to control its cellular concentration. We have recently described a copper resistance system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is mediated by the two-component system, CopRS, a RND metal transport system, CopBAC and a protein of unknown function, CopM. Here, we report the transcriptional responses to copper additions at non-toxic (0.3 µM) and toxic concentrations (3 µM) in the wild type and in the copper sensitive copR mutant strain. While 0.3 µM copper slightly stimulated metabolism and promoted the exchange between cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin as soluble electron carriers, the addition of 3 µM copper catalyzed the formation of ROS, led to a general stress response and induced expression of Fe-S cluster biogenesis genes. According to this, a double mutant strain copRsufR, which expresses constitutively the sufBCDS operon, tolerated higher copper concentration than the copR mutant strain, suggesting that Fe-S clusters are direct targets of copper toxicity in Synechocystis. In addition we have also demonstrated that InrS, a nickel binding transcriptional repressor that belong to the CsoR family of transcriptional factor, was involved in heavy metal homeostasis, including copper, in Synechocystis. Finally, global gene expression analysis of the copR mutant strain suggested that CopRS only controls the expression of copMRS and copBAC operons in response to copper. PMID:25268225

  9. Global Transcriptional Profiles of the Copper Responses in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquin; López-Maury, Luis; Florencio, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential element involved in fundamental processes like respiration and photosynthesis. However, it becomes toxic at high concentration, which has forced organisms to control its cellular concentration. We have recently described a copper resistance system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is mediated by the two-component system, CopRS, a RND metal transport system, CopBAC and a protein of unknown function, CopM. Here, we report the transcriptional responses to copper additions at non-toxic (0.3 µM) and toxic concentrations (3 µM) in the wild type and in the copper sensitive copR mutant strain. While 0.3 µM copper slightly stimulated metabolism and promoted the exchange between cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin as soluble electron carriers, the addition of 3 µM copper catalyzed the formation of ROS, led to a general stress response and induced expression of Fe-S cluster biogenesis genes. According to this, a double mutant strain copRsufR, which expresses constitutively the sufBCDS operon, tolerated higher copper concentration than the copR mutant strain, suggesting that Fe-S clusters are direct targets of copper toxicity in Synechocystis. In addition we have also demonstrated that InrS, a nickel binding transcriptional repressor that belong to the CsoR family of transcriptional factor, was involved in heavy metal homeostasis, including copper, in Synechocystis. Finally, global gene expression analysis of the copR mutant strain suggested that CopRS only controls the expression of copMRS and copBAC operons in response to copper. PMID:25268225

  10. Structurally Distinct Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Induce Differential Transcriptional Responses in Developing Zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, Britton; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn V.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC-MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures.

  11. No Evidence for a Low Linear Energy Transfer Adaptive Response in Irradiated RKO Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Marianne B.; Goetz, Wilfried; Baulch, Janet E.; Lewis, Adam J.; Morgan, William F.

    2011-01-06

    It has become increasingly evident from reports in the literature that there are many confounding factors that are capable of modulating radiation induced non-targeted responses such as the bystander effect and the adaptive response. In this paper we examine recent data that suggest that the observation of non-targeted responses may not be universally observable for differing radiation qualities. We have conducted a study of the adaptive response following low LET exposures for human colon carcinoma cells and failed to observe adaption for the endpoints of clonogenic survival or micronucleus formation.

  12. Nrf2 suppresses macrophage inflammatory response by blocking proinflammatory cytokine transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Eri H.; Suzuki, Takafumi; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Hayashi, Makiko; Sekine, Hiroki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Moriguchi, Takashi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Nakayama, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor-2) transcription factor regulates oxidative/xenobiotic stress response and also represses inflammation. However, the mechanisms how Nrf2 alleviates inflammation are still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Nrf2 interferes with lipopolysaccharide-induced transcriptional upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-1β. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq and ChIP-qPCR analyses revealed that Nrf2 binds to the proximity of these genes in macrophages and inhibits RNA Pol II recruitment. Further, we found that Nrf2-mediated inhibition is independent of the Nrf2-binding motif and reactive oxygen species level. Murine inflammatory models further demonstrated that Nrf2 interferes with IL6 induction and inflammatory phenotypes in vivo. Thus, contrary to the widely accepted view that Nrf2 suppresses inflammation through redox control, we demonstrate here that Nrf2 opposes transcriptional upregulation of proinflammatory cytokine genes. This study identifies Nrf2 as the upstream regulator of cytokine production and establishes a molecular basis for an Nrf2-mediated anti-inflammation approach. PMID:27211851

  13. Genomic redistribution of GR monomers and dimers mediates transcriptional response to exogenous glucocorticoid in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hee-Woong; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Rauch, Alexander; Weiner, Juliane; Hübner, Sabine; Hübner, Norbert; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lazar, Mitchell A.; Tuckermann, Jan; Steger, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly prescribed drugs, but their anti-inflammatory benefits are mitigated by metabolic side effects. Their transcriptional effects, including tissue-specific gene activation and repression, are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is known to bind as a homodimer to a palindromic DNA sequence. Using ChIP-exo in mouse liver under endogenous corticosterone exposure, we report here that monomeric GR interaction with a half-site motif is more prevalent than homodimer binding. Monomers colocalize with lineage-determining transcription factors in both liver and primary macrophages, and the GR half-site motif drives transcription, suggesting that monomeric binding is fundamental to GR's tissue-specific functions. In response to exogenous GC in vivo, GR dimers assemble on chromatin near ligand-activated genes, concomitant with monomer evacuation of sites near repressed genes. Thus, pharmacological GCs mediate gene expression by favoring GR homodimer occupancy at classic palindromic sites at the expense of monomeric binding. The findings have important implications for improving therapies that target GR. PMID:25957148

  14. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S. A.; Yassin, Marwa A.; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway. PMID:26633307

  15. Pokemon (FBI-1) interacts with Smad4 to repress TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Chuanfu; Mei, Zhu; Wang, Yue; Bi, Mingjun; Shan, Dapeng; Meredith, Alex; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2015-03-01

    Pokemon, an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ and Krüppel) family. Smad4, a key component of TGF-β pathway, plays an essential role in TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses. In this study, we show that Pokemon can interact directly with Smad4 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Pokemon decreases TGF-β-induced transcriptional activities, whereas knockdown of Pokemon increases these activities. Interestingly, Pokemon does not affect activation of Smad2/3, formation of Smads complex, or DNA binding activity of Smad4. TGF-β1 treatment increases the interaction between Pokemon and Smad4, and also enhances the recruitment of Pokemon to Smad4-DNA complex. In addition, we also find that Pokemon recruits HDAC1 to Smad4 complex but decreases the interaction between Smad4 and p300/CBP. Taken together, all these data suggest that Pokemon is a new partner of Smad4 and plays a negative role in TGF-β pathway. PMID:25514493

  16. Dynamic transcriptional changes in response to rehydration in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Higo, Akiyoshi; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2007-11-01

    Global transcriptional responses to dehydration and rehydration were determined in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Nearly 300 genes were up- or downregulated during both dehydration and rehydration. While as many as 133 genes showed dehydration-specific downregulation, only 29 genes showed dehydration-specific upregulation. In contrast, while only 13 genes showed rehydration-specific downregulation, as many as 259 genes showed rehydration-specific upregulation. The genes upregulated during rehydration responded rapidly and transiently, whereas those upregulated during dehydration did so gradually and persistently. The expression of various genes involved in DNA repair, protein folding and NAD synthesis, as well as genes responding to nitrogen depletion and CO2 limitation, was upregulated during rehydration. Although no genes for transcriptional regulators showed dehydration-specific upregulation, eight showed rehydration-specific upregulation. Among them, two genes, ancrpB and alr0618, encode putative transcriptional activators of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) family. DNA microarray analysis using gene disruptants revealed that AnCrpB and Alr0618 regulate the genes induced by nitrogen depletion and by CO2 limitation, respectively. We conclude that rehydration is a complex process in which the expression of certain genes, particularly those for metabolism, is dramatically induced. PMID:17975076

  17. Genomic redistribution of GR monomers and dimers mediates transcriptional response to exogenous glucocorticoid in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee-Woong; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Rauch, Alexander; Weiner, Juliane; Hübner, Sabine; Hübner, Norbert; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lazar, Mitchell A; Tuckermann, Jan; Steger, David J

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly prescribed drugs, but their anti-inflammatory benefits are mitigated by metabolic side effects. Their transcriptional effects, including tissue-specific gene activation and repression, are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is known to bind as a homodimer to a palindromic DNA sequence. Using ChIP-exo in mouse liver under endogenous corticosterone exposure, we report here that monomeric GR interaction with a half-site motif is more prevalent than homodimer binding. Monomers colocalize with lineage-determining transcription factors in both liver and primary macrophages, and the GR half-site motif drives transcription, suggesting that monomeric binding is fundamental to GR's tissue-specific functions. In response to exogenous GC in vivo, GR dimers assemble on chromatin near ligand-activated genes, concomitant with monomer evacuation of sites near repressed genes. Thus, pharmacological GCs mediate gene expression by favoring GR homodimer occupancy at classic palindromic sites at the expense of monomeric binding. The findings have important implications for improving therapies that target GR. PMID:25957148

  18. Transcriptional Response to Acute Thermal Exposure in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Determined by RNAseq

    PubMed Central

    Tomalty, Katharine M. H.; Meek, Mariah H.; Stephens, Molly R.; Rincón, Gonzalo; Fangue, Nann A.; May, Bernie P.; Baerwald, Melinda R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal exposure is a serious and growing challenge facing fish species worldwide. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) living in the southern portion of their native range are particularly likely to encounter warmer water due to a confluence of factors. River alterations have increased the likelihood that juveniles will be exposed to warm water temperatures during their freshwater life stage, which can negatively impact survival, growth, and development and pose a threat to dwindling salmon populations. To better understand how acute thermal exposure affects the biology of salmon, we performed a transcriptional analysis of gill tissue from Chinook salmon juveniles reared at 12° and exposed acutely to water temperatures ranging from ideal to potentially lethal (12° to 25°). Reverse-transcribed RNA libraries were sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform and a de novo reference transcriptome was created. Differentially expressed transcripts were annotated using Blast2GO and relevant gene clusters were identified. In addition to a high degree of downregulation of a wide range of genes, we found upregulation of genes involved in protein folding/rescue, protein degradation, cell death, oxidative stress, metabolism, inflammation/immunity, transcription/translation, ion transport, cell cycle/growth, cell signaling, cellular trafficking, and structure/cytoskeleton. These results demonstrate the complex multi-modal cellular response to thermal stress in juvenile salmon. PMID:25911227

  19. Transcriptional response of bathypelagic marine bacterioplankton to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, Adam R; Sharma, Shalabh; Tringe, Susannah G; Martin, Jeffrey; Joye, Samantha B; Moran, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout released a massive amount of oil and gas into the deep ocean between April and July 2010, stimulating microbial blooms of petroleum-degrading bacteria. To understand the metabolic response of marine microorganisms, we sequenced ∼66 million community transcripts that revealed the identity of metabolically active microbes and their roles in petroleum consumption. Reads were assigned to reference genes from ∼2700 bacterial and archaeal taxa, but most assignments (39%) were to just six genomes representing predominantly methane- and petroleum-degrading Gammaproteobacteria. Specific pathways for the degradation of alkanes, aromatic compounds and methane emerged from the metatranscriptomes, with some transcripts assigned to methane monooxygenases representing highly divergent homologs that may degrade either methane or short alkanes. The microbial community in the plume was less taxonomically and functionally diverse than the unexposed community below the plume; this was due primarily to decreased species evenness resulting from Gammaproteobacteria blooms. Surprisingly, a number of taxa (related to SAR11, Nitrosopumilus and Bacteroides, among others) contributed equal numbers of transcripts per liter in both the unexposed and plume samples, suggesting that some groups were unaffected by the petroleum inputs and blooms of degrader taxa, and may be important for re-establishing the pre-spill microbial community structure. PMID:23902988

  20. Investigating the adaptive immune response in influenza and secondary bacterial pneumonia and nanoparticle based therapeutic delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthy, Krishnan V.

    In early 2000, influenza and its associated complications were the 7 th leading cause of death in the United States[1-4]. As of today, this major health problem has become even more of a concern, with the possibility of a potentially devastating avian flu (H5N1) or swine flu pandemic (H1N1). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), over 10 countries have reported transmission of influenza A (H5N1) virus to humans as of June 2006 [5]. In response to this growing concern, the United States pledged over $334 million dollars in international aid for battling influenza[1-4]. The major flu pandemic of the early 1900's provided the first evidence that secondary bacterial pneumonia (not primary viral pneumonia) was the major cause of death in both community and hospital-based settings. Secondary bacterial infections currently account for 35-40% mortality following a primary influenza viral infection [1, 6]. The first component of this work addresses the immunological mechanisms that predispose patients to secondary bacterial infections following a primary influenza viral infection. By assessing host immune responses through various immune-modulatory tools, such as use of volatile anesthetics (i.e. halothane) and Apilimod/STA-5326 (an IL-12/Il-23 transcription blocker), we provide experimental evidence that demonstrates that the overactive adaptive Th1 immune response is critical in mediating increased susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections. We also present data that shows that suppressing the adaptive Th1 immune response enhances innate immunity, specifically in alveolar macrophages, by favoring a pro anti-bacterial phenotype. The second component of this work addresses the use of nanotechnology to deliver therapeutic modalities that affect the primary viral and associated secondary bacterial infections post influenza. First, we used surface functionalized quantum dots for selective targeting of lung alveolar macrophages both in vitro and in vivo

  1. Color responses and their adaptation in human superior colliculus and lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dorita H F; Hess, Robert F; Mullen, Kathy T

    2016-09-01

    We use an fMRI adaptation paradigm to explore the selectivity of human responses in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and superior colliculus (SC) to red-green color and achromatic contrast. We measured responses to red-green (RG) and achromatic (ACH) high contrast sinewave counter-phasing rings with and without adaptation, within a block design. The signal for the RG test stimulus was reduced following both RG and ACH adaptation, whereas the signal for the ACH test was unaffected by either adaptor. These results provide compelling evidence that the human LGN and SC have significant capacity for color adaptation. Since in the LGN red-green responses are mediated by P cells, these findings are in contrast to earlier neurophysiological data from non-human primates that have shown weak or no contrast adaptation in the P pathway. Cross-adaptation of the red-green color response by achromatic contrast suggests unselective response adaptation and points to a dual role for P cells in responding to both color and achromatic contrast. We further show that subcortical adaptation is not restricted to the geniculostriate system, but is also present in the superior colliculus (SC), an oculomotor region that until recently, has been thought to be color-blind. Our data show that the human SC not only responds to red-green color contrast, but like the LGN, shows reliable but unselective adaptation. PMID:27150230

  2. Localization of O-GlcNAc modification on the serum response transcription factor.