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Sample records for adaptive umbrella sampling

  1. Determination of conformational free energies of peptides by multidimensional adaptive umbrella sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Gu, Yan; Liu, Haiyan

    2006-09-01

    We improve the multidimensional adaptive umbrella sampling method for the computation of conformational free energies of biomolecules. The conformational transition between the α-helical and β-hairpin conformational states of an alanine decapeptide is used as an example. Convergence properties of the weighted-histogram-analysis-based adaptive umbrella sampling can be improved by using multiple replicas in each adaptive iteration and by using adaptive updating of the bounds of the umbrella potential. Using positional root-mean-square deviations from structures of the α-helical and β-hairpin reference states as reaction coordinates, we obtained well-converged free energy surfaces of both the in-vacuum and in-solution decapeptide systems. From the free energy surfaces well-converged relative free energies between the two conformational states can be derived. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods for obtaining conformational free energies as well as implications of our results in studying conformational transitions of proteins and in improving force field are discussed.

  2. Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling

    PubMed Central

    van der Vaart, Arjan; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling method (GAMUS), a biased molecular dynamics technique based on adaptive umbrella sampling that efficiently escapes free energy minima in multi-dimensional problems. The prior simulation data are reweighted with a maximum likelihood formulation, and the new approximate probability density is fit to a Gaussian-mixture model, augmented by information about the unsampled areas. The method can be used to identify free energy minima in multi-dimensional reaction coordinates. To illustrate GAMUS, we apply it to the alanine dipeptide (2D reaction coordinate) and tripeptide (4D reaction coordinate). PMID:19284746

  3. Self-Learning Adaptive Umbrella Sampling Method for the Determination of Free Energy Landscapes in Multiple Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Wojtas-Niziurski, Wojciech; Meng, Yilin; Roux, Benoit; Bernèche, Simon

    2013-04-09

    The potential of mean force describing conformational changes of biomolecules is a central quantity that determines the function of biomolecular systems. Calculating an energy landscape of a process that depends on three or more reaction coordinates might require a lot of computational power, making some of multidimensional calculations practically impossible. Here, we present an efficient automatized umbrella sampling strategy for calculating multidimensional potential of mean force. The method progressively learns by itself, through a feedback mechanism, which regions of a multidimensional space are worth exploring and automatically generates a set of umbrella sampling windows that is adapted to the system. The self-learning adaptive umbrella sampling method is first explained with illustrative examples based on simplified reduced model systems, and then applied to two non-trivial situations: the conformational equilibrium of the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin in solution and ion permeation in the KcsA potassium channel. With this method, it is demonstrated that a significant smaller number of umbrella windows needs to be employed to characterize the free energy landscape over the most relevant regions without any loss in accuracy.

  4. Virtual-system-coupled adaptive umbrella sampling to compute free-energy landscape for flexible molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Higo, Junichi; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Kasahara, Kota; Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2015-07-30

    A novel enhanced conformational sampling method, virtual-system-coupled adaptive umbrella sampling (V-AUS), was proposed to compute 300-K free-energy landscape for flexible molecular docking, where a virtual degrees of freedom was introduced to control the sampling. This degree of freedom interacts with the biomolecular system. V-AUS was applied to complex formation of two disordered amyloid-β (Aβ30-35 ) peptides in a periodic box filled by an explicit solvent. An interpeptide distance was defined as the reaction coordinate, along which sampling was enhanced. A uniform conformational distribution was obtained covering a wide interpeptide distance ranging from the bound to unbound states. The 300-K free-energy landscape was characterized by thermodynamically stable basins of antiparallel and parallel β-sheet complexes and some other complex forms. Helices were frequently observed, when the two peptides contacted loosely or fluctuated freely without interpeptide contacts. We observed that V-AUS converged to uniform distribution more effectively than conventional AUS sampling did.

  5. Eigenvector method for umbrella sampling enables error analysis.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Erik H; Van Koten, Brian; Weare, Jonathan; Dinner, Aaron R

    2016-08-28

    Umbrella sampling efficiently yields equilibrium averages that depend on exploring rare states of a model by biasing simulations to windows of coordinate values and then combining the resulting data with physical weighting. Here, we introduce a mathematical framework that casts the step of combining the data as an eigenproblem. The advantage to this approach is that it facilitates error analysis. We discuss how the error scales with the number of windows. Then, we derive a central limit theorem for averages that are obtained from umbrella sampling. The central limit theorem suggests an estimator of the error contributions from individual windows, and we develop a simple and computationally inexpensive procedure for implementing it. We demonstrate this estimator for simulations of the alanine dipeptide and show that it emphasizes low free energy pathways between stable states in comparison to existing approaches for assessing error contributions. Our work suggests the possibility of using the estimator and, more generally, the eigenvector method for umbrella sampling to guide adaptation of the simulation parameters to accelerate convergence.

  6. Eigenvector method for umbrella sampling enables error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiede, Erik H.; Van Koten, Brian; Weare, Jonathan; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2016-08-01

    Umbrella sampling efficiently yields equilibrium averages that depend on exploring rare states of a model by biasing simulations to windows of coordinate values and then combining the resulting data with physical weighting. Here, we introduce a mathematical framework that casts the step of combining the data as an eigenproblem. The advantage to this approach is that it facilitates error analysis. We discuss how the error scales with the number of windows. Then, we derive a central limit theorem for averages that are obtained from umbrella sampling. The central limit theorem suggests an estimator of the error contributions from individual windows, and we develop a simple and computationally inexpensive procedure for implementing it. We demonstrate this estimator for simulations of the alanine dipeptide and show that it emphasizes low free energy pathways between stable states in comparison to existing approaches for assessing error contributions. Our work suggests the possibility of using the estimator and, more generally, the eigenvector method for umbrella sampling to guide adaptation of the simulation parameters to accelerate convergence.

  7. Free energy calculation from umbrella sampling using Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Noam; Stecher, Thomas; Csányi, Gábor

    2013-03-01

    Using simulations to obtain information about the free energy of a system far from its free energy minima requires biased sampling, for example using a series of harmonic umbrella confining potentials to scan over a range of collective variable values. One fundamental distinction between existing methods that use this approach is in what quantities are measured and how they are used: histograms of the system's probability distribution in WHAM, or gradients of the potential of mean force for umbrella integration (UI) and the single-sweep radial basis function (RBF) approach. Here we present a method that reconstructs the free energy from umbrella sampling data using Bayesian inference that effectively uses all available information from multiple umbrella windows. We show that for a single collective variable, our method can use histograms, gradients, or both, to match or outperform WHAM and UI in the accuracy of free energy for a given amount of total simulation time. In higher dimensions, our method can effectively use gradient information to reconstruct the multidimensional free energy surface. We test our method for the alanine polypeptide model system, and show that it is more accurate than a RBF reconstruction for sparse data, and more stable for abundant data.

  8. Separating forward and backward pathways in nonequilibrium umbrella sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Alex; Warmflash, Aryeh; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2009-10-01

    Umbrella sampling enforces uniform sampling of steady-state distributions that are functions of arbitrary numbers of order parameters. The key to applying such methods to nonequilibrium processes is the accumulation of fluxes between regions. A significant difference between microscopically reversible and irreversible systems is that, in the latter case, the transition path ensemble for a reaction can be significantly different for "forward" and "backward" trajectories. Here, we show how to separately treat forward and backward pathways in nonequilibrium umbrella sampling simulations by working in an extended space. In this extended space, the exact rate (for equilibrium or nonequilibrium processes) can be calculated "for free" as a flux in phase space. We compare the efficiency of this rate calculation with forward flux sampling for a two-dimensional potential and show that nonequilibrium umbrella sampling is more efficient when an intermediate is present. We show that this technique can also be used to describe steady-state limit cycles by examining a simulation of circadian oscillations. We obtain the path of the limit cycle in a space of 22 order parameters, as well as the oscillation period. The relation of our method to others is discussed.

  9. Ball-and-Stick Local Elevation Umbrella Sampling: Molecular Simulations Involving Enhanced Sampling within Conformational or Alchemical Subspaces of Low Internal Dimensionalities, Minimal Irrelevant Volumes, and Problem-Adapted Geometries.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Halvor S; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2010-09-14

    A new method, ball-and-stick local elevation umbrella sampling (B&S-LEUS), is proposed to enhance the sampling in computer simulations of (bio)molecular systems. It enables the calculation of conformational free-energy differences between states (or alchemical free-energy differences between molecules), even in situations where the definition of these states relies on a conformational subspace involving more than a few degrees of freedom. The B&S-LEUS method consists of the following steps: (A) choice of a reduced conformational subspace; (B) representation of the relevant states by means of spheres ("balls"), each associated with a biasing potential involving a one-dimensional radial memory-based term and a radial confinement term; (C) definition of a set of lines ("sticks") connecting these spheres, each associated with a biasing potential involving a one-dimensional longitudinal memory-based term and a transverse confinement term; (D) unification of the biasing potentials corresponding to the union of all of the spheres and lines (active subspace) into a single biasing potential according to the enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) scheme; (E) build-up of the memory using the local elevation (LE) procedure, leading to a biasing potential enabling a nearly uniform sampling (radially within the spheres, longitudinally within the lines) of the active subspace; (F) generation of a biased ensemble of configurations using this preoptimized biasing potential, following an umbrella sampling (US) approach; and (G) calculation of the relative free energies of the states via reweighting and state assignment. The main characteristics of this approach are: (i) a low internal dimensionality, that is, the memory only involves one-dimensional grids (acceptable memory requirements); (ii) a minimal irrelevant volume, that is, the conformational volume opened to sampling includes a minimal fraction of irrelevant regions in terms of the free energy of the physical system or of

  10. Sampling free energy surfaces as slices by combining umbrella sampling and metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Shalini; Kapil, Venkat; Nair, Nisanth N

    2016-06-15

    Metadynamics (MTD) is a very powerful technique to sample high-dimensional free energy landscapes, and due to its self-guiding property, the method has been successful in studying complex reactions and conformational changes. MTD sampling is based on filling the free energy basins by biasing potentials and thus for cases with flat, broad, and unbound free energy wells, the computational time to sample them becomes very large. To alleviate this problem, we combine the standard Umbrella Sampling (US) technique with MTD to sample orthogonal collective variables (CVs) in a simultaneous way. Within this scheme, we construct the equilibrium distribution of CVs from biased distributions obtained from independent MTD simulations with umbrella potentials. Reweighting is carried out by a procedure that combines US reweighting and Tiwary-Parrinello MTD reweighting within the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM). The approach is ideal for a controlled sampling of a CV in a MTD simulation, making it computationally efficient in sampling flat, broad, and unbound free energy surfaces. This technique also allows for a distributed sampling of a high-dimensional free energy surface, further increasing the computational efficiency in sampling. We demonstrate the application of this technique in sampling high-dimensional surface for various chemical reactions using ab initio and QM/MM hybrid molecular dynamics simulations. Further, to carry out MTD bias reweighting for computing forward reaction barriers in ab initio or QM/MM simulations, we propose a computationally affordable approach that does not require recrossing trajectories. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A Combined Metadynamics and Umbrella Sampling Method for the Calculation of Ion Permeation Free Energy Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Voth, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Free energy calculations are one of the most useful methods for the study of ion transport mechanisms through confined spaces such as protein ion channels. Their reliability depends on a correctly defined reaction coordinate (RC). A straight line is usually not a proper RC for such complicated processes so in this work a combined metadynamics/umbrella sampling (MTD/US) method is proposed. In the combined method, the ion transport pathway is first identified by the MTD method and then the free energy profile or potential of mean force (PMF) along the path is calculated using umbrella sampling. This combined method avoids the discontinuity problem often associated with normal umbrella sampling calculations that assume a straight line RC and it provides a more physically accurate PMF for such processes. The method is demonstrated for the proton transport process through the protein channel of aquaporin-1. PMID:25100923

  12. Coupled folding and binding with 2D Window-Exchange Umbrella Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Alex; Ahlstrom, Logan S.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions of proteins can gain structure by binding to a partner. This process, of coupled folding and binding, is a fundamental part of many important biological processes. Structure-based models have proven themselves capable of revealing fundamental aspects of how coupled folding and binding occurs, however typical methods to enhance the sampling of these transitions, such as replica exchange, do not adequately sample the transition state region of this extremely rare process. Here we use a variant of Umbrella Sampling to enforce sampling of the transition states of coupled folding and binding of HdeA monomers at neutral pH, an extremely rare process that occurs over timescales ranging from seconds to hours. Using high resolution sampling in the transition state region we cluster states along the principal transition path to obtain a detailed description of coupled binding and folding for the HdeA dimer, revealing new insight into the ensemble of states that are accessible to client recognition. We then demonstrate that exchanges between umbrella sampling windows, as done in previous work, significantly improve relaxation in variables orthogonal to the restraints used. Altogether, these results show that Window Exchange Umbrella Sampling (WEUS) is a promising approach for systems that exhibit flexible binding, and can reveal transition state ensembles of these systems in high detail. PMID:26250657

  13. Umbrella sampling of proton transfer in a creatine-water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Bachert, Peter; Imhof, Petra

    2014-04-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most common processes in chemistry and biology. Proton transfer between creatine and surrounding solvent water is underlying the chemical exchange saturation transfer used as a contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. The free energy barrier, determined by first-principles umbrella sampling simulations (EaDFT 3 kcal/mol) is in the same order of magnitude as the experimentally obtained activation energy. The underlying mechanism is a first proton transfer from the guanidinium group to the water pool, followed by a second transition where a proton is "transferred back" from the nearest water molecule to the deprotonated nitrogen atom of creatine.

  14. Free Energies of Quantum Particles: The Coupled-Perturbed Quantum Umbrella Sampling Method.

    PubMed

    Glover, William J; Casey, Jennifer R; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2014-10-14

    We introduce a new simulation method called Coupled-Perturbed Quantum Umbrella Sampling that extends the classical umbrella sampling approach to reaction coordinates involving quantum mechanical degrees of freedom. The central idea in our method is to solve coupled-perturbed equations to find the response of the quantum system's wave function along a reaction coordinate of interest. This allows for propagation of the system's dynamics under the influence of a quantum biasing umbrella potential and provides a method to rigorously undo the effects of the bias to compute equilibrium ensemble averages. In this way, one can drag electrons into regions of high free energy where they would otherwise not go, thus enabling chemistry by fiat. We demonstrate the applicability of our method for two condensed-phase systems of interest. First, we consider the interaction of a hydrated electron with an aqueous sodium cation, and we calculate a potential of mean force that shows that an e(-):Na(+) contact pair is the thermodynamically favored product starting from either a neutral sodium atom or the separate cation and electron species. Second, we present the first determination of a hydrated electron's free-energy profile relative to an air/water interface. For the particular model parameters used, we find that the hydrated electron is more thermodynamically stable in the bulk rather than at the interface. Our analysis suggests that the primary driving force keeping the electron away from the interface is the long-range electron-solvent polarization interaction rather than the short-range details of the chosen pseudopotential.

  15. Efficient calculation of low energy statistical rates for gas phase dissociation using umbrella sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella, Massimo

    2006-03-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations can be used to compute microcanonical statistical rates of gas phase dissociation reactions. Unfortunately, the MC approach may suffer from a slow convergence and large statistical errors for energies just above the dissociation threshold. In this work, umbrella sampling is proposed as a device to reduce the statistical error of MC rate constants. The method is tested by computing the classical dissociation rate for the reaction [H5O2+]*→H2O+H3O+ over the range of internal energy 38umbrella sampling reduces the computational effort by up to two orders of magnitude when used in conjunction with a careful choice of sampling distributions. The comparison between MC rate constants and classical Rice-Ramsperberg-Kassel harmonic theory shows that anharmonicity plays an important role in the dissociation process of the Zundel cation (H5O2+) at all energies.

  16. Calculating the free energy of transfer of small solutes into a model lipid membrane: Comparison between metadynamics and umbrella sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Bochicchio, Davide; Panizon, Emanuele; Ferrando, Riccardo; Rossi, Giulia; Monticelli, Luca

    2015-10-14

    We compare the performance of two well-established computational algorithms for the calculation of free-energy landscapes of biomolecular systems, umbrella sampling and metadynamics. We look at benchmark systems composed of polyethylene and polypropylene oligomers interacting with lipid (phosphatidylcholine) membranes, aiming at the calculation of the oligomer water-membrane free energy of transfer. We model our test systems at two different levels of description, united-atom and coarse-grained. We provide optimized parameters for the two methods at both resolutions. We devote special attention to the analysis of statistical errors in the two different methods and propose a general procedure for the error estimation in metadynamics simulations. Metadynamics and umbrella sampling yield the same estimates for the water-membrane free energy profile, but metadynamics can be more efficient, providing lower statistical uncertainties within the same simulation time.

  17. Efficient Determination of Free Energy Landscapes in Multiple Dimensions from Biased Umbrella Sampling Simulations Using Linear Regression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) is a standard protocol for postprocessing the information from biased umbrella sampling simulations to construct the potential of mean force with respect to a set of order parameters. By virtue of the WHAM equations, the unbiased density of state is determined by satisfying a self-consistent condition through an iterative procedure. While the method works very effectively when the number of order parameters is small, its computational cost grows rapidly in higher dimension. Here, we present a simple and efficient alternative strategy, which avoids solving the self-consistent WHAM equations iteratively. An efficient multivariate linear regression framework is utilized to link the biased probability densities of individual umbrella windows and yield an unbiased global free energy landscape in the space of order parameters. It is demonstrated with practical examples that free energy landscapes that are comparable in accuracy to WHAM can be generated at a small fraction of the cost. PMID:26574437

  18. Efficient Determination of Free Energy Landscapes in Multiple Dimensions from Biased Umbrella Sampling Simulations Using Linear Regression.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yilin; Roux, Benoît

    2015-08-11

    The weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) is a standard protocol for postprocessing the information from biased umbrella sampling simulations to construct the potential of mean force with respect to a set of order parameters. By virtue of the WHAM equations, the unbiased density of state is determined by satisfying a self-consistent condition through an iterative procedure. While the method works very effectively when the number of order parameters is small, its computational cost grows rapidly in higher dimension. Here, we present a simple and efficient alternative strategy, which avoids solving the self-consistent WHAM equations iteratively. An efficient multivariate linear regression framework is utilized to link the biased probability densities of individual umbrella windows and yield an unbiased global free energy landscape in the space of order parameters. It is demonstrated with practical examples that free energy landscapes that are comparable in accuracy to WHAM can be generated at a small fraction of the cost.

  19. Tryptophan-47 rotational isomerization in variant-3 scorpion neurotoxin. A combination thermodynamic perturbation and umbrella sampling study.

    PubMed Central

    Haydock, C; Sharp, J C; Prendergast, F G

    1990-01-01

    A combination thermodynamic perturbation and umbrella sampling study predicts two free energy wells for the rotational isomerization of the variant-3 scorpion neurotoxin tryptophan-47 indole side chain. One well has the indole side chain in the crystallographic orientation; the other has the indole rotated approximately 220 degrees to form a new conformation with a relative free energy of 3 +/- 2 kcal/mol. The activation barrier is 8.5 kcal/mol from the crystallographic well, from which transition state theory predicts a rate of escape of 2 x 10(5) s-1. Correlations in the displacements of side chains neighboring tryptophan-47 and the isomerization reaction coordinate last up to 20 ps. Favorable conditions of experimental verification are discussed. PMID:2393708

  20. Conformational analysis of short polar side-chain amino-acids through umbrella sampling and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Javier; Cruz, Victor L

    2016-11-01

    Molecular and quantum mechanics calculations were carried out in a series of tripeptides (GXG, where X = D, N and C) as models of the unfolded states of proteins. The selected central amino acids, especially aspartic acid (D) and asparagine (N) are known to present significant average conformations in partially allowed areas of the Ramachandran plot, which have been suggested to be important in unfolded protein regions. In this report, we present the calculation of the propensity values through an umbrella sampling procedure in combination with the calculation of the NMR J-coupling constants obtained by a DFT model. The experimental NMR observations can be reasonably explained in terms of a conformational distribution where PPII and β basins sum up propensities above 0.9. The conformational analysis of the side chain dihedral angle (χ1), along with the computation of (3)J(H(α)H(β)), revealed a preference for the g - and g + rotamers. These may be connected with the presence of intermolecular H-bonding and carbonyl-carbonyl interactions sampled in the PPII and β basins. Taking into account all those results, it can be established that these residues show a similar behavior to other amino acids in short peptides regarding backbone φ,ψ dihedral angle distribution, in agreement with some experimental analysis of capped dipeptides.

  1. How maltose influences structural changes to bind to maltose-binding protein: results from umbrella sampling simulation.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Nahren Manuel; Kästner, Johannes

    2013-02-01

    A well-studied periplasmic-binding protein involved in the abstraction of maltose is maltose-binding protein (MBP), which undergoes a ligand-induced conformational transition from an open (ligand-free) to a closed (ligand-bound) state. Umbrella sampling simulations have been us to estimate the free energy of binding of maltose to MBP and to trace the potential of mean force of the unbinding event using the center-of-mass distance between the protein and ligand as the reaction coordinate. The free energy thus obtained compares nicely with the experimentally measured value justifying our theoretical basis. Measurement of the domain angle (N-terminal-domain - hinge - C-terminal-domain) along the unbinding pathway established the existence of three different states. Starting from a closed state, the protein shifts to an open conformation during the initial unbinding event of the ligand then resides in a semi-open conformation and later resides predominantly in an open-state. These transitions along the ligand unbinding pathway have been captured in greater depth using principal component analysis. It is proposed that in mixed-model, both conformational selection and an induced-fit mechanism combine to the ligand recognition process in MBP.

  2. Adaptive Sampling Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flournoy, Nancy

    Designs for sequential sampling procedures that adapt to cumulative information are discussed. A familiar illustration is the play-the-winner rule in which there are two treatments; after a random start, the same treatment is continued as long as each successive subject registers a success. When a failure occurs, the other treatment is used until…

  3. Water-mediated conformations of the alanine dipeptide as revealed by distributed umbrella sampling simulations, quantum mechanics based calculations, and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Víctor; Ramos, Javier; Martínez-Salazar, Javier

    2011-04-28

    An exhaustive umbrella sampling simulation of the alanine dipeptide in solution is reported. The presence of stable Y conformations in solution is assessed by both quantum calculations and experimental data from X-ray and NMR protein-solved structures available in the protein coil library. The agreement between experimental and simulation Ramachandran plots of the dipeptide in solution is excellent. A suitable explanation of the stabilization of the Y conformation mediated by water for the alanine dipeptide is discussed on the basis of Car-Parrinello MD calculations of the dipeptide in water.

  4. A dynamic structural model of expanded RNA CAG repeats: a refined X-ray structure and computational investigations using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Disney, Matthew D; Schatz, George C

    2013-03-06

    One class of functionally important RNA is repeating transcripts that cause disease through various mechanisms. For example, expanded CAG repeats can cause Huntington's and other disease through translation of toxic proteins. Herein, a crystal structure of r[5'UUGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, a model of CAG expanded transcripts, refined to 1.65 Å resolution is disclosed that shows both anti-anti and syn-anti orientations for 1 × 1 nucleotide AA internal loops. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using AMBER force field in explicit solvent were run for over 500 ns on the model systems r(5'GCGCAGCGC)2 (MS1) and r(5'CCGCAGCGG)2 (MS2). In these MD simulations, both anti-anti and syn-anti AA base pairs appear to be stable. While anti-anti AA base pairs were dynamic and sampled multiple anti-anti conformations, no syn-anti ↔ anti-anti transformations were observed. Umbrella sampling simulations were run on MS2, and a 2D free energy surface was created to extract transformation pathways. In addition, an explicit solvent MD simulation over 800 ns was run on r[5'GGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, which closely represents the refined crystal structure. One of the terminal AA base pairs (syn-anti conformation), transformed to anti-anti conformation. The pathway followed in this transformation was the one predicted by umbrella sampling simulations. Further analysis showed a binding pocket near AA base pairs in syn-anti conformations. Computational results combined with the refined crystal structure show that global minimum conformation of 1 × 1 nucleotide AA internal loops in r(CAG) repeats is anti-anti but can adopt syn-anti depending on the environment. These results are important to understand RNA dynamic-function relationships and to develop small molecules that target RNA dynamic ensembles.

  5. A dynamic structural model of expanded RNA CAG repeats: A refined X-ray structure and computational investigations using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, Hajeung; Disney, Matthew D.; Schatz, George C.

    2013-01-01

    One class of functionally important RNA is repeating transcripts that cause disease through various mechanisms. For example, expanded r(CAG) repeats can cause Huntington’s and other disease through translation of toxic proteins. Herein, crystal structure of r[5ʹUUGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, a model of CAG expanded transcripts, refined to 1.65 Å resolution is disclosed that show both anti-anti and syn-anti orientations for 1×1 nucleotide AA internal loops. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using Amber force field in explicit solvent were run for over 500 ns on model systems r(5ʹGCGCAGCGC)2 (MS1) and r(5ʹCCGCAGCGG)2 (MS2). In these MD simulations, both anti-anti and syn-anti AA base pairs appear to be stable. While anti-anti AA base pairs were dynamic and sampled multiple anti-anti conformations, no syn-anti↔anti-anti transformations were observed. Umbrella sampling simulations were run on MS2, and a 2D free energy surface was created to extract transformation pathways. In addition, over 800 ns explicit solvent MD simulation was run on r[5ʹGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, which closely represents the refined crystal structure. One of the terminal AA base pairs (syn-anti conformation), transformed to anti-anti conformation. The pathway followed in this transformation was the one predicted by umbrella sampling simulations. Further analysis showed a binding pocket near AA base pairs in syn-anti conformations. Computational results combined with the refined crystal structure show that global minimum conformation of 1×1 nucleotide AA internal loops in r(CAG) repeats is anti-anti but can adopt syn-anti depending on the environment. These results are important to understand RNA dynamic-function relationships and develop small molecules that target RNA dynamic ensembles. PMID:23441937

  6. Adaptive sampling for noisy problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu-Paz, E

    2004-03-26

    The usual approach to deal with noise present in many real-world optimization problems is to take an arbitrary number of samples of the objective function and use the sample average as an estimate of the true objective value. The number of samples is typically chosen arbitrarily and remains constant for the entire optimization process. This paper studies an adaptive sampling technique that varies the number of samples based on the uncertainty of deciding between two individuals. Experiments demonstrate the effect of adaptive sampling on the final solution quality reached by a genetic algorithm and the computational cost required to find the solution. The results suggest that the adaptive technique can effectively eliminate the need to set the sample size a priori, but in many cases it requires high computational costs.

  7. Communication: Estimating the initial biasing potential for λ-local-elevation umbrella-sampling (λ-LEUS) simulations via slow growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, Noah S.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2014-11-28

    In a recent article [Bieler et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3006–3022 (2014)], we introduced a combination of the λ-dynamics (λD) approach for calculating alchemical free-energy differences and of the local-elevation umbrella-sampling (LEUS) memory-based biasing method to enhance the sampling along the alchemical coordinate. The combined scheme, referred to as λ-LEUS, was applied to the perturbation of hydroquinone to benzene in water as a test system, and found to represent an improvement over thermodynamic integration (TI) in terms of sampling efficiency at equivalent accuracy. However, the preoptimization of the biasing potential required in the λ-LEUS method requires “filling up” all the basins in the potential of mean force. This introduces a non-productive pre-sampling time that is system-dependent, and generally exceeds the corresponding equilibration time in a TI calculation. In this letter, a remedy is proposed to this problem, termed the slow growth memory guessing (SGMG) approach. Instead of initializing the biasing potential to zero at the start of the preoptimization, an approximate potential of mean force is estimated from a short slow growth calculation, and its negative used to construct the initial memory. Considering the same test system as in the preceding article, it is shown that of the application of SGMG in λ-LEUS permits to reduce the preoptimization time by about a factor of four.

  8. Communication: Estimating the initial biasing potential for λ-local-elevation umbrella-sampling (λ-LEUS) simulations via slow growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, Noah S.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2014-11-01

    In a recent article [Bieler et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3006-3022 (2014)], we introduced a combination of the λ-dynamics (λD) approach for calculating alchemical free-energy differences and of the local-elevation umbrella-sampling (LEUS) memory-based biasing method to enhance the sampling along the alchemical coordinate. The combined scheme, referred to as λ-LEUS, was applied to the perturbation of hydroquinone to benzene in water as a test system, and found to represent an improvement over thermodynamic integration (TI) in terms of sampling efficiency at equivalent accuracy. However, the preoptimization of the biasing potential required in the λ-LEUS method requires "filling up" all the basins in the potential of mean force. This introduces a non-productive pre-sampling time that is system-dependent, and generally exceeds the corresponding equilibration time in a TI calculation. In this letter, a remedy is proposed to this problem, termed the slow growth memory guessing (SGMG) approach. Instead of initializing the biasing potential to zero at the start of the preoptimization, an approximate potential of mean force is estimated from a short slow growth calculation, and its negative used to construct the initial memory. Considering the same test system as in the preceding article, it is shown that of the application of SGMG in λ-LEUS permits to reduce the preoptimization time by about a factor of four.

  9. Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

    2007-07-09

    We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

  10. Exploring transition pathway and free-energy profile of large-scale protein conformational change by combining normal mode analysis and umbrella sampling molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Xu, Zhijian; Liu, Yingtao; Yang, Zhuo; Cossins, Benjamin P; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-01-09

    Large-scale conformational changes of proteins are usually associated with the binding of ligands. Because the conformational changes are often related to the biological functions of proteins, understanding the molecular mechanisms of these motions and the effects of ligand binding becomes very necessary. In the present study, we use the combination of normal-mode analysis and umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulation to delineate the atomically detailed conformational transition pathways and the associated free-energy landscapes for three well-known protein systems, viz., adenylate kinase (AdK), calmodulin (CaM), and p38α kinase in the absence and presence of respective ligands. For each protein under study, the transient conformations along the conformational transition pathway and thermodynamic observables are in agreement with experimentally and computationally determined ones. The calculated free-energy profiles reveal that AdK and CaM are intrinsically flexible in structures without obvious energy barrier, and their ligand binding shifts the equilibrium from the ligand-free to ligand-bound conformation (population shift mechanism). In contrast, the ligand binding to p38α leads to a large change in free-energy barrier (ΔΔG ≈ 7 kcal/mol), promoting the transition from DFG-in to DFG-out conformation (induced fit mechanism). Moreover, the effect of the protonation of D168 on the conformational change of p38α is also studied, which reduces the free-energy difference between the two functional states of p38α and thus further facilitates the conformational interconversion. Therefore, the present study suggests that the detailed mechanism of ligand binding and the associated conformational transition is not uniform for all kinds of proteins but correlated to their respective biological functions.

  11. Efficient parallel implementations of QM/MM-REMD (quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics-replica-exchange MD) and umbrella sampling: isomerization of H2O2 in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Dmitri G; Sugita, Yuji; Choi, Cheol Ho

    2013-07-03

    An efficient parallel implementation of QM/MM-based replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) as well as umbrella samplings techniques was proposed by adopting the generalized distributed data interface (GDDI). Parallelization speed-up of 40.5 on 48 cores was achieved, making our QM/MM-MD engine a robust tool for studying complex chemical dynamics in solution. They were comparatively used to study the torsional isomerization of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution. All results by QM/MM-REMD and QM/MM umbrella sampling techniques yielded nearly identical potentials of mean force (PMFs) regardless of the particular QM theories for solute, showing that the overall dynamics are mainly determined by solvation. Although the entropic penalty of solvent rearrangements exists in cisoid conformers, it was found that both strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding and dipole-dipole interactions preferentially stabilize them in solution, reducing the torsional free-energy barrier at 0° by about 3 kcal/mol as compared to that in gas phase.

  12. Adaptive sampling in convergent beams.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Julián; Mas, David; Pérez, Jorge; Illueca, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    Numerical calculation of convergent Fresnel patterns through fast Fourier transform usually requires a large number of samples to fulfill the Nyquist sampling condition around the focus. From polynomial decomposition of the wavefront it is possible to determine which polynomial orders are the main contributors to the number of samples. This information can be used to properly modify the initial wavefront and relax the Nyquist condition thus giving a more efficient numerical algorithm.

  13. New clinical research strategies in thoracic oncology: clinical trial design, adaptive, basket and umbrella trials, new end-points and new evaluations of response.

    PubMed

    Menis, Jessica; Hasan, Baktiar; Besse, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    In the genomics era, our main goal should be to identify large and meaningful differences in small, molecularly selected groups of patients. Classical phase I, II and III models for drug development require large resources, limiting the number of experimental agents that can be tested and making the evaluation of targeted agents inefficient. There is an urgent need to streamline the development of new compounds, with the aim of identifying "trials designed to learn", which could lead to subsequent "trials designed to conclude". Basket trials are often viewed as parallel phase II trials within the same entity, designed on the basis of a common denominator, which can be a molecular alteration(s). Most basket trials are histology-independent and aberration-specific clinical trials. Umbrella trials are built on a centrally performed molecular portrait and molecularly selected cohorts with matched drugs, and can include patients' randomisation and strategy validation. Beyond new designs, new end-points and new evaluation techniques are also warranted to finally achieve methodology and clinical improvements, in particular within immunotherapy trials.

  14. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Castle, Joseph P.; Lvov, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    The following concepts were introduced: a) Bayesian adaptive sampling for solving biomass estimation; b) Characterization of MISR Rahman model parameters conditioned upon MODIS landcover. c) Rigorous non-parametric Bayesian approach to analytic mixture model determination. d) Unique U.S. asset for science product validation and verification.

  15. Adaptive down-sampling video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ren-Jie; Chien, Ming-Chen; Chang, Pao-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Down-sampling coding, which sub-samples the image and encodes the smaller sized images, is one of the solutions to raise the image quality at insufficiently high rates. In this work, we propose an Adaptive Down-Sampling (ADS) coding for H.264/AVC. The overall system distortion can be analyzed as the sum of the down-sampling distortion and the coding distortion. The down-sampling distortion is mainly the loss of the high frequency components that is highly dependent of the spatial difference. The coding distortion can be derived from the classical Rate-Distortion theory. For a given rate and a video sequence, the optimum down-sampling resolution-ratio can be derived by utilizing the optimum theory toward minimizing the system distortion based on the models of the two distortions. This optimal resolution-ratio is used in both down-sampling and up-sampling processes in ADS coding scheme. As a result, the rate-distortion performance of ADS coding is always higher than the fixed ratio coding or H.264/AVC by 2 to 4 dB at low to medium rates.

  16. Stepwise two-stage sample size adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hong; Ellenberg, Susan S; Anderson, Keaven M

    2015-01-15

    Several adaptive design methods have been proposed to reestimate sample size using the observed treatment effect after an initial stage of a clinical trial while preserving the overall type I error at the time of the final analysis. One unfortunate property of the algorithms used in some methods is that they can be inverted to reveal the exact treatment effect at the interim analysis. We propose using a step function with an inverted U-shape of observed treatment difference for sample size reestimation to lessen the information on treatment effect revealed. This will be referred to as stepwise two-stage sample size adaptation. This method applies calculation methods used for group sequential designs. We minimize expected sample size among a class of these designs and compare efficiency with the fully optimized two-stage design, optimal two-stage group sequential design, and designs based on promising conditional power. The trade-off between efficiency versus the improved blinding of the interim treatment effect will be discussed.

  17. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning. PMID:27150131

  18. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, K.; Knuth, K.; Castle, P.

    2005-12-01

    Typical estimates of standing wood derived from remote sensing sources take advantage of aggregate measurements of canopy heights (e.g. LIDAR) and canopy diameters (segmentation of IKONOS imagery) to obtain a wood volume estimate by assuming homogeneous species and a fixed function that returns volume. The validation of such techniques use manually measured diameter at breast height records (DBH). Our goal is to improve the accuracy and applicability of biomass estimation methods to heterogeneous forests and transitional areas. We are developing estimates with quantifiable uncertainty using a new form of estimation function, active sampling, and volumetric reconstruction image rendering for species specific mass truth. Initially we are developing a Bayesian adaptive sampling method for BRDF associated with the MISR Rahman model with respect to categorical biomes. This involves characterizing the probability distributions of the 3 free parameters of the Rahman model for the 6 categories of biomes used by MISR. Subsequently, these distributions can be used to determine the optimal sampling methodology to distinguish biomes during acquisition. We have a remotely controlled semi-autonomous helicopter that has stereo imaging, lidar, differential GPS, and spectrometers covering wavelengths from visible to NIR. We intend to automatically vary the way points of the flight path via the Bayesian adaptive sampling method. The second critical part of this work is in automating the validation of biomass estimates via using machine vision techniques. This involves taking 2-D pictures of trees of known species, and then via Bayesian techniques, reconstructing 3-D models of the trees to estimate the distribution moments associated with wood volume. Similar techniques have been developed by the medical imaging community. This then provides probability distributions conditional upon species. The final part of this work is in relating the BRDF actively sampled measurements to species

  19. Adaptive spatial sampling of contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L.A. Jr.

    1999-12-01

    Suppose that a residential neighborhood may have been contaminated by a nearby abandoned hazardous waste site. The suspected contamination consists of elevated soil concentrations o chemicals that are also found in the absence of site-related contamination. How should a risk manager decide which residential properties to sample and which ones to clean? This paper introduces an adaptive spatial sampling approach which uses initial observations to guide subsequent search. Unlike some recent model-based spatial data analysis methods, it does not require any specific statistical model for the spatial distribution of hazards, but instead constructs an increasingly accurate nonparametric approximation to it as sampling proceeds. Possible cost-effective sampling and cleanup decision rules are described by decision parameters such as the number of randomly selected locations used to initialize the process, the number of highest-concentration locations searched around, the number of samples taken at each location, a stopping rule, and a remediation action threshold. These decision parameters are optimized by simulating the performance of each decision rule. The simulation is performed using the data collected so far to impute multiple probably values of unknown soil concentration distributions during each simulation run.

  20. HASE - The Helsinki adaptive sample preparation line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palonen, V.; Pesonen, A.; Herranen, T.; Tikkanen, P.; Oinonen, M.

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and built an adaptive sample preparation line with separate modules for combustion, molecular sieve handling, CO2 gas cleaning, CO2 storage, and graphitization. The line is also connected to an elemental analyzer. Operation of the vacuum equipment, a flow controller, pressure sensors, ovens, and graphitization reactors are automated with a reliable NI-cRIO real-time system. Stepped combustion can be performed in two ovens at temperatures up to 900 °C. Depending on the application, CuO or O2-flow combustion can be used. A flow controller is used to adjust the O2 flow and pressure during combustion. For environmental samples, a module for molecular sieve regeneration and sample desorption is attached to the line replacing the combustion module. In the storage module, CO2 samples can be stored behind a gas-tight diaphragm valve and either stored for later graphitization or taken for measurements with separate equipment (AMS gas ion source or a separate mass spectrometer). The graphitization module consists of four automated reactors, capable of graphitizing samples with masses from 3 mg down to 50 μg.

  1. Adaptive Metropolis Sampling with Product Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Lee, Chiu Fan

    2005-01-01

    The Metropolis-Hastings (MH) algorithm is a way to sample a provided target distribution pi(z). It works by repeatedly sampling a separate proposal distribution T(x,x') to generate a random walk {x(t)}. We consider a modification of the MH algorithm in which T is dynamically updated during the walk. The update at time t uses the {x(t' less than t)} to estimate the product distribution that has the least Kullback-Leibler distance to pi. That estimate is the information-theoretically optimal mean-field approximation to pi. We demonstrate through computer experiments that our algorithm produces samples that are superior to those of the conventional MH algorithm.

  2. Adaptive Importance Sampling for Control and Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappen, H. J.; Ruiz, H. C.

    2016-03-01

    Path integral (PI) control problems are a restricted class of non-linear control problems that can be solved formally as a Feynman-Kac PI and can be estimated using Monte Carlo sampling. In this contribution we review PI control theory in the finite horizon case. We subsequently focus on the problem how to compute and represent control solutions. We review the most commonly used methods in robotics and control. Within the PI theory, the question of how to compute becomes the question of importance sampling. Efficient importance samplers are state feedback controllers and the use of these requires an efficient representation. Learning and representing effective state-feedback controllers for non-linear stochastic control problems is a very challenging, and largely unsolved, problem. We show how to learn and represent such controllers using ideas from the cross entropy method. We derive a gradient descent method that allows to learn feed-back controllers using an arbitrary parametrisation. We refer to this method as the path integral cross entropy method or PICE. We illustrate this method for some simple examples. The PI control methods can be used to estimate the posterior distribution in latent state models. In neuroscience these problems arise when estimating connectivity from neural recording data using EM. We demonstrate the PI control method as an accurate alternative to particle filtering.

  3. Umbrella integration in two or more reaction coordinates.

    PubMed

    Kästner, Johannes

    2009-07-21

    Umbrella integration is a method to analyze umbrella sampling simulations by calculating and integrating the mean force. Here, the method is extended to multidimensional reaction coordinates. Approximation of the probability distribution obtained from sampling by a multivariate normal distribution allows to calculate the mean force from the average and the covariance matrix of the reaction coordinate. Integration schemes of the free-energy gradient field are discussed. Integration on a real-space grid is compared to expansion of the gradient in a series of analytic functions (such as a Fourier analysis), which can be integrated, and the expansion of the gradient only at the window means in a series of analytic functions. The Fourier analysis was found particularly useful for periodic reaction coordinates, such as torsion angles. An expression is provided to calculate the Hessian of the free energy with respect to the reaction coordinates from sampling data. The utility of the method is demonstrated at the example of the free-energy surface of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum calculated with respect to the backbone torsion angles Phi and Psi. Relevance of the Jacobian term for non-Cartesian reaction coordinates is discussed.

  4. Two-stage sequential sampling: A neighborhood-free adaptive sampling procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salehi, M.; Smith, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    Designing an efficient sampling scheme for a rare and clustered population is a challenging area of research. Adaptive cluster sampling, which has been shown to be viable for such a population, is based on sampling a neighborhood of units around a unit that meets a specified condition. However, the edge units produced by sampling neighborhoods have proven to limit the efficiency and applicability of adaptive cluster sampling. We propose a sampling design that is adaptive in the sense that the final sample depends on observed values, but it avoids the use of neighborhoods and the sampling of edge units. Unbiased estimators of population total and its variance are derived using Murthy's estimator. The modified two-stage sampling design is easy to implement and can be applied to a wider range of populations than adaptive cluster sampling. We evaluate the proposed sampling design by simulating sampling of two real biological populations and an artificial population for which the variable of interest took the value either 0 or 1 (e.g., indicating presence and absence of a rare event). We show that the proposed sampling design is more efficient than conventional sampling in nearly all cases. The approach used to derive estimators (Murthy's estimator) opens the door for unbiased estimators to be found for similar sequential sampling designs. ?? 2005 American Statistical Association and the International Biometric Society.

  5. Bayesian approaches for adaptive spatial sampling : an example application.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. L.; LePoire, D.; Huttenga, A.; Quinn, J.

    2005-05-25

    BAASS (Bayesian Approaches for Adaptive Spatial Sampling) is a set of computational routines developed to support the design and deployment of spatial sampling programs for delineating contamination footprints, such as those that might result from the accidental or intentional environmental release of radionuclides. BAASS presumes the existence of real-time measurement technologies that provide information quickly enough to affect the progress of data collection. This technical memorandum describes the application of BAASS to a simple example, compares the performance of a BAASS-based program with that of a traditional gridded program, and explores the significance of several of the underlying assumptions required by BAASS. These assumptions include the range of spatial autocorrelation present, the value of prior information, the confidence level required for decision making, and ''inside-out'' versus ''outside-in'' sampling strategies. In the context of the example, adaptive sampling combined with prior information significantly reduced the number of samples required to delineate the contamination footprint.

  6. Adaptive Sampling for High Throughput Data Using Similarity Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Sales, A. P.

    2015-05-06

    The need for adaptive sampling arises in the context of high throughput data because the rates of data arrival are many orders of magnitude larger than the rates at which they can be analyzed. A very fast decision must therefore be made regarding the value of each incoming observation and its inclusion in the analysis. In this report we discuss one approach to adaptive sampling, based on the new data point’s similarity to the other data points being considered for inclusion. We present preliminary results for one real and one synthetic data set.

  7. Node Based Adaptive Sampling and Advanced AUV Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    is to develop and refine node based adaptive sampling and hovering technology using FAU Morpheus vehicle as a test platform. The former one is a...included two days of testing with a “dummy” vehicle followed by two days of testing with the real Morpheus . The initial tests were done with the dummy...vehicle because the Morpheus was unavailable for docking experiments at the time. These tests were conducted in order to get a better sense of

  8. Node Based Adaptive Sampling and Advanced AUV Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    is to develop and refine node based adaptive sampling and hovering technology using FAU Morpheus vehicle as a test platform. The former one is a...dummy” vehicle followed by two days of testing with the real Morpheus . The initial tests were done with the dummy vehicle because the Morpheus was... Morpheus when it became available. The dummy vehicle was constructed from empty Morpheus modules with weight placed inside each at a calculated

  9. Adaptive Sampling Algorithms for Probabilistic Risk Assessment of Nuclear Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Diego Mandelli; Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear simulations are often computationally expensive, time-consuming, and high-dimensional with respect to the number of input parameters. Thus exploring the space of all possible simulation outcomes is infeasible using finite computing resources. During simulation-based probabilistic risk analysis, it is important to discover the relationship between a potentially large number of input parameters and the output of a simulation using as few simulation trials as possible. This is a typical context for performing adaptive sampling where a few observations are obtained from the simulation, a surrogate model is built to represent the simulation space, and new samples are selected based on the model constructed. The surrogate model is then updated based on the simulation results of the sampled points. In this way, we attempt to gain the most information possible with a small number of carefully selected sampled points, limiting the number of expensive trials needed to understand features of the simulation space. We analyze the specific use case of identifying the limit surface, i.e., the boundaries in the simulation space between system failure and system success. In this study, we explore several techniques for adaptively sampling the parameter space in order to reconstruct the limit surface. We focus on several adaptive sampling schemes. First, we seek to learn a global model of the entire simulation space using prediction models or neighborhood graphs and extract the limit surface as an iso-surface of the global model. Second, we estimate the limit surface by sampling in the neighborhood of the current estimate based on topological segmentations obtained locally. Our techniques draw inspirations from topological structure known as the Morse-Smale complex. We highlight the advantages and disadvantages of using a global prediction model versus local topological view of the simulation space, comparing several different strategies for adaptive sampling in both

  10. Adaptive Sampling of Time Series During Remote Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the challenge of online adaptive data collection in a time series. A remote sensor or explorer agent adapts its rate of data collection in order to track anomalous events while obeying constraints on time and power. This problem is challenging because the agent has limited visibility (all its datapoints lie in the past) and limited control (it can only decide when to collect its next datapoint). This problem is treated from an information-theoretic perspective, fitting a probabilistic model to collected data and optimizing the future sampling strategy to maximize information gain. The performance characteristics of stationary and nonstationary Gaussian process models are compared. Self-throttling sensors could benefit environmental sensor networks and monitoring as well as robotic exploration. Explorer agents can improve performance by adjusting their data collection rate, preserving scarce power or bandwidth resources during uninteresting times while fully covering anomalous events of interest. For example, a remote earthquake sensor could conserve power by limiting its measurements during normal conditions and increasing its cadence during rare earthquake events. A similar capability could improve sensor platforms traversing a fixed trajectory, such as an exploration rover transect or a deep space flyby. These agents can adapt observation times to improve sample coverage during moments of rapid change. An adaptive sampling approach couples sensor autonomy, instrument interpretation, and sampling. The challenge is addressed as an active learning problem, which already has extensive theoretical treatment in the statistics and machine learning literature. A statistical Gaussian process (GP) model is employed to guide sample decisions that maximize information gain. Nonsta tion - ary (e.g., time-varying) covariance relationships permit the system to represent and track local anomalies, in contrast with current GP approaches. Most common GP models

  11. Distributed database kriging for adaptive sampling (D²KAS)

    DOE PAGES

    Roehm, Dominic; Pavel, Robert S.; Barros, Kipton; ...

    2015-03-18

    We present an adaptive sampling method supplemented by a distributed database and a prediction method for multiscale simulations using the Heterogeneous Multiscale Method. A finite-volume scheme integrates the macro-scale conservation laws for elastodynamics, which are closed by momentum and energy fluxes evaluated at the micro-scale. In the original approach, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are launched for every macro-scale volume element. Our adaptive sampling scheme replaces a large fraction of costly micro-scale MD simulations with fast table lookup and prediction. The cloud database Redis provides the plain table lookup, and with locality aware hashing we gather input data for our predictionmore » scheme. For the latter we use kriging, which estimates an unknown value and its uncertainty (error) at a specific location in parameter space by using weighted averages of the neighboring points. We find that our adaptive scheme significantly improves simulation performance by a factor of 2.5 to 25, while retaining high accuracy for various choices of the algorithm parameters.« less

  12. Learning Adaptive Forecasting Models from Irregularly Sampled Multivariate Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zitao; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2016-02-01

    Building accurate predictive models of clinical multivariate time series is crucial for understanding of the patient condition, the dynamics of a disease, and clinical decision making. A challenging aspect of this process is that the model should be flexible and adaptive to reflect well patient-specific temporal behaviors and this also in the case when the available patient-specific data are sparse and short span. To address this problem we propose and develop an adaptive two-stage forecasting approach for modeling multivariate, irregularly sampled clinical time series of varying lengths. The proposed model (1) learns the population trend from a collection of time series for past patients; (2) captures individual-specific short-term multivariate variability; and (3) adapts by automatically adjusting its predictions based on new observations. The proposed forecasting model is evaluated on a real-world clinical time series dataset. The results demonstrate the benefits of our approach on the prediction tasks for multivariate, irregularly sampled clinical time series, and show that it can outperform both the population based and patient-specific time series prediction models in terms of prediction accuracy.

  13. Learning Adaptive Forecasting Models from Irregularly Sampled Multivariate Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zitao; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Building accurate predictive models of clinical multivariate time series is crucial for understanding of the patient condition, the dynamics of a disease, and clinical decision making. A challenging aspect of this process is that the model should be flexible and adaptive to reflect well patient-specific temporal behaviors and this also in the case when the available patient-specific data are sparse and short span. To address this problem we propose and develop an adaptive two-stage forecasting approach for modeling multivariate, irregularly sampled clinical time series of varying lengths. The proposed model (1) learns the population trend from a collection of time series for past patients; (2) captures individual-specific short-term multivariate variability; and (3) adapts by automatically adjusting its predictions based on new observations. The proposed forecasting model is evaluated on a real-world clinical time series dataset. The results demonstrate the benefits of our approach on the prediction tasks for multivariate, irregularly sampled clinical time series, and show that it can outperform both the population based and patient-specific time series prediction models in terms of prediction accuracy. PMID:27525189

  14. Distributed Database Kriging for Adaptive Sampling (D2 KAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehm, Dominic; Pavel, Robert S.; Barros, Kipton; Rouet-Leduc, Bertrand; McPherson, Allen L.; Germann, Timothy C.; Junghans, Christoph

    2015-07-01

    We present an adaptive sampling method supplemented by a distributed database and a prediction method for multiscale simulations using the Heterogeneous Multiscale Method. A finite-volume scheme integrates the macro-scale conservation laws for elastodynamics, which are closed by momentum and energy fluxes evaluated at the micro-scale. In the original approach, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are launched for every macro-scale volume element. Our adaptive sampling scheme replaces a large fraction of costly micro-scale MD simulations with fast table lookup and prediction. The cloud database Redis provides the plain table lookup, and with locality aware hashing we gather input data for our prediction scheme. For the latter we use kriging, which estimates an unknown value and its uncertainty (error) at a specific location in parameter space by using weighted averages of the neighboring points. We find that our adaptive scheme significantly improves simulation performance by a factor of 2.5-25, while retaining high accuracy for various choices of the algorithm parameters.

  15. Distributed database kriging for adaptive sampling (D²KAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Roehm, Dominic; Pavel, Robert S.; Barros, Kipton; Rouet-Leduc, Bertrand; McPherson, Allen L.; Germann, Timothy C.; Junghans, Christoph

    2015-03-18

    We present an adaptive sampling method supplemented by a distributed database and a prediction method for multiscale simulations using the Heterogeneous Multiscale Method. A finite-volume scheme integrates the macro-scale conservation laws for elastodynamics, which are closed by momentum and energy fluxes evaluated at the micro-scale. In the original approach, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are launched for every macro-scale volume element. Our adaptive sampling scheme replaces a large fraction of costly micro-scale MD simulations with fast table lookup and prediction. The cloud database Redis provides the plain table lookup, and with locality aware hashing we gather input data for our prediction scheme. For the latter we use kriging, which estimates an unknown value and its uncertainty (error) at a specific location in parameter space by using weighted averages of the neighboring points. We find that our adaptive scheme significantly improves simulation performance by a factor of 2.5 to 25, while retaining high accuracy for various choices of the algorithm parameters.

  16. Adaptive sampling for learning gaussian processes using mobile sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunfei; Choi, Jongeun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel class of self-organizing sensing agents that adaptively learn an anisotropic, spatio-temporal gaussian process using noisy measurements and move in order to improve the quality of the estimated covariance function. This approach is based on a class of anisotropic covariance functions of gaussian processes introduced to model a broad range of spatio-temporal physical phenomena. The covariance function is assumed to be unknown a priori. Hence, it is estimated by the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimator. The prediction of the field of interest is then obtained based on the MAP estimate of the covariance function. An optimal sampling strategy is proposed to minimize the information-theoretic cost function of the Fisher Information Matrix. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and the adaptability of the proposed scheme.

  17. Improving Wang-Landau sampling with adaptive windows.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Netto, A G; Caparica, A A; Tsai, Shan-Ho; Dickman, Ronald; Landau, D P

    2008-11-01

    Wang-Landau sampling (WLS) of large systems requires dividing the energy range into "windows" and joining the results of simulations in each window. The resulting density of states (and associated thermodynamic functions) is shown to suffer from boundary effects in simulations of lattice polymers and the five-state Potts model. Here, we implement WLS using adaptive windows. Instead of defining fixed energy windows (or windows in the energy-magnetization plane for the Potts model), the boundary positions depend on the set of energy values on which the histogram is flat at a given stage of the simulation. Shifting the windows each time the modification factor f is reduced, we eliminate border effects that arise in simulations using fixed windows. Adaptive windows extend significantly the range of system sizes that may be studied reliably using WLS.

  18. Improving Wang-Landau sampling with adaptive windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Netto, A. G.; Caparica, A. A.; Tsai, Shan-Ho; Dickman, Ronald; Landau, D. P.

    2008-11-01

    Wang-Landau sampling (WLS) of large systems requires dividing the energy range into “windows” and joining the results of simulations in each window. The resulting density of states (and associated thermodynamic functions) is shown to suffer from boundary effects in simulations of lattice polymers and the five-state Potts model. Here, we implement WLS using adaptive windows. Instead of defining fixed energy windows (or windows in the energy-magnetization plane for the Potts model), the boundary positions depend on the set of energy values on which the histogram is flat at a given stage of the simulation. Shifting the windows each time the modification factor f is reduced, we eliminate border effects that arise in simulations using fixed windows. Adaptive windows extend significantly the range of system sizes that may be studied reliably using WLS.

  19. Adaptive Sampling for Learning Gaussian Processes Using Mobile Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunfei; Choi, Jongeun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel class of self-organizing sensing agents that adaptively learn an anisotropic, spatio-temporal Gaussian process using noisy measurements and move in order to improve the quality of the estimated covariance function. This approach is based on a class of anisotropic covariance functions of Gaussian processes introduced to model a broad range of spatio-temporal physical phenomena. The covariance function is assumed to be unknown a priori. Hence, it is estimated by the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimator. The prediction of the field of interest is then obtained based on the MAP estimate of the covariance function. An optimal sampling strategy is proposed to minimize the information-theoretic cost function of the Fisher Information Matrix. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and the adaptability of the proposed scheme. PMID:22163785

  20. Ascending serotonin neuron diversity under two umbrellas.

    PubMed

    Commons, Kathryn G

    2016-09-01

    Forebrain serotonin relevant for many psychological disorders arises in the hindbrain, primarily within the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MR). These nuclei are heterogeneous, containing several distinct groups of serotonin neurons. Here, new insight into the afferent and efferent connectivity of these areas is reviewed in correlation with their developmental origin. These data suggest that the caudal third of the DR, the area originally designated B6, may be misidentified as part of the DR as it shares many features of connectivity with the MR. By considering the rostral DR independently and affiliating the B6 to the MR, the diverse subgroups of serotonin neurons can be arranged with more coherence into two umbrella groups, each with distinctive domains of influence. Serotonin neurons within the rostral DR are uniquely interconnected with brain areas associated with emotion and motivation such as the amygdala, accumbens and ventral pallidum. In contrast serotonin neurons in the B6 and MR are characterized by their dominion over the septum and hippocampus. This distinction between the DR and B6/MR parallels their developmental origin and likely impacts their role in both behavior and psychopathology. Implications and further subdivisions within these areas are discussed.

  1. Peace umbrella, a vague policy and checkered past. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Biszak, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    With the break-up of the former Soviet Union, the United Nations Security Council enjoyed a greater consensus among its members in confronting aggression and participation in humanitarian and peace operations. Deploying significant military forces under the peace umbrella at the beginning of this decade was highly unlikely. However, since 1990, 25 deployments have been conducted with the majority falling under the peace umbrella. This paper analyzes current national and military strategy in regards to the peace umbrella, specifically peace enforcement, military doctrine, and the case of Somalia. In addition, this paper looks at doctrine and directives that currently guide deployment of forces and the potential for future peace operations.

  2. Effect of imperfect detectability on adaptive and conventional sampling: Simulated sampling of freshwater mussels in the upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.R.; Gray, B.R.; Newton, T.J.; Nichols, D.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive sampling designs are recommended where, as is typical with freshwater mussels, the outcome of interest is rare and clustered. However, the performance of adaptive designs has not been investigated when outcomes are not only rare and clustered but also imperfectly detected. We address this combination of challenges using data simulated to mimic properties of freshwater mussels from a reach of the upper Mississippi River. Simulations were conducted under a range of sample sizes and detection probabilities. Under perfect detection, efficiency of the adaptive sampling design increased relative to the conventional design as sample size increased and as density decreased. Also, the probability of sampling occupied habitat was four times higher for adaptive than conventional sampling of the lowest density population examined. However, imperfect detection resulted in substantial biases in sample means and variances under both adaptive sampling and conventional designs. The efficiency of adaptive sampling declined with decreasing detectability. Also, the probability of encountering an occupied unit during adaptive sampling, relative to conventional sampling declined with decreasing detectability. Thus, the potential gains in the application of adaptive sampling to rare and clustered populations relative to conventional sampling are reduced when detection is imperfect. The results highlight the need to increase or estimate detection to improve performance of conventional and adaptive sampling designs.

  3. Effect of imperfect detectability on adaptive and conventional sampling: simulated sampling of freshwater mussels in the upper Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Smith, David R; Gray, Brian R; Newton, Teresa J; Nichols, Doug

    2010-11-01

    Adaptive sampling designs are recommended where, as is typical with freshwater mussels, the outcome of interest is rare and clustered. However, the performance of adaptive designs has not been investigated when outcomes are not only rare and clustered but also imperfectly detected. We address this combination of challenges using data simulated to mimic properties of freshwater mussels from a reach of the upper Mississippi River. Simulations were conducted under a range of sample sizes and detection probabilities. Under perfect detection, efficiency of the adaptive sampling design increased relative to the conventional design as sample size increased and as density decreased. Also, the probability of sampling occupied habitat was four times higher for adaptive than conventional sampling of the lowest density population examined. However, imperfect detection resulted in substantial biases in sample means and variances under both adaptive sampling and conventional designs. The efficiency of adaptive sampling declined with decreasing detectability. Also, the probability of encountering an occupied unit during adaptive sampling, relative to conventional sampling declined with decreasing detectability. Thus, the potential gains in the application of adaptive sampling to rare and clustered populations relative to conventional sampling are reduced when detection is imperfect. The results highlight the need to increase or estimate detection to improve performance of conventional and adaptive sampling designs.

  4. Elucidating Microbial Adaptation Dynamics via Autonomous Exposure and Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grace, Joseph M.; Verseux, Cyprien; Gentry, Diana; Moffet, Amy; Thayabaran, Ramanen; Wong, Nathan; Rothschild, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation of micro-organisms to their environments is a complex process of interaction between the pressures of the environment and of competition. Reducing this multifactorial process to environmental exposure in the laboratory is a common tool for elucidating individual mechanisms of evolution, such as mutation rates. Although such studies inform fundamental questions about the way adaptation and even speciation occur, they are often limited by labor-intensive manual techniques. Current methods for controlled study of microbial adaptation limit the length of time, the depth of collected data, and the breadth of applied environmental conditions. Small idiosyncrasies in manual techniques can have large effects on outcomes; for example, there are significant variations in induced radiation resistances following similar repeated exposure protocols. We describe here a project under development to allow rapid cycling of multiple types of microbial environmental exposure. The system allows continuous autonomous monitoring and data collection of both single species and sampled communities, independently and concurrently providing multiple types of controlled environmental pressure (temperature, radiation, chemical presence or absence, and so on) to a microbial community in dynamic response to the ecosystem's current status. When combined with DNA sequencing and extraction, such a controlled environment can cast light on microbial functional development, population dynamics, inter- and intra-species competition, and microbe-environment interaction. The project's goal is to allow rapid, repeatable iteration of studies of both natural and artificial microbial adaptation. As an example, the same system can be used both to increase the pH of a wet soil aliquot over time while periodically sampling it for genetic activity analysis, or to repeatedly expose a culture of bacteria to the presence of a toxic metal, automatically adjusting the level of toxicity based on the

  5. Elucidating Microbial Adaptation Dynamics via Autonomous Exposure and Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, J. M.; Verseux, C.; Gentry, D.; Moffet, A.; Thayabaran, R.; Wong, N.; Rothschild, L.

    2013-12-01

    The adaptation of micro-organisms to their environments is a complex process of interaction between the pressures of the environment and of competition. Reducing this multifactorial process to environmental exposure in the laboratory is a common tool for elucidating individual mechanisms of evolution, such as mutation rates[Wielgoss et al., 2013]. Although such studies inform fundamental questions about the way adaptation and even speciation occur, they are often limited by labor-intensive manual techniques[Wassmann et al., 2010]. Current methods for controlled study of microbial adaptation limit the length of time, the depth of collected data, and the breadth of applied environmental conditions. Small idiosyncrasies in manual techniques can have large effects on outcomes; for example, there are significant variations in induced radiation resistances following similar repeated exposure protocols[Alcántara-Díaz et al., 2004; Goldman and Travisano, 2011]. We describe here a project under development to allow rapid cycling of multiple types of microbial environmental exposure. The system allows continuous autonomous monitoring and data collection of both single species and sampled communities, independently and concurrently providing multiple types of controlled environmental pressure (temperature, radiation, chemical presence or absence, and so on) to a microbial community in dynamic response to the ecosystem's current status. When combined with DNA sequencing and extraction, such a controlled environment can cast light on microbial functional development, population dynamics, inter- and intra-species competition, and microbe-environment interaction. The project's goal is to allow rapid, repeatable iteration of studies of both natural and artificial microbial adaptation. As an example, the same system can be used both to increase the pH of a wet soil aliquot over time while periodically sampling it for genetic activity analysis, or to repeatedly expose a culture of

  6. Robust online tracking via adaptive samples selection with saliency detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jia; Chen, Xi; Zhu, QiuPing

    2013-12-01

    Online tracking has shown to be successful in tracking of previously unknown objects. However, there are two important factors which lead to drift problem of online tracking, the one is how to select the exact labeled samples even when the target locations are inaccurate, and the other is how to handle the confusors which have similar features with the target. In this article, we propose a robust online tracking algorithm with adaptive samples selection based on saliency detection to overcome the drift problem. To deal with the problem of degrading the classifiers using mis-aligned samples, we introduce the saliency detection method to our tracking problem. Saliency maps and the strong classifiers are combined to extract the most correct positive samples. Our approach employs a simple yet saliency detection algorithm based on image spectral residual analysis. Furthermore, instead of using the random patches as the negative samples, we propose a reasonable selection criterion, in which both the saliency confidence and similarity are considered with the benefits that confusors in the surrounding background are incorporated into the classifiers update process before the drift occurs. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via online boosting framework. Experiment results in several challenging video sequences demonstrate the accuracy and stability of our tracker.

  7. 18. SAND BEACH WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. SAND BEACH WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. NORTHWEST ELEVATION OF REFRESHMENT STAND Photocopy of 1930-1940 photograph - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

  8. Sample-adaptive-prediction for HEVC SCC intra coding with ridge estimation from spatially neighboring samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Je-Won; Ryu, Soo-Kyung

    2017-02-01

    In this paper a sample-adaptive prediction technique is proposed to yield efficient coding performance in an intracoding for screen content video coding. The sample-based prediction is to reduce spatial redundancies in neighboring samples. To this aim, the proposed technique uses a weighted linear combination of neighboring samples and applies the robust optimization technique, namely, ridge estimation to derive the weights in a decoder side. The ridge estimation uses L2 norm based regularization term, and, thus the solution is more robust to high variance samples such as in sharp edges and high color contrasts exhibited in screen content videos. It is demonstrated with the experimental results that the proposed technique provides an improved coding gain as compared to the HEVC screen content video coding reference software.

  9. Structured estimation - Sample size reduction for adaptive pattern classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgera, S.; Cooper, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    The Gaussian two-category classification problem with known category mean value vectors and identical but unknown category covariance matrices is considered. The weight vector depends on the unknown common covariance matrix, so the procedure is to estimate the covariance matrix in order to obtain an estimate of the optimum weight vector. The measure of performance for the adapted classifier is the output signal-to-interference noise ratio (SIR). A simple approximation for the expected SIR is gained by using the general sample covariance matrix estimator; this performance is both signal and true covariance matrix independent. An approximation is also found for the expected SIR obtained by using a Toeplitz form covariance matrix estimator; this performance is found to be dependent on both the signal and the true covariance matrix.

  10. Under the Whole Language Umbrella: Many Cultures, Many Voices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flurkey, Alan D., Ed.; Meyer, Richard J., Ed.

    Originally presented at the second annual Whole Language Umbrella Conference, the 18 essays in this book address the three related themes of identity, responsibility, and practice. The essays in the book discuss how whole language is defined, and how its practitioners come to define themselves; how whole language teachers act upon their identities…

  11. Reflective Practice in Healthcare Education: An Umbrella Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fragkos, Konstantinos C.

    2016-01-01

    Reflection in healthcare education is an emerging topic with many recently published studies and reviews. This current systematic review of reviews (umbrella review) of this field explores the following aspects: which definitions and models are currently in use; how reflection impacts design, evaluation, and assessment; and what future challenges…

  12. An adaptive two-stage sequential design for sampling rare and clustered populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.A.; Salehi, M.M.; Moradi, M.; Bell, G.; Smith, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    How to design an efficient large-area survey continues to be an interesting question for ecologists. In sampling large areas, as is common in environmental studies, adaptive sampling can be efficient because it ensures survey effort is targeted to subareas of high interest. In two-stage sampling, higher density primary sample units are usually of more interest than lower density primary units when populations are rare and clustered. Two-stage sequential sampling has been suggested as a method for allocating second stage sample effort among primary units. Here, we suggest a modification: adaptive two-stage sequential sampling. In this method, the adaptive part of the allocation process means the design is more flexible in how much extra effort can be directed to higher-abundance primary units. We discuss how best to design an adaptive two-stage sequential sample. ?? 2008 The Society of Population Ecology and Springer.

  13. Adaptive single replica multiple state transition interface sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wei-Na; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2013-07-01

    The multiple state transition path sampling method allows sampling of rare transitions between many metastable states, but has the drawback that switching between qualitatively different pathways is difficult. Combination with replica exchange transition interface sampling can in principle alleviate this problem, but requires a large number of simultaneous replicas. Here we remove these drawbacks by introducing a single replica sampling algorithm that samples only one interface at a time, while efficiently walking through the entire path space using a Wang-Landau approach or, alternatively, a fixed bias. We illustrate the method on several model systems: a particle diffusing in a simple 2D potential, isomerization in a small Lennard Jones cluster, and isomerization of the alanine dipeptide in explicit water.

  14. POF-Darts: Geometric adaptive sampling for probability of failure

    SciTech Connect

    Ebeida, Mohamed S.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Swiler, Laura P.; Romero, Vicente J.; Rushdi, Ahmad A.

    2016-06-18

    We introduce a novel technique, POF-Darts, to estimate the Probability Of Failure based on random disk-packing in the uncertain parameter space. POF-Darts uses hyperplane sampling to explore the unexplored part of the uncertain space. We use the function evaluation at a sample point to determine whether it belongs to failure or non-failure regions, and surround it with a protection sphere region to avoid clustering. We decompose the domain into Voronoi cells around the function evaluations as seeds and choose the radius of the protection sphere depending on the local Lipschitz continuity. As sampling proceeds, regions uncovered with spheres will shrink, improving the estimation accuracy. After exhausting the function evaluation budget, we build a surrogate model using the function evaluations associated with the sample points and estimate the probability of failure by exhaustive sampling of that surrogate. In comparison to other similar methods, our algorithm has the advantages of decoupling the sampling step from the surrogate construction one, the ability to reach target POF values with fewer samples, and the capability of estimating the number and locations of disconnected failure regions, not just the POF value. Furthermore, we present various examples to demonstrate the efficiency of our novel approach.

  15. POF-Darts: Geometric adaptive sampling for probability of failure

    DOE PAGES

    Ebeida, Mohamed S.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Swiler, Laura P.; ...

    2016-06-18

    We introduce a novel technique, POF-Darts, to estimate the Probability Of Failure based on random disk-packing in the uncertain parameter space. POF-Darts uses hyperplane sampling to explore the unexplored part of the uncertain space. We use the function evaluation at a sample point to determine whether it belongs to failure or non-failure regions, and surround it with a protection sphere region to avoid clustering. We decompose the domain into Voronoi cells around the function evaluations as seeds and choose the radius of the protection sphere depending on the local Lipschitz continuity. As sampling proceeds, regions uncovered with spheres will shrink,more » improving the estimation accuracy. After exhausting the function evaluation budget, we build a surrogate model using the function evaluations associated with the sample points and estimate the probability of failure by exhaustive sampling of that surrogate. In comparison to other similar methods, our algorithm has the advantages of decoupling the sampling step from the surrogate construction one, the ability to reach target POF values with fewer samples, and the capability of estimating the number and locations of disconnected failure regions, not just the POF value. Furthermore, we present various examples to demonstrate the efficiency of our novel approach.« less

  16. Adaptive Web Sampling - ArcPad Applet Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    10 3.1.1 Create and GPS-enable the GIS sampling design geodatabase ............................... 10...38 Appendix D: Geodatabase Design .......................................................................................................... 40...hence, it requires ESRI ArcGIS. It functions as a navigational GPS data collection and decision support tool to guide a user through the process of

  17. Some soil properties on coal mine spoils reclaimed with black locust (Robinia pceudoacacia L.) and umbrella pine (Pinus pinea L.) in Agacli-Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Tahir; Makineci, Ender

    2009-12-01

    This study performed on randomly selected seven sample plots in leguminous black locust (Robinia pceudoacacia L.) plantations and five sample plots in umbrella pine (Pinus pinea L.) plantations on coal mine soil/spoils. Soil samples were taken from eight different soil depths (0-1, 1-3, 3-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40, and 40-50 cm) into the soil profile. On soil samples, bulk density, fine soil fraction (Ø < 2 mm), sand, silt and clay rates, soil acidity (pH), organic carbon (C(org)), and total nitrogen (N(t)) contents were investigated. Also, some forest floor properties (unit mass, organic matter, and total nitrogen) were determined, and results were compared statistically between umbrella pine and black locust. As a result, 17 years after plantations, total forest floor accumulation determined as 6,107 kg ha(-1) under black locust compared to 13,700 kg ha(-1) under umbrella pine. The more rapid transformation of leguminous black locust forest floor creates organic carbon that migrates further into the mineral profile, and rapid accumulation of C and N in the soil profile was registered. Slower transformation processes of forest floor under umbrella pine result in lower soil N ratio and greater quantity of forest floor. Higher soil pH under leguminous black locust was determined significantly than umbrella pine. In conclusion, the composition of symbiotic nitrogen fixation of black locust appears to be a possible factor favoring carbon and nitrogen accumulation and, consequently, soil development. Clearly, both tree species have favorable impacts on initial soil formation. The umbrella pine generates the more forest floor layer; in contrast, black locust forest floor incorporates into the soil more rapidly and significantly increases soil nitrogen in upper soil layers.

  18. Adaptive Sampling of Spatiotemporal Phenomena with Optimization Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.; Thompson, David R.; Hsiang, Kian

    2013-01-01

    This work was designed to find a way to optimally (or near optimally) sample spatiotemporal phenomena based on limited sensing capability, and to create a model that can be run to estimate uncertainties, as well as to estimate covariances. The goal was to maximize (or minimize) some function of the overall uncertainty. The uncertainties and covariances were modeled presuming a parametric distribution, and then the model was used to approximate the overall information gain, and consequently, the objective function from each potential sense. These candidate sensings were then crosschecked against operation costs and feasibility. Consequently, an operations plan was derived that combined both operational constraints/costs and sensing gain. Probabilistic modeling was used to perform an approximate inversion of the model, which enabled calculation of sensing gains, and subsequent combination with operational costs. This incorporation of operations models to assess cost and feasibility for specific classes of vehicles is unique.

  19. Looking beyond rare species as umbrella species: Northern Bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) and conservation of grassland and shrubland birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosby, Andrew D.; Elmore, R.D.; Leslie,, David M.; Will, Rodney E.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in land use and land cover throughout the eastern half of North America have caused substantial declines in populations of birds that rely on grassland and shrubland vegetation types, including socially and economically important game birds such as the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus; hereafter bobwhites). As much attention is focused on habitat management and restoration for bobwhites, they may act as an umbrella species for other bird species with similar habitat requirements. We quantified the relationship of bobwhites to the overall bird community and evaluated the potential for bobwhites to act as an umbrella species for grassland and shrubland birds. We monitored bobwhite presence and bird community composition within 31 sample units on selected private lands in the south-central United States from 2009 to 2011. Bobwhites were strongly associated with other grassland and shrubland birds and were a significant positive predictor for 9 species. Seven of these, including Bell's Vireo (Vireo bell), Dicksissel (Spiza americana), and Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum), are listed as species of conservation concern. Species richness and occupancy probability of grassland and shrubland birds were higher relative to the overall bird community in sample units occupied by bobwhites. Our results show that bobwhites can act as an umbrella species for grassland and shrubland birds, although the specific species in any given situation will depend on region and management objectives. These results suggest that efficiency in conservation funding can be increased by using public interest in popular game species to leverage resources to meet multiple conservation objectives.

  20. Effect of canopy shape on physical load when holding an umbrella.

    PubMed

    Kuijt-Evers, Lottie F M; Könemann, Reinier; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of the canopy shape of an umbrella on physical load when holding the umbrella in different circumstances. For this purpose, thirteen subjects participated in this study and muscle activity of seven muscles of the upper limb (including the forearm) was measured for 5 wind speeds (4, 5, 6, 7, 8 Bft) and two wind directions (front and side). From the results, it was seen that for the p50 value of the muscle activity, the umbrella with the asymmetric canopy required 62% and for the p90 value of the muscle activity 74% of the muscle activity, on average, over all wind speeds - compared to the traditional umbrella. Based on these results, we can conclude that the physical load of holding the traditional umbrella is significantly higher than holding the umbrella with the asymmetric canopy shape in windy conditions.

  1. Effects of Calibration Sample Size and Item Bank Size on Ability Estimation in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Alper; Weiss, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of calibration sample size and item bank size on examinee ability estimation in computerized adaptive testing (CAT). For this purpose, a 500-item bank pre-calibrated using the three-parameter logistic model with 10,000 examinees was simulated. Calibration samples of varying sizes (150, 250, 350, 500,…

  2. Estimating the abundance of clustered animal population by using adaptive cluster sampling and negative binomial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Yizhou; Shifa, Naima

    2013-09-01

    An estimator for finding the abundance of a rare, clustered and mobile population has been introduced. This model is based on adaptive cluster sampling (ACS) to identify the location of the population and negative binomial distribution to estimate the total in each site. To identify the location of the population we consider both sampling with replacement (WR) and sampling without replacement (WOR). Some mathematical properties of the model are also developed.

  3. SMI adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals. [Sample Matrix Inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of adaptive antenna arrays in the presence of weak interfering signals (below thermal noise) is studied. It is shown that a conventional adaptive antenna array sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm is unable to suppress such interfering signals. To overcome this problem, the SMI algorithm is modified. In the modified algorithm, the covariance matrix is redefined such that the effect of thermal noise on the weights of adaptive arrays is reduced. Thus, the weights are dictated by relatively weak signals. It is shown that the modified algorithm provides the desired interference protection.

  4. Growth mechanism of InGaN nano-umbrellas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Haas, Benedikt; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Robin, Eric; Daudin, Bruno

    2016-11-11

    It is demonstrated that growing InGaN nanowires in metal-rich conditions on top of GaN nanowires results in a widening of the InGaN section. It is shown that the widening is eased by stacking faults (SFs) formation, revealing facets favorable to In incorporation. It is furthermore put in evidence that partial dislocations terminating SFs efficiently contribute to elastic strain relaxation. Indium accumulation on top of the InGaN section is found to result in an axial growth rate decrease, which has been assigned to increased N-N recombination and subsequent effective nitrogen flux decrease, eventually leading to the formation of InGaN nano-umbrellas/nanoplatelets.

  5. Growth mechanism of InGaN nano-umbrellas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Haas, Benedikt; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Robin, Eric; Daudin, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    It is demonstrated that growing InGaN nanowires in metal-rich conditions on top of GaN nanowires results in a widening of the InGaN section. It is shown that the widening is eased by stacking faults (SFs) formation, revealing facets favorable to In incorporation. It is furthermore put in evidence that partial dislocations terminating SFs efficiently contribute to elastic strain relaxation. Indium accumulation on top of the InGaN section is found to result in an axial growth rate decrease, which has been assigned to increased N-N recombination and subsequent effective nitrogen flux decrease, eventually leading to the formation of InGaN nano-umbrellas/nanoplatelets.

  6. Implementation of time-efficient adaptive sampling function design for improved undersampled MRI reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinhyeok; Kim, Hyeonjin

    2016-12-01

    To improve the efficacy of undersampled MRI, a method of designing adaptive sampling functions is proposed that is simple to implement on an MR scanner and yet effectively improves the performance of the sampling functions. An approximation of the energy distribution of an image (E-map) is estimated from highly undersampled k-space data acquired in a prescan and efficiently recycled in the main scan. An adaptive probability density function (PDF) is generated by combining the E-map with a modeled PDF. A set of candidate sampling functions are then prepared from the adaptive PDF, among which the one with maximum energy is selected as the final sampling function. To validate its computational efficiency, the proposed method was implemented on an MR scanner, and its robust performance in Fourier-transform (FT) MRI and compressed sensing (CS) MRI was tested by simulations and in a cherry tomato. The proposed method consistently outperforms the conventional modeled PDF approach for undersampling ratios of 0.2 or higher in both FT-MRI and CS-MRI. To fully benefit from undersampled MRI, it is preferable that the design of adaptive sampling functions be performed online immediately before the main scan. In this way, the proposed method may further improve the efficacy of the undersampled MRI.

  7. Adaptive Sampling-Based Information Collection for Wireless Body Area Networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Wendong; Tian, Hui

    2016-08-31

    To collect important health information, WBAN applications typically sense data at a high frequency. However, limited by the quality of wireless link, the uploading of sensed data has an upper frequency. To reduce upload frequency, most of the existing WBAN data collection approaches collect data with a tolerable error. These approaches can guarantee precision of the collected data, but they are not able to ensure that the upload frequency is within the upper frequency. Some traditional sampling based approaches can control upload frequency directly, however, they usually have a high loss of information. Since the core task of WBAN applications is to collect health information, this paper aims to collect optimized information under the limitation of upload frequency. The importance of sensed data is defined according to information theory for the first time. Information-aware adaptive sampling is proposed to collect uniformly distributed data. Then we propose Adaptive Sampling-based Information Collection (ASIC) which consists of two algorithms. An adaptive sampling probability algorithm is proposed to compute sampling probabilities of different sensed values. A multiple uniform sampling algorithm provides uniform samplings for values in different intervals. Experiments based on a real dataset show that the proposed approach has higher performance in terms of data coverage and information quantity. The parameter analysis shows the optimized parameter settings and the discussion shows the underlying reason of high performance in the proposed approach.

  8. Adaptive Sampling-Based Information Collection for Wireless Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Wendong; Tian, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To collect important health information, WBAN applications typically sense data at a high frequency. However, limited by the quality of wireless link, the uploading of sensed data has an upper frequency. To reduce upload frequency, most of the existing WBAN data collection approaches collect data with a tolerable error. These approaches can guarantee precision of the collected data, but they are not able to ensure that the upload frequency is within the upper frequency. Some traditional sampling based approaches can control upload frequency directly, however, they usually have a high loss of information. Since the core task of WBAN applications is to collect health information, this paper aims to collect optimized information under the limitation of upload frequency. The importance of sensed data is defined according to information theory for the first time. Information-aware adaptive sampling is proposed to collect uniformly distributed data. Then we propose Adaptive Sampling-based Information Collection (ASIC) which consists of two algorithms. An adaptive sampling probability algorithm is proposed to compute sampling probabilities of different sensed values. A multiple uniform sampling algorithm provides uniform samplings for values in different intervals. Experiments based on a real dataset show that the proposed approach has higher performance in terms of data coverage and information quantity. The parameter analysis shows the optimized parameter settings and the discussion shows the underlying reason of high performance in the proposed approach. PMID:27589758

  9. Temporally adaptive sampling: a case study in rare species survey design with marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum).

    PubMed

    Charney, Noah D; Kubel, Jacob E; Eiseman, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Improving detection rates for elusive species with clumped distributions is often accomplished through adaptive sampling designs. This approach can be extended to include species with temporally variable detection probabilities. By concentrating survey effort in years when the focal species are most abundant or visible, overall detection rates can be improved. This requires either long-term monitoring at a few locations where the species are known to occur or models capable of predicting population trends using climatic and demographic data. For marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Massachusetts, we demonstrate that annual variation in detection probability of larvae is regionally correlated. In our data, the difference in survey success between years was far more important than the difference among the three survey methods we employed: diurnal surveys, nocturnal surveys, and dipnet surveys. Based on these data, we simulate future surveys to locate unknown populations under a temporally adaptive sampling framework. In the simulations, when pond dynamics are correlated over the focal region, the temporally adaptive design improved mean survey success by as much as 26% over a non-adaptive sampling design. Employing a temporally adaptive strategy costs very little, is simple, and has the potential to substantially improve the efficient use of scarce conservation funds.

  10. Temporally Adaptive Sampling: A Case Study in Rare Species Survey Design with Marbled Salamanders (Ambystoma opacum)

    PubMed Central

    Charney, Noah D.; Kubel, Jacob E.; Eiseman, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Improving detection rates for elusive species with clumped distributions is often accomplished through adaptive sampling designs. This approach can be extended to include species with temporally variable detection probabilities. By concentrating survey effort in years when the focal species are most abundant or visible, overall detection rates can be improved. This requires either long-term monitoring at a few locations where the species are known to occur or models capable of predicting population trends using climatic and demographic data. For marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Massachusetts, we demonstrate that annual variation in detection probability of larvae is regionally correlated. In our data, the difference in survey success between years was far more important than the difference among the three survey methods we employed: diurnal surveys, nocturnal surveys, and dipnet surveys. Based on these data, we simulate future surveys to locate unknown populations under a temporally adaptive sampling framework. In the simulations, when pond dynamics are correlated over the focal region, the temporally adaptive design improved mean survey success by as much as 26% over a non-adaptive sampling design. Employing a temporally adaptive strategy costs very little, is simple, and has the potential to substantially improve the efficient use of scarce conservation funds. PMID:25799224

  11. Selection of multiple umbrella species for functional and taxonomic diversity to represent urban biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Sattler, T; Pezzatti, G B; Nobis, M P; Obrist, M K; Roth, T; Moretti, M

    2014-04-01

    Surrogates, such as umbrella species, are commonly used to reduce the complexity of quantifying biodiversity for conservation purposes. The presence of umbrella species is often indicative of high taxonomic diversity; however, functional diversity is now recognized as an important metric for biodiversity and thus should be considered when choosing umbrella species. We identified umbrella species associated with high taxonomic and functional biodiversity in urban areas in Switzerland. We analyzed 39,752 individuals of 574 animal species from 96 study plots and 1397 presences of 262 plant species from 58 plots. Thirty-one biodiversity measures of 7 taxonomic groups (plants, spiders, bees, ground beetles, lady bugs, weevils and birds) were included in within- and across-taxa analyses. Sixteen measures were taxonomical (species richness and species diversity), whereas 15 were functional (species traits including mobility, resource use, and reproduction). We used indicator value analysis to identify umbrella species associated with single or multiple biodiversity measures. Many umbrella species were indicators of high biodiversity within their own taxonomic group (from 33.3% in weevils to 93.8% in birds), to a lesser extent they were indicators across taxa. Principal component analysis revealed that umbrella species for multiple measures of biodiversity represented different aspects of biodiversity, especially with respect to measures of taxonomic and functional diversity. Thus, even umbrella species for multiple measures of biodiversity were complementary in the biodiversity aspects they represented. Thus, the choice of umbrella species based solely on taxonomic diversity is questionable and may not represent biodiversity comprehensively. Our results suggest that, depending on conservation priorities, managers should choose multiple and complementary umbrella species to assess the state of biodiversity.

  12. Adaptive sampling rate control for networked systems based on statistical characteristics of packet disordering.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Na; Er, Meng-Joo; Tan, Yen-Kheng; Yu, Hai-Bin; Zeng, Peng

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates an adaptive sampling rate control scheme for networked control systems (NCSs) subject to packet disordering. The main objectives of the proposed scheme are (a) to avoid heavy packet disordering existing in communication networks and (b) to stabilize NCSs with packet disordering, transmission delay and packet loss. First, a novel sampling rate control algorithm based on statistical characteristics of disordering entropy is proposed; secondly, an augmented closed-loop NCS that consists of a plant, a sampler and a state-feedback controller is transformed into an uncertain and stochastic system, which facilitates the controller design. Then, a sufficient condition for stochastic stability in terms of Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs) is given. Moreover, an adaptive tracking controller is designed such that the sampling period tracks a desired sampling period, which represents a significant contribution. Finally, experimental results are given to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed scheme.

  13. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale in a French-Speaking Swiss Sample: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Personality and Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossier, Jerome; Zecca, Gregory; Stauffer, Sarah D.; Maggiori, Christian; Dauwalder, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) in a French-speaking Swiss sample and its relationship with personality dimensions and work engagement. The heterogeneous sample of 391 participants (M[subscript age] = 39.59, SD = 12.30) completed the CAAS-International and a short version…

  14. Dynamically optimized Wang-Landau sampling with adaptive trial moves and modification factors.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yang Wei; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Okabe, Yutaka

    2013-11-01

    The density of states of continuous models is known to span many orders of magnitudes at different energies due to the small volume of phase space near the ground state. Consequently, the traditional Wang-Landau sampling which uses the same trial move for all energies faces difficulties sampling the low-entropic states. We developed an adaptive variant of the Wang-Landau algorithm that very effectively samples the density of states of continuous models across the entire energy range. By extending the acceptance ratio method of Bouzida, Kumar, and Swendsen such that the step size of the trial move and acceptance rate are adapted in an energy-dependent fashion, the random walker efficiently adapts its sampling according to the local phase space structure. The Wang-Landau modification factor is also made energy dependent in accordance with the step size, enhancing the accumulation of the density of states. Numerical simulations show that our proposed method performs much better than the traditional Wang-Landau sampling.

  15. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang

    2015-08-01

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes' rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle these challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.

  16. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang

    2015-03-21

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes’ rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle these challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.

  17. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang

    2015-03-21

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes’ rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle thesemore » challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.« less

  18. Local Adaptation in European Firs Assessed through Extensive Sampling across Altitudinal Gradients in Southern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Postolache, Dragos; Lascoux, Martin; Drouzas, Andreas D.; Källman, Thomas; Leonarduzzi, Cristina; Liepelt, Sascha; Piotti, Andrea; Popescu, Flaviu; Roschanski, Anna M.; Zhelev, Peter; Fady, Bruno; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background Local adaptation is a key driver of phenotypic and genetic divergence at loci responsible for adaptive traits variations in forest tree populations. Its experimental assessment requires rigorous sampling strategies such as those involving population pairs replicated across broad spatial scales. Methods A hierarchical Bayesian model of selection (HBM) that explicitly considers both the replication of the environmental contrast and the hierarchical genetic structure among replicated study sites is introduced. Its power was assessed through simulations and compared to classical ‘within-site’ approaches (FDIST, BAYESCAN) and a simplified, within-site, version of the model introduced here (SBM). Results HBM demonstrates that hierarchical approaches are very powerful to detect replicated patterns of adaptive divergence with low false-discovery (FDR) and false-non-discovery (FNR) rates compared to the analysis of different sites separately through within-site approaches. The hypothesis of local adaptation to altitude was further addressed by analyzing replicated Abies alba population pairs (low and high elevations) across the species’ southern distribution range, where the effects of climatic selection are expected to be the strongest. For comparison, a single population pair from the closely related species A. cephalonica was also analyzed. The hierarchical model did not detect any pattern of adaptive divergence to altitude replicated in the different study sites. Instead, idiosyncratic patterns of local adaptation among sites were detected by within-site approaches. Conclusion Hierarchical approaches may miss idiosyncratic patterns of adaptation among sites, and we strongly recommend the use of both hierarchical (multi-site) and classical (within-site) approaches when addressing the question of adaptation across broad spatial scales. PMID:27392065

  19. Region and edge-adaptive sampling and boundary completion for segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dillard, Scott E; Prasad, Lakshman; Grazzini, Jacopo A

    2010-01-01

    Edge detection produces a set of points that are likely to lie on discontinuities between objects within an image. We consider faces of the Gabriel graph of these points, a sub-graph of the Delaunay triangulation. Features are extracted by merging these faces using size, shape and color cues. We measure regional properties of faces using a novel shape-dependant sampling method that overcomes undesirable sampling bias of the Delaunay triangles. Instead, sampling is biased so as to smooth regional statistics within the detected object boundaries, and this smoothing adapts to local geometric features of the shape such as curvature, thickness and straightness.

  20. Assessing the umbrella value of a range-wide conservation network for jaguars (Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    Thornton, Daniel; Zeller, Kathy; Rondinini, Carlo; Boitani, Luigi; Crooks, Kevin; Burdeh, Christopher; Rabinowitz, Alan; Quigley, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Umbrella species are employed as conservation short-cuts for the design of reserves or reserve networks. However, empirical data on the effectiveness of umbrellas is equivocal, which has prevented more widespread application of this conservation strategy. We perform a novel, large-scale evaluation of umbrella species by assessing the potential umbrella value of a jaguar (Panthera onca) conservation network (consisting of viable populations and corridors) that extends from Mexico to Argentina. Using species richness, habitat quality, and fragmentation indices of ~1500 co-occurring mammal species, we show that jaguar populations and corridors overlap a substantial amount and percentage of high-quality habitat for co-occurring mammals and that the jaguar network performs better than random networks in protecting high-quality, interior habitat. Significantly, the effectiveness of the jaguar network as an umbrella would not have been noticeable had we focused on species richness as our sole metric of umbrella utility. Substantial inter-order variability existed, indicating the need for complementary conservation strategies for certain groups of mammals. We offer several reasons for the positive result we document, including the large spatial scale of our analysis and our focus on multiple metrics of umbrella effectiveness. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a regional, single-species conservation strategy can serve as an effective umbrella for the larger community and should help conserve viable populations and connectivity for a suite of co-occurring mammals. Current and future range-wide planning exercises for other large predators may therefore have important umbrella benefits.

  1. Maximum type 1 error rate inflation in multiarmed clinical trials with adaptive interim sample size modifications.

    PubMed

    Graf, Alexandra C; Bauer, Peter; Glimm, Ekkehard; Koenig, Franz

    2014-07-01

    Sample size modifications in the interim analyses of an adaptive design can inflate the type 1 error rate, if test statistics and critical boundaries are used in the final analysis as if no modification had been made. While this is already true for designs with an overall change of the sample size in a balanced treatment-control comparison, the inflation can be much larger if in addition a modification of allocation ratios is allowed as well. In this paper, we investigate adaptive designs with several treatment arms compared to a single common control group. Regarding modifications, we consider treatment arm selection as well as modifications of overall sample size and allocation ratios. The inflation is quantified for two approaches: a naive procedure that ignores not only all modifications, but also the multiplicity issue arising from the many-to-one comparison, and a Dunnett procedure that ignores modifications, but adjusts for the initially started multiple treatments. The maximum inflation of the type 1 error rate for such types of design can be calculated by searching for the "worst case" scenarios, that are sample size adaptation rules in the interim analysis that lead to the largest conditional type 1 error rate in any point of the sample space. To show the most extreme inflation, we initially assume unconstrained second stage sample size modifications leading to a large inflation of the type 1 error rate. Furthermore, we investigate the inflation when putting constraints on the second stage sample sizes. It turns out that, for example fixing the sample size of the control group, leads to designs controlling the type 1 error rate.

  2. Self-adaptive sampling rate data acquisition in JET's correlation reflectometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcas, G. de; Lopez, J. M.; Ruiz, M.; Barrera, E.; Vega, J.; Fonseca, A.

    2008-10-15

    Data acquisition systems with self-adaptive sampling rate capabilities have been proposed as a solution to reduce the shear amount of data collected in every discharge of present fusion devices. This paper discusses the design of such a system for its use in the KG8B correlation reflectometer at JET. The system, which is based on the ITMS platform, continuously adapts the sample rate during the acquisition depending on the signal bandwidth. Data are acquired continuously at the expected maximum sample rate and transferred to a memory buffer in the host processor. Thereafter the rest of the process is based on software. Data are read from the memory buffer in blocks and for each block an intelligent decimation algorithm is applied. The decimation algorithm determines the signal bandwidth for each block in order to choose the optimum sample rate for that block, and from there the decimation factor to be used. Memory buffers are used to adapt the throughput of the three main software modules (data acquisition, processing, and storage) following a typical producer-consumer architecture. The system optimizes the amount of data collected while maintaining the same information. Design issues are discussed and results of performance evaluation are presented.

  3. A Common MicroRNA Signature Consisting of miR-133a, miR-139-3p, and miR-142-3p Clusters Bladder Carcinoma in Situ with Normal Umbrella Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Angela Y.; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Domingo-Domenech, Josep; Bonal, Dennis M.; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta; Silva, Jose M.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs with critical roles in a large variety of biological processes such as development and tumorigenesis. miRNA expression profiling has been reported to be a powerful tool to classify tissue samples, including cancers, based on their developmental lineage. In this study, we have profiled the expression of miRNAs in bladder carcinoma in situ (CIS) and distinct cell compartments of the normal bladder, namely umbrella and basal-intermediate urothelial cells, as well as the muscularis propria. We identified several miRNAs differentially expressed between umbrella and basal-intermediate cells (miR-133a, miR-139-3p, miR-142-3p, miR-199b-5p, and miR-221). In situ hybridization confirmed the expression of miR-133a and miR-139-3p in umbrella cells, and miR-142-3p in basal-intermediate cells. Strikingly, miRNA expression levels of CIS most closely resembled the miRNA profile of umbrella cells. Finally, we examined well-established umbrella and basal-intermediate cell immunohistochemical biomarkers in an independent series of CIS samples. Again, this analysis revealed the significant expression of umbrella-specific markers in CIS when compared to non-CIS lesions. Overall, our studies represent a comprehensive and accurate description of the different miRNAs expressed in CIS tumors and three distinct histological areas of the urinary bladder. Notably, this study provides evidence of the possible origin relationship between CIS and normal umbrella cells. PMID:23410519

  4. Using continuous in-situ measurements to adaptively trigger urban storm water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, B. P.; Kerkez, B.

    2015-12-01

    Until cost-effective in-situ sensors are available for biological parameters, nutrients and metals, automated samplers will continue to be the primary source of reliable water quality measurements. Given limited samples bottles, however, autosamplers often obscure insights on nutrient sources and biogeochemical processes which would otherwise be captured using a continuous sampling approach. To that end, we evaluate the efficacy a novel method to measure first-flush nutrient dynamics in flashy, urban watersheds. Our approach reduces the number of samples required to capture water quality dynamics by leveraging an internet-connected sensor node, which is equipped with a suite of continuous in-situ sensors and an automated sampler. To capture both the initial baseflow as well as storm concentrations, a cloud-hosted adaptive algorithm analyzes the high-resolution sensor data along with local weather forecasts to optimize a sampling schedule. The method was tested in a highly developed urban catchment in Ann Arbor, Michigan and collected samples of nitrate, phosphorus, and suspended solids throughout several storm events. Results indicate that the watershed does not exhibit first flush dynamics, a behavior that would have been obscured when using a non-adaptive sampling approach.

  5. Correlates of dietary behavior in adults: an umbrella review

    PubMed Central

    Kroeze, Willemieke; Kohl, Leonie F.M.; Bolten, Laura M.; Velema, Elizabeth; Kaspers, Pam; Kremers, Stef P.J.; Brug, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Context: Multiple studies have been conducted on correlates of dietary behavior in adults, but a clear overview is currently lacking. Objective: An umbrella review, or review-of-reviews, was conducted to summarize and synthesize the scientific evidence on correlates and determinants of dietary behavior in adults. Data Sources: Eligible systematic reviews were identified in four databases: PubMed, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. Only reviews published between January 1990 and May 2014 were included. Study Selection: Systematic reviews of observable food and dietary behavior that describe potential behavioral determinants of dietary behavior in adults were included. After independent selection of potentially relevant reviews by two authors, a total of 14 reviews were considered eligible. Data Extraction: For data extraction, the importance of determinants, the strength of the evidence, and the methodological quality of the eligible reviews were evaluated. Multiple observers conducted the data extraction independently. Data Synthesis: Social-cognitive determinants and environmental determinants (mainly the social-cultural environment) were included most often in the available reviews. Sedentary behavior and habit strength were consistently identified as important correlates of dietary behavior. Other correlates and potential determinants of dietary behavior, such as motivational regulation, shift work, and the political environment, have been studied in relatively few studies, but results are promising. Conclusions: The multitude of studies conducted on correlates of dietary behavior provides mixed, but sometimes quite convincing, evidence. However, because of the generally weak research design of the studies covered in the available reviews, the evidence for true determinants is suggestive, at best. PMID:26106126

  6. Adaptation and Validation of the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a Sample of Male Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Medina, Pablo; Sierra, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-21

    The aim of the present study was to adapt and validate the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a sample of male drug users. A sample of 326 male drug users and 322 non-clinical males was selected by cluster sampling and convenience sampling, respectively. Results showed that the scale had good psychometric properties and adequate internal consistency reliability (Initiation = .66, Refusal = .74 and STD-P = .79). An evaluation of the invariance showed strong factor equivalence between both samples. A high and moderate effect of Differential Item Functioning was only found in items 1 and 14 (∆R 2 Nagelkerke = .076 and .037, respectively). We strongly recommend not using item 1 if the goal is to compare the scores of both groups, otherwise the comparison will be biased. Correlations obtained between the CSFQ-14 and the safe sex ratio and the SAS subscales were significant (CI = 95%) and indicated good concurrent validity. Scores of male drug users were similar to those of non-clinical males. Therefore, the adaptation of the SAS to drug users provides enough guarantees for reliable and valid use in both clinical practice and research, although care should be taken with item 1.

  7. Self-organizing adaptive map: autonomous learning of curves and surfaces from point samples.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Competitive Hebbian Learning (CHL) (Martinetz, 1993) is a simple and elegant method for estimating the topology of a manifold from point samples. The method has been adopted in a number of self-organizing networks described in the literature and has given rise to related studies in the fields of geometry and computational topology. Recent results from these fields have shown that a faithful reconstruction can be obtained using the CHL method only for curves and surfaces. Within these limitations, these findings constitute a basis for defining a CHL-based, growing self-organizing network that produces a faithful reconstruction of an input manifold. The SOAM (Self-Organizing Adaptive Map) algorithm adapts its local structure autonomously in such a way that it can match the features of the manifold being learned. The adaptation process is driven by the defects arising when the network structure is inadequate, which cause a growth in the density of units. Regions of the network undergo a phase transition and change their behavior whenever a simple, local condition of topological regularity is met. The phase transition is eventually completed across the entire structure and the adaptation process terminates. In specific conditions, the structure thus obtained is homeomorphic to the input manifold. During the adaptation process, the network also has the capability to focus on the acquisition of input point samples in critical regions, with a substantial increase in efficiency. The behavior of the network has been assessed experimentally with typical data sets for surface reconstruction, including suboptimal conditions, e.g. with undersampling and noise.

  8. Transcatheter Closure of Bilateral Multiple Huge Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations with Homemade Double-Umbrella Occluders

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Hongshan Xu Ke; Shao Haibo

    2008-07-15

    A 28-year-old man underwent successful transcatheter occlusion of three huge pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) using homemade double-umbrella occluders and stainless steel coils. Thoracic CT with three-dimensional reconstruction and pulmonary angiography were used for treatment planning and follow-up. The diameters of the feeding vessels were 11 mm, 13 mm, and 14 mm, respectively. This report demonstrates the novel design and utility of the double-umbrella occluder, an alternative tool for treatment of large PAVMs.

  9. Treatment of domestic wastewater by vertical flow constructed wetland planted with umbrella sedge and Vetiver grass.

    PubMed

    Kantawanichkul, Suwasa; Sattayapanich, Somsiri; van Dien, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of wastewater treatment by vertical flow constructed wetland systems under different hydraulic loading rates (HLR). The comparison of two types of plants, Cyperus alternifolius (Umbrella sedge) and Vetiveria zizanioides (Vetiver grass), was also conducted. In this study, six circular concrete tanks (diameter 0.8 m) were filled with fine sand and gravel to the depth of 1.23 m. Three tanks were planted with Umbrella sedge and the other three tanks were planted with Vetiver grass. Settled domestic wastewater from Chiang Mai University (chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH4(+)-N and suspended solids (SS) of 127.1, 27.4 and 29.5 mg/L on average, respectively) was intermittently applied for 45 min and rested for 3 h 15 min. The HLR of each tank was controlled at 20, 29 and 40 cm/d. It was found that the removal efficiency of the Umbrella sedge systems was higher than the Vetiver grass systems for every parameter, and the lowest HLR provided the maximum treatment efficiency. The removal efficiency of COD and nitrogen in terms of total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) was 76 and 65% at 20 cm/d HLR for Umbrella sedge compared to only 67 and 56% for Vetiver grass. Nitrogen accumulation in plant biomass was also higher in Umbrella sedge than in Vetiver grass in every HLR. Umbrella sedge was thus proved to be a suitable constructed wetland plant in tropical climates.

  10. Adaptive sampling strategy support for the unlined chromic acid pit, chemical waste landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    Adaptive sampling programs offer substantial savings in time and money when assessing hazardous waste sites. Key to some of these savings is the ability to adapt a sampling program to the real-time data generated by an adaptive sampling program. This paper presents a two-prong approach to supporting adaptive sampling programs: a specialized object-oriented database/geographical information system (SitePlanner{trademark} ) for data fusion, management, and display and combined Bayesian/geostatistical methods (PLUME) for contamination-extent estimation and sample location selection. This approach is applied in a retrospective study of a subsurface chromium plume at Sandia National Laboratories` chemical waste landfill. Retrospective analyses suggest the potential for characterization cost savings on the order of 60% through a reduction in the number of sampling programs, total number of soil boreholes, and number of samples analyzed from each borehole.

  11. The Portuguese adaptation of the Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale (GSS1) in a sample of inmates.

    PubMed

    Pires, Rute; Silva, Danilo R; Ferreira, Ana Sousa

    2014-01-01

    This paper comprises two studies which address the validity of the Portuguese adaptation of the Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale, GSS1. In study 1, the means and standard deviations for the suggestibility results of a sample of Portuguese inmates (N=40, Mage=37.5 years, SD=8.1) were compared to those of a sample of Icelandic inmates (Gudjonsson, 1997; Gudjonsson & Sigurdsson, 1996). Portuguese inmates' results were in line with the original results. In study 2, the means and standard deviations for the suggestibility results of the sample of Portuguese inmates were compared to those of a general Portuguese population sample (N=57, Mage=36.1 years, SD=12.7). The forensic sample obtained significantly higher scores in suggestibility measures than the general population sample. ANOVA confirmed that the increased suggestibility in the inmates sample was due to the limited memory capacity of this latter group. Given that the results of both studies 1 and 2 are in keeping with the author's original results (Gudjonsson, 1997), this may be regarded as a confirmation of the validity of the Portuguese GSS1.

  12. Adaptive millimeter-wave synthetic aperture imaging for compressive sampling of sparse scenes.

    PubMed

    Mrozack, Alex; Heimbeck, Martin; Marks, Daniel L; Richard, Jonathan; Everitt, Henry O; Brady, David J

    2014-06-02

    We apply adaptive sensing techniques to the problem of locating sparse metallic scatterers using high-resolution, frequency modulated continuous wave W-band RADAR. Using a single detector, a frequency stepped source, and a lateral translation stage, inverse synthetic aperture RADAR reconstruction techniques are used to search for one or two wire scatterers within a specified range, while an adaptive algorithm determined successive sampling locations. The two-dimensional location of each scatterer is thereby identified with sub-wavelength accuracy in as few as 1/4 the number of lateral steps required for a simple raster scan. The implications of applying this approach to more complex scattering geometries are explored in light of the various assumptions made.

  13. Influence of wave-front sampling in adaptive optics retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Laslandes, Marie; Salas, Matthias; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Pircher, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of sampling densities of the wave-front has been used in retinal adaptive optics (AO) instruments, compared to the number of corrector elements. We developed a model in order to characterize the link between number of actuators, number of wave-front sampling points and AO correction performance. Based on available data from aberration measurements in the human eye, 1000 wave-fronts were generated for the simulations. The AO correction performance in the presence of these representative aberrations was simulated for different deformable mirror and Shack Hartmann wave-front sensor combinations. Predictions of the model were experimentally tested through in vivo measurements in 10 eyes including retinal imaging with an AO scanning laser ophthalmoscope. According to our study, a ratio between wavefront sampling points and actuator elements of 2 is sufficient to achieve high resolution in vivo images of photoreceptors. PMID:28271004

  14. High-resolution in-depth imaging of optically cleared thick samples using an adaptive SPIM

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Aurore; Escande, Paul; Frongia, Céline; Clouvel, Grégory; Ducommun, Bernard; Lorenzo, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Today, Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) makes it possible to image fluorescent samples through depths of several hundreds of microns. However, LSFM also suffers from scattering, absorption and optical aberrations. Spatial variations in the refractive index inside the samples cause major changes to the light path resulting in loss of signal and contrast in the deepest regions, thus impairing in-depth imaging capability. These effects are particularly marked when inhomogeneous, complex biological samples are under study. Recently, chemical treatments have been developed to render a sample transparent by homogenizing its refractive index (RI), consequently enabling a reduction of scattering phenomena and a simplification of optical aberration patterns. One drawback of these methods is that the resulting RI of cleared samples does not match the working RI medium generally used for LSFM lenses. This RI mismatch leads to the presence of low-order aberrations and therefore to a significant degradation of image quality. In this paper, we introduce an original optical-chemical combined method based on an adaptive SPIM and a water-based clearing protocol enabling compensation for aberrations arising from RI mismatches induced by optical clearing methods and acquisition of high-resolution in-depth images of optically cleared complex thick samples such as Multi-Cellular Tumour Spheroids. PMID:26576666

  15. High-resolution in-depth imaging of optically cleared thick samples using an adaptive SPIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Aurore; Escande, Paul; Frongia, Céline; Clouvel, Grégory; Ducommun, Bernard; Lorenzo, Corinne

    2015-11-01

    Today, Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) makes it possible to image fluorescent samples through depths of several hundreds of microns. However, LSFM also suffers from scattering, absorption and optical aberrations. Spatial variations in the refractive index inside the samples cause major changes to the light path resulting in loss of signal and contrast in the deepest regions, thus impairing in-depth imaging capability. These effects are particularly marked when inhomogeneous, complex biological samples are under study. Recently, chemical treatments have been developed to render a sample transparent by homogenizing its refractive index (RI), consequently enabling a reduction of scattering phenomena and a simplification of optical aberration patterns. One drawback of these methods is that the resulting RI of cleared samples does not match the working RI medium generally used for LSFM lenses. This RI mismatch leads to the presence of low-order aberrations and therefore to a significant degradation of image quality. In this paper, we introduce an original optical-chemical combined method based on an adaptive SPIM and a water-based clearing protocol enabling compensation for aberrations arising from RI mismatches induced by optical clearing methods and acquisition of high-resolution in-depth images of optically cleared complex thick samples such as Multi-Cellular Tumour Spheroids.

  16. Organ sample generator for expected treatment dose construction and adaptive inverse planning optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Nie Xiaobo; Liang Jian; Yan Di

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To create an organ sample generator (OSG) for expected treatment dose construction and adaptive inverse planning optimization. The OSG generates random samples of organs of interest from a distribution obeying the patient specific organ variation probability density function (PDF) during the course of adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Principle component analysis (PCA) and a time-varying least-squares regression (LSR) method were used on patient specific geometric variations of organs of interest manifested on multiple daily volumetric images obtained during the treatment course. The construction of the OSG includes the determination of eigenvectors of the organ variation using PCA, and the determination of the corresponding coefficients using time-varying LSR. The coefficients can be either random variables or random functions of the elapsed treatment days depending on the characteristics of organ variation as a stationary or a nonstationary random process. The LSR method with time-varying weighting parameters was applied to the precollected daily volumetric images to determine the function form of the coefficients. Eleven h and n cancer patients with 30 daily cone beam CT images each were included in the evaluation of the OSG. The evaluation was performed using a total of 18 organs of interest, including 15 organs at risk and 3 targets. Results: Geometric variations of organs of interest during h and n cancer radiotherapy can be represented using the first 3 {approx} 4 eigenvectors. These eigenvectors were variable during treatment, and need to be updated using new daily images obtained during the treatment course. The OSG generates random samples of organs of interest from the estimated organ variation PDF of the individual. The accuracy of the estimated PDF can be improved recursively using extra daily image feedback during the treatment course. The average deviations in the estimation of the mean and standard deviation of the organ variation PDF for h

  17. Low-power metabolic equivalents estimation algorithm using adaptive acceleration sampling.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Mio; Nakanishi, Motofumi; Izumi, Shintaro; Nakai, Yozaburo; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Masahiko; Tsukahara, Mio; Nakanishi, Motofumi; Izumi, Shintaro; Nakai, Yozaburo; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Masahiko; Izumi, Shintaro; Nakai, Yozaburo; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Masahiko; Tsukahara, Mio; Nakanishi, Motofumi

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a proposed low-power metabolic equivalent estimation algorithm that can calculate the value of metabolic equivalents (METs) from triaxial acceleration at an adaptively changeable sampling rate. This algorithm uses four rates of 32, 16, 8 and 4 Hz. The mode of switching them is decided from synthetic acceleration. Applying this proposed algorithm to acceleration measured for 1 day, we achieved the low root mean squared error (RMSE) of calculated METs, with current consumption that was 41.5 % of the value at 32 Hz, and 75.4 % of the value at 16 Hz.

  18. Exercise for adults with fibromyalgia: an umbrella systematic review with synthesis of best evidence.

    PubMed

    Bidonde, Julia; Busch, Angela Jean; Bath, Brenna; Milosavljevic, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this umbrella systematic review was to identify, evaluate, and synthesize systematic reviews of physical activity interventions for adults with fibromyalgia (FM) focussing on four outcomes: pain, multidimensional function (wellness or quality of life), physical function (self-reported physical function or measured physical fitness) and adverse effects. A further objective was to link these outcomes with details of the interventions so as to guide and shape future practice and research. Electronic databases including Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, the Cochrane Library, and DARE, were searched for the January 1(st) 2007 to March 31(st) 2013 period. Nine systematic reviews (60 RCTs with 3816 participants) were included. Meta-analysis was not conducted due to the heterogeneity of the sample. We found positive results of diverse exercise interventions on pain, multidimensional function, and self-reported physical function, and no supporting evidence for new (to FM) interventions (i.e., qigong, tai chi). There were no serious adverse effects reported. The variability of the interventions in the reviews prevented us from answering important clinical questions to guide practical decisions about optimal modes or dosages (i.e., frequency, intensity, duration). Finally, the number of review articles is proliferating, leading researchers and reviewers to consider the rigor and quality of the information being reviewed. As well, consumers of these reviews (i.e., clinicians, individuals with FM) should not rely on them without careful consideration.

  19. Accelerating Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation by differential evolution with self-adaptive randomized subspace sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Hyman, James M; Robinson, Bruce A; Higdon, Dave; Ter Braak, Cajo J F; Diks, Cees G H

    2008-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods have found widespread use in many fields of study to estimate the average properties of complex systems, and for posterior inference in a Bayesian framework. Existing theory and experiments prove convergence of well constructed MCMC schemes to the appropriate limiting distribution under a variety of different conditions. In practice, however this convergence is often observed to be disturbingly slow. This is frequently caused by an inappropriate selection of the proposal distribution used to generate trial moves in the Markov Chain. Here we show that significant improvements to the efficiency of MCMC simulation can be made by using a self-adaptive Differential Evolution learning strategy within a population-based evolutionary framework. This scheme, entitled DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis or DREAM, runs multiple different chains simultaneously for global exploration, and automatically tunes the scale and orientation of the proposal distribution in randomized subspaces during the search. Ergodicity of the algorithm is proved, and various examples involving nonlinearity, high-dimensionality, and multimodality show that DREAM is generally superior to other adaptive MCMC sampling approaches. The DREAM scheme significantly enhances the applicability of MCMC simulation to complex, multi-modal search problems.

  20. A Surrogate-based Adaptive Sampling Approach for History Matching and Uncertainty Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weixuan; Zhang, Dongxiao; Lin, Guang

    2015-02-25

    A critical procedure in reservoir simulations is history matching (or data assimilation in a broader sense), which calibrates model parameters such that the simulation results are consistent with field measurements, and hence improves the credibility of the predictions given by the simulations. Often there exist non-unique combinations of parameter values that all yield the simulation results matching the measurements. For such ill-posed history matching problems, Bayesian theorem provides a theoretical foundation to represent different solutions and to quantify the uncertainty with the posterior PDF. Lacking an analytical solution in most situations, the posterior PDF may be characterized with a sample of realizations, each representing a possible scenario. A novel sampling algorithm is presented here for the Bayesian solutions to history matching problems. We aim to deal with two commonly encountered issues: 1) as a result of the nonlinear input-output relationship in a reservoir model, the posterior distribution could be in a complex form, such as multimodal, which violates the Gaussian assumption required by most of the commonly used data assimilation approaches; 2) a typical sampling method requires intensive model evaluations and hence may cause unaffordable computational cost. In the developed algorithm, we use a Gaussian mixture model as the proposal distribution in the sampling process, which is simple but also flexible to approximate non-Gaussian distributions and is particularly efficient when the posterior is multimodal. Also, a Gaussian process is utilized as a surrogate model to speed up the sampling process. Furthermore, an iterative scheme of adaptive surrogate refinement and re-sampling ensures sampling accuracy while keeping the computational cost at a minimum level. The developed approach is demonstrated with an illustrative example and shows its capability in handling the above-mentioned issues. Multimodal posterior of the history matching

  1. Image classification with densely sampled image windows and generalized adaptive multiple kernel learning.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shengye; Xu, Xinxing; Xu, Dong; Lin, Stephen; Li, Xuelong

    2015-03-01

    We present a framework for image classification that extends beyond the window sampling of fixed spatial pyramids and is supported by a new learning algorithm. Based on the observation that fixed spatial pyramids sample a rather limited subset of the possible image windows, we propose a method that accounts for a comprehensive set of windows densely sampled over location, size, and aspect ratio. A concise high-level image feature is derived to effectively deal with this large set of windows, and this higher level of abstraction offers both efficient handling of the dense samples and reduced sensitivity to misalignment. In addition to dense window sampling, we introduce generalized adaptive l(p)-norm multiple kernel learning (GA-MKL) to learn a robust classifier based on multiple base kernels constructed from the new image features and multiple sets of prelearned classifiers from other classes. With GA-MKL, multiple levels of image features are effectively fused, and information is shared among different classifiers. Extensive evaluation on benchmark datasets for object recognition (Caltech256 and Caltech101) and scene recognition (15Scenes) demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the state-of-the-art under a broad range of settings.

  2. Adaptive pulse width control and sampling for low power pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Gubbi, Sagar Venkatesh; Amrutur, Bharadwaj

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing of physiological parameters could be a cost effective approach to improving health care, and low-power sensors are essential for remote sensing because these sensors are often energy constrained. This paper presents a power optimized photoplethysmographic sensor interface to sense arterial oxygen saturation, a technique to dynamically trade off SNR for power during sensor operation, and a simple algorithm to choose when to acquire samples in photoplethysmography. A prototype of the proposed pulse oximeter built using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components is tested on 10 adults. The dynamic adaptation techniques described reduce power consumption considerably compared to our reference implementation, and our approach is competitive to state-of-the-art implementations. The techniques presented in this paper may be applied to low-power sensor interface designs where acquiring samples is expensive in terms of power as epitomized by pulse oximetry.

  3. Sample entropy-based adaptive wavelet de-noising approach for meteorologic and hydrologic time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Singh, Vijay P.; Shang, Xiaosan; Ding, Hao; Wu, Jichun; Wang, Lachun; Zou, Xinqing; Chen, Yuanfang; Chen, Xi; Wang, Shicheng; Wang, Zhenlong

    2014-07-01

    De-noising meteorologic and hydrologic time series is important to improve the accuracy and reliability of extraction, analysis, simulation, and forecasting. A hybrid approach, combining sample entropy and wavelet de-noising method, is developed to separate noise from original series and is named as AWDA-SE (adaptive wavelet de-noising approach using sample entropy). The AWDA-SE approach adaptively determines the threshold for wavelet analysis. Two kinds of meteorologic and hydrologic data sets, synthetic data set and 3 representative field measured data sets (one is the annual rainfall data of Jinan station and the other two are annual streamflow series from two typical stations in China, Yingluoxia station on the Heihe River, which is little affected by human activities, and Lijin station on the Yellow River, which is greatly affected by human activities), are used to illustrate the approach. The AWDA-SE approach is compared with three conventional de-noising methods, including fixed-form threshold algorithm, Stein unbiased risk estimation algorithm, and minimax algorithm. Results show that the AWDA-SE approach separates effectively the signal and noise of the data sets and is found to be better than the conventional methods. Measures of assessment standards show that the developed approach can be employed to investigate noisy and short time series and can also be applied to other areas.

  4. Adaptive sampling dual terahertz comb spectroscopy using dual free-running femtosecond lasers

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Ryuji; Hsieh, Yi-Da; Hayashi, Kenta; Cahyadi, Harsono; Hindle, Francis; Sakaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Iwata, Tetsuo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Minoshima, Kaoru; Inaba, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) dual comb spectroscopy (DCS) is a promising method for high-accuracy, high-resolution, broadband THz spectroscopy because the mode-resolved THz comb spectrum includes both broadband THz radiation and narrow-line CW-THz radiation characteristics. In addition, all frequency modes of a THz comb can be phase-locked to a microwave frequency standard, providing excellent traceability. However, the need for stabilization of dual femtosecond lasers has often hindered its wide use. To overcome this limitation, here we have demonstrated adaptive-sampling THz-DCS, allowing the use of free-running femtosecond lasers. To correct the fluctuation of the time and frequency scales caused by the laser timing jitter, an adaptive sampling clock is generated by dual THz-comb-referenced spectrum analysers and is used for a timing clock signal in a data acquisition board. The results not only indicated the successful implementation of THz-DCS with free-running lasers but also showed that this configuration outperforms standard THz-DCS with stabilized lasers due to the slight jitter remained in the stabilized lasers. PMID:26035687

  5. Motion-adapted pulse sequences for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Lu, George J; Opella, Stanley J

    2013-08-28

    One of the main applications of solid-state NMR is to study the structure and dynamics of biopolymers, such as membrane proteins, under physiological conditions where the polypeptides undergo global motions as they do in biological membranes. The effects of NMR radiofrequency irradiations on nuclear spins are strongly influenced by these motions. For example, we previously showed that the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence yields spectra with resonance line widths about half of those observed using the conventional pulse sequence when applied to membrane proteins undergoing rapid uniaxial rotational diffusion in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the line widths were not changed in microcrystalline samples where the molecules did not undergo global motions. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and describe analytically how some Hamiltonian terms are susceptible to sample motions, and it is their removal through the critical π/2 Z-rotational symmetry that confers the "motion adapted" property to the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence. This leads to the design of separated local field pulse sequence "Motion-adapted SAMPI4" and is generalized to an approach for the design of decoupling sequences whose performance is superior in the presence of molecular motions. It works by cancelling the spin interaction by explicitly averaging the reduced Wigner matrix to zero, rather than utilizing the 2π nutation to average spin interactions. This approach is applicable to both stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments.

  6. An Energy Aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm for Energy Harvesting WSN with Energy Hungry Sensors.

    PubMed

    Srbinovski, Bruno; Magno, Michele; Edwards-Murphy, Fiona; Pakrashi, Vikram; Popovici, Emanuel

    2016-03-28

    Wireless sensor nodes have a limited power budget, though they are often expected to be functional in the field once deployed for extended periods of time. Therefore, minimization of energy consumption and energy harvesting technology in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are key tools for maximizing network lifetime, and achieving self-sustainability. This paper proposes an energy aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm (ASA) for WSN with power hungry sensors and harvesting capabilities, an energy management technique that can be implemented on any WSN platform with enough processing power to execute the proposed algorithm. An existing state-of-the-art ASA developed for wireless sensor networks with power hungry sensors is optimized and enhanced to adapt the sampling frequency according to the available energy of the node. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using two in-field testbeds that are supplied by two different energy harvesting sources (solar and wind). Simulation and comparison between the state-of-the-art ASA and the proposed energy aware ASA (EASA) in terms of energy durability are carried out using in-field measured harvested energy (using both wind and solar sources) and power hungry sensors (ultrasonic wind sensor and gas sensors). The simulation results demonstrate that using ASA in combination with an energy aware function on the nodes can drastically increase the lifetime of a WSN node and enable self-sustainability. In fact, the proposed EASA in conjunction with energy harvesting capability can lead towards perpetual WSN operation and significantly outperform the state-of-the-art ASA.

  7. Structure and static analysis of a new umbrella-shaped keel concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiao-ju; Fu, Bi; Dai, Jian-feng; Lu, Rui-e.; Zhao, Pei; He, Cheng-dan

    2012-04-01

    In order to improve the concentration efficiency and eliminate the optical aberration, the umbrella-shaped keel structure has been introduced into the deployable structure concentrator, which can overcome the shortcomings such as the low concentration ratio and ineliminable superimposed folds. A deployable solar parabolic concentrator, possessing the collapsible umbrella-shaped keel and aperture radius of 4.9m has been designed. Its finite element model has been established, the ANSYS software has been adopted to perform the structure and static analysis. Under the influence of solar wind and films surface tension, the maximum deformation of the umbrella fabric is only 0.941mm, the radius of spot size is 6.37cm, geometry concentrator ratio could achieve 5908, only 1.3% reduced than the standard parabolic. The maximum stress is 1.6 MPa, which are much smaller than the tensile strength of Kevlar material. Power density of the concentrator is 8149227.24W/m2, the weight of the system is 0.38Kg per kW. The results indicated that the influence of films tension and solar wind on the working shape of concentrator bas been offset to a large extent by the umbrella-shaped keel. The new umbrella-shaped keel concentrator has available for the solar thermal thruster (STP) system, which has the advantage of high geometry concentrator ratio, structure stability, small envelope volume, light weight and deployable perfectly, as well as the selected structure and materials are appropriate.

  8. Multi-species attributes as the condition for adaptive sampling of rare species using two-stage sequential sampling with an auxiliary variable

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panahbehagh, B.; Smith, D.R.; Salehi, M.M.; Hornbach, D.J.; Brown, D.J.; Chan, F.; Marinova, D.; Anderssen, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing populations of rare species is challenging because of the large effort required to locate patches of occupied habitat and achieve precise estimates of density and abundance. The presence of a rare species has been shown to be correlated with presence or abundance of more common species. Thus, ecological community richness or abundance can be used to inform sampling of rare species. Adaptive sampling designs have been developed specifically for rare and clustered populations and have been applied to a wide range of rare species. However, adaptive sampling can be logistically challenging, in part, because variation in final sample size introduces uncertainty in survey planning. Two-stage sequential sampling (TSS), a recently developed design, allows for adaptive sampling, but avoids edge units and has an upper bound on final sample size. In this paper we present an extension of two-stage sequential sampling that incorporates an auxiliary variable (TSSAV), such as community attributes, as the condition for adaptive sampling. We develop a set of simulations to approximate sampling of endangered freshwater mussels to evaluate the performance of the TSSAV design. The performance measures that we are interested in are efficiency and probability of sampling a unit occupied by the rare species. Efficiency measures the precision of population estimate from the TSSAV design relative to a standard design, such as simple random sampling (SRS). The simulations indicate that the density and distribution of the auxiliary population is the most important determinant of the performance of the TSSAV design. Of the design factors, such as sample size, the fraction of the primary units sampled was most important. For the best scenarios, the odds of sampling the rare species was approximately 1.5 times higher for TSSAV compared to SRS and efficiency was as high as 2 (i.e., variance from TSSAV was half that of SRS). We have found that design performance, especially for adaptive

  9. Adaption of G-TAG Software for Validating Touch and Go Asteroid Sample Return Design Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars James C.; Acikmese, Behcet; Mandic, Milan

    2012-01-01

    A software tool is used to demonstrate the feasibility of Touch and Go (TAG) sampling for Asteroid Sample Return missions. TAG is a concept whereby a spacecraft is in contact with the surface of a small body, such as a comet or asteroid, for a few seconds or less before ascending to a safe location away from the small body. Previous work at JPL developed the G-TAG simulation tool, which provides a software environment for fast, multi-body simulations of the TAG event. G-TAG is described in Multibody Simulation Software Testbed for Small-Body Exploration and Sampling, (NPO-47196) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 11 (November 2011), p.54. This current innovation adapts this tool to a mission that intends to return a sample from the surface of an asteroid. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the TAG concept, the new software tool was used to generate extensive simulations that demonstrate the designed spacecraft meets key requirements. These requirements state that contact force and duration must be sufficient to ensure that enough material from the surface is collected in the brushwheel sampler (BWS), and that the spacecraft must survive the contact and must be able to recover and ascend to a safe position, and maintain velocity and orientation after the contact.

  10. Adaptive free energy sampling in multidimensional collective variable space using boxed molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mike; Paci, Emanuele; McIntosh-Smith, Simon; Glowacki, David R

    2016-12-22

    The past decade has seen the development of a new class of rare event methods in which molecular configuration space is divided into a set of boundaries/interfaces, and then short trajectories are run between boundaries. For all these methods, an important concern is how to generate boundaries. In this paper, we outline an algorithm for adaptively generating boundaries along a free energy surface in multi-dimensional collective variable (CV) space, building on the boxed molecular dynamics (BXD) rare event algorithm. BXD is a simple technique for accelerating the simulation of rare events and free energy sampling which has proven useful for calculating kinetics and free energy profiles in reactive and non-reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations across a range of systems, in both NVT and NVE ensembles. Two key developments outlined in this paper make it possible to automate BXD, and to adaptively map free energy and kinetics in complex systems. First, we have generalized BXD to multidimensional CV space. Using strategies from rigid-body dynamics, we have derived a simple and general velocity-reflection procedure that conserves energy for arbitrary collective variable definitions in multiple dimensions, and show that it is straightforward to apply BXD to sampling in multidimensional CV space so long as the Cartesian gradients ∇CV are available. Second, we have modified BXD to undertake on-the-fly statistical analysis during a trajectory, harnessing the information content latent in the dynamics to automatically determine boundary locations. Such automation not only makes BXD considerably easier to use; it also guarantees optimal boundaries, speeding up convergence. We have tested the multidimensional adaptive BXD procedure by calculating the potential of mean force for a chemical reaction recently investigated using both experimental and computational approaches - i.e., F + CD3CN → DF + D2CN in both the gas phase and a strongly coupled explicit CD3CN solvent

  11. A Molecular Umbrella Approach to the Intracellular Delivery of siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Lauren L.; Janout, Vaclav; Fisher, Michael; Juliano, Rudolph L.; Regen, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    A series of diwalled and tetrawalled molecular umbrellas have been synthesized using cholic acid, spermidine, and lysine as starting material. Coupling of these molecular umbrellas to an octaarginine peptide afforded agents that were capable of promoting the transport of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to HeLa cells, as judged by the knockdown of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression. The efficiency of this knockdown was found to increase with an increasing number of facially amphiphilic walls present, and also when a cleavable disulfide linker was replaced with a non-cleavable, maleimido moiety. The knockdown efficiency that was observed for one tetrawalled molecular umbrella-octaargine conjugate was comparable to that observed with a commercially available transfection agent, Lipofectamine 2000, but showed less cytotoxicity. PMID:21985221

  12. Differentially Private Histogram Publication For Dynamic Datasets: An Adaptive Sampling Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Xiong, Li; Liu, Jinfei

    2015-10-01

    Differential privacy has recently become a de facto standard for private statistical data release. Many algorithms have been proposed to generate differentially private histograms or synthetic data. However, most of them focus on "one-time" release of a static dataset and do not adequately address the increasing need of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time. A straightforward application of existing histogram methods on each snapshot of such dynamic datasets will incur high accumulated error due to the composibility of differential privacy and correlations or overlapping users between the snapshots. In this paper, we address the problem of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time with differential privacy, using a novel adaptive distance-based sampling approach. Our first method, DSFT, uses a fixed distance threshold and releases a differentially private histogram only when the current snapshot is sufficiently different from the previous one, i.e., with a distance greater than a predefined threshold. Our second method, DSAT, further improves DSFT and uses a dynamic threshold adaptively adjusted by a feedback control mechanism to capture the data dynamics. Extensive experiments on real and synthetic datasets demonstrate that our approach achieves better utility than baseline methods and existing state-of-the-art methods.

  13. Differentially Private Histogram Publication For Dynamic Datasets: An Adaptive Sampling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Xiong, Li; Liu, Jinfei

    2016-01-01

    Differential privacy has recently become a de facto standard for private statistical data release. Many algorithms have been proposed to generate differentially private histograms or synthetic data. However, most of them focus on “one-time” release of a static dataset and do not adequately address the increasing need of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time. A straightforward application of existing histogram methods on each snapshot of such dynamic datasets will incur high accumulated error due to the composibility of differential privacy and correlations or overlapping users between the snapshots. In this paper, we address the problem of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time with differential privacy, using a novel adaptive distance-based sampling approach. Our first method, DSFT, uses a fixed distance threshold and releases a differentially private histogram only when the current snapshot is sufficiently different from the previous one, i.e., with a distance greater than a predefined threshold. Our second method, DSAT, further improves DSFT and uses a dynamic threshold adaptively adjusted by a feedback control mechanism to capture the data dynamics. Extensive experiments on real and synthetic datasets demonstrate that our approach achieves better utility than baseline methods and existing state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26973795

  14. Cellular Entry and Nuclear Targeting By a Highly Anionic Molecular Umbrella

    PubMed Central

    Mehiri, Mohamed; Jing, Bingwen; Ringhoff, Danielle; Janout, Vaclav; Cassimeris, Lynne; Regen, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    A fluorescently-labeled, persulfated molecular umbrella (1) has been synthesized from cholic acid, lysine, spermine and Coumarin 343 and found capable of entering live HeLa cells. The distribution of 1 throughout the cytoplasm and the nucleus was diffuse and punctate, respectively. This finding, together with its ability to cross liposomal membranes by passive diffusion, suggests that passive diffusion plays a significant role in the ability of 1 to enter cells. The fact that 1 is concentrated at the nucleus raises the possibility that molecular umbrellas of this type could be used for the nuclear targeting of drugs. PMID:18681467

  15. A Bayesian adaptive blinded sample size adjustment method for risk differences.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Andrew Montgomery

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive sample size adjustment (SSA) for clinical trials consists of examining early subsets of on trial data to adjust estimates of sample size requirements. Blinded SSA is often preferred over unblinded SSA because it obviates many logistical complications of the latter and generally introduces less bias. On the other hand, current blinded SSA methods for binary data offer little to no new information about the treatment effect, ignore uncertainties associated with the population treatment proportions, and/or depend on enhanced randomization schemes that risk partial unblinding. I propose an innovative blinded SSA method for use when the primary analysis is a non-inferiority or superiority test regarding a risk difference. The method incorporates evidence about the treatment effect via the likelihood function of a mixture distribution. I compare the new method with an established one and with the fixed sample size study design, in terms of maximization of an expected utility function. The new method maximizes the expected utility better than do the comparators, under a range of assumptions. I illustrate the use of the proposed method with an example that incorporates a Bayesian hierarchical model. Lastly, I suggest topics for future study regarding the proposed methods.

  16. Recruiting hard-to-reach United States population sub-groups via adaptations of snowball sampling strategy

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Georgia Robins; Lee, Hau-Chen; Seung-Hwan Lim, Rod; Fullerton, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Nurse researchers and educators often engage in outreach to narrowly defined populations. This article offers examples of how variations on the snowball sampling recruitment strategy can be applied in the creation of culturally appropriate, community-based information dissemination efforts related to recruitment to health education programs and research studies. Examples from the primary author’s program of research are provided to demonstrate how adaptations of snowball sampling can be effectively used in the recruitment of members of traditionally underserved or vulnerable populations. The adaptation of snowball sampling techniques, as described in this article, helped the authors to gain access to each of the more vulnerable population groups of interest. The use of culturally sensitive recruitment strategies is both appropriate and effective in enlisting the involvement of members of vulnerable populations. Adaptations of snowball sampling strategies should be considered when recruiting participants for education programs or subjects for research studies when recruitment of a population based sample is not essential. PMID:20727089

  17. Accelerating the Convergence of Replica Exchange Simulations Using Gibbs Sampling and Adaptive Temperature Sets

    DOE PAGES

    Vogel, Thomas; Perez, Danny

    2015-08-28

    We recently introduced a novel replica-exchange scheme in which an individual replica can sample from states encountered by other replicas at any previous time by way of a global configuration database, enabling the fast propagation of relevant states through the whole ensemble of replicas. This mechanism depends on the knowledge of global thermodynamic functions which are measured during the simulation and not coupled to the heat bath temperatures driving the individual simulations. Therefore, this setup also allows for a continuous adaptation of the temperature set. In this paper, we will review the new scheme and demonstrate its capability. The methodmore » is particularly useful for the fast and reliable estimation of the microcanonical temperature T (U) or, equivalently, of the density of states g(U) over a wide range of energies.« less

  18. Accelerating the Convergence of Replica Exchange Simulations Using Gibbs Sampling and Adaptive Temperature Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Thomas; Perez, Danny

    2015-08-28

    We recently introduced a novel replica-exchange scheme in which an individual replica can sample from states encountered by other replicas at any previous time by way of a global configuration database, enabling the fast propagation of relevant states through the whole ensemble of replicas. This mechanism depends on the knowledge of global thermodynamic functions which are measured during the simulation and not coupled to the heat bath temperatures driving the individual simulations. Therefore, this setup also allows for a continuous adaptation of the temperature set. In this paper, we will review the new scheme and demonstrate its capability. The method is particularly useful for the fast and reliable estimation of the microcanonical temperature T (U) or, equivalently, of the density of states g(U) over a wide range of energies.

  19. An Energy Aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm for Energy Harvesting WSN with Energy Hungry Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Srbinovski, Bruno; Magno, Michele; Edwards-Murphy, Fiona; Pakrashi, Vikram; Popovici, Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor nodes have a limited power budget, though they are often expected to be functional in the field once deployed for extended periods of time. Therefore, minimization of energy consumption and energy harvesting technology in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are key tools for maximizing network lifetime, and achieving self-sustainability. This paper proposes an energy aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm (ASA) for WSN with power hungry sensors and harvesting capabilities, an energy management technique that can be implemented on any WSN platform with enough processing power to execute the proposed algorithm. An existing state-of-the-art ASA developed for wireless sensor networks with power hungry sensors is optimized and enhanced to adapt the sampling frequency according to the available energy of the node. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using two in-field testbeds that are supplied by two different energy harvesting sources (solar and wind). Simulation and comparison between the state-of-the-art ASA and the proposed energy aware ASA (EASA) in terms of energy durability are carried out using in-field measured harvested energy (using both wind and solar sources) and power hungry sensors (ultrasonic wind sensor and gas sensors). The simulation results demonstrate that using ASA in combination with an energy aware function on the nodes can drastically increase the lifetime of a WSN node and enable self-sustainability. In fact, the proposed EASA in conjunction with energy harvesting capability can lead towards perpetual WSN operation and significantly outperform the state-of-the-art ASA. PMID:27043559

  20. Real-time nutrient monitoring in rivers: adaptive sampling strategies, technological challenges and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaen, Phillip; Khamis, Kieran; Lloyd, Charlotte; Bradley, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Excessive nutrient concentrations in river waters threaten aquatic ecosystem functioning and can pose substantial risks to human health. Robust monitoring strategies are therefore required to generate reliable estimates of river nutrient loads and to improve understanding of the catchment processes that drive spatiotemporal patterns in nutrient fluxes. Furthermore, these data are vital for prediction of future trends under changing environmental conditions and thus the development of appropriate mitigation measures. In recent years, technological developments have led to an increase in the use of continuous in-situ nutrient analysers, which enable measurements at far higher temporal resolutions than can be achieved with discrete sampling and subsequent laboratory analysis. However, such instruments can be costly to run and difficult to maintain (e.g. due to high power consumption and memory requirements), leading to trade-offs between temporal and spatial monitoring resolutions. Here, we highlight how adaptive monitoring strategies, comprising a mixture of temporal sample frequencies controlled by one or more 'trigger variables' (e.g. river stage, turbidity, or nutrient concentration), can advance our understanding of catchment nutrient dynamics while simultaneously overcoming many of the practical and economic challenges encountered in typical in-situ river nutrient monitoring applications. We present examples of short-term variability in river nutrient dynamics, driven by complex catchment behaviour, which support our case for the development of monitoring systems that can adapt in real-time to rapid environmental changes. In addition, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of current nutrient monitoring techniques, and suggest new research directions based on emerging technologies and highlight how these might improve: 1) monitoring strategies, and 2) understanding of linkages between catchment processes and river nutrient fluxes.

  1. Adaptive sampling of CT data for myocardial blood flow estimation from dose-reduced dynamic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modgil, Dimple; Bindschadler, Michael D.; Alessio, Adam M.; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) can aid in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there are no widely accepted clinical methods for estimating MBF. Dynamic CT holds the promise of providing a quick and easy method to measure MBF quantitatively, however the need for repeated scans has raised concerns about the potential for high radiation dose. In our previous work, we explored techniques to reduce the patient dose by either uniformly reducing the tube current or by uniformly reducing the number of temporal frames in the dynamic CT sequence. These dose reduction techniques result in very noisy data, which can give rise to large errors in MBF estimation. In this work, we seek to investigate whether nonuniformly varying the tube current or sampling intervals can yield more accurate MBF estimates. Specifically, we try to minimize the dose and obtain the most accurate MBF estimate through addressing the following questions: when in the time attenuation curve (TAC) should the CT data be collected and at what tube current(s). We hypothesize that increasing the sampling rate and/or tube current during the time frames when the myocardial CT number is most sensitive to the flow rate, while reducing them elsewhere, can achieve better estimation accuracy for the same dose. We perform simulations of contrast agent kinetics and CT acquisitions to evaluate the relative MBF estimation performance of several clinically viable adaptive acquisition methods. We found that adaptive temporal and tube current sequences can be performed that impart an effective dose of about 5 mSv and allow for reductions in MBF estimation RMSE on the order of 11% compared to uniform acquisition sequences with comparable or higher radiation doses.

  2. Efficient estimation of abundance for patchily distributed populations via two-phase, adaptive sampling.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Runge, J.P.; Barker, R.J.; Schofield, M.R.; Fonnesbeck, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Many organisms are patchily distributed, with some patches occupied at high density, others at lower densities, and others not occupied. Estimation of overall abundance can be difficult and is inefficient via intensive approaches such as capture-mark-recapture (CMR) or distance sampling. We propose a two-phase sampling scheme and model in a Bayesian framework to estimate abundance for patchily distributed populations. In the first phase, occupancy is estimated by binomial detection samples taken on all selected sites, where selection may be of all sites available, or a random sample of sites. Detection can be by visual surveys, detection of sign, physical captures, or other approach. At the second phase, if a detection threshold is achieved, CMR or other intensive sampling is conducted via standard procedures (grids or webs) to estimate abundance. Detection and CMR data are then used in a joint likelihood to model probability of detection in the occupancy sample via an abundance-detection model. CMR modeling is used to estimate abundance for the abundance-detection relationship, which in turn is used to predict abundance at the remaining sites, where only detection data are collected. We present a full Bayesian modeling treatment of this problem, in which posterior inference on abundance and other parameters (detection, capture probability) is obtained under a variety of assumptions about spatial and individual sources of heterogeneity. We apply the approach to abundance estimation for two species of voles (Microtus spp.) in Montana, USA. We also use a simulation study to evaluate the frequentist properties of our procedure given known patterns in abundance and detection among sites as well as design criteria. For most population characteristics and designs considered, bias and mean-square error (MSE) were low, and coverage of true parameter values by Bayesian credibility intervals was near nominal. Our two-phase, adaptive approach allows efficient estimation of

  3. Defining and evaluating the umbrella species concept for conserving and restoring landscape connectivity.

    PubMed

    Breckheimer, Ian; Haddad, Nick M; Morris, William F; Trainor, Anne M; Fields, William R; Jobe, R Todd; Hudgens, Brian R; Moody, Aaron; Walters, Jeffrey R

    2014-12-01

    Conserving or restoring landscape connectivity between patches of breeding habitat is a common strategy to protect threatened species from habitat fragmentation. By managing connectivity for some species, usually charismatic vertebrates, it is often assumed that these species will serve as conservation umbrellas for other species. We tested this assumption by developing a quantitative method to measure overlap in dispersal habitat of 3 threatened species-a bird (the umbrella), a butterfly, and a frog-inhabiting the same fragmented landscape. Dispersal habitat was determined with Circuitscape, which was parameterized with movement data collected for each species. Despite differences in natural history and breeding habitat, we found substantial overlap in the spatial distributions of areas important for dispersal of this suite of taxa. However, the intuitive umbrella species (the bird) did not have the highest overlap with other species in terms of the areas that supported connectivity. Nevertheless, we contend that when there are no irreconcilable differences between the dispersal habitats of species that cohabitate on the landscape, managing for umbrella species can help conserve or restore connectivity simultaneously for multiple threatened species with different habitat requirements.

  4. The Outdoor Education Umbrella: A Metaphoric Model To Conceptualize Outdoor Experiential Learning Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisson, Christian

    Explaining what outdoor experiential education is can be problematic, as a variety of terms are being used to identify a wide range of outdoor experiential learning methods. This paper proposes the metaphoric model of an umbrella to explain the relationships existing among these terms and their respective outdoor experiential learning methods. The…

  5. The "Umbrella Sign": A Useful Clue in the Diagnosis of Melanocytic Lesions in Sun Damaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Wood, Benjamin A; Harvey, Nathan T

    2016-07-01

    As ultraviolet radiation is an important aetiological agent in melanoma development, the presence of solar elastosis is an important factor in the assessment of any melanocytic lesion. However, melanocytic naevi are also seen in chronically sun damaged skin, particularly in regions with high levels of ultraviolet exposure and fair skinned populations. It has previously been noted that the relationship of a melanocytic proliferation to elastic fibers in the dermis can be of discriminatory value in the separation of melanoma from melanocytic naevus, in particular, it has been proposed that naevi act as a "sunscreen," which may result in a histological clue that the authors colloquially refer to in practice as "the umbrella sign." The aim of this study was to evaluate the patterns of solar elastosis within and beneath melanocytic proliferations developing in sun damaged skin and to determine the utility of the "umbrella sign" in diagnostic practice. We assessed 81 melanocytic proliferations in sun damaged skin for the presence of an umbrella sign, that was present in 49/53 melanocytic naevi (92%) compared with only 2/28 melanomas (7%, P < 0.05). In addition, entrapped elastotic fibers displaying distinct purple discolouration were identified in 16 melanocytic naevi. This finding was not identified in any of the melanomas. The umbrella sign appears to be a useful clue in the distinction of melanoma from melanocytic naevus in sun damaged skin, although as with all histological features in melanocytic pathology, it requires interpretation within a multifactorial assessment cognizant of potential diagnostic pitfalls.

  6. Summer Mathematics Remediation for Incoming Pupils; 1975 High School Umbrella Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegelman, Marvin

    Funded under Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I, the Summer Remediation for Incoming Pupils 1975 High School Umbrella #2 program (RIP) was designed to provide remedial instruction in mathematics to incoming ninth and tenth grade pupils who had attended Title I junior high or intermediate schools. The program was designed to bridge the gap…

  7. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  8. French Adaptation of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory in a Belgian French-Speaking Sample.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stéphanie; Kempenaers, Chantal; Linkowski, Paul; Loas, Gwenolé

    2016-01-01

    The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is the most widely used self-report scale to assess the construct of narcissism, especially in its grandiosity expression. Over the years, several factor models have been proposed in order to improve the understanding of the multidimensional aspect of this construct. The available data are heterogeneous, suggesting one to at least seven factors. In this study, we propose a French adaptation of the NPI submitted to a sample of Belgian French-speaking students (n = 942). We performed a principal component analysis on a tetrachoric correlation matrix to explore its factor structure. Unlike previous studies, our study shows that a first factor explains the largest part of the variance. Internal consistency is excellent and we reproduced the sex differences reported when using the original scale. Correlations with social desirability are taken into account in the interpretation of our results. Altogether, the results of this study support a unidimensional structure for the NPI using the total score as a self-report measure of the Narcissistic Personality Disorder in its grandiose form. Future studies including confirmatory factor analysis and gender invariance measurement are also discussed.

  9. French Adaptation of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory in a Belgian French-Speaking Sample

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Stéphanie; Kempenaers, Chantal; Linkowski, Paul; Loas, Gwenolé

    2016-01-01

    The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is the most widely used self-report scale to assess the construct of narcissism, especially in its grandiosity expression. Over the years, several factor models have been proposed in order to improve the understanding of the multidimensional aspect of this construct. The available data are heterogeneous, suggesting one to at least seven factors. In this study, we propose a French adaptation of the NPI submitted to a sample of Belgian French-speaking students (n = 942). We performed a principal component analysis on a tetrachoric correlation matrix to explore its factor structure. Unlike previous studies, our study shows that a first factor explains the largest part of the variance. Internal consistency is excellent and we reproduced the sex differences reported when using the original scale. Correlations with social desirability are taken into account in the interpretation of our results. Altogether, the results of this study support a unidimensional structure for the NPI using the total score as a self-report measure of the Narcissistic Personality Disorder in its grandiose form. Future studies including confirmatory factor analysis and gender invariance measurement are also discussed. PMID:28066299

  10. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer. PMID:27499762

  11. Adaptive geostatistical sampling enables efficient identification of malaria hotspots in repeated cross-sectional surveys in rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Chipeta, Michael G.; McCann, Robert S.; Phiri, Kamija S.; van Vugt, Michèle; Takken, Willem; Diggle, Peter; Terlouw, Anja D.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In the context of malaria elimination, interventions will need to target high burden areas to further reduce transmission. Current tools to monitor and report disease burden lack the capacity to continuously detect fine-scale spatial and temporal variations of disease distribution exhibited by malaria. These tools use random sampling techniques that are inefficient for capturing underlying heterogeneity while health facility data in resource-limited settings are inaccurate. Continuous community surveys of malaria burden provide real-time results of local spatio-temporal variation. Adaptive geostatistical design (AGD) improves prediction of outcome of interest compared to current random sampling techniques. We present findings of continuous malaria prevalence surveys using an adaptive sampling design. Methods We conducted repeated cross sectional surveys guided by an adaptive sampling design to monitor the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and anaemia in children below five years old in the communities living around Majete Wildlife Reserve in Chikwawa district, Southern Malawi. AGD sampling uses previously collected data to sample new locations of high prediction variance or, where prediction exceeds a set threshold. We fitted a geostatistical model to predict malaria prevalence in the area. Findings We conducted five rounds of sampling, and tested 876 children aged 6–59 months from 1377 households over a 12-month period. Malaria prevalence prediction maps showed spatial heterogeneity and presence of hotspots—where predicted malaria prevalence was above 30%; predictors of malaria included age, socio-economic status and ownership of insecticide-treated mosquito nets. Conclusions Continuous malaria prevalence surveys using adaptive sampling increased malaria prevalence prediction accuracy. Results from the surveys were readily available after data collection. The tool can assist local managers to target malaria control interventions in areas with the

  12. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  13. The Parent Version of the Preschool Social Skills Rating System: Psychometric Analysis and Adaptation with a German Preschool Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Markus; Scheithauer, Herbert; Kleiber, Dieter; Wille, Nora; Erhart, Michael; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    The Social Skills Rating System (SSRS) developed by Gresham and Elliott (1990) is a multirater, norm-referenced instrument measuring social skills and adaptive behavior in preschool children. The aims of the present study were (a) to test the factorial structure of the Parent Form of the SSRS for the first time with a German preschool sample (391…

  14. Some Features of the Sampling Distribution of the Ability Estimate in Computerized Adaptive Testing According to Two Stopping Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blais, Jean-Guy; Raiche, Gilles

    This paper examines some characteristics of the statistics associated with the sampling distribution of the proficiency level estimate when the Rasch model is used. These characteristics allow the judgment of the meaning to be given to the proficiency level estimate obtained in adaptive testing, and as a consequence, they can illustrate the…

  15. Fluoropyrimidine and platinum toxicity pharmacogenetics: an umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jared M; Bateman, Emma; Peters, Micah Dj; Bowen, Joanne M; Keefe, Dorothy M; Stephenson, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    Fluoropyrimidine (FU) and platinum-based chemotherapies are greatly complicated by their associated toxicities. This umbrella systematic review synthesized all systematic reviews that investigated associations between germline variations and toxicity, with the aim of informing personalized medicine. Systematic reviews are important in pharmacogenetics where false positives are common. Four systematic reviews were identified for FU-induced toxicity and three for platinum. Polymorphisms of DPYD and TYMS, but not MTHFR, were statistically significantly associated with FU-induced toxicity (although only DPYD had clinical significance). For platinum, GSTP1 was found to not be associated with toxicity. This umbrella systematic review has synthesized the best available evidence on the pharmacogenetics of FU and platinum toxicity. It provides a useful reference for clinicians and identifies important research gaps.

  16. Umbrella-coplanar transition in the triangular XXZ model with arbitrary spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorini, Giacomo; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Danshita, Ippei

    2016-06-01

    The quantum triangular XXZ model has recently enjoyed a wealth of new theoretical results, especially in relation to the modeling of the Ba3CoSb2O9 compound. In particular, it has been understood that in a longitudinal magnetic field the umbrella (cone) phase, classically stable in all the easy-plane region of the ground-state phase diagram, is considerably reduced by the effect of quantum fluctuations. We provide more quantitative information for this phenomenon at arbitrary value of the site spin S , by employing the dilute Bose gas expansion, valid in the high-field regime; our results improve the available estimates of the 1 /S expansion. We quantify the extent to which a higher spin suppresses the effect of quantum fluctuations. Besides, we show how in three-dimensional layered systems a relatively small antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling has a similar consequence of bringing back the umbrella phase in some part of the phase diagram.

  17. A comparison of adaptive sampling designs and binary spatial models: A simulation study using a census of Bromus inermis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Kathryn M.; Thornton, Jamie; Backus, Vickie M.; Hohmann, Matthew G.; Lehnhoff, Erik A.; Maxwell, Bruce D.; Michels, Kurt; Rew, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Commonly in environmental and ecological studies, species distribution data are recorded as presence or absence throughout a spatial domain of interest. Field based studies typically collect observations by sampling a subset of the spatial domain. We consider the effects of six different adaptive and two non-adaptive sampling designs and choice of three binary models on both predictions to unsampled locations and parameter estimation of the regression coefficients (species–environment relationships). Our simulation study is unique compared to others to date in that we virtually sample a true known spatial distribution of a nonindigenous plant species, Bromus inermis. The census of B. inermis provides a good example of a species distribution that is both sparsely (1.9 % prevalence) and patchily distributed. We find that modeling the spatial correlation using a random effect with an intrinsic Gaussian conditionally autoregressive prior distribution was equivalent or superior to Bayesian autologistic regression in terms of predicting to un-sampled areas when strip adaptive cluster sampling was used to survey B. inermis. However, inferences about the relationships between B. inermis presence and environmental predictors differed between the two spatial binary models. The strip adaptive cluster designs we investigate provided a significant advantage in terms of Markov chain Monte Carlo chain convergence when trying to model a sparsely distributed species across a large area. In general, there was little difference in the choice of neighborhood, although the adaptive king was preferred when transects were randomly placed throughout the spatial domain.

  18. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of In situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    integrated observation system that is being coupled to a data assimilative hydrodynamic bio-optical ecosystem model. The system was used adaptively to develop hyperspectral remote sensing techniques in optically complex nearshore coastal waters.

  19. Geological support for the Umbrella Effect as a link between geomagnetic field and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaba, Ikuko; Hyodo, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Katoh, Shigehiro; Dettman, David L.; Sato, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The weakening of the geomagnetic field causes an increase in galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux. Some researchers argue that enhanced GCR flux might lead to a climatic cooling by increasing low cloud formation, which enhances albedo (umbrella effect). Recent studies have reported geological evidence for a link between weakened geomagnetic field and climatic cooling. However, more work is needed on the mechanism of this link, including whether the umbrella effect is playing a central role. In this research, we present new geological evidence that GCR flux change had a greater impact on continental climate than on oceanic climate. According to pollen data from Osaka Bay, Japan, the decrease in temperature of the Siberian air mass was greater than that of the Pacific air mass during geomagnetic reversals in marine isotope stages (MIS) 19 and 31. Consequently, the summer land-ocean temperature gradient was smaller, and the summer monsoon was weaker. Greater terrestrial cooling indicates that a reduction of insolation is playing a key role in the link between the weakening of the geomagnetic field and climatic cooling. The most likely candidate for the mechanism seems to be the increased albedo of the umbrella effect.

  20. Geological support for the Umbrella Effect as a link between geomagnetic field and climate

    PubMed Central

    Kitaba, Ikuko; Hyodo, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Katoh, Shigehiro; Dettman, David L.; Sato, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The weakening of the geomagnetic field causes an increase in galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux. Some researchers argue that enhanced GCR flux might lead to a climatic cooling by increasing low cloud formation, which enhances albedo (umbrella effect). Recent studies have reported geological evidence for a link between weakened geomagnetic field and climatic cooling. However, more work is needed on the mechanism of this link, including whether the umbrella effect is playing a central role. In this research, we present new geological evidence that GCR flux change had a greater impact on continental climate than on oceanic climate. According to pollen data from Osaka Bay, Japan, the decrease in temperature of the Siberian air mass was greater than that of the Pacific air mass during geomagnetic reversals in marine isotope stages (MIS) 19 and 31. Consequently, the summer land-ocean temperature gradient was smaller, and the summer monsoon was weaker. Greater terrestrial cooling indicates that a reduction of insolation is playing a key role in the link between the weakening of the geomagnetic field and climatic cooling. The most likely candidate for the mechanism seems to be the increased albedo of the umbrella effect. PMID:28091595

  1. Orthogonal Coordinates and Hyperquantization Algorithm. The NH3 and H3O+ Umbrella Inversion Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragni, M.; Lombardi, A.; Pereira Barreto, P. R.; Peixoto Bitencourt, A. C.

    2009-09-01

    In order to describe the umbrella inversion mode, which is characteristic of AB3-type molecules, we have introduced an alternative hyperspherical coordinate set based on a parametrization of Radau-Smith orthogonal vectors and have considered constraints which allow us to enforce the C3v symmetry. Structural properties and electronic energies at equilibrium and barrier configurations have been obtained at MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Energy profiles have been calculated using the CCSD(T) method with an aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. The NH3 and H3O+ umbrella inversion levels are obtained by the hyperquantization algorithm for a one-dimensional calculation, using a specially defined hyperangle as the inversion coordinate. The results are compared with experimental and theoretical energy levels, in particular, with those obtained by calculations based on two-dimensional models. The emerging picture of the umbrella inversion based on this hyperangular coordinate compares favorably with respect to the usual valence-type description.

  2. Adaptation of G-TAG Software for Validating Touch-and-Go Comet Surface Sampling Design Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandic, Milan; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The G-TAG software tool was developed under the R&TD on Integrated Autonomous Guidance, Navigation, and Control for Comet Sample Return, and represents a novel, multi-body dynamics simulation software tool for studying TAG sampling. The G-TAG multi-body simulation tool provides a simulation environment in which a Touch-and-Go (TAG) sampling event can be extensively tested. TAG sampling requires the spacecraft to descend to the surface, contact the surface with a sampling collection device, and then to ascend to a safe altitude. The TAG event lasts only a few seconds but is mission-critical with potentially high risk. Consequently, there is a need for the TAG event to be well characterized and studied by simulation and analysis in order for the proposal teams to converge on a reliable spacecraft design. This adaptation of the G-TAG tool was developed to support the Comet Odyssey proposal effort, and is specifically focused to address comet sample return missions. In this application, the spacecraft descends to and samples from the surface of a comet. Performance of the spacecraft during TAG is assessed based on survivability and sample collection performance. For the adaptation of the G-TAG simulation tool to comet scenarios, models are developed that accurately describe the properties of the spacecraft, approach trajectories, and descent velocities, as well as the models of the external forces and torques acting on the spacecraft. The adapted models of the spacecraft, descent profiles, and external sampling forces/torques were more sophisticated and customized for comets than those available in the basic G-TAG simulation tool. Scenarios implemented include the study of variations in requirements, spacecraft design (size, locations, etc. of the spacecraft components), and the environment (surface properties, slope, disturbances, etc.). The simulations, along with their visual representations using G-View, contributed to the Comet Odyssey New Frontiers proposal

  3. Adaptation and psychometric properties of the student career construction inventory for a Portuguese sample: formative and reflective constructs.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Magda; Guimarães, Maria Isabel

    2012-12-01

    The adaptation of the student career construction inventory was carried out with a Portuguese sample of 356 first-year economics, management, psychology, nursing, nutrition sciences, bio-engineering, and biosciences students (244 women, 112 men; M age = 19.4, SD = 4.4) in the Catholic University of Portugal, Porto. Confirmatory factorial analysis supported the prior structure of the reflective models, with acceptable fit indexes. Internal consistency coefficients for the scales were poor to acceptable (.51 to .89). The formative nature of career adaptability was supported in a complex model identified by structural relations for which the fit indexes were weak but acceptable for a preliminary study.

  4. Sample preparation and biomass determination of SRF model mixture using cryogenic milling and the adapted balance method

    SciTech Connect

    Schnöller, Johannes Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Hahn, Manuel; Fellner, Johann; Rechberger, Helmut

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • An alternative sample comminution procedure for SRF is tested. • Proof of principle is shown on a SRF model mixture. • The biogenic content of the SRF is analyzed with the adapted balance method. • The novel method combines combustion analysis and a data reconciliation algorithm. • Factors for the variance of the analysis results are statistically quantified. - Abstract: The biogenic fraction of a simple solid recovered fuel (SRF) mixture (80 wt% printer paper/20 wt% high density polyethylene) is analyzed with the in-house developed adapted balance method (aBM). This fairly new approach is a combination of combustion elemental analysis (CHNS) and a data reconciliation algorithm based on successive linearisation for evaluation of the analysis results. This method shows a great potential as an alternative way to determine the biomass content in SRF. However, the employed analytical technique (CHNS elemental analysis) restricts the probed sample mass to low amounts in the range of a few hundred milligrams. This requires sample comminution to small grain sizes (<200 μm) to generate representative SRF specimen. This is not easily accomplished for certain material mixtures (e.g. SRF with rubber content) by conventional means of sample size reduction. This paper presents a proof of principle investigation of the sample preparation and analysis of an SRF model mixture with the use of cryogenic impact milling (final sample comminution) and the adapted balance method (determination of biomass content). The so derived sample preparation methodology (cutting mills and cryogenic impact milling) shows a better performance in accuracy and precision for the determination of the biomass content than one solely based on cutting mills. The results for the determination of the biogenic fraction are within 1–5% of the data obtained by the reference methods, selective dissolution method (SDM) and {sup 14}C-method ({sup 14}C-M)

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality in a PTSD Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Erika J.; Harrington, Kelly M.; Miller, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric characteristics of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP; Clark, 1996) in 280 individuals who screened positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The SNAP validity, trait, temperament, and personality disorder (PD) scales were compared with scales on the Brief Form of the…

  6. Adaption of egg and larvae sampling techniques for lake sturgeon and broadcast spawning fishes in a deep river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseman, Edward F.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Craig, Jaquelyn; Boase, James; Soper, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this report we describe how we adapted two techniques for sampling lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) and other fish early life history stages to meet our research needs in the Detroit River, a deep, flowing Great Lakes connecting channel. First, we developed a buoy-less method for sampling fish eggs and spawning activity using egg mats deployed on the river bottom. The buoy-less method allowed us to fish gear in areas frequented by boaters and recreational anglers, thus eliminating surface obstructions that interfered with recreational and boating activities. The buoy-less method also reduced gear loss due to drift when masses of floating aquatic vegetation would accumulate on buoys and lines, increasing the drag on the gear and pulling it downstream. Second, we adapted a D-frame drift net system formerly employed in shallow streams to assess larval lake sturgeon dispersal for use in the deeper (>8 m) Detroit River using an anchor and buoy system.

  7. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of In situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    We are developing an integrated rapid environmental assessment capability that will be used to feed an ocean nowcast/forecast system. The goal is to develop a capacity for predicting the dynamics in inherent optical properties in coastal waters. This is being accomplished by developing an integrated observation system that is being coupled to a data assimilative hydrodynamic bio-optical ecosystem model. The system was used adaptively to calibrate hyperspectral remote sensing sensors in optically complex nearshore coastal waters.

  8. Overcoming the Curse of Dimension: Methods Based on Sparse Representation and Adaptive Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-28

    carried out mainly by him, together with our joint post-doc Haijun Yu. Please refer to his report for the progress made in this direction. 3 Exploring...multiscale modeling using sparse representation”, Comm. Comp. Phys., 4(5), pp. 1025–1033 (2008). [3] X. Zhou and W. Ren and W. E, “Adaptive minimum...action method for the study of rare events”, J. Chem. Phys., 128, 10, 2008. [4] X. Wan, X. Zhou and W. E, “Noise-induced transitions in the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation”, preprint, submitted. 4

  9. Adaptive sample size modification in clinical trials: start small then ask for more?

    PubMed

    Jennison, Christopher; Turnbull, Bruce W

    2015-12-20

    We consider sample size re-estimation in a clinical trial, in particular when there is a significant delay before the measurement of patient response. Mehta and Pocock have proposed methods in which sample size is increased when interim results fall in a 'promising zone' where it is deemed worthwhile to increase conditional power by adding more subjects. Our analysis reveals potential pitfalls in applying this approach. Mehta and Pocock use results of Chen, DeMets and Lan to identify when increasing sample size, but applying a conventional level α significance test at the end of the trial does not inflate the type I error rate: we have found the greatest gains in power per additional observation are liable to lie outside the region defined by this method. Mehta and Pocock increase sample size to achieve a particular conditional power, calculated under the current estimate of treatment effect: this leads to high increases in sample size for a small range of interim outcomes, whereas we have found it more efficient to make moderate increases in sample size over a wider range of cases. If the aforementioned pitfalls are avoided, we believe the broad framework proposed by Mehta and Pocock is valuable for clinical trial design. Working in this framework, we propose sample size rules that apply explicitly the principle of adding observations when they are most beneficial. The resulting trial designs are closely related to efficient group sequential tests for a delayed response proposed by Hampson and Jennison.

  10. Random Transect with Adaptive Clustering Sampling Design - ArcPad Applet Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    sampling design geodatabase ................................. 6 3.1.2 Create features in geodatabase ...developed for ArcPad®, a mobile geographical information software (GIS) for field applications developed by ESRI ® of Redlands, CA. ArcPad is designed to...occurrence maps (Rew et al. 2005) to guide future surveying and management efforts. The RTAC combines features of the two NIS sampling designs described

  11. An adaptive sampling algorithm for Doppler-shift fluorescence velocimetry in high-speed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Page, Laurent M.; O'Byrne, Sean

    2017-03-01

    We present an approach to improving the efficiency of obtaining samples over a given domain for the peak location of Gaussian line-shapes. The method uses parameter estimates obtained from previous measurements to determine subsequent sampling locations. The method may be applied to determine the location of a spectral peak, where the monetary or time cost is too high to allow a less efficient search method, such as sampling at uniformly distributed domain locations, to be used. We demonstrate the algorithm using linear least-squares fitting of log-scaled planar laser-induced fluorescence data combined with Monte-Carlo simulation of measurements, to accurately determine the Doppler-shifted fluorescence peak frequency for each pixel of a fluorescence image. A simulated comparison between this approach and a uniformly spaced sampling approach is carried out using fits both for a single pixel and for a collection of pixels representing the fluorescence images that would be obtained in a hypersonic flow facility. In all cases, the peak location of Doppler-shifted line-shapes were determined to a similar precision with fewer samples than could be achieved using the more typical uniformly distributed sampling approach.

  12. Acquiring Peak Samples from Phytoplankton Thin Layers and Intermediate Nepheloid Layers by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle with Adaptive Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; McEwen, R.; Ryan, J. P.; Bellingham, J. G.; Harvey, J.; Vrijenhoek, R.

    2010-12-01

    Phytoplankton thin layers (PTLs) affect many fundamental aspects of coastal ocean ecology including primary productivity, development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and the survival and growth of zooplankton and fish larvae. Intermediate nepheloid layers (INLs) that contain suspended particulate matter transported from the bottom boundary layer of continental shelves and slopes also affect biogeochemistry and ecology of ocean margins. To better understand the impacts of these types of layers, we have developed an adaptive sampling method for an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to detect a layer (adjusting detection parameters in situ), acquire water samples from peaks in the layer, and acquire control samples outside the layer. We have used the method in a number of field experiments with the AUV Dorado, which is equipped with ten water samplers (called "gulpers"). In real time, the algorithm tracks background levels of fluorescence and optical backscatter and the peaks' baseline to ensure that detection is tuned to the ambient conditions. The algorithm cross-checks fluorescence and backscatter signals to differentiate PTLs from INLs. To capture peak water samples with minimal delay, the algorithm exploits the AUV's sawtooth (i.e., yo-yo) trajectory: the vehicle crosses the detected layer twice in one yo-yo cycle. At the first crossing, it detects the layer's peak and saves its signal height. Sampling is triggered at the second crossing when the signal reaches the saved peak height plus meeting additional timing and depth conditions. The algorithm is also capable of triggering gulpers to acquire control samples outside the layer for comparison with ambient water. The sequence of peak and control samples can be set based on need. In recent AUV Dorado missions, the algorithm triggered the gulpers to acquire peak and control samples from INLs and PTLs in Monterey Bay. Zooplankton analysis of some peak samples showed very high concentrations of mussel and barnacle

  13. Reliability and Validity of the Spanish Adaptation of EOSS, Comparing Normal and Clinical Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valero-Aguayo, Luis; Ferro-Garcia, Rafael; Lopez-Bermudez, Miguel Angel; de Huralde, Ma. Angeles Selva-Lopez

    2012-01-01

    The Experiencing of Self Scale (EOSS) was created for the evaluation of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (Kohlenberg & Tsai, 1991, 2001, 2008) in relation to the concept of the experience of personal self as socially and verbally constructed. This paper presents a reliability and validity study of the EOSS with a Spanish sample (582…

  14. Social Daydreaming and Adjustment: An Experience-Sampling Study of Socio-Emotional Adaptation During a Life Transition

    PubMed Central

    Poerio, Giulia L.; Totterdell, Peter; Emerson, Lisa-Marie; Miles, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Estimates suggest that up to half of waking life is spent daydreaming; that is, engaged in thought that is independent of, and unrelated to, one’s current task. Emerging research indicates that daydreams are predominately social suggesting that daydreams may serve socio-emotional functions. Here we explore the functional role of social daydreaming for socio-emotional adjustment during an important and stressful life transition (the transition to university) using experience-sampling with 103 participants over 28 days. Over time, social daydreams increased in their positive characteristics and positive emotional outcomes; specifically, participants reported that their daydreams made them feel more socially connected and less lonely, and that the content of their daydreams became less fanciful and involved higher quality relationships. These characteristics then predicted less loneliness at the end of the study, which, in turn was associated with greater social adaptation to university. Feelings of connection resulting from social daydreams were also associated with less emotional inertia in participants who reported being less socially adapted to university. Findings indicate that social daydreaming is functional for promoting socio-emotional adjustment to an important life event. We highlight the need to consider the social content of stimulus-independent cognitions, their characteristics, and patterns of change, to specify how social thoughts enable socio-emotional adaptation. PMID:26834685

  15. Whole genome resequencing of a laboratory-adapted Drosophila melanogaster population sample.

    PubMed

    Gilks, William P; Pennell, Tanya M; Flis, Ilona; Webster, Matthew T; Morrow, Edward H

    2016-01-01

    As part of a study into the molecular genetics of sexually dimorphic complex traits, we used high-throughput sequencing to obtain data on genomic variation in an outbred laboratory-adapted fruit fly ( Drosophila melanogaster) population. We successfully resequenced the whole genome of 220 hemiclonal females that were heterozygous for the same Berkeley reference line genome (BDGP6/dm6), and a unique haplotype from the outbred base population (LH M). The use of a static and known genetic background enabled us to obtain sequences from whole-genome phased haplotypes. We used a BWA-Picard-GATK pipeline for mapping sequence reads to the dm6 reference genome assembly, at a median depth-of coverage of 31X, and have made the resulting data publicly-available in the NCBI Short Read Archive (Accession number SRP058502). We used Haplotype Caller to discover and genotype 1,726,931 small genomic variants (SNPs and indels, <200bp). Additionally we detected and genotyped 167 large structural variants (1-100Kb in size) using GenomeStrip/2.0. Sequence and genotype data are publicly-available at the corresponding NCBI databases: Short Read Archive, dbSNP and dbVar (BioProject PRJNA282591). We have also released the unfiltered genotype data, and the code and logs for data processing and summary statistics ( https://zenodo.org/communities/sussex_drosophila_sequencing/).

  16. Whole genome resequencing of a laboratory-adapted Drosophila melanogaster population sample

    PubMed Central

    Gilks, William P.; Pennell, Tanya M.; Flis, Ilona; Webster, Matthew T.; Morrow, Edward H.

    2016-01-01

    As part of a study into the molecular genetics of sexually dimorphic complex traits, we used high-throughput sequencing to obtain data on genomic variation in an outbred laboratory-adapted fruit fly ( Drosophila melanogaster) population. We successfully resequenced the whole genome of 220 hemiclonal females that were heterozygous for the same Berkeley reference line genome (BDGP6/dm6), and a unique haplotype from the outbred base population (LH M). The use of a static and known genetic background enabled us to obtain sequences from whole-genome phased haplotypes. We used a BWA-Picard-GATK pipeline for mapping sequence reads to the dm6 reference genome assembly, at a median depth-of coverage of 31X, and have made the resulting data publicly-available in the NCBI Short Read Archive (Accession number SRP058502). We used Haplotype Caller to discover and genotype 1,726,931 small genomic variants (SNPs and indels, <200bp). Additionally we detected and genotyped 167 large structural variants (1-100Kb in size) using GenomeStrip/2.0. Sequence and genotype data are publicly-available at the corresponding NCBI databases: Short Read Archive, dbSNP and dbVar (BioProject PRJNA282591). We have also released the unfiltered genotype data, and the code and logs for data processing and summary statistics ( https://zenodo.org/communities/sussex_drosophila_sequencing/). PMID:27928499

  17. Psychometric properties of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality in a PTSD sample.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Erika J; Harrington, Kelly M; Miller, Mark W

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric characteristics of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP; Clark, 1996) in 280 individuals who screened positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The SNAP validity, trait, temperament, and personality disorder (PD) scales were compared with scales on the Brief Form of the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (Patrick, Curtin, & Tellegen, 2002). In a subsample of 86 veterans, the SNAP PD, trait, and temperament scales were also evaluated in comparison to the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE; Loranger, 1999), a semistructured diagnostic interview. Results revealed that the SNAP scales have good convergent validity, as evidenced by their pattern of associations with related measures of personality and PD. However, evidence for their discriminant validity in relationship to other measures of personality and PD was more mixed, and test scores on the SNAP trait and temperament scales left much unexplained variance in IPDE-assessed PDs. The diagnostic scoring of the SNAP PD scales greatly inflated prevalence estimates of PDs relative to the IPDE and showed poor agreement with the IPDE. In contrast, the dimensional SNAP scores yielded far stronger associations with continuous scores on the IPDE. The SNAP scales also largely evidenced expected patterns of association with a measure of PTSD severity. Overall, findings support the use of this measure in this population and contribute to our conceptualization of the association between temperament, PTSD, and Axis II psychopathology.

  18. The Application of Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Program (ASAP) Techniques to NORM Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert; Smith, Karen P.; Quinn, John

    1999-10-29

    The results from the Michigan demonstration establish that this type of approach can be very effective for NORM sites. The advantages include (1) greatly reduced per sample analytical costs; (2) a reduced reliance on soil sampling and ex situ gamma spectroscopy analyses; (3) the ability to combine characterization with remediation activities in one fieldwork cycle; (4) improved documentation; and (5) ultimately better remediation, as measured by greater precision in delineating soils that are not in compliance with requirements from soils that are in compliance. In addition, the demonstration showed that the use of real-time technologies, such as the RadInSoil, can facilitate the implementation of a Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM)-based final status survey program

  19. Adaptive robust image registration approach based on adequately sampling polar transform and weighted angular projection function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhao; Tao, Feng; Jun, Wang

    2013-10-01

    An efficient, robust, and accurate approach is developed for image registration, which is especially suitable for large-scale change and arbitrary rotation. It is named the adequately sampling polar transform and weighted angular projection function (ASPT-WAPF). The proposed ASPT model overcomes the oversampling problem of conventional log-polar transform. Additionally, the WAPF presented as the feature descriptor is robust to the alteration in the fovea area of an image, and reduces the computational cost of the following registration process. The experimental results show two major advantages of the proposed method. First, it can register images with high accuracy even when the scale factor is up to 10 and the rotation angle is arbitrary. However, the maximum scaling estimated by the state-of-the-art algorithms is 6. Second, our algorithm is more robust to the size of the sampling region while not decreasing the accuracy of the registration.

  20. Compact Ocean Models Enable Onboard AUV Autonomy and Decentralized Adaptive Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    synoptic information on-board a mobile platform. 2. To benefit from additional information provided by synoptic models, we developed a combination...properties ( chlorophyll -a and absorption due to phytoplankton), the model was able to reproduce intensity and tendencies in surface and subsurface... chlorophyll distributions observed at water samples locations in the Monterey Bay, CA (Figure 3). 5 2a) MODIS Chl-a 2b) without data

  1. Adaptive use of bubble wrap for storing liquid samples and performing analytical assays.

    PubMed

    Bwambok, David K; Christodouleas, Dionysios C; Morin, Stephen A; Lange, Heiko; Phillips, Scott T; Whitesides, George M

    2014-08-05

    This paper demonstrates that the gas-filled compartments in the packing material commonly called "bubble wrap" can be repurposed in resource-limited regions as containers to store liquid samples, and to perform bioanalyses. The bubbles of bubble wrap are easily filled by injecting the samples into them using a syringe with a needle or a pipet tip, and then sealing the hole with nail hardener. The bubbles are transparent in the visible range of the spectrum, and can be used as "cuvettes" for absorbance and fluorescence measurements. The interiors of these bubbles are sterile and allow storage of samples without the need for expensive sterilization equipment. The bubbles are also permeable to gases, and can be used to culture and store micro-organisms. By incorporating carbon electrodes, these bubbles can be used as electrochemical cells. This paper demonstrates the capabilities of the bubbles by culturing E. coli, growing C. elegans, measuring glucose and hemoglobin spectrophotometrically, and measuring ferrocyanide electrochemically, all within the bubbles.

  2. Longitudinal Patterns and Predictors of Depression Trajectories Related to the 2014 Occupy Central/Umbrella Movement in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tom K.; Pang, Herbert; Chan, Brandford H. Y.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Schooling, Catherine Mary; Leung, Gabriel Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the longitudinal patterns and predictors of depression trajectories before, during, and after Hong Kong’s 2014 Occupy Central/Umbrella Movement. Methods. In a prospective study, between March 2009 and November 2015, we interviewed 1170 adults randomly sampled from the population-representative FAMILY Cohort. We used the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 to assess depressive symptoms and probable major depression. We investigated pre-event and time-varying predictors of depressive symptoms. Results. We identified 4 trajectories: resistant (22.6% of sample), resilient (37.0%), mild depressive symptoms (32.5%), and persistent moderate depression (8.0%). Baseline predictors that appeared to protect against persistent moderate depression included higher household income (odds ratio [OR] = 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.06, 0.56), greater psychological resilience (OR = 0.63; 95% CI = 0.48, 0.82), more family harmony (OR = 0.68; 95% CI = 0.56, 0.83), higher family support (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.69, 0.92), better self-rated health (OR = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.16, 0.49), and fewer depressive symptoms (OR = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.43, 0.81). Conclusions. Depression trajectories after a major protest are comparable to those after major population events. Health care professionals should be aware of the mental health consequences during and after social movements, particularly among individuals lacking social support. PMID:28207329

  3. Massively parallel sampling of lattice proteins reveals foundations of thermal adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venev, Sergey V.; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.

    2015-08-01

    Evolution of proteins in bacteria and archaea living in different conditions leads to significant correlations between amino acid usage and environmental temperature. The origins of these correlations are poorly understood, and an important question of protein theory, physics-based prediction of types of amino acids overrepresented in highly thermostable proteins, remains largely unsolved. Here, we extend the random energy model of protein folding by weighting the interaction energies of amino acids by their frequencies in protein sequences and predict the energy gap of proteins designed to fold well at elevated temperatures. To test the model, we present a novel scalable algorithm for simultaneous energy calculation for many sequences in many structures, targeting massively parallel computing architectures such as graphics processing unit. The energy calculation is performed by multiplying two matrices, one representing the complete set of sequences, and the other describing the contact maps of all structural templates. An implementation of the algorithm for the CUDA platform is available at http://www.github.com/kzeldovich/galeprot and calculates protein folding energies over 250 times faster than a single central processing unit. Analysis of amino acid usage in 64-mer cubic lattice proteins designed to fold well at different temperatures demonstrates an excellent agreement between theoretical and simulated values of energy gap. The theoretical predictions of temperature trends of amino acid frequencies are significantly correlated with bioinformatics data on 191 bacteria and archaea, and highlight protein folding constraints as a fundamental selection pressure during thermal adaptation in biological evolution.

  4. Adaption of egg and larvae sampling techniques for lake sturgeon and broadcast spawning fishes in a deep river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseman, E.F.; Boase, J.; Kennedy, G.; Craig, J.; Soper, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this report we describe how we adapted two techniques for sampling lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) and other fish early life history stages to meet our research needs in the Detroit River, a deep, flowing Great Lakes connecting channel. First, we developed a buoy-less method for sampling fish eggs and spawning activity using egg mats deployed on the river bottom. The buoy-less method allowed us to fish gear in areas frequented by boaters and recreational anglers, thus eliminating surface obstructions that interfered with recreational and boating activities. The buoy-less method also reduced gear loss due to drift when masses of floating aquatic vegetation would accumulate on buoys and lines, increasing the drag on the gear and pulling it downstream. Second, we adapted a D-frame drift net system formerly employed in shallow streams to assess larval lake sturgeon dispersal for use in the deeper (>8m) Detroit River using an anchor and buoy system. ?? 2011 Blackwell Verlag, Berlin.

  5. Adaptive decision making in a dynamic environment: a test of a sequential sampling model of relative judgment.

    PubMed

    Vuckovic, Anita; Kwantes, Peter J; Neal, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Research has identified a wide range of factors that influence performance in relative judgment tasks. However, the findings from this research have been inconsistent. Studies have varied with respect to the identification of causal variables and the perceptual and decision-making mechanisms underlying performance. Drawing on the ecological rationality approach, we present a theory of the judgment and decision-making processes involved in a relative judgment task that explains how people judge a stimulus and adapt their decision process to accommodate their own uncertainty associated with those judgments. Undergraduate participants performed a simulated air traffic control conflict detection task. Across two experiments, we systematically manipulated variables known to affect performance. In the first experiment, we manipulated the relative distances of aircraft to a common destination while holding aircraft speeds constant. In a follow-up experiment, we introduced a direct manipulation of relative speed. We then fit a sequential sampling model to the data, and used the best fitting parameters to infer the decision-making processes responsible for performance. Findings were consistent with the theory that people adapt to their own uncertainty by adjusting their criterion and the amount of time they take to collect evidence in order to make a more accurate decision. From a practical perspective, the paper demonstrates that one can use a sequential sampling model to understand performance in a dynamic environment, allowing one to make sense of and interpret complex patterns of empirical findings that would otherwise be difficult to interpret using standard statistical analyses.

  6. Focussing over the edge: adaptive subsurface laser fabrication up to the sample face.

    PubMed

    Salter, P S; Booth, M J

    2012-08-27

    Direct laser writing is widely used for fabrication of subsurface, three dimensional structures in transparent media. However, the accessible volume is limited by distortion of the focussed beam at the sample edge. We determine the aberrated focal intensity distribution for light focused close to the edge of the substrate. Aberrations are modelled by dividing the pupil into two regions, each corresponding to light passing through the top and side facets. Aberration correction is demonstrated experimentally using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator for femtosecond microfabrication in fused silica. This technique allows controlled subsurface fabrication right up to the edge of the substrate. This can benefit a wide range of applications using direct laser writing, including the manufacture of waveguides and photonic crystals.

  7. The Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE): a model for training underserved scientists in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Franco, Idalid; Bailey, LeeAnn O; Bakos, Alexis D; Springfield, Sanya A

    2011-03-01

    Mentoring is a critical aspect of research and training; and the adoption of a successful mentoring model for guiding researchers through the educational pipeline is lacking. The Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE) program was established in the Comprehensive Minority Biomedical Branch; which is part of the National Cancer Institute. This program offers unique training and career development opportunities to enhance diversity in cancer research. The CURE initiative focuses on broadening the cadre of underserved investigators engaging in cancer research. CURE begins with high school students and fosters scientific, academic and research excellence throughout the trainee's educational progression. The program supports students throughout the entirety of their training career. During this period, the trainee matures into a competitive early stage investigator; capable of securing advanced research project funding in academic and industry workforces. Thus, the CURE program provides a comprehensive vehicle for training and reinforces the critical mass of underserved investigators conducting cancer research.

  8. Birth of Four Chimeric Plastid Gene Clusters in Japanese Umbrella Pine

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Yao; Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2016-01-01

    Many genes in the plastid genomes (plastomes) of plants are organized as gene clusters, in which genes are co-transcribed, resembling bacterial operons. These plastid operons are highly conserved, even among conifers, whose plastomes are highly rearranged relative to other seed plants. We have determined the complete plastome sequence of Sciadopitys verticillata (Japanese umbrella pine), the sole member of Sciadopityaceae. The Sciadopitys plastome is characterized by extensive inversions, pseudogenization of four tRNA genes after tandem duplications, and a unique pair of 370-bp inverted repeats involved in the formation of isomeric plastomes. We showed that plastomic inversions in Sciadopitys have led to shuffling of the remote conserved operons, resulting in the birth of four chimeric gene clusters. Our data also demonstrated that the relocated genes can be co-transcribed in these chimeric gene clusters. The plastome of Sciadopitys advances our current understanding of how the conifer plastomes have evolved toward increased diversity and complexity. PMID:27269365

  9. A Quantitative Evaluation of the Conservation Umbrella of Spotted Owl Management Areas in the Sierra Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Ryan D.; Roberts, L. Jay

    2015-01-01

    Whether by design or default, single species management often serves as an umbrella for species with similar habitat requirements. In recent decades the focus of National Forest management in the Sierra Nevada of California has shifted towards increasing closed canopy mature forest conditions through the protection of areas occupied by the California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis). To evaluate the implications of these habitat changes and the potential umbrella resulting from a system of owl reserves on the broader avian community, we estimated occupancy of birds inside and outside of Spotted Owl Home Range Core Areas in northeastern California. We used point count data in a multi-species hierarchical Bayesian model incorporating the detection history of 81 species over a two-year time period (2005-2006). A small set of vegetation cover and topography covariates were included in the model to account for broad differences in habitat conditions, as well as a term identifying whether or not a site was within a Core Area. Seventeen species had a negative Core Area effect, seven had a positive effect, and the rest were not significant. Estimated species richness was significantly different with 23.1 species per 100 m radius circle outside Core Areas and 21.7 inside Core Areas. The majority of the species negatively associated with Core Areas are tied to early successional and other disturbance-dependent habitats. Conservation and climate vulnerability rankings were mixed. On average we found higher scores (greater risk) for the species positively associated with Core Areas, but a larger number of species with the highest scores were negatively associated with Core Areas. We discuss the implications for managing the Sierra Nevada ecosystem and illustrate the role of monitoring broader suites of species in guiding management of large complex ecosystems. PMID:25905920

  10. A quantitative evaluation of the conservation umbrella of spotted owl management areas in the Sierra Nevada.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Ryan D; Roberts, L Jay

    2015-01-01

    Whether by design or default, single species management often serves as an umbrella for species with similar habitat requirements. In recent decades the focus of National Forest management in the Sierra Nevada of California has shifted towards increasing closed canopy mature forest conditions through the protection of areas occupied by the California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis). To evaluate the implications of these habitat changes and the potential umbrella resulting from a system of owl reserves on the broader avian community, we estimated occupancy of birds inside and outside of Spotted Owl Home Range Core Areas in northeastern California. We used point count data in a multi-species hierarchical Bayesian model incorporating the detection history of 81 species over a two-year time period (2005-2006). A small set of vegetation cover and topography covariates were included in the model to account for broad differences in habitat conditions, as well as a term identifying whether or not a site was within a Core Area. Seventeen species had a negative Core Area effect, seven had a positive effect, and the rest were not significant. Estimated species richness was significantly different with 23.1 species per 100 m radius circle outside Core Areas and 21.7 inside Core Areas. The majority of the species negatively associated with Core Areas are tied to early successional and other disturbance-dependent habitats. Conservation and climate vulnerability rankings were mixed. On average we found higher scores (greater risk) for the species positively associated with Core Areas, but a larger number of species with the highest scores were negatively associated with Core Areas. We discuss the implications for managing the Sierra Nevada ecosystem and illustrate the role of monitoring broader suites of species in guiding management of large complex ecosystems.

  11. Optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy following percutaneous coronary intervention: protocol for an umbrella review

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Shannon E; Bai, Zemin; Liu, Wenfei; Skidmore, Becky; Boucher, Michel; So, Derek Y F; Wells, George A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is routinely given to patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting, the optimal duration is unknown. Recent evidence indicates there may be benefits in extending the duration beyond 12 months but such decisions may increase the risk of bleeding. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature for clinicians and policymakers via an umbrella review assessing the optimal duration of DAPT. Methods and analysis We will perform a comprehensive search of the published and grey literature for systematic reviews involving randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the optimal duration of DAPT following PCI with stenting. The intervention of interest is extended DAPT (beyond 12 months) compared with short-term DAPT (6–12 months). Studies will be selected for inclusion by two reviewers, and the quality will be assessed. The primary outcomes of interest are all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Secondary outcomes will be bleeding (major, minor and gastrointestinal), urgent target vessel revascularisation, major adverse cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, stroke and stent thrombosis. Outcomes will be assessed while on DAPT and after withdrawal of DAPT. Data will be summarised with respect to the number of included RCTs, number of participants, effect estimates and heterogeneity. Data will be reported separately based on patient demographics, procedural parameters (eg, stent types, lesion complexity and concurrent disease) and clinical presentation (eg, acute coronary syndromes, infarct type). Ethics and dissemination Our umbrella review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the benefits and harms associated with extending DAPT beyond 12 months following PCI with stenting. The results of this review will inform clinical and policy decisions regarding the optimal treatment duration and reimbursement of DAPT following PCI with stenting

  12. Greater sage-grouse as an umbrella species for sagebrush-associated vertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowland, M.M.; Wisdom, M.J.; Suring, L.H.; Meinke, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    Widespread degradation of the sagebrush ecosystem in the western United States, including the invasion of cheatgrass, has prompted resource managers to consider a variety of approaches to restore and conserve habitats for sagebrush-associated species. One such approach involves the use of greater sage-grouse, a species of prominent conservation interest, as an umbrella species. This shortcut approach assumes that managing habitats to conserve sage-grouse will simultaneously benefit other species of conservation concern. The efficacy of using sage-grouse as an umbrella species for conservation management, however, has not been fully evaluated. We tested that concept by comparing: (1) commonality in land-cover associations, and (2) spatial overlap in habitats between sage-grouse and 39 other sagebrush-associated vertebrate species of conservation concern in the Great Basin ecoregion. Overlap in species' land-cover associations with those of sage-grouse, based on the ?? (phi) correlation coefficient, was substantially greater for sagebrush obligates (x??=0.40) than non-obligates (x??=0.21). Spatial overlap between habitats of target species and those associated with sage-grouse was low (mean ?? = 0.23), but somewhat greater for habitats at high risk of displacement by cheatgrass (mean ?? = 0.33). Based on our criteria, management of sage-grouse habitats likely would offer relatively high conservation coverage for sagebrush obligates such as pygmy rabbit (mean ?? = 0.84), but far less for other species we addressed, such as lark sparrow (mean ?? = 0.09), largely due to lack of commonality in land-cover affinity and geographic ranges of these species and sage-grouse.

  13. Cross-sector Service Provision in Health and Social Care: An Umbrella Review

    PubMed Central

    Magalhaes, Lilian; Anne Kinsella, Elizabeth; Kothari, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Meeting the complex health needs of people often requires interaction among numerous different sectors. No one service can adequately respond to the diverse care needs of consumers. Providers working more effectively together is frequently touted as the solution. Cross-sector service provision is defined as independent, yet interconnected sectors working together to better meet the needs of consumers and improve the quality and effectiveness of service provision. Cross-sector service provision is expected, yet much remains unknown about how it is conceptualised or its impact on health status. This umbrella review aims to clarify the critical attributes that shape cross-sector service provision by presenting the current state of the literature and building on the findings of the 2004 review by Sloper. Methods: Literature related to cross-sector service provision is immense, which poses a challenge for decision makers wishing to make evidence-informed decisions. An umbrella review was conducted to articulate the overall state of cross-sector service provision literature and examine the evidence to allow for the discovery of consistencies and discrepancies across the published knowledge base. Findings: Sixteen reviews met the inclusion criteria. Seven themes emerged: Focusing on the consumer, developing a shared vision of care, leadership involvement, service provision across the boundaries, adequately resourcing the arrangement, developing novel arrangements or aligning with existing relationships, and strengthening connections between sectors. Future research from a cross-organisational, rather than individual provider, perspective is needed to better understand what shapes cross-sector service provision at the boundaries. Conclusion: Findings aligned closely with the work done by Sloper and raise red flags related to reinventing what is already known. Future researchers should look to explore novel areas rather than looking into areas that have been

  14. Evaluation of single and two-stage adaptive sampling designs for estimation of density and abundance of freshwater mussels in a large river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.R.; Rogala, J.T.; Gray, B.R.; Zigler, S.J.; Newton, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable estimates of abundance are needed to assess consequences of proposed habitat restoration and enhancement projects on freshwater mussels in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR). Although there is general guidance on sampling techniques for population assessment of freshwater mussels, the actual performance of sampling designs can depend critically on the population density and spatial distribution at the project site. To evaluate various sampling designs, we simulated sampling of populations, which varied in density and degree of spatial clustering. Because of logistics and costs of large river sampling and spatial clustering of freshwater mussels, we focused on adaptive and non-adaptive versions of single and two-stage sampling. The candidate designs performed similarly in terms of precision (CV) and probability of species detection for fixed sample size. Both CV and species detection were determined largely by density, spatial distribution and sample size. However, designs did differ in the rate that occupied quadrats were encountered. Occupied units had a higher probability of selection using adaptive designs than conventional designs. We used two measures of cost: sample size (i.e. number of quadrats) and distance travelled between the quadrats. Adaptive and two-stage designs tended to reduce distance between sampling units, and thus performed better when distance travelled was considered. Based on the comparisons, we provide general recommendations on the sampling designs for the freshwater mussels in the UMR, and presumably other large rivers.

  15. Signatures of local adaptation in lowland and highland teosintes from whole-genome sequencing of pooled samples.

    PubMed

    Fustier, M-A; Brandenburg, J-T; Boitard, S; Lapeyronnie, J; Eguiarte, L E; Vigouroux, Y; Manicacci, D; Tenaillon, M I

    2017-03-03

    Spatially varying selection triggers differential adaptation of local populations. Here, we mined the determinants of local adaptation at the genomewide scale in the two closest maize wild relatives, the teosintes Zea mays ssp parviglumis and ssp. mexicana. We sequenced 120 individuals from six populations: two lowland, two intermediate and two highland populations sampled along two altitudinal gradients. We detected 8 479 581 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covered in the six populations with an average sequencing depth per site per population ranging from 17.0× to 32.2×. Population diversity varied from 0.10 to 0.15, and linkage disequilibrium decayed very rapidly. We combined two differentiation-based methods, and correlation of allele frequencies with environmental variables to detect outlier SNPs. Outlier SNPs displayed significant clustering. From clusters, we identified 47 candidate regions. We further modified a haplotype-based method to incorporate genotype uncertainties in haplotype calling, and applied it to candidate regions. We retrieved evidence for selection at the haplotype level in 53% of our candidate regions, and in 70% of the cases the same haplotype was selected in the two lowland or the two highland populations. We recovered a candidate region located within a previously characterized inversion on chromosome 1. We found evidence of a soft sweep at a locus involved in leaf macrohair variation. Finally, our results revealed frequent colocalization between our candidate regions and loci involved in the variation of traits associated with plant-soil interactions such as root morphology, aluminium and low phosphorus tolerance. Soil therefore appears to be a major driver of local adaptation in teosintes.

  16. ALS-resistant Smallflower umbrella (Cyperus difformis) in Arkansas rice: physiological and molecular basis of resistance mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smallflower umbrella sedge is a problematic weed in direct-seeded rice in the midsouthern U.S. It recently has evolved resistance to the acetolactate synthase (ALS)–inhibiting herbicide halosulfuron in Arkansas rice. Studies were conducted to (1) determine if the resistant biotype is cross resista...

  17. Speed-up of Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation Using Self-Adaptive Different Evolution with Subspace Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrugt, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are widely used in fields ranging from physics and chemistry, to finance, economics and statistical inference for estimating the average properties of complex systems. The convergence rate of MCMC schemes is often observed, however to be disturbingly low, limiting its practical use in many applications. This is frequently caused by an inappropriate selection of the proposal distribution used to generate trial moves. Here we show that significant improvements to the efficiency of MCMC algorithms can be made by using a self-adaptive Differential Evolution search strategy within a population-based evolutionary framework. This scheme differs fundamentally from existing MCMC algorithms, in that trial jumps are simply a fixed multiple of the difference of randomly chosen members of the population using various genetic operators that are adaptively updated during the search. In addition, the algorithm includes randomized subspace sampling to further improve convergence and acceptance rate. Detailed balance and ergodicity of the algorithm are proved, and hydrologic examples show that the proposed method significantly enhances the efficiency and applicability of MCMC simulations to complex, multi-modal search problems.

  18. Particle System Based Adaptive Sampling on Spherical Parameter Space to Improve the MDL Method for Construction of Statistical Shape Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Hirano, Yasushi; Tachibana, Rie; Hara, Takeshi; Kido, Shoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Minimum description length (MDL) based group-wise registration was a state-of-the-art method to determine the corresponding points of 3D shapes for the construction of statistical shape models (SSMs). However, it suffered from the problem that determined corresponding points did not uniformly spread on original shapes, since corresponding points were obtained by uniformly sampling the aligned shape on the parameterized space of unit sphere. We proposed a particle-system based method to obtain adaptive sampling positions on the unit sphere to resolve this problem. Here, a set of particles was placed on the unit sphere to construct a particle system whose energy was related to the distortions of parameterized meshes. By minimizing this energy, each particle was moved on the unit sphere. When the system became steady, particles were treated as vertices to build a spherical mesh, which was then relaxed to slightly adjust vertices to obtain optimal sampling-positions. We used 47 cases of (left and right) lungs and 50 cases of livers, (left and right) kidneys, and spleens for evaluations. Experiments showed that the proposed method was able to resolve the problem of the original MDL method, and the proposed method performed better in the generalization and specificity tests. PMID:23861721

  19. Adaptation of a speciation sampling cartridge for measuring ammonia flux from cattle feedlots using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K. A.; Ham, J. M.

    Improved measurements of ammonia losses from cattle feedlots are needed to quantify the national NH 3 emissions inventory and evaluate management techniques for reducing emissions. Speciation cartridges composed of glass honeycomb denuders and filter packs were adapted to measure gaseous NH 3 and aerosol NH 4+ fluxes using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). Laboratory testing showed that a cartridge equipped with four honeycomb denuders had a total capture capacity of 1800 μg of NH 3. In the field, a pair of cartridges was deployed adjacent to a sonic anemometer and an open-path gas analyzer on a mobile tower. High-speed valves were attached to the inlets of the cartridges and controlled by a datalogger so that up- and down-moving eddies were independently sampled based on direction of the vertical wind speed and a user-defined deadband. Air flowed continuously through the cartridges even when not sampling by means of a recirculating air handling system. Eddy covariance measurement of CO 2 and H 2O, as measured by the sonic and open-path gas analyzer, were used to determine the relaxation factor needed to compute REA-based fluxes. The REA system was field tested at the Beef Research Unit at Kansas State University in the summer and fall of 2007. Daytime NH 3 emissions ranged between 68 and 127 μg m -2 s -1; fluxes tended to follow a diurnal pattern correlated with latent heat flux. Daily fluxes of NH 3 were between 2.5 and 4.7 g m -2 d -1 and on average represented 38% of fed nitrogen. Aerosol NH 4+ fluxes were negligible compared with NH 3 emissions. An REA system designed around the high-capacity speciation cartridges can be used to measure NH 3 fluxes from cattle feedlots and other strong sources. The system could be adapted to measure fluxes of other gases and aerosols.

  20. Developmental Coordination Disorder, An Umbrella Term for Motor Impairments in Children: Nature and Co-Morbid Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vaivre-Douret, Laurence; Lalanne, Christophe; Golse, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    assessment, including neuromuscular tone examination, using appropriate standardized neurodevelopmental tools (common tasks across ages with age-related normative data) in order to distinguish motor impairments gathered under the umbrella term of developmental coordination disorders (subcortical vs. cortical). Mild spasticity in the gastrocnemius muscles, such as phasic stretch reflex (PSR), suggests disturbances of the motor pathway, increasing impairment of gross and fine motricity. These findings contribute to understanding the nature of motor disorders in DCD by taking account of possible co-morbidities (corticospinal tract disturbances) to improve diagnosis and adapt treatment programmes in clinical practice. PMID:27148114

  1. ADAPTIVE ANNEALED IMPORTANCE SAMPLING FOR MULTIMODAL POSTERIOR EXPLORATION AND MODEL SELECTION WITH APPLICATION TO EXTRASOLAR PLANET DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin

    2014-07-01

    We describe an algorithm that can adaptively provide mixture summaries of multimodal posterior distributions. The parameter space of the involved posteriors ranges in size from a few dimensions to dozens of dimensions. This work was motivated by an astrophysical problem called extrasolar planet (exoplanet) detection, wherein the computation of stochastic integrals that are required for Bayesian model comparison is challenging. The difficulty comes from the highly nonlinear models that lead to multimodal posterior distributions. We resort to importance sampling (IS) to estimate the integrals, and thus translate the problem to be how to find a parametric approximation of the posterior. To capture the multimodal structure in the posterior, we initialize a mixture proposal distribution and then tailor its parameters elaborately to make it resemble the posterior to the greatest extent possible. We use the effective sample size (ESS) calculated based on the IS draws to measure the degree of approximation. The bigger the ESS is, the better the proposal resembles the posterior. A difficulty within this tailoring operation lies in the adjustment of the number of mixing components in the mixture proposal. Brute force methods just preset it as a large constant, which leads to an increase in the required computational resources. We provide an iterative delete/merge/add process, which works in tandem with an expectation-maximization step to tailor such a number online. The efficiency of our proposed method is tested via both simulation studies and real exoplanet data analysis.

  2. Exploring equivalence domain in nonlinear inverse problems using Covariance Matrix Adaption Evolution Strategy (CMAES) and random sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Kuvshinov, Alexey V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology to sample equivalence domain (ED) in nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE)-constrained inverse problems. For this purpose, we first applied state-of-the-art stochastic optimization algorithm called Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMAES) to identify low-misfit regions of the model space. These regions were then randomly sampled to create an ensemble of equivalent models and quantify uncertainty. CMAES is aimed at exploring model space globally and is robust on very ill-conditioned problems. We show that the number of iterations required to converge grows at a moderate rate with respect to number of unknowns and the algorithm is embarrassingly parallel. We formulated the problem by using the generalized Gaussian distribution. This enabled us to seamlessly use arbitrary norms for residual and regularization terms. We show that various regularization norms facilitate studying different classes of equivalent solutions. We further show how performance of the standard Metropolis-Hastings Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm can be substantially improved by using information CMAES provides. This methodology was tested by using individual and joint inversions of magneotelluric, controlled-source electromagnetic (EM) and global EM induction data.

  3. Conserving migratory mule deer through the umbrella of sage-grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Copeland, H. E.; Sawyer, H.; Monteith, K. L.; Naugle, D.E.; Pocewicz, Amy; Graf, N.; Kauffman, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Conserving migratory ungulates in increasingly human-dominated landscapes presents a difficult challenge to land managers and conservation practitioners. Nevertheless, ungulates may receive ancillary benefits from conservation actions designed to protect species of greater conservation priority where their ranges are sympatric. Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocerus urophasianus), for example, have been proposed as an umbrella species for other sagebrush (Artemesia spp.)-dependent fauna. We examined a landscape where conservation efforts for sage-grouse overlap spatially with mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) to determine whether sage-grouse conservation measures also might protect important mule deer migration routes and seasonal ranges. We conducted a spatial analysis to determine what proportion of migration routes, stopover areas, and winter ranges used by mule deer were located in areas managed for sage-grouse conservation. Conservation measures overlapped with 66–70% of migration corridors, 74–75% of stopovers, and 52–91% of wintering areas for two mule deer populations in the upper Green River Basin of Wyoming. Of those proportions, conservation actions targeted towards sage-grouse accounted for approximately half of the overlap in corridors and stopover areas, and nearly all overlap on winter ranges, indicating that sage-grouse conservation efforts represent an important step in conserving migratory mule deer. Conservation of migratory species presents unique challenges because although overlap with conserved lands may be high, connectivity of the entire route must be maintained as barriers to movement anywhere within the migration corridor could render it unviable. Where mule deer habitats overlap with sage-grouse core areas, our results indicate that increased protection is afforded to winter ranges and migration routes within the umbrella of sage-grouse conservation, but this protection is contingent on concentrated developments within core areas not

  4. Adaptive Function in Preschoolers in Relation to Developmental Delay and Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Insights from a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Susan L.; McDonald, Jenny L.; Comino, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between developmental ability, autism and adaptive skills in preschoolers. Adaptive function was assessed in 152 preschoolers with autism, with and without developmental delay, and without autism, with and without developmental delay. Their overall adaptive function, measured by the general adaptive…

  5. Rovibrational molecular hamiltonian in mixed bond-angle and umbrella-like coordinates.

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, Jan; Skalozub, Alexander

    2007-08-16

    A new exact quantum mechanical rovibrational Hamiltonian operator for molecules exhibiting large amplitude inversion and torsion motions is derived. The derivation is based on a division of a molecule into two parts: a frame and a top. The nuclei of the frame only are used to construct a molecular system of axes. The inversion motion of the frame is described in the umbrella-like coordinates, whereas the torsion motion of the top is described by the nonstandard torsion angle defined in terms of the nuclear vectors and one of the molecular axes. The internal coordinates chosen take into account the properties of the inversion and torsion motions. Vibrational s and rotational Omega vectors obtained for the introduced internal coordinates determine the rovibrational tensor G defined by simple scalar products of these vectors. The Jacobian of the transformation from the Cartesian to the internal coordinates considered and the G tensor specify the rovibrational Hamiltonian. As a result, the Hamiltonian for penta-atomic molecules like NH2OH with one inverter is presented and a complete set of the formulas necessary to write down the Hamiltonian of more complex molecules, like NH2NH2 with two inverters, is reported. The approach considered is essentially general and sufficiently simple, as demonstrated by derivation of a polyatomic molecule Hamiltonian in polyspherical coordinates, obtained by other methods with much greater efforts.

  6. Kinematics and simulations of the stellar stream in the halo of the Umbrella Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, C.; Lux, H.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Martínez-Delgado, D.; Zibetti, S.; Arnold, J. A.; Brodie, J. P.; Ciardullo, R.; GaBany, R. J.; Merrifield, M. R.; Singh, N.; Strader, J.

    2014-08-01

    We study the dynamics of faint stellar substructures around the Umbrella Galaxy, NGC 4651, which hosts a dramatic system of streams and shells formed through the tidal disruption of a nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxy. We elucidate the basic characteristics of the system (colours, luminosities, stellar masses) using multiband Subaru/Suprime-Cam images. The implied stellar mass ratio of the ongoing merger event is ˜1:50. We identify candidate kinematic tracers (globular clusters, planetary nebulae, H II regions) and follow up a subset with Keck/DEIMOS (DEep Imaging Multi-object Spectrograph) spectroscopy to obtain velocities. We find that 15 of the tracers are likely associated with halo substructures, including the probable stream progenitor nucleus. These objects delineate a kinematically cold feature in position-velocity phase space. We model the stream using single test particle orbits, plus a rescaled pre-existing N-body simulation. We infer a very eccentric orbit with a period of ˜0.35 Gyr and turning points at ˜2-4 and ˜40 kpc, implying a recent passage of the satellite through the disc, which may have provoked the visible disturbances in the host galaxy. This work confirms that the kinematics of low surface brightness substructures can be recovered and modelled using discrete tracers - a breakthrough that opens up a fresh avenue for unravelling the detailed physics of minor merging.

  7. Extending the limits of transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects with the double umbrella device (CardioSEAL)

    PubMed Central

    Kaulitz, R; Paul, T; Hausdorf, G

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To report initial findings from a selected group of patients with morphological variations of the atrial septal defect who underwent transcatheter closure with a second generation redesigned double umbrella device.
Patients—Two patients with abnormal location of the oval fossa and partial deficiency of the septal rim, three patients with multiple defects, and two patients with a multiperforated aneurysm of the interatrial septum (age range, 3.6-25.5 years).
Methods—Defects were closed with the double umbrella device (CardioSEAL) consisting of two sets of flexible arms (with central and two mid-arm hinges) covered with sewn Dacron patches. The implantation procedure was monitored by transoesophageal echocardiography.
Results—The diameter of the defect measured during transoesophageal echocardiography ranged from 7-18 mm and the balloon stretched diameter ranged from 13-21 mm. The size of the devices varied from 28-33 mm and the ratio of device size to defect size varied from 1.6-2.1. Two devices (23 and 28 mm) were chosen in a patient with two separated defects. No complications or serious arrhythmias were observed during implantation or follow up (median, 1.8 months). Residual shunting was trivial in three patients and mild in one patient (inferiorly located additional defect).
Conclusions—To extend the selection critera of an isolated central interatrial defect for transcatheter closure, some modifications of the implantation technique are needed. Using the redesigned double umbrella device, effective closure in patients with multiple or irregularly shaped atrial septal defects was achieved, indicating a broadening of the spectrum of transcatheter closure.

 Keywords: atrial septal defects;  transcatheter closure;  congenital heart disorders;  double umbrella device;  CardioSEAL PMID:9764060

  8. Developing an Instructional Material Using a Concept Cartoon Adapted to the 5E Model: A Sample of Teaching Erosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birisci, Salih; Metin, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Using different instructional materials adapted within the constructivist learning theory will enhance students' conceptual understanding. From this point of view, an instructional instrument using a concept cartoon adapted with 5E model has developed and introduced in this study. The study has some deficiencies in investigating students'…

  9. Diagnosing Intellectual Disability in a Forensic Sample: Gender and Age Effects on the Relationship between Cognitive and Adaptive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The relationship between adaptive behaviour and cognitive functioning in offenders with intellectual disabilities is not well researched. This study aims to examine gender and age effects on the relationship between these two areas of functioning. Method: The "Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales" (VABS) and the "Kaufman…

  10. Potential increased risk of cancer from commonly used medications: an umbrella review of meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Zhou, Y.; Chang, C. Q.; Schully, S. D.; Khoury, M. J.; Freedman, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Several commonly used medications have been associated with increased cancer risk in the literature. Here, we evaluated the strength and consistency of these claims in published meta-analyses. We carried out an umbrella review of 74 meta-analysis articles addressing the association of commonly used medications (antidiabetics, antihyperlipidemics, antihypertensives, antirheumatics, drugs for osteoporosis, and others) with cancer risk where at least one meta-analysis in the medication class included some data from randomized trials. Overall, 51 articles found no statistically significant differences, 13 found some decreased cancer risk, and 11 found some increased risk (one reported both increased and decreased risks). The 11 meta-analyses that found some increased risks reported 16 increased risk estimates, of which 5 pertained to overall cancer and 11 to site-specific cancer. Six of the 16 estimates were derived from randomized trials and 10 from observational data. Estimates of increased risk were strongly inversely correlated with the amount of evidence (number of cancer cases) (Spearman's correlation coefficient = −0.77, P < 0.001). In 4 of the 16 topics, another meta-analysis existed that was larger (n = 2) or included better controlled data (n = 2) and in all 4 cases there was no statistically significantly increased risk of malignancy. No medication or class had substantial and consistent evidence for increased risk of malignancy. However, for most medications we cannot exclude small risks or risks in population subsets. Such risks are unlikely to be possible to document robustly unless very large, collaborative studies with standardized analyses and no selective reporting are carried out. PMID:24310915

  11. Building a Persian Gulf Ballistic Missile Defense Umbrella: A Comparative Case Study Analysis of Regional Phased Adaptive Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Theater Ballistic Missile Defense AN/SPY-1 Army Navy/Sea-based S-band Radar Surveillance AN/ TPY -2 Army Navy/Transportable X-band Radar...has put in a request for PATRIOT batteries, and Qatar has agreed to host a TPY -2 X-band radar; “International Cooperation,” Missile Defense Agency...Surveillance System (STSS), Sea-Based X-Band Radar (SBX), Land Based Transportable Radar Surveillance ( TPY -2), and the Aegis SPY-1 Radar. STSS is a

  12. A Newly Developed Perfused Umbrella Electrode for Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Evaluation Study in Bovine Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Bruners, Philipp Pfeffer, Jochen; Kazim, Rana M.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly developed perfused monopolar radiofrequency (RF) probe with an umbrella-shaped array. A perfused umbrella-shaped monopolar RF probe based on a LeVeen electrode (Boston Scientific Corp., Natick, MA, USA) with a 3-cm array diameter was developed. Five different configurations of this electrode were tested: (a) perfusion channel/endhole, (b) perfusion channel/endhole + sideholes, (c) 1 cm insulation removed at the tip, (d) 1 cm insulation removed at the tip + perfusion channel/endhole, and (e) 1 cm insulation removed at the tip + perfusion channel/endhole + sideholes. An unmodified LeVeen electrode served as a reference standard. RF ablations were performed in freshly excised bovine liver using a commercial monopolar RF system with a 200-W generator (RF 3000; Boston Scientific Corp.). Each electrode was tested 10 times applying the vendor's recommended ablation protocol combined with the preinjection of 2 ml 0.9% saline. Volumes and shapes of the lesions were compared. Lesions generated with the original LeVeen electrode showed a mean volume of 12.74 {+-} 0.52 cm{sup 3}. Removing parts of the insulation led to larger coagulation volumes (22.65 {+-} 2.12 cm{sup 3}). Depending on the configuration, saline preinjection resulted in a further increase in coagulation volume (25.22 {+-} 3.37 to 31.28 {+-} 2.32 cm{sup 3}). Besides lesion volume, the shape of the ablation zone was influenced by the configuration of the electrode used. We conclude that saline preinjection in combination with increasing the active tip length of the umbrella-shaped LeVeen RF probe allows the reliable ablation of larger volumes in comparison to the originally configured electrode.

  13. Differences in the umbrella effects of African amphibians and mammals based on two estimators of the area of occupancy.

    PubMed

    Rondinini, Carlo; Boitani, Luigi

    2006-02-01

    Conservation organizations are collecting large-scale data regarding distribution and threats to vertebrate taxa. These data sets will enable planners to systematically identify large-scale conservation priorities; however, they will cover only a tiny proportion of living organisms. Therefore, it is essential to investigate to what extent the areas selected for conservation actions can provide protection for other species. We analyzed the umbrella effect between amphibians and mammals across mainland Africa. We built habitat suitability models within the geographic ranges of 1654 species, based on data collected in the framework of the World Conservation Union (IUCN) Global Amphibian Assessment and IUCN Global Mammal Assessment. We applied systematic reserve selection algorithms to two sets of estimators of the area of occupancy of amphibians and mammals (geographic ranges and estimated suitable areas) and thus selected four reserve systems. We then quantified the protection that each of the four systems provided for amphibians and mammals. Reserves selected for amphibians and mammals were comparable in area, with the former concentrated in the Afrotropical region and the latter more evenly dispersed. Mammal reserves left fewer gaps in species coverage among amphibians than the reverse, but amphibian reserves included a larger proportion of each mammal's area of occupancy than the reverse. For both taxa, setting reserves to include estimated suitable areas instead of ranges resulted in the clustering of reserves in the tropics. Furthermore, it efficiently protected hidden gaps (species with unsuitable portions of their range inside protected areas) in the other taxon and included a higher proportion of the area of occupancy of the other taxon. Overall, amphibians and mammals in Africa acted as an umbrella for a high proportion of species in the other taxon. Focusing on estimated suitable areas instead of ranges improved the umbrella effect of both taxa.

  14. Testing Set-Point Theory in a Swiss National Sample: Reaction and Adaptation to Major Life Events

    PubMed Central

    Anusic, Ivana; Yap, Stevie C. Y.; Lucas, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    Set-point theory posits that individuals react to the experience of major life events, but quickly adapt back to pre-event baseline levels of subjective well-being in the years following the event. A large, nationally representative panel study of Swiss households was used to examine set-point theory by investigating the extent of adaptation following the experience of marriage, childbirth, widowhood, unemployment, and disability. Our results demonstrate that major life events are associated with marked change in life satisfaction and, for some events (e.g., marriage, disability), these changes are relatively long lasting even when accounting for normative, age related change. PMID:25419036

  15. A Feedfordward Adaptive Controller to Reduce the Imaging Time of Large-Sized Biological Samples with a SPM-Based Multiprobe Station

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Jorge; Guerrero, Hector; Gonzalez, Laura; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2012-01-01

    The time required to image large samples is an important limiting factor in SPM-based systems. In multiprobe setups, especially when working with biological samples, this drawback can make impossible to conduct certain experiments. In this work, we present a feedfordward controller based on bang-bang and adaptive controls. The controls are based in the difference between the maximum speeds that can be used for imaging depending on the flatness of the sample zone. Topographic images of Escherichia coli bacteria samples were acquired using the implemented controllers. Results show that to go faster in the flat zones, rather than using a constant scanning speed for the whole image, speeds up the imaging process of large samples by up to a 4× factor. PMID:22368491

  16. Optimizing trial design in pharmacogenetics research: comparing a fixed parallel group, group sequential, and adaptive selection design on sample size requirements.

    PubMed

    Boessen, Ruud; van der Baan, Frederieke; Groenwold, Rolf; Egberts, Antoine; Klungel, Olaf; Grobbee, Diederick; Knol, Mirjam; Roes, Kit

    2013-01-01

    Two-stage clinical trial designs may be efficient in pharmacogenetics research when there is some but inconclusive evidence of effect modification by a genomic marker. Two-stage designs allow to stop early for efficacy or futility and can offer the additional opportunity to enrich the study population to a specific patient subgroup after an interim analysis. This study compared sample size requirements for fixed parallel group, group sequential, and adaptive selection designs with equal overall power and control of the family-wise type I error rate. The designs were evaluated across scenarios that defined the effect sizes in the marker positive and marker negative subgroups and the prevalence of marker positive patients in the overall study population. Effect sizes were chosen to reflect realistic planning scenarios, where at least some effect is present in the marker negative subgroup. In addition, scenarios were considered in which the assumed 'true' subgroup effects (i.e., the postulated effects) differed from those hypothesized at the planning stage. As expected, both two-stage designs generally required fewer patients than a fixed parallel group design, and the advantage increased as the difference between subgroups increased. The adaptive selection design added little further reduction in sample size, as compared with the group sequential design, when the postulated effect sizes were equal to those hypothesized at the planning stage. However, when the postulated effects deviated strongly in favor of enrichment, the comparative advantage of the adaptive selection design increased, which precisely reflects the adaptive nature of the design.

  17. Human cytomegalovirus and human umbilical vein endothelial cells: restriction of primary isolation to blood samples and susceptibilities of clinical isolates from other sources to adaptation.

    PubMed

    Gerna, Giuseppe; Percivalle, Elena; Sarasini, Antonella; Revello, M Grazia

    2002-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients with disseminated infection, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is widespread in the microvascular endothelium of multiple organs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used in parallel to human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF) to recover HCMV from blood samples of immunocompromised patients. Using the shell vial technique, comparable median numbers of p72-positive HUVEC and HELF cells were found with the 26 HCMV-positive buffy coat samples out of 150 examined. Analysis of other clinical samples inoculated as controls revealed, in the presence of highly infected HELF monolayers, either the presence of very few infected HUVEC with urine specimens (n = 10 samples) or the lack of infected HUVEC with throat washes (n = 3) or amniotic fluid samples (n = 2). Thus, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) appear essential for primary isolation of HCMV in HUVEC. In this respect, HCMV strains, recovered from clinical samples other than buffy coats in HELF only, could be readily adapted to growth in HUVEC by coculturing PBL from healthy blood donors with infected HELF and then inoculating infected PBL onto HUVEC. Recently elucidated mechanisms of interaction of leukocytes and HUVEC with bidirectional transfer of virus seem to provide the basis for the restriction of HCMV primary isolation in HUVEC to blood samples. However, virus strains recovered from only HELF could be adapted to growth in HUVEC when inoculated with HELF-derived (either cell-associated or cell-free) HCMV strains upon primary isolation. In conclusion, due to the in vitro selection of virus variants provided with both PBL tropism and HUVEC tropism, HCMV recovery in HUVEC is PBL mediated and substantially restricted to blood samples. Lack of HCMV recovery in HUVEC from clinical samples other than blood leads to the assumption that epithelial cells, such as urinary, amniotic, or pharyngeal cells, do not possess adequate adhesion molecules to establish close contacts with HUVEC.

  18. Mobile membrane introduction tandem mass spectrometry for on-the-fly measurements and adaptive sampling of VOCs around oil and gas projects in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogh, E.; Gill, C.; Bell, R.; Davey, N.; Martinsen, M.; Thompson, A.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    The release of hydrocarbons into the environment can have significant environmental and economic consequences. The evolution of smaller, more portable mass spectrometers to the field can provide spatially and temporally resolved information for rapid detection, adaptive sampling and decision support. We have deployed a mobile platform membrane introduction mass spectrometer (MIMS) for the in-field simultaneous measurement of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. In this work, we report instrument and data handling advances that produce geographically referenced data in real-time and preliminary data where these improvements have been combined with high precision ultra-trace VOCs analysis to adaptively sample air plumes near oil and gas operations in Alberta, Canada. We have modified a commercially available ion-trap mass spectrometer (Griffin ICX 400) with an in-house temperature controlled capillary hollow fibre polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer membrane interface and in-line permeation tube flow cell for a continuously infused internal standard. The system is powered by 24 VDC for remote operations in a moving vehicle. Software modifications include the ability to run continuous, interlaced tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments for multiple contaminants/internal standards. All data are time and location stamped with on-board GPS and meteorological data to facilitate spatial and temporal data mapping. Tandem MS/MS scans were employed to simultaneously monitor ten volatile and semi-volatile analytes, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX), reduced sulfur compounds, halogenated organics and naphthalene. Quantification was achieved by calibrating against a continuously infused deuterated internal standard (toluene-d8). Time referenced MS/MS data were correlated with positional data and processed using Labview and Matlab to produce calibrated, geographical Google Earth data-visualizations that enable adaptive sampling protocols

  19. Adapting the semi-explicit assembly solvation model for estimating water-cyclohexane partitioning with the SAMPL5 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brini, Emiliano; Paranahewage, S. Shanaka; Fennell, Christopher J.; Dill, Ken A.

    2016-11-01

    We describe here some tests we made in the SAMPL5 communal event of `Semi-Explicit Assembly' (SEA), a recent method for computing solvation free energies. We combined the prospective tests of SAMPL5 with followup retrospective calculations, to improve two technical aspects of the field variant of SEA. First, SEA uses an approximate analytical surface around the solute on which a water potential is computed. We have improved and simplified the mathematical model of that surface. Second, some of the solutes in SAMPL5 were large enough to need a way to treat solvating waters interacting with `buried atoms', i.e. interior atoms of the solute. We improved SEA with a buried-atom correction. We also compare SEA to Thermodynamic Integration molecular dynamics simulations, so that we can sort out force field errors.

  20. A New Framework for Adaptive Sampling and Analysis During Long-Term Monitoring and Remedial Action Management

    SciTech Connect

    Minsker, Barbara; Albert Valocchi; Barbara Bailey

    2008-01-27

    DOE and other Federal agencies are making a significant investment in the development of field analytical techniques, nonintrusive technologies, and sensor technologies that will have a profound impact on the way environmental monitoring is conducted. Monitoring and performance evaluation networks will likely be base on suites of in situ sensors, with physical sampling playing a much more limited role. Designing and using these types of networks effectively will require development of a new paradigm for sampling and analysis of remedial actions, which is the overall goal of this project.

  1. Molecular Umbrellas: a Novel Class of Candidate Topical Microbicides To Prevent Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Rebecca Pellett; Mesquita, Pedro M. M.; Cheshenko, Natalia; Jing, Bingwen; Shende, Vikas; Guzman, Esmeralda; Heald, Taylor; Keller, Marla J.; Regen, Steven L.; Shattock, Robin J.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular umbrella compounds may function as novel topical microbicides to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections. In a preliminary structure-activity investigation, one umbrella compound, designated Spm8CHAS, was identified which inhibited both HIV and HSV infections with no cellular toxicity. The objectives of the current studies were to define its spectrum of antiviral activity, characterize its mechanism of action, and explore the possibility of combining Spm8CHAS with HIV-specific reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Spm8CHAS inhibited infections by laboratory and clinical R5 and X4 clade B and clade C HIV strains in cell culture. Ectocervical tissue explants exposed to HIV-1BaL in the presence of Spm8CHAS were completely protected (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 13.6 μg/ml), and transfer of virus to target T cells via migratory cells was abolished (IC50, 3.8 μg/ml). Spm8CHAS inhibited HSV-2 infection of epithelial cells 10,000-fold if present throughout the infection. Notably, adding Spm8CHAS to cultures following HSV entry significantly reduced viral infection, indicating that the drug also acts postentry. Subsequent studies indicated that Spm8CHAS blocks cell-to-cell spread of HSV. Confocal microscopy using a fluorescently labeled analog of Spm8CHAS demonstrated that this conjugate crosses the plasma cell membrane and is transported to the nucleus. Combinations of Spm8CHAS with UC-781 or 9-[R-2-(phosphonylmethoxy)propyl] adenine monohydrate in vitro exhibited additive anti-HIV activity with preserved anti-HSV activity. The abilities of Spm8CHAS to inhibit primary isolates of HIV, block HSV infection postentry, and cross cell membranes support the development of a combination microbicide containing Spm8CHAS with an HIV-specific reverse transcriptase inhibitor to prevent both HIV and HSV infections by multiple mechanisms. PMID:17494078

  2. Adaptation of the Participant Role Scale (PRS) in a Spanish youth sample: measurement invariance across gender and relationship with sociometric status.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Molina, Beatriz; Williamson, Ariel A; Pulido, Rosa; Calderón, Sonsoles

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, bullying research has transitioned from investigating the characteristics of the bully-victim dyad to examining bullying as a group-level process, in which the majority of children play some kind of role. This study used a shortened adaptation of the Participant Role Scale (PRS) to identify these roles in a representative sample of 2,050 Spanish children aged 8 to 13 years. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed three different roles, indicating that the adapted scale remains a reliable way to distinguish the Bully, Defender, and Outsider roles. In addition, measurement invariance of the adapted scale was examined to analyze possible gender differences among the roles. Peer status was assessed separately by gender through two sociometric procedures: the nominations-based method and the ratings-based method. Across genders, children in the Bully role were more often rated as rejected, whereas Defenders were more popular. Results suggest that although the PRS can reveal several different peer roles in the bullying process, a more clear distinction between bullying roles (i.e., Bully, Assistant, and Reinforcer) could better inform strategies for bullying interventions.

  3. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of Near-Shore In Situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    of the water conditions in the coastal ocean makes any sampling, optical or otherwise, very time consuming and difficult. However, the focus on...applications. To accurately resolve the non-linear time -dependent ecological and optical processes in a short -term numerical simulation requires a...clarity are clearly required for Mine Warfare (MIW), Mine Counter Measures (MCM), and Naval Special Warfare (NSW), particularly in the Very Shallow

  4. A Response to Increasing Faculty Resource Constraints: The Development of Umbrella Academic Programs and New Curricular Aggregates from Existing Instructional Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Jerry E.; Hellweg, Susan A.

    1979-01-01

    The dilemma of providing for continued development of new academic programs in the context of severe budgetary constraints is examined. Two curricular planning strategies that provide for academic growth with minimum resource proliferation are detailed--development of umbrella academic programs and creation of curricular aggregates. (AF)

  5. The Influence of Liberal Studies on Students' Participation in Socio-Political Activities: The Case of the Umbrella Movement in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Dennis; Su, Angie

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an investigation into how secondary student participants in Hong Kong's Umbrella Movement related this particular political experience to their learning of Liberal Studies. Questionnaire-based surveys and interviews were conducted to probe their interpretations of Liberal Studies' impact on their political involvement and their…

  6. The Appalachian Math Science Partnership: A Multi-State Umbrella Partnership Promoting Local Mathematics and Science Reform. Close-Up Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inverness Research, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The papers presented in this paper accompany a core report about the Appalachian Math Science Partnership (AMSP) entitled "The Appalachian Math Science Partnership: A Multi-State Umbrella Partnership Promoting Local Mathematics and Science Reform Report." Each of them focuses on an especially effective strategy or component of the AMSP…

  7. Adaptively biased sequential importance sampling for rare events in reaction networks with comparison to exact solutions from finite buffer dCME method.

    PubMed

    Cao, Youfang; Liang, Jie

    2013-07-14

    Critical events that occur rarely in biological processes are of great importance, but are challenging to study using Monte Carlo simulation. By introducing biases to reaction selection and reaction rates, weighted stochastic simulation algorithms based on importance sampling allow rare events to be sampled more effectively. However, existing methods do not address the important issue of barrier crossing, which often arises from multistable networks and systems with complex probability landscape. In addition, the proliferation of parameters and the associated computing cost pose significant problems. Here we introduce a general theoretical framework for obtaining optimized biases in sampling individual reactions for estimating probabilities of rare events. We further describe a practical algorithm called adaptively biased sequential importance sampling (ABSIS) method for efficient probability estimation. By adopting a look-ahead strategy and by enumerating short paths from the current state, we estimate the reaction-specific and state-specific forward and backward moving probabilities of the system, which are then used to bias reaction selections. The ABSIS algorithm can automatically detect barrier-crossing regions, and can adjust bias adaptively at different steps of the sampling process, with bias determined by the outcome of exhaustively generated short paths. In addition, there are only two bias parameters to be determined, regardless of the number of the reactions and the complexity of the network. We have applied the ABSIS method to four biochemical networks: the birth-death process, the reversible isomerization, the bistable Schlögl model, and the enzymatic futile cycle model. For comparison, we have also applied the finite buffer discrete chemical master equation (dCME) method recently developed to obtain exact numerical solutions of the underlying discrete chemical master equations of these problems. This allows us to assess sampling results objectively

  8. Adaptively biased sequential importance sampling for rare events in reaction networks with comparison to exact solutions from finite buffer dCME method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Youfang; Liang, Jie

    2013-07-01

    Critical events that occur rarely in biological processes are of great importance, but are challenging to study using Monte Carlo simulation. By introducing biases to reaction selection and reaction rates, weighted stochastic simulation algorithms based on importance sampling allow rare events to be sampled more effectively. However, existing methods do not address the important issue of barrier crossing, which often arises from multistable networks and systems with complex probability landscape. In addition, the proliferation of parameters and the associated computing cost pose significant problems. Here we introduce a general theoretical framework for obtaining optimized biases in sampling individual reactions for estimating probabilities of rare events. We further describe a practical algorithm called adaptively biased sequential importance sampling (ABSIS) method for efficient probability estimation. By adopting a look-ahead strategy and by enumerating short paths from the current state, we estimate the reaction-specific and state-specific forward and backward moving probabilities of the system, which are then used to bias reaction selections. The ABSIS algorithm can automatically detect barrier-crossing regions, and can adjust bias adaptively at different steps of the sampling process, with bias determined by the outcome of exhaustively generated short paths. In addition, there are only two bias parameters to be determined, regardless of the number of the reactions and the complexity of the network. We have applied the ABSIS method to four biochemical networks: the birth-death process, the reversible isomerization, the bistable Schlögl model, and the enzymatic futile cycle model. For comparison, we have also applied the finite buffer discrete chemical master equation (dCME) method recently developed to obtain exact numerical solutions of the underlying discrete chemical master equations of these problems. This allows us to assess sampling results objectively

  9. Unconstrained Enhanced Sampling for Free Energy Calculations of Biomolecules: A Review.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; McCammon, J Andrew

    Free energy calculations are central to understanding the structure, dynamics and function of biomolecules. Yet insufficient sampling of biomolecular configurations is often regarded as one of the main sources of error. Many enhanced sampling techniques have been developed to address this issue. Notably, enhanced sampling methods based on biasing collective variables (CVs), including the widely used umbrella sampling, adaptive biasing force and metadynamics, have been discussed in a recent excellent review (Abrams and Bussi, Entropy, 2014). Here, we aim to review enhanced sampling methods that do not require predefined system-dependent CVs for biomolecular simulations and as such do not suffer from the hidden energy barrier problem as encountered in the CV-biasing methods. These methods include, but are not limited to, replica exchange/parallel tempering, self-guided molecular/Langevin dynamics, essential energy space random walk and accelerated molecular dynamics. While it is overwhelming to describe all details of each method, we provide a summary of the methods along with the applications and offer our perspectives. We conclude with challenges and prospects of the unconstrained enhanced sampling methods for accurate biomolecular free energy calculations.

  10. Computationally efficient video restoration for Nyquist sampled imaging sensors combining an affine-motion-based temporal Kalman filter and adaptive Wiener filter.

    PubMed

    Rucci, Michael; Hardie, Russell C; Barnard, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient video restoration algorithm to address both blur and noise for a Nyquist sampled imaging system. The proposed method utilizes a temporal Kalman filter followed by a correlation-model based spatial adaptive Wiener filter (AWF). The Kalman filter employs an affine background motion model and novel process-noise variance estimate. We also propose and demonstrate a new multidelay temporal Kalman filter designed to more robustly treat local motion. The AWF is a spatial operation that performs deconvolution and adapts to the spatially varying residual noise left in the Kalman filter stage. In image areas where the temporal Kalman filter is able to provide significant noise reduction, the AWF can be aggressive in its deconvolution. In other areas, where less noise reduction is achieved with the Kalman filter, the AWF balances the deconvolution with spatial noise reduction. In this way, the Kalman filter and AWF work together effectively, but without the computational burden of full joint spatiotemporal processing. We also propose a novel hybrid system that combines a temporal Kalman filter and BM3D processing. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed methods, we test the algorithms on both simulated imagery and video collected with a visible camera.

  11. The initial giant umbrella cloud of the May 18th, 1980, explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, R.S.J.; Moore, J.G.; Rice, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The initial eruption column of May 18th, 1980 reached nearly 30 km altitude and released 1017 joules of thermal energy into the atmosphere in only a few minutes. Ascent of the cloud resulted in forced intrusion of a giant umbrella-shaped cloud between altitudes of 10 and 20 km at radial horizontal velocities initially in excess of 50 m/s. The mushroom cloud expanded 15 km upwind, forming a stagnation point where the radial expansion velocity and wind velocity were equal. The cloud was initiated when the pyroclastic blast flow became buoyant. The flow reduced its density as it moved away from the volcano by decompression, by sedimentation, and by mixing with and heating the surrounding air. Observations indicate that much of the flow, covering an area of 600 km2, became buoyant within 1.5 minutes and abruptly ascended to form the giant cloud. Calculations are presented for the amount of air that must have been entrained into the flow to make it buoyant. Assuming an initial temperature of 450??C and a magmatic origin for the explosion, these calculations indicate that the flow became buoyant when its temperature was approximately 150??C and the flow consisted of a mixture of 3.25 ?? 1011 kg of pyroclasts and 5.0 ?? 1011 kg of air. If sedimentation is considered, these figures reduce to 1.1 ?? 1011 kg of pyroclasts and 1.0 ?? 1011 kg of air. ?? 1986.

  12. Scientists and Educators in Sync: Exploring the Strengths of Each through a Collaborative Educational "Umbrella" on Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Singer, H. J.

    2003-12-01

    Scientists and educators have much to offer formal and informal science education forums (and each other) when brought together in balanced collaboration. New educational opportunities from NASA and NSF have made it easier to develop these collaborations, effectively allowing for the establishment of educational "umbrellas" whereby several separately funded programs focused on a single theme are overseen by a single working group. Here, we explore one such collaboration on space weather developed by CU's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, in collaboration with NOAA's Space Environment Center, the Fiske Planetarium, the Space Science Institute and teachers from local school districts. The goal of the collaboration is to develop a new planetarium show, associated curricula and teacher workshops and guidebooks, as well as distance learning programming through the NASA Center for Distance Learning. One hallmark of this collaboration is the recognition that both scientists and educators bring important research-based perspectives to the table - Scientists are primarily responsible for the scientific integrity of the programming; Educators offer effective (tested) educational models for implementing student and teacher experiences. Both bring creativity, ingenuity and innovation to this dynamic environment. Sustainability is enhanced by integrating components and activities into a cogent whole, and efforts are perceived as even more worthwhile since most aspects of this program will be available for national distribution over the next several years.

  13. Family-related predictors of body weight and weight-related behaviours among children and adolescents: a systematic umbrella review.

    PubMed

    Cislak, A; Safron, M; Pratt, M; Gaspar, T; Luszczynska, A

    2012-05-01

    This umbrella review analysed the relationships between family variables and child/adolescent body weight, diet and physical activity. In line with theories of health behaviour change, it was assumed that behaviour-specific family variables (i.e. beliefs, perceptions and practices referring to food intake or physical activity) would have stronger support than more general family variables (i.e. socio-economic status or general parental practices). Data obtained from 18 systematic reviews (examining 375 quantitative studies) were analysed. Reviews of experimental trials generally supported the effectiveness of reward/positive reinforcement parental strategies, parental involvement in treatment or prevention programmes, and cognitive-behavioural treatment in reducing child/adolescent body mass and/or obesity. Results across reviews of correlational studies indicated that healthy nutrition of children/adolescents was related to only one parental practice (parental monitoring), but was associated with several behaviour-specific family variables (e.g. a lack of restrictive control over food choices, high intake of healthy foods and low intake of unhealthy foods by parents and siblings, low pressure to consume foods). With regard to adolescent physical activity, stronger support was also found for behaviour-specific variables (e.g. physical activity of siblings), and for certain socio-economic variables (e.g. parental education). Child and adolescent obesity prevention programmes should account for behaviour-specific family variables.

  14. Improvement of near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) analysis of caffeine in roasted Arabica coffee by variable selection method of stability competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (SCARS).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Wei; Yin, Bin; Chen, Weizhong; Kelly, Declan P; Wang, Xiaoxin; Zheng, Kaiyi; Du, Yiping

    2013-10-01

    Coffee is the most heavily consumed beverage in the world after water, for which quality is a key consideration in commercial trade. Therefore, caffeine content which has a significant effect on the final quality of the coffee products requires to be determined fast and reliably by new analytical techniques. The main purpose of this work was to establish a powerful and practical analytical method based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and chemometrics for quantitative determination of caffeine content in roasted Arabica coffees. Ground coffee samples within a wide range of roasted levels were analyzed by NIR, meanwhile, in which the caffeine contents were quantitative determined by the most commonly used HPLC-UV method as the reference values. Then calibration models based on chemometric analyses of the NIR spectral data and reference concentrations of coffee samples were developed. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to construct the models. Furthermore, diverse spectra pretreatment and variable selection techniques were applied in order to obtain robust and reliable reduced-spectrum regression models. Comparing the respective quality of the different models constructed, the application of second derivative pretreatment and stability competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (SCARS) variable selection provided a notably improved regression model, with root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.375 mg/g and correlation coefficient (R) of 0.918 at PLS factor of 7. An independent test set was used to assess the model, with the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.378 mg/g, mean relative error of 1.976% and mean relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.707%. Thus, the results provided by the high-quality calibration model revealed the feasibility of NIR spectroscopy for at-line application to predict the caffeine content of unknown roasted coffee samples, thanks to the short analysis time of a few seconds and non

  15. Improvement of near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) analysis of caffeine in roasted Arabica coffee by variable selection method of stability competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (SCARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Wei; Yin, Bin; Chen, Weizhong; Kelly, Declan P.; Wang, Xiaoxin; Zheng, Kaiyi; Du, Yiping

    2013-10-01

    Coffee is the most heavily consumed beverage in the world after water, for which quality is a key consideration in commercial trade. Therefore, caffeine content which has a significant effect on the final quality of the coffee products requires to be determined fast and reliably by new analytical techniques. The main purpose of this work was to establish a powerful and practical analytical method based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and chemometrics for quantitative determination of caffeine content in roasted Arabica coffees. Ground coffee samples within a wide range of roasted levels were analyzed by NIR, meanwhile, in which the caffeine contents were quantitative determined by the most commonly used HPLC-UV method as the reference values. Then calibration models based on chemometric analyses of the NIR spectral data and reference concentrations of coffee samples were developed. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to construct the models. Furthermore, diverse spectra pretreatment and variable selection techniques were applied in order to obtain robust and reliable reduced-spectrum regression models. Comparing the respective quality of the different models constructed, the application of second derivative pretreatment and stability competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (SCARS) variable selection provided a notably improved regression model, with root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.375 mg/g and correlation coefficient (R) of 0.918 at PLS factor of 7. An independent test set was used to assess the model, with the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.378 mg/g, mean relative error of 1.976% and mean relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.707%. Thus, the results provided by the high-quality calibration model revealed the feasibility of NIR spectroscopy for at-line application to predict the caffeine content of unknown roasted coffee samples, thanks to the short analysis time of a few seconds and non

  16. Fast simulated annealing and adaptive Monte Carlo sampling based parameter optimization for dense optical-flow deformable image registration of 4DCT lung anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Tai H.; Min, Yugang; Neylon, John; Thomas, David; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2016-03-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is an important step in radiotherapy treatment planning. An optimal input registration parameter set is critical to achieve the best registration performance with the specific algorithm. Methods In this paper, we investigated a parameter optimization strategy for Optical-flow based DIR of the 4DCT lung anatomy. A novel fast simulated annealing with adaptive Monte Carlo sampling algorithm (FSA-AMC) was investigated for solving the complex non-convex parameter optimization problem. The metric for registration error for a given parameter set was computed using landmark-based mean target registration error (mTRE) between a given volumetric image pair. To reduce the computational time in the parameter optimization process, a GPU based 3D dense optical-flow algorithm was employed for registering the lung volumes. Numerical analyses on the parameter optimization for the DIR were performed using 4DCT datasets generated with breathing motion models and open-source 4DCT datasets. Results showed that the proposed method efficiently estimated the optimum parameters for optical-flow and closely matched the best registration parameters obtained using an exhaustive parameter search method.

  17. Under the Nuclear Umbrella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Leon F.

    1987-01-01

    Entertains the thesis that social work has a stake in the technological-humanistic debate and should greet the recent and spectacular technological failures with protest and alarm. Discusses relationship of nuclear issue and social work, effects of nuclear issue on children, and Chernobyl. Advocates pacifism, activism, and a coherent conception of…

  18. Broadening the ESP Umbrella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanning, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The fragility of English for Special Purposes (ESP) is examined in the context of a particular British ESP course, European Business Administration. Issues include the characteristic ESP time pressure, the treatment of "hard" terminology in English for Academic Purposes (EAP), the nonlinguistic subject matter of EAP courses, and the use…

  19. Does integrated care reduce hospital activity for patients with chronic diseases? An umbrella review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Damery, Sarah; Flanagan, Sarah; Combes, Gill

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarise the evidence regarding the effectiveness of integrated care interventions in reducing hospital activity. Design Umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Setting Interventions must have delivered care crossing the boundary between at least two health and/or social care settings. Participants Adult patients with one or more chronic diseases. Data sources MEDLINE, Embase, ASSIA, PsycINFO, HMIC, CINAHL, Cochrane Library (HTA database, DARE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews), EPPI-Centre, TRIP, HEED, manual screening of references. Outcome measures Any measure of hospital admission or readmission, length of stay (LoS), accident and emergency use, healthcare costs. Results 50 reviews were included. Interventions focused on case management (n=8), chronic care model (CCM) (n=9), discharge management (n=15), complex interventions (n=3), multidisciplinary teams (MDT) (n=10) and self-management (n=5). 29 reviews reported statistically significant improvements in at least one outcome. 11/21 reviews reported significantly reduced emergency admissions (15–50%); 11/24 showed significant reductions in all-cause (10–30%) or condition-specific (15–50%) readmissions; 9/16 reported LoS reductions of 1–7 days and 4/9 showed significantly lower A&E use (30–40%). 10/25 reviews reported significant cost reductions but provided little robust evidence. Effective interventions included discharge management with postdischarge support, MDT care with teams that include condition-specific expertise, specialist nurses and/or pharmacists and self-management as an adjunct to broader interventions. Interventions were most effective when targeting single conditions such as heart failure, and when care was provided in patients’ homes. Conclusions Although all outcomes showed some significant reductions, and a number of potentially effective interventions were found, interventions rarely demonstrated unequivocally positive effects. Despite the

  20. The DELPHI expert process of the German umbrella project AUGE as basis for recommendations to CO2 storage in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilz, Peter; Schoebel, Birgit; Liebscher, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Within the GEOTECHNOLOGIEN funding scheme for geological CO2 storage by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in Germany 33 projects (135 subprojects) have been funded with a total budget of 58 Mio € (excluding industry funds) from 2005 to 2014. In 2012, the German parliament passed the transposition of the EU CCS Directive 2009/31/EG into the national "Carbon Dioxide Storage Law" (KSpG). Annex 1 of the KSpG provides a description of criteria for the characterization and assessment of a potential CO2 storage site. Annex 2 describes the expected monitoring system of a CO2 storage site. The criteria given in the appendices are of general nature, which reflects (1) that the CO2 storage technology is still being developed and (2) that site specific aspects needs to be considered. In 2012 an umbrella project called AUGE has been launched in order to compile and summarize the results of the GEOTECHNOLOGIEN projects to underpin the two Annexes scientifically. By integration of the individual project results AUGE aims at derive recommendations for the review and implementation of the KSpG. The recommendations shall be drafted based on a common ground of science, public authorities and industry. Therefore, the AUGE project includes a Delphi expert process as an essential part. It is realized in cooperation with the company COMPARE Consulting, Göppingen. The implementation of the Delphi-Process is organized in three steps: • After the technical preparation of a standardized questionnaire (2014/2015) it was sent to 129 experts from science, industry and public authorities in Germany. After a few weeks of consideration time, 40 persons (30 %) had decided to participate actively in this inquiry. • Following the results of the first interrogation campaign, the second survey campaign started at the end of 2015. The same list of questions was used, complemented with the results of the first inquiry campaign. The intention is reduce the variance of the

  1. Thriving While Engaging in Risk? Examining Trajectories of Adaptive Functioning, Delinquency, and Substance Use in a Nationally Representative Sample of U.S. Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Michael T.; Wray-Lake, Laura; Rote, Wendy M.; Shubert, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in positive youth development theory and research explicate complex associations between adaptive functioning and risk behavior, acknowledging that high levels of both co-occur in the lives of some adolescents. However, evidence on nuanced overlapping developmental trajectories of adaptive functioning and risk has been limited to 1…

  2. An adaptive-in-temperature method for on-the-fly sampling of thermal neutron scattering data in continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlou, Andrew Theodore

    The Monte Carlo simulation of full-core neutron transport requires high fidelity data to represent not only the various types of possible interactions that can occur, but also the temperature and energy regimes for which these data are relevant. For isothermal conditions, nuclear cross section data are processed in advance of running a simulation. In reality, the temperatures in a neutronics simulation are not fixed, but change with respect to the temperatures computed from an associated heat transfer or thermal hydraulic (TH) code. To account for the temperature change, a code user must either 1) compute new data at the problem temperature inline during the Monte Carlo simulation or 2) pre-compute data at a variety of temperatures over the range of possible values. Inline data processing is computationally inefficient while pre-computing data at many temperatures can be memory expensive. An alternative on-the-fly approach to handle the temperature component of nuclear data is desired. By on-the-fly we mean a procedure that adjusts cross section data to the correct temperature adaptively during the Monte Carlo random walk instead of before the running of a simulation. The on-the-fly procedure should also preserve simulation runtime efficiency. While on-the-fly methods have recently been developed for higher energy regimes, the double differential scattering of thermal neutrons has not been examined in detail until now. In this dissertation, an on-the-fly sampling method is developed by investigating the temperature dependence of the thermal double differential scattering distributions. The temperature dependence is analyzed with a linear least squares regression test to develop fit coefficients that are used to sample thermal scattering data at any temperature. The amount of pre-stored thermal scattering data has been drastically reduced from around 25 megabytes per temperature per nuclide to only a few megabytes per nuclide by eliminating the need to compute data

  3. Adaptation and Validation of the Brief Sexual Opinion Survey (SOS) in a Colombian Sample and Factorial Equivalence with the Spanish Version

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Juan Carlos; Soler, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Attitudes toward sexuality are a key variable for sexual health. It is really important for psychology and education to have adapted and validated questionnaires to evaluate these attitudes. Therefore, the objective of this research was to adapt, validate and calculate the equivalence of the Colombia Sexual Opinion Survey as compared to the same survey from Spain. To this end, a total of eight experts were consulted and 1,167 subjects from Colombia and Spain answered the Sexual Opinion Survey, the Sexual Assertiveness Scale, the Massachusetts General Hospital-Sexual Functioning Questionnaire, and the Sexuality Scale. The evaluation was conducted by online and the results show adequate qualitative and quantitative properties of the items, with adequate reliability and external validity and compliance with the strong invariance between the two countries. Consequently, the Colombia Sexual Opinion Survey is a valid and reliable scale and its scores can be compared with the ones from the Spain survey, with minimum bias. PMID:27627114

  4. Behavioral Regulation, Visual Spatial Maturity in Kindergarten, and the Relationship of School Adaptation in the First Grade for a Sample of Turkish Children.

    PubMed

    Özer, Serap

    2016-04-01

    Behavioral regulation has recently become an important variable in research looking at kindergarten and first-grade achievement of children in private and public schools. The purpose of this study was to examine a measure of behavioral regulation, the Head Toes Knees Shoulders Task, and to evaluate its relationship with visual spatial maturity at the end of kindergarten. Later, in first grade, teachers were asked to rate the children (N = 82) in terms of academic and behavioral adaptation. Behavioral regulation and visual spatial maturity were significantly different between the two school types, but ratings by the teachers in the first grade were affected by children's visual spatial maturity rather than by behavioral regulation. Socioeducational opportunities provided by the two types of schools may be more important to school adaptation than behavioral regulation.

  5. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  6. Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for Persons with Intellectual Disability Scale (SE/SS-AID) in a Spanish Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio; Paz-Lourido, Berta; Lee, Miyoung; Peterson-Besse, Jana J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this study we aimed to develop a Spanish version of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support Scales for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID). Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 117 individuals with intellectual disability (ID). The SE/SS-AID scales were translated into Spanish and their…

  7. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  8. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  9. Low incidence of clonality in cold water corals revealed through the novel use of standardized protocol adapted to deep sea sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becheler, Ronan; Cassone, Anne-Laure; Noel, Philippe; Mouchel, Olivier; Morrison, Cheryl; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Sampling in the deep sea is a technical challenge, which has hindered the acquisition of robust datasets that are necessary to determine the fine-grained biological patterns and processes that may shape genetic diversity. Estimates of the extent of clonality in deep-sea species, despite the importance of clonality in shaping the local dynamics and evolutionary trajectories, have been largely obscured by such limitations. Cold-water coral reefs along European margins are formed mainly by two reef-building species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. Here we present a fine-grained analysis of the genotypic and genetic composition of reefs occurring in the Bay of Biscay, based on an innovative deep-sea sampling protocol. This strategy was designed to be standardized, random, and allowed the georeferencing of all sampled colonies. Clonal lineages discriminated through their Multi-Locus Genotypes (MLG) at 6–7 microsatellite markers could thus be mapped to assess the level of clonality and the spatial spread of clonal lineages. High values of clonal richness were observed for both species across all sites suggesting a limited occurrence of clonality, which likely originated through fragmentation. Additionally, spatial autocorrelation analysis underlined the possible occurrence of fine-grained genetic structure in several populations of both L. pertusa and M. oculata. The two cold-water coral species examined had contrasting patterns of connectivity among canyons, with among-canyon genetic structuring detected in M. oculata, whereas L. pertusa was panmictic at the canyon scale. This study exemplifies that a standardized, random and georeferenced sampling strategy, while challenging, can be applied in the deep sea, and associated benefits outlined here include improved estimates of fine grained patterns of clonality and dispersal that are comparable across sites and among species.

  10. Vitamin D and multiple health outcomes: umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of observational studies and randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Zgaga, Lina; Ioannidis, John P A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the breadth, validity, and presence of biases of the associations of vitamin D with diverse outcomes. Design Umbrella review of the evidence across systematic reviews and meta-analyses of observational studies of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations and randomised controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation. Data sources Medline, Embase, and screening of citations and references. Eligibility criteria Three types of studies were eligible for the umbrella review: systematic reviews and meta-analyses that examined observational associations between circulating vitamin D concentrations and any clinical outcome; and meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials assessing supplementation with vitamin D or active compounds (both established and newer compounds of vitamin D). Results 107 systematic literature reviews and 74 meta-analyses of observational studies of plasma vitamin D concentrations and 87 meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation were identified. The relation between vitamin D and 137 outcomes has been explored, covering a wide range of skeletal, malignant, cardiovascular, autoimmune, infectious, metabolic, and other diseases. Ten outcomes were examined by both meta-analyses of observational studies and meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials, but the direction of the effect and level of statistical significance was concordant only for birth weight (maternal vitamin D status or supplementation). On the basis of the available evidence, an association between vitamin D concentrations and birth weight, dental caries in children, maternal vitamin D concentrations at term, and parathyroid hormone concentrations in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis is probable, but further studies and better designed trials are needed to draw firmer conclusions. In contrast to previous reports, evidence does not support the argument that vitamin D only

  11. Adaptive Learning and Risk Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denrell, Jerker

    2007-01-01

    Humans and animals learn from experience by reducing the probability of sampling alternatives with poor past outcomes. Using simulations, J. G. March (1996) illustrated how such adaptive sampling could lead to risk-averse as well as risk-seeking behavior. In this article, the author develops a formal theory of how adaptive sampling influences risk…

  12. Mini-midi-mito: adapting the amplification and sequencing strategy of mtDNA to the degradation state of crime scene samples.

    PubMed

    Berger, Cordula; Parson, Walther

    2009-06-01

    The degradation state of some biological traces recovered from the crime scene requires the amplification of very short fragments to attain a useful mitochondrial (mt)DNA sequence. We have previously introduced two mini-multiplex assays that amplify 10 overlapping control region (CR) fragments in two separate multiplex PCRs, which brought successful CR consensus sequences from even highly degraded DNA extracts. This procedure requires a total of 20 sequencing reactions per sample, which is laborious and cost intensive. For only moderately degraded samples that we encounter more frequently with typical mtDNA casework material, we developed two new multiplex assays that use a subset of the mini-amplicon primers but embrace larger fragments (midis) and require only 10 sequencing reactions to build a double-stranded CR consensus sequence. We used a preceding mtDNA quantitation step by real-time PCR with two different target fragments (143 and 283 bp) that roughly correspond to the average fragment sizes of the different multiplex approaches to estimate size-dependent mtDNA quantities and to aid the choice of the appropriate PCR multiplexes with respect to quality of the results and required costs.

  13. Adaptive Telemetry Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinderson, R. L.; Salazar, G. A.; Haddick, C. M., Jr.; Spahn, C. J.; Venkatesh, C. N.

    1989-01-01

    Telemetry-data-acquisition unit adjusted remotely to produce changes in sampling rate, sampling channels, measurement scale, and output-bias level. Functional configuration adapted to changing conditions or new requirements by distant operator over telemetry link. Reconfiguration done in real time, without removing equipment from service. Bus-interface unit accepts reprogramming commands and translates them for low-rate adaptive multiplexer. Reprogrammable equipment reduces need for spare parts, since not necessary to stock variety of hardware with fixed characteristics. Adaptive multiplexer performs well in tests, amplitude errors less than 0.5 percent, distortion less than 0.25 percent, and crosstalk and common-mode rejection indiscernible.

  14. Optimizing electrostatic field calculations with the adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver to predict electric fields at protein-protein interfaces. I. Sampling and focusing.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Andrew W; Webb, Lauren J

    2013-10-03

    Continuum electrostatics methods are commonly used to calculate electrostatic potentials in proteins and at protein-protein interfaces to aid many types of biophysical studies. Despite their ubiquity throughout the biophysical literature, these calculations are difficult to test against experimental data to determine their accuracy and validity. To address this, we have calculated the Boltzmann-weighted electrostatic field at the midpoint of a nitrile bond placed at a variety of locations on the surface of the protein RalGDS, both in its monomeric form as well as when docked to four different constructs of the protein Rap, and compared the computation results to vibrational absorption energy measurements of the nitrile oscillator. This was done by generating a statistical ensemble of protein structures using enhanced molecular dynamics sampling with the Amber03 force field, followed by solving the linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for each structure using the Applied Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) software package. Using a two-stage focusing strategy, we examined numerous second stage box dimensions, grid point densities, box locations, and compared the numerical result to the result obtained from the sum of the numeric reaction field and the analytic Coulomb field. It was found that the reaction field method yielded higher correlation with experiment for the absolute calculation of fields, while the numeric solutions yielded higher correlation with experiment for the relative field calculations. Finer grid spacing typically improved the calculation, although this effect was less pronounced in the reaction field method. These sorts of calculations were also very sensitive to the box location, particularly for the numeric calculations of absolute fields using a 10(3) Å(3) box.

  15. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  16. Apparatus and method for handheld sampling

    DOEpatents

    Staab, Torsten A.

    2005-09-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus, and corresponding method, for taking a sample. The apparatus is built around a frame designed to be held in at least one hand. A sample media is used to secure the sample. A sample media adapter for securing the sample media is operated by a trigger mechanism connectively attached within the frame to the sample media adapter.

  17. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  18. An Umbrella for Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded several grants to study effects of and possible solutions to the problem of "acid rain"; pollution from atmospheric nitric and sulfuric acids. The research program is administered through North Carolina State University at Raleigh and will focus on biological effects of acid rain. (JMF)

  19. Assessment of the behavioral inhibition system and the behavioral approach system: adaptation and validation of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ) in a Chilean sample.

    PubMed

    Dufey, Michele; Fernández, Ana María; Mourgues, Catalina

    2011-05-01

    The goal of the present study is to estimate the psychometric properties of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ; Torrubia, Avila, Moltó, & Caseras, 2001) in a sample of Chilean college students. The main hypothesis is that the instrument would show appropriate levels of reliability and validity, in light of previous validation studies. A pilot study was conducted in order to generate the adapted version of the questionnaire, which was then applied to a student sample from different undergraduate careers (n = 434). The results show the expected levels of reliability (test-retest and internal consistency). The factorial validity does not comply with the expected model, suggesting a further consideration of the structure of the questionnaire. External validity is appropriate, as the questionnaire shows the expected correlations with other personality measures. It is concluded that the SPSRQ is adequate for the context of validation, and this study contributes to the generalization of the questionnaire, since the results are consistent with the expected psychometric properties that have been reported in the literature.

  20. Adaptive Sampling using Support Vector Machines

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mandelli; C. Smith

    2012-11-01

    Reliability/safety analysis of stochastic dynamic systems (e.g., nuclear power plants, airplanes, chemical plants) is currently performed through a combination of Event-Tress and Fault-Trees. However, these conventional methods suffer from certain drawbacks: • Timing of events is not explicitly modeled • Ordering of events is preset by the analyst • The modeling of complex accident scenarios is driven by expert-judgment For these reasons, there is currently an increasing interest into the development of dynamic PRA methodologies since they can be used to address the deficiencies of conventional methods listed above.

  1. Adaptive Sampling in Autonomous Marine Sensor Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    left.perr > 180.0) left- perr - 360.0 - left.perr; double right.perr - fabs(evalCRS - rightabs); if (right.perr > 180.0) right.perr = 360.0 - right- perr ...if Cright..cerr > 180.0) right-.cerr - 360.0 - right-.cerr; if (left..cerr <- right..cerr) if (left.. perr < right.. perr ) mval - (CC200-left-. perr )/2.0...90.0-left...cerr)/2.0); else mval - (200-right.. perr )/2.0; I else if (right.. perr <- left.. perr ) mval - (CC200-right-. perr )/2.0) + (90.0 -right

  2. Evolution of the MIDTAL microarray: the adaption and testing of oligonucleotide 18S and 28S rDNA probes and evaluation of subsequent microarray generations with Prymnesium spp. cultures and field samples.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Gary R; Touzet, Nicolas; Fleming, Gerard T A; Raine, Robin

    2015-07-01

    The toxic microalgal species Prymnesium parvum and Prymnesium polylepis are responsible for numerous fish kills causing economic stress on the aquaculture industry and, through the consumption of contaminated shellfish, can potentially impact on human health. Monitoring of toxic phytoplankton is traditionally carried out by light microscopy. However, molecular methods of identification and quantification are becoming more common place. This study documents the optimisation of the novel Microarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae (MIDTAL) microarray from its initial stages to the final commercial version now available from Microbia Environnement (France). Existing oligonucleotide probes used in whole-cell fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) for Prymnesium species from higher group probes to species-level probes were adapted and tested on the first-generation microarray. The combination and interaction of numerous other probes specific for a whole range of phytoplankton taxa also spotted on the chip surface caused high cross reactivity, resulting in false-positive results on the microarray. The probe sequences were extended for the subsequent second-generation microarray, and further adaptations of the hybridisation protocol and incubation temperatures significantly reduced false-positive readings from the first to the second-generation chip, thereby increasing the specificity of the MIDTAL microarray. Additional refinement of the subsequent third-generation microarray protocols with the addition of a poly-T amino linker to the 5' end of each probe further enhanced the microarray performance but also highlighted the importance of optimising RNA labelling efficiency when testing with natural seawater samples from Killary Harbour, Ireland.

  3. Implementing Teacher Work Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinne, Lenore J.; Watson, Dwight C.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how the teacher work sample methodology of the Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher Quality was implemented within the teacher education program at a small liberal arts college. Resulting program improvements are described, as well as on-going challenges. The adapted teacher work sample prompt and scoring rubric are…

  4. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  5. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, Joel Del; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  6. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  7. Specificity and timescales of cortical adaptation as inferences about natural movie statistics

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Michoel; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Schwartz, Odelia

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation is a phenomenological umbrella term under which a variety of temporal contextual effects are grouped. Previous models have shown that some aspects of visual adaptation reflect optimal processing of dynamic visual inputs, suggesting that adaptation should be tuned to the properties of natural visual inputs. However, the link between natural dynamic inputs and adaptation is poorly understood. Here, we extend a previously developed Bayesian modeling framework for spatial contextual effects to the temporal domain. The model learns temporal statistical regularities of natural movies and links these statistics to adaptation in primary visual cortex via divisive normalization, a ubiquitous neural computation. In particular, the model divisively normalizes the present visual input by the past visual inputs only to the degree that these are inferred to be statistically dependent. We show that this flexible form of normalization reproduces classical findings on how brief adaptation affects neuronal selectivity. Furthermore, prior knowledge acquired by the Bayesian model from natural movies can be modified by prolonged exposure to novel visual stimuli. We show that this updating can explain classical results on contrast adaptation. We also simulate the recent finding that adaptation maintains population homeostasis, namely, a balanced level of activity across a population of neurons with different orientation preferences. Consistent with previous disparate observations, our work further clarifies the influence of stimulus-specific and neuronal-specific normalization signals in adaptation. PMID:27699416

  8. Adaptive control of linearizable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. Shankar; Isidori, Alberto

    1989-01-01

    Initial results are reported regarding the adaptive control of minimum-phase nonlinear systems which are exactly input-output linearizable by state feedback. Parameter adaptation is used as a technique to make robust the exact cancellation of nonlinear terms, which is called for in the linearization technique. The application of the adaptive technique to control of robot manipulators is discussed. Only the continuous-time case is considered; extensions to the discrete-time and sampled-data cases are not obvious.

  9. The Structure and Organization within the Membrane of the Helices Composing the Pore-Forming Domain of Bacillus thuringiensis δ -Endotoxin are Consistent with an ``Umbrella-Like'' Structure of the Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Ehud; La Rocca, Paolo; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Shai, Yechiel

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of membrane insertion and the structural organization of pores formed by Bacillus thuringiensis δ -endotoxin. We determined the relative affinities for membranes of peptides corresponding to the seven helices that compose the toxin pore-forming domain, their modes of membrane interaction, their structures within membranes, and their orientations relative to the membrane normal. In addition, we used resonance energy transfer measurements of all possible combinatorial pairs of membrane-bound helices to map the network of interactions between helices in their membrane-bound state. The interaction of the helices with the bilayer membrane was also probed by a Monte Carlo simulation protocol to determine lowest-energy orientations. Our results are consistent with a situation in which helices α 4 and α 5 insert into the membrane as a helical hairpin in an antiparallel manner, while the other helices lie on the membrane surface like the ribs of an umbrella (the ``umbrella model''). Our results also support the suggestion that α 7 may serve as a binding sensor to initiate the structural rearrangement of the pore-forming domain.

  10. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  11. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  12. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  13. F-VIPGI: a new adapted version of VIPGI for FORS2 spectroscopy. Application to a sample of 16 X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastasi, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Fassbender, R.; Böhringer, H.; Pierini, D.; Verdugo, M.; Garilli, B. M.; Franzetti, P.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: The goal of this paper is twofold. Firstly, we present F-VIPGI, a new version of the VIMOS Interactive Pipeline and Graphical Interface (VIPGI) adapted to handle FORS2 spectroscopic data taken with the standard instrument configuration. Secondly, we investigate the spectro-photometric properties of a sample of galaxies residing in distant X-ray selected galaxy clusters, the optical spectra of which were reduced with this new pipeline. Methods: We provide basic technical information about the innovations of the new software and refer the reader to the original VIPGI paper for a detailed description of the core functions and performances. As a demonstration of the capabilities of the new pipeline, we then show results obtained for 16 distant (0.65 ≤ z ≤ 1.25) X-ray luminous galaxy clusters selected within the XMM-Newton Distant Cluster Project. We performed a spectral indices analysis of the extracted optical spectra of their members, based on which we created a library of composite high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. We then compared the average spectra of the passive galaxies of our sample with those computed for the same class of objects that reside in the field at similar high redshift and in groups in the local Universe. Finally, We computed the "photometric" properties of our templates and compared them with those of the Coma Cluster galaxies, which we took as representative of the local cluster population. Results: We demonstrate the capabilities of F-VIPGI, whose strength is an increased efficiency and a simultaneous shortening of FORS2 spectroscopic data reduction time by a factor of ~10 w.r.t. the standard IRAF procedures. We then discuss the quality of the final stacked optical spectra and provide them in electronic form as high-quality spectral templates, representative of passive and star-forming galaxies residing in distant galaxy clusters. By comparing the spectro-photometric properties of our templates with the local and distant galaxy

  14. Direct Adaptive Control Of An Industrial Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Lee, Thomas; Delpech, Michel

    1992-01-01

    Decentralized direct adaptive control scheme for six-jointed industrial robot eliminates part of overall computational burden imposed by centralized controller and degrades performance of robot by reducing sampling rate. Control and controller-adaptation laws based on observed performance of manipulator: no need to model dynamics of robot. Adaptive controllers cope with uncertainties and variations in robot and payload.

  15. Adaptation of adaptive optics systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Zhao, Dazun; Li, Chen

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a concept of an adaptation of adaptive optical system (AAOS) is proposed. The AAOS has certain real time optimization ability against the variation of the brightness of detected objects m, atmospheric coherence length rO and atmospheric time constant τ by means of changing subaperture number and diameter, dynamic range, and system's temporal response. The necessity of AAOS using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and some technical approaches are discussed. Scheme and simulation of an AAOS with variable subaperture ability by use of both hardware and software are presented as an example of the system.

  16. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... repeat the test with blood drawn from a vein. Alternative Names Blood sample - capillary; Fingerstick; Heelstick Images Phenylketonuria test Phenylketonuria test Capillary sample References Garza ...

  17. Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conformational changes that occur upon ligand binding may be too slow to observe on the time scales routinely accessible using molecular dynamics simulations. The adaptive integration method (AIM) leverages the notion that when a ligand is either fully coupled or decoupled, according to λ, barrier heights may change, making some conformational transitions more accessible at certain λ values. AIM adaptively changes the value of λ in a single simulation so that conformations sampled at one value of λ seed the conformational space sampled at another λ value. Adapting the value of λ throughout a simulation, however, does not resolve issues in sampling when barriers remain high regardless of the λ value. In this work, we introduce a new method, called Accelerated AIM (AcclAIM), in which the potential energy function is flattened at intermediate values of λ, promoting the exploration of conformational space as the ligand is decoupled from its receptor. We show, with both a simple model system (Bromocyclohexane) and the more complex biomolecule Thrombin, that AcclAIM is a promising approach to overcome high barriers in the calculation of free energies, without the need for any statistical reweighting or additional processors. PMID:24780083

  18. Adaptive equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, S. U. H.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical work which has been effective in improving data transmission by telephone and radio links using adaptive equalization (AE) techniques is reviewed. AE has been applied to reducing the temporal dispersion effects, such as intersymbol interference, caused by the channel accessed. Attention is given to the Nyquist telegraph transmission theory, least mean square error adaptive filtering and the theory and structure of linear receive and transmit filters for reducing error. Optimum nonlinear receiver structures are discussed in terms of optimality criteria as a function of error probability. A suboptimum receiver structure is explored in the form of a decision-feedback equalizer. Consideration is also given to quadrature amplitude modulation and transversal equalization for receivers.

  19. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  20. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  1. Biological sample collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  2. Venous Sampling

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of the body, including: Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) , in which blood samples are taken from the ... for a few days before the procedure. For AVS, you will be asked to stop taking certain ...

  3. Laser sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatenko, A. A.; Revina, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The review is devoted to the major advances in laser sampling. The advantages and drawbacks of the technique are considered. Specific features of combinations of laser sampling with various instrumental analytical methods, primarily inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, are discussed. Examples of practical implementation of hybrid methods involving laser sampling as well as corresponding analytical characteristics are presented. The bibliography includes 78 references.

  4. Adaptive manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyue; Wang, Jing; Zha, Hongyuan

    2012-02-01

    Manifold learning algorithms seek to find a low-dimensional parameterization of high-dimensional data. They heavily rely on the notion of what can be considered as local, how accurately the manifold can be approximated locally, and, last but not least, how the local structures can be patched together to produce the global parameterization. In this paper, we develop algorithms that address two key issues in manifold learning: 1) the adaptive selection of the local neighborhood sizes when imposing a connectivity structure on the given set of high-dimensional data points and 2) the adaptive bias reduction in the local low-dimensional embedding by accounting for the variations in the curvature of the manifold as well as its interplay with the sampling density of the data set. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our methods for improving the performance of manifold learning algorithms using both synthetic and real-world data sets.

  5. Lunar Sample Quarantine & Sample Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of this presentation is to discuss some of the responsibility of the lunar sample quarantine project. The responsibilities are: flying the mission safely, and on schedule, protect the Earth from biohazard, and preserve scientific integrity of samples.

  6. Adaptive Beamforming with Inadequate Snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YU, Jing; LI, Yaan

    2017-01-01

    In array signal processing, the covariance matrix used to calculate the adaptive weights is often poor estimated when the snapshot number is inadequate. The prior environmental knowledge can be used to make the estimation more accuracy. In this paper, an alternative knowledge-aided adaptive beamforming approach that is robust to low sample support environment is proposed. In this algorithm the covariance matrix used to calculate the optimum weights is constructed by blending a sample covariance matrix and a priori structured covariance matrix. Numerical simulations demonstrate the proposed algorithm has the potential for substantial performance improvement.

  7. Sampling Development

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of the enterprise. This article discusses how to sample development in order to accurately discern the shape of developmental change. The ideal solution is daunting: to summarize behavior over 24-hour intervals and collect daily samples over the critical periods of change. We discuss the magnitude of errors due to undersampling, and the risks associated with oversampling. When daily sampling is not feasible, we offer suggestions for sampling methods that can provide preliminary reference points and provisional sketches of the general shape of a developmental trajectory. Denser sampling then can be applied strategically during periods of enhanced variability, inflections in the rate of developmental change, or in relation to key events or processes that may affect the course of change. Despite the challenges of dense repeated sampling, researchers must take seriously the problem of sampling on a developmental time scale if we are to know the true shape of developmental change. PMID:22140355

  8. Sampling Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  9. Adaptive hybrid control of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Simple methods for the design of adaptive force and position controllers for robot manipulators within the hybrid control architecuture is presented. The force controller is composed of an adaptive PID feedback controller, an auxiliary signal and a force feedforward term, and it achieves tracking of desired force setpoints in the constraint directions. The position controller consists of adaptive feedback and feedforward controllers and an auxiliary signal, and it accomplishes tracking of desired position trajectories in the free directions. The controllers are capable of compensating for dynamic cross-couplings that exist between the position and force control loops in the hybrid control architecture. The adaptive controllers do not require knowledge of the complex dynamic model or parameter values of the manipulator or the environment. The proposed control schemes are computationally fast and suitable for implementation in on-line control with high sampling rates.

  10. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  11. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  12. Elevating sampling

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Joseph M.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Sampling – the process of collecting, preparing, and introducing an appropriate volume element (voxel) into a system – is often under appreciated and pushed behind the scenes in lab-on-a-chip research. What often stands in the way between proof-of-principle demonstrations of potentially exciting technology and its broader dissemination and actual use, however, is the effectiveness of sample collection and preparation. The power of micro- and nanofluidics to improve reactions, sensing, separation, and cell culture cannot be accessed if sampling is not equally efficient and reliable. This perspective will highlight recent successes as well as assess current challenges and opportunities in this area. PMID:24781100

  13. Community-Based Adaptation To A Changing Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This resource discusses how climate change is affecting community services, presents sample adaptation strategies, gives examples of successful community adaptation actions, and provides links to other key federal resources.

  14. SAMPLING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hannaford, B.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Segaser, C.L.; Terry, C.L.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus is given for the batch sampling of radioactive liquids such as slurries from a system by remote control, while providing shielding for protection of operating personnel from the harmful effects of radiation.

  15. Adaptive clinical trial designs in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yong; Lee, J. Jack

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive designs have become popular in clinical trial and drug development. Unlike traditional trial designs, adaptive designs use accumulating data to modify the ongoing trial without undermining the integrity and validity of the trial. As a result, adaptive designs provide a flexible and effective way to conduct clinical trials. The designs have potential advantages of improving the study power, reducing sample size and total cost, treating more patients with more effective treatments, identifying efficacious drugs for specific subgroups of patients based on their biomarker profiles, and shortening the time for drug development. In this article, we review adaptive designs commonly used in clinical trials and investigate several aspects of the designs, including the dose-finding scheme, interim analysis, adaptive randomization, biomarker-guided randomization, and seamless designs. For illustration, we provide examples of real trials conducted with adaptive designs. We also discuss practical issues from the perspective of using adaptive designs in oncology trials. PMID:25811018

  16. SAMPLING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOEpatents

    Sugarman, R.M.

    1960-08-30

    An oscilloscope is designed for displaying transient signal waveforms having random time and amplitude distributions. The oscilloscopc is a sampling device that selects for display a portion of only those waveforms having a particular range of amplitudes. For this purpose a pulse-height analyzer is provided to screen the pulses. A variable voltage-level shifter and a time-scale rampvoltage generator take the pulse height relative to the start of the waveform. The variable voltage shifter produces a voltage level raised one step for each sequential signal waveform to be sampled and this results in an unsmeared record of input signal waveforms. Appropriate delay devices permit each sample waveform to pass its peak amplitude before the circuit selects it for display.

  17. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  18. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Norman R.; King, Lloyd L.; Jackson, Peter O.; Zulich, Alan W.

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

  19. Adaptive walking in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nineteen elders with AD participated in the study. A veteran neuropsychiatrist established the degree of AD in the sample. To determine dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait, patients performed five trials for each experimental condition: free and adaptive gait with and without a dual-task (regressive countdown). Spatial and temporal parameters were collected through an optoelectronic tridimensional system. The central stride was analyzed in free gait, and the steps immediately before (approaching phase) and during the obstacle crossing were analyzed in adaptive gait. Results indicated that AD patients walked more slowly during adaptive gait and free gait, using conservative strategies when confronted either with an obstacle or a secondary task. Furthermore, patients sought for stability to perform the tasks, particularly for adaptive gait with dual task, who used anticipatory and online adjustments to perform the task. Therefore, the increase of task complexity enhances cognitive load and risk of falls for AD patients.

  20. Adaptive Walking in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nineteen elders with AD participated in the study. A veteran neuropsychiatrist established the degree of AD in the sample. To determine dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait, patients performed five trials for each experimental condition: free and adaptive gait with and without a dual-task (regressive countdown). Spatial and temporal parameters were collected through an optoelectronic tridimensional system. The central stride was analyzed in free gait, and the steps immediately before (approaching phase) and during the obstacle crossing were analyzed in adaptive gait. Results indicated that AD patients walked more slowly during adaptive gait and free gait, using conservative strategies when confronted either with an obstacle or a secondary task. Furthermore, patients sought for stability to perform the tasks, particularly for adaptive gait with dual task, who used anticipatory and online adjustments to perform the task. Therefore, the increase of task complexity enhances cognitive load and risk of falls for AD patients. PMID:22991684

  1. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H.; Nguyen, Truong Q.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the Expectation-Maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad-hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper: First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. Experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  2. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  3. Chain Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-08-01

    35609 Advanced Techniques Branch Plans and Programs Analysis Division Directorate for Product Assurance U. S. Army Missile Command Redstone Arsenal...Ray Heathcock Advanced Techniques Branch Plans and Programs Analysis Division Directorate for Product Assurance U. S. Army Missile Command...for Product Assurance has established a rather unique computer program for handling a variety of chain sampling schemes and is available for

  4. Sampling Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Three locations to the right of the test dig area are identified for the first samples to be delivered to the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL), and the Optical Microscope (OM) on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. These sampling areas are informally labeled 'Baby Bear', 'Mama Bear', and 'Papa Bear' respectively. This image was taken on the seventh day of the Mars mission, or Sol 7 (June 1, 2008) by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Systems and methods for self-synchronized digital sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, Jr., John R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Systems and methods for self-synchronized data sampling are provided. In one embodiment, a system for capturing synchronous data samples is provided. The system includes an analog to digital converter adapted to capture signals from one or more sensors and convert the signals into a stream of digital data samples at a sampling frequency determined by a sampling control signal; and a synchronizer coupled to the analog to digital converter and adapted to receive a rotational frequency signal from a rotating machine, wherein the synchronizer is further adapted to generate the sampling control signal, and wherein the sampling control signal is based on the rotational frequency signal.

  6. Activation energy for a model ferrous-ferric half reaction from transition path sampling.

    PubMed

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Sprik, Michiel

    2012-01-21

    Activation parameters for the model oxidation half reaction of the classical aqueous ferrous ion are compared for different molecular simulation techniques. In particular, activation free energies are obtained from umbrella integration and Marcus theory based thermodynamic integration, which rely on the diabatic gap as the reaction coordinate. The latter method also assumes linear response, and both methods obtain the activation entropy and the activation energy from the temperature dependence of the activation free energy. In contrast, transition path sampling does not require knowledge of the reaction coordinate and directly yields the activation energy [C. Dellago and P. G. Bolhuis, Mol. Simul. 30, 795 (2004)]. Benchmark activation energies from transition path sampling agree within statistical uncertainty with activation energies obtained from standard techniques requiring knowledge of the reaction coordinate. In addition, it is found that the activation energy for this model system is significantly smaller than the activation free energy for the Marcus model, approximately half the value, implying an equally large entropy contribution.

  7. Adaptation and initial validation of the Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 Questionnaire (GAD-7) in an Arabic speaking Lebanese psychiatric outpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Helen; Atoui, Mia; Hamadeh, Aya; Zeinoun, Pia; Nahas, Ziad

    2016-05-30

    The Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 (GAD-7) are short screening measures used in medical and community settings to assess depression and anxiety severity. The aim of this study is to translate the screening tools into Arabic and evaluate their psychometric properties in an Arabic-speaking Lebanese psychiatric outpatient sample. The patients completed the questionnaires, among others, prior to being evaluated by a clinical psychiatrist or psychologist. The scales' internal consistency and factor structure were measured and convergent and discriminant validity were established by comparing the scores with clinical diagnoses and the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire - MDD subset (PDSQ - MDD). Results showed that the PHQ-9 and GAD-7 are reliable screening tools for depression and anxiety and their factor structures replicated those reported in the literature. Sensitivity and specificity analyses showed that the PHQ-9 is sensitive but not specific at capturing depressive symptoms when compared to clinician diagnoses whereas the GAD-7 was neither sensitive nor specific at capturing anxiety symptoms. The implications of these findings are discussed in reference to the scales themselves and the cultural specificity of the Lebanese population.

  8. Habituation of visual adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue; Gao, Yi; Lv, Lili; Bao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Our sensory system adjusts its function driven by both shorter-term (e.g. adaptation) and longer-term (e.g. learning) experiences. Most past adaptation literature focuses on short-term adaptation. Only recently researchers have begun to investigate how adaptation changes over a span of days. This question is important, since in real life many environmental changes stretch over multiple days or longer. However, the answer to the question remains largely unclear. Here we addressed this issue by tracking perceptual bias (also known as aftereffect) induced by motion or contrast adaptation across multiple daily adaptation sessions. Aftereffects were measured every day after adaptation, which corresponded to the degree of adaptation on each day. For passively viewed adapters, repeated adaptation attenuated aftereffects. Once adapters were presented with an attentional task, aftereffects could either reduce for easy tasks, or initially show an increase followed by a later decrease for demanding tasks. Quantitative analysis of the decay rates in contrast adaptation showed that repeated exposure of the adapter appeared to be equivalent to adaptation to a weaker stimulus. These results suggest that both attention and a non-attentional habituation-like mechanism jointly determine how adaptation develops across multiple daily sessions. PMID:26739917

  9. Try This: Umbrella--Materials Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This article is the second in "Teaching Science's" "Try This" series. These hands-on activities are designed especially for early childhood students to encourage their natural curiosity and promote development of scientific thinking. In this activity, the problem-based learning approach means that the children are engaged in a…

  10. Arcjet Testing of Woven Carbon Cloth for Use on Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; laub, Bernard; Chen, Yih-Kang; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Bittner, M. E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes arcjet testing and analysis that has successfully demonstrated the viability of three dimensional woven carbon cloth for dual use in the Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT). ADEPT is an umbrella-like entry system that is folded for stowage in the launch vehicle s shroud and deployed in space prior to reaching the atmospheric interface. A key feature of the ADEPT concept is its lower ballistic coefficient for delivery of a given payload than those for conventional, rigid body entry systems. The benefits that accrue from the lower ballistic coefficient include factor of ten reductions of deceleration forces and entry heating. The former enables consideration of new classes of scientific instruments for solar system exploration while the latter enables the design of a more efficient thermal protection system. The carbon cloth now base lined for ADEPT has a dual use in that it serves as ADEPT s thermal protection system and as the "skin" that transfers aerodynamic deceleration loads to its umbrella-like substructure. The arcjet testing described in this paper was conducted for some of the higher heating conditions for a future Venus mission using the ADEPT concept, thereby showing that the carbon cloth can perform in a relevant entry environment. The ADEPT project considered the carbon cloth to be mission enabling and was carrying it as a major risk during Fiscal Year 2012. The testing and analysis reported here played a major role in retiring that risk and is highly significant to the success and possible adoption of ADEPT for future NASA missions. Finally, this paper also describes a preliminary engineering level code, based on the arcjet data, that can be used to estimate cloth thickness for future missions using ADEPT and to predict carbon cloth performance in future arcjet tests.

  11. Expressing Adaptation Strategies Using Adaptation Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemirline, N.; Bourda, Y.; Reynaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a real challenge to enable personalized access to information. Several systems have been proposed to address this challenge including Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHSs). However, the specification of adaptation strategies remains a difficult task for creators of such systems. In this paper, we consider the problem of the definition…

  12. Returning Samples from Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Kanik, I.; Brownlee, D.; McKay, C.; Anbar, A.; Glavin, D.; Yano, H.

    2012-12-01

    From the first half century of space exploration, we have obtained samples only from the Moon, comet Wild 2, the Solar Wind and the asteroid Itokawa. The in-depth analyses of these samples in terrestrial laboratories have yielded profound knowledge that could not have been obtained without the returned samples. While obtaining samples from Solar System bodies is crucial science, it is rarely done due to cost and complexity. Cassini's discovery of geysers on Enceladus and organic materials, indicate that there is an exceptional opportunity and science rational to do a low-cost flyby sample return mission, similar to what was done by the Stardust. The earliest low cost possible flight opportunity is the next Discovery Mission [Tsou et al 2012]. Enceladus Plume Discovery - While Voyager provided evidence for young surfaces on Enceladus, the existence of Enceladus plumes was discovered by Cassini. Enceladus and comets are the only known solar system bodies that have jets enabling sample collection without landing or surface contact. Cassini in situ Findings -Cassini's made many discoveries at Saturn, including the break up of large organics in the plumes of Enceladus. Four prime criteria for habitability are liquid water, a heat source, organics and nitrogen [McKay et al. 2008, Waite et al. 2009, Postberg et al. 2011]. Out of all the NASA designated habitability targets, Enceladus is the single body that presents evidence for all four criteria. Significant advancement in the exploration of the biological potential of Enceladus can be made on returned samples in terrestrial laboratories where the full power of state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation and procedures can be used. Without serious limits on power, mass or even cost, terrestrial laboratories provide the ultimate in analytical capability, adaptability, reproducibility and reliability. What Questions can Samples Address? - Samples collected from the Enceladus plume will enable a thorough and replicated

  13. Umbrella structure and channel-wall stoping in the Cambrian St. Roch Formation, Quebec Appalachians: significance for particle support mechanisms and turbulence development in hyper-concentrated sediment gravity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, Reinhard; Fong, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Umbrella structure is a newly recognized sedimentary structure associated with large platy clasts in resedimented boulder-bearing pebble conglomerate with a sandy matrix. It consists of a sand rim that lacks pebbles on parts or the entire underside of platy boulders, whereas on the upper side, pebbles are in direct contact with the boulders. The depositing processes were high- to hyper-concentrated sediment gravity flows in a submarine channel or canyon on the Cambrian continental slope of North America bordering the Iapetus Ocean. The structure occurs predominantly where clasts dip moderately in the down-current direction. Based on the association of the structure with slightly forward dipping slabs, it is proposed that these down-current dipping slabs may have been in the process of counter-clockwise rotation that was aborted and may have generated a pressure shadow on the underside enabling the inrush of fluid and the infiltration of sand into the anomalous low-pressure zone. The structure has implications for particle support mechanisms in high- to hyper-concentrated sedimentary gravity flows, in that it redirects attention to the much debated mechanism of dispersive pressure and alternatives. It provides an observable sediment structure that supports dispersive pressure which so far depended on experimental evidence and theoretical arguments alone. Vrolijk and Southard's (1997) concept of a `laminar sheared layer' is here for the first time interpreted as having an upward-moving `free-surface' layer effect during deposition from hyper-concentrated flows. Channel-wall stoping involves unlithified turbiditic spillover sand in the levee sediment of the canyon wall that was washed out by the upper diluted parts of the high-concentration flows coming down the channel and leaving a niche in the wall that was filled with coarser channel-axis facies by the same flow (or later flows) when its aggradation reached the level of the niche. The contact between turbidite and

  14. Stability of multirate sampled-data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, D. P.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    Current adaptive sampling schemes that can be used in sampled-data systems with variable rate sampling does not guarantee the stability of the resulting closed-loop system. A study was undertaken with the objective of finding a stable control law for multirate sampled-data systems. The problem is formulated such that the sampling interval is selected from a set of fixed number of sample intervals. A necessary and sufficient condition under which these types of systems can be stabilized is given. For a certain subclass of these types of systems, a sampling selection algorithm is given which results in a stable closed-loop system.

  15. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  16. An Adaptive Framework for Image and Video Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    bandwidth on the camera transmission or memory is not optimally utilized. In this paper we outline a framework for an adaptive sensor where the spatial and...scene can be realized, with small distortion. Keywords: Adaptive Imaging, Varying Sampling Rate, Image Content Measure, Scene Adaptive, Camera ...second order effect on the spatio-temporal trade-off. Figure 1 is an example of the spatio-temporal sampling rate tradeoff in a typical camera (e.g

  17. Sample Size Reassessment and Hypothesis Testing in Adaptive Survival Trials

    PubMed Central

    Magirr, Dominic; Jaki, Thomas; Koenig, Franz; Posch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mid-study design modifications are becoming increasingly accepted in confirmatory clinical trials, so long as appropriate methods are applied such that error rates are controlled. It is therefore unfortunate that the important case of time-to-event endpoints is not easily handled by the standard theory. We analyze current methods that allow design modifications to be based on the full interim data, i.e., not only the observed event times but also secondary endpoint and safety data from patients who are yet to have an event. We show that the final test statistic may ignore a substantial subset of the observed event times. An alternative test incorporating all event times is found, where a conservative assumption must be made in order to guarantee type I error control. We examine the power of this approach using the example of a clinical trial comparing two cancer therapies. PMID:26863139

  18. Resilience through adaptation

    PubMed Central

    van Voorn, George A. K.; Ligtenberg, Arend; Molenaar, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation of agents through learning or evolution is an important component of the resilience of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). Without adaptation, the flexibility of such systems to cope with outside pressures would be much lower. To study the capabilities of CAS to adapt, social simulations with agent-based models (ABMs) provide a helpful tool. However, the value of ABMs for studying adaptation depends on the availability of methodologies for sensitivity analysis that can quantify resilience and adaptation in ABMs. In this paper we propose a sensitivity analysis methodology that is based on comparing time-dependent probability density functions of output of ABMs with and without agent adaptation. The differences between the probability density functions are quantified by the so-called earth-mover’s distance. We use this sensitivity analysis methodology to quantify the probability of occurrence of critical transitions and other long-term effects of agent adaptation. To test the potential of this new approach, it is used to analyse the resilience of an ABM of adaptive agents competing for a common-pool resource. Adaptation is shown to contribute positively to the resilience of this ABM. If adaptation proceeds sufficiently fast, it may delay or avert the collapse of this system. PMID:28196372

  19. Adaptive Process Control in Rubber Industry.

    PubMed

    Brause, Rüdiger W; Pietruschka, Ulf

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the problems and an adaptive solution for process control in rubber industry. We show that the human and economical benefits of an adaptive solution for the approximation of process parameters are very attractive. The modeling of the industrial problem is done by the means of artificial neural networks. For the example of the extrusion of a rubber profile in tire production our method shows good resuits even using only a few training samples.

  20. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  1. Sampling for Contaminants in Ecological Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhardt, L. Lee; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This paper is concerned with problems in assessing the behavior of trace substances introduced into natural systems, sampling models of five classes that might be used in the study of contaminants are reviewed. Adaptation of an industrial experimentation method and techniques used in economic geology to ecological sampling is recommended.…

  2. Organizational Adaptation and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim S.

    1984-01-01

    Organizational adaptation and types of adaptation needed in academe in the future are reviewed and major conceptual approaches to organizational adaptation are presented. The probable environment that institutions will face in the future that will require adaptation is discussed. (MLW)

  3. Human heat adaptation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S

    2014-01-01

    In this overview, human morphological and functional adaptations during naturally and artificially induced heat adaptation are explored. Through discussions of adaptation theory and practice, a theoretical basis is constructed for evaluating heat adaptation. It will be argued that some adaptations are specific to the treatment used, while others are generalized. Regarding ethnic differences in heat tolerance, the case is put that reported differences in heat tolerance are not due to natural selection, but can be explained on the basis of variations in adaptation opportunity. These concepts are expanded to illustrate how traditional heat adaptation and acclimatization represent forms of habituation, and thermal clamping (controlled hyperthermia) is proposed as a superior model for mechanistic research. Indeed, this technique has led to questioning the perceived wisdom of body-fluid changes, such as the expansion and subsequent decay of plasma volume, and sudomotor function, including sweat habituation and redistribution. Throughout, this contribution was aimed at taking another step toward understanding the phenomenon of heat adaptation and stimulating future research. In this regard, research questions are posed concerning the influence that variations in morphological configuration may exert upon adaptation, the determinants of postexercise plasma volume recovery, and the physiological mechanisms that modify the cholinergic sensitivity of sweat glands, and changes in basal metabolic rate and body core temperature following adaptation.

  4. Passive adaptive imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David

    2016-05-01

    Standard methods for improved imaging system performance under degrading optical turbulence conditions typically involve active adaptive techniques or post-capture image processing. Here, passive adaptive methods are considered where active sources are disallowed, a priori. Theoretical analyses of short-exposure turbulence impacts indicate that varying aperture sizes experience different degrees of turbulence impacts. Smaller apertures often outperform larger aperture systems as turbulence strength increases. This suggests a controllable aperture system is advantageous. In addition, sub-aperture sampling of a set of training images permits the system to sense tilts in different sub-aperture regions through image acquisition and image cross-correlation calculations. A four sub-aperture pattern supports corrections involving five realizable operating modes (beyond tip and tilt) for removing aberrations over an annular pattern. Progress to date will be discussed regarding development and field trials of a prototype system.

  5. Psychometrics behind Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-03-01

    The paper provides a survey of 18 years' progress that my colleagues, students (both former and current) and I made in a prominent research area in Psychometrics-Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). We start with a historical review of the establishment of a large sample foundation for CAT. It is worth noting that the asymptotic results were derived under the framework of Martingale Theory, a very theoretical perspective of Probability Theory, which may seem unrelated to educational and psychological testing. In addition, we address a number of issues that emerged from large scale implementation and show that how theoretical works can be helpful to solve the problems. Finally, we propose that CAT technology can be very useful to support individualized instruction on a mass scale. We show that even paper and pencil based tests can be made adaptive to support classroom teaching.

  6. Adaptive synthetic vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julier, Simon J.; Brown, Dennis; Livingston, Mark A.; Thomas, Justin

    2006-05-01

    Through their ability to safely collect video and imagery from remote and potentially dangerous locations, UAVs have already transformed the battlespace. The effectiveness of this information can be greatly enhanced through synthetic vision. Given knowledge of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the camera, synthetic vision superimposes spatially-registered computer graphics over the video feed from the UAV. This technique can be used to show many types of data such as landmarks, air corridors, and the locations of friendly and enemy forces. However, the effectiveness of a synthetic vision system strongly depends on the accuracy of the registration - if the graphics are poorly aligned with the real world they can be confusing, annoying, and even misleading. In this paper, we describe an adaptive approach to synthetic vision that modifies the way in which information is displayed depending upon the registration error. We describe an integrated software architecture that has two main components. The first component automatically calculates registration error based on information about the uncertainty in the camera parameters. The second component uses this information to modify, aggregate, and label annotations to make their interpretation as clear as possible. We demonstrate the use of this approach on some sample datasets.

  7. Adaptive multibeam antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. I.

    1984-01-01

    An adaptive multibeam antenna array is considered which will enhance the advantages of a plain one. By providing simultaneous reception of signals from different directions and their sequential processing. The optimization of the array control for maximum interference suppression in the radiation pattern is emphasized. The optimum control is sought with respect to the signal-to-interference power ratio as a genaralized criterion. Sampled useful signals and transmission coefficients are found to be complex-conjugate quantities, assuming compatible formation of beams, so that synphasal equiamplitude addition of signals from all array element is attainable by unique settings of the weight factors. Calculations are simplified by letting the useful signal power in the 1-th beam be approximately equal to the k-th weight factor, before optimizing the weight vector for maximum signal-to-interference ratio. A narrowband interference described by power P and vector V of signal distribution over the array is considered as an example, to demonstrate the algorithm of synthesis. The algorithm, using the Butler matrix, was executed experimentally on a computer for a linear equidistant antenna array of 32 elements with compatible formation of beams.

  8. Statistical Inference for Data Adaptive Target Parameters.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Alan E; Kherad-Pajouh, Sara; van der Laan, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Consider one observes n i.i.d. copies of a random variable with a probability distribution that is known to be an element of a particular statistical model. In order to define our statistical target we partition the sample in V equal size sub-samples, and use this partitioning to define V splits in an estimation sample (one of the V subsamples) and corresponding complementary parameter-generating sample. For each of the V parameter-generating samples, we apply an algorithm that maps the sample to a statistical target parameter. We define our sample-split data adaptive statistical target parameter as the average of these V-sample specific target parameters. We present an estimator (and corresponding central limit theorem) of this type of data adaptive target parameter. This general methodology for generating data adaptive target parameters is demonstrated with a number of practical examples that highlight new opportunities for statistical learning from data. This new framework provides a rigorous statistical methodology for both exploratory and confirmatory analysis within the same data. Given that more research is becoming "data-driven", the theory developed within this paper provides a new impetus for a greater involvement of statistical inference into problems that are being increasingly addressed by clever, yet ad hoc pattern finding methods. To suggest such potential, and to verify the predictions of the theory, extensive simulation studies, along with a data analysis based on adaptively determined intervention rules are shown and give insight into how to structure such an approach. The results show that the data adaptive target parameter approach provides a general framework and resulting methodology for data-driven science.

  9. Gravitational adaptation of animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Burton, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of gravitational adaptation is studied in a group of five Leghorn cocks which had become physiologically adapted to 2 G after 162 days of centrifugation. After this period of adaptation, they are periodically exposed to a 2 G field, accompanied by five previously unexposed hatch-mates, and the degree of retained acceleration adaptation is estimated from the decrease in lymphocyte frequency after 24 hr at 2 G. Results show that the previously adapted birds exhibit an 84% greater lymphopenia than the unexposed birds, and that the lymphocyte frequency does not decrease to a level below that found at the end of 162 days at 2 G. In addition, the capacity for adaptation to chronic acceleration is found to be highly heritable. An acceleration tolerant strain of birds shows lesser mortality during chronic acceleration, particularly in intermediate fields, although the result of acceleration selection is largely quantitative (a greater number of survivors) rather than qualitative (behavioral or physiological changes).

  10. Technology transfer for adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  11. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  12. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  13. Quantifying the adaptive cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  14. Human adaptation to smog

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.W. Jacobs, S.V.; Frager, N.B.

    1982-10-01

    This study examined the health effects of human adaptation to photochemical smog. A group of recent arrivals to the Los Angeles air basin were compared to long-term residents of the basin. Evidence for adaptation included greater irritation and respiratory problems among the recent arrivals and desensitization among the long-term residents in their judgments of the severity of the smog problem to their health. There was no evidence for biochemical adaptation as measured by hemoglobin response to oxidant challenge. The results were discussed in terms of psychological adaption to chronic environmental stressors.

  15. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle.

    PubMed

    Angeler, David G; Allen, Craig R; Garmestani, Ahjond S; Gunderson, Lance H; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994-2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  16. Adaptive parallel logic networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Tony R.; Vidal, Jacques J.

    1988-01-01

    Adaptive, self-organizing concurrent systems (ASOCS) that combine self-organization with massive parallelism for such applications as adaptive logic devices, robotics, process control, and system malfunction management, are presently discussed. In ASOCS, an adaptive network composed of many simple computing elements operating in combinational and asynchronous fashion is used and problems are specified by presenting if-then rules to the system in the form of Boolean conjunctions. During data processing, which is a different operational phase from adaptation, the network acts as a parallel hardware circuit.

  17. The orientation period: essential for new registered nurses' adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Kathleen S

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore adaptation in new registered nurses using the Roy adaptation model as the guiding conceptual framework. This quantitative study employed a random sampling of new nurses in the state of North Carolina. Personal attributes of the new registered nurses and characteristics of their work setting were modeled with four measures considered suitable proxies for adaptation. Being in a formal orientation period significantly supported the new nurses' overall adaptation. This may represent the benefit of social support, including education, which seems to facilitate adaptation.

  18. Techniques for geothermal liquid sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.H.; Woodruff, E.M.

    1981-07-01

    A methodology has been developed that is particularly suited to liquid-dominated resources and adaptable to a variety of situations. It is intended to be a base methodology upon which variations can be made to meet specific needs or situations. The approach consists of recording flow conditions at the time of sampling, a specific insertable probe sampling system, a sample stabilization procedure, commercially available laboratory instruments, and data quality check procedures.

  19. Physiologic adaptation to space - Space adaptation syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderploeg, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The adaptive changes of the neurovestibular system to microgravity, which result in space motion sickness (SMS), are studied. A list of symptoms, which range from vomiting to drowsiness, is provided. The two patterns of symptom development, rapid and gradual, and the duration of the symptoms are described. The concept of sensory conflict and rearrangements to explain SMS is being investigated.

  20. Water Resource Adaptation Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

  1. On Teaching Adaptively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corno, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    New theory on adaptive teaching reflects the social dynamics of classrooms to explain what practicing teachers do to address student differences related to learning. In teaching adaptively, teachers respond to learners as they work. Teachers read student signals to diagnose needs on the fly and tap previous experience with similar learners to…

  2. Computerized Adaptive Ability Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    The general objective of a research program on adaptive testing was to identify several sources of potential error in test scores, and to study adaptive testing as a means for reducing these errors. Errors can result from the mismatch of item difficulty to the individual's ability; the psychological effects of testing and the test environment; the…

  3. Uncertainty in adaptive capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adger, W. Neil; Vincent, Katharine

    2005-03-01

    The capacity to adapt is a critical element of the process of adaptation: it is the vector of resources that represent the asset base from which adaptation actions can be made. Adaptive capacity can in theory be identified and measured at various scales, from the individual to the nation. The assessment of uncertainty within such measures comes from the contested knowledge domain and theories surrounding the nature of the determinants of adaptive capacity and the human action of adaptation. While generic adaptive capacity at the national level, for example, is often postulated as being dependent on health, governance and political rights, and literacy, and economic well-being, the determinants of these variables at national levels are not widely understood. We outline the nature of this uncertainty for the major elements of adaptive capacity and illustrate these issues with the example of a social vulnerability index for countries in Africa. To cite this article: W.N. Adger, K. Vincent, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  4. Retinal Imaging: Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. S.; Iroshnikov, N. G.; Larichev, Andrey V.

    This chapter describes several factors influencing the performance of ophthalmic diagnostic systems with adaptive optics compensation of human eye aberration. Particular attention is paid to speckle modulation, temporal behavior of aberrations, and anisoplanatic effects. The implementation of a fundus camera with adaptive optics is considered.

  5. Research, Adaptation, & Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Lee A., Ed.; And Others

    Research adaptation is an endeavor that implies solid collaboration among school practitioners and university and college researchers. This volume addresses the broad issues of research as an educational endeavor, adaptation as a necessary function associated with applying research findings to school situations, and change as an inevitable…

  6. Adaptive Wavelet Transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Szu, H.; Hsu, C.

    1996-12-31

    Human sensors systems (HSS) may be approximately described as an adaptive or self-learning version of the Wavelet Transforms (WT) that are capable to learn from several input-output associative pairs of suitable transform mother wavelets. Such an Adaptive WT (AWT) is a redundant combination of mother wavelets to either represent or classify inputs.

  7. Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change in Canadian Jurisdictions

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Stephanie E.; Ford, James D.; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Araos, Malcolm; Parker, Stephen; Fleury, Manon D.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change poses numerous risks to the health of Canadians. Extreme weather events, poor air quality, and food insecurity in northern regions are likely to increase along with the increasing incidence and range of infectious diseases. In this study we identify and characterize Canadian federal, provincial, territorial and municipal adaptation to these health risks based on publically available information. Federal health adaptation initiatives emphasize capacity building and gathering information to address general health, infectious disease and heat-related risks. Provincial and territorial adaptation is varied. Quebec is a leader in climate change adaptation, having a notably higher number of adaptation initiatives reported, addressing almost all risks posed by climate change in the province, and having implemented various adaptation types. Meanwhile, all other Canadian provinces and territories are in the early stages of health adaptation. Based on publically available information, reported adaptation also varies greatly by municipality. The six sampled Canadian regional health authorities (or equivalent) are not reporting any adaptation initiatives. We also find little relationship between the number of initiatives reported in the six sampled municipalities and their provinces, suggesting that municipalities are adapting (or not adapting) autonomously. PMID:25588156

  8. 75 FR 57859 - Specially Adapted Housing and Special Home Adaptation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN21 Specially Adapted Housing and Special Home Adaptation AGENCY... housing and special home adaptation grants. This final rule incorporates certain provisions from the... adapted housing (SAH) grants and special home adaptation (SHA) grants. The public comment period ended...

  9. Financing climate change adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Laurens M; Aerts, Jeroen C J H

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the topic of financing adaptation in future climate change policies. A major question is whether adaptation in developing countries should be financed under the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), or whether funding should come from other sources. We present an overview of financial resources and propose the employment of a two-track approach: one track that attempts to secure climate change adaptation funding under the UNFCCC; and a second track that improves mainstreaming of climate risk management in development efforts. Developed countries would need to demonstrate much greater commitment to the funding of adaptation measures if the UNFCCC were to cover a substantial part of the costs. The mainstreaming of climate change adaptation could follow a risk management path, particularly in relation to disaster risk reduction. 'Climate-proofing' of development projects that currently do not consider climate and weather risks could improve their sustainability.

  10. Complex Patterns of Local Adaptation in Teosinte

    PubMed Central

    Pyhäjärvi, Tanja; Hufford, Matthew B.; Mezmouk, Sofiane; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Populations of widely distributed species encounter and must adapt to local environmental conditions. However, comprehensive characterization of the genetic basis of adaptation is demanding, requiring genome-wide genotype data, multiple sampled populations, and an understanding of population structure and potential selection pressures. Here, we used single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and data on numerous environmental variables to describe the genetic basis of local adaptation in 21 populations of teosinte, the wild ancestor of maize. We found complex hierarchical genetic structure created by altitude, dispersal events, and admixture among subspecies, which complicated identification of locally beneficial alleles. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium revealed four large putative inversion polymorphisms showing clinal patterns of frequency. Population differentiation and environmental correlations suggest that both inversions and intergenic polymorphisms are involved in local adaptation. PMID:23902747

  11. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  12. Sample preparation for STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Christian A; Neumann, Daniel; Schmidt, Roman; Egner, Alexander; Jakobs, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of the diffraction barrier in the late nineteenth century, it has been commonly accepted that with far-field optical microscopy it is not possible to resolve structural details considerably finer than half the wavelength of light. The emergence of STED microscopy showed that, at least for fluorescence imaging, these limits can be overcome. Since STED microscopy is a far-field technique, in principle, the same sample preparation as for conventional confocal microscopy may be utilized. The increased resolution, however, requires additional precautions to ensure the structural preservation of the specimen. We present robust protocols to generate test samples for STED microscopy. These protocols for bead samples and immunolabeled mammalian cells may be used as starting points to adapt existing labeling strategies for the requirements of sub-diffraction resolution microscopy.

  13. Adaptive optics without guide stars (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Jerome; Li, Jiang; Beaulieu, Devin; Paudel, Hari P.; Barankov, Roman; Bifano, Thomas G.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics is a strategy to compensate for sample-induced aberrations in microscopy applications. Generally, it requires the presence of "guide stars" in the sample to serve as localized reference targets. We describe an implementation of conjugate adaptive optics that is amenable to widefield (i.e. non-scanning) microscopy, and can provide aberration corrections over potentially large fields of view without the use of guide stars. A unique feature of our implementation is that it is based on wavefront sensing with a single-shot partitioned-aperture sensor that provides large dynamic range compatible with extended samples. Combined information provided by this sensor and the imaging camera enable robust image de-blurring based on a rapid estimation of sample and aberrations obtained by closed-loop feedback. We present the theoretical principle of our technique and experimental demonstrations using both trans-illumination and fluorescence microscopes. Finally, we apply our technique to mouse brain imaging.

  14. Identification and dual adaptive control of a turbojet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W.; Leininger, G.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to utilize the design methods of modern control theory to realize a dual-adaptive feedback control unit for a highly nonlinear single spool airbreathing turbojet engine. Using a very detailed and accurate simulation of the nonlinear engine as the data source, linear operating point models of unspecified dimension are identified. Feedback control laws are designed at each operating point for a prespecified set of sampling rates using sampled-data output regulator theory. The control system sampling rate is determined by an adaptive sampling algorithm in correspondence with turbojet engine performance. The result is a dual-adaptive control law that is functionally dependent upon the sampling rate selected and environmental operating conditions. Simulation transients demonstrate the utility of the dual-adaptive design to improve on-board computer utilization while maintaining acceptable levels of engine performance.

  15. Extreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, B.; Graham, J. R.; Ghez, A.; Kalas, P.; Lloyd, J.; Makidon, R.; Olivier, S.; Patience, J.; Perrin, M.; Poyneer, L.; Severson, S.; Sheinis, A.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Troy, M.; Wallace, J.; Wilhelmsen, J.

    2002-12-01

    Direct detection of photons emitted or reflected by extrasolar planets is the next major step in extrasolar planet studies. Current adaptive optics (AO) systems, with <300 subapertures and Strehl ratio 0.4-0.7, can achieve contrast levels of 106 at 2" separations; this is sufficient to see very young planets in wide orbits but insufficient to detect solar systems more like our own. Contrast levels of 107 - 108 in the near-IR are needed to probe a significant part of the extrasolar planet phase space. The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics is carrying out a design study for a dedicated ultra-high-contrast "Extreme" adaptive optics system for an 8-10m telescope. With 3000 controlled subapertures it should achieve Strehl ratios > 0.9 in the near-IR. Using a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, the system will be optimized to control scattered light over a large radius and suppress artifacts caused static errors. We predict that it will achieve contrast levels of 107-108 around a large sample of stars (R<7-10), sufficient to detect Jupiter-like planets through their near-IR emission over a wide range of ages and masses. The system will be capable of a variety of high-contrast science including studying circumstellar dust disks at densities a factor of 10-100 lower than currently feasible and a systematic inventory of other solar systems on 10-100 AU scale. This work was supported by the NSF Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by UC Santa Cruz under AST-9876783. Portions of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  16. Adaptation to blur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Michael A.; Webster, Shernaaz M.; MacDonald, Jennifer; Bahradwadj, Shrikant R.

    2001-06-01

    Blur is an intrinsic property of the retinal image that can vary substantially in natural viewing. We examined how processes of contrast adaptation might adjust the visual system to regulate the perception of blur. Observers viewed a blurred or sharpened image for 2-5 minutes, and then judged the apparent focus of a series of 0.5-sec test images interleaved with 6-sec of readaptation. A 2AFC staircase procedure was used to vary the amplitude spectrum of successive test to find the image that appeared in focus. Adapting to a blurred image causes a physically focused image to appear too sharp. Opposite after-effects occur for sharpened adapting images. Pronounced biases were observed over a wide range of magnitudes of adapting blur, and were similar for different types of blur. After-effects were also similar for different classes of images but were generally weaker when the adapting and test stimuli were different images, showing that the adaptation is not adjusting simply to blur per se. These adaptive adjustments may strongly influence the perception of blur in normal vision and how it changes with refractive errors.

  17. Spreading good ideas: adapting illustrated materials.

    PubMed

    Haffey, J; Jimerson, A

    1985-01-01

    Adapting existing educational materials to fit local conditions is generally a less expenseive, less time consuming, often a more effective strategy than creating new educational materials. This is especially true for illustrated materials. Existing materials, which have been successfully used in 1 country or local setting must, of course, be carefully adapted and pretested before they are used in a new setting. Symbols are frequently culture specific, and adapted materials must utilize only those symbols which will be understood by the new targeted population. In adapting materials it is often necessary to insert additional information relevant to the needs of each new population. For example, if the target population has misconceptions about a contraceptive method, the educational materials concerning the method should incorporate messages to counter these misconceptions. Care must be taken to ensure that illustrated materials used in 1 culture do not offend members of another culture. New materials generally require much more testing than adapted materials. Once an appropriate format has been developed for transmitting technical information, it is relatively easy to adapt the format to other cultural settings because the technical information itself generally does not have to be modified. The Program for the Introduction and Adaptation of Contraceptive Technology and the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PIACT/PATH) provides assistance and information to organizations interested in adapting educational materials. Interested individuals may send inquiries to PIACT/PATH, suite 420, 1255 23rd Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, 20037, USA. Sample copies of family planning education materials and assistance in adapting these materials is also provided by the Population Communication Services Project at The Johns Hopkins University. Inquiries should be sent to Population Communication Services, The Johns Hopkins University, 624 North

  18. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy.

  19. Adaptive network countermeasures.

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland-Bane, Randy; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Carathimas, Anthony G.; Thomas, Eric D.

    2003-10-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year LDRD funded by the Differentiating Technologies investment area. The project investigated the use of countermeasures in protecting computer networks as well as how current countermeasures could be changed in order to adapt with both evolving networks and evolving attackers. The work involved collaboration between Sandia employees and students in the Sandia - California Center for Cyber Defenders (CCD) program. We include an explanation of the need for adaptive countermeasures, a description of the architecture we designed to provide adaptive countermeasures, and evaluations of the system.

  20. Adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Roorda, A

    2000-01-01

    Retinal images in the human eye are normally degraded because we are forced to use the optical system of the human eye--which is fraught with aberrations--as the objective lens. The recent application of adaptive optics technology to measure and compensate for these aberrations has produced retinal images in human eyes with unprecedented resolution. The adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is used to take pictures of photoreceptors and capillaries and to study spectral and angular tuning properties of individual photoreceptors. Application of adaptive optics technology for ophthalmoscopy promises continued progress toward understanding the basic properties of the living human retina and also for clinical applications.

  1. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D.

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The default parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST

  2. Adaptive Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, A E; Babajanyan, S G; Martirosyan, N H; Melkikh, A V

    2016-07-15

    A major limitation of many heat engines is that their functioning demands on-line control and/or an external fitting between the environmental parameters (e.g., temperatures of thermal baths) and internal parameters of the engine. We study a model for an adaptive heat engine, where-due to feedback from the functional part-the engine's structure adapts to given thermal baths. Hence, no on-line control and no external fitting are needed. The engine can employ unknown resources; it can also adapt to results of its own functioning that make the bath temperatures closer. We determine resources of adaptation and relate them to the prior information available about the environment.

  3. Rocketing into Adaptive Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Dowling, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    Defines adaptive inquiry and argues for employing this method which allows lessons to be shaped in response to student needs. Illustrates this idea by detailing an activity in which teams of students build rockets. (DDR)

  4. Adaptive Management of Ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management. As such, management may be treated as experiment, with replication, or management may be conducted in an iterative manner. Although the concept has resonated with many...

  5. Leak test adapter for containers

    DOEpatents

    Hallett, Brian H.; Hartley, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

  6. School Psychologists' Perceptions of Instructional Adaptations in Inclusive Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masten, William G.; Henry, Lindy; Robertson, Harvetta M.; Priest, Billie R.; Scott, Barbara; Stacks, James; Massey, Christine; Miller, Daniel C.; Martin, Sander

    2003-01-01

    This study assessed the perceptions of school psychologists toward effectiveness and use of instructional adaptations in inclusive classrooms with the Adaptation Evaluation Instrument (AEI; Schumm & Vaughn, 1991). The sample included 59 regular members of the Texas Association of School Psychologists (TASP). Items receiving the highest and…

  7. Sense of Control and Career Adaptability among Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Ryan D.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the direct relation of sense of control to career adaptability, as well as its ability to function as a mediator for other established predictors, with a sample of 1,991 undergraduate students. Students endorsing a greater sense of personal control were more likely to view themselves as adaptable to the world of work.…

  8. The Relationship between Spirituality, Religiousness, and Career Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Blustein, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between spirituality, religiousness, and career adaptability using a sample of undergraduate students (N=144). We proposed that higher levels of religiousness and spirituality would predict higher levels of career adaptability, defined in this study by career decision self-efficacy and career choice…

  9. Robust Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narendra, K. S.; Annaswamy, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Several concepts and results in robust adaptive control are are discussed and is organized in three parts. The first part surveys existing algorithms. Different formulations of the problem and theoretical solutions that have been suggested are reviewed here. The second part contains new results related to the role of persistent excitation in robust adaptive systems and the use of hybrid control to improve robustness. In the third part promising new areas for future research are suggested which combine different approaches currently known.

  10. Adaptive Gaussian Pattern Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    redundant model of the data to be used in classification . There are two classes of learning, or adaptation schemes. The first, unsupervised learning...37, No. 3, pp. 242-247, 1983. [2] E. F. Codd, Cellular Automata , Academic Press, 1968. [31 H. Everett, G. Gilbreath, S. Alderson, D. J. Marchette...Na al Oca aytm aete !JTI FL E COPY AD-A 199 030 Technical Document 1335 August 1988 Adaptive Gaussian Pattern Classif ication C. E. Priebe D. J

  11. Driver Adaptive Warning Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    this threshold, an alarm is triggered. Since TLC based systems can have user defined thresholds, a warning can be given as early as desired. However, the...Driver Adaptive Warning Systems Thesis Proposal Parag H. Batavia CMU-RI-TR-98-07 The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh...control number. 1. REPORT DATE MAR 1998 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1998 to 00-00-1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Driver Adaptive Warning

  12. Adaptable DC offset correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  13. Intestinal adaptation following resection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.

  14. Adaptation and perceptual norms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Michael A.; Yasuda, Maiko; Haber, Sara; Leonard, Deanne; Ballardini, Nicole

    2007-02-01

    We used adaptation to examine the relationship between perceptual norms--the stimuli observers describe as psychologically neutral, and response norms--the stimulus levels that leave visual sensitivity in a neutral or balanced state. Adapting to stimuli on opposite sides of a neutral point (e.g. redder or greener than white) biases appearance in opposite ways. Thus the adapting stimulus can be titrated to find the unique adapting level that does not bias appearance. We compared these response norms to subjectively defined neutral points both within the same observer (at different retinal eccentricities) and between observers. These comparisons were made for visual judgments of color, image focus, and human faces, stimuli that are very different and may depend on very different levels of processing, yet which share the property that for each there is a well defined and perceptually salient norm. In each case the adaptation aftereffects were consistent with an underlying sensitivity basis for the perceptual norm. Specifically, response norms were similar to and thus covaried with the perceptual norm, and under common adaptation differences between subjectively defined norms were reduced. These results are consistent with models of norm-based codes and suggest that these codes underlie an important link between visual coding and visual experience.

  15. Adaptation through proportion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liyang; Shi, Wenjia; Tang, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Adaptation is a ubiquitous feature in biological sensory and signaling networks. It has been suggested that adaptive systems may follow certain simple design principles across diverse organisms, cells and pathways. One class of networks that can achieve adaptation utilizes an incoherent feedforward control, in which two parallel signaling branches exert opposite but proportional effects on the output at steady state. In this paper, we generalize this adaptation mechanism by establishing a steady-state proportionality relationship among a subset of nodes in a network. Adaptation can be achieved by using any two nodes in the sub-network to respectively regulate the output node positively and negatively. We focus on enzyme networks and first identify basic regulation motifs consisting of two and three nodes that can be used to build small networks with proportional relationships. Larger proportional networks can then be constructed modularly similar to LEGOs. Our method provides a general framework to construct and analyze a class of proportional and/or adaptation networks with arbitrary size, flexibility and versatile functional features.

  16. The Climate Adaptation Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2013-01-01

    Climate adaptation has emerged as a mainstream risk management strategy for assisting in maintaining socio-ecological systems within the boundaries of a safe operating space. Yet, there are limits to the ability of systems to adapt. Here, we introduce the concept of an adaptation frontier , which is defined as a socio-ecological system s transitional adaptive operating space between safe and unsafe domains. A number of driving forces are responsible for determining the sustainability of systems on the frontier. These include path dependence, adaptation/development deficits, values conflicts and discounting of future loss and damage. The cumulative implications of these driving forces are highly uncertain. Nevertheless, the fact that a broad range of systems already persist at the edge of their frontiers suggests a high likelihood that some limits will eventually be exceeded. The resulting system transformation is likely to manifest as anticipatory modification of management objectives or loss and damage. These outcomes vary significantly with respect to their ethical implications. Successful navigation of the adaptation frontier will necessitate new paradigms of risk governance to elicit knowledge that encourages reflexive reevaluation of societal values that enable or constrain sustainability.

  17. Adaptive scalar quantization without side information.

    PubMed

    Ortega, A; Vetterli, M

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel technique for adaptive scalar quantization. Adaptivity is useful in applications, including image compression, where the statistics of the source are either not known a priori or will change over time. Our algorithm uses previously quantized samples to estimate the distribution of the source, and does not require that side information be sent in order to adapt to changing source statistics. Our quantization scheme is thus backward adaptive. We propose that an adaptive quantizer can be separated into two building blocks, namely, model estimation and quantizer design. The model estimation produces an estimate of the changing source probability density function, which is then used to redesign the quantizer using standard techniques. We introduce nonparametric estimation techniques that only assume smoothness of the input distribution. We discuss the various sources of error in our estimation and argue that, for a wide class of sources with a smooth probability density function (pdf), we provide a good approximation to a "universal" quantizer, with the approximation becoming better as the rate increases. We study the performance of our scheme and show how the loss due to adaptivity is minimal in typical scenarios. In particular, we provide examples and show how our technique can achieve signal-to-noise ratios within 0.05 dB of the optimal Lloyd-Max quantizer for a memoryless source, while achieving over 1.5 dB gain over a fixed quantizer for a bimodal source.

  18. Optical Communication System for Remote Monitoring and Adaptive Control of Distributed Ground Sensors Exhibiting Collective Intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Comprehensive management of the battle-space has created new requirements in information management, communication, and interoperability as they effect surveillance and situational awareness. The objective of this proposal is to expand intelligent controls theory to produce a uniquely powerful implementation of distributed ground-based measurement incorporating both local collective behavior, and interoperative global optimization for sensor fusion and mission oversight. By using a layered hierarchal control architecture to orchestrate adaptive reconfiguration of autonomous robotic agents, we can improve overall robustness and functionality in dynamic tactical environments without information bottlenecks. In this concept, each sensor is equipped with a miniaturized optical reflectance modulator which is interactively monitored as a remote transponder using a covert laser communication protocol from a remote mothership or operative. Robot data-sharing at the ground level can be leveraged with global evaluation criteria, including terrain overlays and remote imaging data. Information sharing and distributed intelli- gence opens up a new class of remote-sensing applications in which small single-function autono- mous observers at the local level can collectively optimize and measure large scale ground-level signals. AS the need for coverage and the number of agents grows to improve spatial resolution, cooperative behavior orchestrated by a global situational awareness umbrella will be an essential ingredient to offset increasing bandwidth requirements within the net. A system of the type described in this proposal will be capable of sensitively detecting, tracking, and mapping spatial distributions of measurement signatures which are non-stationary or obscured by clutter and inter- fering obstacles by virtue of adaptive reconfiguration. This methodology could be used, for example, to field an adaptive ground-penetrating radar for detection of underground structures in

  19. Frequency dependency of temporal contrast adaptation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Hohberger, Bettina; Rössler, Christopher W; Jünemann, Anselm G M; Horn, Folkert K; Kremers, Jan

    2011-06-21

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of temporal frequency of temporal contrast adaptation on contrast sensitivity in healthy subjects. Temporal contrast sensitivities (TCS) were measured monocularly in seven healthy subjects with a modified ERG full-field bowl stimulator at eight different test temporal frequencies (9, 15, 20, 25, 31, 37, 44, 51 Hz) using a two-alternative-forced-choice strategy. Before each presentation of the test stimulus, a 100% contrast adapting flicker stimulus was presented (frequencies: 9, 15, 20, 25, 31, 37, 44, 51, 100 Hz). At each adapting frequency, a complete set of TCSs was measured. All temporal contrast sensitivities decreased with increasing temporal frequencies. Adaptation led to a general temporal contrast sensitivity decrease. Largest adaptation effects were seen at an adaptation frequency of 25 Hz. Reduction of contrast sensitivity was significantly larger at 25 Hz adaptation than at 9 Hz adaptation (t-test of paired samples, Bonferroni corrected). The results of this study showed a general TCS decrease with the largest effect at an adaptation frequency of 25 Hz. This finding indicates that the contrast adaptation probably occurred in the magnocellular-pathway. In future clinical studies adaptation effects could be investigated in patients with reduced temporal contrast sensitivity.

  20. Towards psychologically adaptive brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrden, A.; Chau, T.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) performance is sensitive to short-term changes in psychological states such as fatigue, frustration, and attention. This paper explores the design of a BCI that can adapt to these short-term changes. Approach. Eleven able-bodied individuals participated in a study during which they used a mental task-based EEG-BCI to play a simple maze navigation game while self-reporting their perceived levels of fatigue, frustration, and attention. In an offline analysis, a regression algorithm was trained to predict changes in these states, yielding Pearson correlation coefficients in excess of 0.45 between the self-reported and predicted states. Two means of fusing the resultant mental state predictions with mental task classification were investigated. First, single-trial mental state predictions were used to predict correct classification by the BCI during each trial. Second, an adaptive BCI was designed that retrained a new classifier for each testing sample using only those training samples for which predicted mental state was similar to that predicted for the current testing sample. Main results. Mental state-based prediction of BCI reliability exceeded chance levels. The adaptive BCI exhibited significant, but practically modest, increases in classification accuracy for five of 11 participants and no significant difference for the remaining six despite a smaller average training set size. Significance. Collectively, these findings indicate that adaptation to psychological state may allow the design of more accurate BCIs.

  1. Domain adaptive boosting method and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jie; Miao, Zhenjiang

    2015-03-01

    Differences of data distributions widely exist among datasets, i.e., domains. For many pattern recognition, nature language processing, and content-based analysis systems, a decrease in performance caused by the domain differences between the training and testing datasets is still a notable problem. We propose a domain adaptation method called domain adaptive boosting (DAB). It is based on the AdaBoost approach with extensions to cover the domain differences between the source and target domains. Two main stages are contained in this approach: source-domain clustering and source-domain sample selection. By iteratively adding the selected training samples from the source domain, the discrimination model is able to achieve better domain adaptation performance based on a small validation set. The DAB algorithm is suitable for the domains with large scale samples and easy to extend for multisource adaptation. We implement this method on three computer vision systems: the skin detection model in single images, the video concept detection model, and the object classification model. In the experiments, we compare the performances of several commonly used methods and the proposed DAB. Under most situations, the DAB is superior.

  2. Adaptive Dynamic Event Tree in RAVEN code

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur

    2014-11-01

    RAVEN is a software tool that is focused on performing statistical analysis of stochastic dynamic systems. RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other applications (system codes). Among the several capabilities currently present in RAVEN, there are five different sampling strategies: Monte Carlo, Latin Hyper Cube, Grid, Adaptive and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) sampling methodologies. The scope of this paper is to present a new sampling approach, currently under definition and implementation: an evolution of the DET me

  3. Adaptable Deployable Entry & Placement Technology (ADEPT) for Cubesat Delivery to Mars Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wercinski, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The Adaptable, Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT), uses a mechanical skeleton to deploy a revolutionary carbon fabric system that serves as both heat shield and primary structure during atmospheric entry. The NASA ADEPT project, currently funded by the Game Changing Development Program in STMD is currently focused on 1m class hypersonic decelerators for the delivery of very small payloads ( 5 kg) to locations of interest in an effort to leverage low-cost platforms to rapidly mature the technology while simultaneously delivering high-value science. Preliminary mission design and aerothermal performance testing in arcjets have shown the ADEPT system is quite capable of safe delivery of cubesats to Mars surface. The ability of the ADEPT to transit to Mars in a stowed configuration (similar to an umbrella) provides options for integration with the Mars 2020 cruise stage, even to consider multiple ADEPTs. System-level test campaigns are underway for FY15 execution or planning for FY16. These include deployment testing, wind tunnel testing, system-level arc jet testing, and a sounding rocket flight test. The goal is system level maturation (TRL 6) at a 1m class Mars design reference mission configuration.

  4. Population Education in Mathematics: Some Sample Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This mathematics teacher's manual contains ten sample lessons on population growth and demography that were adapted from materials produced in several countries in Asia and Oceania. Among the mathematics concepts and skills students apply during these lessons are set theory, cardinal and ordinal numbers, frequency tallies, percentages, ratios,…

  5. Population Education in Science: Some Sample Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This science teacher's manual contains nine sample population education lessons adapted from materials produced in several countries in Asia and Oceania. Activities are designed for lower primary through high school students. Included are class discussions, small group activities, and a role-playing situation. Food chains, human dependence upon…

  6. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  7. Sampling by Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of sampling methods used in information science research focuses on Fussler's method for sampling catalog cards and on sampling by length. Highlights include simple random sampling, sampling with probability equal to size without replacement, sampling with replacement, and examples of estimating the number of books on shelves in certain…

  8. WORTH ADAPTING? REVISITING THE USEFULNESS OF OUTCOME-ADAPTIVE RANDOMIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. Jack; Chen, Nan; Yin, Guosheng

    2012-01-01

    Outcome-adaptive randomization (AR) allocates more patients to the better treatments as the information accumulates in the trial. Is it worth to apply outcome-AR in clinical trials? Different views permeate the medical and statistical communities. We provide additional insights to the question by conducting extensive simulation studies. Trials are designed to maintain the type I error rate, achieve a specified power, and provide better treatment to patients. Generally speaking, equal randomization (ER) requires a smaller sample size and yields a smaller number of non-responders than AR by controlling type I and type II errors. Conversely, AR produces a higher overall response rate than ER with or without expanding the trial to the same maximum sample size. When there exist substantial treatment differences, AR can yield a higher overall response rate as well as a lower average sample size and a smaller number of non-responders. Similar results are found for the survival endpoint. The differences between AR and ER quickly diminish with early stopping of a trial due to efficacy or futility. In summary, ER maintains balanced allocation throughout the trial and reaches the specified statistical power with a smaller number of patients in the trial. If the trial’s result is positive, ER may lead to early approval of the treatment. AR focuses on treating patients best in the trial. AR may be preferred when the difference in efficacy between treatments is large or when limited patients are available. PMID:22753588

  9. Adaptive spectral doppler estimation.

    PubMed

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence. The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch's method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out. Simulations in Field II for pulsating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior performance for short observation windows compared with the averaged periodogram. Computational costs and implementation details are also discussed.

  10. Solar tomography adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhao, Gang

    2014-03-10

    Conventional solar adaptive optics uses one deformable mirror (DM) and one guide star for wave-front sensing, which seriously limits high-resolution imaging over a large field of view (FOV). Recent progress toward multiconjugate adaptive optics indicates that atmosphere turbulence induced wave-front distortion at different altitudes can be reconstructed by using multiple guide stars. To maximize the performance over a large FOV, we propose a solar tomography adaptive optics (TAO) system that uses tomographic wave-front information and uses one DM. We show that by fully taking advantage of the knowledge of three-dimensional wave-front distribution, a classical solar adaptive optics with one DM can provide an extra performance gain for high-resolution imaging over a large FOV in the near infrared. The TAO will allow existing one-deformable-mirror solar adaptive optics to deliver better performance over a large FOV for high-resolution magnetic field investigation, where solar activities occur in a two-dimensional field up to 60'', and where the near infrared is superior to the visible in terms of magnetic field sensitivity.

  11. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  12. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-24

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  13. Adaptation and risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation assessment methods are compatible with the international risk management standard ISO:31000. Risk management approaches are increasingly being recommended for adaptation assessments at both national and local levels. Two orientations to assessments can commonly be identified: top-down and bottom-up, and prescriptive and diagnostic. Combinations of these orientations favor different types of assessments. The choice of orientation can be related to uncertainties in prediction and taking action, in the type of adaptation and in the degree of system stress. Adopting multiple viewpoints is to be encouraged, especially in complex situations. The bulk of current guidance material is consistent with top-down and predictive approaches, thus is most suitable for risk scoping and identification. Abroad range ofmaterial fromwithin and beyond the climate change literature can be used to select methods to be used in assessing and implementing adaptation. The framing of risk, correct formulation of the questions being investigated and assessment methodology are critical aspects of the scoping phase. Only when these issues have been addressed should be issue of specific methods and tools be addressed. The reorientation of adaptation from an assessment focused solely on anthropogenic climate change to broader issues of vulnerability/resilience, sustainable development and disaster risk, especially through a risk management framework, can draw from existing policy and management understanding in communities, professions and agencies, incorporating existing agendas, knowledge, risks, and issues they already face.

  14. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics. PMID:28233824

  15. Solar Adaptive Optics.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Thomas R; Marino, Jose

    Adaptive optics (AO) has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO) and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO) will be given.

  16. A Mars Sample Return Sample Handling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David; Stroker, Carol

    2013-01-01

    We present a sample handling system, a subsystem of the proposed Dragon landed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission [1], that can return to Earth orbit a significant mass of frozen Mars samples potentially consisting of: rock cores, subsurface drilled rock and ice cuttings, pebble sized rocks, and soil scoops. The sample collection, storage, retrieval and packaging assumptions and concepts in this study are applicable for the NASA's MPPG MSR mission architecture options [2]. Our study assumes a predecessor rover mission collects samples for return to Earth to address questions on: past life, climate change, water history, age dating, understanding Mars interior evolution [3], and, human safety and in-situ resource utilization. Hence the rover will have "integrated priorities for rock sampling" [3] that cover collection of subaqueous or hydrothermal sediments, low-temperature fluidaltered rocks, unaltered igneous rocks, regolith and atmosphere samples. Samples could include: drilled rock cores, alluvial and fluvial deposits, subsurface ice and soils, clays, sulfates, salts including perchlorates, aeolian deposits, and concretions. Thus samples will have a broad range of bulk densities, and require for Earth based analysis where practical: in-situ characterization, management of degradation such as perchlorate deliquescence and volatile release, and contamination management. We propose to adopt a sample container with a set of cups each with a sample from a specific location. We considered two sample cups sizes: (1) a small cup sized for samples matching those submitted to in-situ characterization instruments, and, (2) a larger cup for 100 mm rock cores [4] and pebble sized rocks, thus providing diverse samples and optimizing the MSR sample mass payload fraction for a given payload volume. We minimize sample degradation by keeping them frozen in the MSR payload sample canister using Peltier chip cooling. The cups are sealed by interference fitted heat activated memory

  17. Advances in Adaptive Control Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2009-01-01

    This poster presentation describes recent advances in adaptive control technology developed by NASA. Optimal Control Modification is a novel adaptive law that can improve performance and robustness of adaptive control systems. A new technique has been developed to provide an analytical method for computing time delay stability margin for adaptive control systems.

  18. Development and Standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of Item Response Theory to the Assessment of Adaptive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Tassé, Marc J; Schalock, Robert L; Thissen, David; Balboni, Giulia; Bersani, Henry Hank; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon A; Spreat, Scott; Widaman, Keith F; Zhang, Dalun; Navas, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (DABS) was developed using item response theory (IRT) methods and was constructed to provide the most precise and valid adaptive behavior information at or near the cutoff point of making a decision regarding a diagnosis of intellectual disability. The DABS initial item pool consisted of 260 items. Using IRT modeling and a nationally representative standardization sample, the item set was reduced to 75 items that provide the most precise adaptive behavior information at the cutoff area determining the presence or not of significant adaptive behavior deficits across conceptual, social, and practical skills. The standardization of the DABS is described and discussed.

  19. Experimental adaptive process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, I. A.; Struchalin, G. I.; Straupe, S. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Kravtsov, K. S.; Kulik, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive measurements were recently shown to significantly improve the performance of quantum state tomography. Utilizing information about the system for the online choice of optimal measurements allows one to reach the ultimate bounds of precision for state reconstruction. In this article we generalize an adaptive Bayesian approach to the case of process tomography and experimentally show its superiority in the task of learning unknown quantum operations. Our experiments with photonic polarization qubits cover all types of single-qubit channels. We also discuss instrumental errors and the criteria for evaluation of the ultimate achievable precision in an experiment. It turns out that adaptive tomography provides a lower noise floor in the presence of strong technical noise.

  20. Cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews recent flight and ground-based studies of cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight. Prominent features of microgravity exposure include loss of gravitational pressures, relatively low venous pressures, headward fluid shifts, plasma volume loss, and postflight orthostatic intolerance and reduced exercise capacity. Many of these short-term responses to microgravity extend themselves during long-duration microgravity exposure and may be explained by altered pressures (blood and tissue) and fluid balance in local tissues nourished by the cardiovascular system. In this regard, it is particularly noteworthy that tissues of the lower body (e.g., foot) are well adapted to local hypertension on Earth, whereas tissues of the upper body (e.g., head) are not as well adapted to increase in local blood pressure. For these and other reasons, countermeasures for long-duration flight should include reestablishment of higher, Earth-like blood pressures in the lower body.

  1. Adaptive modulations of martensites.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, S; Rössler, U K; Heczko, O; Wuttig, M; Buschbeck, J; Schultz, L; Fähler, S

    2010-04-09

    Modulated phases occur in numerous functional materials like giant ferroelectrics and magnetic shape-memory alloys. To understand the origin of these phases, we employ and generalize the concept of adaptive martensite. As a starting point, we investigate the coexistence of austenite, adaptive 14M phase, and tetragonal martensite in Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape-memory alloy epitaxial films. We show that the modulated martensite can be constructed from nanotwinned variants of the tetragonal martensite phase. By combining the concept of adaptive martensite with branching of twin variants, we can explain key features of modulated phases from a microscopic view. This includes metastability, the sequence of 6M-10M-14M-NM intermartensitic transitions, and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  2. Adaptive Epibiochemistry and Epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Buryanov, Ya I

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reactions of post-synthetic modification of macromolecules occur in the cells of all organisms. These reactions, which can be designated as epibiochemical, are of a special type and, as discriminated from reactions with low molecular weight substrates, occur on the level of biopolymers, causing their covalent modification. The majority of epibiochemical modifications of proteins, DNA, and RNA are reversible and are carried out by modification transferases and de-modification enzymes, respectively. Epibiochemical, i.e. those located above the low molecular weight metabolites, modifications of proteins and nucleic acids perform various functions, including participation in molecular mechanisms of adaptive epigenetic heredity. This paper presents an overview of some adaptive epibiochemical modifications of macromolecules and the adaptive epigenetic processes on their basis. The features of epigenetic inheritance of acquired characteristics and the limits of biological evolution are discussed.

  3. Adaptive response modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Belli, Mauro

    Cellular response to radiation is often modified by a previous delivery of a small "priming" dose: a smaller amount of damage, defined by the end point being investigated, is observed, and for this reason the effect is called adaptive response. An improved understanding of this effect is essential (as much as for the case of the bystander effect) for a reliable radiation risk assessment when low dose irradiations are involved. Experiments on adaptive response have shown that there are a number of factors that strongly influence the occurrence (and the level) of the adaptation. In particular, priming doses and dose rates have to fall in defined ranges; the same is true for the time interval between the delivery of the small priming dose and the irradiation with the main, larger, dose (called in this case challenging dose). Different hypotheses can be formulated on the main mechanism(s) determining the adaptive response: an increased efficiency of DNA repair, an increased level of antioxidant enzymes, an alteration of cell cycle progression, a chromatin conformation change. An experimental clearcut evidence going definitely in the direction of one of these explanations is not yet available. Modelling can be done at different levels. Simple models, relating the amount of damage, through elementary differential equations, to the dose and dose rate experienced by the cell, are relatively easy to handle, and they can be modified to account for the priming irradiation. However, this can hardly be of decisive help in the explanation of the mechanisms, since each parameter of these models often incorporates in an effective way several cellular processes related to the response to radiation. In this presentation we show our attempts to describe adaptive response with models that explicitly contain, as a dynamical variable, the inducible adaptive agent. At a price of a more difficult treatment, this approach is probably more prone to give support to the experimental studies

  4. Fast autodidactic adaptive equalization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilal, Katia

    Autodidactic equalization by adaptive filtering is addressed in a mobile radio communication context. A general method, using an adaptive stochastic gradient Bussgang type algorithm, to deduce two low cost computation algorithms is given: one equivalent to the initial algorithm and the other having improved convergence properties thanks to a block criteria minimization. Two start algorithms are reworked: the Godard algorithm and the decision controlled algorithm. Using a normalization procedure, and block normalization, the performances are improved, and their common points are evaluated. These common points are used to propose an algorithm retaining the advantages of the two initial algorithms. This thus inherits the robustness of the Godard algorithm and the precision and phase correction of the decision control algorithm. The work is completed by a study of the stable states of Bussgang type algorithms and of the stability of the Godard algorithms, initial and normalized. The simulation of these algorithms, carried out in a mobile radio communications context, and under severe conditions on the propagation channel, gave a 75% reduction in the number of samples required for the processing in relation with the initial algorithms. The improvement of the residual error was of a much lower return. These performances are close to making possible the use of autodidactic equalization in the mobile radio system.

  5. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Konrad

    Die adaptive Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung (ACC, Adaptive Cruise Control) ist eine Weiterentwicklung der konventionellen Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung, die eine konstante Fahrgeschwindigkeit einstellt. ACC überwacht mittels eines Radarsensors den Bereich vor dem Fahrzeug und passt die Geschwindigkeit den Gegebenheiten an. ACC reagiert auf langsamer vorausfahrende oder einscherende Fahrzeuge mit einer Reduzierung der Geschwindigkeit, sodass der vorgeschriebene Mindestabstand zum vorausfahrenden Fahrzeug nicht unterschritten wird. Hierzu greift ACC in Antrieb und Bremse ein. Sobald das vorausfahrende Fahrzeug beschleunigt oder die Spur verlässt, regelt ACC die Geschwindigkeit wieder auf die vorgegebene Sollgeschwindigkeit ein (Bild 1). ACC steht somit für eine Geschwindigkeitsregelung, die sich dem vorausfahrenden Verkehr anpasst.

  6. Adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Jr., Robert L. (Inventor); Vipperman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cole, Daniel G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An adaptive algorithm implemented in digital or analog form is used in conjunction with a voltage controlled amplifier to compensate for the feedthrough capacitance of piezoelectric sensoriactuator. The mechanical response of the piezoelectric sensoriactuator is resolved from the electrical response by adaptively altering the gain imposed on the electrical circuit used for compensation. For wideband, stochastic input disturbances, the feedthrough capacitance of the sensoriactuator can be identified on-line, providing a means of implementing direct-rate-feedback control in analog hardware. The device is capable of on-line system health monitoring since a quasi-stable dynamic capacitance is indicative of sustained health of the piezoelectric element.

  7. Adaptive management: Chapter 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  8. Reference Device-Assisted Adaptive Location Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongjin; Xia, Linyuan

    2016-01-01

    Location fingerprinting suffers in dynamic environments and needs recalibration from time to time to maintain system performance. This paper proposes an adaptive approach for location fingerprinting. Based on real-time received signal strength indicator (RSSI) samples measured by a group of reference devices, the approach applies a modified Universal Kriging (UK) interpolant to estimate adaptive temporal and environmental radio maps. The modified UK can take the spatial distribution characteristics of RSSI into account. In addition, the issue of device heterogeneity caused by multiple reference devices is further addressed. To compensate the measuring differences of heterogeneous reference devices, differential RSSI metric is employed. Extensive experiments were conducted in an indoor field and the results demonstrate that the proposed approach not only adapts to dynamic environments and the situation of changing APs’ positions, but it is also robust toward measuring differences of heterogeneous reference devices. PMID:27258284

  9. Some challenges with statistical inference in adaptive designs.

    PubMed

    Hung, H M James; Wang, Sue-Jane; Yang, Peiling

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive designs have generated a great deal of attention to clinical trial communities. The literature contains many statistical methods to deal with added statistical uncertainties concerning the adaptations. Increasingly encountered in regulatory applications are adaptive statistical information designs that allow modification of sample size or related statistical information and adaptive selection designs that allow selection of doses or patient populations during the course of a clinical trial. For adaptive statistical information designs, a few statistical testing methods are mathematically equivalent, as a number of articles have stipulated, but arguably there are large differences in their practical ramifications. We pinpoint some undesirable features of these methods in this work. For adaptive selection designs, the selection based on biomarker data for testing the correlated clinical endpoints may increase statistical uncertainty in terms of type I error probability, and most importantly the increased statistical uncertainty may be impossible to assess.

  10. Keck adaptive optics: control subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1996-03-08

    Adaptive optics on the Keck 10 meter telescope will provide an unprecedented level of capability in high resolution ground based astronomical imaging. The system is designed to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance with Strehl {gt} 0.3 n median Keck seeing of r0 = 25 cm, T =10 msec at 500 nm wavelength. The system will be equipped with a 20 watt sodium laser guide star to provide nearly full sky coverage. The wavefront control subsystem is responsible for wavefront sensing and the control of the tip-tilt and deformable mirrors which actively correct atmospheric turbulence. The spatial sampling interval for the wavefront sensor and deformable mirror is de=0.56 m which gives us 349 actuators and 244 subapertures. This paper summarizes the wavefront control system and discusses particular issues in designing a wavefront controller for the Keck telescope.

  11. Adaptive measurements of urban runoff quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Brandon P.; Kerkez, Branko

    2016-11-01

    An approach to adaptively measure runoff water quality dynamics is introduced, focusing specifically on characterizing the timing and magnitude of urban pollutographs. Rather than relying on a static schedule or flow-weighted sampling, which can miss important water quality dynamics if parameterized inadequately, novel Internet-enabled sensor nodes are used to autonomously adapt their measurement frequency to real-time weather forecasts and hydrologic conditions. This dynamic approach has the potential to significantly improve the use of constrained experimental resources, such as automated grab samplers, which continue to provide a strong alternative to sampling water quality dynamics when in situ sensors are not available. Compared to conventional flow-weighted or time-weighted sampling schemes, which rely on preset thresholds, a major benefit of the approach is the ability to dynamically adapt to features of an underlying hydrologic signal. A 28 km2 urban watershed was studied to characterize concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) and total phosphorus. Water quality samples were autonomously triggered in response to features in the underlying hydrograph and real-time weather forecasts. The study watershed did not exhibit a strong first flush and intraevent concentration variability was driven by flow acceleration, wherein the largest loadings of TSS and total phosphorus corresponded with the steepest rising limbs of the storm hydrograph. The scalability of the proposed method is discussed in the context of larger sensor network deployments, as well the potential to improving control of urban water quality.

  12. Ranked set sampling with unequal samples.

    PubMed

    Bhoj, D S

    2001-09-01

    A ranked set sampling procedure with unequal samples (RSSU) is proposed and used to estimate the population mean. This estimator is then compared with the estimators based on the ranked set sampling (RSS) and median ranked set sampling (MRSS) procedures. It is shown that the relative precisions of the estimator based on RSSU are higher than those of the estimators based on RSS and MRSS. An example of estimating the mean diameter at breast height of longleaf-pine trees on the Wade Tract in Thomas County, Georgia, is presented.

  13. Hybrid Adaptive Flight Control with Model Inversion Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates a hybrid adaptive flight control method as a design possibility for a flight control system that can enable an effective adaptation strategy to deal with off-nominal flight conditions. The hybrid adaptive control blends both direct and indirect adaptive control in a model inversion flight control architecture. The blending of both direct and indirect adaptive control provides a much more flexible and effective adaptive flight control architecture than that with either direct or indirect adaptive control alone. The indirect adaptive control is used to update the model inversion controller by an on-line parameter estimation of uncertain plant dynamics based on two methods. The first parameter estimation method is an indirect adaptive law based on the Lyapunov theory, and the second method is a recursive least-squares indirect adaptive law. The model inversion controller is therefore made to adapt to changes in the plant dynamics due to uncertainty. As a result, the modeling error is reduced that directly leads to a decrease in the tracking error. In conjunction with the indirect adaptive control that updates the model inversion controller, a direct adaptive control is implemented as an augmented command to further reduce any residual tracking error that is not entirely eliminated by the indirect adaptive control.

  14. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  15. Identification and dual adaptive control of a turbojet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W.; Leininger, G.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to utilize the design methods of modern control theory to realize a 'dual-adaptive' feedback control unit for a highly non-linear single spool airbreathing turbojet engine. Using a very detailed and accurate simulation of the non-linear engine as the data source, linear operating point models of unspecified dimension are identified. Feedback control laws are designed at each operating point for a prespecified set of sampling rates using sampled-data output regulator theory. The control system sampling rate is determined by an adaptive sampling algorithm in correspondence with turbojet engine performance. The result is a 'dual-adpative' control law that is functionally dependent upon the sampling rate selected and environmental operating conditions. Simulation transients demonstrate the utility of the dual-adaptive design to improve on-board computer utilization while maintaining acceptable levels of engine performance.

  16. Viability of 3 D Woven Carbon Cloth and Advanced Carbon-Carbon Ribs for Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) for Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, K. H.; Blosser, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes aerothermodynamic and thermal structural testing that demonstrate the viability of three dimensional woven carbon cloth and advanced carbon-carbon (ACC) ribs for use in the Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT). ADEPT is an umbrella-like entry system that is folded for stowage in the launch vehicle's shroud and deployed prior to reaching the atmeopheric interface. A key feature of the ADEPT concept is a lower ballistic coefficient for delivery of a given payload than seen with conventional, rigid body entry systems. The benefits that accrue from the lower ballistic coefficient incllude factor-of-ten reductions of deceleration forces and entry heating. The former enables consideration of new classes of scientific instruments for solar system exploration while the latter enables the design of a more efficient thermal protection system. The carbon cloth base lined for ADEPT has a dual use in that it serves as the thermal protection system and as the "skin" that transfers aerdynamic deceleration loads to its umbrella-like substructure. Arcjet testing described in this paper was conducted for some of the higher heating conditions for a future Venus mission using the ADEPT concept, thereby showing that the carbon cloth can perform in a relevant entry environment. Recently completed the thermal structural testing of the cloth attached to a representative ACC rib design is also described. Finally, this paper describes a preliminary engineering level code, based on the arcjet data, that can be used to estimate cloth thickness for future ADEPT missions and to predict carbon cloth performance in future arcjet tests.

  17. Adaptive Cruise Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winner, Hermann; Danner, Bernd; Steinle, Joachim

    Mit Adaptive Cruise Control, abgekürzt ACC, wird eine Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung bezeichnet, die sich an die Verkehrssituation anpasst. Synonyme Bezeichnungen sind Aktive Geschwindigkeitsregelung, Automatische Distanzregelung oder Abstandsregeltempomat. Im englischen Sprachraum fnden sich die weiteren Bezeichnungen Active Cruise Control, Automatic Cruise Control oder Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control. Als markengeschützte Bezeichnungen sind Distronic und Automatische Distanz-Regelung (ADR) eingetragen.

  18. Multiple Docking Adapter Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This cutaway drawing details the major characteristics of the Skylab Multiple Docking Adapter (MDA). The MDA, built under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, housed the control units for the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP), and Zero-Gravity Materials Processing Facility, and provided a docking port for the Apollo Command Module (CM).

  19. Generalization of Prism Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redding, Gordon M.; Wallace, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Prism exposure produces 2 kinds of adaptive response. Recalibration is ordinary strategic remapping of spatially coded movement commands to rapidly reduce performance error. Realignment is the extraordinary process of transforming spatial maps to bring the origins of coordinate systems into correspondence. Realignment occurs when spatial…

  20. Prism Adaptation in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Nirav O.; Turner, Beth M.; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Paulsen, Jane S.; O'Leary, Daniel S.; Ho, Beng-Choon

    2006-01-01

    The prism adaptation test examines procedural learning (PL) in which performance facilitation occurs with practice on tasks without the need for conscious awareness. Dynamic interactions between frontostriatal cortices, basal ganglia, and the cerebellum have been shown to play key roles in PL. Disruptions within these neural networks have also…

  1. Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinger, Scott A.; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa; Cohen, David; Green, Joseph J.; Lou, John; Ohara, Catherine; Redding, David; Shi, Fang

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval software uses the Modified Gerchberg-Saxton (MGS) algorithm, an image-based sensing method that can turn any focal plane science instrument into a wavefront sensor, avoiding the need to use external metrology equipment. Knowledge of the wavefront enables intelligent control of active optical systems.

  2. Adapting Environmental Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This publication provides Peace Corps volunteers and others who conduct environmental education activities in schools, environmental education centers, parks, and communities with the tools to adapt existing environmental education resources to local environmental issues, cultures, and audiences. Sections include: (1) the process of adapting…

  3. Parallel multilevel adaptive methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, B.; Govett, M.; Mccormick, S.; Quinlan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The progress of a project for the design and analysis of a multilevel adaptive algorithm (AFAC/HM/) targeted for the Navier Stokes Computer is discussed. The results of initial timing tests of AFAC, coupled with multigrid and an efficient load balancer, on a 16-node Intel iPSC/2 hypercube are included. The results of timing tests are presented.

  4. Adaptive sequential controller

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Xing, Jian; Butler, Nicholas G.; Rodriguez, Alonso

    1994-01-01

    An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

  5. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative...

  6. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5’UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments. PMID:27812193

  7. Narrative, Adaptation, and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateson, Mary Catherine

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores how individuals and communities orient themselves to the future by the way they story the past. There is a persistent tendency to think of such narratives as factual and therefore stable. The mutability of such narratives is actually a key adaptive characteristic, ranging from complete repression of individual traumas to public…

  8. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5'UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments.

  9. Career Adaptability in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, Paul J.; Porfeli, Erik J.; Vondracek, Fred W.

    2008-01-01

    Childhood marks the dawn of vocational development, involving developmental tasks, transitions, and change. Children must acquire the rudiments of career adaptability to envision a future, make educational and vocational decisions, explore self and occupations, and problem solve. The authors situate child vocational development within human life…

  10. Flexibility: Ensuring Adaptability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Slyke, Paul; Goode, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how to collaborate with administrators, physical plant representatives, department heads, lawmakers, and design professionals to create flexible school facilities that adapt to changing needs, noting the importance of utilizing a programming process that determines the true needs of a facility, based on the potential activities that will…

  11. Adaptive Recreational Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Mary Lou, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Designed for teachers interested in therapeutic recreation, the document lists sources of adaptive recreational equipment and their homemade counterparts. Brief descriptions for ordering or constructing recreational equipment for the visually impaired, poorly coordinated, physically impaired, and mentally retarded are given. Specific adaptations…

  12. Adapting to the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovach, Amy L.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity on natural selection and how the peppered moth's adaptive values for their colors changed during the Industrial Revolution in Manchester, England, influencing their survival and ultimately affecting the survival of their offspring. Includes activity objectives. (Author/KHR)

  13. Adapted Aquatics and Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Martin E.; Conatser, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    Presents strategies and techniques to help instructors and directors promote successful inclusive aquatics programs for students with disabilities, discussing the importance of considering issues related to: teaching style, collaborative planning, goal determination, appropriate inclusive placement, personnel preparation, curriculum adaptation,…

  14. Spectral gap optimization of order parameters for sampling complex molecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Berne, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    In modern-day simulations of many-body systems, much of the computational complexity is shifted to the identification of slowly changing molecular order parameters called collective variables (CVs) or reaction coordinates. A vast array of enhanced-sampling methods are based on the identification and biasing of these low-dimensional order parameters, whose fluctuations are important in driving rare events of interest. Here, we describe a new algorithm for finding optimal low-dimensional CVs for use in enhanced-sampling biasing methods like umbrella sampling, metadynamics, and related methods, when limited prior static and dynamic information is known about the system, and a much larger set of candidate CVs is specified. The algorithm involves estimating the best combination of these candidate CVs, as quantified by a maximum path entropy estimate of the spectral gap for dynamics viewed as a function of that CV. The algorithm is called spectral gap optimization of order parameters (SGOOP). Through multiple practical examples, we show how this postprocessing procedure can lead to optimization of CV and several orders of magnitude improvement in the convergence of the free energy calculated through metadynamics, essentially giving the ability to extract useful information even from unsuccessful metadynamics runs. PMID:26929365

  15. How Sample Size Affects a Sampling Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulekar, Madhuri S.; Siegel, Murray H.

    2009-01-01

    If students are to understand inferential statistics successfully, they must have a profound understanding of the nature of the sampling distribution. Specifically, they must comprehend the determination of the expected value and standard error of a sampling distribution as well as the meaning of the central limit theorem. Many students in a high…

  16. Representing and publishing physical sample descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaraju, Anusuriya; Klump, Jens; Cox, Simon J. D.; Golodoniuc, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a metadata model for physical samples, developed by CSIRO for its role as an allocating agent. The model is essential for connecting various samples to the Web in a systematic manner. It serves as a basis for registering and publishing samples from researchers and laboratories in CSIRO with the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN). The model is simple, extensible and publicly available. We specify how existing controlled vocabularies are incorporated into the model development, and discuss their relevance and limitations. We also describe the mappings between the developed model and existing standards. This is necessary to extend the model's adoption across various science domains. The model has been implemented and tested in the context of two large sample repositories in CSIRO. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the metadata model while maintaining its flexibility to adapt to various sample types.

  17. Vineland Adaptive Behavior Profiles in Children with Autism and Moderate to Severe Developmental Delay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Gemma; D'Ardia, Caterina; Valente, Donatella; Vecchio, Ilaria del; Fabrizi, Anna; Bernabei, Paola

    2003-01-01

    A study examined adaptive behavior profiles in children (ages 21-108 months) with moderate to severe developmental delay and autism (n=23) and without autism (n=27). The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales was administered, and contrary to initial predictions, the sample presented fairly homogeneous adaptive behavior profiles. (Contains references.)…

  18. Transformational adaptation when incremental adaptations to climate change are insufficient.

    PubMed

    Kates, Robert W; Travis, William R; Wilbanks, Thomas J

    2012-05-08

    All human-environment systems adapt to climate and its natural variation. Adaptation to human-induced change in climate has largely been envisioned as increments of these adaptations intended to avoid disruptions of systems at their current locations. In some places, for some systems, however, vulnerabilities and risks may be so sizeable that they require transformational rather than incremental adaptations. Three classes of transformational adaptations are those that are adopted at a much larger scale, that are truly new to a particular region or resource system, and that transform places and shift locations. We illustrate these with examples drawn from Africa, Europe, and North America. Two conditions set the stage for transformational adaptation to climate change: large vulnerability in certain regions, populations, or resource systems; and severe climate change that overwhelms even robust human use systems. However, anticipatory transformational adaptation may be difficult to implement because of uncertainties about climate change risks and adaptation benefits, the high costs of transformational actions, and institutional and behavioral actions that tend to maintain existing resource systems and policies. Implementing transformational adaptation requires effort to initiate it and then to sustain the effort over time. In initiating transformational adaptation focusing events and multiple stresses are important, combined with local leadership. In sustaining transformational adaptation, it seems likely that supportive social contexts and the availability of acceptable options and resources for actions are key enabling factors. Early steps would include incorporating transformation adaptation into risk management and initiating research to expand the menu of innovative transformational adaptations.

  19. Transformational adaptation when incremental adaptations to climate change are insufficient

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Robert W.; Travis, William R.; Wilbanks, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    All human–environment systems adapt to climate and its natural variation. Adaptation to human-induced change in climate has largely been envisioned as increments of these adaptations intended to avoid disruptions of systems at their current locations. In some places, for some systems, however, vulnerabilities and risks may be so sizeable that they require transformational rather than incremental adaptations. Three classes of transformational adaptations are those that are adopted at a much larger scale, that are truly new to a particular region or resource system, and that transform places and shift locations. We illustrate these with examples drawn from Africa, Europe, and North America. Two conditions set the stage for transformational adaptation to climate change: large vulnerability in certain regions, populations, or resource systems; and severe climate change that overwhelms even robust human use systems. However, anticipatory transformational adaptation may be difficult to implement because of uncertainties about climate change risks and adaptation benefits, the high costs of transformational actions, and institutional and behavioral actions that tend to maintain existing resource systems and policies. Implementing transformational adaptation requires effort to initiate it and then to sustain the effort over time. In initiating transformational adaptation focusing events and multiple stresses are important, combined with local leadership. In sustaining transformational adaptation, it seems likely that supportive social contexts and the availability of acceptable options and resources for actions are key enabling factors. Early steps would include incorporating transformation adaptation into risk management and initiating research to expand the menu of innovative transformational adaptations. PMID:22509036

  20. Sampling honeybee colonies for brood production: a double sampling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.E.; Gilbert, R.O.; Burgett, M.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure is described for estimating numbers of capped brood cells by double sampling combined with linear regression. A complete census of capped brood cells is better than an estimate, provided it is possible to count all brood cells directly or from photographs of brood frames. The double sampling technique, however, has the advantage of enabling data to be collected more quickly and at a lower cost than for a complete count. It also provides an estimate of the approximate variability associated with brood estimates and a mechanism for correcting biases associated with different investigators or with estimates by the same individual at different times or under different conditions. The technique is easy to apply in the field and involves minimal disturbance to the colony. A disadvantage is that the calculations associated with estimates of brood area are more arduous, estimates of variability are approximate, and brood estimates may be biased if the data are too few. All calculations can be easily adapted to a programmable calculator or small computer. Linear calibration, an alternative to the use of double sampling, is briefly discussed.

  1. Improved LMS algorithm for adaptive beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godara, Lal C.

    1990-01-01

    Two adaptive algorithms which make use of all the available samples to estimate the required gradient are proposed and studied. The first algorithm is referred to as the recursive LMS (least mean squares) and is applicable to a general array. The second algorithm is referred to as the improved LMS algorithm and exploits the Toeplitz structure of the ACM (array correlation matrix); it can be used only for an equispaced linear array.

  2. Adaptive density estimator for galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Enn

    2016-10-01

    Galaxy number or luminosity density serves as a basis for many structure classification algorithms. Several methods are used to estimate this density. Among them kernel methods have probably the best statistical properties and allow also to estimate the local sample errors of the estimate. We introduce a kernel density estimator with an adaptive data-driven anisotropic kernel, describe its properties and demonstrate the wealth of additional information it gives us about the local properties of the galaxy distribution.

  3. A model for culturally adapting a learning system.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, M L

    1975-12-01

    The Cross-Cultural Adaption Model (XCAM) is designed to help identify cultural values contained in the text, narration, or visual components of a learning instrument and enables the adapter to evaluate his adapted model so that he can modify or revise it, and allows him to assess the modified version by actually measuring the amount of cultural conflict still present in it. Such a model would permit world-wide adaption of learning materials in population regulation. A random sample of the target group is selected. The adapter develops a measurin g instrument, the cross-cultural adaption scale (XCA), a number of statements about the cultural affinity of the object evaluated. The pretest portion of the sample tests the clarity and understandability of the rating scale to be used for evaluating the instructional materials; the pilot group analyzes the original version of the instructional mater ials, determines the criteria for change, and analyzes the adapted version in terms of these criteria; the control group is administered the original version of the learning materials; and the experimental group is administered the adapted version. Finally, the responses obtained from the XRA rating scale and discussions of both the experimental and control groups are studied and group differences are ev aluated according to cultural conflicts met with each version. With this data, the preferred combination of elements is constructed.

  4. Adaptive classifier for steel strip surface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingming; Li, Guangyao; Xie, Li; Xiao, Mang; Yi, Li

    2017-01-01

    Surface defects detection system has been receiving increased attention as its precision, speed and less cost. One of the most challenges is reacting to accuracy deterioration with time as aged equipment and changed processes. These variables will make a tiny change to the real world model but a big impact on the classification result. In this paper, we propose a new adaptive classifier with a Bayes kernel (BYEC) which update the model with small sample to it adaptive for accuracy deterioration. Firstly, abundant features were introduced to cover lots of information about the defects. Secondly, we constructed a series of SVMs with the random subspace of the features. Then, a Bayes classifier was trained as an evolutionary kernel to fuse the results from base SVMs. Finally, we proposed the method to update the Bayes evolutionary kernel. The proposed algorithm is experimentally compared with different algorithms, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can be updated with small sample and fit the changed model well. Robustness, low requirement for samples and adaptive is presented in the experiment.

  5. Contrast Adaptation Implies Two Spatiotemporal Channels but Three Adapting Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, Keith; Bex, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    The contrast gain control model of adaptation predicts that the effects of contrast adaptation correlate with contrast sensitivity. This article reports that the effects of high contrast spatiotemporal adaptors are maximum when adapting around 19 Hz, which is a factor of two or more greater than the peak in contrast sensitivity. To explain the…

  6. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  7. Retroelements: propagation and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hull, R; Covey, S N

    1995-01-01

    Retroelements are genetic entities that exist in both DNA and RNA forms generated by cyclic alternation of transcription and reverse transcription. They have in common a genetic core (the gag-pol core), encoding conserved functions of a structural protein and a replicase. These are supplemented with a variety of cis-acting nucleic acid sequences controlling transcription and reverse transcription. Most retroelements have additional genes with regulatory or adaptive roles, both within the cell and for movement between cells and organisms. These features reflect the variety of mechanisms that have developed to ensure propagation of the elements and their ability to adapt to specific niches in their hosts with which they co-evolve.

  8. Adaptive passive fathometer processing.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Martin; Song, Heechun; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S; Hursky, Paul; Harrison, Chris

    2010-04-01

    Recently, a technique has been developed to image seabed layers using the ocean ambient noise field as the sound source. This so called passive fathometer technique exploits the naturally occurring acoustic sounds generated on the sea-surface, primarily from breaking waves. The method is based on the cross-correlation of noise from the ocean surface with its echo from the seabed, which recovers travel times to significant seabed reflectors. To limit averaging time and make this practical, beamforming is used with a vertical array of hydrophones to reduce interference from horizontally propagating noise. The initial development used conventional beamforming, but significant improvements have been realized using adaptive techniques. In this paper, adaptive methods for this process are described and applied to several data sets to demonstrate improvements possible as compared to conventional processing.

  9. NEEDS - Information Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. L.; Benz, H. F.; Meredith, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    The Information Adaptive System (IAS) is an element of the NASA End-to-End Data System (NEEDS) Phase II and is focused toward onboard image processing. The IAS is a data preprocessing system which is closely coupled to the sensor system. Some of the functions planned for the IAS include sensor response nonuniformity correction, geometric correction, data set selection, data formatting, packetization, and adaptive system control. The inclusion of these sensor data preprocessing functions onboard the spacecraft will significantly improve the extraction of information from the sensor data in a timely and cost effective manner, and provide the opportunity to design sensor systems which can be reconfigured in near real-time for optimum performance. The purpose of this paper is to present the preliminary design of the IAS and the plans for its development.

  10. Automatic transmission adapter kit

    SciTech Connect

    Stich, R.L.; Neal, W.D.

    1987-02-10

    This patent describes, in a four-wheel-drive vehicle apparatus having a power train including an automatic transmission and a transfer case, an automatic transmission adapter kit for installation of a replacement automatic transmission of shorter length than an original automatic transmission in the four-wheel-drive vehicle. The adapter kit comprises: an extension housing interposed between the replacement automatic transmission and the transfer case; an output shaft, having a first end which engages the replacement automatic transmission and a second end which engages the transfer case; first sealing means for sealing between the extension housing and the replacement automatic transmission; second sealing means for sealing between the extension housing and the transfer case; and fastening means for connecting the extension housing between the replacement automatic transmission and the transfer case.

  11. Bacterial surface adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  12. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Falgout, R; MacLachlan, S; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J

    2004-04-09

    Our ability to simulate physical processes numerically is constrained by our ability to solve the resulting linear systems, prompting substantial research into the development of multiscale iterative methods capable of solving these linear systems with an optimal amount of effort. Overcoming the limitations of geometric multigrid methods to simple geometries and differential equations, algebraic multigrid methods construct the multigrid hierarchy based only on the given matrix. While this allows for efficient black-box solution of the linear systems associated with discretizations of many elliptic differential equations, it also results in a lack of robustness due to assumptions made on the near-null spaces of these matrices. This paper introduces an extension to algebraic multigrid methods that removes the need to make such assumptions by utilizing an adaptive process. The principles which guide the adaptivity are highlighted, as well as their application to algebraic multigrid solution of certain symmetric positive-definite linear systems.

  13. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, Lawrie E.; Jachim, Stephen P.; Natter, Eckard F.

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  14. Adaptive hierarchical fuzzy controller

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, G.V.S.; Jun Zhou

    1993-07-01

    A methodology for designing adaptive hierarchical fuzzy controllers is presented. In order to evaluate this concept, several suitable performance indices were developed and converted to linguistic fuzzy variables. Based on those variables, a supervisory fuzzy rule set was constructed and used to change the parameters of a hierarchical fuzzy controller to accommodate the variations of system parameters. The proposed algorithm was used in feedwater flow control to a steam generator. Simulation studies are presented that illustrate the effectiveness of the approach

  15. Adaptive Decentralized Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    computational requirements and response time provide strong incentives for the use of distributed control architectures. The basic focus of our research is on...ADCON (for Adaptive Decentralized CONtrol) comes from the following observations about the current status of control theory . An important aspect of...decentralized control of completely known systems still has many unresolved issues and some basic problems are yet to be answered. Under these conditions

  16. Adaptive Biomedical Innovation.

    PubMed

    Honig, P K; Hirsch, G

    2016-12-01

    Adaptive Biomedical Innovation (ABI) is a multistakeholder approach to product and process innovation aimed at accelerating the delivery of clinical value to patients and society. ABI offers the opportunity to transcend the fragmentation and linearity of decision-making in our current model and create a common collaborative framework that optimizes the benefit and access of new medicines for patients as well as creating a more sustainable innovation ecosystem.

  17. Reconfigurable environmentally adaptive computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coxe, Robin L. (Inventor); Galica, Gary E. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Described are methods and apparatus, including computer program products, for reconfigurable environmentally adaptive computing technology. An environmental signal representative of an external environmental condition is received. A processing configuration is automatically selected, based on the environmental signal, from a plurality of processing configurations. A reconfigurable processing element is reconfigured to operate according to the selected processing configuration. In some examples, the environmental condition is detected and the environmental signal is generated based on the detected condition.

  18. Adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Roorda, Austin; Duncan, Jacque L

    2015-11-01

    This review starts with a brief history and description of adaptive optics (AO) technology, followed by a showcase of the latest capabilities of AO systems for imaging the human retina and an extensive review of the literature on where AO is being used clinically. The review concludes with a discussion on future directions and guidance on usage and interpretation of images from AO systems for the eye.

  19. Adaptive continuous twisting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jaime A.; Negrete, Daniel Y.; Torres-González, Victor; Fridman, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an adaptive continuous twisting algorithm (ACTA) is presented. For double integrator, ACTA produces a continuous control signal ensuring finite time convergence of the states to zero. Moreover, the control signal generated by ACTA compensates the Lipschitz perturbation in finite time, i.e. its value converges to the opposite value of the perturbation. ACTA also keeps its convergence properties, even in the case that the upper bound of the derivative of the perturbation exists, but it is unknown.

  20. Adaptive aperture synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. M.; Zhang, S.; Mudassar, A.; Love, G. D.; Greenaway, A. H.

    2005-12-01

    High-resolution imaging can be achieved by optical aperture synthesis (OAS). Such an imaging process is subject to aberrations introduced by instrumental defects and/or turbulent media. Redundant spacings calibration (RSC) is a snapshot calibration technique that can be used to calibrate OAS arrays without use of assumptions about the object being imaged. Here we investigate the analogies between RSC and adaptive optics in passive imaging applications.

  1. MITRE Adaptive Processing Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    gathering, Funded Research and Development transfer, processing , and interpretation of Center (FFRDC) under the primary data are provided. A strong state-of...1988: Unisys Reston Technology Center, Reston, VA Dr. Bronez was a Member of the Technical Staff. He performed research on signal processing and... processing , mathematical research , and sensor array processing . He was Project Leader and Principal Investigator for projects in adaptive beamforming

  2. Vestibulospinal adaptation to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Human balance control is known to be transiently disrupted after spaceflight; however, the mechanisms responsible for postflight postural ataxia are still under investigation. In this report, we propose a conceptual model of vestibulospinal adaptation based on theoretical adaptive control concepts and supported by the results from a comprehensive study of balance control recovery after spaceflight. The conceptual model predicts that immediately after spaceflight the balance control system of a returning astronaut does not expect to receive gravity-induced afferent inputs and that descending vestibulospinal control of balance is disrupted until the central nervous system is able to cope with the newly available vestibular otolith information. Predictions of the model are tested using data from a study of the neurosensory control of balance in astronauts immediately after landing. In that study, the mechanisms of sensorimotor balance control were assessed under normal, reduced, and/or altered (sway-referenced) visual and somatosensory input conditions. We conclude that the adaptive control model accurately describes the neurobehavioral responses to spaceflight and that similar models of altered sensory, motor, or environmental constraints are needed clinically to predict responses that patients with sensorimotor pathologies may have to various visual-vestibular or changing stimulus environments.

  3. Adaptive Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, B M

    2007-10-26

    A discrete-time Markov process can be compactly modeled as a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN)--a graphical model with nodes representing random variables and directed edges indicating causality between variables. Each node has a probability distribution, conditional on the variables represented by the parent nodes. A DBN's graphical structure encodes fixed conditional dependencies between variables. But in real-world systems, conditional dependencies between variables may be unknown a priori or may vary over time. Model errors can result if the DBN fails to capture all possible interactions between variables. Thus, we explore the representational framework of adaptive DBNs, whose structure and parameters can change from one time step to the next: a distribution's parameters and its set of conditional variables are dynamic. This work builds on recent work in nonparametric Bayesian modeling, such as hierarchical Dirichlet processes, infinite-state hidden Markov networks and structured priors for Bayes net learning. In this paper, we will explain the motivation for our interest in adaptive DBNs, show how popular nonparametric methods are combined to formulate the foundations for adaptive DBNs, and present preliminary results.

  4. Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parliament, Hugh A.

    1991-09-01

    The design and implementation of a system for the acquisition, processing, and analysis of signal data is described. The initial application for the system is the development and analysis of algorithms for excision of interfering tones from direct sequence spread spectrum communication systems. The system is called the Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) and is an integrated hardware and software system built around the TMS320C30 chip. The hardware consists of a radio frequency data source, digital receiver, and an adaptive signal processor implemented on a Sun workstation. The software components of the ASPT consists of a number of packages including the Sun driver package; UNIX programs that support software development on the TMS320C30 boards; UNIX programs that provide the control, user interaction, and display capabilities for the data acquisition, processing, and analysis components of the ASPT; and programs that perform the ASPT functions including data acquisition, despreading, and adaptive filtering. The performance of the ASPT system is evaluated by comparing actual data rates against their desired values. A number of system limitations are identified and recommendations are made for improvements.

  5. Adaptive colouration in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Rudh, Andreas; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians, i.e. salamanders, frogs and caecilians show a wide range of bright colours in combination with contrasting patterns. There is variation among species, populations and also within species and populations. Furthermore, individuals often change colours during developmental stages or in response to environmental factors. This extraordinary variation means that there are excellent opportunities to test hypotheses of the adaptive significance of colours using amphibian species as models. We review the present view of functions of colouration in amphibians with the main focus on relatively unexplored topics. Variation in colouration has been found to play a role in thermoregulation, UV protection, predator avoidance and sexual signalling. However, many proposed cases of adaptive functions of colouration in amphibians remain virtually scientifically unexplored and surprisingly few genes influencing pigmentation or patterning have been detected. We would like to especially encourage more studies that take advantage of recent developments in measurement of visual properties of several possible signalling receivers (e.g. predators, competitors or mates). Future investigations on interactions between behaviour, ecology and vision have the potential to challenge our current view of the adaptive function of colouration in amphibians.

  6. Adaptive building skin structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Grosso, A. E.; Basso, P.

    2010-12-01

    The concept of adaptive and morphing structures has gained considerable attention in the recent years in many fields of engineering. In civil engineering very few practical applications are reported to date however. Non-conventional structural concepts like deployable, inflatable and morphing structures may indeed provide innovative solutions to some of the problems that the construction industry is being called to face. To give some examples, searches for low-energy consumption or even energy-harvesting green buildings are amongst such problems. This paper first presents a review of the above problems and technologies, which shows how the solution to these problems requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving the integration of architectural and engineering disciplines. The discussion continues with the presentation of a possible application of two adaptive and dynamically morphing structures which are proposed for the realization of an acoustic envelope. The core of the two applications is the use of a novel optimization process which leads the search for optimal solutions by means of an evolutionary technique while the compatibility of the resulting configurations of the adaptive envelope is ensured by the virtual force density method.

  7. Stasis and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Coiera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Many of our most pressing societal challenges arise from our inability to move on from present practices and structures and do what is needed. Healthcare struggles to improve safety and quality. It resists adoption of best practices and persists in high levels of unwarranted variation in care delivery, and clings to financially unsustainable models of care. One explanation for this state of affairs is not a lack of will, but that we are experiencing system inertia--a consequence of the increasing complexity of our human systems. In this paper I explore three possible system level interventions that may help design systems that are less likely to approach inertia, as well as help change our current systems so that they again become adaptive, and move to the outcomes we desire. Firstly, I question our religious belief in the power of standards, an intervention designed to minimise adaptation and almost from first principles designed to lead to inertia. Next I explore the power of apoptosis, a process that sees existing structures and practices programmatically removed to free up resource for adaptation. Finally I explore a flexible but controversial approach to system management called market-based control. Whether any of these, together or in tandem, are a way out of inertia is an open question. However, it is time for us to engage with the challenge of system inertia, and find a way out.

  8. Multidimensional Adaptation in MAS Organizations.

    PubMed

    Alberola, Juan M; Julian, Vicente; Garcia-Fornes, Ana

    2013-04-01

    Organization adaptation requires determining the consequences of applying changes not only in terms of the benefits provided but also measuring the adaptation costs as well as the impact that these changes have on all of the components of the organization. In this paper, we provide an approach for adaptation in multiagent systems based on a multidimensional transition deliberation mechanism (MTDM). This approach considers transitions in multiple dimensions and is aimed at obtaining the adaptation with the highest potential for improvement in utility based on the costs of adaptation. The approach provides an accurate measurement of the impact of the adaptation since it determines the organization that is to be transitioned to as well as the changes required to carry out this transition. We show an example of adaptation in a service provider network environment in order to demonstrate that the measurement of the adaptation consequences taken by the MTDM improves the organization performance more than the other approaches.

  9. Advanced Adaptive Optics Control Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Optimal estimation and control methods for high energy laser adaptive optics systems are described. Three system types are examined: Active...the adaptive optics approaches and potential system implementations are recommended.

  10. CosmoPMC: Cosmology sampling with Population Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilbinger, Martin; Benabed, Karim; Cappé, Olivier; Coupon, Jean; Cardoso, Jean-François; Fort, Gersende; McCracken, Henry Joy; Prunet, Simon; Robert, Christian P.; Wraith, Darren

    2012-12-01

    CosmoPMC is a Monte-Carlo sampling method to explore the likelihood of various cosmological probes. The sampling engine is implemented with the package pmclib. It is called Population MonteCarlo (PMC), which is a novel technique to sample from the posterior. PMC is an adaptive importance sampling method which iteratively improves the proposal to approximate the posterior. This code has been introduced, tested and applied to various cosmology data sets.

  11. Expressed emotion measure adaptation into a foreign language.

    PubMed

    Rein, Z; Duclos, J; Perdereau, F; Curt, F; Apfel, Alexandre; Wallier, J; Verdier, A; Fermanian, J; Falissard, B; Zaden, S; Godart, N T

    2011-01-01

    Expressed emotion (EE) measures have been created in English; adaptation into a foreign language is difficult. The aim of this study was to adapt the five minutes speech sample (FMSS), with a designed procedure ensuring optimum quality of the adaptation, and thus better trans-cultural validity. A strategy for improving inter-rater agreement comprised three phases: (1) phase of initial ratings (70 French samples), (2) experimental phase in two steps: ratings of 40 other samples in French, followed by analysis of differences between the French-language ratings and English-language ratings and (3) final rating phase of the initial 70 samples. For each phase, the κ coefficients measuring inter-rater agreement were calculated and compared using a bootstrap procedure. The improvements between these scorings were significant at p < 0.05 (phase 2 initial versus phase 2 final and phases 1 versus 3). The French inter-rater agreement significantly improved after this procedure.

  12. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  13. Enhanced conformational sampling using enveloping distribution sampling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-10-14

    To lessen the problem of insufficient conformational sampling in biomolecular simulations is still a major challenge in computational biochemistry. In this article, an application of the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) is proposed that addresses this challenge and its sampling efficiency is demonstrated in simulations of a hexa-β-peptide whose conformational equilibrium encompasses two different helical folds, i.e., a right-handed 2.7(10∕12)-helix and a left-handed 3(14)-helix, separated by a high energy barrier. Standard MD simulations of this peptide using the GROMOS 53A6 force field did not reach convergence of the free enthalpy difference between the two helices even after 500 ns of simulation time. The use of soft-core non-bonded interactions in the centre of the peptide did enhance the number of transitions between the helices, but at the same time led to neglect of relevant helical configurations. In the simulations of a two-state EDS reference Hamiltonian that envelops both the physical peptide and the soft-core peptide, sampling of the conformational space of the physical peptide ensures that physically relevant conformations can be visited, and sampling of the conformational space of the soft-core peptide helps to enhance the transitions between the two helices. The EDS simulations sampled many more transitions between the two helices and showed much faster convergence of the relative free enthalpy of the two helices compared with the standard MD simulations with only a slightly larger computational effort to determine optimized EDS parameters. Combined with various methods to smoothen the potential energy surface, the proposed EDS application will be a powerful technique to enhance the sampling efficiency in biomolecular simulations.

  14. Going global by adapting local: A review of recent human adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shaohua; Hansen, Matthew E. B.; Lo, Yancy; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    The spread of modern humans across the globe has led to genetic adaptations to diverse local environments. Recent developments in genomic technologies, statistical analyses, and expanded sampled populations have led to improved identification and fine-mapping of genetic variants associated with adaptations to regional living conditions and dietary practices. Ongoing efforts in sequencing genomes of indigenous populations, accompanied by the growing availability of “-omics” and ancient DNA data, promises a new era in our understanding of recent human evolution and the origins of variable traits and disease risks. PMID:27846491

  15. Theory of psychological adaptive modes.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Juha

    2016-05-01

    When an individual is facing a stressor and normal stress-response mechanism cannot guarantee sufficient adaptation, special emotional states, adaptive modes, are activated (for example a depressive reaction). Adaptive modes are involuntary states of mind, they are of comprehensive nature, they interfere with normal functioning, and they cannot be repressed or controlled the same way as many emotions. Their transformational nature differentiates them from other emotional states. The object of the adaptive mode is to optimize the problem-solving abilities according to the situation that has provoked the mode. Cognitions and emotions during the adaptive mode are different than in a normal mental state. These altered cognitions and emotional reactions guide the individual to use the correct coping skills in order to deal with the stressor. Successful adaptation will cause the adaptive mode to fade off since the adaptive mode is no longer necessary, and the process as a whole will lead to raised well-being. However, if the adaptation process is inadequate, then the transformation period is prolonged, and the adaptive mode will turn into a dysfunctional state. Many psychiatric disorders are such maladaptive processes. The maladaptive processes can be turned into functional ones by using adaptive skills that are used in functional adaptive processes.

  16. Activation energy for a model ferrous-ferric half reaction from transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Sprik, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Activation parameters for the model oxidation half reaction of the classical aqueous ferrous ion are compared for different molecular simulation techniques. In particular, activation free energies are obtained from umbrella integration and Marcus theory based thermodynamic integration, which rely on the diabatic gap as the reaction coordinate. The latter method also assumes linear response, and both methods obtain the activation entropy and the activation energy from the temperature dependence of the activation free energy. In contrast, transition path sampling does not require knowledge of the reaction coordinate and directly yields the activation energy [C. Dellago and P. G. Bolhuis, Mol. Simul. 30, 795 (2004), 10.1080/08927020412331294869]. Benchmark activation energies from transition path sampling agree within statistical uncertainty with activation energies obtained from standard techniques requiring knowledge of the reaction coordinate. In addition, it is found that the activation energy for this model system is significantly smaller than the activation free energy for the Marcus model, approximately half the value, implying an equally large entropy contribution.

  17. SAGE - MULTIDIMENSIONAL SELF-ADAPTIVE GRID CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    acceptable since it makes possible an overall and local error reduction through grid redistribution. SAGE includes the ability to modify the adaption techniques in boundary regions, which substantially improves the flexibility of the adaptive scheme. The vectorial approach used in the analysis also provides flexibility. The user has complete choice of adaption direction and order of sequential adaptions without concern for the computational data structure. Multiple passes are available with no restraint on stepping directions; for each adaptive pass the user can choose a completely new set of adaptive parameters. This facility, combined with the capability of edge boundary control, enables the code to individually adapt multi-dimensional multiple grids. Zonal grids can be adapted while maintaining continuity along the common boundaries. For patched grids, the multiple-pass capability enables complete adaption. SAGE is written in FORTRAN 77 and is intended to be machine independent; however, it requires a FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST input. It has been successfully implemented on Sun series computers, SGI IRIS's, DEC MicroVAX computers, HP series computers, the Cray YMP, and IBM PC compatibles. Source code is provided, but no sample input and output files are provided. The code reads three datafiles: one that contains the initial grid coordinates (x,y,z), one that contains corresponding flow-field variables, and one that contains the user control parameters. It is assumed that the first two datasets are formatted as defined in the plotting software package PLOT3D. Several machine versions of PLOT3D are available from COSMIC. The amount of main memory is dependent on the size of the matrix. The standard distribution medium for SAGE is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. It is also available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format or on a 9-track 1600 BPI ASCII CARD IMAGE format magnetic tape. SAGE was developed in 1989, first

  18. Apollo 14 rock samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, I. C.

    1978-01-01

    Petrographic descriptions of all Apollo 14 samples larger than 1 cm in any dimension are presented. The sample description format consists of: (1) an introductory section which includes information on lunar sample location, orientation, and return containers, (2) a section on physical characteristics, which contains the sample mass, dimensions, and a brief description; (3) surface features, including zap pits, cavities, and fractures as seen in binocular view; (4) petrographic description, consisting of a binocular description and, if possible, a thin section description; and (5) a discussion of literature relevant to sample petrology is included for samples which have previously been examined by the scientific community.

  19. Stardust Sample: Investigator's Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carl

    2006-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust spacecraft returned the first in situ collection of samples from a comet, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust. Stardust is the first US sample return mission from a planetary body since Apollo, and the first ever from beyond the moon. This handbook is a basic reference source for allocation procedures and policies for Stardust samples. These samples consist of particles and particle residues in aerogel collectors, in aluminum foil, and in spacecraft components. Contamination control samples and unflown collection media are also available for allocation.

  20. Aircraft adaptive learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P. S. T.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    The optimal control theory of stochastic linear systems is discussed in terms of the advantages of distributed-control systems, and the control of randomly-sampled systems. An optimal solution to longitudinal control is derived and applied to the F-8 DFBW aircraft. A randomly-sampled linear process model with additive process and noise is developed.

  1. GROUND WATER SAMPLING ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and
    remedial performance monitoring objectives. Issues which must be considered prior to initiating a ground-water monitoring program include defining monitoring goals and objectives, sampling point...

  2. Improved Sampling Method Reduces Isokinetic Sampling Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karels, Gale G.

    The particulate sampling system currently in use by the Bay Area Air Pollution Control District, San Francisco, California is described in this presentation for the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. The method represents a practical, inexpensive tool that can…

  3. Adaptive nonlinear flight control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysdyk, Rolf Theoduor

    1998-08-01

    Research under supervision of Dr. Calise and Dr. Prasad at the Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Aerospace Engineering. has demonstrated the applicability of an adaptive controller architecture. The architecture successfully combines model inversion control with adaptive neural network (NN) compensation to cancel the inversion error. The tiltrotor aircraft provides a specifically interesting control design challenge. The tiltrotor aircraft is capable of converting from stable responsive fixed wing flight to unstable sluggish hover in helicopter configuration. It is desirable to provide the pilot with consistency in handling qualities through a conversion from fixed wing flight to hover. The linear model inversion architecture was adapted by providing frequency separation in the command filter and the error-dynamics, while not exiting the actuator modes. This design of the architecture provides for a model following setup with guaranteed performance. This in turn allowed for convenient implementation of guaranteed handling qualities. A rigorous proof of boundedness is presented making use of compact sets and the LaSalle-Yoshizawa theorem. The analysis allows for the addition of the e-modification which guarantees boundedness of the NN weights in the absence of persistent excitation. The controller is demonstrated on the Generic Tiltrotor Simulator of Bell-Textron and NASA Ames R.C. The model inversion implementation is robustified with respect to unmodeled input dynamics, by adding dynamic nonlinear damping. A proof of boundedness of signals in the system is included. The effectiveness of the robustification is also demonstrated on the XV-15 tiltrotor. The SHL Perceptron NN provides a more powerful application, based on the universal approximation property of this type of NN. The SHL NN based architecture is also robustified with the dynamic nonlinear damping. A proof of boundedness extends the SHL NN augmentation with robustness to unmodeled actuator

  4. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  5. Adaptation in collaborative governance regimes.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  6. Controlling Growth Rates of Protein Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Frederick T.; Herren, Blair J.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus enables control of humidity in chamber to control rates of growth of crystalline samples of protein. Size of drop of solution from which protein is grown made larger or smaller by condensation or evaporation of water. Situated between desiccant and water source, drop of protein solution shrinks or swells, according to which valve operator opens. Growing protein crystal viewed through polarizing film. Readily adapted to automation.

  7. Renal adaptation during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Jani, Alkesh; Martin, Sandra L; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L

    2013-12-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation.

  8. Holographic Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.

    For the last two decades adaptive optics has been used as a technique for correcting imaging applications and directed energy/laser targeting and laser communications systems affected by atmospheric turbulence. Typically these systems are bulky and limited to <10 kHz due to large computing overhead and limited photon efficiencies. Moreover most use zonal wavefront sensors which cannot easily handle extreme scintillation or unexpected obscuration of a pre-set aperture. Here we present a compact, lightweight adaptive optics system with the potential to operate at speeds of MHz. The system utilizes a hologram to perform an all-optical wavefront analysis that removes the need for any computer. Finally, the sensing is made on a modal basis so it is largely insensitive to scintillation and obscuration. We have constructed a prototype device and will present experimental results from our research. The holographic adaptive optics system begins with the creation of a multiplexed hologram. This hologram is created by recording the maximum and minimum response functions of every actuator in the deformable mirror against a unique focused reference beam. When a wavefront of some arbitrary phase is incident on the processed hologram, a number of focal spots are created -- one pair for each actuator in the DM. The absolute phase error at each particular actuator location is simply related to the ratio of the intensity of each pair of spots. In this way we can use an array of photodetectors to give a direct readout of phase error without the need for any calculations. The advantages of holographic adaptive optics are many. To begin with, the measurement of phase error is made all optically, so the wavefront sensor directly controls the actuators in the DM without any computers. Using fast, photon counting photodetectors allows for closed loop correction limited only by the speed of the deformable mirror which in the case of MEMS devices can be 100 kHz or more. All this can be

  9. Cardiovascular adaptation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Richard; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-01-01

    Millions of athletes train for and participate in competitive athletics each year. Many of these athletes will present to a cardiovascular specialist with signs or symptoms that might indicate heart disease and these athletes/patients will ask for advice on their ability to continue to train and compete safely. By virtue of their training, athletes׳ hearts may undergo significant structural and electrical change, presenting a special challenge for the cardiovascular specialist. It is important to understand normal adaptive changes in order to separate normal physiology from pathology.

  10. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  11. Adaptive CT scanning system

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2016-11-22

    Apparatus, systems, and methods that provide an X-ray interrogation system having a plurality of stationary X-ray point sources arranged to substantially encircle an area or space to be interrogated. A plurality of stationary detectors are arranged to substantially encircle the area or space to be interrogated, A controller is adapted to control the stationary X-ray point sources to emit X-rays one at a time, and to control the stationary detectors to detect the X-rays emitted by the stationary X-ray point sources.

  12. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably.

  13. Climate Change Adaptation Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE JUN 2014 2 . REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Climate...PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 I...policy and guidance. 3 I N T R O D U C T I O NC O N T E N T S EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2 CONTENTS 3 INTRODUCTION 4 What’s new in the 2014 Adaptation Plan 4

  14. Renal adaptation during hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sandra L.; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation. PMID:24049148

  15. Laser adaptive holographic hydrophone

    SciTech Connect

    Romashko, R V; Kulchin, Yu N; Bezruk, M N; Ermolaev, S A

    2016-03-31

    A new type of a laser hydrophone based on dynamic holograms, formed in a photorefractive crystal, is proposed and studied. It is shown that the use of dynamic holograms makes it unnecessary to use complex optical schemes and systems for electronic stabilisation of the interferometer operating point. This essentially simplifies the scheme of the laser hydrophone preserving its high sensitivity, which offers the possibility to use it under a strong variation of the environment parameters. The laser adaptive holographic hydrophone implemented at present possesses the sensitivity at a level of 3.3 mV Pa{sup -1} in the frequency range from 1 to 30 kHz. (laser hydrophones)

  16. Decision by Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Chater, Nick; Brown, Gordon D. A.

    2006-01-01

    We present a theory of decision by sampling (DbS) in which, in contrast with traditional models, there are no underlying psychoeconomic scales. Instead, we assume that an attribute's subjective value is constructed from a series of binary, ordinal comparisons to a sample of attribute values drawn from memory and is its rank within the sample. We…

  17. Developing Water Sampling Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Participants in the D-19 symposium on aquatic sampling and measurement for water pollution assessment were informed that determining the extent of waste water stream pollution is not a cut and dry procedure. Topics discussed include field sampling, representative sampling from storm sewers, suggested sampler features and application of improved…

  18. SAMPLING OF CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of characterization of the amount and species of contamination of a hazardous waste site is the sampling plan developed for that site. f the sampling plan is not thoroughly conceptualized before sampling takes place, then certain critical aspects of the limits o...

  19. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, M.; Ward, R.L.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a fluid sampling pump for withdrawing pressurized sample fluid from a flow line and for pumping a preselected quantity of sample fluid with each pump driving stroke from the pump to a sample vessel, the sampling pump including a pump body defining a pump bore therein having a central axis, a piston slideably moveable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, a fluid sample inlet port open to sample fluid in the flow line, a fluid sample outlet port for transmitting fluid from the pump bore to the sample vessel, and a line pressure port in fluid pressure sample fluid in the flow line, an inlet valve for selectively controlling sample fluid flow from the flow line through the fluid sample inlet port, an operator unit for periodically reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a controller for regulating the stroke of the piston within the pump bore, and thereby the quantity of fluid pumped with each pump driving stroke. It comprises a balanced check valve seat; a balanced check valve seal; a compression member; and a central plunger.

  20. Classifying climate change adaptation frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Complex socio-ecological demographics are factors that must be considered when addressing adaptation to the potential effects of climate change. As such, a suite of deployable climate change adaptation frameworks is necessary. Multiple frameworks that are required to communicate the risks of climate change and facilitate adaptation. Three principal adaptation frameworks have emerged from the literature; Scenario - Led (SL), Vulnerability - Led (VL) and Decision - Centric (DC). This study aims to identify to what extent these adaptation frameworks; either, planned or deployed are used in a neighbourhood vulnerable to climate change. This work presents a criterion that may be used as a tool for identifying the hallmarks of adaptation frameworks and thus enabling categorisation of projects. The study focussed on the coastal zone surrounding the Sizewell nuclear power plant in Suffolk in the UK. An online survey was conducted identifying climate change adaptation projects operating in the study area. This inventory was analysed to identify the hallmarks of each adaptation project; Levels of dependency on climate model information, Metrics/units of analysis utilised, Level of demographic knowledge, Level of stakeholder engagement, Adaptation implementation strategies and Scale of adaptation implementation. The study found that climate change adaptation projects could be categorised, based on the hallmarks identified, in accordance with the published literature. As such, the criterion may be used to establish the matrix of adaptation frameworks present in a given area. A comprehensive summary of the nature of adaptation frameworks in operation in a locality provides a platform for further comparative analysis. Such analysis, enabled by the criterion, may aid the selection of appropriate frameworks enhancing the efficacy of climate change adaptation.