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Sample records for adaptive waveform design

  1. Frequency Adaptability and Waveform Design for OFDM Radar Space-Time Adaptive Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata; Glover, Charles Wayne

    2012-01-01

    We propose an adaptive waveform design technique for an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar signal employing a space-time adaptive processing (STAP) technique. We observe that there are inherent variabilities of the target and interference responses in the frequency domain. Therefore, the use of an OFDM signal can not only increase the frequency diversity of our system, but also improve the target detectability by adaptively modifying the OFDM coefficients in order to exploit the frequency-variabilities of the scenario. First, we formulate a realistic OFDM-STAP measurement model considering the sparse nature of the target and interference spectra in the spatio-temporal domain. Then, we show that the optimal STAP-filter weight-vector is equal to the generalized eigenvector corresponding to the minimum generalized eigenvalue of the interference and target covariance matrices. With numerical examples we demonstrate that the resultant OFDM-STAP filter-weights are adaptable to the frequency-variabilities of the target and interference responses, in addition to the spatio-temporal variabilities. Hence, by better utilizing the frequency variabilities, we propose an adaptive OFDM-waveform design technique, and consequently gain a significant amount of STAP-performance improvement.

  2. Adaptive OFDM waveform design for spatio-temporal-sparsity exploited STAP radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Satyabrata; Barhen, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    We propose a sparsity-based space-time adaptive processing (STAP) algorithm to detect a slowly-moving target using an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar. The motivation of employing an OFDM signal is that it improves the target-detectability from the interfering signals by increasing the frequency diversity of the system. However, due to the addition of one extra dimension in terms of frequency, the adaptive degrees-of- freedom in an OFDM-STAP also increases. Therefore, to avoid the construction a fully-adaptive OFDM-STAP, we propose a sparsity-based STAP algorithm. We observe that the interference spectrum is inherently sparse in the spatio-temporal domain, as the clutter responses occupy only a diagonal ridge on the spatio-temporal plane and the jammer signals interfere only from a few spatial directions. Hence, we exploit that sparsity to develop an efficient STAP technique that utilizes considerably lesser number of secondary data compared to the other existing STAP techniques, and produces nearly optimum STAP performance. In addition to designing the STAP filter, we propose to optimally design the transmit OFDM signals by maximizing the output signal- to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) in order to improve the STAP-performance. The computation of output SINR depends on the estimated value of the interference covariance matrix, which we obtain by applying the sparse recovery algorithm. Therefore, we analytically assess the effects of the synthesized OFDM coefficients on the sparse recovery of the interference covariance matrix by computing the coherence measure of the sparse measurement matrix. Our numerical examples demonstrate the achieved STAP-performance due to sparsity- based technique and adaptive waveform design.

  3. Performance bounds on micro-Doppler estimation and adaptive waveform design using OFDM signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Satyabrata; Barhen, Jacob; Glover, Charles W.

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the performance of a wideband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in estimating the micro-Doppler frequency of a target having multiple rotating scatterers (e.g., rotor blades of a helicopter, propellers of a submarine). The presence of rotating scatterers introduces Doppler frequency modulation in the received signal by generating sidebands about the transmitted frequencies. This is called the micro-Doppler effects. The use of a frequency-diverse OFDM signal in this context enables us to independently analyze the micro-Doppler characteristics with respect to a set of orthogonal subcarrier frequencies. Therefore, to characterize the accuracy of micro-Doppler frequency estimation, we compute the Craḿer-Rao Bound (CRB) on the angular-velocity estimate of the target while considering the scatterer responses as deterministic but unknown nuisance parameters. Additionally, to improve the accuracy of the estimation procedure, we formulate and solve an optimization problem by minimizing the CRB on the angular-velocity estimate with respect to the transmitting OFDM spectral coefficients. We present several numerical examples to demonstrate the CRB variations at different values of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the number of OFDM subcarriers. The CRB values not only decrease with the increase in the SNR values, but also reduce as we increase the number of subcarriers implying the significance of frequency-diverse OFDM waveforms. The improvement in estimation accuracy due to the adaptive waveform design is also numerically analyzed. Interestingly, we find that the relative decrease in the CRBs on the angular-velocity estimate is more pronounced for larger number of OFDM subcarriers.

  4. Performance Bounds on Micro-Doppler Estimation and Adaptive Waveform Design Using OFDM Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata; Barhen, Jacob; Glover, Charles Wayne

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the performance of a wideband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in estimating the micro-Doppler frequency of a target having multiple rotating scatterers (e.g., rotor blades of a helicopter, propellers of a submarine). The presence of rotating scatterers introduces Doppler frequency modulation in the received signal by generating sidebands about the transmitted frequencies. This is called the micro-Doppler effects. The use of a frequency-diverse OFDM signal in this context enables us to independently analyze the micro-Doppler characteristics with respect to a set of orthogonal subcarrier frequencies. Therefore, to characterize the accuracy of micro-Doppler frequency estimation, we compute the Cram er-Rao Bound (CRB) on the angular-velocity estimate of the target while considering the scatterer responses as deterministic but unknown nuisance parameters. Additionally, to improve the accuracy of the estimation procedure, we formulate and solve an optimization problem by minimizing the CRB on the angular-velocity estimate with respect to the transmitting OFDM spectral coefficients. We present several numerical examples to demonstrate the CRB variations at different values of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the number of OFDM subcarriers. The CRB values not only decrease with the increase in the SNR values, but also reduce as we increase the number of subcarriers implying the significance of frequency-diverse OFDM waveforms. The improvement in estimation accuracy due to the adaptive waveform design is also numerically analyzed. Interestingly, we find that the relative decrease in the CRBs on the angular-velocity estimate is more pronounced for larger number of OFDM subcarriers.

  5. Altimeter waveform software design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayne, G. S.; Miller, L. S.; Brown, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are described for preprocessing raw return waveform data from the GEOS-3 radar altimeter. Topics discussed include: (1) general altimeter data preprocessing to be done at the GEOS-3 Data Processing Center to correct altimeter waveform data for temperature calibrations, to convert between engineering and final data units and to convert telemetered parameter quantities to more appropriate final data distribution values: (2) time "tagging" of altimeter return waveform data quantities to compensate for various delays, misalignments and calculational intervals; (3) data processing procedures for use in estimating spacecraft attitude from altimeter waveform sampling gates; and (4) feasibility of use of a ground-based reflector or transponder to obtain in-flight calibration information on GEOS-3 altimeter performance.

  6. ALES, the multi­mission Adaptive Leading Edge Sub­Waveform Retracker, design and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Marcello; Benveniste, Jérôme; Vignudelli, Stefano; Cipollini, Paolo; Quartly, Graham; Snaith, Helen

    Satellite altimetry has revolutionized our understanding of ocean dynamics thanks to high repetition rate and global coverage. Nevertheless, coastal data has been flagged as unreliable due to land and calm water interference in the altimeter and radiometer footprint and high frequency tidal and atmospheric forcing. Our study addresses the first issue, i.e. retracking, presenting ALES, the Adaptive Leading Edge Subwaveform Retracker. ALES is potentially applicable to all the pulse­limited altimetry altimetry missions and its aim is to retrack with the same precision both open ocean and coastal data with the same algorithm. ALES selects part of each returned echo and models it with a classic ‘open ocean’ Brown functional form, by means of least square estimation whose convergence is found through the Nelder­Mead nonlinear optimization technique. By avoiding echoes from bright targets along the trailing edge, it is capable of retrieving the majority of coastal waveform up to 2 to 3 Km from the coasts. By adapting the estimation window to the significant wave height, it aims at preserving the precision of the standard data both in open ocean and in the coastal strip. ALES is validated against tide gauges in the Adriatic Sea and in the Greater Agulhas System for three different missions: Envisat, Jason­1 and Jason­2. Considerations on noise and biases provide a further verification of the strategy.

  7. An adaptive transfer function for deriving the aortic pressure waveform from a peripheral artery pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Gokul; Xu, Da; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2009-11-01

    We developed a new technique to mathematically transform a peripheral artery pressure (PAP) waveform distorted by wave reflections into the physiologically more relevant aortic pressure (AP) waveform. First, a transfer function relating PAP to AP is defined in terms of the unknown parameters of a parallel tube model of pressure and flow in the arterial tree. The parameters are then estimated from the measured PAP waveform along with a one-time measurement of the wave propagation delay time between the aorta and peripheral artery measurement site (which may be accomplished noninvasively) by exploiting preknowledge of aortic flow. Finally, the transfer function with its estimated parameters is applied to the measured waveform so as to derive the AP waveform. Thus, in contrast to the conventional generalized transfer function, the transfer function is able to adapt to the intersubject and temporal variability of the arterial tree. To demonstrate the feasibility of this adaptive transfer function technique, we performed experiments in 6 healthy dogs in which PAP and reference AP waveforms were simultaneously recorded during 12 different hemodynamic interventions. The AP waveforms derived by the technique showed agreement with the measured AP waveforms (overall total waveform, systolic pressure, and pulse pressure root mean square errors of 3.7, 4.3, and 3.4 mmHg, respectively) statistically superior to the unprocessed PAP waveforms (corresponding errors of 8.6, 17.1, and 20.3 mmHg) and the AP waveforms derived by two previously proposed transfer functions developed with a subset of the same canine data (corresponding errors of, on average, 5.0, 6.3, and 6.7 mmHg). PMID:19783780

  8. Wideband Waveform Design principles for Solid-state Weather Radars

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Nitin; Chandrasekar, V.

    2012-01-01

    The use of solid-state transmitter is becoming a key part of the strategy to realize a network of low cost electronically steered radars. However, solid-state transmitters have low peak powers and this necessitates the use of pulse compression waveforms. In this paper a frequency diversity wideband waveforms design is proposed to mitigate low sensitivity of solid-state transmitters. In addition, the waveforms mitigate the range eclipsing problem associated with long pulse compression. An analysis of the performance of pulse compression using mismatched compression filters designed to minimize side lobe levels is presented. The impact of range side lobe level on the retrieval of Doppler moments are presented. Realistic simulations are performed based on CSU-CHILL radar data and Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) Integrated Project I (IP1) radar data.

  9. Design of a 9-loop quasi-exponential waveform generator.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Partha; Shukla, Rohit; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-12-01

    We know in an under-damped L-C-R series circuit, current follows a damped sinusoidal waveform. But if a number of sinusoidal waveforms of decreasing time period, generated in an L-C-R circuit, be combined in first quarter cycle of time period, then a quasi-exponential nature of output current waveform can be achieved. In an L-C-R series circuit, quasi-exponential current waveform shows a rising current derivative and thereby finds many applications in pulsed power. Here, we have described design and experiment details of a 9-loop quasi-exponential waveform generator. In that, design details of magnetic switches have also been described. In the experiment, output current of 26 kA has been achieved. It has been shown that how well the experimentally obtained output current profile matches with the numerically computed output. PMID:26724051

  10. Design of a 9-loop quasi-exponential waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Partha; Shukla, Rohit; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-12-01

    We know in an under-damped L-C-R series circuit, current follows a damped sinusoidal waveform. But if a number of sinusoidal waveforms of decreasing time period, generated in an L-C-R circuit, be combined in first quarter cycle of time period, then a quasi-exponential nature of output current waveform can be achieved. In an L-C-R series circuit, quasi-exponential current waveform shows a rising current derivative and thereby finds many applications in pulsed power. Here, we have described design and experiment details of a 9-loop quasi-exponential waveform generator. In that, design details of magnetic switches have also been described. In the experiment, output current of 26 kA has been achieved. It has been shown that how well the experimentally obtained output current profile matches with the numerically computed output.

  11. Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ringdal, F; Harris, D B; Dodge, D; Gibbons, S J

    2009-07-23

    Waveform correlation detectors compare a signal template with successive windows of a continuous data stream and report a detection when the correlation coefficient, or some comparable detection statistic, exceeds a specified threshold. Since correlation detectors exploit the fine structure of the full waveform, they are exquisitely sensitive when compared to power (STA/LTA) detectors. The drawback of correlation detectors is that they require complete knowledge of the signal to be detected, which limits such methods to instances of seismicity in which a very similar signal has already been observed by every station used. Such instances include earthquake swarms, aftershock sequences, repeating industrial seismicity, and many other forms of controlled explosions. The reduction in the detection threshold is even greater when the techniques are applied to arrays since stacking can be performed on the individual channel correlation traces to achieve significant array gain. In previous years we have characterized the decrease in detection threshold afforded by correlation detection across an array or network when observations of a previous event provide an adequate template for signals from subsequent events located near the calibration event. Last year we examined two related issues: (1) the size of the source region calibration footprint afforded by a master event, and (2) the use of temporally incoherent detectors designed to detect the gross envelope structure of the signal to extend the footprint. In Case 1, results from the PETROBAR-1 marine refraction profile indicated that array correlation gain was usable at inter-source separations out to one or two wavelengths. In Case 2, we found that incoherent detectors developed from a magnitude 6 event near Svalbard were successful at detecting aftershocks where correlation detectors derived from individual aftershocks were not. Incoherent detectors might provide 'seed' events for correlation detectors that then could

  12. A Simple Adaptive Transfer Function for Deriving the Central Blood Pressure Waveform from a Radial Blood Pressure Waveform.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingwu; Rose, William C; Fetics, Barry; Kass, David A; Chen, Chen-Huan; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Generalized transfer functions (GTFs) are available to compute the more relevant central blood pressure (BP) waveform from a more easily measured radial BP waveform. However, GTFs are population averages and therefore may not adapt to variations in pulse pressure (PP) amplification (ratio of radial to central PP). A simple adaptive transfer function (ATF) was developed. First, the transfer function is defined in terms of the wave travel time and reflection coefficient parameters of an arterial model. Then, the parameters are estimated from the radial BP waveform by exploiting the observation that central BP waveforms exhibit exponential diastolic decays. The ATF was assessed using the original data that helped popularize the GTF. These data included radial BP waveforms and invasive reference central BP waveforms from cardiac catheterization patients. The data were divided into low, middle, and high PP amplification groups. The ATF estimated central BP with greater accuracy than GTFs in the low PP amplification group (e.g., central systolic BP and PP root-mean-square-errors of 3.3 and 4.2 mm Hg versus 6.2 and 7.1 mm Hg; p ≤ 0.05) while showing similar accuracy in the higher PP amplification groups. The ATF may permit more accurate, non-invasive central BP monitoring in elderly and hypertensive patients. PMID:27624389

  13. Design and Testing of Space Telemetry SCA Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Handler, Louis M.; Quinn, Todd M.

    2006-01-01

    A Software Communications Architecture (SCA) Waveform for space telemetry is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The space telemetry waveform is implemented in a laboratory testbed consisting of general purpose processors, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), and digital-to-analog converters (DACs). The radio hardware is integrated with an SCA Core Framework and other software development tools. The waveform design is described from both the bottom-up signal processing and top-down software component perspectives. Simulations and model-based design techniques used for signal processing subsystems are presented. Testing with legacy hardware-based modems verifies proper design implementation and dynamic waveform operations. The waveform development is part of an effort by NASA to define an open architecture for space based reconfigurable transceivers. Use of the SCA as a reference has increased understanding of software defined radio architectures. However, since space requirements put a premium on size, mass, and power, the SCA may be impractical for today s space ready technology. Specific requirements for an SCA waveform and other lessons learned from this development are discussed.

  14. The waveform correlation event detection system global prototype software design

    SciTech Connect

    Beiriger, J.I.; Moore, S.G.; Trujillo, J.R.; Young, C.J.

    1997-12-01

    The WCEDS prototype software system was developed to investigate the usefulness of waveform correlation methods for CTBT monitoring. The WCEDS prototype performs global seismic event detection and has been used in numerous experiments. This report documents the software system design, presenting an overview of the system operation, describing the system functions, tracing the information flow through the system, discussing the software structures, and describing the subsystem services and interactions. The effectiveness of the software design in meeting project objectives is considered, as well as opportunities for code refuse and lessons learned from the development process. The report concludes with recommendations for modifications and additions envisioned for regional waveform-correlation-based detector.

  15. Efficient pulse compression for LPI waveforms based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengzheng; Nepal, Ramesh; Zhang, Yan; Blake, WIlliam

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve low probability-of-intercept (LPI), radar waveforms are usually long and randomly generated. Due to the randomized nature, Matched filter responses (autocorrelation) of those waveforms can have high sidelobes which would mask weaker targets near a strong target, limiting radar's ability to distinguish close-by targets. To improve resolution and reduced sidelobe contaminations, a waveform independent pulse compression filter is desired. Furthermore, the pulse compression filter needs to be able to adapt to received signal to achieve optimized performance. As many existing pulse techniques require intensive computation, real-time implementation is infeasible. This paper introduces a new adaptive pulse compression technique for LPI waveforms that is based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach (IAA). Due to the nonparametric nature, no parameter tuning is required for different waveforms. IAA can achieve super-resolution and sidelobe suppression in both range and Doppler domains. Also it can be extended to directly handle the matched filter (MF) output (called MF-IAA), which further reduces the computational load. The practical impact of LPI waveform operations on IAA and MF-IAA has not been carefully studied in previous work. Herein the typical LPI waveforms such as random phase coding and other non- PI waveforms are tested with both single-pulse and multi-pulse IAA processing. A realistic airborne radar simulator as well as actual measured radar data are used for the validations. It is validated that in spite of noticeable difference with different test waveforms, the IAA algorithms and its improvement can effectively achieve range-Doppler super-resolution in realistic data.

  16. Waveform design for cognitive radar: target detection in heavy clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Benjamin H.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.

    2016-05-01

    In many applications of radar systems, detection of targets in environments with heavy clutter and interference can be difficult. It is desired that a radar system should detect targets at a further range as well as be able to detect these targets with very few false positive or negative readings. In a cognitive radar system, there are ways that these negative effects can be mitigated and target detection can be significantly improved. An important metric to focus on for increasing target detectability is the signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Cognitive radar offers solutions to issues such as this with the use of a priori knowledge of targets and environments as well as real time adaptations. A feature of cognitive radar that is of interest is the ability to adapt and optimize transmitted waveforms to a given situation. A database is used to hold a priori and dynamic knowledge of the operational environment and targets to be detected, such as clutter characteristics and target radar cross-section (RCS) estimations. Assuming this knowledge is available or can be estimated in real-time, the transmitted waveform can be tailored using methods such as transmission of a spectrum corresponding to the target-to-clutter ratio (TCR). These methods provide significant improvement in distinguishing targets from clutter or interference.

  17. Optimal waveforms design for ultra-wideband impulse radio sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhou, Zheng; Zou, Weixia; Li, Dejian; Zhao, Chong

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-wideband impulse radio (UWB-IR) sensors should comply entirely with the regulatory spectral limits for elegant coexistence. Under this premise, it is desirable for UWB pulses to improve frequency utilization to guarantee the transmission reliability. Meanwhile, orthogonal waveform division multiple-access (WDMA) is significant to mitigate mutual interferences in UWB sensor networks. Motivated by the considerations, we suggest in this paper a low complexity pulse forming technique, and its efficient implementation on DSP is investigated. The UWB pulse is derived preliminarily with the objective of minimizing the mean square error (MSE) between designed power spectrum density (PSD) and the emission mask. Subsequently, this pulse is iteratively modified until its PSD completely conforms to spectral constraints. The orthogonal restriction is then analyzed and different algorithms have been presented. Simulation demonstrates that our technique can produce UWB waveforms with frequency utilization far surpassing the other existing signals under arbitrary spectral mask conditions. Compared to other orthogonality design schemes, the designed pulses can maintain mutual orthogonality without any penalty on frequency utilization, and hence, are much superior in a WDMA network, especially with synchronization deviations. PMID:22163511

  18. Optimal Waveforms Design for Ultra-Wideband Impulse Radio Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Zhou, Zheng; Zou, Weixia; Li, Dejian; Zhao, Chong

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-wideband impulse radio (UWB-IR) sensors should comply entirely with the regulatory spectral limits for elegant coexistence. Under this premise, it is desirable for UWB pulses to improve frequency utilization to guarantee the transmission reliability. Meanwhile, orthogonal waveform division multiple-access (WDMA) is significant to mitigate mutual interferences in UWB sensor networks. Motivated by the considerations, we suggest in this paper a low complexity pulse forming technique, and its efficient implementation on DSP is investigated. The UWB pulse is derived preliminarily with the objective of minimizing the mean square error (MSE) between designed power spectrum density (PSD) and the emission mask. Subsequently, this pulse is iteratively modified until its PSD completely conforms to spectral constraints. The orthogonal restriction is then analyzed and different algorithms have been presented. Simulation demonstrates that our technique can produce UWB waveforms with frequency utilization far surpassing the other existing signals under arbitrary spectral mask conditions. Compared to other orthogonality design schemes, the designed pulses can maintain mutual orthogonality without any penalty on frequency utilization, and hence, are much superior in a WDMA network, especially with synchronization deviations. PMID:22163511

  19. PAPR-Constrained Pareto-Optimal Waveform Design for OFDM-STAP Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2014-01-01

    We propose a peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) constrained Pareto-optimal waveform design approach for an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar signal to detect a target using the space-time adaptive processing (STAP) technique. The use of an OFDM signal does not only increase the frequency diversity of our system, but also enables us to adaptively design the OFDM coefficients in order to further improve the system performance. First, we develop a parametric OFDM-STAP measurement model by considering the effects of signaldependent clutter and colored noise. Then, we observe that the resulting STAP-performance can be improved by maximizing the output signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) with respect to the signal parameters. However, in practical scenarios, the computation of output SINR depends on the estimated values of the spatial and temporal frequencies and target scattering responses. Therefore, we formulate a PAPR-constrained multi-objective optimization (MOO) problem to design the OFDM spectral parameters by simultaneously optimizing four objective functions: maximizing the output SINR, minimizing two separate Cramer-Rao bounds (CRBs) on the normalized spatial and temporal frequencies, and minimizing the trace of CRB matrix on the target scattering coefficients estimations. We present several numerical examples to demonstrate the achieved performance improvement due to the adaptive waveform design.

  20. The use of fractally-designed waveforms in electroforming

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, J.S.; Lawson, R.L.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    Pulsed electrodeposition offers the potential for superior control of deposit properties because of the additional control variables available. However, optimization of pulsed deposition processes is a challenge because of the complexity. E.g., the tendency of electroforms to acquire irregularities such as dendritic growths or other morphological instabilities, creates the need for methods to control these undesirable phenomena. One such method is periodic reverse pulses. Optimization of periodic reverse processes is not simple and can lead to local solutions that do not optimize all properties simultaneously. One method for global optimization that might, for example, control surface irregularities on several size scales, uses a periodic reverse design based on fractal time series. This incorporates deplating pulses of several lengths within one self- similar waveform. The properties of fractals permit control of highly complex designs with a small number of input variables. The creation of such waveforms, their properties, and their use in a lead- plating process are described. Speculation on the potential for further application of this method is offered. 26 figs, 11 refs.

  1. Adaptation as organism design

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andy

    2009-01-01

    The problem of adaptation is to explain the apparent design of organisms. Darwin solved this problem with the theory of natural selection. However, population geneticists, whose responsibility it is to formalize evolutionary theory, have long neglected the link between natural selection and organismal design. Here, I review the major historical developments in theory of organismal adaptation, clarifying what adaptation is and what it is not, and I point out future avenues for research. PMID:19793739

  2. Radar Constant-Modulus Waveform Design with Prior Information of the Extended Target and Clutter

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wenzhen; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yimin; Xie, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    Radar waveform design is of great importance for radar system performances and has drawn considerable attention recently. Constant modulus is an important waveform design consideration, both from the point of view of hardware realization and to allow for full utilization of the transmitter’s power. In this paper, we consider the problem of constant-modulus waveform design for extended target detection with prior information about the extended target and clutter. At first, we propose an arbitrary-phase unimodular waveform design method via joint transmitter-receiver optimization. We exploit a semi-definite relaxation technique to transform an intractable non-convex problem into a convex problem, which can then be efficiently solved. Furthermore, quadrature phase shift keying waveform is designed, which is easier to implement than arbitrary-phase waveforms. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:27322275

  3. Radar Constant-Modulus Waveform Design with Prior Information of the Extended Target and Clutter.

    PubMed

    Yue, Wenzhen; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yimin; Xie, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    Radar waveform design is of great importance for radar system performances and has drawn considerable attention recently. Constant modulus is an important waveform design consideration, both from the point of view of hardware realization and to allow for full utilization of the transmitter's power. In this paper, we consider the problem of constant-modulus waveform design for extended target detection with prior information about the extended target and clutter. At first, we propose an arbitrary-phase unimodular waveform design method via joint transmitter-receiver optimization. We exploit a semi-definite relaxation technique to transform an intractable non-convex problem into a convex problem, which can then be efficiently solved. Furthermore, quadrature phase shift keying waveform is designed, which is easier to implement than arbitrary-phase waveforms. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:27322275

  4. An adaptive subspace trust-region method for frequency-domain seismic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Li, Xiaofan; Song, Hanjie; Liu, Shaolin

    2015-05-01

    Full waveform inversion is currently considered as a promising seismic imaging method to obtain high-resolution and quantitative images of the subsurface. It is a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem, the main difficulty of which that prevents the full waveform inversion from widespread applying to real data is the sensitivity to incorrect initial models and noisy data. Local optimization theories including Newton's method and gradient method always lead the convergence to local minima, while global optimization algorithms such as simulated annealing are computationally costly. To confront this issue, in this paper we investigate the possibility of applying the trust-region method to the full waveform inversion problem. Different from line search methods, trust-region methods force the new trial step within a certain neighborhood of the current iterate point. Theoretically, the trust-region methods are reliable and robust, and they have very strong convergence properties. The capability of this inversion technique is tested with the synthetic Marmousi velocity model and the SEG/EAGE Salt model. Numerical examples demonstrate that the adaptive subspace trust-region method can provide solutions closer to the global minima compared to the conventional Approximate Hessian approach and the L-BFGS method with a higher convergence rate. In addition, the match between the inverted model and the true model is still excellent even when the initial model deviates far from the true model. Inversion results with noisy data also exhibit the remarkable capability of the adaptive subspace trust-region method for low signal-to-noise data inversions. Promising numerical results suggest this adaptive subspace trust-region method is suitable for full waveform inversion, as it has stronger convergence and higher convergence rate.

  5. Design and implementation of a hospital wide waveform capture system.

    PubMed

    Blum, James M; Joo, Heyon; Lee, Henry; Saeed, Mohammed

    2015-06-01

    The use of telemetry and invasive monitoring is exceptionally common in modern healthcare. To date the vast majority of this information is not stored for more than a brief duration on the local monitor. This prohibits extensive investigation into waveform data. We describe a system to collect such data in a quaternary care facility. Using standardized "packet sniffing" technology along with routine manual documentation, we reverse engineered the Unity network protocol used to transmit waveform data across the University of Michigan mission critical monitor network. Data was subsequently captured using a proprietary piece of software writing waveform data to local disks. Nightly, this data is post-processed using data from the admit-discharge-transfer system into individual patient waveforms for the day regardless of location. Over a 10 month period, over 2,785 individual patients had a total of 65,112 waveforms captured 15,978 from the operating rooms and 49,134 from the ICUs. The average OR case collected over 11 MB of data. The average single day data collection consisted of 8.6 GB of data. Entire hospital waveform data collection is possible using internally developed software enabling research on waveform data with minimal technical burden. Further research is required to determine the long-term storage and processing of such data. PMID:25224387

  6. Adaptive Sampling Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flournoy, Nancy

    Designs for sequential sampling procedures that adapt to cumulative information are discussed. A familiar illustration is the play-the-winner rule in which there are two treatments; after a random start, the same treatment is continued as long as each successive subject registers a success. When a failure occurs, the other treatment is used until…

  7. Optimal Multicarrier Phase-Coded Waveform Design for Detection of Extended Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata; Glover, Charles Wayne

    2013-01-01

    We design a parametric multicarrier phase-coded (MCPC) waveform that achieves the optimal performance in detecting an extended target in the presence of signal-dependent interference. Traditional waveform design techniques provide only the optimal energy spectral density of the transmit waveform and suffer a performance loss in the synthesis process of the time-domain signal. Therefore, we opt for directly designing an MCPC waveform in terms of its time-frequency codes to obtain the optimal detection performance. First, we describe the modeling assumptions considering an extended target buried within the signal-dependent clutter with known power spectral density, and deduce the performance characteristics of the optimal detector. Then, considering an MCPC signal transmission, we express the detection characteristics in terms of the phase-codes of the MCPC waveform and propose to optimally design the MCPC signal by maximizing the detection probability. Our numerical results demonstrate that the designed MCPC signal attains the optimal detection performance and requires a lesser computational time than the other parametric waveform design approach.

  8. Phase-Modulated Waveform Design for Extended Target Detection in the Presence of Clutter

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xuhua; Meng, Huadong; Wei, Yimin; Wang, Xiqin

    2011-01-01

    The problem to be addressed in this paper is a phase-modulated waveform design for the detection of extended targets contaminated by signal-dependent noise (clutter) and additive noise in practical radar systems. An optimal waveform design method that leads to the energy spectral density (ESD) of signal under the maximum signal-to-clutter-and-noise ratio (SCNR) criterion is introduced first. In order to make full use of the transmission power, a novel phase-iterative algorithm is then proposed for designing the phase-modulated waveform with a constant envelope, whose ESD matches the optimal one. This method is proven to be able to achieve a small SCNR loss by minimizing the mean-square spectral distance between the optimal waveform and the designed waveform. The results of extensive simulations demonstrate that our approach provides less than 1 dB SCNR loss when the signal duration is greater than 1 μs, and outperforms the stationary phase method and other phase-modulated waveform design methods. PMID:22164009

  9. Radar Tracking Waveform Design in Continuous Space and Optimization Selection Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bryan

    Waveform design that allows for a wide variety of frequency-modulation (FM) has proven benefits. However, dictionary based optimization is limited and gradient search methods are often intractable. A new method is proposed using differential evolution to design waveforms with instantaneous frequencies (IFs) with cubic FM functions whose coefficients are constrained to the surface of the three dimensional unit sphere. Cubic IF functions subsume well-known IF functions such as linear, quadratic monomial, and cubic monomial IF functions. In addition, all nonlinear IF functions sufficiently approximated by a third order Taylor series over the unit time sequence can be represented in this space. Analog methods for generating polynomial IF waveforms are well established allowing for practical implementation in real world systems. By sufficiently constraining the search space to these waveforms of interest, alternative optimization methods such as differential evolution can be used to optimize tracking performance in a variety of radar environments. While simplified tracking models and finite waveform dictionaries have information theoretic results, continuous waveform design in high SNR, narrowband, cluttered environments is explored.

  10. NORSAR Final Scientific Report Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2009-04-16

    Correlation detection is a relatively new approach in seismology that offers significant advantages in increased sensitivity and event screening over standard energy detection algorithms. The basic concept is that a representative event waveform is used as a template (i.e. matched filter) that is correlated against a continuous, possibly multichannel, data stream to detect new occurrences of that same signal. These algorithms are therefore effective at detecting repeating events, such as explosions and aftershocks at a specific location. This final report summarizes the results of a three-year cooperative project undertaken by NORSAR and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The overall objective has been to develop and test a new advanced, automatic approach to seismic detection using waveform correlation. The principal goal is to develop an adaptive processing algorithm. By this we mean that the detector is initiated using a basic set of reference ('master') events to be used in the correlation process, and then an automatic algorithm is applied successively to provide improved performance by extending the set of master events selectively and strategically. These additional master events are generated by an independent, conventional detection system. A periodic analyst review will then be applied to verify the performance and, if necessary, adjust and consolidate the master event set. A primary focus of this project has been the application of waveform correlation techniques to seismic arrays. The basic procedure is to perform correlation on the individual channels, and then stack the correlation traces using zero-delay beam forming. Array methods such as frequency-wavenumber analysis can be applied to this set of correlation traces to help guarantee the validity of detections and lower the detection threshold. In principle, the deployment of correlation detectors against seismically active regions could involve very large numbers of very specific detectors. To

  11. Design of radio frequency pulse waveforms for mitigating signal inhomogeneity in magnetic resonance imaging due to metallic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Taeseong; Kim, Dongmin; Someya, Takao; Sekino, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Metallic implants can result in considerable inhomogeneity in the signal intensity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because the implant generates a shielding effect to the applied radio-frequency (RF) magnetic fields. In this study, we propose an acquisition method to mitigate the signal inhomogeneities using an adaptive RF pulse waveform. The effectiveness of the method was investigated using both numerical simulations and experiments. The RF pulse waveform was calculated based on inverse analyses of the Bloch equation incorporating the measured RF field distribution within the object. A simulation was carried out using a simplified numerical model of RF field inhomogeneity assumed at the center of model. An RF pulse waveform was designed to recover the attenuated signal region in the given model, and we show a significant improvement in the signal homogeneity compared with that obtained using a conventional pulse. We implemented the proposed method on a 7T-MRI system to show the efficacy experimentally. Test samples were fabricated from agarose gel with inserted copper or aluminum implants of different thicknesses. The RF pulse for selective excitation was calculated after mapping the RF field distribution of each imaging object. The acquired images exhibit an improvement in the homogeneity at the region of metallic implants. These results indicate that the proposed method is effective for MRI measurements of objects containing metallic implants.

  12. Waveform diversity for wireless sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Tariq; Zoltowski, Michael

    2008-04-01

    In active sensing systems such as radar and sensor networks, one is interested in transmitting waveforms that possess an ideal thumbtack shaped ambiguity function. However, the synthesis of waveforms with the desired ambiguity function is a difficult problem in applied mathematics and more often than not, one needs to rely on developing waveforms with an ambiguity function that is close to the desired ambiguity function in some sense. Designing waveforms with ambiguity functions that possess certain desirable properties has been a well researched problem in the field of signal analysis. In this paper, we present a methodology for designing multiantenna adaptive waveforms with autocorrelation functions that allow perfect separation at the receiver. We focus on the 4×4 case and derive the conditions that the four waveforms must satisfy in order to achieve perfect separation. Using these conditions, we show that waveforms constructed using Golay complementary sequences, barker codes and quarter-band signals through kronecker products satisfy these conditions and are therefore seperable at the receiver. We also give examples of more general wavefom families that are matched to the environment and also of waveforms that do not necessarily satisfy the conditions for perfect separation but still have good delay-Doppler ambiguity functions making them suitable for sensing environments.

  13. High resolution imaging of the Earth with adaptive full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M.; Guasch, L.; Umpleby, A.; Yao, G.; Herrmann, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a high-resolution, high-fidelity, quantitative, seismic imaging technique that has advanced rapidly within the oil and gas industry. The method involves the iterative improvement of a starting model using a series of local linearized updates to solve the full non-linear inversion problem. During the inversion, forward modeling employs the full two-way three-dimensional heterogeneous anisotropic acoustic or elastic wave equation to predict the observed raw field data, wiggle-for-wiggle, trace-by-trace. The method is computationally demanding; it is highly parallelized, and runs on large multi-core multi-node clusters. A recently developed adaptive version of FWI is able to overcome the requirement for a good starting model and low frequencies in the data, and this opens up the range of datasets and problems to which FWI can be applied. Here, we demonstrate what can be achieved by applying this newly practical technique to high-density 3D seismic datasets acquired to image petroleum targets. We show that the resulting anisotropic p-wave velocity models match in situ measurements in boreholes, reproduce detailed structure observed independently on high-resolution seismic reflection sections, accurately predict the raw seismic data, and simplify and sharpen reverse-time-migrated reflection images of deeper horizons. The velocity models image individual faults, gas clouds, channels, and other geological features with previously unobtainable resolution and clarity. These same benefits can be obtained when this technique is applied to scientific targets provided that the data coverage is adequate in three-dimensions, and that an appropriate range of offsets and azimuths are available. Possible targets range from the water column, ice sheets, and Holocene deposits, through active faults, spreading centres, collision zones, rifted margins, magma plumbing, lower-continental crust, and deep crustal hot zones, to whole

  14. Constant-Envelope Waveform Design for Optimal Target-Detection and Autocorrelation Performances

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    We propose an algorithm to directly synthesize in time-domain a constant-envelope transmit waveform that achieves the optimal performance in detecting an extended target in the presence of signal-dependent interference. This approach is in contrast to the traditional indirect methods that synthesize the transmit signal following the computation of the optimal energy spectral density. Additionally, we aim to maintain a good autocorrelation property of the designed signal. Therefore, our waveform design technique solves a bi-objective optimization problem in order to simultaneously improve the detection and autocorrelation performances, which are in general conflicting in nature. We demonstrate this compromising characteristics of the detection and autocorrelation performances with numerical examples. Furthermore, in the absence of the autocorrelation criterion, our designed signal is shown to achieve a near-optimum detection performance.

  15. Inherent secure communications using lattice based waveform design.

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Matthew Owen

    2013-12-01

    The wireless communications channel is innately insecure due to the broadcast nature of the electromagnetic medium. Many techniques have been developed and implemented in order to combat insecurities and ensure the privacy of transmitted messages. Traditional methods include encrypting the data via cryptographic methods, hiding the data in the noise floor as in wideband communications, or nulling the signal in the spatial direction of the adversary using array processing techniques. This work analyzes the design of signaling constellations, i.e. modulation formats, to combat eavesdroppers from correctly decoding transmitted messages. It has been shown that in certain channel models the ability of an adversary to decode the transmitted messages can be degraded by a clever signaling constellation based on lattice theory. This work attempts to optimize certain lattice parameters in order to maximize the security of the data transmission. These techniques are of interest because they are orthogonal to, and can be used in conjunction with, traditional security techniques to create a more secure communication channel.

  16. Reliability of a MEMS Actuator Improved by Spring Corner Designs and Reshaped Driving Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Hsin-Ta; Su, Guo-Dung John

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report spring corner designs and driving waveforms to improve the reliability for a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) actuator. In order to prevent the stiction problems, no stopper or damping absorber is adopted. Therefore, an actuator could travel long distance by electromagnetic force without any object in moving path to absorb excess momentum. Due to long displacement and large mass, springs of MEMS actuators tend to crack from weak points with high stress concentration and this situation degrades reliability performance. Stress distribution over different spring designs were simulated and a serpentine spring with circular and wide corner design was chosen due to its low stress concentration. This design has smaller stress concentration versus displacement. Furthermore, the resonant frequencies are removed from the driving waveform based on the analysis of discrete Fourier transfer function. The reshaped waveform not only shortens actuator switching time, but also ensures that the spring is in a small displacement region without overshooting so that the maximum stress is kept below 200 MPa. The experimental results show that the MEMS device designed by theses principles can survive 500 g (gravity acceleration) shock test and pass 150 million switching cycles without failure.

  17. Low PMEPR OFDM Radar Waveform Design Using the Iterative Least Squares Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tianyao; Zhao, Tong

    2015-11-01

    This letter considers waveform design of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal for radar applications, and aims at mitigating the envelope fluctuation in OFDM. A novel method is proposed to reduce the peak-to-mean envelope power ratio (PMEPR), which is commonly used to evaluate the fluctuation. The proposed method is based on the tone reservation approach, in which some bits or subcarriers of OFDM are allocated for decreasing PMEPR. We introduce the coefficient of variation of envelopes (CVE) as the cost function for waveform optimization, and develop an iterative least squares algorithm. Minimizing CVE leads to distinct PMEPR reduction, and it is guaranteed that the cost function monotonically decreases by applying the iterative algorithm. Simulations demonstrate that the envelope is significantly smoothed by the proposed method.

  18. LBT adaptive secondary preliminary design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallieni, Daniele; Del Vecchio, Ciro; Anaclerio, E.; Lazzarini, P. G.

    2000-07-01

    We report on the design of the two Gregorian adaptive secondary mirrors of the Large Binocular Telescope. Each adaptive secondary is a Zerodur shell having an external diameter of 911 mm and a thickness of about 1.5 mm. The deformable mirror is controlled by a pattern of 918 electromagnetic actuators. Its shape is referred to a stable ULE back plate by means of capacitive sensors co-located to the actuators pattern. The preliminary design of the system is addressed with particular attention to the reference plate optimization.

  19. Adaptive clinical trial designs in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yong; Lee, J. Jack

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive designs have become popular in clinical trial and drug development. Unlike traditional trial designs, adaptive designs use accumulating data to modify the ongoing trial without undermining the integrity and validity of the trial. As a result, adaptive designs provide a flexible and effective way to conduct clinical trials. The designs have potential advantages of improving the study power, reducing sample size and total cost, treating more patients with more effective treatments, identifying efficacious drugs for specific subgroups of patients based on their biomarker profiles, and shortening the time for drug development. In this article, we review adaptive designs commonly used in clinical trials and investigate several aspects of the designs, including the dose-finding scheme, interim analysis, adaptive randomization, biomarker-guided randomization, and seamless designs. For illustration, we provide examples of real trials conducted with adaptive designs. We also discuss practical issues from the perspective of using adaptive designs in oncology trials. PMID:25811018

  20. Dynamics of adaptive structures: Design through simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, S.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a helical bi-morph actuator/sensor concept by mimicking the change of helical waveform in bacterial flagella is perhaps the first application of bacterial motions (living species) to longitudinal deployment of space structures. However, no dynamical considerations were analyzed to explain the waveform change mechanisms. The objective is to review various deployment concepts from the dynamics point of view and introduce the dynamical considerations from the outset as part of design considerations. Specifically, the impact of the incorporation of the combined static mechanisms and dynamic design considerations on the deployment performance during the reconfiguration stage is studied in terms of improved controllability, maneuvering duration, and joint singularity index. It is shown that intermediate configurations during articulations play an important role for improved joint mechanisms design and overall structural deployability.

  1. ERIS adaptive optics system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Soenke, Christian; Fedrigo, Enrico; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Hubin, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the next-generation instrument planned for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Adaptive Optics facility (AOF). It is an AO assisted instrument that will make use of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF), and it is planned for the Cassegrain focus of the telescope UT4. The project is currently in its Phase A awaiting for approval to continue to the next phases. The Adaptive Optics system of ERIS will include two wavefront sensors (WFS) to maximize the coverage of the proposed sciences cases. The first is a high order 40x40 Pyramid WFS (PWFS) for on axis Natural Guide Star (NGS) observations. The second is a high order 40x40 Shack-Hartmann WFS for single Laser Guide Stars (LGS) observations. The PWFS, with appropriate sub-aperture binning, will serve also as low order NGS WFS in support to the LGS mode with a field of view patrolling capability of 2 arcmin diameter. Both WFSs will be equipped with the very low read-out noise CCD220 based camera developed for the AOF. The real-time reconstruction and control is provided by a SPARTA real-time platform adapted to support both WFS modes. In this paper we will present the ERIS AO system in all its main aspects: opto-mechanical design, real-time computer design, control and calibrations strategy. Particular emphasis will be given to the system performance obtained via dedicated numerical simulations.

  2. A Design Method of Code Correlation Reference Waveform in GNSS Based on Least-Squares Fitting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengtao; Liu, Zhe; Tang, Xiaomei; Wang, Feixue

    2016-01-01

    The multipath effect is one of the main error sources in the Global Satellite Navigation Systems (GNSSs). The code correlation reference waveform (CCRW) technique is an effective multipath mitigation algorithm for the binary phase shift keying (BPSK) signal. However, it encounters the false lock problem in code tracking, when applied to the binary offset carrier (BOC) signals. A least-squares approximation method of the CCRW design scheme is proposed, utilizing the truncated singular value decomposition method. This algorithm was performed for the BPSK signal, BOC(1,1) signal, BOC(2,1) signal, BOC(6,1) and BOC(7,1) signal. The approximation results of CCRWs were presented. Furthermore, the performances of the approximation results are analyzed in terms of the multipath error envelope and the tracking jitter. The results show that the proposed method can realize coherent and non-coherent CCRW discriminators without false lock points. Generally, there is performance degradation in the tracking jitter, if compared to the CCRW discriminator. However, the performance promotions in the multipath error envelope for the BOC(1,1) and BPSK signals makes the discriminator attractive, and it can be applied to high-order BOC signals. PMID:27483275

  3. Designing for Productive Adaptations of Curriculum Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debarger, Angela Haydel; Choppin, Jeffrey; Beauvineau, Yves; Moorthy, Savitha

    2013-01-01

    Productive adaptations at the classroom level are evidence-based curriculum adaptations that are responsive to the demands of a particular classroom context and still consistent with the core design principles and intentions of a curriculum intervention. The model of design-based implementation research (DBIR) offers insights into complexities and…

  4. Drought Adaptation Mechanisms Should Guide Experimental Design.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Matthew E; Medina, Viviana

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism, or hypothesis, of how a plant might be adapted to drought should strongly influence experimental design. For instance, an experiment testing for water conservation should be distinct from a damage-tolerance evaluation. We define here four new, general mechanisms for plant adaptation to drought such that experiments can be more easily designed based upon the definitions. A series of experimental methods are suggested together with appropriate physiological measurements related to the drought adaptation mechanisms. The suggestion is made that the experimental manipulation should match the rate, length, and severity of soil water deficit (SWD) necessary to test the hypothesized type of drought adaptation mechanism. PMID:27090148

  5. Survey of adaptive control using Liapunov design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindorff, D. P.; Carroll, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A survey was made of the literature devoted to the synthesis of model-tracking adaptive systems based on application of Liapunov's second method. The basic synthesis procedure is introduced and a critical review of extensions made to the theory since 1966 is made. The extensions relate to design for relative stability, reduction of order techniques, design with disturbance, design with time variable parameters, multivariable systems, identification, and an adaptive observer.

  6. Dynamic optimization and adaptive controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, S. R.

    2010-10-01

    In this work I present a new type of controller which is an adaptive tracking controller which employs dynamic optimization for optimizing current value of controller action for the temperature control of nonisothermal continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). We begin with a two-state model of nonisothermal CSTR which are mass and heat balance equations and then add cooling system dynamics to eliminate input multiplicity. The initial design value is obtained using local stability of steady states where approach temperature for cooling action is specified as a steady state and a design specification. Later we make a correction in the dynamics where material balance is manipulated to use feed concentration as a system parameter as an adaptive control measure in order to avoid actuator saturation for the main control loop. The analysis leading to design of dynamic optimization based parameter adaptive controller is presented. The important component of this mathematical framework is reference trajectory generation to form an adaptive control measure.

  7. Waveforms and Sonic Boom Perception and Response (WSPR): Low-Boom Community Response Program Pilot Test Design, Execution, and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Juliet A.; Hodgdon, Kathleen K.; Krecker, Peg; Cowart, Robbie; Hobbs, Chris; Wilmer, Clif; Koening, Carrie; Holmes, Theresa; Gaugler, Trent; Shumway, Durland L.; Rosenberger, James L.; Philips, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    The Waveforms and Sonic boom Perception and Response (WSPR) Program was designed to test and demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of techniques to gather data relating human subjective response to multiple low-amplitude sonic booms. It was in essence a practice session for future wider scale testing on naive communities, using a purpose built low-boom demonstrator aircraft. The low-boom community response pilot experiment was conducted in California in November 2011. The WSPR team acquired sufficient data to assess and evaluate the effectiveness of the various physical and psychological data gathering techniques and analysis methods.

  8. A novel high resolution wide swath SAR based on waveform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), with "all weather", day or night imaging capabilities, has been playing an important role in the domination of Earth observation. Spaceborne high-resolution wide-swath SAR (HRWS-SAR) can quickly obtain wide range of the earth's surface information, which is of great significance to Earth mapping, geological exploration, vegetation and biomass estimates, marine monitoring, target search, disaster relief, etc. As a result, spaceborne HRWS-SAR has been gaining more and more attention. However, considering the restrictions on pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and power-aperture product, space-based SAR imaging cannot achieve high resolution and wide swath at the same time. Currently existing solutions mainly focus on the antenna system hardware devices, such as MIMO, DBF; other signal-processing-bias solutions, such as Mosaic imaging technology, have higher requirements of the antenna pointing or beam control. These methods adopt more antenna elements or complex beam control method, which greatly increased the demand for hardware performance, and the signal processing method become more complicated as well. In order to relieve the pressure on the system hardware devices, this paper presents a new orthogonal coded waveform method based on the theory of communication. By using this method, the LFM signal is coded by the orthogonal codes to make the inter-pulse waveform irrelevant, which ensures the azimuth sampling rate as well as a wide swath. Theoretically, this method can alleviate the contradiction between PRF and high resolution wide swath imaging.

  9. SCA Waveform Development for Space Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Kifle, Multi; Hall, C. Steve; Quinn, Todd M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating and developing suitable reconfigurable radio architectures for future NASA missions. This effort is examining software-based open-architectures for space based transceivers, as well as common hardware platform architectures. The Joint Tactical Radio System's (JTRS) Software Communications Architecture (SCA) is a candidate for the software approach, but may need modifications or adaptations for use in space. An in-house SCA compliant waveform development focuses on increasing understanding of software defined radio architectures and more specifically the JTRS SCA. Space requirements put a premium on size, mass, and power. This waveform development effort is key to evaluating tradeoffs with the SCA for space applications. Existing NASA telemetry links, as well as Space Exploration Initiative scenarios, are the basis for defining the waveform requirements. Modeling and simulations are being developed to determine signal processing requirements associated with a waveform and a mission-specific computational burden. Implementation of the waveform on a laboratory software defined radio platform is proceeding in an iterative fashion. Parallel top-down and bottom-up design approaches are employed.

  10. Code division controlled-MAC in wireless sensor network by adaptive binary signature design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lili; Batalama, Stella N.; Pados, Dimitris A.; Suter, Bruce

    2007-04-01

    We consider the problem of signature waveform design for code division medium-access-control (MAC) of wireless sensor networks (WSN). In contract to conventional randomly chosen orthogonal codes, an adaptive signature design strategy is developed under the maximum pre-detection SINR (signal to interference plus noise ratio) criterion. The proposed algorithm utilizes slowest descent cords of the optimization surface to move toward the optimum solution and exhibits, upon eigenvector decomposition, linear computational complexity with respect to signature length. Numerical and simulation studies demonstrate the performance of the proposed method and offer comparisons with conventional signature code sets.

  11. Optimum PWM waveform synthesis - a filtering approach

    SciTech Connect

    Divan, D.M.

    1985-09-01

    A fundamentally different approach is proposed for the synthesis of optimum pulsewidth modulated (PWM) waveforms for highpower inverter applications. Conventional optimum PWM waveform synthesis techniques which seek to control harmonic levels in the inverter output directly are seen to be equivalent to a filtering operation. Digital filter structures capable of processing PWM waveforms are examined and waveform synthesis strategies are proposed and verified experimentally. Finally, the design of a high-performance PWM waveform generator is detailed.

  12. Flexible receiver adapter formal design review

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, S.A.

    1995-06-13

    This memo summarizes the results of the Formal (90%) Design Review process and meetings held to evaluate the design of the Flexible Receiver Adapters, support platforms, and associated equipment. The equipment is part of the Flexible Receiver System used to remove, transport, and store long length contaminated equipment and components from both the double and single-shell underground storage tanks at the 200 area tank farms.

  13. Computerized Adaptive Testing System Design: Preliminary Design Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croll, Paul R.

    A functional design model for a computerized adaptive testing (CAT) system was developed and presented through a series of hierarchy plus input-process-output (HIPO) diagrams. System functions were translated into system structure: specifically, into 34 software components. Implementation of the design in a physical system was addressed through…

  14. Numerical design of an adaptive aileron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendola, Gianluca; Dimino, Ignazio; Concilio, Antonio; Magnifico, Marco; Pecora, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    The study herein described is aimed at investigating the feasibility of an innovative full-scale camber morphing aileron device. In the framework of the "Adaptive Aileron" project, an international cooperation between Italy and Canada, this goal was carried out with the integration of different morphing concepts in a wing-tip prototype. As widely demonstrated in recent European projects such as Clean Sky JTI and SARISTU, wing trailing edge morphing may lead to significant drag reduction (up to 6%) in off-design flight points by adapting chord-wise camber variations in cruise to compensate A/C weight reduction following fuel consumption. Those researches focused on the flap region as the most immediate solution to implement structural adaptations. However, there is also a growing interest in extending morphing functionalities to the aileron region preserving its main functionality in controlling aircraft directional stability. In fact, the external region of the wing seems to be the most effective in producing "lift over drag" improvements by morphing. Thus, the objective of the presented research is to achieve a certain drag reduction in off-design flight points by adapting wing shape and lift distribution following static deflections. In perspective, the developed device could also be used as a load alleviation system to reduce gust effects, augmenting its frequency bandwidth. In this paper, the preliminary design of the adaptive aileron is first presented, assessed on the base of the external aerodynamic loads. The primary structure is made of 5 segmented ribs, distributed along 4 bays, each splitted into three consecutive parts, connected with spanwise stringers. The aileron shape modification is then implemented by means of an actuation system, based on a classical quick-return mechanism, opportunely suited for the presented application. Finite element analyses were assessed for properly sizing the load-bearing structure and actuation systems and for

  15. Adaptive strategies for materials design using uncertainties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Xue, Dezhen; Theiler, James; Hogden, John; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-21

    Here, we compare several adaptive design strategies using a data set of 223 M2AX family of compounds for which the elastic properties [bulk (B), shear (G), and Young’s (E) modulus] have been computed using density functional theory. The design strategies are decomposed into an iterative loop with two main steps: machine learning is used to train a regressor that predicts elastic properties in terms of elementary orbital radii of the individual components of the materials; and a selector uses these predictions and their uncertainties to choose the next material to investigate. The ultimate goal is to obtain a material withmore » desired elastic properties in as few iterations as possible. We examine how the choice of data set size, regressor and selector impact the design. We find that selectors that use information about the prediction uncertainty outperform those that don’t. Our work is a step in illustrating how adaptive design tools can guide the search for new materials with desired properties.« less

  16. Adaptive Strategies for Materials Design using Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Xue, Dezhen; Theiler, James; Hogden, John; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-01

    We compare several adaptive design strategies using a data set of 223 M2AX family of compounds for which the elastic properties [bulk (B), shear (G), and Young’s (E) modulus] have been computed using density functional theory. The design strategies are decomposed into an iterative loop with two main steps: machine learning is used to train a regressor that predicts elastic properties in terms of elementary orbital radii of the individual components of the materials; and a selector uses these predictions and their uncertainties to choose the next material to investigate. The ultimate goal is to obtain a material with desired elastic properties in as few iterations as possible. We examine how the choice of data set size, regressor and selector impact the design. We find that selectors that use information about the prediction uncertainty outperform those that don’t. Our work is a step in illustrating how adaptive design tools can guide the search for new materials with desired properties.

  17. Adaptive Strategies for Materials Design using Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Xue, Dezhen; Theiler, James; Hogden, John; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-01

    We compare several adaptive design strategies using a data set of 223 M2AX family of compounds for which the elastic properties [bulk (B), shear (G), and Young’s (E) modulus] have been computed using density functional theory. The design strategies are decomposed into an iterative loop with two main steps: machine learning is used to train a regressor that predicts elastic properties in terms of elementary orbital radii of the individual components of the materials; and a selector uses these predictions and their uncertainties to choose the next material to investigate. The ultimate goal is to obtain a material with desired elastic properties in as few iterations as possible. We examine how the choice of data set size, regressor and selector impact the design. We find that selectors that use information about the prediction uncertainty outperform those that don’t. Our work is a step in illustrating how adaptive design tools can guide the search for new materials with desired properties. PMID:26792532

  18. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Microelectronic Device Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Lou, John; Norton, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Finite element and finite volume methods are used in a variety of design simulations when it is necessary to compute fields throughout regions that contain varying materials or geometry. Convergence of the simulation can be assessed by uniformly increasing the mesh density until an observable quantity stabilizes. Depending on the electrical size of the problem, uniform refinement of the mesh may be computationally infeasible due to memory limitations. Similarly, depending on the geometric complexity of the object being modeled, uniform refinement can be inefficient since regions that do not need refinement add to the computational expense. In either case, convergence to the correct (measured) solution is not guaranteed. Adaptive mesh refinement methods attempt to selectively refine the region of the mesh that is estimated to contain proportionally higher solution errors. The refinement may be obtained by decreasing the element size (h-refinement), by increasing the order of the element (p-refinement) or by a combination of the two (h-p refinement). A successful adaptive strategy refines the mesh to produce an accurate solution measured against the correct fields without undue computational expense. This is accomplished by the use of a) reliable a posteriori error estimates, b) hierarchal elements, and c) automatic adaptive mesh generation. Adaptive methods are also useful when problems with multi-scale field variations are encountered. These occur in active electronic devices that have thin doped layers and also when mixed physics is used in the calculation. The mesh needs to be fine at and near the thin layer to capture rapid field or charge variations, but can coarsen away from these layers where field variations smoothen and charge densities are uniform. This poster will present an adaptive mesh refinement package that runs on parallel computers and is applied to specific microelectronic device simulations. Passive sensors that operate in the infrared portion of

  19. Factors in the design of adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    A brief review of adaptive antenna technology is given, and two topic areas are addressed. The first is concerned with the general difficulties encountered in design, in particular the avoidance of nulling wanted signals, the provision of an adequate rate of convergence towards a desired characteristic, and the degradation of null depths caused by the proximity of the platform and by dispersion in the array and receiving channels. The second topic concerns specific design approaches. Closed loop processors, in which the array output is sensed in order to provide a drive to the weight networks, are exemplified by a feedback loop correlator design and a weight perturbation technique. An example of open-loop control of weight values is also included, and its lack of self-correction is shown to be disadvantageous compared to the closed loop approach. Advanced methods, associated with sample matrix inversion, are also summarized.

  20. A Tutorial on Adaptive Design Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jay I.; Cavagnaro, Daniel R.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Experimentation is ubiquitous in the field of psychology and fundamental to the advancement of its science, and one of the biggest challenges for researchers is designing experiments that can conclusively discriminate the theoretical hypotheses or models under investigation. The recognition of this challenge has led to the development of sophisticated statistical methods that aid in the design of experiments and that are within the reach of everyday experimental scientists. This tutorial paper introduces the reader to an implementable experimentation methodology, dubbed Adaptive Design Optimization, that can help scientists to conduct “smart” experiments that are maximally informative and highly efficient, which in turn should accelerate scientific discovery in psychology and beyond. PMID:23997275

  1. Adaptive design of visual perception experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John D.; Hixson, Jonathan; Thomas, James M., Jr.; Peterson, Matthew S.; Parasuraman, Raja

    2010-04-01

    Meticulous experimental design may not always prevent confounds from affecting experimental data acquired during visual perception experiments. Although experimental controls reduce the potential effects of foreseen sources of interference, interaction, or noise, they are not always adequate for preventing the confounding effects of unforeseen forces. Visual perception experimentation is vulnerable to unforeseen confounds because of the nature of the associated cognitive processes involved in the decision task. Some confounds are beyond the control of experimentation, such as what a participant does immediately prior to experimental participation, or the participant's attitude or emotional state. Other confounds may occur through ignorance of practical control methods on the part of the experiment's designer. The authors conducted experiments related to experimental fatigue and initially achieved significant results that were, upon re-examination, attributable to a lack of adequate controls. Re-examination of the original results and the processes and events that led to them yielded a second experimental design with more experimental controls and significantly different results. The authors propose that designers of visual perception experiments can benefit from planning to use a test-fix-test or adaptive experimental design cycle, so that unforeseen confounds in the initial design can be remedied.

  2. Dual adaptive control: Design principles and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookerjee, Purusottam

    1988-01-01

    The design of an actively adaptive dual controller based on an approximation of the stochastic dynamic programming equation for a multi-step horizon is presented. A dual controller that can enhance identification of the system while controlling it at the same time is derived for multi-dimensional problems. This dual controller uses sensitivity functions of the expected future cost with respect to the parameter uncertainties. A passively adaptive cautious controller and the actively adaptive dual controller are examined. In many instances, the cautious controller is seen to turn off while the latter avoids the turn-off of the control and the slow convergence of the parameter estimates, characteristic of the cautious controller. The algorithms have been applied to a multi-variable static model which represents a simplified linear version of the relationship between the vibration output and the higher harmonic control input for a helicopter. Monte Carlo comparisons based on parametric and nonparametric statistical analysis indicate the superiority of the dual controller over the baseline controller.

  3. STRS Compliant FPGA Waveform Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer; Downey, Joseph; Mortensen, Dale

    2008-01-01

    The Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture Standard describes a standard for NASA space software defined radios (SDRs). It provides a common framework that can be used to develop and operate a space SDR in a reconfigurable and reprogrammable manner. One goal of the STRS Architecture is to promote waveform reuse among multiple software defined radios. Many space domain waveforms are designed to run in the special signal processing (SSP) hardware. However, the STRS Architecture is currently incomplete in defining a standard for designing waveforms in the SSP hardware. Therefore, the STRS Architecture needs to be extended to encompass waveform development in the SSP hardware. The extension of STRS to the SSP hardware will promote easier waveform reconfiguration and reuse. A transmit waveform for space applications was developed to determine ways to extend the STRS Architecture to a field programmable gate array (FPGA). These extensions include a standard hardware abstraction layer for FPGAs and a standard interface between waveform functions running inside a FPGA. A FPGA-based transmit waveform implementation of the proposed standard interfaces on a laboratory breadboard SDR will be discussed.

  4. Valuation of design adaptability in aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Martin, Ismael

    As more information is brought into early stages of the design, more pressure is put on engineers to produce a reliable, high quality, and financially sustainable product. Unfortunately, requirements established at the beginning of a new project by customers, and the environment that surrounds them, continue to change in some unpredictable ways. The risk of designing a system that may become obsolete during early stages of production is currently tackled by the use of robust design simulation, a method that allows to simultaneously explore a plethora of design alternatives and requirements with the intention of accounting for uncertain factors in the future. Whereas this design technique has proven to be quite an improvement in design methods, under certain conditions, it fails to account for the change of uncertainty over time and the intrinsic value embedded in the system when certain design features are activated. This thesis introduces the concepts of adaptability and real options to manage risk foreseen in the face of uncertainty at early design stages. The method described herein allows decision-makers to foresee the financial impact of their decisions at the design level, as well as the final exposure to risk. In this thesis, cash flow models, traditionally used to obtain the forecast of a project's value over the years, were replaced with surrogate models that are capable of showing fluctuations on value every few days. This allowed a better implementation of real options valuation, optimization, and strategy selection. Through the option analysis model, an optimization exercise allows the user to obtain the best implementation strategy in the face of uncertainty as well as the overall value of the design feature. Here implementation strategy refers to the decision to include a new design feature in the system, after the design has been finalized, but before the end of its production life. The ability to do this in a cost efficient manner after the system

  5. Generating nonlinear FM chirp waveforms for radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Nonlinear FM waveforms offer a radar matched filter output with inherently low range sidelobes. This yields a 1-2 dB advantage in Signal-to-Noise Ratio over the output of a Linear FM waveform with equivalent sidelobe filtering. This report presents design and implementation techniques for Nonlinear FM waveforms.

  6. Predicting electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure waveforms with different Echo State Network architectures.

    PubMed

    Fong, Allan; Mittu, Ranjeev; Ratwani, Raj; Reggia, James

    2014-01-01

    Alarm fatigue caused by false alarms and alerts is an extremely important issue for the medical staff in Intensive Care Units. The ability to predict electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure waveforms can potentially help the staff and hospital systems better classify a patient's waveforms and subsequent alarms. This paper explores the use of Echo State Networks, a specific type of neural network for mining, understanding, and predicting electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure waveforms. Several network architectures are designed and evaluated. The results show the utility of these echo state networks, particularly ones with larger integrated reservoirs, for predicting electrocardiogram waveforms and the adaptability of such models across individuals. The work presented here offers a unique approach for understanding and predicting a patient's waveforms in order to potentially improve alarm generation. We conclude with a brief discussion of future extensions of this research. PMID:25954359

  7. Test Information Targeting Strategies for Adaptive Multistage Testing Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.; Burgin, William

    Adaptive multistage testlet (MST) designs appear to be gaining popularity for many large-scale computer-based testing programs. These adaptive MST designs use a modularized configuration of preconstructed testlets and embedded score-routing schemes to prepackage different forms of an adaptive test. The conditional information targeting (CIT)…

  8. Dual-Frequency Alternating Current Designer Waveform for Reliable Voltammetric Determination of Electrode Kinetics Approaching the Reversible Limit.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiezhen; Bentley, Cameron L; Bond, Alan M; Zhang, Jie

    2016-02-16

    Alternating current (ac) voltammetry provides access to faster electrode kinetics than direct current (dc) methods. However, difficulties in ac and other methods arise when the heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant (k(0)) approaches the reversible limit, because the voltammetric characteristics become insensitive to electrode kinetics. Thus, in this near-reversible regime, even small uncertainties associated with bulk concentration (C), diffusion coefficient (D), electrode area (A), and uncompensated resistance (Ru) can lead to significant systematic error in the determination of k(0). In this study, we have introduced a kinetically sensitive dual-frequency designer waveform into the Fourier-transformed large-amplitude alternating current (FTAC) voltammetric method that is made up of two sine waves having the same amplitude but with different frequencies (e.g., 37 and 615 Hz) superimposed onto a dc ramp to quantify the close-to-reversible Fc(0/+) process (Fc = ferrocene) in two nonhaloaluminate ionic liquids. The concept is that from a single experiment the lower-frequency data set, collected on a time scale where the target process is reversible, can be used as an internal reference to calibrate A, D, C, and Ru. These calibrated values are then used to calculate k(0) from analysis of the harmonics of the higher-frequency data set, where the target process is quasi-reversible. With this approach, k(0) values of 0.28 and 0.11 cm·s(-1) have been obtained at a 50 μm diameter platinum microdisk electrode for the close-to-diffusion-controlled Fc(0/+) process in two ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, respectively. PMID:26771276

  9. Assessing Adaptive Instructional Design Tools and Methods in ADAPT[IT].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eseryel, Deniz; Spector, J. Michael

    ADAPT[IT] (Advanced Design Approach for Personalized Training - Interactive Tools) is a European project within the Information Society Technologies program that is providing design methods and tools to guide a training designer according to the latest cognitive science and standardization principles. ADAPT[IT] addresses users in two significantly…

  10. Neutron Detector Waveform Digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toebbe, Jonathan; Gray, Fred; Grafil, Elliot; Greife, Uwe

    2010-11-01

    In the frame of a DoE Office of Nuclear Energy funded collaboration to design a next generation neutron elastic and inelastic scattering experiment, the Colorado School of Mines/Regis University group is responsible for developing and testing neutron detectors, pulse shape discrimination and read-out methods. This contribution will describe the test setup based on an n-ToF neutron selection using a ^244Cm-^13C source and the Regis Digitizer. Results on pulse shape discrimination from waveform digitization will be compared to other commercially available discrimination methods. We will also present our efforts to explore different types of algorithm for extraction of neutron assignment probabilities from the collected waveforms.

  11. Survey of adaptive control using Liapunov design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindorff, D. P.; Carroll, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of the literature in which Liapunov's second method is used in determining the control law is presented, with emphasis placed on the model-tracking adaptive control problem. Forty references are listed. Following a brief tutorial exposition of the adaptive control problem, the techniques for treating reduction of order, disturbance and time-varying parameters, multivariable systems, identification, and adaptive observers are discussed. The method is critically evaluated, particularly with respect to possibilities for application.

  12. Designing and Generating Educational Adaptive Hypermedia Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retalis, Symeon; Papasalouros, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Educational Adaptive Hypermedia Applications (EAHA) provide personalized views on the learning content to individual learners. They also offer adaptive sequencing (navigation) over the learning content based on rules that stem from the user model requirements and the instructional strategies. EAHA are gaining the focus of the research community as…

  13. STRS Compliant FPGA Waveform Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer; Downey, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture Standard describes a standard for NASA space software defined radios (SDRs). It provides a common framework that can be used to develop and operate a space SDR in a reconfigurable and reprogrammable manner. One goal of the STRS Architecture is to promote waveform reuse among multiple software defined radios. Many space domain waveforms are designed to run in the special signal processing (SSP) hardware. However, the STRS Architecture is currently incomplete in defining a standard for designing waveforms in the SSP hardware. Therefore, the STRS Architecture needs to be extended to encompass waveform development in the SSP hardware. A transmit waveform for space applications was developed to determine ways to extend the STRS Architecture to a field programmable gate array (FPGA). These extensions include a standard hardware abstraction layer for FPGAs and a standard interface between waveform functions running inside a FPGA. Current standards were researched and new standard interfaces were proposed. The implementation of the proposed standard interfaces on a laboratory breadboard SDR will be presented.

  14. Robust design of configurations and parameters of adaptable products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Yongliang; Xue, Deyi; Gu, Peihua

    2014-03-01

    An adaptable product can satisfy different customer requirements by changing its configuration and parameter values during the operation stage. Design of adaptable products aims at reducing the environment impact through replacement of multiple different products with single adaptable ones. Due to the complex architecture, multiple functional requirements, and changes of product configurations and parameter values in operation, impact of uncertainties to the functional performance measures needs to be considered in design of adaptable products. In this paper, a robust design approach is introduced to identify the optimal design configuration and parameters of an adaptable product whose functional performance measures are the least sensitive to uncertainties. An adaptable product in this paper is modeled by both configurations and parameters. At the configuration level, methods to model different product configuration candidates in design and different product configuration states in operation to satisfy design requirements are introduced. At the parameter level, four types of product/operating parameters and relations among these parameters are discussed. A two-level optimization approach is developed to identify the optimal design configuration and its parameter values of the adaptable product. A case study is implemented to illustrate the effectiveness of the newly developed robust adaptable design method.

  15. Application of Adaptive Autopilot Designs for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Yoonghyun; Calise, Anthony J.; Motter, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes the application of two adaptive approaches to autopilot design, and presents an evaluation and comparison of the two approaches in simulation for an unmanned aerial vehicle. One approach employs two-stage dynamic inversion and the other employs feedback dynamic inversions based on a command augmentation system. Both are augmented with neural network based adaptive elements. The approaches permit adaptation to both parametric uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics, and incorporate a method that permits adaptation during periods of control saturation. Simulation results for an FQM-117B radio controlled miniature aerial vehicle are presented to illustrate the performance of the neural network based adaptation.

  16. Multiscale full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Trampert, Jeannot; Cupillard, Paul; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay; Capdeville, Yann; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We develop and apply a full waveform inversion method that incorporates seismic data on a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, thereby constraining the details of both crustal and upper-mantle structure. This is intended to further our understanding of crust-mantle interactions that shape the nature of plate tectonics, and to be a step towards improved tomographic models of strongly scale-dependent earth properties, such as attenuation and anisotropy. The inversion for detailed regional earth structure consistently embedded within a large-scale model requires locally refined numerical meshes that allow us to (1) model regional wave propagation at high frequencies, and (2) capture the inferred fine-scale heterogeneities. The smallest local grid spacing sets the upper bound of the largest possible time step used to iteratively advance the seismic wave field. This limitation leads to extreme computational costs in the presence of fine-scale structure, and it inhibits the construction of full waveform tomographic models that describe earth structure on multiple scales. To reduce computational requirements to a feasible level, we design a multigrid approach based on the decomposition of a multiscale earth model with widely varying grid spacings into a family of single-scale models where the grid spacing is approximately uniform. Each of the single-scale models contains a tractable number of grid points, which ensures computational efficiency. The multi-to-single-scale decomposition is the foundation of iterative, gradient-based optimization schemes that simultaneously and consistently invert data on all scales for one multi-scale model. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in a full waveform inversion for Eurasia, with a special focus on Anatolia where coverage is particularly dense. Continental-scale structure is constrained by complete seismic waveforms in the 30-200 s period range. In addition to the well-known structural elements of the Eurasian mantle

  17. Adaptive and Adaptable Automation Design: A Critical Review of the Literature and Recommendations for Future Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kaber, David B.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a review of literature on approaches to adaptive and adaptable task/function allocation and adaptive interface technologies for effective human management of complex systems that are likely to be issues for the Next Generation Air Transportation System, and a focus of research under the Aviation Safety Program, Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Project. Contemporary literature retrieved from an online database search is summarized and integrated. The major topics include the effects of delegation-type, adaptable automation on human performance, workload and situation awareness, the effectiveness of various automation invocation philosophies and strategies to function allocation in adaptive systems, and the role of user modeling in adaptive interface design and the performance implications of adaptive interface technology.

  18. Multidimensional Adaptive Testing with Optimal Design Criteria for Item Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Joris; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2009-01-01

    Several criteria from the optimal design literature are examined for use with item selection in multidimensional adaptive testing. In particular, it is examined what criteria are appropriate for adaptive testing in which all abilities are intentional, some should be considered as a nuisance, or the interest is in the testing of a composite of the…

  19. Mental workload dynamics in adaptive interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, Peter A.; Chignell, Mark H.

    1988-01-01

    In examining the role of time in mental workload, the authors present a different perspective from which to view the problem of assessment. Mental workload is plotted in three dimensions, whose axes represent effective time for action, perceived distance from desired goal state, level of effort required to achieve the time-constrained goal. This representation allows the generation of isodynamic workload contours that incorporate the factors of operator skill and equifinality of effort. An adaptive interface for dynamic task reallocation is described that uses this form of assessment to reconcile the joint aims of stable operator loading and acceptable primary task performance by the total system.

  20. 28. 'TOWER DESIGN NO. 11, ADAPTED FROM NO. 9,' drawn ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. 'TOWER DESIGN NO. 11, ADAPTED FROM NO. 9,' drawn by project architect Alfred Eichler, undated, ca. 1934. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  1. Design of Pel Adaptive DPCM coding based upon image partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, T.; Harashima, H.; Miyakawa, H.

    1982-01-01

    A Pel Adaptive DPCM coding system based on image partition is developed which possesses coding characteristics superior to those of the Block Adaptive DPCM coding system. This method uses multiple DPCM coding loops and nonhierarchical cluster analysis. It is found that the coding performances of the Pel Adaptive DPCM coding method differ depending on the subject images. The Pel Adaptive DPCM designed using these methods is shown to yield a maximum performance advantage of 2.9 dB for the Girl and Couple images and 1.5 dB for the Aerial image, although no advantage was obtained for the moon image. These results show an improvement over the optimally designed Block Adaptive DPCM coding method proposed by Saito et al. (1981).

  2. Phase Detector For Rectangular Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dischert, Robert A.; Walter, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Phase detector for use with phase-locked-loops, servocontrol, and other electronic circuits designed to avoid disadvantages of other phase detectors. Used with both intermittent and continuous input signals. Circuit offers several advantages; reference signals continuous, burst of few pulses, or single pulse. Circuit "coasts" in absence of reference signal. Generates no steady-state output waveform at lock which makes filtering easier.

  3. Design of Low Complexity Model Reference Adaptive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Schaefer, Jacob; Johnson, Marcus; Nguyen, Nhan

    2012-01-01

    Flight research experiments have demonstrated that adaptive flight controls can be an effective technology for improving aircraft safety in the event of failures or damage. However, the nonlinear, timevarying nature of adaptive algorithms continues to challenge traditional methods for the verification and validation testing of safety-critical flight control systems. Increasingly complex adaptive control theories and designs are emerging, but only make testing challenges more difficult. A potential first step toward the acceptance of adaptive flight controllers by aircraft manufacturers, operators, and certification authorities is a very simple design that operates as an augmentation to a non-adaptive baseline controller. Three such controllers were developed as part of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration flight research experiment to determine the appropriate level of complexity required to restore acceptable handling qualities to an aircraft that has suffered failures or damage. The controllers consist of the same basic design, but incorporate incrementally-increasing levels of complexity. Derivations of the controllers and their adaptive parameter update laws are presented along with details of the controllers implementations.

  4. Team-Centered Perspective for Adaptive Automation Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2003-01-01

    Automation represents a very active area of human factors research. The journal, Human Factors, published a special issue on automation in 1985. Since then, hundreds of scientific studies have been published examining the nature of automation and its interaction with human performance. However, despite a dramatic increase in research investigating human factors issues in aviation automation, there remain areas that need further exploration. This NASA Technical Memorandum describes a new area of automation design and research, called adaptive automation. It discusses the concepts and outlines the human factors issues associated with the new method of adaptive function allocation. The primary focus is on human-centered design, and specifically on ensuring that adaptive automation is from a team-centered perspective. The document shows that adaptive automation has many human factors issues common to traditional automation design. Much like the introduction of other new technologies and paradigm shifts, adaptive automation presents an opportunity to remediate current problems but poses new ones for human-automation interaction in aerospace operations. The review here is intended to communicate the philosophical perspective and direction of adaptive automation research conducted under the Aerospace Operations Systems (AOS), Physiological and Psychological Stressors and Factors (PPSF) project.

  5. The Potential of Adaptive Design in Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Majid, Arshad; Bae, Ok-Nam; Redgrave, Jessica; Teare, Dawn; Ali, Ali; Zemke, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials are the backbone of medical research, and are often the last step in the development of new therapies for use in patients. Prior to human testing, however, preclinical studies using animal subjects are usually performed in order to provide initial data on the safety and effectiveness of prospective treatments. These studies can be costly and time consuming, and may also raise concerns about the ethical treatment of animals when potentially harmful procedures are involved. Adaptive design is a process by which the methods used in a study may be altered while it is being conducted in response to preliminary data or other new information. Adaptive design has been shown to be useful in reducing the time and costs associated with clinical trials, and may provide similar benefits in preclinical animal studies. The purpose of this review is to summarize various aspects of adaptive design and evaluate its potential for use in preclinical research. PMID:26473839

  6. The Potential of Adaptive Design in Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Arshad; Bae, Ok-Nam; Redgrave, Jessica; Teare, Dawn; Ali, Ali; Zemke, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials are the backbone of medical research, and are often the last step in the development of new therapies for use in patients. Prior to human testing, however, preclinical studies using animal subjects are usually performed in order to provide initial data on the safety and effectiveness of prospective treatments. These studies can be costly and time consuming, and may also raise concerns about the ethical treatment of animals when potentially harmful procedures are involved. Adaptive design is a process by which the methods used in a study may be altered while it is being conducted in response to preliminary data or other new information. Adaptive design has been shown to be useful in reducing the time and costs associated with clinical trials, and may provide similar benefits in preclinical animal studies. The purpose of this review is to summarize various aspects of adaptive design and evaluate its potential for use in preclinical research. PMID:26473839

  7. The design of digital-adaptive controllers for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, R. F.; Broussard, J. R.; Berry, P. W.

    1976-01-01

    Design procedures for VTOL automatic control systems have been developed and are presented. Using linear-optimal estimation and control techniques as a starting point, digital-adaptive control laws have been designed for the VALT Research Aircraft, a tandem-rotor helicopter which is equipped for fully automatic flight in terminal area operations. These control laws are designed to interface with velocity-command and attitude-command guidance logic, which could be used in short-haul VTOL operations. Developments reported here include new algorithms for designing non-zero-set-point digital regulators, design procedures for rate-limited systems, and algorithms for dynamic control trim setting.

  8. Seismic waveform viewer, processor and calculator

    2015-02-15

    SWIFT is a computer code that is designed to do research level signal analysis on seismic waveforms, including visualization, filtering and measurement. LLNL is using this code, amplitude and global tomography efforts.

  9. Precision of maximum likelihood estimation in adaptive designs.

    PubMed

    Graf, Alexandra Christine; Gutjahr, Georg; Brannath, Werner

    2016-03-15

    There has been increasing interest in trials that allow for design adaptations like sample size reassessment or treatment selection at an interim analysis. Ignoring the adaptive and multiplicity issues in such designs leads to an inflation of the type 1 error rate, and treatment effect estimates based on the maximum likelihood principle become biased. Whereas the methodological issues concerning hypothesis testing are well understood, it is not clear how to deal with parameter estimation in designs were adaptation rules are not fixed in advanced so that, in practice, the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) is used. It is therefore important to understand the behavior of the MLE in such designs. The investigation of Bias and mean squared error (MSE) is complicated by the fact that the adaptation rules need not be fully specified in advance and, hence, are usually unknown. To investigate Bias and MSE under such circumstances, we search for the sample size reassessment and selection rules that lead to the maximum Bias or maximum MSE. Generally, this leads to an overestimation of Bias and MSE, which can be reduced by imposing realistic constraints on the rules like, for example, a maximum sample size. We consider designs that start with k treatment groups and a common control and where selection of a single treatment and control is performed at the interim analysis with the possibility to reassess each of the sample sizes. We consider the case of unlimited sample size reassessments as well as several realistically restricted sample size reassessment rules. PMID:26459506

  10. Missile guidance law design using adaptive cerebellar model articulation controller.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Min; Peng, Ya-Fu

    2005-05-01

    An adaptive cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) is proposed for command to line-of-sight (CLOS) missile guidance law design. In this design, the three-dimensional (3-D) CLOS guidance problem is formulated as a tracking problem of a time-varying nonlinear system. The adaptive CMAC control system is comprised of a CMAC and a compensation controller. The CMAC control is used to imitate a feedback linearization control law and the compensation controller is utilized to compensate the difference between the feedback linearization control law and the CMAC control. The online adaptive law is derived based on the Lyapunov stability theorem to learn the weights of receptive-field basis functions in CMAC control. In addition, in order to relax the requirement of approximation error bound, an estimation law is derived to estimate the error bound. Then the adaptive CMAC control system is designed to achieve satisfactory tracking performance. Simulation results for different engagement scenarios illustrate the validity of the proposed adaptive CMAC-based guidance law. PMID:15940993

  11. An MSK Radar Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater

  12. Experimental Design to Evaluate Directed Adaptive Mutation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiaro, Christopher R; May, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe the experimental design for a methodological approach to determine whether directed adaptive mutation occurs in mammalian cells. Identification of directed adaptive mutation would have profound practical significance for a wide variety of biomedical problems, including disease development and resistance to treatment. In adaptive mutation, the genetic or epigenetic change is not random; instead, the presence and type of selection influences the frequency and character of the mutation event. Adaptive mutation can contribute to the evolution of microbial pathogenesis, cancer, and drug resistance, and may become a focus of novel therapeutic interventions. Objective Our experimental approach was designed to distinguish between 3 types of mutation: (1) random mutations that are independent of selective pressure, (2) undirected adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces a general increase in the mutation rate, and (3) directed adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces targeted mutations that specifically influence the adaptive response. The purpose of this report is to introduce an experimental design and describe limited pilot experiment data (not to describe a complete set of experiments); hence, it is an early report. Methods An experimental design based on immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells is presented that links clonal cell growth to reversal of an inactivating polyadenylation site mutation. Thus, cells exhibit growth only in the presence of both the countermutation and an inducing agent (doxycycline). The type and frequency of mutation in the presence or absence of doxycycline will be evaluated. Additional experimental approaches would determine whether the cells exhibit a generalized increase in mutation rate and/or whether the cells show altered expression of error-prone DNA polymerases or of mismatch repair proteins. Results We performed the initial stages of characterizing our system

  13. Adaptive multibeam phased array design for a Spacelab experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noji, T. T.; Fass, S.; Fuoco, A. M.; Wang, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    The parametric tradeoff analyses and design for an Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA) for a Spacelab experiment are described. This AMPA Experiment System was designed with particular emphasis to maximize channel capacity and minimize implementation and cost impacts for future austere maritime and aeronautical users, operating with a low gain hemispherical coverage antenna element, low effective radiated power, and low antenna gain-to-system noise temperature ratio.

  14. Interactive spatial tools for the design of regional adaptation strategies.

    PubMed

    Eikelboom, T; Janssen, R

    2013-09-01

    Regional adaptation strategies are plans that consist of feasible measures to shift a region towards a system that is flexible and robust for future climate changes. They apply to regional impacts of climate change and are imbedded in broader planning. Multiple adaptation frameworks and guidelines exist that describe the development stages of regional adaptation strategies. Spatial information plays a key role in the design of adaptation measures as both the effects of climate change as well as many adaptation measures have spatial impacts. Interactive spatial support tools such as drawing, simulation and evaluation tools can assist the development process. This paper presents how to connect tasks derived from the actual development stages to spatial support tools in an interactive multi-stakeholder context. This link helps to decide what spatial tools are suited to support which stages in the development process of regional adaptation strategies. The practical implication of the link is illustrated for three case study workshops in the Netherlands. The regional planning workshops combine expertise from both scientists and stakeholders with an interactive mapping device. This approach triggered participants to share their expertise and stimulated integration of knowledge. PMID:23137917

  15. An information theoretic approach of designing sparse kernel adaptive filters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifeng; Park, Il; Principe, José C

    2009-12-01

    This paper discusses an information theoretic approach of designing sparse kernel adaptive filters. To determine useful data to be learned and remove redundant ones, a subjective information measure called surprise is introduced. Surprise captures the amount of information a datum contains which is transferable to a learning system. Based on this concept, we propose a systematic sparsification scheme, which can drastically reduce the time and space complexity without harming the performance of kernel adaptive filters. Nonlinear regression, short term chaotic time-series prediction, and long term time-series forecasting examples are presented. PMID:19923047

  16. Frequency based design of modal controllers for adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Agapito, Guido; Battistelli, Giorgio; Mari, Daniele; Selvi, Daniela; Tesi, Alberto; Tesi, Pietro

    2012-11-19

    This paper addresses the problem of reducing the effects of wavefront distortions in ground-based telescopes within a "Modal-Control" framework. The proposed approach allows the designer to optimize the Youla parameter of a given modal controller with respect to a relevant adaptive optics performance criterion defined on a "sampled" frequency domain. This feature makes it possible to use turbulence/vibration profiles of arbitrary complexity (even empirical power spectral densities from data), while keeping the controller order at a moderate value. Effectiveness of the proposed solution is also illustrated through an adaptive optics numerical simulator. PMID:23187567

  17. A Hierarchical Adaptive Approach to Optimal Experimental Design

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woojae; Pitt, Mark A.; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Steyvers, Mark; Myung, Jay I.

    2014-01-01

    Experimentation is at the core of research in the behavioral and neural sciences, yet observations can be expensive and time-consuming to acquire (e.g., MRI scans, responses from infant participants). A major interest of researchers is designing experiments that lead to maximal accumulation of information about the phenomenon under study with the fewest possible number of observations. In addressing this challenge, statisticians have developed adaptive design optimization methods. This letter introduces a hierarchical Bayes extension of adaptive design optimization that provides a judicious way to exploit two complementary schemes of inference (with past and future data) to achieve even greater accuracy and efficiency in information gain. We demonstrate the method in a simulation experiment in the field of visual perception. PMID:25149697

  18. Surrogate waveform models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Jonathan; Field, Scott; Galley, Chad; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela; Tiglio, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    With the advanced detector era just around the corner, there is a strong need for fast and accurate models of gravitational waveforms from compact binary coalescence. Fast surrogate models can be built out of an accurate but slow waveform model with minimal to no loss in accuracy, but may require a large number of evaluations of the underlying model. This may be prohibitively expensive if the underlying is extremely slow, for example if we wish to build a surrogate for numerical relativity. We examine alternate choices to building surrogate models which allow for a more sparse set of input waveforms. Research supported in part by NSERC.

  19. Design of an adaptive neural network based power system stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh K; Wunsch, Donald C

    2003-01-01

    Power system stabilizers (PSS) are used to generate supplementary control signals for the excitation system in order to damp the low frequency power system oscillations. To overcome the drawbacks of conventional PSS (CPSS), numerous techniques have been proposed in the literature. Based on the analysis of existing techniques, this paper presents an indirect adaptive neural network based power system stabilizer (IDNC) design. The proposed IDNC consists of a neuro-controller, which is used to generate a supplementary control signal to the excitation system, and a neuro-identifier, which is used to model the dynamics of the power system and to adapt the neuro-controller parameters. The proposed method has the features of a simple structure, adaptivity and fast response. The proposed IDNC is evaluated on a single machine infinite bus power system under different operating conditions and disturbances to demonstrate its effectiveness and robustness. PMID:12850048

  20. Adaptive Modeling, Engineering Analysis and Design of Advanced Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Hsu, Su-Yuen; Mason, Brian H.; Hicks, Mike D.; Jones, William T.; Sleight, David W.; Chun, Julio; Spangler, Jan L.; Kamhawi, Hilmi; Dahl, Jorgen L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes initial progress towards the development and enhancement of a set of software tools for rapid adaptive modeling, and conceptual design of advanced aerospace vehicle concepts. With demanding structural and aerodynamic performance requirements, these high fidelity geometry based modeling tools are essential for rapid and accurate engineering analysis at the early concept development stage. This adaptive modeling tool was used for generating vehicle parametric geometry, outer mold line and detailed internal structural layout of wing, fuselage, skin, spars, ribs, control surfaces, frames, bulkheads, floors, etc., that facilitated rapid finite element analysis, sizing study and weight optimization. The high quality outer mold line enabled rapid aerodynamic analysis in order to provide reliable design data at critical flight conditions. Example application for structural design of a conventional aircraft and a high altitude long endurance vehicle configuration are presented. This work was performed under the Conceptual Design Shop sub-project within the Efficient Aerodynamic Shape and Integration project, under the former Vehicle Systems Program. The project objective was to design and assess unconventional atmospheric vehicle concepts efficiently and confidently. The implementation may also dramatically facilitate physics-based systems analysis for the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Mission. In addition to providing technology for design and development of unconventional aircraft, the techniques for generation of accurate geometry and internal sub-structure and the automated interface with the high fidelity analysis codes could also be applied towards the design of vehicles for the NASA Exploration and Space Science Mission projects.

  1. Design of Adaptive Policy Pathways under Deep Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babovic, Vladan

    2013-04-01

    The design of large-scale engineering and infrastructural systems today is growing in complexity. Designers need to consider sociotechnical uncertainties, intricacies, and processes in the long- term strategic deployment and operations of these systems. In this context, water and spatial management is increasingly challenged not only by climate-associated changes such as sea level rise and increased spatio-temporal variability of precipitation, but also by pressures due to population growth and particularly accelerating rate of urbanisation. Furthermore, high investment costs and long term-nature of water-related infrastructure projects requires long-term planning perspective, sometimes extending over many decades. Adaptation to such changes is not only determined by what is known or anticipated at present, but also by what will be experienced and learned as the future unfolds, as well as by policy responses to social and water events. As a result, a pathway emerges. Instead of responding to 'surprises' and making decisions on ad hoc basis, exploring adaptation pathways into the future provide indispensable support in water management decision-making. In this contribution, a structured approach for designing a dynamic adaptive policy based on the concepts of adaptive policy making and adaptation pathways is introduced. Such an approach provides flexibility which allows change over time in response to how the future unfolds, what is learned about the system, and changes in societal preferences. The introduced flexibility provides means for dealing with complexities of adaptation under deep uncertainties. It enables engineering systems to change in the face of uncertainty to reduce impacts from downside scenarios while capitalizing on upside opportunities. This contribution presents comprehensive framework for development and deployment of adaptive policy pathway framework, and demonstrates its performance under deep uncertainties on a case study related to urban

  2. Self-Adaptive Stepsize Search Applied to Optimal Structural Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolle, L.; Bland, J. A.

    Structural engineering often involves the design of space frames that are required to resist predefined external forces without exhibiting plastic deformation. The weight of the structure and hence the weight of its constituent members has to be as low as possible for economical reasons without violating any of the load constraints. Design spaces are usually vast and the computational costs for analyzing a single design are usually high. Therefore, not every possible design can be evaluated for real-world problems. In this work, a standard structural design problem, the 25-bar problem, has been solved using self-adaptive stepsize search (SASS), a relatively new search heuristic. This algorithm has only one control parameter and therefore overcomes the drawback of modern search heuristics, i.e. the need to first find a set of optimum control parameter settings for the problem at hand. In this work, SASS outperforms simulated-annealing, genetic algorithms, tabu search and ant colony optimization.

  3. Adaptive antenna design considerations for satellite communication antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhan, J. T.

    1983-02-01

    The present investigation is concerned with some general considerations inherent in designing an adaptive antenna system for use on a geosynchronous satellite illuminating the earth field of view. The problem has been addressed from the viewpoint of the system designer who has to determine the required antenna characteristics and the antenna aperture size. Concerning the choice of the antenna type, it usually has to be decided whether to use a phased array (PA) or a multiple-beam antenna (MBA). Attention is given to nulling resolution and MBA/PA configuration, taking into account the phased array and multiple-beam antennas. The choice of which antenna type to use depends on the nulling bandwidth, the number of weighted channels in the adaptive processor, and the overall coverage area to be served by the antenna system.

  4. Design and development of advanced adaptive polymer lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Freddie

    The dissertation presented here describes advancements made in adaptive polymer lens design and implementation. Singlets and doublets lenses were constructed for visible, short- wavelength infrared (SWIR), and middle-wavelength infrared (MWIR) applications. The lenses are implemented in a variety of tactical imaging systems to demonstrate their performance. A process was developed that defines the allowable fabrication variables, first for APL singlets and then for APL doublets. A first-order finite element model is described that enables going from an optical design to APL fabrication. This model was then extended to the design of fluidic doublets, which are equivalent to their two-element glass counter-parts. Two constant volume fluidic chambers were enclosed by three flexible membranes resulting in a variable focal length doublet. Chromatic focal shift was then used to compare numerical modeling to experimentally measured results. These same tools, methodology, and process were lastly used in the definition and fabrication of the SWIR and MWIR adaptive polymer lens for tactical systems. Imaging and illumination systems are presented, based on these lensesnotably an adaptive zoom imaging system, in the MWIR. This is the first known instance of such a system in this band.

  5. A comparative survey of non-adaptive pooling designs

    SciTech Connect

    Balding, D.J.; Bruno, W.J.; Torney, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    Pooling (or {open_quotes}group testing{close_quotes}) designs for screening clone libraries for rare {open_quotes}positives{close_quotes} are described and compared. We focus on non-adaptive designs in which, in order both to facilitate automation and to minimize the total number of pools required in multiple screenings, all the pools are specified in advance of the experiments. The designs considered include deterministic designs, such as set-packing designs, the widely-used {open_quotes}row and column{close_quotes} designs and the more general {open_quotes}transversal{close_quotes} designs, as well as random designs such as {open_quotes}random incidence{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}random k-set{close_quotes} designs. A range of possible performance measures is considered, including the expected numbers of unresolved positive and negative clones, and the probability of a one-pass solution. We describe a flexible strategy in which the experimenter chooses a compromise between the random k-set and the set-packing designs. In general, the latter have superior performance while the former are nearly as efficient and are easier to construct. 39 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. A Bayesian adaptive design with biomarkers for targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Eickhoff, Jens C; Kim, KyungMann; Beach, Jason; Kolesar, Jill M; Gee, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    Background Targeted therapies are becoming increasingly important for the treatment of various diseases. Biomarkers are a critical component of a targeted therapy as they can be used to identify patients who are more likely to benefit from a treatment. Targeted therapies, however, have created major challenges in the design, conduct, and analysis of clinical trials. In traditional clinical trials, treatment effects for various biomarkers are typically evaluated in an exploratory fashion and only limited information about the predictive values of biomarkers obtained. Purpose New study designs are required, which effectively evaluate both the diagnostic and the therapeutic implication of biomarkers. Methods The Bayesian approach provides a useful framework for optimizing the clinical trial design by directly integrating information about biomarkers and clinical outcomes as they become available. We propose a Bayesian covariate-adjusted response-adaptive randomization design, which utilizes individual biomarker profiles and patient's clinical outcomes as they become available during the course of the trial, to assign the most efficacious treatment to individual patients. Predictive biomarker subgroups are determined adaptively using a partial least squares regression approach. Results A series of simulation studies were conducted to examine the operating characteristics of the proposed study design. The simulation studies show that the proposed design efficiently identifies patients who benefit most from a targeted therapy and that there are substantial savings in the sample size requirements when compared to alternative designs. Limitations The design does not control for the type I error in the traditional sense and a positive result should be confirmed by conducting an independent phase III study focusing on the selected biomarker profile groups. Conclusions We conclude that the proposed design may serve a useful role in the early efficacy phase of targeted therapy

  7. Launch vehicle payload adapter design with vibration isolation features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gareth R.; Fadick, Cynthia M.; Fram, Bryan J.

    2005-05-01

    Payloads, such as satellites or spacecraft, which are mounted on launch vehicles, are subject to severe vibrations during flight. These vibrations are induced by multiple sources that occur between liftoff and the instant of final separation from the launch vehicle. A direct result of the severe vibrations is that fatigue damage and failure can be incurred by sensitive payload components. For this reason a payload adapter has been designed with special emphasis on its vibration isolation characteristics. The design consists of an annular plate that has top and bottom face sheets separated by radial ribs and close-out rings. These components are manufactured from graphite epoxy composites to ensure a high stiffness to weight ratio. The design is tuned to keep the frequency of the axial mode of vibration of the payload on the flexibility of the adapter to a low value. This is the main strategy adopted for isolating the payload from damaging vibrations in the intermediate to higher frequency range (45Hz-200Hz). A design challenge for this type of adapter is to keep the pitch frequency of the payload above a critical value in order to avoid dynamic interactions with the launch vehicle control system. This high frequency requirement conflicts with the low axial mode frequency requirement and this problem is overcome by innovative tuning of the directional stiffnesses of the composite parts. A second design strategy that is utilized to achieve good isolation characteristics is the use of constrained layer damping. This feature is particularly effective at keeping the responses to a minimum for one of the most important dynamic loading mechanisms. This mechanism consists of the almost-tonal vibratory load associated with the resonant burn condition present in any stage powered by a solid rocket motor. The frequency of such a load typically falls in the 45-75Hz range and this phenomenon drives the low frequency design of the adapter. Detailed finite element analysis is

  8. The VIADUC project: innovation in climate adaptation through service design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corre, L.; Dandin, P.; L'Hôte, D.; Besson, F.

    2015-07-01

    From the French National Adaptation to Climate Change Plan, the "Drias, les futurs du climat" service has been developed to provide easy access to French regional climate projections. This is a major step for the implementation of French Climate Services. The usefulness of this service for the end-users and decision makers involved with adaptation planning at a local scale is investigated. As such, the VIADUC project is: to evaluate and enhance Drias, as well as to imagine future development in support of adaptation. Climate scientists work together with end-users and a service designer. The designer's role is to propose an innovative approach based on the interaction between scientists and citizens. The chosen end-users are three Natural Regional Parks located in the South West of France. The latter parks are administrative entities which gather municipalities having a common natural and cultural heritage. They are also rural areas in which specific economic activities take place, and therefore are concerned and involved in both protecting their environment and setting-up sustainable economic development. The first year of the project has been dedicated to investigation including the questioning of relevant representatives. Three key local economic sectors have been selected: i.e. forestry, pastoral farming and building activities. Working groups were composed of technicians, administrative and maintenance staff, policy makers and climate researchers. The sectors' needs for climate information have been assessed. The lessons learned led to actions which are presented hereinafter.

  9. Full Waveform Inversion Using Waveform Sensitivity Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Florian; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    We present a full waveform inversion concept for applications ranging from seismological to enineering contexts, in which the steps of forward simulation, computation of sensitivity kernels, and the actual inversion are kept separate of each other. We derive waveform sensitivity kernels from Born scattering theory, which for unit material perturbations are identical to the Born integrand for the considered path between source and receiver. The evaluation of such a kernel requires the calculation of Green functions and their strains for single forces at the receiver position, as well as displacement fields and strains originating at the seismic source. We compute these quantities in the frequency domain using the 3D spectral element code SPECFEM3D (Tromp, Komatitsch and Liu, 2008) and the 1D semi-analytical code GEMINI (Friederich and Dalkolmo, 1995) in both, Cartesian and spherical framework. We developed and implemented the modularized software package ASKI (Analysis of Sensitivity and Kernel Inversion) to compute waveform sensitivity kernels from wavefields generated by any of the above methods (support for more methods is planned), where some examples will be shown. As the kernels can be computed independently from any data values, this approach allows to do a sensitivity and resolution analysis first without inverting any data. In the context of active seismic experiments, this property may be used to investigate optimal acquisition geometry and expectable resolution before actually collecting any data, assuming the background model is known sufficiently well. The actual inversion step then, can be repeated at relatively low costs with different (sub)sets of data, adding different smoothing conditions. Using the sensitivity kernels, we expect the waveform inversion to have better convergence properties compared with strategies that use gradients of a misfit function. Also the propagation of the forward wavefield and the backward propagation from the receiver

  10. Low frequency AC waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Bilharz, Oscar W.

    1986-01-01

    Low frequency sine, cosine, triangle and square waves are synthesized in circuitry which allows variation in the waveform amplitude and frequency while exhibiting good stability and without requiring significant stabilization time. A triangle waveform is formed by a ramped integration process controlled by a saturation amplifier circuit which produces the necessary hysteresis for the triangle waveform. The output of the saturation circuit is tapped to produce the square waveform. The sine waveform is synthesized by taking the absolute value of the triangular waveform, raising this absolute value to a predetermined power, multiplying the raised absolute value of the triangle wave with the triangle wave itself and properly scaling the resultant waveform and subtracting it from the triangular waveform itself. The cosine is synthesized by squaring the triangular waveform, raising the triangular waveform to a predetermined power and adding the squared waveform raised to the predetermined power with a DC reference and subtracting the squared waveform therefrom, with all waveforms properly scaled. The resultant waveform is then multiplied with a square wave in order to correct the polarity and produce the resultant cosine waveform.

  11. Hybrid Computerized Adaptive Testing: From Group Sequential Design to Fully Sequential Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shiyu; Lin, Haiyan; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage testing (MST) have become two of the most popular modes in large-scale computer-based sequential testing. Though most designs of CAT and MST exhibit strength and weakness in recent large-scale implementations, there is no simple answer to the question of which design is better because different…

  12. Design of an Adaptive Secondary Mirror: A Global Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, Guido; del Vecchio, Ciro

    1998-07-01

    We present the mechanical and actuator design of an adaptive secondary mirror that matches the optical requirements of the active and adaptive corrections. Conceived for the particular implementation for the 6.5-m conversion of the multiple-mirror telescope, with small variations of the input parameters this study is suitable for applications for telescopes of the same class. We found that a three-layer structure, i.e., a thin deformable shell, a thick reference plate, and a third plate that acts as actuator support and heat sink, is able to provide the required mechanical stability and actuator density. We also found that a simple electromagnetic actuator can be used. This actuator, when optimized, will dissipate a typical power of a few tenths of watts.

  13. A neuro-adaptive autopilot design for guided munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manu

    This thesis treats some neural-network-based nonlinear control methodologies. In particular, a neuro-adaptive autopilot guided munitions is developed. The motivation is to reduce both the effort required, and direct cost incurred for autopilot design for these vehicles. Towards this end, a neural network is used to augment an inverting controller. The network compensates for error present in the inverting logic, thereby providing robustness to parametric uncertainty in the mathematical model of the munition. This equates to a reduced need for expensive wind-tunnel testing. Furthermore, the adaptive nature of the autopilot obviates the requirement for gain scheduling. The methodology is demonstrated on the MK-84 variant of the Joint Direct Attack Munition family of precision-guided munitions. The entire design and tuning procedure is first performed using a simulation based entirely on analytical aerodynamic data generated by Missile DATCOM. The autopilot is then tested on a second simulation, which is based on validated wind-tunnel data and tested. This last step may be viewed as a flight test. A method of augmenting existing linear controllers with neural networks is also addressed. The motivation is to introduce the benefits of adaptation without requiring modifications to the existing architecture. A framework that collapses to many classical and modern forms is considered, to which a corrective control signal is added. The corrective signal is generated by a neural network to force the plant to track a high-order response model that describes the ideal closed-loop dynamics. Subsequently, this philosophy is combined with adaptive backstepping to address unmatched uncertainties in a class of systems in strict-feedback form.

  14. Optimal Pid Controller Design Using Adaptive Vurpso Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirkohi, Majid Moradi

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to improve theVelocity Update Relaxation Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (VURPSO). The improved algorithm is called Adaptive VURPSO (AVURPSO) algorithm. Then, an optimal design of a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller is obtained using the AVURPSO algorithm. An adaptive momentum factor is used to regulate a trade-off between the global and the local exploration abilities in the proposed algorithm. This operation helps the system to reach the optimal solution quickly and saves the computation time. Comparisons on the optimal PID controller design confirm the superiority of AVURPSO algorithm to the optimization algorithms mentioned in this paper namely the VURPSO algorithm, the Ant Colony algorithm, and the conventional approach. Comparisons on the speed of convergence confirm that the proposed algorithm has a faster convergence in a less computation time to yield a global optimum value. The proposed AVURPSO can be used in the diverse areas of optimization problems such as industrial planning, resource allocation, scheduling, decision making, pattern recognition and machine learning. The proposed AVURPSO algorithm is efficiently used to design an optimal PID controller.

  15. Nonlinear waveform generation.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, L J; Rypins, E B

    1990-01-01

    We developed three analog logic SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis, developed at the University of California, Berkeley, CA) subcircuits, a voltage comparator and a nonlinear waveform generator to compliment the previously derived functions (Goldstein and Rypins, Comput. Methods Programs Biomed. 29 (1989) 161-172) that simplify modeling of physiologic systems. The logic elements are the 'AND', 'OR' and 'NOT' Boolean functions. In addition, we derived a voltage comparator for use in our composite waveform generator. All the circuits are analog so they can be incorporated into existing analog circuits while performing digital functions. PMID:2364683

  16. LBT adaptive secondary units final design and construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallieni, Daniele; Anaclerio, Enzo; Lazzarini, Paolo G.; Ripamonti, Angelo; Spairani, Roberto; Del Vecchio, Ciro; Salinari, Piero; Riccardi, Armando; Stefanini, Paolo; Biasi, Roberto

    2003-02-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope will perform its first level AO correction at visual wavelengths by the two Gregorian secondary mirrors. Each unit is made by a 911 mm diameter and 1.6 mm thick Zerodur shell which shape is controlled by 672 electromagnetic actuators at 1 kHz rate. The shape of each mirror is referred to a Zerodur 50 mm thick backplate through a set of capacitive sensors co-located with the actuators. Each adaptive secondary unit embeds its real time computer for actuator control and communication. Each unit is aligned into the secondary hub by a 6 d.o.f. hexapod system. The construction of the AO units started this year, while the hexapods have been completed in 2001. We present in this paper the final design of the adaptive secondary systems with particular emphasis on the modifications that we made based on the MMT adaptive secondary experience. We will also report the first results of the subsystems development tests.

  17. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J

    2003-11-26

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) to track the LGS light subaperture by

  18. Fully probabilistic control design in an adaptive critic framework.

    PubMed

    Herzallah, Randa; Kárný, Miroslav

    2011-12-01

    Optimal stochastic controller pushes the closed-loop behavior as close as possible to the desired one. The fully probabilistic design (FPD) uses probabilistic description of the desired closed loop and minimizes Kullback-Leibler divergence of the closed-loop description to the desired one. Practical exploitation of the fully probabilistic design control theory continues to be hindered by the computational complexities involved in numerically solving the associated stochastic dynamic programming problem; in particular, very hard multivariate integration and an approximate interpolation of the involved multivariate functions. This paper proposes a new fully probabilistic control algorithm that uses the adaptive critic methods to circumvent the need for explicitly evaluating the optimal value function, thereby dramatically reducing computational requirements. This is a main contribution of this paper. PMID:21752597

  19. Optical design of the adaptive optics laser guide star system

    SciTech Connect

    Bissinger, H.

    1994-11-15

    The design of an adaptive optics package for the 3 meter Lick telescope is presented. This instrument package includes a 69 actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann type wavefront sensor operating in the visible wavelength; a quadrant detector for the tip-tile sensor and a tip-tilt mirror to stabilize atmospheric first order tip-tile errors. A high speed computer drives the deformable mirror to achieve near diffraction limited imagery. The different optical components and their individual design constraints are described. motorized stages and diagnostics tools are used to operate and maintain alignment throughout observation time from a remote control room. The expected performance are summarized and actual results of astronomical sources are presented.

  20. Design of a motion JPEG (M/JPEG) adapter card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. H.; Sudharsanan, Subramania I.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper we describe a design of a high performance JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) Micro Channel adapter card. The card, tested on a range of PS/2 platforms (models 50 to 95), can complete JPEG operations on a 640 by 240 pixel image within 1/60 of a second, thus enabling real-time capture and display of high quality digital video. The card accepts digital pixels for either a YUV 4:2:2 or an RGB 4:4:4 pixel bus and has been shown to handle up to 2.05 MBytes/second of compressed data. The compressed data is transmitted to a host memory area by Direct Memory Access operations. The card uses a single C-Cube's CL550 JPEG processor that complies with the baseline JPEG. We give broad descriptions of the hardware that controls the video interface, CL550, and the system interface. Some critical design points that enhance the overall performance of the M/JPEG systems are pointed out. The control of the adapter card is achieved by an interrupt driven software that runs under DOS. The software performs a variety of tasks that include change of color space (RGB or YUV), change of quantization and Huffman tables, odd and even field control and some diagnostic operations.

  1. Adaptive strategies in designing the simultaneous global drug development program.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhilong; Chen, Gang; Huang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Many methods have been proposed to account for the potential impact of ethnic/regional factors when extrapolating results from multiregional clinical trials (MRCTs) to targeted ethnic (TE) patients, i.e., "bridging." Most of them either focused on TE patients in the MRCT (i.e., internal bridging) or a separate local clinical trial (LCT) (i.e., external bridging). Huang et al. (2012) integrated both bridging concepts in their method for the Simultaneous Global Drug Development Program (SGDDP) which designs both the MRCT and the LCT prospectively and combines patients in both trials by ethnic origin, i.e., TE vs. non-TE (NTE). The weighted Z test was used to combine information from TE and NTE patients to test with statistical rigor whether a new treatment is effective in the TE population. Practically, the MRCT is often completed before the LCT. Thus to increase the power for the SGDDP and/or obtain more informative data in TE patients, we may use the final results from the MRCT to re-evaluate initial assumptions (e.g., effect sizes, variances, weight), and modify the LCT accordingly. We discuss various adaptive strategies for the LCT such as sample size reassessment, population enrichment, endpoint change, and dose adjustment. As an example, we extend a popular adaptive design method to re-estimate the sample size for the LCT, and illustrate it for a normally distributed endpoint. PMID:26098138

  2. Design of infrasound-detection system via adaptive LMSTDE algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalaf, C. S.; Stoughton, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A proposed solution to an aviation safety problem is based on passive detection of turbulent weather phenomena through their infrasonic emission. This thesis describes a system design that is adequate for detection and bearing evaluation of infrasounds. An array of four sensors, with the appropriate hardware, is used for the detection part. Bearing evaluation is based on estimates of time delays between sensor outputs. The generalized cross correlation (GCC), as the conventional time-delay estimation (TDE) method, is first reviewed. An adaptive TDE approach, using the least mean square (LMS) algorithm, is then discussed. A comparison between the two techniques is made and the advantages of the adaptive approach are listed. The behavior of the GCC, as a Roth processor, is examined for the anticipated signals. It is shown that the Roth processor has the desired effect of sharpening the peak of the correlation function. It is also shown that the LMSTDE technique is an equivalent implementation of the Roth processor in the time domain. A LMSTDE lead-lag model, with a variable stability coefficient and a convergence criterion, is designed.

  3. Low frequency ac waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Bilharz, O.W.

    1983-11-22

    Low frequency sine, cosine, triangle and square waves are synthesized in circuitry which allows variation in the waveform amplitude and frequency while exhibiting good stability and without requiring significant stablization time. A triangle waveform is formed by a ramped integration process controlled by a saturation amplifier circuit which produces the necessary hysteresis for the triangle waveform. The output of the saturation circuit is tapped to produce the square waveform. The sine waveform is synthesized by taking the absolute value of the triangular waveform, raising this absolute value to a predetermined power, multiplying the raised absolute value of the triangle wave with the triangle wave itself and properly scaling the resultant waveform and subtracting it from the triangular waveform to a predetermined power and adding the squared waveform raised to the predetermined power with a DC reference and subtracting the squared waveform therefrom, with all waveforms properly scaled. The resultant waveform is then multiplied with a square wave in order to correct the polarity and produce the resultant cosine waveform.

  4. Simulated breath waveform control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Subsystem was developed which provides twelve waveform controls to breath drive mechanism. Twelve position, magnetically actuated rotary switch is connected to one end of crankshaft drive, such that it makes one complete revolution for each simulated breath. Connections with common wired point are included in modifications made to standard motor speed controller.

  5. The Waveform Suite: A robust platform for accessing and manipulating seismic waveforms in MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, C. G.; West, M. E.; McNutt, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    developments is demonstrated with the Correlation Toolbox for MATLAB. This mature package contains 50+ codes for carrying out various type of waveform correlation analyses (multiplet analysis, clustering, interferometry, …) This package is greatly strengthened by delegating numerous book-keeping and signal processing tasks to the underlying Waveform Suite. The Waveform Suite’s built-in tools for searching arbitrary directory/file structures is demonstrated with matched video and audio from the recent eruption of Redoubt Volcano. These tools were used to find subsets of photo images corresponding to specific seismic traces. Using Waveform’s audio file routines, matched video and audio were assembled to produce outreach-quality eruption products. The Waveform Suite is not designed as a ready-to-go replacement for more comprehensive packages such as SAC or AH. Rather, it is a suite of classes which provide core time series functionality in a MATLAB environment. It is designed to be a more robust alternative to the numerous ad hoc MATLAB formats that exist. Complex programs may be created upon the Waveform Suite’s framework, while existing programs may be modified to take advantage of the Waveform Suites capabilities.

  6. Design of the Dual Conjugate Adaptive Optics Test-bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, Inna; Bell, K.; Crampton, D.; Fitzsimmons, J.; Herriot, Glen; Jolissaint, Laurent; Lee, B.; Richardson, H.; van der Kamp, D.; Veran, Jean-Pierre

    In this paper, we describe the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics laboratory test-bed presently under construction at the University of Victoria, Canada. The test-bench will be used to support research in the performance of multi-conjugate adaptive optics, turbulence simulators, laser guide stars and miniaturizing adaptive optics. The main components of the test-bed include two micro-machined deformable mirrors, a tip-tilt mirror, four wavefront sensors, a source simulator, a dual-layer turbulence simulator, as well as computational and control hardware. The paper will describe in detail the opto-mechanical design of the adaptive optics module, the design of the hot-air turbulence generator and the configuration chosen for the source simulator. Below, we present a summary of these aspects of the bench. The optical and mechanical design of the test-bed has been largely driven by the particular choice of the deformable mirrors. These are continuous micro-machined mirrors manufactured by Boston Micromachines Corporation. They have a clear aperture of 3.3 mm and are deformed with 140 actuators arranged in a square grid. Although the mirrors have an open-loop bandwidth of 6.6 KHz, their shape can be updated at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. In our optical design, the mirrors are conjugated at 0km and 10 km in the atmosphere. A planar optical layout was achieved by using four off-axis paraboloids and several folding mirrors. These optics will be mounted on two solid blocks which can be aligned with respect to each other. The wavefront path design accommodates 3 monochromatic guide stars that can be placed at either 90 km or at infinity. The design relies on the natural separation of the beam into 3 parts because of differences in locations of the guide stars in the field of view. In total four wavefront sensors will be procured from Adaptive Optics Associates (AOA) or built in-house: three for the guide stars and the fourth to collect data from the science source output in

  7. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  8. Robust Engineering Designs for Infrastructure Adaptation to a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, C.; Cook, L.

    2015-12-01

    Infrastructure systems are expected to be functional, durable and safe over long service lives - 50 to over 100 years. Observations and models of climate science show that greenhouse gas emissions resulting from human activities have changed climate, weather and extreme events. Projections of future changes (albeit with uncertainties caused by inadequacies of current climate/weather models) can be made based on scenarios for future emissions, but actual future emissions are themselves uncertain. Most current engineering standards and practices for infrastructure assume that the probabilities of future extreme climate and weather events will match those of the past. Climate science shows that this assumption is invalid, but is unable, at present, to define these probabilities over the service lives of existing and new infrastructure systems. Engineering designs, plans, and institutions and regulations will need to be adaptable for a range of future conditions (conditions of climate, weather and extreme events, as well as changing societal demands for infrastructure services). For their current and future projects, engineers should: Involve all stakeholders (owners, financers, insurance, regulators, affected public, climate/weather scientists, etc.) in key decisions; Use low regret, adaptive strategies, such as robust decision making and the observational method, comply with relevant standards and regulations, and exceed their requirements where appropriate; Publish design studies and performance/failure investigations to extend the body of knowledge for advancement of practice. The engineering community should conduct observational and modeling research with climate/weather/social scientists and the concerned communities and account rationally for climate change in revised engineering standards and codes. This presentation presents initial research on decisionmaking under uncertainty for climate resilient infrastructure design.

  9. Analysis of orthogonal waveform for spaceborne MIMO-GMTI radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Bo; Dong, Zhen; Du, Xiang-yu

    2011-10-01

    The application of MIMO (Multiple input multiple output) techniques to spaceborne multichannel radar offers a number of advantages, including target detection, parameter estimation, and so on. Based on two kinds of waveforms presented in MIMO radar, a concise definition of synthetical ISLR is proposed. Through analysis of synthetical ISLR for two kinds of waveforms, it concludes that compared with orthogonal frequency division waveform, the crosscorrelation of orthogonal code waveform badly weakens the performance of spaceborne MIMO radar in GMTI (Ground moving target indication). Thus, by adopting orthogonal frequency division waveform, the basic principle of space-time-frequency adaptive processing is studied. Simulation results demonstrate the superiority of frequency division orthogonal MIMO radar in improving clutter suppression and GMTI performance.

  10. Microsystem design framework based on tool adaptations and library developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Jean Michel; Courtois, Bernard; Rencz, Marta; Poppe, Andras; Szekely, Vladimir

    1996-09-01

    Besides foundry facilities, Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools are also required to move microsystems from research prototypes to an industrial market. This paper describes a Computer-Aided-Design Framework for microsystems, based on selected existing software packages adapted and extended for microsystem technology, assembled with libraries where models are available in the form of standard cells described at different levels (symbolic, system/behavioral, layout). In microelectronics, CAD has already attained a highly sophisticated and professional level, where complete fabrication sequences are simulated and the device and system operation is completely tested before manufacturing. In comparison, the art of microsystem design and modelling is still in its infancy. However, at least for the numerical simulation of the operation of single microsystem components, such as mechanical resonators, thermo-elements, elastic diaphragms, reliable simulation tools are available. For the different engineering disciplines (like electronics, mechanics, optics, etc) a lot of CAD-tools for the design, simulation and verification of specific devices are available, but there is no CAD-environment within which we could perform a (micro-)system simulation due to the different nature of the devices. In general there are two different approaches to overcome this limitation: the first possibility would be to develop a new framework tailored for microsystem-engineering. The second approach, much more realistic, would be to use the existing CAD-tools which contain the most promising features, and to extend these tools so that they can be used for the simulation and verification of microsystems and of the devices involved. These tools are assembled with libraries in a microsystem design environment allowing a continuous design flow. The approach is driven by the wish to make microsystems accessible to a large community of people, including SMEs and non-specialized academic institutions.

  11. Wireless thermal sensor network with adaptive low power design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Yin; Chen, Shih-Lun; Chen, Chiung-An; Huang, Hong-Yi; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2007-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop flexible, reconfigurable, and intelligent low power wireless sensor network (WSN) system for healthcare applications. Technical advancements in micro-sensors, MEMS devices, low power electronics, and radio frequency circuits have enabled the design and development of such highly integrated system. In this paper, we present our proposed wireless thermal sensor network system, which is separated into control and data paths. Both of these paths have their own transmission frequencies. The control path sends the power and function commands from computer to each sensor elements by 2.4GHz RF circuits and the data path transmits measured data by 2.4GHz in sensor layer and 60GHz in higher layers. This hierarchy architecture would make reconfigurable mapping and pipeline applications on WSN possibly, and the average power consumption can be efficiently reduced about 60% by using the adaptive technique. PMID:18003354

  12. Design, realization and structural testing of a compliant adaptable wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, G.; Quack, M.; Arrieta, A. F.; Morari, M.; Ermanni, P.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the design, optimization, realization and testing of a novel wing morphing concept, based on distributed compliance structures, and actuated by piezoelectric elements. The adaptive wing features ribs with a selectively compliant inner structure, numerically optimized to achieve aerodynamically efficient shape changes while simultaneously withstanding aeroelastic loads. The static and dynamic aeroelastic behavior of the wing, and the effect of activating the actuators, is assessed by means of coupled 3D aerodynamic and structural simulations. To demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed morphing concept and optimization procedure, the wings of a model airplane are designed and manufactured according to the presented approach. The goal is to replace conventional ailerons, thus to achieve controllability in roll purely by morphing. The mechanical properties of the manufactured components are characterized experimentally, and used to create a refined and correlated finite element model. The overall stiffness, strength, and actuation capabilities are experimentally tested and successfully compared with the numerical prediction. To counteract the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the piezoelectric actuators, a closed-loop controller is implemented, and its capability of accurately achieving the desired shape adaptation is evaluated experimentally. Using the correlated finite element model, the aeroelastic behavior of the manufactured wing is simulated, showing that the morphing concept can provide sufficient roll authority to allow controllability of the flight. The additional degrees of freedom offered by morphing can be also used to vary the plane lift coefficient, similarly to conventional flaps. The efficiency improvements offered by this technique are evaluated numerically, and compared to the performance of a rigid wing.

  13. PFC design via FRIT Approach for Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Discrete-time Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, Ikuro; Takagi, Taro; Fukui, Sota; Shah, Sirish L.

    This paper deals with a design problem of an adaptive output feedback control for discrete-time systems with a parallel feedforward compensator (PFC) which is designed for making the augmented controlled system ASPR. A PFC design scheme by a FRIT approach with only using an input/output experimental data set will be proposed for discrete-time systems in order to design an adaptive output feedback control system. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the proposed PFC design method will be confirmed through numerical simulations by designing adaptive control system with adaptive NN (Neural Network) for an uncertain discrete-time system.

  14. Multiplexed chirp waveform synthesizer

    DOEpatents

    Dudley, Peter A.; Tise, Bert L.

    2003-09-02

    A synthesizer for generating a desired chirp signal has M parallel channels, where M is an integer greater than 1, each channel including a chirp waveform synthesizer generating at an output a portion of a digital representation of the desired chirp signal; and a multiplexer for multiplexing the M outputs to create a digital representation of the desired chirp signal. Preferably, each channel receives input information that is a function of information representing the desired chirp signal.

  15. Classification of infantile nystagmus waveforms.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Maria; Clement, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Classification of infantile nystagmus waveforms is an important problem because the characteristic waveforms can be used to distinguish between infantile and acquired nystagmus. A clear description of the nystagmus is also a necessary first stage in understanding its origin. Currently infantile nystagmus waveforms are classified into at least 12 different types. In this study we analyse a database of nystagmus recordings in order to investigate if this classification can be simplified. Application of principal components analysis revealed that 96.9% of the variance of the waveforms is described by a linear sum of two component waveforms. The components consist of sawtooth and pseudocycloid waveforms that account for 78.7% and 18.2% of the variance respectively for the most common single cycle waveforms. This simplified description of infantile nystagmus highlights the importance of identifying the origin of the jerk component and its synchronisation with the pseudocycloid component for the characterisation and treatment of the nystagmus. PMID:27125578

  16. A multi-channel waveform digitizer system

    SciTech Connect

    Bieser, F.; Muller, W.F.J. )

    1990-04-01

    The authors report on the design and performance of a multichannel waveform digitizer system for use with the Multiple Sample Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) Detector at the Bevalac. 128 channels of 20 MHz Flash ADC plus 256 word deep memory are housed in a single crate. Digital thresholds and hit pattern logic facilitate zero suppression during readout which is performed over a standard VME bus.

  17. Seismic waveform modeling over cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Cong; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    With the fast growing computational technologies, numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation achieved huge successes. Obtaining the synthetic waveforms through numerical simulation receives an increasing amount of attention from seismologists. However, computational seismology is a data-intensive research field, and the numerical packages usually come with a steep learning curve. Users are expected to master considerable amount of computer knowledge and data processing skills. Training users to use the numerical packages, correctly access and utilize the computational resources is a troubled task. In addition to that, accessing to HPC is also a common difficulty for many users. To solve these problems, a cloud based solution dedicated on shallow seismic waveform modeling has been developed with the state-of-the-art web technologies. It is a web platform integrating both software and hardware with multilayer architecture: a well designed SQL database serves as the data layer, HPC and dedicated pipeline for it is the business layer. Through this platform, users will no longer need to compile and manipulate various packages on the local machine within local network to perform a simulation. By providing users professional access to the computational code through its interfaces and delivering our computational resources to the users over cloud, users can customize the simulation at expert-level, submit and run the job through it.

  18. AMR++: Object-oriented design for adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.

    1998-12-01

    The development of object-oriented libraries for scientific computing is complicated by the wide range of applications that are targeted and the complexity and wide range of numerical methods that are used. A problem is to design a library that can be customized to handle a wide range of target applications and increasingly complex numerical methods while maintaining a sufficiently useful library for simple problems. These problems have been classically at odds with one another and have compromised the design of many object-oriented library solutions. In this paper the authors detail the mechanisms used within AMR**, and object-oriented library for Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), to provide the level of extensibility that is required to make AMR++ easily customizable for the more obscure applications while remaining small and simple for less complex applications. The goal has been to have a complex applications. The goal has been to have a complexity that matches the complexity of the target application. These mechanisms are general and extend to other libraries as well.

  19. Solution-verified reliability analysis and design of bistable MEMS using error estimation and adaptivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Michael Scott; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Neckels, David; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Notz, Patrick K.; Adams, Brian M.; Carnes, Brian; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Bichon, Barron J.; Copps, Kevin D.

    2006-10-01

    This report documents the results for an FY06 ASC Algorithms Level 2 milestone combining error estimation and adaptivity, uncertainty quantification, and probabilistic design capabilities applied to the analysis and design of bistable MEMS. Through the use of error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement, solution verification can be performed in an automated and parameter-adaptive manner. The resulting uncertainty analysis and probabilistic design studies are shown to be more accurate, efficient, reliable, and convenient.

  20. Accelerated search for materials with targeted properties by adaptive design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Dezhen; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Hogden, John; Theiler, James; Xue, Deqing; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-01

    Finding new materials with targeted properties has traditionally been guided by intuition, and trial and error. With increasing chemical complexity, the combinatorial possibilities are too large for an Edisonian approach to be practical. Here we show how an adaptive design strategy, tightly coupled with experiments, can accelerate the discovery process by sequentially identifying the next experiments or calculations, to effectively navigate the complex search space. Our strategy uses inference and global optimization to balance the trade-off between exploitation and exploration of the search space. We demonstrate this by finding very low thermal hysteresis (ΔT) NiTi-based shape memory alloys, with Ti50.0Ni46.7Cu0.8Fe2.3Pd0.2 possessing the smallest ΔT (1.84 K). We synthesize and characterize 36 predicted compositions (9 feedback loops) from a potential space of ~800,000 compositions. Of these, 14 had smaller ΔT than any of the 22 in the original data set.

  1. Designing for Change: Interoperability in a scaling and adapting environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth Science cyberinfrastructure landscape is constantly changing. Technologies advance and technical implementations are refined or replaced. Data types, volumes, packaging, and use cases evolve. Scientific requirements emerge and mature. Standards shift while systems scale and adapt. In this complex and dynamic environment, interoperability remains a critical component of successful cyberinfrastructure. Through the resource- and priority-driven iterations on systems, interfaces, and content, questions fundamental to stable and useful Earth Science cyberinfrastructure arise. For instance, how are sociotechnical changes planned, tracked, and communicated? How should operational stability balance against 'new and shiny'? How can ongoing maintenance and mitigation of technical debt be managed in an often short-term resource environment? The Arctic Data Explorer is a metadata brokering application developed to enable discovery of international, interdisciplinary Arctic data across distributed repositories. Completely dependent on interoperable third party systems, the Arctic Data Explorer publicly launched in 2013 with an original 3000+ data records from four Arctic repositories. Since then the search has scaled to 25,000+ data records from thirteen repositories at the time of writing. In the final months of original project funding, priorities shift to lean operations with a strategic eye on the future. Here we present lessons learned from four years of Arctic Data Explorer design, development, communication, and maintenance work along with remaining questions and potential directions.

  2. Accelerated search for materials with targeted properties by adaptive design.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dezhen; Balachandran, Prasanna V; Hogden, John; Theiler, James; Xue, Deqing; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-01

    Finding new materials with targeted properties has traditionally been guided by intuition, and trial and error. With increasing chemical complexity, the combinatorial possibilities are too large for an Edisonian approach to be practical. Here we show how an adaptive design strategy, tightly coupled with experiments, can accelerate the discovery process by sequentially identifying the next experiments or calculations, to effectively navigate the complex search space. Our strategy uses inference and global optimization to balance the trade-off between exploitation and exploration of the search space. We demonstrate this by finding very low thermal hysteresis (ΔT) NiTi-based shape memory alloys, with Ti50.0Ni46.7Cu0.8Fe2.3Pd0.2 possessing the smallest ΔT (1.84 K). We synthesize and characterize 36 predicted compositions (9 feedback loops) from a potential space of ∼800,000 compositions. Of these, 14 had smaller ΔT than any of the 22 in the original data set. PMID:27079901

  3. Optical Design and Optimization of Translational Reflective Adaptive Optics Ophthalmoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Yusufu N. B.

    The retina serves as the primary detector for the biological camera that is the eye. It is composed of numerous classes of neurons and support cells that work together to capture and process an image formed by the eye's optics, which is then transmitted to the brain. Loss of sight due to retinal or neuro-ophthalmic disease can prove devastating to one's quality of life, and the ability to examine the retina in vivo is invaluable in the early detection and monitoring of such diseases. Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopy is a promising diagnostic tool in early stages of development, still facing significant challenges before it can become a clinical tool. The work in this thesis is a collection of projects with the overarching goal of broadening the scope and applicability of this technology. We begin by providing an optical design approach for AO ophthalmoscopes that reduces the aberrations that degrade the performance of the AO correction. Next, we demonstrate how to further improve image resolution through the use of amplitude pupil apodization and non-common path aberration correction. This is followed by the development of a viewfinder which provides a larger field of view for retinal navigation. Finally, we conclude with the development of an innovative non-confocal light detection scheme which improves the non-invasive visualization of retinal vasculature and reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segments in healthy and diseased eyes.

  4. Evidence for adaptive design in human gaze preference.

    PubMed

    Conway, C A; Jones, B C; DeBruine, L M; Little, A C

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the physical cues that influence face preferences. By contrast, relatively few studies have investigated the effects of facial cues to the direction and valence of others' social interest (i.e. gaze direction and facial expressions) on face preferences. Here we found that participants demonstrated stronger preferences for direct gaze when judging the attractiveness of happy faces than that of disgusted faces, and that this effect of expression on the strength of attraction to direct gaze was particularly pronounced for judgements of opposite-sex faces (study 1). By contrast, no such opposite-sex bias in preferences for direct gaze was observed when participants judged the same faces for likeability (study 2). Collectively, these findings for a context-sensitive opposite-sex bias in preferences for perceiver-directed smiles, but not perceiver-directed disgust, suggest gaze preference functions, at least in part, to facilitate efficient allocation of mating effort, and evince adaptive design in the perceptual mechanisms that underpin face preferences. PMID:17986435

  5. Accelerated search for materials with targeted properties by adaptive design

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dezhen; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Hogden, John; Theiler, James; Xue, Deqing; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-01

    Finding new materials with targeted properties has traditionally been guided by intuition, and trial and error. With increasing chemical complexity, the combinatorial possibilities are too large for an Edisonian approach to be practical. Here we show how an adaptive design strategy, tightly coupled with experiments, can accelerate the discovery process by sequentially identifying the next experiments or calculations, to effectively navigate the complex search space. Our strategy uses inference and global optimization to balance the trade-off between exploitation and exploration of the search space. We demonstrate this by finding very low thermal hysteresis (ΔT) NiTi-based shape memory alloys, with Ti50.0Ni46.7Cu0.8Fe2.3Pd0.2 possessing the smallest ΔT (1.84 K). We synthesize and characterize 36 predicted compositions (9 feedback loops) from a potential space of ∼800,000 compositions. Of these, 14 had smaller ΔT than any of the 22 in the original data set. PMID:27079901

  6. Current Practice in Designing Training for Complex Skills: Implications for Design and Evaluation of ADAPT[IT].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eseryel, Deniz; Schuver-van Blanken, Marian J.; Spector, J. Michael

    ADAPT[IT] (Advanced Design Approach for Personalized Training-Interactive Tools is a European project coordinated by the Dutch National Aerospace Laboratory. The aim of ADAPT[IT] is to create and validate an effective training design methodology, based on cognitive science and leading to the integration of advanced technologies, so that the…

  7. High precision triangular waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, Theodore R.

    1983-01-01

    An ultra-linear ramp generator having separately programmable ascending and descending ramp rates and voltages is provided. Two constant current sources provide the ramp through an integrator. Switching of the current at current source inputs rather than at the integrator input eliminates switching transients and contributes to the waveform precision. The triangular waveforms produced by the waveform generator are characterized by accurate reproduction and low drift over periods of several hours. The ascending and descending slopes are independently selectable.

  8. SXS Catalog of Gravitational Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemberger, Daniel; SXS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Many aspects of gravitational-wave astronomy rely on numerical relativity for accurate models of gravitational waveforms. In recent years, several numerical relativity groups have built catalogs of numerical waveforms from binary black hole systems. I will report on the status of the Simulating Extreme Spacetimes (SXS) waveform catalog, which comprises simulations performed with the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC). I will describe our approach for assessing numerical errors and convergence. Finally, I will discuss future plans to increase parameter space coverage of the catalog and to improve waveform accuracy.

  9. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Miranta; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2016-01-01

    Background Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient’s biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker’s clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible. Methods and Findings We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design. Conclusions Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs. PMID:26910238

  10. Adaptation Patterns as a Conceptual Tool for Designing the Adaptive Operation of CSCL Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakostas, Anastasios; Demetriadis, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    While adaptive collaboration support has become the focus of increasingly intense research efforts in the CSCL domain, scarce, however, remain the research-based evidence on pedagogically useful ideas on what and how to adapt during the collaborative learning activity. Based principally on two studies, this work presents a compilation of…

  11. Design and Operation of 6-bit, 0.25-mVpp Quasi-sine Voltage Waveform Generator based on SFQ Pulse-frequency Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Hiroshi; Maezawa, Masaaki; Mizugaki, Yoshinao

    A digital-to-analogue converter (DAC) consisting of single-flux-quantum (SFQ) circuitry is known to generate accurate analogue voltages defined by the Josephson relationship. We have been developing SFQ-DACs of the pulse-frequency modulation (PFM) type. Toward voltage standard applications of SFQ-DACs, we have set the target values for the voltage amplitude and resolution at 20 mVpp and 10 bits, respectively. So far, we have reported a 5-bit, 10-μVpp quasi-sine voltage waveform generator comprising a PFM-type SFQ-DAC integrated with an on-chip digital code generator. Its small peak-to-peak voltage amplitude was due to the lack of an on-chip voltage multiplier (VM). In this paper, we present a 6-bit, 0.25-mVpp quasi-sine voltage waveform generator integrated with a 10-fold VM. The resolution is improved by introducing efficient logic sequences into the SFQ-DAC.

  12. An adaptive optics imaging system designed for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Qiang; Saito, Kenichi; Nozato, Koji; Williams, David R; Rossi, Ethan A

    2015-06-01

    Here we demonstrate a new imaging system that addresses several major problems limiting the clinical utility of conventional adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), including its small field of view (FOV), reliance on patient fixation for targeting imaging, and substantial post-processing time. We previously showed an efficient image based eye tracking method for real-time optical stabilization and image registration in AOSLO. However, in patients with poor fixation, eye motion causes the FOV to drift substantially, causing this approach to fail. We solve that problem here by tracking eye motion at multiple spatial scales simultaneously by optically and electronically integrating a wide FOV SLO (WFSLO) with an AOSLO. This multi-scale approach, implemented with fast tip/tilt mirrors, has a large stabilization range of ± 5.6°. Our method consists of three stages implemented in parallel: 1) coarse optical stabilization driven by a WFSLO image, 2) fine optical stabilization driven by an AOSLO image, and 3) sub-pixel digital registration of the AOSLO image. We evaluated system performance in normal eyes and diseased eyes with poor fixation. Residual image motion with incremental compensation after each stage was: 1) ~2-3 arc minutes, (arcmin) 2) ~0.5-0.8 arcmin and, 3) ~0.05-0.07 arcmin, for normal eyes. Performance in eyes with poor fixation was: 1) ~3-5 arcmin, 2) ~0.7-1.1 arcmin and 3) ~0.07-0.14 arcmin. We demonstrate that this system is capable of reducing image motion by a factor of ~400, on average. This new optical design provides additional benefits for clinical imaging, including a steering subsystem for AOSLO that can be guided by the WFSLO to target specific regions of interest such as retinal pathology and real-time averaging of registered images to eliminate image post-processing. PMID:26114033

  13. An adaptive optics imaging system designed for clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Qiang; Saito, Kenichi; Nozato, Koji; Williams, David R.; Rossi, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a new imaging system that addresses several major problems limiting the clinical utility of conventional adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), including its small field of view (FOV), reliance on patient fixation for targeting imaging, and substantial post-processing time. We previously showed an efficient image based eye tracking method for real-time optical stabilization and image registration in AOSLO. However, in patients with poor fixation, eye motion causes the FOV to drift substantially, causing this approach to fail. We solve that problem here by tracking eye motion at multiple spatial scales simultaneously by optically and electronically integrating a wide FOV SLO (WFSLO) with an AOSLO. This multi-scale approach, implemented with fast tip/tilt mirrors, has a large stabilization range of ± 5.6°. Our method consists of three stages implemented in parallel: 1) coarse optical stabilization driven by a WFSLO image, 2) fine optical stabilization driven by an AOSLO image, and 3) sub-pixel digital registration of the AOSLO image. We evaluated system performance in normal eyes and diseased eyes with poor fixation. Residual image motion with incremental compensation after each stage was: 1) ~2–3 arc minutes, (arcmin) 2) ~0.5–0.8 arcmin and, 3) ~0.05–0.07 arcmin, for normal eyes. Performance in eyes with poor fixation was: 1) ~3–5 arcmin, 2) ~0.7–1.1 arcmin and 3) ~0.07–0.14 arcmin. We demonstrate that this system is capable of reducing image motion by a factor of ~400, on average. This new optical design provides additional benefits for clinical imaging, including a steering subsystem for AOSLO that can be guided by the WFSLO to target specific regions of interest such as retinal pathology and real-time averaging of registered images to eliminate image post-processing. PMID:26114033

  14. Assessing Accuracy of Waveform Models against Numerical Relativity Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pürrer, Michael; LVC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We compare currently available phenomenological and effective-one-body inspiral-merger-ringdown models for gravitational waves (GW) emitted from coalescing black hole binaries against a set of numerical relativity waveforms from the SXS collaboration. Simplifications are used in the construction of some waveform models, such as restriction to spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, no inclusion of higher harmonics in the GW radiation, no modeling of eccentricity and the use of effective parameters to describe spin precession. In contrast, NR waveforms provide us with a high fidelity representation of the ``true'' waveform modulo small numerical errors. To focus on systematics we inject NR waveforms into zero noise for early advanced LIGO detector sensitivity at a moderately optimistic signal-to-noise ratio. We discuss where in the parameter space the above modeling assumptions lead to noticeable biases in recovered parameters.

  15. Time domain and frequency domain design techniques for model reference adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1971-01-01

    Some problems associated with the design of model-reference adaptive control systems are considered and solutions to these problems are advanced. The stability of the adapted system is a primary consideration in the development of both the time-domain and the frequency-domain design techniques. Consequentially, the use of Liapunov's direct method forms an integral part of the derivation of the design procedures. The application of sensitivity coefficients to the design of model-reference adaptive control systems is considered. An application of the design techniques is also presented.

  16. Waveform Sampler CAMAC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, D.R.; Haller, G.M.; Kang, H.; Wang, J.

    1985-09-01

    A Waveform Sampler Module (WSM) for the measurement of signal shapes coming from the multi-hit drift chambers of the SLAC SLC detector is described. The module uses a high speed, high resolution analog storage device (AMU) developed in collaboration between SLAC and Stanford University. The AMU devices together with high speed TTL clocking circuitry are packaged in a hybrid which is also suitable for mounting on the detector. The module is in CAMAC format and provides eight signal channels, each recording signal amplitude versus time in 512 cells at a sampling rate of up to 360 MHz. Data are digitized by a 12-bit ADC with a 1 ..mu..s conversion time and stored in an on-board memory accessible through CAMAC.

  17. A Comparison of Testlet-Based Test Designs for Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnipke, Deborah L.; Reese, Lynda M.

    Two-stage and multistage test designs provide a way of roughly adapting item difficulty to test-taker ability. All test takers take a parallel stage-one test, and, based on their scores, they are routed to tests of different difficulty levels in subsequent stages. These designs provide some of the benefits of standard computerized adaptive testing…

  18. Design and analysis of the launch vehicle adapter fitting for the petite amateur navy satellite (PANSAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Brian B.

    1994-09-01

    The Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT) is a small communications satellite being developed at the Naval Postgraduate School. This thesis provides a structural design and analysis for the adapter fitting which mates PANSAT to the space shuttle Get Away Special (GAS) cannister launching system. Launch vehicle loading and interface requirements were combined with PANS AT design priorities to determine design specifications. Structural Dynamics Research Corporation's 1-DEAS Masters Series software was utilized to model two adapter designs. The finite element solver in 1-DEAS was used to analyze the two designs for strength and natural frequency. Design and analysis of fasteners, used to attach the adapter fitting to PANSAT, were also conducted. The results showed that a titanium alloy adapter, which does not shadow the solar arrays, and stainless steel fasteners exceeded all design specifications.

  19. Issues and Challenges in the Design of Culturally Adapted Evidence-Based Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Felipe González; Barrera, Manuel; Holleran Steiker, Lori K.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines issues and challenges in the design of cultural adaptations that are developed from an original evidence-based intervention (EBI). Recently emerging multistep frameworks or stage models are examined, as these can systematically guide the development of culturally adapted EBIs. Critical issues are also presented regarding whether and how such adaptations may be conducted, and empirical evidence is presented regarding the effectiveness of such cultural adaptations. Recent evidence suggests that these cultural adaptations are effective when applied with certain subcultural groups, although they are less effective when applied with other subcultural groups. Generally, current evidence regarding the effectiveness of cultural adaptations is promising but mixed. Further research is needed to obtain more definitive conclusions regarding the efficacy and effectiveness of culturally adapted EBIs. Directions for future research and recommendations are presented to guide the development of a new generation of culturally adapted EBIs. PMID:20192800

  20. Adapting Dam and Reservoir Design and Operations to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, René; Braun, Marco; Chaumont, Diane

    2013-04-01

    In order to identify the potential initiatives that the dam, reservoir and water resources systems owners and operators may undertake to cope with climate change issues, it is essential to determine the current state of knowledge of their impacts on hydrological variables at regional and local scales. Future climate scenarios derived from climate model simulations can be combined with operational hydrological modeling tools and historical observations to evaluate realistic pathways of future hydrological conditions for specific drainage basins. In the case of hydropower production those changes in hydrological conditions may have significant economic impacts. For over a decade the state owned hydropower producer Hydro Québec has been exploring the physical impacts on their watersheds by relying on climate services in collaboration with Ouranos, a consortium on regional climatology and adaptation to climate change. Previous climate change impact analysis had been including different sources of climate simulation data, explored different post-processing approaches and used hydrological impact models. At a new stage of this collaboration the operational management of Hydro Quebec aspired to carry out a cost-benefit analysis of considering climate change in the refactoring of hydro-power installations. In the process of the project not only a set of scenarios of future runoff regimes had to be defined to support long term planning decisions of a dam and reservoir operator, but also the significance of uncertainties needed to be communicated and made understood. We provide insight into a case study that took some unexpected turns and leaps by bringing together climate scientists, hydrologists and hydro-power operation managers. The study includes the selection of appropriate climate scenarios, the correction of biases, the application of hydrological models and the assessment of uncertainties. However, it turned out that communicating the science properly and

  1. Design of adaptive objective lens for ultrabroad near infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Gongpu; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-03-01

    We present a compound adaptive objective lens in which a water-filled membrane lens is inserted into a front group (one lens) and a back group (two lenses). This adaptive objective lens works in the ultrabroad near infrared waveband (760nm ~ 920nm) with the volume scan of > 1mm3 and the resolution of 2.8 μm (calculated at the wavelength of 840 nm). The focal range is 19.5mm ~ 20.5mm and the numerical number is 0.196. The size of the adaptive lens is 10mm (diameter) × 17mm (length). This kind of lens can be widely used in three-dimensional (3D) volume biomedical imaging instruments, such as confocal microscope, optical coherence tomography (OCT), two photon microscope, etc.

  2. An Automatic Online Calibration Design in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makransky, Guido; Glas, Cees A. W.

    2010-01-01

    An accurately calibrated item bank is essential for a valid computerized adaptive test. However, in some settings, such as occupational testing, there is limited access to test takers for calibration. As a result of the limited access to possible test takers, collecting data to accurately calibrate an item bank in an occupational setting is…

  3. Design of Adaptive Hypermedia Learning Systems: A Cognitive Style Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mampadi, Freddy; Chen, Sherry Y.; Ghinea, Gheorghita; Chen, Ming-Puu

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, a number of adaptive hypermedia learning systems have been developed. However, most of these systems tailor presentation content and navigational support solely according to students' prior knowledge. On the other hand, previous research suggested that cognitive styles significantly affect student learning because they refer to…

  4. Simulated lidar waveforms for understanding factors affecting waveform shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Angela M.; Olsen, Richard C.

    2011-06-01

    Full-waveform LIDAR is a technology which enables the analysis of the 3-D structure and arrangement of objects. An in-depth understanding of the factors that affect the shape of the full-waveform signal is required in order to extract as much information as possible from the signal. A simple model of LIDAR propagation has been created which simulates the interaction of LIDAR energy with objects in a scene. A 2-dimensional model tree allows controlled manipulation of the geometric arrangement of branches and leaves with varying spectral properties. Results suggest complex interactions of the LIDAR energy with the tree canopy, including the occurrence of multiple bounces for energy reaching the ground under the canopy. Idealized sensor instrument response functions incorporated in the simulation illustrate a large impact on waveform shape. A waveform recording laser rangefinder has been built which will allow validation or model results; preliminary collection results are presented here.

  5. Time domain reflectometry waveform analysis with second order bounded mean oscillation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tangent-line methods and adaptive waveform interpretation with Gaussian filtering (AWIGF) have been proposed for determining reflection positions of time domain reflectometry (TDR) waveforms. However, the accuracy of those methods is limited for short probe TDR sensors. Second order bounded mean osc...

  6. Signal Waveform Detection with Statistical Automaton for Internet and Web Service Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiming; Huang, Nai-Lun; Zeng, Fufu; Lin, Fang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, many approaches have been suggested for Internet and web streaming detection. In this paper, we propose an approach to signal waveform detection for Internet and web streaming, with novel statistical automatons. The system records network connections over a period of time to form a signal waveform and compute suspicious characteristics of the waveform. Network streaming according to these selected waveform features by our newly designed Aho-Corasick (AC) automatons can be classified. We developed two versions, that is, basic AC and advanced AC-histogram waveform automata, and conducted comprehensive experimentation. The results confirm that our approach is feasible and suitable for deployment. PMID:25032231

  7. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  8. Optimal current waveforms for brushless permanent magnet motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehle, Nicholas; Boyd, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we give energy-optimal current waveforms for a permanent magnet synchronous motor that result in a desired average torque. Our formulation generalises previous work by including a general back-electromotive force (EMF) wave shape, voltage and current limits, an arbitrary phase winding connection, a simple eddy current loss model, and a trade-off between power loss and torque ripple. Determining the optimal current waveforms requires solving a small convex optimisation problem. We show how to use the alternating direction method of multipliers to find the optimal current in milliseconds or hundreds of microseconds, depending on the processor used, which allows the possibility of generating optimal waveforms in real time. This allows us to adapt in real time to changes in the operating requirements or in the model, such as a change in resistance with winding temperature, or even gross changes like the failure of one winding. Suboptimal waveforms are available in tens or hundreds of microseconds, allowing for quick response after abrupt changes in the desired torque. We demonstrate our approach on a simple numerical example, in which we give the optimal waveforms for a motor with a sinusoidal back-EMF, and for a motor with a more complicated, nonsinusoidal waveform, in both the constant-torque region and constant-power region.

  9. A mathematical basis for the design and design optimization of adaptive trusses in precision control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, S. K.; Utku, S.; Chen, G.-S.; Wada, B. K.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical basis for the optimal design of adaptive trusses to be used in supporting precision equipment is provided. The general theory of adaptive structures is introduced, and the global optimization problem of placing a limited number, q, of actuators, so as to maximally achieve precision control and provide prestress, is stated. Two serialized optimization problems, namely, optimal actuator placement for prestress and optimal actuator placement for precision control, are addressed. In the case of prestressing, the computation of a 'desired' prestress is discussed, the interaction between actuators and redundants in conveying the prestress is shown in its mathematical form, and a methodology for arriving at the optimal placement of actuators and additional redundants is discussed. With regard to precision control, an optimal placement scheme (for q actuators) for maximum 'authority' over the precision points is suggested. The results of the two serialized optimization problems are combined to give a suboptimal solution to the global optimization problem. A method for improving this suboptimal actuator placement scheme by iteration is presented.

  10. Design and comparison of 8x8 optical switches with adaptive wavelength routing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Shyh-Lin; Lu, Yu M.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, some wavelength routers with various 8 X 8 optical wavelength-switching networks are designed. All of the wavelength routers have three stages architecture. We also analyze the wavelength crosstalk, SNR and BER for various 8 X 8 optical switching networks for adaptive wavelength routing choice. The analysis shows the performance adaptive of routing networks. The 8 X 8 dilated Benes optical switches that adaptive router closed will the best performance among the wavelength routers.

  11. Decentralized adaptive control of robot manipulators with robust stabilization design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Bau-San; Book, Wayne J.

    1988-01-01

    Due to geometric nonlinearities and complex dynamics, a decentralized technique for adaptive control for multilink robot arms is attractive. Lyapunov-function theory for stability analysis provides an approach to robust stabilization. Each joint of the arm is treated as a component subsystem. The adaptive controller is made locally stable with servo signals including proportional and integral gains. This results in the bound on the dynamical interactions with other subsystems. A nonlinear controller which stabilizes the system with uniform boundedness is used to improve the robustness properties of the overall system. As a result, the robot tracks the reference trajectories with convergence. This strategy makes computation simple and therefore facilitates real-time implementation.

  12. Context-Adaptive Learning Designs by Using Semantic Web Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietze, Stefan; Gugliotta, Alessio; Domingue, John

    2007-01-01

    IMS Learning Design (IMS-LD) is a promising technology aimed at supporting learning processes. IMS-LD packages contain the learning process metadata as well as the learning resources. However, the allocation of resources--whether data or services--within the learning design is done manually at design-time on the basis of the subjective appraisals…

  13. Designing Automated Adaptive Support to Improve Student Helping Behaviors in a Peer Tutoring Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Erin; Rummel, Nikol; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive collaborative learning support systems analyze student collaboration as it occurs and provide targeted assistance to the collaborators. Too little is known about how to design adaptive support to have a positive effect on interaction and learning. We investigated this problem in a reciprocal peer tutoring scenario, where two students take…

  14. Towards Individualized Online Learning: The Design and Development of an Adaptive Web Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inan, Fethi A.; Flores, Raymond; Ari, Fatih; Arslan-Ari, Ismahan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the design and development of an adaptive system which individualizes instruction such as content, interfaces, instructional strategies, and resources dependent on two factors, namely student motivation and prior knowledge levels. Combining adaptive hypermedia methods with strategies proposed by…

  15. A Web-Based Adaptive Tutor to Teach PCR Primer Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Seters, Janneke R.; Wellink, Joan; Tramper, Johannes; Goedhart, Martin J.; Ossevoort, Miriam A.

    2012-01-01

    When students have varying prior knowledge, personalized instruction is desirable. One way to personalize instruction is by using adaptive e-learning to offer training of varying complexity. In this study, we developed a web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design: the PCR Tutor. We used part of the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (the…

  16. Comparing numerical and analytic approximate gravitational waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Nousha; Lovelace, Geoffrey; SXS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A direct observation of gravitational waves will test Einstein's theory of general relativity under the most extreme conditions. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO, began searching for gravitational waves in September 2015 with three times the sensitivity of initial LIGO. To help Advanced LIGO detect as many gravitational waves as possible, a major research effort is underway to accurately predict the expected waves. In this poster, I will explore how the gravitational waveform produced by a long binary-black-hole inspiral, merger, and ringdown is affected by how fast the larger black hole spins. In particular, I will present results from simulations of merging black holes, completed using the Spectral Einstein Code (black-holes.org/SpEC.html), including some new, long simulations designed to mimic black hole-neutron star mergers. I will present comparisons of the numerical waveforms with analytic approximations.

  17. ADAPT: A knowledge-based synthesis tool for digital signal processing system design

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    A computer aided synthesis tool for expansion, compression, and filtration of digital images is described. ADAPT, the Autonomous Digital Array Programming Tool, uses an extensive design knowledge base to synthesize a digital signal processing (DSP) system. Input to ADAPT can be either a behavioral description in English, or a block level specification via Petri Nets. The output from ADAPT comprises code to implement the DSP system on an array of processors. ADAPT is constructed using C, Prolog, and X Windows on a SUN 3/280 workstation. ADAPT knowledge encompasses DSP component information and the design algorithms and heuristics of a competent DSP designer. The knowledge is used to form queries for design capture, to generate design constraints from the user's responses, and to examine the design constraints. These constraints direct the search for possible DSP components and target architectures. Constraints are also used for partitioning the target systems into less complex subsystems. The subsystems correspond to architectural building blocks of the DSP design. These subsystems inherit design constraints and DSP characteristics from their parent blocks. Thus, a DSP subsystem or parent block, as designed by ADAPT, must meet the user's design constraints. Design solutions are sought by searching the Components section of the design knowledge base. Component behavior which matches or is similar to that required by the DSP subsystems is sought. Each match, which corresponds to a design alternative, is evaluated in terms of its behavior. When a design is sufficiently close to the behavior required by the user, detailed mathematical simulations may be performed to accurately determine exact behavior.

  18. Aircraft conceptual design - an adaptable parametric sizing methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Gary John, Jr.

    Aerospace is a maturing industry with successful and refined baselines which work well for traditional baseline missions, markets and technologies. However, when new markets (space tourism) or new constrains (environmental) or new technologies (composite, natural laminar flow) emerge, the conventional solution is not necessarily best for the new situation. Which begs the question "how does a design team quickly screen and compare novel solutions to conventional solutions for new aerospace challenges?" The answer is rapid and flexible conceptual design Parametric Sizing. In the product design life-cycle, parametric sizing is the first step in screening the total vehicle in terms of mission, configuration and technology to quickly assess first order design and mission sensitivities. During this phase, various missions and technologies are assessed. During this phase, the designer is identifying design solutions of concepts and configurations to meet combinations of mission and technology. This research undertaking contributes the state-of-the-art in aircraft parametric sizing through (1) development of a dedicated conceptual design process and disciplinary methods library, (2) development of a novel and robust parametric sizing process based on 'best-practice' approaches found in the process and disciplinary methods library, and (3) application of the parametric sizing process to a variety of design missions (transonic, supersonic and hypersonic transports), different configurations (tail-aft, blended wing body, strut-braced wing, hypersonic blended bodies, etc.), and different technologies (composite, natural laminar flow, thrust vectored control, etc.), in order to demonstrate the robustness of the methodology and unearth first-order design sensitivities to current and future aerospace design problems. This research undertaking demonstrates the importance of this early design step in selecting the correct combination of mission, technologies and configuration to

  19. Adapting the Mathematical Task Framework to Design Online Didactic Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Janet; Bezuk, Nadine; Aguilar, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Designing didactic objects involves imagining how students can conceive of specific mathematical topics and then imagining what types of classroom discussions could support these mental constructions. This study investigated whether it was possible to design Java applets that might serve as didactic objects to support online learning where…

  20. CHANGE WITHOUT BUYING: AN APPLICATION OF ADAPTABLE DESIGN IN APPAREL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Female college students typically wear casual clothing on campus. To meet this need and make our design to be used more often and longer by female college students, we decided to focus on casual wear design. Cotton fibers, with relatively poor resiliency, are commonly used in ...

  1. Adaptive optoelectronic camouflage systems with designs inspired by cephalopod skins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cunjiang; Li, Yuhang; Zhang, Xun; Huang, Xian; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Wang, Shuodao; Shi, Yan; Gao, Li; Su, Yewang; Zhang, Yihui; Xu, Hangxun; Hanlon, Roger T; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-09-01

    Octopus, squid, cuttlefish, and other cephalopods exhibit exceptional capabilities for visually adapting to or differentiating from the coloration and texture of their surroundings, for the purpose of concealment, communication, predation, and reproduction. Long-standing interest in and emerging understanding of the underlying ultrastructure, physiological control, and photonic interactions has recently led to efforts in the construction of artificial systems that have key attributes found in the skins of these organisms. Despite several promising options in active materials for mimicking biological color tuning, existing routes to integrated systems do not include critical capabilities in distributed sensing and actuation. Research described here represents progress in this direction, demonstrated through the construction, experimental study, and computational modeling of materials, device elements, and integration schemes for cephalopod-inspired flexible sheets that can autonomously sense and adapt to the coloration of their surroundings. These systems combine high-performance, multiplexed arrays of actuators and photodetectors in laminated, multilayer configurations on flexible substrates, with overlaid arrangements of pixelated, color-changing elements. The concepts provide realistic routes to thin sheets that can be conformally wrapped onto solid objects to modulate their visual appearance, with potential relevance to consumer, industrial, and military applications. PMID:25136094

  2. Adaptive optoelectronic camouflage systems with designs inspired by cephalopod skins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cunjiang; Li, Yuhang; Zhang, Xun; Huang, Xian; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Wang, Shuodao; Shi, Yan; Gao, Li; Su, Yewang; Zhang, Yihui; Xu, Hangxun; Hanlon, Roger T.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Octopus, squid, cuttlefish, and other cephalopods exhibit exceptional capabilities for visually adapting to or differentiating from the coloration and texture of their surroundings, for the purpose of concealment, communication, predation, and reproduction. Long-standing interest in and emerging understanding of the underlying ultrastructure, physiological control, and photonic interactions has recently led to efforts in the construction of artificial systems that have key attributes found in the skins of these organisms. Despite several promising options in active materials for mimicking biological color tuning, existing routes to integrated systems do not include critical capabilities in distributed sensing and actuation. Research described here represents progress in this direction, demonstrated through the construction, experimental study, and computational modeling of materials, device elements, and integration schemes for cephalopod-inspired flexible sheets that can autonomously sense and adapt to the coloration of their surroundings. These systems combine high-performance, multiplexed arrays of actuators and photodetectors in laminated, multilayer configurations on flexible substrates, with overlaid arrangements of pixelated, color-changing elements. The concepts provide realistic routes to thin sheets that can be conformally wrapped onto solid objects to modulate their visual appearance, with potential relevance to consumer, industrial, and military applications. PMID:25136094

  3. Adapting the mathematical task framework to design online didactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Janet; Bezuk, Nadine; Aguilar, Karen

    2011-06-01

    Designing didactic objects involves imagining how students can conceive of specific mathematical topics and then imagining what types of classroom discussions could support these mental constructions. This study investigated whether it was possible to design Java applets that might serve as didactic objects to support online learning where 'discussions' are broadly defined as the conversations students have with themselves as they interact with the dynamic mathematical representations on the screen. Eighty-four pre-service elementary teachers enrolled in hybrid mathematics courses were asked to interact with a series of applets designed to support their understanding of qualitative graphing. The results of the surveys indicate that various design features of the applets did in fact cause perturbations and opportunities for resolutions that enabled the users to 'discuss' their learning by reflecting on their in-class discussions and online activities. The discussion includes four design features for guiding future applet creation.

  4. 75 FR 8968 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Adaptive Design Clinical Trials for Drugs and Biologics; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Adaptive Design Clinical... entitled ``Adaptive Design Clinical Trials for Drugs and Biologics.'' The draft guidance provides sponsors... Evaluation and Research (CBER) with information regarding adaptive design clinical trials when used in...

  5. Design of smart composite platforms for adaptive trust vector control and adaptive laser telescope for satellite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents design of smart composite platforms for adaptive trust vector control (TVC) and adaptive laser telescope for satellite applications. To eliminate disturbances, the proposed adaptive TVC and telescope systems will be mounted on two analogous smart composite platform with simultaneous precision positioning (pointing) and vibration suppression (stabilizing), SPPVS, with micro-radian pointing resolution, and then mounted on a satellite in two different locations. The adaptive TVC system provides SPPVS with large tip-tilt to potentially eliminate the gimbals systems. The smart composite telescope will be mounted on a smart composite platform with SPPVS and then mounted on a satellite. The laser communication is intended for the Geosynchronous orbit. The high degree of directionality increases the security of the laser communication signal (as opposed to a diffused RF signal), but also requires sophisticated subsystems for transmission and acquisition. The shorter wavelength of the optical spectrum increases the data transmission rates, but laser systems require large amounts of power, which increases the mass and complexity of the supporting systems. In addition, the laser communication on the Geosynchronous orbit requires an accurate platform with SPPVS capabilities. Therefore, this work also addresses the design of an active composite platform to be used to simultaneously point and stabilize an intersatellite laser communication telescope with micro-radian pointing resolution. The telescope is a Cassegrain receiver that employs two mirrors, one convex (primary) and the other concave (secondary). The distance, as well as the horizontal and axial alignment of the mirrors, must be precisely maintained or else the optical properties of the system will be severely degraded. The alignment will also have to be maintained during thruster firings, which will require vibration suppression capabilities of the system as well. The innovative platform has been

  6. Design of artificial genetic regulatory networks with multiple delayed adaptive responses*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluza, Pablo; Inoue, Masayo

    2016-06-01

    Genetic regulatory networks with adaptive responses are widely studied in biology. Usually, models consisting only of a few nodes have been considered. They present one input receptor for activation and one output node where the adaptive response is computed. In this work, we design genetic regulatory networks with many receptors and many output nodes able to produce delayed adaptive responses. This design is performed by using an evolutionary algorithm of mutations and selections that minimizes an error function defined by the adaptive response in signal shapes. We present several examples of network constructions with a predefined required set of adaptive delayed responses. We show that an output node can have different kinds of responses as a function of the activated receptor. Additionally, complex network structures are presented since processing nodes can be involved in several input-output pathways.

  7. SMARTer Discontinuation Trial Designs for Developing an Adaptive Treatment Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Scott N.; Rynn, Moira A.; Walkup, John T.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Developing evidenced-based practices for the management of childhood psychiatric disorders requires research studies that address how to treat children during both the acute phase of the disorder and beyond. Given the selection of a medication for acute treatment, discontinuation trials are used to evaluate the effects of treatment duration (e.g., time on medication) and/or maintenance strategies following successful acute-phase treatment. Recently, sequential multiple assignment randomized trials (SMART) have been proposed for use in informing sequences of critical clinical decisions such as those mentioned. The objective of this article is to illustrate how a SMART study is related to the standard discontinuation trial design, while addressing additional clinically important questions with similar trial resources. Method The recently completed Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS), a randomized trial that examined the relative efficacy of three acute-phase treatments for pediatric anxiety disorders, along with a next logical step, a standard discontinuation trial design, is used to clarify the ideas. This example is used to compare the discontinuation trial design relative to the SMART design. Results We find that the standard discontinuation trial can be modified slightly using a SMART design to yield high-quality data that can be used to address a wider variety of questions in addition to the impact of treatment duration. We discuss how this innovative trial design is ultimately more efficient and less costly than the standard discontinuation trial, and may result in more representative comparisons between treatments. Conclusions Mental health researchers who are interested in addressing questions concerning the effects of continued treatment (for different durations) following successful acute-phase treatment should consider SMART designs in place of discontinuation trial designs in their research. SMART designs can be used to

  8. Water Infrastructure Adaptation in New Urban Design: Possibilities and Constraints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural constraints, including climate change and dynamic socioeconomic development, can significantly impact the way we plan, design, and operate water infrastructure, thus its sustainability to deliver reliable quality water supplies and comply with environmental regulations. ...

  9. Twenty-five years of confirmatory adaptive designs: opportunities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Peter; Bretz, Frank; Dragalin, Vladimir; König, Franz; Wassmer, Gernot

    2016-02-10

    'Multistage testing with adaptive designs' was the title of an article by Peter Bauer that appeared 1989 in the German journal Biometrie und Informatik in Medizin und Biologie. The journal does not exist anymore but the methodology found widespread interest in the scientific community over the past 25 years. The use of such multistage adaptive designs raised many controversial discussions from the beginning on, especially after the publication by Bauer and Köhne 1994 in Biometrics: Broad enthusiasm about potential applications of such designs faced critical positions regarding their statistical efficiency. Despite, or possibly because of, this controversy, the methodology and its areas of applications grew steadily over the years, with significant contributions from statisticians working in academia, industry and agencies around the world. In the meantime, such type of adaptive designs have become the subject of two major regulatory guidance documents in the US and Europe and the field is still evolving. Developments are particularly noteworthy in the most important applications of adaptive designs, including sample size reassessment, treatment selection procedures, and population enrichment designs. In this article, we summarize the developments over the past 25 years from different perspectives. We provide a historical overview of the early days, review the key methodological concepts and summarize regulatory and industry perspectives on such designs. Then, we illustrate the application of adaptive designs with three case studies, including unblinded sample size reassessment, adaptive treatment selection, and adaptive endpoint selection. We also discuss the availability of software for evaluating and performing such designs. We conclude with a critical review of how expectations from the beginning were fulfilled, and - if not - discuss potential reasons why this did not happen. PMID:25778935

  10. Satellite and Instrument Influences on ICESat Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, C. E.; Urban, T. J.; Neuenschwander, A. L.; Gutierrez, R.; Schutz, B. E.

    2007-12-01

    The White Sands Space Harbor (WSSH) has served as the principal ground calibration site throughout the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission. The Center for Space Research (CSR) at the University of Texas at Austin continues to conduct various experiments designed to validate the timing, geolocation and geometric characteristics of individual laser footprints on the surface. In addition, two airborne lidar surveys of the calibration site and surrounding area were conducted during the mission, first in 2003 and again in 2007. Chosen for its limited surface roughness and topographic flatness, this area has been targeted 3-4 times in each of the 12 ICESat mapping campaigns to date, yielding a significant altimetry data set. The derived surface elevations are compared with those from the airborne lidar surveys, as well as those obtained by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Furthermore, the Geoscience Laser Altimetry System (GLAS) onboard ICESat records a digitized waveform for each laser pulse returned from the surface. The two methods currently used to fit such signals in ICESat data processing are examined and compared for the WSSH waveforms. The first fits up to two distinct Gaussians and provides a surface elevation at the location of the maximum peak. The second fits up to six overlapping Gaussians and provides a surface elevation at the centroid of the pulse. Observed differences in the reported elevations are discussed in terms of the satellite's off-nadir targeting geometry, the laser energy, and the skewness of the returned waveforms.

  11. An adaptive two-stage sequential design for sampling rare and clustered populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.A.; Salehi, M.M.; Moradi, M.; Bell, G.; Smith, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    How to design an efficient large-area survey continues to be an interesting question for ecologists. In sampling large areas, as is common in environmental studies, adaptive sampling can be efficient because it ensures survey effort is targeted to subareas of high interest. In two-stage sampling, higher density primary sample units are usually of more interest than lower density primary units when populations are rare and clustered. Two-stage sequential sampling has been suggested as a method for allocating second stage sample effort among primary units. Here, we suggest a modification: adaptive two-stage sequential sampling. In this method, the adaptive part of the allocation process means the design is more flexible in how much extra effort can be directed to higher-abundance primary units. We discuss how best to design an adaptive two-stage sequential sample. ?? 2008 The Society of Population Ecology and Springer.

  12. Context-Aware Design for Process Flexibility and Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Today's organizations face continuous and unprecedented changes in their business environment. Traditional process design tools tend to be inflexible and can only support rigidly defined processes (e.g., order processing in the supply chain). This considerably restricts their real-world applications value, especially in the dynamic and…

  13. Adapting Wood Technology to Teach Design and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Technology education has changed dramatically over the last few years. The transition of industrial arts to technology education and more recently the pursuit of design and engineering has resulted in technology education teachers often needing to change their curriculum and course activities to meet the demands of a rapidly changing profession.…

  14. RESIDENTIAL BUILDING ADAPTIVE ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (R-BAEMS) DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The expected outcomes from Phase I included 1) a set of guidelines for implementing R-BAEMS in residential structures from both a retrofit and original design perspective and 2) a cost and energy analysis of R-BAEMS impact on the environment. The status of each of the outcomes...

  15. Optimal adaptive two-stage designs for early phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen; Wilding, Gregory E; Hutson, Alan D; Gerstenberger, Shawn

    2016-04-15

    Simon's optimal two-stage design has been widely used in early phase clinical trials for Oncology and AIDS studies with binary endpoints. With this approach, the second-stage sample size is fixed when the trial passes the first stage with sufficient activity. Adaptive designs, such as those due to Banerjee and Tsiatis (2006) and Englert and Kieser (2013), are flexible in the sense that the second-stage sample size depends on the response from the first stage, and these designs are often seen to reduce the expected sample size under the null hypothesis as compared with Simon's approach. An unappealing trait of the existing designs is that they are not associated with a second-stage sample size, which is a non-increasing function of the first-stage response rate. In this paper, an efficient intelligent process, the branch-and-bound algorithm, is used in extensively searching for the optimal adaptive design with the smallest expected sample size under the null, while the type I and II error rates are maintained and the aforementioned monotonicity characteristic is respected. The proposed optimal design is observed to have smaller expected sample sizes compared to Simon's optimal design, and the maximum total sample size of the proposed adaptive design is very close to that from Simon's method. The proposed optimal adaptive two-stage design is recommended for use in practice to improve the flexibility and efficiency of early phase therapeutic development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26526165

  16. The emergence of grid cells: Intelligent design or just adaptation?

    PubMed

    Kropff, Emilio; Treves, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Individual medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) 'grid' cells provide a representation of space that appears to be essentially invariant across environments, modulo simple transformations, in contrast to multiple, rapidly acquired hippocampal maps; it may therefore be established gradually during rodent development. We explore with a simplified mathematical model the possibility that the self-organization of multiple grid fields into a triangular grid pattern may be a single-cell process, driven by firing rate adaptation and slowly varying spatial inputs. A simple analytical derivation indicates that triangular grids are favored asymptotic states of the self-organizing system, and computer simulations confirm that such states are indeed reached during a model learning process, provided it is sufficiently slow to effectively average out fluctuations. The interactions among local ensembles of grid units serve solely to stabilize a common grid orientation. Spatial information, in the real mEC network, may be provided by any combination of feedforward cortical afferents and feedback hippocampal projections from place cells, since either input alone is likely sufficient to yield grid fields. PMID:19021261

  17. Technical Data Exchange Software Tools Adapted to Distributed Microsatellite Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pache, Charly

    2002-01-01

    One critical issue concerning distributed design of satellites, is the collaborative work it requires. In particular, the exchange of data between each group responsible for each subsystem can be complex and very time-consuming. The goal of this paper is to present a design collaborative tool, the SSETI Design Model (SDM), specifically developed for enabling satellite distributed design. SDM is actually used in the ongoing Student Space Exploration &Technology (SSETI) initiative (www.sseti.net). SSETI is lead by European Space Agency (ESA) outreach office (http://www.estec.esa.nl/outreach), involving student groups from all over Europe for design, construction and launch of a microsatellite. The first part of this paper presents the current version of the SDM tool, a collection of Microsoft Excel linked worksheets, one for each subsystem. An overview of the project framework/structure is given, explaining the different actors, the flows between them, as well as the different types of data and the links - formulas - between data sets. Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagrams give an overview of the different parts . Then the SDM's functionalities, developed in VBA scripts (Visual Basic for Application), are introduced, as well as the interactive features, user interfaces and administration tools. The second part discusses the capabilities and limitations of SDM current version. Taking into account these capabilities and limitations, the third part outlines the next version of SDM, a web-oriented, database-driven evolution of the current version. This new approach will enable real-time data exchange and processing between the different actors of the mission. Comprehensive UML diagrams will guide the audience through the entire modeling process of such a system. Tradeoffs simulation capabilities, security, reliability, hardware and software issues will also be thoroughly discussed.

  18. Adaptive ultrasonic measurement of blood vessel diameter and wall thickness: theory and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Rafii, K; Jaffe, J S

    1998-01-01

    An adaptive ultrasonic technique for measuring blood vessel diameter and wall thickness is presented. This technique allows one to use a target-specific transmitted waveform/receiver filter to obtain a larger signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the received signal than conventional techniques. Generally, SNR of a received wave increases as the intensity of the transmit wave increases; however, because of the FDA limitations placed on the amount of transmit energy, it is important to be able to make the most efficient use of the energy that is available to obtain the best possible SNR in the received signal. Adaptive ultrasonic measurement makes the most efficient use of the energy that is available by placing the maximum amount of energy in the largest target scattering mode. This results in more energy backscatter from a given target, which leads to a higher SNR in the received waveform. Computer simulations of adaptive ultrasonic measurement of blood vessel diameter show that for a SNR of 0 dB in the transmitted waveform, the standard deviation of the diameter measurements for a custom-designed transmitted waveform is about two orders of magnitude less than the standard deviation of the diameter measurements using more conventional waveforms. Diameter and wall thickness measurement experiments were performed on a latex tube and a bovine blood vessel using both custom-made and conventionally used transmitted waveforms. Results show that the adaptively designed waveform gives a smaller uncertainty in the measurements. The adaptive ultrasonic blood vessel diameter and wall thickness measuring technique has potential applications in examining vessels which are either too deep inside the body or too small for conventional techniques to be used, because of the low SNR in the received signal. PMID:18244211

  19. Adaptive time-lapse optimized survey design for electrical resistivity tomography monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Paul B.; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Meldrum, Philip I.; Chambers, Jonathan E.; Carrière, Simon; Oxby, Lucy S.; Loke, M. H.

    2015-10-01

    Adaptive optimal experimental design methods use previous data and results to guide the choice and design of future experiments. This paper describes the formulation of an adaptive survey design technique to produce optimal resistivity imaging surveys for time-lapse geoelectrical monitoring experiments. These survey designs are time-dependent and, compared to dipole-dipole or static optimized surveys that do not change over time, focus a greater degree of the image resolution on regions of the subsurface that are actively changing. The adaptive optimization method is validated using a controlled laboratory monitoring experiment comprising a well-defined cylindrical target moving along a trajectory that changes its depth and lateral position. The algorithm is implemented on a standard PC in conjunction with a modified automated multichannel resistivity imaging system. Data acquisition using the adaptive survey designs requires no more time or power than with comparable standard surveys, and the algorithm processing takes place while the system batteries recharge. The results show that adaptively designed optimal surveys yield a quantitative increase in image quality over and above that produced by using standard dipole-dipole or static (time-independent) optimized surveys.

  20. Design and analysis of closed-loop decoder adaptation algorithms for brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dangi, Siddharth; Orsborn, Amy L; Moorman, Helene G; Carmena, Jose M

    2013-07-01

    Closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA) is an emerging paradigm for achieving rapid performance improvements in online brain-machine interface (BMI) operation. Designing an effective CLDA algorithm requires making multiple important decisions, including choosing the timescale of adaptation, selecting which decoder parameters to adapt, crafting the corresponding update rules, and designing CLDA parameters. These design choices, combined with the specific settings of CLDA parameters, will directly affect the algorithm's ability to make decoder parameters converge to values that optimize performance. In this article, we present a general framework for the design and analysis of CLDA algorithms and support our results with experimental data of two monkeys performing a BMI task. First, we analyze and compare existing CLDA algorithms to highlight the importance of four critical design elements: the adaptation timescale, selective parameter adaptation, smooth decoder updates, and intuitive CLDA parameters. Second, we introduce mathematical convergence analysis using measures such as mean-squared error and KL divergence as a useful paradigm for evaluating the convergence properties of a prototype CLDA algorithm before experimental testing. By applying these measures to an existing CLDA algorithm, we demonstrate that our convergence analysis is an effective analytical tool that can ultimately inform and improve the design of CLDA algorithms. PMID:23607558

  1. On Adaptive Extended Compatibility Changing Type of Product Design Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenwen, Jiang; Zhibin, Xie

    The article uses research ways of Enterprise localization and enterprise's development course to research strategy of company's product design and development. It announces at different stages for development, different kinds of enterprises will adopt product design and development policies of different modes. It also announces close causality between development course of company and central technology and product. The result indicated enterprises in leading position in market, technology and brand adopt pioneer strategy type of product research and development. These enterprise relying on the large-scale leading enterprise offering a complete set service adopts the passively duplicating type tactic of product research and development. Some enterprise in part of advantage in technology, market, management or brand adopt following up strategy of product research and development. The enterprises with relative advantage position adopt the strategy of technology applied taking optimizing services as centre in product research and development in fields of brand culture and market service.

  2. A new approach for designing self-organizing systems and application to adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramamoorthy, P. A.; Zhang, Shi; Lin, Yueqing; Huang, Song

    1993-01-01

    There is tremendous interest in the design of intelligent machines capable of autonomous learning and skillful performance under complex environments. A major task in designing such systems is to make the system plastic and adaptive when presented with new and useful information and stable in response to irrelevant events. A great body of knowledge, based on neuro-physiological concepts, has evolved as a possible solution to this problem. Adaptive resonance theory (ART) is a classical example under this category. The system dynamics of an ART network is described by a set of differential equations with nonlinear functions. An approach for designing self-organizing networks characterized by nonlinear differential equations is proposed.

  3. Group-Work in the Design of Complex Adaptive Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavroudi, Anna; Hadzilacos, Thanasis

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a case study where twelve graduate students undertook the demanding role of the adaptive e-course developer and worked collaboratively on an authentic and complex design task in the context of open and distance tertiary education. The students had to work in groups in order to conceptualise and design a learning scenario for…

  4. Activity Structures for Project-Based Teaching and Learning: Design and Adaptation of Cultural Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polman, Joseph L.

    This paper discusses research on activity structure design in a project-based science classroom and efforts to adapt designs from this setting to an after-school program involving historical inquiry. Common activity structures such as classroom lessons and Initiation-Reply-Evaluation (I-R-E) sequences are important cultural tools that help…

  5. A Framework for Adaptive Learning Design in a Web-Conferencing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Many recent technologies provide the ability to dynamically adjust the interface depending on the emerging cognitive and collaborative needs of the learning episode. This means that educators can adaptively re-design the learning environment during the lesson, rather than purely relying on preemptive learning design thinking. Based on a…

  6. Systematic design and analysis of laser-guide-star adaptive-optics systems for large telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.T.; Morris, J.R.; Vernon, R.G.

    1994-02-01

    The authors discuss the design of laser-guided adaptive-optics systems for the large, 8-10-m-class telescopes. Through proper choice of system components and optimized system design, the laser power that is needed at the astronomical site can be kept to a minimum. 37 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Simple adaptive control system design for a quadrotor with an internal PFC

    SciTech Connect

    Mizumoto, Ikuro; Nakamura, Takuto; Kumon, Makoto; Takagi, Taro

    2014-12-10

    The paper deals with an adaptive control system design problem for a four rotor helicopter or quadrotor. A simple adaptive control design scheme with a parallel feedforward compensator (PFC) in the internal loop of the considered quadrotor will be proposed based on the backstepping strategy. As is well known, the backstepping control strategy is one of the advanced control strategy for nonlinear systems. However, the control algorithm will become complex if the system has higher order relative degrees. We will show that one can skip some design steps of the backstepping method by introducing a PFC in the inner loop of the considered quadrotor, so that the structure of the obtained controller will be simplified and a high gain based adaptive feedback control system will be designed. The effectiveness of the proposed method will be confirmed through numerical simulations.

  8. Simple adaptive control system design for a quadrotor with an internal PFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, Ikuro; Nakamura, Takuto; Kumon, Makoto; Takagi, Taro

    2014-12-01

    The paper deals with an adaptive control system design problem for a four rotor helicopter or quadrotor. A simple adaptive control design scheme with a parallel feedforward compensator (PFC) in the internal loop of the considered quadrotor will be proposed based on the backstepping strategy. As is well known, the backstepping control strategy is one of the advanced control strategy for nonlinear systems. However, the control algorithm will become complex if the system has higher order relative degrees. We will show that one can skip some design steps of the backstepping method by introducing a PFC in the inner loop of the considered quadrotor, so that the structure of the obtained controller will be simplified and a high gain based adaptive feedback control system will be designed. The effectiveness of the proposed method will be confirmed through numerical simulations.

  9. Fuzzy Adaptive Control Design and Discretization for a Class of Nonlinear Uncertain Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Shi, Peng; Zheng, Xiaolong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, tracking control problems are investigated for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems in lower triangular form. First, a state-feedback controller is designed by using adaptive backstepping technique and the universal approximation ability of fuzzy logic systems. During the design procedure, a developed method with less computation is proposed by constructing one maximum adaptive parameter. Furthermore, adaptive controllers with nonsymmetric dead-zone are also designed for the systems. Then, a sampled-data control scheme is presented to discretize the obtained continuous-time controller by using the forward Euler method. It is shown that both proposed continuous and discrete controllers can ensure that the system output tracks the target signal with a small bounded error and the other closed-loop signals remain bounded. Two simulation examples are presented to verify the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed new design techniques. PMID:26208376

  10. Waveform efficiency analysis of auditory nerve fiber stimulation for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Lotfi Navaii, Mehdi; Sadjedi, Hamed; Jalali, Mohsen

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of the electrical stimulation efficiency of various stimulating waveforms is an important issue for efficient neural stimulator design. Concerning the implantable micro devices design, it is also necessary to consider the feasibility of hardware implementation of the desired waveforms. In this paper, the charge, power and energy efficiency of four waveforms (i.e. square, rising ramp, triangular and rising ramp-decaying exponential) in various durations have been simulated and evaluated based on the computational model of the auditory nerve fibers. Moreover, for a fair comparison of their feasibility, a fully integrated current generator circuit has been developed so that the desired stimulating waveforms can be generated. The simulation results show that stimulation with the square waveforms is a proper choice in short and intermediate durations while the rising ramp-decaying exponential or triangular waveforms can be employed for long durations. PMID:23918258

  11. Design and Preliminary Testing of the International Docking Adapter's Peripheral Docking Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Christopher W.; Blaschak, Johnathan; Eldridge, Erin A.; Brazzel, Jack P.; Spehar, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    The International Docking Adapter's Peripheral Docking Target (PDT) was designed to allow a docking spacecraft to judge its alignment relative to the docking system. The PDT was designed to be compatible with relative sensors using visible cameras, thermal imagers, or Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) technologies. The conceptual design team tested prototype designs and materials to determine the contrast requirements for the features. This paper will discuss the design of the PDT, the methodology and results of the tests, and the conclusions pertaining to PDT design that were drawn from testing.

  12. Multivariable output feedback robust adaptive tracking control design for a class of delayed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkin, Boris; Gutman, Per-Olof

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a model reference adaptive control scheme for a class of multi-input multi-output nonlinearly perturbed dynamic systems with unknown time-varying state delays which is also robust with respect to an external disturbance with unknown bounds. The output feedback adaptive control scheme uses feedback actions only, and thus does not require a direct measurement of the command or disturbance signals. A suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii type functional is introduced to design the adaptation algorithms and to prove stability.

  13. On Adaptive Extended Different Life Cycle of Product Design Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenwen, Jiang; Zhibin, Xie

    The article uses research ways of following the whole lifespan of product and enterprise's development course to research strategy of company's product design and development. It announces enterprises of different nature, enterprises at different developing stage will adopt different mode strategy. It also announces close causality between development course of company and central technology and product. The result indicated in different developing stages such as company development period, crisis predicament period, lasting steadies period, improving by payback period, issues steadies secondary period, declining go and live period, enterprise should pursue different mode product tactics of research and development such as shrinking strategy, consolidating strategy, innovation keeping forging ahead strategy. Enterprise should break regular management mode to introduce different research and development mode to promote enterprise's competitiveness effectively.

  14. Low Level Waste Conceptual Design Adaption to Poor Geological Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.; Drimmer, D.; Giovannini, A.; Manfroy, P.; Maquet, F.; Schittekat, J.; Van Cotthem, A.; Van Echelpoel, E.

    2002-02-26

    Since the early eighties, several studies have been carried out in Belgium with respect to a repository for the final disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). In 1998, the Belgian Government decided to restrict future investigations to the four existing nuclear sites in Belgium or sites that might show interest. So far, only two existing nuclear sites have been thoroughly investigated from a geological and hydrogeological point of view. These sites are located in the North-East (Mol-Dessel) and in the mid part (Fleurus-Farciennes) of the country. Both sites have the disadvantage of presenting poor geological and hydrogeological conditions, which are rather unfavorable to accommodate a surface disposal facility for LLW. The underground of the Mol-Dessel site consists of neogene sand layers of about 180 m thick which cover a 100 meters thick clay layer. These neogene sands contain, at 20 m depth, a thin clayey layer. The groundwater level is quite close to the surface (0-2m) and finally, the topography is almost totally flat. The upper layer of the Fleurus-Farciennes site consists of 10 m silt with poor geomechanical characteristics, overlying sands (only a few meters thick) and Westphalian shales between 15 and 20 m depth. The Westphalian shales are tectonized and strongly weathered. In the past, coal seams were mined out. This activity induced locally important surface subsidence. For both nuclear sites that were investigated, a conceptual design was made that could allow any unfavorable geological or hydrogeological conditions of the site to be overcome. In Fleurus-Farciennes, for instance, the proposed conceptual design of the repository is quite original. It is composed of a shallow, buried concrete cylinder, surrounded by an accessible concrete ring, which allows permanent inspection and control during the whole lifetime of the repository. Stability and drainage systems should be independent of potential differential settlements an d subsidences

  15. Adaptation of NASA technology for the optimum design of orthopedic knee implants.

    PubMed

    Saravanos, D A; Mraz, P J; Davy, D T; Hopkins, D A

    1991-03-01

    NASA technology originally developed for designing aircraft turbine-engine blades has been adapted and applied to orthopedic knee implants. This article describes a method for tailoring an implant for optimal interaction with the environment of the tibia. The implant components are designed to control stresses in the bone for minimizing bone degradation and preventing failures. Engineers expect the tailoring system to improve knee prosthesis design and allow customized implants for individual patients. PMID:10150099

  16. Design of adaptive steganographic schemes for digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filler, Tomás; Fridrich, Jessica

    2011-02-01

    Most steganographic schemes for real digital media embed messages by minimizing a suitably defined distortion function. In practice, this is often realized by syndrome codes which offer near-optimal rate-distortion performance. However, the distortion functions are designed heuristically and the resulting steganographic algorithms are thus suboptimal. In this paper, we present a practical framework for optimizing the parameters of additive distortion functions to minimize statistical detectability. We apply the framework to digital images in both spatial and DCT domain by first defining a rich parametric model which assigns a cost of making a change at every cover element based on its neighborhood. Then, we present a practical method for optimizing the parameters with respect to a chosen detection metric and feature space. We show that the size of the margin between support vectors in soft-margin SVMs leads to a fast detection metric and that methods minimizing the margin tend to be more secure w.r.t. blind steganalysis. The parameters obtained by the Nelder-Mead simplex-reflection algorithm for spatial and DCT-domain images are presented and the new embedding methods are tested by blind steganalyzers utilizing various feature sets. Experimental results show that as few as 80 images are sufficient for obtaining good candidates for parameters of the cost model, which allows us to speed up the parameter search.

  17. Evolutionary body building: adaptive physical designs for robots.

    PubMed

    Funes, P; Pollack, J

    1998-01-01

    Creating artificial life forms through evolutionary robotics faces a "chicken and egg" problem: Learning to control a complex body is dominated by problems specific to its sensors and effectors, while building a body that is controllable assumes the pre-existence of a brain. The idea of coevolution of bodies and brains is becoming popular, but little work has been done in evolution of physical structure because of the lack of a general framework for doing it. Evolution of creatures in simulation has usually resulted in virtual entities that are not buildable, while embodied evolution in actual robotics is constrained by the slow pace of real time. The work we present takes a step in addressing the problem of body evolution by applying evolutionary techniques to the design of structures assembled out of elementary components that stick together. Evolution takes place in a simulator that computes forces and stresses and predicts stability of three-dimensional brick structures. The final printout of our program is a schematic assembly, which is then built physically. We demonstrate the functionality of this approach to robot body building with many evolved artifacts. PMID:10352237

  18. Adaptive Clinical Trial Design: An Overview and Potential Applications in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Elman, Scott A; Ware, James H; Gottlieb, Alice B; Merola, Joseph F

    2016-07-01

    The challenges of drug development, including increasing costs, late-stage drug failures, and the decline in the number of drugs being approved by the US Food and Drug Administration over time, have generated interest in adaptive study designs that have the potential to address these problems. Adaptive trial designs use interim data analysis to amend trials, and have been recognized for more than a decade as a way to increase trial efficiency, partly by the increased probability of demonstrating a drug effect if one exists. In this article, we define adaptive trials; give examples of the most common types; highlight the pros, cons, and ethical considerations of these designs; and illustrate how these tools can be applied to drug development in dermatology. PMID:27157773

  19. Sandia's Arbitrary Waveform MEMO Actuator

    2003-08-07

    SAMA is a multichannel, arbitrary waveform generator program for driving microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). It allows the user to piece together twelve available wave parts, thereby permitting the user to create practically any waveform, or upload a previously constructed signal. The waveforms (bundled together as a signal) may simultaneously be output through four different channels to actuate MEMS devices, and the number of output channels may be increased depending on the DAQ card or instrument utilized.more » Additionally, real-time changes may be made to the frequency and amplitude. The signal may be paused temporarily. The waveform may be saved to file for future uploading. Recent work for this version has focused on modifications that will allow loading previously generated arbitrary waveforms, independent channel waveform amplification, adding a pause function, separating the "modify waveform: and "end program" functions, and simplifying the user interface by adding test blocks with statements to help the user program and output the desired signals. The program was developed in an effort to alleviate some of the limitations of Micro Driver. For example, Micro Driver will not allow the user to select a segment of a sine wave, but rather the user is limited to choosing either a whole or half sine wave pattern. It therefore becomes quite difficult ot construct partial sine wave patterns out of a "ramp" waveparts for several reasons. First, one must determine on paper how many data points each ramp will cover, and what the slopes of these ramps will be. Second, from what was observed, Micro Driver has difficulty processing more than six distinct waveparts during sequencing. The program will allow the user to input the various waves into the desired sequence; however, it will not allow the user to compile them (by clicking "ok" and returning to the main screen). Third, should the user decide that they want to increase the amplitute of the output signal

  20. A Bayesian decision-theoretic sequential response-adaptive randomization design.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; Jack Lee, J; Müller, Peter

    2013-05-30

    We propose a class of phase II clinical trial designs with sequential stopping and adaptive treatment allocation to evaluate treatment efficacy. Our work is based on two-arm (control and experimental treatment) designs with binary endpoints. Our overall goal is to construct more efficient and ethical randomized phase II trials by reducing the average sample sizes and increasing the percentage of patients assigned to the better treatment arms of the trials. The designs combine the Bayesian decision-theoretic sequential approach with adaptive randomization procedures in order to achieve simultaneous goals of improved efficiency and ethics. The design parameters represent the costs of different decisions, for example, the decisions for stopping or continuing the trials. The parameters enable us to incorporate the actual costs of the decisions in practice. The proposed designs allow the clinical trials to stop early for either efficacy or futility. Furthermore, the designs assign more patients to better treatment arms by applying adaptive randomization procedures. We develop an algorithm based on the constrained backward induction and forward simulation to implement the designs. The algorithm overcomes the computational difficulty of the backward induction method, thereby making our approach practicable. The designs result in trials with desirable operating characteristics under the simulated settings. Moreover, the designs are robust with respect to the response rate of the control group. PMID:23315678

  1. First-order design of off-axis reflective ophthalmic adaptive optics systems using afocal telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vieyra, Armando; Dubra, Alfredo; Malacara-Hernández, Daniel; Williams, David R

    2009-10-12

    Expressions for minimal astigmatism in image and pupil planes in off-axis afocal reflective telescopes formed by pairs of spherical mirrors are presented. These formulae which are derived from the marginal ray fan equation can be used for designing laser cavities, spectrographs and adaptive optics retinal imaging systems. The use, range and validity of these formulae are limited by spherical aberration and coma for small and large angles respectively. This is discussed using examples from adaptive optics retinal imaging systems. The performance of the resulting optical designs are evaluated and compared against the configurations with minimal wavefront RMS, using the defocus-corrected wavefront RMS as a metric. PMID:20372626

  2. Multiobjective control design including performance robustness for gust alleviation of a wing with adaptive material actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, Jeffrey B.

    1997-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the use of covariance control to directly design reduced-order multi-objective controllers for gust alleviation using adaptive materials as the control effector. It will use piezoelectric actuators as control effectors in a finite element model of a full-size wing model. More precisely, the finite element model is of the F-16 Agile Falcon/Active Flexible Wing that is modified to use piezoelectric actuators as control effectors. The paper will also examine the interacting roles of important control design constraints and objectives for designing an aeroservoelastic system. The paper will also present some results of multiobjective control design for the model, illustrating the benefits and complexity of modern practical control design for aeroservoelastic systems that use adaptive materials for actuation.

  3. An MSK Waveform for Radar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a minimum shift keying (MSK) waveform developed for use in radar applications. This waveform is characterized in terms of its spectrum, autocorrelation, and ambiguity function, and is compared with the conventionally used bi-phase coded (BPC) radar signal. It is shown that the MSK waveform has several advantages when compared with the BPC waveform, and is a better candidate for deep-space radar imaging systems such as NASA's Goldstone Solar System Radar.

  4. Design of a Model Reference Adaptive Controller for an Unmanned Air Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Matsutani, Megumi; Annaswamy, Anuradha M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the "Adaptive Control Technology for Safe Flight (ACTS)" architecture, which consists of a non-adaptive controller that provides satisfactory performance under nominal flying conditions, and an adaptive controller that provides robustness under off nominal ones. The design and implementation procedures of both controllers are presented. The aim of these procedures, which encompass both theoretical and practical considerations, is to develop a controller suitable for flight. The ACTS architecture is applied to the Generic Transport Model developed by NASA-Langley Research Center. The GTM is a dynamically scaled test model of a transport aircraft for which a flight-test article and a high-fidelity simulation are available. The nominal controller at the core of the ACTS architecture has a multivariable LQR-PI structure while the adaptive one has a direct, model reference structure. The main control surfaces as well as the throttles are used as control inputs. The inclusion of the latter alleviates the pilot s workload by eliminating the need for cancelling the pitch coupling generated by changes in thrust. Furthermore, the independent usage of the throttles by the adaptive controller enables their use for attitude control. Advantages and potential drawbacks of adaptation are demonstrated by performing high fidelity simulations of a flight-validated controller and of its adaptive augmentation.

  5. Offset prediction for charge-balanced stimulus waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, V. M.; Triantis, I. F.; Toumazou, C.

    2011-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation with cuff electrodes involves the controlled injection of current into an electrically excitable tissue for sensory or motor rehabilitation. Some charge injected during stimulation is 'lost' at the electrode-electrolyte interface when the charge carrier is translated from an electron to an ion in the solution. The process of charge injection through chemical reactions can reduce electrode longevity and implant biocompatibility. Conventionally, the excess charge is minimized by complex hardware solutions, which are often not appropriate for robust long-term implantable solutions. Here, we present a method of waveform design that minimizes irrecoverable charge during continuous pulsing through the use of biphasic waveforms with unequally charged phases. We developed an equivalent electrical model of the electrode-electrolyte impedance based on the electrode's surface chemistry during psuedo-bipolar stimulation conditions. Simulations with the equivalent circuit determined the uncompensated charge to be a function of stimulus parameters. In vitro stimulation experiments in saline confirmed that we could preemptively compensate for the excess charge following biphasic stimulus waveforms. As a result, there was a 92% reduction in the pre-pulse potential after a pulse train with this new waveform design when compared to stimulation with conventional biphasic waveforms.

  6. Offset prediction for charge-balanced stimulus waveforms.

    PubMed

    Woods, V M; Triantis, I F; Toumazou, C

    2011-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation with cuff electrodes involves the controlled injection of current into an electrically excitable tissue for sensory or motor rehabilitation. Some charge injected during stimulation is 'lost' at the electrode-electrolyte interface when the charge carrier is translated from an electron to an ion in the solution. The process of charge injection through chemical reactions can reduce electrode longevity and implant biocompatibility. Conventionally, the excess charge is minimized by complex hardware solutions, which are often not appropriate for robust long-term implantable solutions. Here, we present a method of waveform design that minimizes irrecoverable charge during continuous pulsing through the use of biphasic waveforms with unequally charged phases. We developed an equivalent electrical model of the electrode-electrolyte impedance based on the electrode's surface chemistry during psuedo-bipolar stimulation conditions. Simulations with the equivalent circuit determined the uncompensated charge to be a function of stimulus parameters. In vitro stimulation experiments in saline confirmed that we could preemptively compensate for the excess charge following biphasic stimulus waveforms. As a result, there was a 92% reduction in the pre-pulse potential after a pulse train with this new waveform design when compared to stimulation with conventional biphasic waveforms. PMID:21753229

  7. Adaptive combinatorial design to explore large experimental spaces: approach and validation.

    PubMed

    Lejay, L V; Shasha, D E; Palenchar, P M; Kouranov, A Y; Cruikshank, A A; Chou, M F; Coruzzi, G M

    2004-12-01

    Systems biology requires mathematical tools not only to analyse large genomic datasets, but also to explore large experimental spaces in a systematic yet economical way. We demonstrate that two-factor combinatorial design (CD), shown to be useful in software testing, can be used to design a small set of experiments that would allow biologists to explore larger experimental spaces. Further, the results of an initial set of experiments can be used to seed further 'Adaptive' CD experimental designs. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate the usefulness of this Adaptive CD approach by analysing data from the effects of six binary inputs on the regulation of genes in the N-assimilation pathway of Arabidopsis. This CD approach identified the more important regulatory signals previously discovered by traditional experiments using far fewer experiments, and also identified examples of input interactions previously unknown. Tests using simulated data show that Adaptive CD suffers from fewer false positives than traditional experimental designs in determining decisive inputs, and succeeds far more often than traditional or random experimental designs in determining when genes are regulated by input interactions. We conclude that Adaptive CD offers an economical framework for discovering dominant inputs and interactions that affect different aspects of genomic outputs and organismal responses. PMID:17051692

  8. Temporally adaptive sampling: a case study in rare species survey design with marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum).

    PubMed

    Charney, Noah D; Kubel, Jacob E; Eiseman, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Improving detection rates for elusive species with clumped distributions is often accomplished through adaptive sampling designs. This approach can be extended to include species with temporally variable detection probabilities. By concentrating survey effort in years when the focal species are most abundant or visible, overall detection rates can be improved. This requires either long-term monitoring at a few locations where the species are known to occur or models capable of predicting population trends using climatic and demographic data. For marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Massachusetts, we demonstrate that annual variation in detection probability of larvae is regionally correlated. In our data, the difference in survey success between years was far more important than the difference among the three survey methods we employed: diurnal surveys, nocturnal surveys, and dipnet surveys. Based on these data, we simulate future surveys to locate unknown populations under a temporally adaptive sampling framework. In the simulations, when pond dynamics are correlated over the focal region, the temporally adaptive design improved mean survey success by as much as 26% over a non-adaptive sampling design. Employing a temporally adaptive strategy costs very little, is simple, and has the potential to substantially improve the efficient use of scarce conservation funds. PMID:25799224

  9. Temporally Adaptive Sampling: A Case Study in Rare Species Survey Design with Marbled Salamanders (Ambystoma opacum)

    PubMed Central

    Charney, Noah D.; Kubel, Jacob E.; Eiseman, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Improving detection rates for elusive species with clumped distributions is often accomplished through adaptive sampling designs. This approach can be extended to include species with temporally variable detection probabilities. By concentrating survey effort in years when the focal species are most abundant or visible, overall detection rates can be improved. This requires either long-term monitoring at a few locations where the species are known to occur or models capable of predicting population trends using climatic and demographic data. For marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Massachusetts, we demonstrate that annual variation in detection probability of larvae is regionally correlated. In our data, the difference in survey success between years was far more important than the difference among the three survey methods we employed: diurnal surveys, nocturnal surveys, and dipnet surveys. Based on these data, we simulate future surveys to locate unknown populations under a temporally adaptive sampling framework. In the simulations, when pond dynamics are correlated over the focal region, the temporally adaptive design improved mean survey success by as much as 26% over a non-adaptive sampling design. Employing a temporally adaptive strategy costs very little, is simple, and has the potential to substantially improve the efficient use of scarce conservation funds. PMID:25799224

  10. Conceptual design for a user-friendly adaptive optics system at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bissinger, H.D.; Olivier, S.; Max, C.

    1996-03-08

    In this paper, we present a conceptual design for a general-purpose adaptive optics system, usable with all Cassegrain facility instruments on the 3 meter Shane telescope at the University of California`s Lick Observatory located on Mt. Hamilton near San Jose, California. The overall design goal for this system is to take the sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics technology out of the demonstration stage and to build a user-friendly astronomical tool. The emphasis will be on ease of calibration, improved stability and operational simplicity in order to allow the system to be run routinely by observatory staff. A prototype adaptive optics system and a 20 watt sodium-layer laser guide star system have already been built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use at Lick Observatory. The design presented in this paper is for a next- generation adaptive optics system that extends the capabilities of the prototype system into the visible with more degrees of freedom. When coupled with a laser guide star system that is upgraded to a power matching the new adaptive optics system, the combined system will produce diffraction-limited images for near-IR cameras. Atmospheric correction at wavelengths of 0.6-1 mm will significantly increase the throughput of the most heavily used facility instrument at Lick, the Kast Spectrograph, and will allow it to operate with smaller slit widths and deeper limiting magnitudes. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Waveform-Sampling Electronics for a Whole-Body Time-of-Flight PET Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Ashmanskas, W. J.; LeGeyt, B. C.; Newcomer, F. M.; Panetta, J. V.; Ryan, W. A.; Van Berg, R.; Wiener, R. I.; Karp Fellow, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Waveform sampling is an appealing technique for instruments requiring precision time and pulse-height measurements. Sampling each PMT waveform at oscilloscope-like rates of several gigasamples per second enables one to process PMT signals digitally, which in turn makes it straightforward to optimize timing resolution and amplitude (energy and position) resolution in response to calibration effects, pile-up effects, and other systematic sources of waveform variation. We describe a system design and preliminary implementation that neatly maps waveform-sampling technology onto the LaPET prototype whole-body time-of-flight PET scanner that serves as the platform for testing this new technology. PMID:25484379

  12. Covariate-adjusted response-adaptive designs for longitudinal treatment responses: PEMF trial revisited.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Atanu; Park, Eunsik; Bhattacharya, Rahul

    2012-08-01

    Response-adaptive designs have become popular for allocation of the entering patients among two or more competing treatments in a phase III clinical trial. Although there are a lot of designs for binary treatment responses, the number of designs involving covariates is very small. Sometimes the patients give repeated responses. The only available response-adaptive allocation design for repeated binary responses is the urn design by Biswas and Dewanji [Biswas A and Dewanji AA. Randomized longitudinal play-the-winner design for repeated binary data. ANZJS 2004; 46: 675-684; Biswas A and Dewanji A. Inference for a RPW-type clinical trial with repeated monitoring for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Biometr J 2004; 46: 769-779.], although it does not take care of the covariates of the patients in the allocation design. In this article, a covariate-adjusted response-adaptive randomisation procedure is developed using the log-odds ratio within the Bayesian framework for longitudinal binary responses. The small sample performance of the proposed allocation procedure is assessed through a simulation study. The proposed procedure is illustrated using some real data set. PMID:20974667

  13. Nonlinear adaptive control systems design of BTT missile based on fully tuned RBF neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yunan; Jin, Yuqiang; Li, Jing

    2003-09-01

    Based on fully tuned RBF neural networks and backstepping control techniques, a novel nonlinear adaptive control scheme is proposed for missile control systems with a general set of uncertainties. The effect of the uncertainties is synthesized one term in the design procedure. Then RBF neural networks are used to eliminate its effect. The nonlinear adaptive controller is designed using backstepping control techniques. The control problem is resolved while the control coefficient matrix is unknown. The adaptive tuning rules for updating all of the parameters of the fully tuned RBF neural networks are firstly derived by the Lyapunov stability theorem. Finally, nonlinear 6-DOF numerical simulation results for a BTT missile model are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Adaptive design for digital nonlinear autopilot of ship-to-ship missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Ki Hong; Chaw, Dongkyoung; Choi, Jin Young

    2005-12-01

    This paper proposes a practical design method for ship-to-ship missiles' autopilot. When the pre-designed analogue autopilot is implemented in digital way, they generally suffer from severe performance degradation and instability problem even for a sufficiently small sampling time. Also, aerodynamic uncertainties can affect the overall stability and this happens more severely when the nonlinear autopilot is digitally implemented. In order to realize a practical autopilot, two main issues, digital implementation problem and compensation for the aerodynamic uncertainties, are considered in this paper. MIMO (multi-input multi-output) nonlinear autopilot is presented first and the input and output of the missile are discretized for implementation. In this step, the discretization effect is compensated by designing an additional control input. Finally, we design a parameter adaptation law to compensate the control performance. Stability analysis and 6-DOF (degree-of-freedom) simulations are presented to verify the proposed adaptive autopilot.

  15. Application of positive-real functions in hyperstable discrete model-reference adaptive system design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karmarkar, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Proposal of an algorithmic procedure, based on mathematical programming methods, to design compensators for hyperstable discrete model-reference adaptive systems (MRAS). The objective of the compensator is to render the MRAS insensitive to initial parameter estimates within a maximized hypercube in the model parameter space.

  16. Transient analysis of an adaptive system for optimization of design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    Averaging methods are applied to analyzing and optimizing the transient response associated with the direct adaptive control of an oscillatory second-order minimum-phase system. The analytical design methods developed for a second-order plant can be applied with some approximation to a MIMO flexible structure having a single dominant mode.

  17. Direct and Inverse Problems of Item Pool Design for Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.; Armstrong, Ronald D.

    2009-01-01

    The recent literature on computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has developed methods for creating CAT item pools from a large master pool. Each CAT pool is designed as a set of nonoverlapping forms reflecting the skill levels of an assumed population of test takers. This article presents a Monte Carlo method to obtain these CAT pools and discusses…

  18. Lessons Learned in Designing and Implementing a Computer-Adaptive Test for English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burston, Jack; Neophytou, Maro

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the lessons learned in designing and implementing a computer-adaptive test (CAT) for English. The early identification of students with weak L2 English proficiency is of critical importance in university settings that have compulsory English language course graduation requirements. The most efficient means of diagnosing the L2…

  19. Can Approaches to Research in Art and Design Be Beneficially Adapted for Research into Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trowler, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the research practices in Art and Design that are distinctively different from those common in research into higher education outside those fields. It considers whether and what benefit could be derived from their adaptation by the latter. The paper also examines the factors that are conducive and obstructive to adaptive…

  20. The design and development of a two-dimensional adaptive truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwao, Fumihiro; Motohashi, Shoichi; Yoshihara, Makoto; Takahara, Kenichi; Natori, Michihiro

    1987-01-01

    The functional model of a two dimensional adaptive truss structure which can purposefully change its geometrical configuration is introduced. The details of design and fabrication such as kinematic analysis, dynamic characteristics analysis and some test results are presented for the demonstration of this two dimensional truss concept.

  1. An objective re-evaluation of adaptive sample size re-estimation: commentary on 'Twenty-five years of confirmatory adaptive designs'.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Cyrus; Liu, Lingyun

    2016-02-10

    Over the past 25 years, adaptive designs have gradually gained acceptance and are being used with increasing frequency in confirmatory clinical trials. Recent surveys of submissions to the regulatory agencies reveal that the most popular type of adaptation is unblinded sample size re-estimation. Concerns have nevertheless been raised that this type of adaptation is inefficient.We intend to show in our discussion that such concerns are greatly exaggerated in any practical setting and that the advantages of adaptive sample size re-estimation usually outweigh any minor loss of efficiency. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26757953

  2. Determinism in synthesized chaotic waveforms.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Blakely, Jonathan N; Hayes, Scott T; Pethel, Shawn D

    2008-03-01

    The output of a linear filter driven by a randomly polarized square wave, when viewed backward in time, is shown to exhibit determinism at all times when embedded in a three-dimensional state space. Combined with previous results establishing exponential divergence equivalent to a positive Lyapunov exponent, this result rigorously shows that such reverse-time synthesized waveforms appear equally to have been produced by a deterministic chaotic system. PMID:18517561

  3. Why Waveform Correlation Sometimes Fails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, J.

    2015-12-01

    Waveform correlation detectors used in explosion monitoring scan noisy geophysical data to test two competing hypotheses: either (1) an amplitude-scaled version of a template waveform is present, or, (2) no signal is present at all. In reality, geophysical wavefields that are monitored for explosion signatures include waveforms produced by non-target sources that are partially correlated with the waveform template. Such signals can falsely trigger correlation detectors, particularly at low thresholds required to monitor for smaller target explosions. This challenge is particularly formidable when monitoring known test sites for seismic disturbances, since uncatalogued natural seismicity is (generally) more prevalent at lower magnitudes, and could be mistaken for small explosions. To address these challenges, we identify real examples in which correlation detectors targeting explosions falsely trigger on both site-proximal earthquakes (Figure 1, below) and microseismic "noise". Motivated by these examples, we quantify performance loss when applying these detectors, and re-evaluate the correlation-detector's hypothesis test. We thereby derive new detectors from more general hypotheses that admit unknown background seismicity, and apply these to real data. From our treatment, we derive "rules of thumb'' for proper template and threshold selection in heavily cluttered signal environments. Last, we answer the question "what is the probability of falsely detecting an earthquake collocated at a test site?", using correlation detectors that include explosion-triggered templates. Figure Top: An eight-channel data stream (black) recorded from an earthquake near a mine. Red markers indicate a detection. Middle: The correlation statistic computed by scanning the template against the data stream at top. The red line indicates the threshold for event declaration, determined by a false-alarm on noise probability constraint, as computed from the signal-absent distribution using

  4. A two-stage patient enrichment adaptive design in phase II oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Song, James X

    2014-01-01

    Illustrated is the use of a patient enrichment adaptive design in a randomized phase II trial which allows the evaluation of treatment benefits by the biomarker expression level and makes interim adjustment according to the pre-specified rules. The design was applied to an actual phase II metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) trial in which progression-free survival (PFS) in two biomarker-defined populations is evaluated at both interim and final analyses. As an extension, a short-term biomarker is used to predict the long-term PFS in a Bayesian model in order to improve the precision of hazard ratio (HR) estimate at the interim analysis. The characteristics of the extended design are examined in a number of scenarios via simulations. The recommended adaptive design is shown to be useful in a phase II setting. When a short-term maker which correlates with the long-term PFS is available, the design can be applied in smaller early phase trials in which PFS requires longer follow-up. In summary, the adaptive design offers flexibility in randomized phase II patient enrichment trials and should be considered in an overall personalized healthcare (PHC) strategy. PMID:24342820

  5. Analysis and design of a high power laser adaptive phased array transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mevers, G. E.; Soohoo, J. F.; Winocur, J.; Massie, N. A.; Southwell, W. H.; Brandewie, R. A.; Hayes, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of delivering substantial quantities of optical power to a satellite in low earth orbit from a ground based high energy laser (HEL) coupled to an adaptive antenna was investigated. Diffraction effects, atmospheric transmission efficiency, adaptive compensation for atmospheric turbulence effects, including the servo bandwidth requirements for this correction, and the adaptive compensation for thermal blooming were examined. To evaluate possible HEL sources, atmospheric investigations were performed for the CO2, (C-12)(O-18)2 isotope, CO and DF wavelengths using output antenna locations of both sea level and mountain top. Results indicate that both excellent atmospheric and adaption efficiency can be obtained for mountain top operation with a micron isotope laser operating at 9.1 um, or a CO laser operating single line (P10) at about 5.0 (C-12)(O-18)2um, which was a close second in the evaluation. Four adaptive power transmitter system concepts were generated and evaluated, based on overall system efficiency, reliability, size and weight, advanced technology requirements and potential cost. A multiple source phased array was selected for detailed conceptual design. The system uses a unique adaption technique of phase locking independent laser oscillators which allows it to be both relatively inexpensive and most reliable with a predicted overall power transfer efficiency of 53%.

  6. Design of artificial genetic regulatory networks with multiple delayed adaptive responses*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluza, Pablo; Inoue, Masayo

    2016-06-01

    Genetic regulatory networks with adaptive responses are widely studied in biology. Usually, models consisting only of a few nodes have been considered. They present one input receptor for activation and one output node where the adaptive response is computed. In this work, we design genetic regulatory networks with many receptors and many output nodes able to produce delayed adaptive responses. This design is performed by using an evolutionary algorithm of mutations and selections that minimizes an error function defined by the adaptive response in signal shapes. We present several examples of network constructions with a predefined required set of adaptive delayed responses. We show that an output node can have different kinds of responses as a function of the activated receptor. Additionally, complex network structures are presented since processing nodes can be involved in several input-output pathways. Supplementary material in the form of one nets file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70172-9

  7. Fusion of waveform LiDAR data and hyperspectral imagery for land cover classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhou; Glennie, Craig

    2015-10-01

    Current research into the fusion of hyperspectral imagery (HI) and full waveform LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) has relied on first processing the full waveform LiDAR (FWL) data to a set of discrete returns before merging because the data structure and sampling interval of HI and FWL are distinctly different. However, additional information about target properties can potentially be recovered if the waveform shape is preserved in the fusion process. This paper proposes a "voxelization" method to register FWL data to HI by dividing the waveform data into voxels, and then synthesizing all waveforms which intersect a voxel column into one three-dimensional superposition waveform: the synthesized waveform (SWF). A vertical energy distribution coefficients (VEDC) feature is proposed for extracting features from SWF, and then the SWF and HI are fused to form a complete feature space for classification. A pairwise classifier was adapted and completed using both Maximum Likelihood and Support Vector Machine classifiers for the combined SWF/HI features. Results show that this method of generating SWF from FWL data can effectively preserve information from the original waveforms, and the fusion of SWF and HI enhanced land cover classification compared to both using either data set alone or the merging of HI with a discrete LiDAR return point cloud.

  8. Automated Analysis, Classification, and Display of Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Chiman; Xu, Roger; Mayhew, David; Zhang, Frank; Zide, Alan; Bonggren, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    A computer program partly automates the analysis, classification, and display of waveforms represented by digital samples. In the original application for which the program was developed, the raw waveform data to be analyzed by the program are acquired from space-shuttle auxiliary power units (APUs) at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. The program could also be modified for application to other waveforms -- for example, electrocardiograms. The program begins by performing principal-component analysis (PCA) of 50 normal-mode APU waveforms. Each waveform is segmented. A covariance matrix is formed by use of the segmented waveforms. Three eigenvectors corresponding to three principal components are calculated. To generate features, each waveform is then projected onto the eigenvectors. These features are displayed on a three-dimensional diagram, facilitating the visualization of the trend of APU operations.

  9. Evaluation of novel stimulus waveforms for deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foutz, Thomas J.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. Historically, DBS and other neurostimulation technologies have relied on rectangular stimulation waveforms to impose their effects on the nervous system. Recent work has suggested that non-rectangular waveforms may have advantages over the traditional rectangular pulse. Therefore, we used detailed computer models to compare a range of charge-balanced biphasic waveforms with rectangular, exponential, triangular, Gaussian and sinusoidal stimulus pulse shapes. We explored the neural activation energy of these waveforms for both intracellular and extracellular current-controlled stimulation conditions. In the context of extracellular stimulation, we compared their effects on both axonal fibers of passage and projection neurons. Finally, we evaluated the impact of delivering the waveforms through a clinical DBS electrode, as opposed to a theoretical point source. Our results suggest that DBS with a 1 ms centered-triangular pulse can decrease energy consumption by 64% when compared with the standard 100 µs rectangular pulse (energy cost of 48 and 133 nJ, respectively, to stimulate 50% of a distributed population of axons) and can decrease energy consumption by 10% when compared with the most energy efficient rectangular pulse (1.25 ms duration). In turn, there may be measureable energy savings when using appropriately designed non-rectangular pulses in clinical DBS applications, thereby warranting further experimental investigation.

  10. Target discrimination technique utilizing noise waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodington, Gordon; DeLuca, Mark; Moro, Richard; Lemus, Daniel; Vela, Russell; Narayanan, Ram

    2011-06-01

    Noise waveforms generated using low cost diodes are a simple way for radars to transmit a wideband (> 4 GHz) multi-bit pseudorandom code for use in a cross correlation receiver. This type of waveform also has the advantage of being difficult to intercept and is less prone to interfere with adjacent systems. Radar designed to operate over this wide frequency range can take advantage of unique target Radar Cross Section (RCS) ripple versus frequency for objects of different materials and sizes. Specifically the periodicity and amplitude of the ripple is dependent on the shape and size of a target. Since background clutter does not display this variation, RCS variation determines whether a known target is present in a return. This paper will present the radar hardware and signal processing techniques used to maximize a target's unique spectral response against a cluttered background. The system operates CW over a 4-8 GHz bandwidth requiring the need to address issues regarding range resolution and far out undesired returns. Lessons learned from field observations and mitigation techniques incorporated in the system are included. This paper also deals with the signal processing technique used for detection, then discrimination. Detection thresholds are set and triggered by a simple correlation peak level. Discrimination involves inspection of the spectral return. A comparison performed in real time to a stored library value determines the presence of known objects. Measured data provided demonstrates the ability of the radar to discriminate multiple targets against multiple backgrounds.

  11. Design and progress toward a multi-conjugate adaptive optics system for distributed aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Olivier, S; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Gavel, D; Lim, R; Gratrix, E

    2004-08-17

    This article investigates the use of a multi-conjugate adaptive optics system to improve the field-of-view for the system. The emphasis of this research is to develop techniques to improve the performance of optical systems with applications to horizontal imaging. The design and wave optics simulations of the proposed system are given. Preliminary results from the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system are also presented. The experimental system utilizes a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator and an interferometric wave-front sensor for correction and sensing of the phase aberrations, respectively.

  12. Adjoint-Based Algorithms for Adaptation and Design Optimizations on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    Schemes based on discrete adjoint algorithms present several exciting opportunities for significantly advancing the current state of the art in computational fluid dynamics. Such methods provide an extremely efficient means for obtaining discretely consistent sensitivity information for hundreds of design variables, opening the door to rigorous, automated design optimization of complex aerospace configuration using the Navier-Stokes equation. Moreover, the discrete adjoint formulation provides a mathematically rigorous foundation for mesh adaptation and systematic reduction of spatial discretization error. Error estimates are also an inherent by-product of an adjoint-based approach, valuable information that is virtually non-existent in today's large-scale CFD simulations. An overview of the adjoint-based algorithm work at NASA Langley Research Center is presented, with examples demonstrating the potential impact on complex computational problems related to design optimization as well as mesh adaptation.

  13. Design and inference for the intent-to-treat principle using adaptive treatment.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Ree; Lavori, Philip W

    2015-04-30

    Nonadherence to assigned treatment jeopardizes the power and interpretability of intent-to-treat comparisons from clinical trial data and continues to be an issue for effectiveness studies, despite their pragmatic emphasis. We posit that new approaches to design need to complement developments in methods for causal inference to address nonadherence, in both experimental and practice settings. This paper considers the conventional study design for psychiatric research and other medical contexts, in which subjects are randomized to treatments that are fixed throughout the trial and presents an alternative that converts the fixed treatments into an adaptive intervention that reflects best practice. The key element is the introduction of an adaptive decision point midway into the study to address a patient's reluctance to remain on treatment before completing a full-length trial of medication. The clinical uncertainty about the appropriate adaptation prompts a second randomization at the new decision point to evaluate relevant options. Additionally, the standard 'all-or-none' principal stratification (PS) framework is applied to the first stage of the design to address treatment discontinuation that occurs too early for a midtrial adaptation. Drawing upon the adaptive intervention features, we develop assumptions to identify the PS causal estimand and to introduce restrictions on outcome distributions to simplify expectation-maximization calculations. We evaluate the performance of the PS setup, with particular attention to the role played by a binary covariate. The results emphasize the importance of collecting covariate data for use in design and analysis. We consider the generality of our approach beyond the setting of psychiatric research. PMID:25581413

  14. Adaptive sampling in two-phase designs: a biomarker study for progression in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, Michael A; Cook, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Response-dependent two-phase designs are used increasingly often in epidemiological studies to ensure sampling strategies offer good statistical efficiency while working within resource constraints. Optimal response-dependent two-phase designs are difficult to implement, however, as they require specification of unknown parameters. We propose adaptive two-phase designs that exploit information from an internal pilot study to approximate the optimal sampling scheme for an analysis based on mean score estimating equations. The frequency properties of estimators arising from this design are assessed through simulation, and they are shown to be similar to those from optimal designs. The design procedure is then illustrated through application to a motivating biomarker study in an ongoing rheumatology research program. Copyright © 2015 © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25951124

  15. A holistic environment for the design and execution of self-adaptive clinical pathways.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, Dimitrios Al; Skitsas, Ioannis E; Mentzas, Gregoris N

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges to be confronted by modern health care, so as to increase treatment quality, is the personalization of treatment. The treatment personalization requires the continuous reconfiguration and adaptation of the selected treatment schemes according to the "current" clinical status of each patient and "current" circumstances inside a health care organization that change rapidly, as well as the updated medical knowledge. In this paper, we present an innovative software environment that provides an integrated IT solution concerning the adaptation of health care processes (clinical pathways) during execution time. The software comprises a health care process execution engine assisted by a semantic infrastructure for reconfiguring the clinical pathways. During the execution of clinical pathways, the system reasons over the rules and reconfigures the next steps of the treatment. A graphical designer interface is implemented for the definition of the rule-set for the clinical pathways adaptation in a user-friendly way. PMID:20876028

  16. An Integrated Systems Approach to Designing Climate Change Adaptation Policy in Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, D.; Malano, H. M.; Davidson, B.; George, B.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change projections are characterised by large uncertainties with rainfall variability being the key challenge in designing adaptation policies. Climate change adaptation in water resources shows all the typical characteristics of 'wicked' problems typified by cognitive uncertainty as new scientific knowledge becomes available, problem instability, knowledge imperfection and strategic uncertainty due to institutional changes that inevitably occur over time. Planning that is characterised by uncertainties and instability requires an approach that can accommodate flexibility and adaptive capacity for decision-making. An ability to take corrective measures in the event that scenarios and responses envisaged initially derive into forms at some future stage. We present an integrated-multidisciplinary and comprehensive framework designed to interface and inform science and decision making in the formulation of water resource management strategies to deal with climate change in the Musi Catchment of Andhra Pradesh, India. At the core of this framework is a dialogue between stakeholders, decision makers and scientists to define a set of plausible responses to an ensemble of climate change scenarios derived from global climate modelling. The modelling framework used to evaluate the resulting combination of climate scenarios and adaptation responses includes the surface and groundwater assessment models (SWAT & MODFLOW) and the water allocation modelling (REALM) to determine the water security of each adaptation strategy. Three climate scenarios extracted from downscaled climate models were selected for evaluation together with four agreed responses—changing cropping patterns, increasing watershed development, changing the volume of groundwater extraction and improving irrigation efficiency. Water security in this context is represented by the combination of level of water availability and its associated security of supply for three economic activities (agriculture

  17. Design Framework for an Adaptive MOOC Enhanced by Blended Learning: Supplementary Training and Personalized Learning for Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gynther, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The research project has developed a design framework for an adaptive MOOC that complements the MOOC format with blended learning. The design framework consists of a design model and a series of learning design principles which can be used to design in-service courses for teacher professional development. The framework has been evaluated by…

  18. Design Process of Flight Vehicle Structures for a Common Bulkhead and an MPCV Spacecraft Adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin; Hull, Patrick V.

    2015-01-01

    Design and manufacturing space flight vehicle structures is a skillset that has grown considerably at NASA during that last several years. Beginning with the Ares program and followed by the Space Launch System (SLS); in-house designs were produced for both the Upper Stage and the SLS Multipurpose crew vehicle (MPCV) spacecraft adapter. Specifically, critical design review (CDR) level analysis and flight production drawing were produced for the above mentioned hardware. In particular, the experience of this in-house design work led to increased manufacturing infrastructure for both Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), improved skillsets in both analysis and design, and hands on experience in building and testing (MSA) full scale hardware. The hardware design and development processes from initiation to CDR and finally flight; resulted in many challenges and experiences that produced valuable lessons. This paper builds on these experiences of NASA in recent years on designing and fabricating flight hardware and examines the design/development processes used, as well as the challenges and lessons learned, i.e. from the initial design, loads estimation and mass constraints to structural optimization/affordability to release of production drawing to hardware manufacturing. While there are many documented design processes which a design engineer can follow, these unique experiences can offer insight into designing hardware in current program environments and present solutions to many of the challenges experienced by the engineering team.

  19. A new adaptive merging and growing algorithm for designing artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Monirul; Sattar, Md Abdus; Amin, Md Faijul; Yao, Xin; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm, called adaptive merging and growing algorithm (AMGA), in designing artificial neural networks (ANNs). This algorithm merges and adds hidden neurons during the training process of ANNs. The merge operation introduced in AMGA is a kind of a mixed mode operation, which is equivalent to pruning two neurons and adding one neuron. Unlike most previous studies, AMGA puts emphasis on autonomous functioning in the design process of ANNs. This is the main reason why AMGA uses an adaptive not a predefined fixed strategy in designing ANNs. The adaptive strategy merges or adds hidden neurons based on the learning ability of hidden neurons or the training progress of ANNs. In order to reduce the amount of retraining after modifying ANN architectures, AMGA prunes hidden neurons by merging correlated hidden neurons and adds hidden neurons by splitting existing hidden neurons. The proposed AMGA has been tested on a number of benchmark problems in machine learning and ANNs, including breast cancer, Australian credit card assessment, and diabetes, gene, glass, heart, iris, and thyroid problems. The experimental results show that AMGA can design compact ANN architectures with good generalization ability compared to other algorithms. PMID:19203888

  20. Application-specific design of adaptive structures with piezoceramic patch actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierach, Peter; Monner, Hans P.; Schoenecker, Andreas; Duerr, Johannes K.

    2002-07-01

    The development of a new technology for the manufacturing of adaptive structures on the basis of thin monolithic peizoceramic wafers is an important goal of the German industrial project 'Adaptronik'. Partners from automotive-, space-, medical-, engineering- and optical industry participate in this project to enable new adaptive solutions for their applications. Due to the extreme brittleness of the piezoceramic material the manufacturing of these structures is still very demanding. Very often cracks in the piezoceramic material make the structure useless. This problem becomes serious when large scale structures with many actuators and sensor are considered. To come to more reliable results the use of encapsulated piezoceramic actuators and sensor came into focus. With respect to the great variety of different requirements given by the industrial partners the use of standardized solutions was not feasible. The goal was to develop new elements with improved performance parameters that can easily be adapted to different applications. Due to a modular concept, the developed multifunctional elements can be designed to meet a great variety of different structures was developed. A first step to adapt this technology to prototype structures has been done by the development of special encapsulated patches for an adaptive lightweight satellite mirror.

  1. Dynamic experiment design regularization approach to adaptive imaging with array radar/SAR sensor systems.

    PubMed

    Shkvarko, Yuriy; Tuxpan, José; Santos, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    We consider a problem of high-resolution array radar/SAR imaging formalized in terms of a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem of nonparametric estimation of the power spatial spectrum pattern (SSP) of the random wavefield scattered from a remotely sensed scene observed through a kernel signal formation operator and contaminated with random Gaussian noise. First, the Sobolev-type solution space is constructed to specify the class of consistent kernel SSP estimators with the reproducing kernel structures adapted to the metrics in such the solution space. Next, the "model-free" variational analysis (VA)-based image enhancement approach and the "model-based" descriptive experiment design (DEED) regularization paradigm are unified into a new dynamic experiment design (DYED) regularization framework. Application of the proposed DYED framework to the adaptive array radar/SAR imaging problem leads to a class of two-level (DEED-VA) regularized SSP reconstruction techniques that aggregate the kernel adaptive anisotropic windowing with the projections onto convex sets to enforce the consistency and robustness of the overall iterative SSP estimators. We also show how the proposed DYED regularization method may be considered as a generalization of the MVDR, APES and other high-resolution nonparametric adaptive radar sensing techniques. A family of the DYED-related algorithms is constructed and their effectiveness is finally illustrated via numerical simulations. PMID:22163859

  2. Waveform design considerations for modulated pulse lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Shawn; Lee, Robert; Mullen, Linda; Cochenour, Brandon

    2014-05-01

    Techniques have been developed to mitigate many of the issues associated with underwater imaging in turbid environments. However, as targets get smaller and better camouflaged, new techniques are needed to enhance system sensitivity. Researchers at NAVAIR have been developing several techniques that use RF modulation to suppress background clutter and enhance target detection. One approach in particular uses modulation to encode a pulse in a synchronous line scan configuration. Previous results have shown this technique to be effective at both forward and backscatter suppression. Nearly a perfect analog to modulated pulse radar, this technique can leverage additional signal processing and pulse encoding schemes to further suppress background clutter, pull signals out of noise, and improve image resolution. Additionally, using a software controlled transmitter, we can exploit this flexibility without the need to change out expensive hardware. Various types of encoding schemes were tested and compared. We report on their comparative effectiveness relative to a more conventional non-coded pulse scheme to suppress background clutter and improved target detection.

  3. Full waveform modelling and misfit calculation using the VERCE platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, Thomas; Spinuso, Alessandro; Casarotti, Emanuele; Magnoni, Federica; Krischner, Lion; Igel, Heiner; Schwichtenberg, Horst; Frank, Anton; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the increasing resolution of seismic imagining by full waveform inversion has opened new research perspectives and practices. These methods rely on harnessing the computational power of large supercomputers and new storage capabilities, to run large parallel codes to simulate the seismic wave field in three-dimensional geological settings. The VERCE platform is designed to make these full waveform techniques accessible to a far wider spectrum of the seismological community. VERCE empowers a broad base of seismology researchers to harvest the new opportunities provided by well-established high-performance wave simulation codes such as SPECFEM3D. It meets a range of seismic research needs by eliminating the technical difficulties associated with using these codes, allowing users to focus on their research questions. VERCE delivers this power to seismologists through its science gateway, supporting wave simulation codes on each of the provided computing resources. Users can design their waveform simulation scenarios making use of a library of pre-loaded meshes and velocity models, and services for selecting earthquake focal mechanisms, seismic stations and recorded waveforms from existing catalogues, such as the GCMT catalogue, and FDSN data sources. They can also supply their own mesh, velocity model, earthquake catalogue and seismic observations. They can submit the simulations onto different computing resources, where VERCE provides codes that are tuned and supported for those resources. The simulations can currently be run on a range of European supercomputers in the PRACE network, including superMUC at LRZ, GALILEO at CINECA and on selected resources like Drachenfels at SCAI and within the EGI network. The gateway automates and looks after all these stages, but supplies seismologists with a provenance system that allows them to manage a large series of runs, review progress, and explore the results. The platform automates misfit analysis between

  4. Lightning current waveform measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtasinski, R. J.; Fuchs, J. C.; Grove, C. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus is described for monitoring current waveforms produced by lightning strikes which generate currents in an elongated cable. These currents are converted to voltages and to light waves for being transmitted over an optical cable to a remote location. At the remote location, the waves are reconstructed back into electrical waves for being stored into a memory. The information is stored within the memory with a timing signal so that only different signals need be stored in order to reconstruct the wave form.

  5. Local Laser Strengthening of Steel Sheets for Load Adapted Component Design in Car Body Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Axel; Heitmanek, Marco; Standfuss, Jens; Brenner, Berndt; Wunderlich, Gerd; Donat, Bernd

    The current trend in car body construction concerning light weight design and car safety improvement increasingly requires an adaption of the local material properties on the component load. Martensitic hardenable steels, which are typically used in car body components, show a significant hardening effect, for instance in laser welded seams. This effect can be purposefully used as a local strengthening method. For several steel grades the local strengthening, resulting from a laser remelting process was investigated. The strength in the treated zone was determined at crash relevant strain rates. A load adapted design of complex reinforcement structures was developed for compression and bending loaded tube samples, using numerical simulation of the deformation behavior. Especially for bending loaded parts, the crash energy absorption can be increased significantly by local laser strengthening.

  6. Reaction jet and aerodynamics compound control missile autopilot design based on adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenhui; Dong, Chaoyang

    2006-11-01

    Because of nonlinearity and strong coupling of reaction-jet and aerodynamics compound control missile, a missile autopilot design method based on adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control (AFSMC) is proposed in this paper. The universal approximation ability of adaptive fuzzy system is used to approximate the nonlinear function in missile dynamics equation during the flight of high angle of attack. And because the sliding mode control is robustness to external disturbance strongly, the sliding mode surface of the error system is constructed to overcome the influence of approximation error and external disturbance so that the actual overload can track the maneuvering command with high precision. Simulation results show that the missile autopilot designed in this paper not only can track large overload command with higher precision than traditional method, but also is robust to model uncertainty and external disturbance strongly.

  7. Design of Unstructured Adaptive (UA) NAS Parallel Benchmark Featuring Irregular, Dynamic Memory Accesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Hui-Yu; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the design of a new method for the measurement of the performance of modern computer systems when solving scientific problems featuring irregular, dynamic memory accesses. The method involves the solution of a stylized heat transfer problem on an unstructured, adaptive grid. A Spectral Element Method (SEM) with an adaptive, nonconforming mesh is selected to discretize the transport equation. The relatively high order of the SEM lowers the fraction of wall clock time spent on inter-processor communication, which eases the load balancing task and allows us to concentrate on the memory accesses. The benchmark is designed to be three-dimensional. Parallelization and load balance issues of a reference implementation will be described in detail in future reports.

  8. Waveform modeling the deep slab beneath northernmost Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, D. V.; Sun, D.

    2011-12-01

    The interactions between subducted slab and transition zone are crucial issues in dynamic modeling. Previous mantle convection studies have shown that various viscosity structures can result in various slab shape, width, and edge sharpness. Recent tomographic images based on USArray data reveals strong multi-scale heterogeneous upper mantle beneath western US. Among those features, a slab-like fast anomaly extends from 300 to 600 km depth below Nevada and western Utah, which was suggested as a segmented chunk of the Farallon slab. But we still missing key information about the details of this structure and whether this structure flatten outs in the transition zone, where various tomographic models display inconsistent images. The study of multipathing and waveform broadening around sharp features have been proved a efficient way to study such features. Here, we use both P and S waveform data from High Lava Plains seismic experiments and USArray to produce a detailed image. If we amplify the Schmandt and Humphreys [2010] 's S-wave tomography model by 1.5, we can produce excellent travel-time fits. But the waveform distortions are not as strong as those observed in data for events coming from the southeast, which suggest a much sharper anomaly. The waveform broadening features are not observed for events arriving from northwestern. By fitting the SH waveform data, we suggest that this slab-like structure dips ~35° to the southeast, extending to a depth near 660 km with a velocity increase of about 5 per cent. To generate corresponding P model, we adapt the SH wave model and scale the model using a suite of R (=dlnVs/dlnVp) values. We find that synthetics from the model with R ≈ 2 can fit the observed data, which confirms the segmented slab interpretation of this high velocity anomaly.

  9. Fractal characteristics for binary noise radar waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing C.

    2016-05-01

    Noise radars have many advantages over conventional radars and receive great attentions recently. The performance of a noise radar is determined by its waveforms. Investigating characteristics of noise radar waveforms has significant value for evaluating noise radar performance. In this paper, we use binomial distribution theory to analyze general characteristics of binary phase coded (BPC) noise waveforms. Focusing on aperiodic autocorrelation function, we demonstrate that the probability distributions of sidelobes for a BPC noise waveform depend on the distances of these sidelobes to the mainlobe. The closer a sidelobe to the mainlobe, the higher the probability for this sidelobe to be a maximum sidelobe. We also develop Monte Carlo framework to explore the characteristics that are difficult to investigate analytically. Through Monte Carlo experiments, we reveal the Fractal relationship between the code length and the maximum sidelobe value for BPC waveforms, and propose using fractal dimension to measure noise waveform performance.

  10. Building Adaptive Game-Based Learning Resources: The Integration of IMS Learning Design and

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgos, Daniel; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Sierra, Jose Luis; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar; Specht, Marcus; Koper, Rob

    2008-01-01

    IMS Learning Design (IMS-LD) is a specification to create units of learning (UoLs), which express a certain pedagogical model or strategy (e.g., adaptive learning with games). However, the authoring process of a UoL remains difficult because of the lack of high-level authoring tools for IMS-LD, even more so when the focus is on specific topics,…

  11. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting. PMID:24273128

  12. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain’s behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user’s motor intention during CLDA—a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to

  13. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Orsborn, Amy L; Carmena, Jose M

    2016-04-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain's behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user's motor intention during CLDA-a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to parameter

  14. Genomic Measures to Predict Adaptation to Novel Sensorimotor Environments and Improve Personalization of Countermeasure Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreutzberg, G. A.; Zanello, S.; Seidler, R. D.; Peters, B.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during their initial exposure to microgravity and during the re-adaptation phase following a return to an Earth-gravitational environment. These alterations may affect crewmembers' ability to perform mission-critical functional tasks. Interestingly, astronauts have shown significant inter-subject variation in adaptive capability during gravitational transitions. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which individual astronauts would be affected would improve the efficacy of personalized countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. The success of such an approach depends on the development of predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptation, which would ascertain each crewmember's adaptive capacity. The goal of this study is to determine whether specific genetic polymorphisms have significant influence on sensorimotor adaptability, which can help inform the design of personalized training countermeasures. Methods. Subjects (n=15) were tested on their ability to negotiate a complex obstacle course for ten test trials while wearing up-down vision-displacing goggles. This presented a visuomotor challenge while doing a full body task. The first test trial time and the recovery rate over the ten trials were used as adaptability performance metrics. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected for their role in neural pathways underlying sensorimotor adaptation and were identified in subjects' DNA extracted from saliva samples: catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT, rs4680), dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2, rs1076560), brain-derived neurotrophic factor genes (BDNF, rs6265), and the DraI polymorphism of the alpha-2 adrenergic receptor. The relationship between the SNPs and test performance was assessed by assigning subjects a rank score based on their adaptability performance metrics and comparing gene expression between the top half and bottom half performers

  15. High-precision triangular-waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, T.R.

    1981-11-14

    An ultra-linear ramp generator having separately programmable ascending and decending ramp rates and voltages is provided. Two constant current sources provide the ramp through an integrator. Switching of the current at current source inputs rather than at the integrator input eliminates switching transients and contributes to the waveform precision. The triangular waveforms produced by the waveform generator are characterized by accurate reproduction and low drift over periods of several hours. The ascending and descending slopes are independently selectable.

  16. Cascade direct adaptive fuzzy control design for a nonlinear two-axis inverted-pendulum servomechanism.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong; Kuo, Meng-An; Lee, Jeng-Dao

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents and analyzes a cascade direct adaptive fuzzy control (DAFC) scheme for a two-axis inverted-pendulum servomechanism. Because the dynamic characteristic of the two-axis inverted-pendulum servomechanism is a nonlinear unstable nonminimum-phase underactuated system, it is difficult to design a suitable control scheme that simultaneously realizes real-time stabilization and accurate tracking control, and it is not easy to directly apply conventional computed torque strategies to this underactuated system. Therefore, the cascade DAFC scheme including inner and outer control loops is investigated for the stabilizing and tracking control of a nonlinear two-axis inverted-pendulum servomechanism. The goal of the inner control loop is to design a DAFC law so that the stick angle vector can fit the stick angle command vector derived from the stick angle reference model. In the outer loop, the reference signal vector is designed via an adaptive path planner so that the cart position vector tracks the cart position command vector. Moreover, all adaptive algorithms in the cascade DAFC system are derived using the Lyapunov stability analysis, so that system stability can be guaranteed in the entire closed-loop system. Relying on this cascade structure, the stick angle and cart position tracking-error vectors will simultaneously converge to zero. Numerical simulations and experimental results are given to verify that the proposed cascade DAFC system can achieve favorable stabilizing and tracking performance and is robust with regard to system uncertainties. PMID:18348926

  17. Analysis of Q burst waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toshio; Komatsu, Masayuki

    2007-04-01

    The electric field changes in ELF to VLF were observed with a ball antenna in fair weather at Kochi (latitude 33.3°N, longitude 133.4°E) during 2003-2004. Some 376 Q bursts were obtained, seven examples of which are analyzed in the present study. The continuous frequency spectra of the Q bursts and the background noises from 1.0 Hz to 11 kHz are compared, and it was found that the Q bursts prevail over the background in the frequency range from 1 to 300 Hz. The surplus is 20 dB (in amplitude) near the fundamental mode frequency. The "W"-type changes found in the initial portion of the Q burst waveforms are interpreted as the combined electromagnetic waveform of direct and antipodal waves from the causative lightning strokes. From the time intervals between the two waves, the source-receiver distances are estimated as far as 19 Mm. The pulses to excite the Schumann resonances in the Q bursts are clearly identified.

  18. Aluminum reference plate, heat sink, and actuator design for an adaptive secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Vecchio, Ciro

    1998-09-01

    The design of an adaptive secondary mirror has to satisfy many requirements coming from different fields. The thin mirror must be actuated very precisely with a large bandwidth. The reference plate has to provide a high stability reference for the optical surfaces. The local seeing is not to be degraded by any significant thermal perturbation. In this article, the performances of a configuration with a single aluminum reference plate, that also provides the heat sink, are computed starting from the input power coming from the magnetic actuators, whose magnetic design has been revised.

  19. Object-oriented software design for the Mt. Wilson 100-inch Hooker telescope adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas G.

    2000-06-01

    The object oriented software design paradigm has been instrumented in the development of the Adoptics software used in the Hooker telescope's ADOPT adaptive optics system. The software runs on a Pentium-class PC host and eight DSP processors connected to the host's motherboard bus. C++ classes were created to implement most of the host software's functionality, with the object oriented features of inheritance, encapsulation and abstraction being the most useful. Careful class design at the inception of the project allowed for the rapid addition of features without comprising the integrity of the software. Base class implementations include the DSP system, real-time graphical displays and opto-mechanical actuator control.

  20. Broadband noise suppression and feature identification of ECG waveforms using mathematical morphology and embedding theorem.

    PubMed

    Ji, T Y; Wu, Q H

    2013-12-01

    The paper presents an adaptive morphological filter developed using multiscale mathematical morphology (MM) to reject broadband noise from ECG signals without affecting the feature waveforms. As a pre-processing procedure, the adaptive morphological filter cleans an ECG signal to prepare it for further analysis. The noiseless ECG signal is embedded within a two-dimensional phase space to form a binary image and the identification of the feature waveforms is carried out based on the information presented by the image. The classification of the feature waveforms is implemented by an adaptive clustering technique according to the geometric information represented by the image in the phase space. Simulation studies on ECG records from the MIT-BIH and BIDMC databases have demonstrated the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed methods. PMID:24094825

  1. Optimal adaptive two-stage designs for phase II cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Englert, Stefan; Kieser, Meinhard

    2013-11-01

    In oncology, single-arm two-stage designs with binary endpoint are widely applied in phase II for the development of cytotoxic cancer therapies. Simon's optimal design with prefixed sample sizes in both stages minimizes the expected sample size under the null hypothesis and is one of the most popular designs. The search algorithms that are currently used to identify phase II designs showing prespecified characteristics are computationally intensive. For this reason, most authors impose restrictions on their search procedure. However, it remains unclear to what extent this approach influences the optimality of the resulting designs. This article describes an extension to fixed sample size phase II designs by allowing the sample size of stage two to depend on the number of responses observed in the first stage. Furthermore, we present a more efficient numerical algorithm that allows for an exhaustive search of designs. Comparisons between designs presented in the literature and the proposed optimal adaptive designs show that while the improvements are generally moderate, notable reductions in the average sample size can be achieved for specific parameter constellations when applying the new method and search strategy. PMID:23868324

  2. Design of adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural sliding mode controller for uncertain nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Shahriari kahkeshi, Maryam; Sheikholeslam, Farid; Zekri, Maryam

    2013-05-01

    This paper proposes novel adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural sliding mode controller (AFWN-SMC) for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. The main contribution of this paper is to design smooth sliding mode control (SMC) for a class of high-order nonlinear systems while the structure of the system is unknown and no prior knowledge about uncertainty is available. The proposed scheme composed of an Adaptive Fuzzy Wavelet Neural Controller (AFWNC) to construct equivalent control term and an Adaptive Proportional-Integral (A-PI) controller for implementing switching term to provide smooth control input. Asymptotical stability of the closed loop system is guaranteed, using the Lyapunov direct method. To show the efficiency of the proposed scheme, some numerical examples are provided. To validate the results obtained by proposed approach, some other methods are adopted from the literature and applied for comparison. Simulation results show superiority and capability of the proposed controller to improve the steady state performance and transient response specifications by using less numbers of fuzzy rules and on-line adaptive parameters in comparison to other methods. Furthermore, control effort has considerably decreased and chattering phenomenon has been completely removed. PMID:23453235

  3. Carotid arterial blood pressure waveform monitoring using a portable ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Joohyun Seo; Pietrangelo, Sabino J; Hae-Seung Lee; Sodini, Charles G

    2015-08-01

    This work presents a non-invasive arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform monitoring technique using ultrasound. A portable ultrasound system to excite ultrasound transducers and acquire data is designed with off-the-shelf components. The insonation angles are identified using a vector Doppler technique based on the cosine dependency of the Doppler signals. The pulse pressure of an estimated waveform at the left common carotid artery is compared to the standard sphygmomanometer measurement in a clinical test. The estimated carotid ABP waveform shows excellent agreement to the finger ABP waveform with expected discrepancy of the systolic peak shape due to different measurement sites. The proposed method also tracks slow blood pressure fluctuations. This validation on human subjects shows potential for a noninvasive blood pressure waveform monitoring device at central arterial sites. PMID:26737584

  4. Goldstone Solar System Radar Waveform Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    Due to distances and relative motions among the transmitter, target object, and receiver, the time-base between any transmitted and received signal will undergo distortion. Pre-distortion of the transmitted signal to compensate for this time-base distortion allows reception of an undistorted signal. In most radar applications, an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) would be used to store the pre-calculated waveform and then play back this waveform during transmission. The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), however, has transmission durations that exceed the available memory storage of such a device. A waveform generator capable of real-time pre-distortion of a radar waveform to a given time-base distortion function is needed. To pre-distort the transmitted signal, both the baseband radar waveform and the RF carrier must be modified. In the GSSR, this occurs at the up-conversion mixing stage to an intermediate frequency (IF). A programmable oscillator (PO) is used to generate the IF along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the RF carrier. This serves as the IF input to the waveform generator where it is mixed with a baseband radar waveform whose time-base has been distorted to match the given time-base distortion function producing the modulated IF output. An error control feedback loop is used to precisely control the time-base distortion of the baseband waveform, allowing its real-time generation. The waveform generator produces IF modulated radar waveforms whose time-base has been pre-distorted to match a given arbitrary function. The following waveforms are supported: continuous wave (CW), frequency hopped (FH), binary phase code (BPC), and linear frequency modulation (LFM). The waveform generator takes as input an IF with a time varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier. The waveform generator supports interconnection with deep-space network (DSN) timing and frequency standards, and

  5. The design of a parallel adaptive paving all-quadrilateral meshing algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, T.J.; Lober, R.R.; Vaughan, C.

    1995-08-01

    Adaptive finite element analysis demands a great deal of computational resources, and as such is most appropriately solved in a massively parallel computer environment. This analysis will require other parallel algorithms before it can fully utilize MP computers, one of which is parallel adaptive meshing. A version of the paving algorithm is being designed which operates in parallel but which also retains the robustness and other desirable features present in the serial algorithm. Adaptive paving in a production mode is demonstrated using a Babuska-Rheinboldt error estimator on a classic linearly elastic plate problem. The design of the parallel paving algorithm is described, and is based on the decomposition of a surface into {open_quotes}virtual{close_quotes} surfaces. The topology of the virtual surface boundaries is defined using mesh entities (mesh nodes and edges) so as to allow movement of these boundaries with smoothing and other operations. This arrangement allows the use of the standard paving algorithm on subdomain interiors, after the negotiation of the boundary mesh.

  6. Using adaptive genetic algorithms in the design of morphological filters in textural image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Haese-Coat, Veronique; Ronsin, Joseph

    1996-03-01

    An adaptive GA scheme is adopted for the optimal morphological filter design problem. The adaptive crossover and mutation rate which make the GA avoid premature and at the same time assure convergence of the program are successfully used in optimal morphological filter design procedure. In the string coding step, each string (chromosome) is composed of a structuring element coding chain concatenated with a filter sequence coding chain. In decoding step, each string is divided into 3 chains which then are decoded respectively into one structuring element with a size inferior to 5 by 5 and two concatenating morphological filter operators. The fitness function in GA is based on the mean-square-error (MSE) criterion. In string selection step, a stochastic tournament procedure is used to replace the simple roulette wheel program in order to accelerate the convergence. The final convergence of our algorithm is reached by a two step converging strategy. In presented applications of noise removal from texture images, it is found that with the optimized morphological filter sequences, the obtained MSE values are smaller than those using corresponding non-adaptive morphological filters, and the optimized shapes and orientations of structuring elements take approximately the same shapes and orientations as those of the image textons.

  7. A versatile waveform generator for testing neuroelectric signal processors.

    PubMed

    Kohn, A F

    1989-08-01

    A multi-channel waveform generator was designed for testing neuroelectric signal processors. Smooth transient signals that resemble action potentials or evoked potentials are generated by a second order switched capacitor filter excited by brief rectangular pulses. The choice of an integrated circuit switched capacitor filter simplified the design by circumventing some of the disadvantages of conventional active filters. The waveform generator is versatile, with several signal parameters being independently adjustable from front panel controls: duration, waveshape, latency, amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio. The generator has been used for testing evoked potential acquisition and processing systems, for evaluating the effects of analog filters on evoked potentials and for testing systems designed to detect and classify trains of multi-unit action potentials. PMID:2770339

  8. A robust adaptive autopilot design for decomposed bank to turn missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kwang Sub

    2001-07-01

    A decomposed robust adaptive controller design procedure is developed for 3-channel BTT missile systems. Three decomposed subsystems are constructed for highly nonlinear and coupled dynamic systems after parameter analysis is carried out. Appropriate adaptive optimal inner loop controllers are designed for accurate tracking performance to the reference command inputs of the respective subsystems. For robustness of systems, decomposed outer loop structures are introduced to minimize system coupling and to reduce nonlinear effects of BTT missile dynamic systems. The overall outer loop robust controller is designed to accommodate parameter variations and uncertainties with referenced model systems. The robust outer loop controller is designed by constructing decomposed stabilizing controllers in the form of the Youla parameterization. The results can be readily generalized to N-channel systems. The design procedure is built upon the J-spectral factorization approach to Hinfinity control. Instead of the centralized control, we employed decentralized controllers for reduced complexity in control implementations. In this research, a new concept for system modeling and decomposition, which uses the rate of system dynamics or the sensitivity of system parameter. After exhaustive classification and investigations of system characteristics, we can categorize several subsystems from overall system dynamic models. Subsystems are characterized by system dynamics with similar rates of changes. Once we get relatively small sized and homogeneous parameter groups, it is easier to design respective controllers. Otherwise, difficult trade offs must be made on control objectives for different kinds of dynamic characteristics of the whole system. The new idea is applied to a typical BTT missile system. Simulations results demonstrate that decomposed controller design is satisfactory for the BTT missile autopilot systems with good robustness and dynamic performances.

  9. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, A; Baum, P

    2016-07-22

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample's oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available. PMID:27463670

  10. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A.; Baum, P.

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample’s oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available.

  11. Designing Adaptive Low-Dissipative High Order Schemes for Long-Time Integrations. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen C.; Sjoegreen, B.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A general framework for the design of adaptive low-dissipative high order schemes is presented. It encompasses a rather complete treatment of the numerical approach based on four integrated design criteria: (1) For stability considerations, condition the governing equations before the application of the appropriate numerical scheme whenever it is possible; (2) For consistency, compatible schemes that possess stability properties, including physical and numerical boundary condition treatments, similar to those of the discrete analogue of the continuum are preferred; (3) For the minimization of numerical dissipation contamination, efficient and adaptive numerical dissipation control to further improve nonlinear stability and accuracy should be used; and (4) For practical considerations, the numerical approach should be efficient and applicable to general geometries, and an efficient and reliable dynamic grid adaptation should be used if necessary. These design criteria are, in general, very useful to a wide spectrum of flow simulations. However, the demand on the overall numerical approach for nonlinear stability and accuracy is much more stringent for long-time integration of complex multiscale viscous shock/shear/turbulence/acoustics interactions and numerical combustion. Robust classical numerical methods for less complex flow physics are not suitable or practical for such applications. The present approach is designed expressly to address such flow problems, especially unsteady flows. The minimization of employing very fine grids to overcome the production of spurious numerical solutions and/or instability due to under-resolved grids is also sought. The incremental studies to illustrate the performance of the approach are summarized. Extensive testing and full implementation of the approach is forthcoming. The results shown so far are very encouraging.

  12. Designing Adaptive Artificial Agents for an Economic Production and Conflict Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani-M, Behrooz; Parris, Brett W.

    Production and conflict models have been used over the past 30 years to represent the effects of unproductive resource allocation in economics. Their major applications are in modelling the assignment of property rights, rent-seeking and defense economics. This paper describes the process of designing an agent used in a production and conflict model. Using the capabilities of an agent-based approach to economic modelling, we have enriched a simple decision-maker of the kind used in classic general equilibrium economic models, to build an adaptive and interactive agent which uses its own attributes, its neighbors' parameters and information from its environment to make resource allocation decisions. Our model presents emergent and adaptive behaviors than cannot be captured using classic production and conflict agents. Some possible extensions for future applications are also recommended.

  13. A Unifying Framework for Adaptive Radar Detection in Homogeneous Plus Structured Interference— Part II: Detectors Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuonzo, Domenico; De Maio, Antonio; Orlando, Danilo

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of adaptive multidimensional/multichannel signal detection in homogeneous Gaussian disturbance with unknown covariance matrix and structured (unknown) deterministic interference. The aforementioned problem extends the well-known Generalized Multivariate Analysis of Variance (GMANOVA) tackled in the open literature. In a companion paper, we have obtained the Maximal Invariant Statistic (MIS) for the problem under consideration, as an enabling tool for the design of suitable detectors which possess the Constant False-Alarm Rate (CFAR) property. Herein, we focus on the development of several theoretically-founded detectors for the problem under consideration. First, all the considered detectors are shown to be function of the MIS, thus proving their CFARness property. Secondly, coincidence or statistical equivalence among some of them in such a general signal model is proved. Thirdly, strong connections to well-known simpler scenarios found in adaptive detection literature are established. Finally, simulation results are provided for a comparison of the proposed receivers.

  14. Neural Controller Design-Based Adaptive Control for Nonlinear MIMO Systems With Unknown Hysteresis Inputs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Tong, Shaocheng; Chen, C L Philip; Li, Dong-Juan

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies an adaptive neural control for nonlinear multiple-input multiple-output systems in interconnected form. The studied systems are composed of N subsystems in pure feedback structure and the interconnection terms are contained in every equation of each subsystem. Moreover, the studied systems consider the effects of Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) hysteresis model. It is for the first time to study the control problem for such a class of systems. In addition, the proposed scheme removes an important assumption imposed on the previous works that the bounds of the parameters in PI hysteresis are known. The radial basis functions neural networks are employed to approximate unknown functions. The adaptation laws and the controllers are designed by employing the backstepping technique. The closed-loop system can be proven to be stable by using Lyapunov theorem. A simulation example is studied to validate the effectiveness of the scheme. PMID:25898325

  15. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator.

    PubMed

    Govorkov, S; Ivanov, B I; Il'ichev, E; Meyer, H-G

    2014-05-01

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation. PMID:24880390

  16. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator

    SciTech Connect

    Govorkov, S.; Ivanov, B. I.; Il'ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2014-05-15

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation.

  17. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorkov, S.; Ivanov, B. I.; Il'ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2014-05-01

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation.

  18. Design and Flight Tests of an Adaptive Control System Employing Normal-Acceleration Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, Water E.; McLean, John D.; Hegarty, Daniel M.; Heinle, Donovan R.

    1961-01-01

    An adaptive control system employing normal-acceleration command has been designed with the aid of an analog computer and has been flight tested. The design of the system was based on the concept of using a mathematical model in combination with a high gain and a limiter. The study was undertaken to investigate the application of a system of this type to the task of maintaining nearly constant dynamic longitudinal response of a piloted airplane over the flight envelope without relying on air data measurements for gain adjustment. The range of flight conditions investigated was between Mach numbers of 0.36 and 1.15 and altitudes of 10,000 and 40,000 feet. The final adaptive system configuration was derived from analog computer tests, in which the physical airplane control system and much of the control circuitry were included in the loop. The method employed to generate the feedback signals resulted in a model whose characteristics varied somewhat with changes in flight condition. Flight results showed that the system limited the variation in longitudinal natural frequency of the adaptive airplane to about half that of the basic airplane and that, for the subsonic cases, the damping ratio was maintained between 0.56 and 0.69. The system also automatically compensated for the transonic trim change. Objectionable features of the system were an exaggerated sensitivity of pitch attitude to gust disturbances, abnormally large pitch attitude response for a given pilot input at low speeds, and an initial delay in normal-acceleration response to pilot control at all flight conditions. The adaptive system chatter of +/-0.05 to +/-0.10 of elevon at about 9 cycles per second (resulting in a maximum airplane normal-acceleration response of from +/-0.025 g to +/- 0.035 g) was considered by the pilots to be mildly objectionable but tolerable.

  19. Carrier Modulation Via Waveform Probability Density Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2004-01-01

    Beyond the classic modes of carrier modulation by varying amplitude (AM), phase (PM), or frequency (FM), we extend the modulation domain of an analog carrier signal to include a class of general modulations which are distinguished by their probability density function histogram. Separate waveform states are easily created by varying the pdf of the transmitted waveform. Individual waveform states are assignable as proxies for digital ONEs or ZEROs. At the receiver, these states are easily detected by accumulating sampled waveform statistics and performing periodic pattern matching, correlation, or statistical filtering. No fundamental natural laws are broken in the detection process. We show how a typical modulation scheme would work in the digital domain and suggest how to build an analog version. We propose that clever variations of the modulating waveform (and thus the histogram) can provide simple steganographic encoding.

  20. Carrier Modulation Via Waveform Probability Density Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2006-01-01

    Beyond the classic modes of carrier modulation by varying amplitude (AM), phase (PM), or frequency (FM), we extend the modulation domain of an analog carrier signal to include a class of general modulations which are distinguished by their probability density function histogram. Separate waveform states are easily created by varying the pdf of the transmitted waveform. Individual waveform states are assignable as proxies for digital one's or zero's. At the receiver, these states are easily detected by accumulating sampled waveform statistics and performing periodic pattern matching, correlation, or statistical filtering. No fundamental physical laws are broken in the detection process. We show how a typical modulation scheme would work in the digital domain and suggest how to build an analog version. We propose that clever variations of the modulating waveform (and thus the histogram) can provide simple steganographic encoding.

  1. Designing a meta-level architecture in Java for adaptive parallelism by mobile software agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, Stephen Victor

    Adaptive parallelism refers to a parallel computation that runs on a pool of processors that may join or withdraw from a running computation. In this dissertation, a functional system of agents and agent behaviors for adaptive parallelism is developed. Software agents have the properties of robustness and have capacity for fault-tolerance. Adaptation and fault-tolerance emerge from the interaction of self-directed autonomous software agents for a parallel computation application. The multi-agent system can be considered an object-oriented system with a higher-level architectural component, i.e., a meta level for agent behavior. The meta-level object architecture is based on patterns of behavior and communication for mobile agents, which are developed to support cooperative problem solving in a distributed-heterogeneous computing environment. Although parallel processing is a suggested application domain for mobile agents implemented in the Java language, the development of robust agent behaviors implemented in an efficient manner is an active research area. Performance characteristics for three versions of a pattern recognition problem are used to demonstrate a linear speed-up with efficiency that is compared to research using a traditional client-server protocol in the C language. The best ideas from existing approaches to adaptive parallelism are used to create a single general-purpose paradigm that overcomes problems associated with nodefailure, the use of a single-centralized or shared resource, requirements for clients to actively join a computation, and a variety of other limitations that are associated with existing systems. The multi-agent system, and experiments, show how adaptation and parallelism can be exploited by a meta-architecture for a distributed-scientific application that is of particular interest to design of signal-processing ground stations. To a large extent the framework separates concern for algorithmic design from concern for where and

  2. Adaptive filter design based on the LMS algorithm for delay elimination in TCR/FC compensators.

    PubMed

    Hooshmand, Rahmat Allah; Torabian Esfahani, Mahdi

    2011-04-01

    Thyristor controlled reactor with fixed capacitor (TCR/FC) compensators have the capability of compensating reactive power and improving power quality phenomena. Delay in the response of such compensators degrades their performance. In this paper, a new method based on adaptive filters (AF) is proposed in order to eliminate delay and increase the response of the TCR compensator. The algorithm designed for the adaptive filters is performed based on the least mean square (LMS) algorithm. In this design, instead of fixed capacitors, band-pass LC filters are used. To evaluate the filter, a TCR/FC compensator was used for nonlinear and time varying loads of electric arc furnaces (EAFs). These loads caused occurrence of power quality phenomena in the supplying system, such as voltage fluctuation and flicker, odd and even harmonics and unbalancing in voltage and current. The above design was implemented in a realistic system model of a steel complex. The simulation results show that applying the proposed control in the TCR/FC compensator efficiently eliminated delay in the response and improved the performance of the compensator in the power system. PMID:21193194

  3. Effect of Margin Design and Processing Steps on Marginal Adaptation of Captek Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Amy; Flinton, Robert; Vaidyanathan, Jayalakshmi; Vaidyanathan, Tritala

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of four margin designs on marginal adaptation of Captek crowns during selected processing steps. Twenty-four Captek crowns were fabricated, six each of four margin designs: shoulder (Group A), chamfer (Group B), chamfer with bevel (Group C), and shoulder with bevel (Group D). Marginal discrepancies between crowns and matching dies were measured at selected points for each sample at the coping stage (Stage 1), following porcelain application (Stage 2) and cementation (Stage 3). Digital imaging methods were used to measure marginal gap. The results indicate decreasing trend of margin gap as a function of margin design in the order A>B>C>D. Between processing steps, the trend was in the order Stage 3 < Stage 1 < Stage 2. Porcelain firing had no significant effect on marginal adaptation, but cementation decreased the marginal gap. Generally, the margin gap in Captek restorations were in all cases less than the reported acceptable range of margin gaps for ceramometal restorations. These results are clinically favorable outcomes and may be associated with the ductility and burnishability of matrix phase in Captek metal coping margins. PMID:21991488

  4. Design of adaptive control systems by means of self-adjusting transversal filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merhav, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    The design of closed-loop adaptive control systems based on nonparametric identification was addressed. Implementation is by self-adjusting Least Mean Square (LMS) transversal filters. The design concept is Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC). Major issues are to preserve the linearity of the error equations of each LMS filter, and to prevent estimation bias that is due to process or measurement noise, thus providing necessary conditions for the convergence and stability of the control system. The controlled element is assumed to be asymptotically stable and minimum phase. Because of the nonparametric Finite Impulse Response (FIR) estimates provided by the LMS filters, a-priori information on the plant model is needed only in broad terms. Following a survey of control system configurations and filter design considerations, system implementation is shown here in Single Input Single Output (SISO) format which is readily extendable to multivariable forms. In extensive computer simulation studies the controlled element is represented by a second-order system with widely varying damping, natural frequency, and relative degree.

  5. Truncated adaptation design for decentralised neural dynamic surface control of interconnected nonlinear systems under input saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shigen; Dong, Hairong; Lyu, Shihang; Ning, Bin

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies decentralised neural adaptive control of a class of interconnected nonlinear systems, each subsystem is in the presence of input saturation and external disturbance and has independent system order. Using a novel truncated adaptation design, dynamic surface control technique and minimal-learning-parameters algorithm, the proposed method circumvents the problems of 'explosion of complexity' and 'dimension curse' that exist in the traditional backstepping design. Comparing to the methodology that neural weights are online updated in the controllers, only one scalar needs to be updated in the controllers of each subsystem when dealing with unknown systematic dynamics. Radial basis function neural networks (NNs) are used in the online approximation of unknown systematic dynamics. It is proved using Lyapunov stability theory that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded. The tracking errors of each subsystems, the amplitude of NN approximation residuals and external disturbances can be attenuated to arbitrarily small by tuning proper design parameters. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Adaptive uniform grayscale coded aperture design for high dynamic range compressive spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Nelson; Rueda, Hoover; Arguello, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is an important area with many applications in surveillance, agriculture and medicine. The disadvantage of conventional spectroscopy techniques is that they collect the whole datacube. In contrast, compressive spectral imaging systems capture snapshot compressive projections, which are the input of reconstruction algorithms to yield the underlying datacube. Common compressive spectral imagers use coded apertures to perform the coded projections. The coded apertures are the key elements in these imagers since they define the sensing matrix of the system. The proper design of the coded aperture entries leads to a good quality in the reconstruction. In addition, the compressive measurements are prone to saturation due to the limited dynamic range of the sensor, hence the design of coded apertures must consider saturation. The saturation errors in compressive measurements are unbounded and compressive sensing recovery algorithms only provide solutions for bounded noise or bounded with high probability. In this paper it is proposed the design of uniform adaptive grayscale coded apertures (UAGCA) to improve the dynamic range of the estimated spectral images by reducing the saturation levels. The saturation is attenuated between snapshots using an adaptive filter which updates the entries of the grayscale coded aperture based on the previous snapshots. The coded apertures are optimized in terms of transmittance and number of grayscale levels. The advantage of the proposed method is the efficient use of the dynamic range of the image sensor. Extensive simulations show improvements in the image reconstruction of the proposed method compared with grayscale coded apertures (UGCA) and adaptive block-unblock coded apertures (ABCA) in up to 10 dB.

  7. Strategy missile control system design using adaptive fuzzy control based on Popov stability criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianling; An, Jinwen; Wang, Mina

    2005-11-01

    This paper describes the application and simulation of an adaptive fuzzy controller for a missile model. The fuzzy control system is tested using different values of fuzzy controller correctional factor on a nonlinear missile model. It is shown that the self-tuning fuzzy controller is well suited for controlling the pitch loop of the missile control system with air turbulence and parameter variety. The research shows that the Popov stability criterion could successfully guarantee the stability of the fuzzy system. It provides a good method for the design of missile control system. Simulation results suggest significant benefits from fuzzy logic in control task for missile pitch loop control.

  8. Optical design of the Big Bear Solar Observatory's multi-conjugate adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianyu; Gorceix, Nicolas; Schmidt, Dirk; Goode, Philip R.; Cao, Wenda; Rimmele, Thomas R.; Coulter, Roy

    2014-07-01

    A multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system is being built for the world's largest aperture 1.6m solar telescope, New Solar Telescope, at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The BBSO MCAO system employs three deformable mirrors to enlarge the corrected field of view. In order to characterize the MCAO performance with different optical configurations and DM conjugated altitudes, the BBSO MCAO setup also needs to be flexible. In this paper, we present the optical design of the BBSO MCAO system.

  9. Reliability Optimization Design for Contact Springs of AC Contactors Based on Adaptive Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sheng; Su, Xiuping; Wu, Ziran; Xu, Chengwen

    The paper illustrates the procedure of reliability optimization modeling for contact springs of AC contactors under nonlinear multi-constraint conditions. The adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA) is utilized to perform reliability optimization on the contact spring parameters of a type of AC contactor. A method that changes crossover and mutation rates at different times in the AGA can effectively avoid premature convergence, and experimental tests are performed after optimization. The experimental result shows that the mass of each optimized spring is reduced by 16.2%, while the reliability increases to 99.9% from 94.5%. The experimental result verifies the correctness and feasibility of this reliability optimization designing method.

  10. Optical design of an adaptive front-lighting system with high energy efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiangbing; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Han; Jiang, Long

    2014-07-01

    To meet the demands of safe and comfortable driving, we present a new design of a highly energy-efficient Adaptive Front-lighting System (AFS) that can automatically adjust the shape, range, and light distribution of the illumination. The AFS system consists of a lamp, a reflector, light pipes, a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD), a condenser, and a lens. Our simulations show that this system can achieve different beams, such as basic passing beams, town beams, motorway beams, and corner lighting. By using the second light pipe to collect light, the illumination efficiency is increased by 10 points, accordingly reducing the generated heat of the lighting system.

  11. Update on Optical Design of Adaptive Optics System at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T; Waltjen, K E; Freeze, G J; Hurd, R L; Gates, E I; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Pennington, D M

    2001-07-31

    In 1999, we presented our plan to upgrade the adaptive optics (AO) system on the Lick Observatory Shane telescope (3m) from a prototype instrument pressed into field service to a facility instrument. This paper updates the progress of that plan and details several important improvements in the alignment and calibration of the AO bench. The paper also includes a discussion of the problems seen in the original design of the tip/tilt (t/t) sensor used in laser guide star mode, and how these problems were corrected with excellent results.

  12. Simultaneous inversion for velocity and attenuation by waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fengxia; Wang, Yanghua

    2016-08-01

    Seismic waveform tomography can invert for the velocity and attenuation (Q- 1) variations simultaneously. For this simultaneous inversion, we propose two strategies for waveform tomography. First, we analyze the contributions of the real part and the imaginary part of the gradients, associated with the velocity and attenuation parameters respectively, and determine that the combination of the real part of the gradient subvector for the velocity parameter and the imaginary part of the gradient subvector for the attenuation parameter would produce an optimal inversion result. Second, we attempt to balance the sensitivities of the objective function to the velocity and the attenuation parameters. Considering the magnitude differences between these two-type parameters in the simultaneous inversion, we apply preliminarily a normalization to both the velocity model and the attenuation model. However, for balancing their sensitivities, we further adjust the corresponding model updates using a tuning factor. We determine this tuning parameter adaptively, based on the sensitivities of these two parameters, at each iteration. Numerical tests demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of these two strategies in full waveform inversion.

  13. Modeling Gravitational Radiation Waveforms from Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. G.; Centrelia, J. M.; Choi, D.; Koppitz, M.; VanMeter, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational radiation from merging binary black hole systems is anticipated as a key source for gravitational wave observations. Ground-based instruments, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) may observe mergers of stellar-scale black holes, while the space-based Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) observatory will be sensitive to mergers of massive galactic-center black holes over a broad range of mass scales. These cataclysmic events may emit an enormous amount of energy in a brief time. Gravitational waves from comparable mass mergers carry away a few percent of the system's mass-energy in just a few wave cycles, with peak gravitational wave luminosities on the order of 10^23 L_Sun. Optimal analysis and interpretation of merger observation data will depend on developing a detailed understanding, based on general relativistic modeling, of the radiation waveforms. We discuss recent progress in modeling radiation from equal mass mergers using numerical simulations of Einstein's gravitational field equations, known as numerical relativity. Our simulations utilize Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to allow high-resolution near the black holes while simultaneously keeping the outer boundary of the computational domain far from the black holes, and making it possible to read out gravitational radiation waveforms in the weak-field wave zone. We discuss the results from simulations beginning with the black holes orbiting near the system's innermost stable orbit, comparing the recent simulations with earlier "Lazarus" waveform estimates based on an approximate hybrid numerical/perturbative technique.

  14. Design of a Mobile Agent-Based Adaptive Communication Middleware for Federations of Critical Infrastructure Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görbil, Gökçe; Gelenbe, Erol

    The simulation of critical infrastructures (CI) can involve the use of diverse domain specific simulators that run on geographically distant sites. These diverse simulators must then be coordinated to run concurrently in order to evaluate the performance of critical infrastructures which influence each other, especially in emergency or resource-critical situations. We therefore describe the design of an adaptive communication middleware that provides reliable and real-time one-to-one and group communications for federations of CI simulators over a wide-area network (WAN). The proposed middleware is composed of mobile agent-based peer-to-peer (P2P) overlays, called virtual networks (VNets), to enable resilient, adaptive and real-time communications over unreliable and dynamic physical networks (PNets). The autonomous software agents comprising the communication middleware monitor their performance and the underlying PNet, and dynamically adapt the P2P overlay and migrate over the PNet in order to optimize communications according to the requirements of the federation and the current conditions of the PNet. Reliable communications is provided via redundancy within the communication middleware and intelligent migration of agents over the PNet. The proposed middleware integrates security methods in order to protect the communication infrastructure against attacks and provide privacy and anonymity to the participants of the federation. Experiments with an initial version of the communication middleware over a real-life networking testbed show that promising improvements can be obtained for unicast and group communications via the agent migration capability of our middleware.

  15. A QoS adaptive multimedia transport system: design, implementation and experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Andrew; Coulson, Geoff

    1997-03-01

    The long awaited `new environment' of high speed broadband networks and multimedia applications is fast becoming a reality. However, few systems in existence today, whether they be large scale pilots or small scale test-beds in research laboratories, offer a fully integrated and flexible environment where multimedia applications can maximally exploit the quality of service (QoS) capabilities of supporting networks and end-systems. In this paper we describe the implementation of an adaptive transport system that incorporates a QoS oriented API and a range of mechanisms to assist applications in exploiting QoS and adapting to fluctuations in QoS. The system, which is an instantiation of the Lancaster QoS Architecture, is implemented in a multi ATM switch network environment with Linux based PC end systems and continuous media file servers. A performance evaluation of the system configured to support video-on-demand application scenario is presented and discussed. Emphasis is placed on novel features of the system and on their integration into a complete prototype. The most prominent novelty of our design is a `distributed QoS adaptation' scheme which allows applications to delegate to the system responsibility for augmenting and reducing the perceptual quality of video and audio flows when resource availability increases or decreases.

  16. A fuzzy model based adaptive PID controller design for nonlinear and uncertain processes.

    PubMed

    Savran, Aydogan; Kahraman, Gokalp

    2014-03-01

    We develop a novel adaptive tuning method for classical proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller to control nonlinear processes to adjust PID gains, a problem which is very difficult to overcome in the classical PID controllers. By incorporating classical PID control, which is well-known in industry, to the control of nonlinear processes, we introduce a method which can readily be used by the industry. In this method, controller design does not require a first principal model of the process which is usually very difficult to obtain. Instead, it depends on a fuzzy process model which is constructed from the measured input-output data of the process. A soft limiter is used to impose industrial limits on the control input. The performance of the system is successfully tested on the bioreactor, a highly nonlinear process involving instabilities. Several tests showed the method's success in tracking, robustness to noise, and adaptation properties. We as well compared our system's performance to those of a plant with altered parameters with measurement noise, and obtained less ringing and better tracking. To conclude, we present a novel adaptive control method that is built upon the well-known PID architecture that successfully controls highly nonlinear industrial processes, even under conditions such as strong parameter variations, noise, and instabilities. PMID:24140160

  17. A design of LED adaptive dimming lighting system based on incremental PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiangyan; Xiao, Zexin; He, Shaojia

    2010-11-01

    As a new generation energy-saving lighting source, LED is applied widely in various technology and industry fields. The requirement of its adaptive lighting technology is more and more rigorous, especially in the automatic on-line detecting system. In this paper, a closed loop feedback LED adaptive dimming lighting system based on incremental PID controller is designed, which consists of MEGA16 chip as a Micro-controller Unit (MCU), the ambient light sensor BH1750 chip with Inter-Integrated Circuit (I2C), and constant-current driving circuit. A given value of light intensity required for the on-line detecting environment need to be saved to the register of MCU. The optical intensity, detected by BH1750 chip in real time, is converted to digital signal by AD converter of the BH1750 chip, and then transmitted to MEGA16 chip through I2C serial bus. Since the variation law of light intensity in the on-line detecting environment is usually not easy to be established, incremental Proportional-Integral-Differential (PID) algorithm is applied in this system. Control variable obtained by the incremental PID determines duty cycle of Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM). Consequently, LED's forward current is adjusted by PWM, and the luminous intensity of the detection environment is stabilized by self-adaptation. The coefficients of incremental PID are obtained respectively after experiments. Compared with the traditional LED dimming system, it has advantages of anti-interference, simple construction, fast response, and high stability by the use of incremental PID algorithm and BH1750 chip with I2C serial bus. Therefore, it is suitable for the adaptive on-line detecting applications.

  18. Acquisition of L2 Japanese Geminates: Training with Waveform Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motohashi-Saigo, Miki; Hardison, Debra M.

    2009-01-01

    The value of waveform displays as visual feedback was explored in a training study involving perception and production of L2 Japanese by beginning-level L1 English learners. A pretest-posttest design compared auditory-visual (AV) and auditory-only (A-only) Web-based training. Stimuli were singleton and geminate /t,k,s/ followed by /a,u/ in two…

  19. Computer-controlled High Resolution Arbitrary Waveform Generator (HRAWG) for Focusing Beamforming Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assef, Amauri Amorin; Maia, Joaquim Miguel; Costa, Eduardo Tavares

    In advanced ultrasound imaging systems, expensive high-end integrated analog front-ends have been traditionally used to support generation of arbitrary transmit waveforms, in addition to transmit focusing and apodization control. In this paper, we present a cost-effective computer-controlled reconfigurable high-resolution arbitrary waveform generator (HRAWG) that has been designed for ultrasound research, development and teaching at the Federal University of Technology (UTFPR), Brazil. The 8-channel transmit beamformer is fully controlled by a host computer in which a Matlab GUI with the Field II simulation program, allows easy and accurate control over the transmission parameters such as waveform, amplitude apodization and timing.

  20. Development and design of flexible Fowler flaps for an adaptive wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monner, Hans P.; Hanselka, Holger; Breitbach, Elmar J.

    1998-06-01

    Civil transport airplanes fly with fixed geometry wings optimized only for one design point described by altitude, Mach number and airplane weight. These parameters vary continuously during flight, to which means the wing geometry seldom is optimal. According to aerodynamic investigations a chordwide variation of the wing camber leads to improvements in operational flexibility, buffet boundaries and performance resulting in reduction of fuel consumption. A spanwise differential camber variation allows to gain control over spanwise lift distributions reducing wing root bending moments. This paper describes the design of flexible Fowler flaps for an adaptive wing to be used in civil transport aircraft that allows both a chordwise as well as spanwise differential camber variation during flight. Since both lower and upper skins are flexed by active ribs, the camber variation is achieved with a smooth contour and without any additional gaps.

  1. Rational Design and Adaptive Management of Combination Therapies for Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ruian; Loverdo, Claude; Qi, Hangfei; Sun, Ren; Lloyd-Smith, James O.

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries of direct acting antivirals against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) have raised hopes of effective treatment via combination therapies. Yet rapid evolution and high diversity of HCV populations, combined with the reality of suboptimal treatment adherence, make drug resistance a clinical and public health concern. We develop a general model incorporating viral dynamics and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics to assess how suboptimal adherence affects resistance development and clinical outcomes. We derive design principles and adaptive treatment strategies, identifying a high-risk period when missing doses is particularly risky for de novo resistance, and quantifying the number of additional doses needed to compensate when doses are missed. Using data from large-scale resistance assays, we demonstrate that the risk of resistance can be reduced substantially by applying these principles to a combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. By providing a mechanistic framework to link patient characteristics to the risk of resistance, these findings show the potential of rational treatment design. PMID:26125950

  2. Adaptive load-stand design for real-time HWIL JSOW missile control section characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, E. Paul

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of having dynamically adaptive load stand capability is to verify and monitor control section actuator performance under simulated free-flight aerodynamic load conditions in a Closed Loop Real Time HWIL environment. HWIL testing is a cost effective and risk reducing means of evaluating missile system prior to flight testing. This article develops methods of designing, analyzing, and testing of an extension spring driven load stand. Load stand spring natural and surging frequencies are evaluated. Nonlinear control section actuator anomalies are discussed in terms of load stand testing. Actuator time response data is examined under hinge moment and normal force loaded conditions. A design verification procedure was executed to provide a high degree of assurance that the load stand would perform as predicted by analytical methods.

  3. Adaptive change in electrically stimulated muscle: a framework for the design of clinical protocols.

    PubMed

    Salmons, Stanley

    2009-12-01

    Adult mammalian skeletal muscles have a remarkable capacity for adapting to increased use. Although this behavior is familiar from the changes brought about by endurance exercise, it is seen to a much greater extent in the response to long-term neuromuscular stimulation. The associated phenomena include a markedly increased resistance to fatigue, and this is the key to several clinical applications. However, a more rational basis is needed for designing regimes of stimulation that are conducive to an optimal outcome. In this review I examine relevant factors, such as the amount, frequency, and duty cycle of stimulation, the influence of force generation, and the animal model. From these considerations a framework emerges for the design of protocols that yield an overall functional profile appropriate to the application. Three contrasting examples illustrate the issues that need to be addressed clinically. PMID:19902542

  4. First-order design of a reflective viewfinder for adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dubra, Alfredo; Sulai, Yusufu N.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopes with small fields of view have limited clinical utility. We propose to address this problem in reflective instruments by incorporating a viewfinder pupil relay designed by considering pupil and image centering and conjugation. Diverting light from an existing pupil optical relay to the viewfinder relay allows switching field of view size. Design methods that meet all four centering and conjugation conditions using either a single concave mirror or with two concave mirrors forming an off-axis afocal telescope are presented. Two different methods for calculating the focal length and orientation of the concave mirrors in the afocal viewfinder relay are introduced. Finally, a 2.2 × viewfinder mode is demonstrated in an AO scanning light ophthalmoscope. PMID:23187514

  5. First-order design of a reflective viewfinder for adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dubra, Alfredo; Sulai, Yusufu N

    2012-11-19

    Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopes with small fields of view have limited clinical utility. We propose to address this problem in reflective instruments by incorporating a viewfinder pupil relay designed by considering pupil and image centering and conjugation. Diverting light from an existing pupil optical relay to the viewfinder relay allows switching field of view size. Design methods that meet all four centering and conjugation conditions using either a single concave mirror or with two concave mirrors forming an off-axis afocal telescope are presented. Two different methods for calculating the focal length and orientation of the concave mirrors in the afocal viewfinder relay are introduced. Finally, a 2.2 × viewfinder mode is demonstrated in an AO scanning light ophthalmoscope. PMID:23187514

  6. A generalizable adaptive brain-machine interface design for control of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Yuxiao Yang; Shanechi, Maryam M

    2015-08-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) for closed-loop control of anesthesia have the potential to automatically monitor and control brain states under anesthesia. Since a variety of anesthetic states are needed in different clinical scenarios, designing a generalizable BMI architecture that can control a wide range of anesthetic states is essential. In addition, drug dynamics are non-stationary over time and could change with the depth of anesthesia. Hence for precise control, a BMI needs to track these non-stationarities online. Here we design a BMI architecture that generalizes to control of various anesthetic states and their associated neural signatures, and is adaptive to time-varying drug dynamics. We provide a systematic approach to build general parametric models that quantify the anesthetic state and describe the drug dynamics. Based on these models, we develop an adaptive closed-loop controller within the framework of stochastic optimal feedback control. This controller tracks the non-stationarities in drug dynamics, achieves tight control in a time-varying environment, and removes the need for an offline system identification session. For robustness, the BMI also ensures small drug infusion rate variations at steady state. We test the BMI architecture for control of two common anesthetic states, i.e., burst suppression in medically-induced coma and unconsciousness in general anesthesia. Using numerical experiments, we find that the BMI generalizes to control of both these anesthetic states; in a time-varying environment, even without initial knowledge of model parameters, the BMI accurately controls these two different anesthetic states, reducing bias and error more than 70 times and 9 times, respectively, compared with a non-adaptive system. PMID:26736457

  7. Wavefield Compression for Full-Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas; de la Puente, Josep; Hanzich, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    We present compression techniques tailored to iterative nonlinear minimization methods that significantly reduce the memory requirements to store the forward wavefield for the computation of sensitivity kernels. Full-waveform inversion on 3d data sets requires massive computing and memory capabilities. Adjoint techniques offer a powerful tool to compute the first and second derivatives. However, due to the asynchronous nature of forward and adjoint simulations, a severe bottleneck is introduced by the necessity to access both wavefields simultaneously when computing sensitivity kernels. There exist two opposing strategies to deal with this challenge. On the one hand, conventional approaches save the whole forward wavefield to the disk, which yields a significant I/O overhead and might require several terabytes of storage capacity per seismic event. On the other hand, checkpointing techniques allow to trade an almost arbitrary amount of memory requirements for a - potentially large - number of additional forward simulations. We propose an alternative approach that strikes a balance between memory requirements and the need for additional computations. Here, we aim at compressing the forward wavefield in such a way that (1) the I/O overhead is reduced substantially without the need for additional simulations, (2) the costs for compressing/decompressing the wavefield are negligible, and (3) the approximate derivatives resulting from the compressed forward wavefield do not affect the rate of convergence of a Newton-type minimization method. To this end, we apply an adaptive re-quantization of the displacement field that uses dynamically adjusted floating-point accuracies - i.e., a locally varying number of bits - to store the data. Furthermore, the spectral element functions are adaptively downsampled to a lower polynomial degree. In addition, a sliding-window cubic spline re-interpolates the temporal snapshots to recover a smooth signal. Moreover, a preprocessing step

  8. Evolving curriculum design: a novel framework for continuous, timely, and relevant curriculum adaptation in faculty development.

    PubMed

    Lieff, Susan Janet

    2009-01-01

    The time lag between needs assessment and implementation of faculty development curricula assumes a certain stability of participants' individual and contextual needs which may not reflect the often complex and shifting priorities in health professional schools. In addition to the variability of issues they face, participants are typically better able to recognize and articulate their needs once engaged in a curriculum.This article is a conceptual description of how applying an umbrella strategy to curriculum design illuminated an iterative methodology for continuous adaptation of the 2004-2006 University of Toronto Education Scholars Program in real time to the emergent needs of participants and their context. The general goals or umbrella for the core curriculum were determined by a broad-based environmental scan. In keeping with a learner-centered collaborative program, a number of process strategies were developed to solicit input from participants during the two years of the program. These included creating a dialogue space, use of class and program evaluations, modified Delphi needs assessments, and opinion leader interviews. Adaptation of curriculum was enabled by protection of curriculum time and flexibility of course leadership. The application of strategy theory to curriculum design has not been previously described. This iterative approach enabled course leadership to successfully identify multiple unperceived issues to address. With this unique and cyclical process, curricular relevance and timeliness are ensured as well as enhancing participant motivation and engagement, consistent with adult learning principles. This methodology should be considered by course directors of all continuing professional development programs. PMID:19116491

  9. Design, fabrication, and testing of SMA-enabled adaptive chevrons for jet noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Cano, Roberto J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2004-07-01

    This study presents the status and results from an effort to design, fabricate, and test an adaptive jet engine chevron concept based upon embedding shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators in a composite laminate, termed a SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC). The approach for fabricating the adaptive SMAHC chevrons involves embedding prestrained Nitinol actuators on one side of the mid-plane of the composite laminate such that thermal excitation generates a thermal moment and deflects the structure. A glass-epoxy pre-preg/Nitinol ribbon material system and a vacuum hot press consolidation approach are employed. A versatile test system for control and measurement of the chevron deflection performance is described. Projection moire interferometry (PMI) is used for global deformation measurement and infrared (IR) thermography is used for 2-D temperature measurement and feedback control. A recently commercialized constitutive model for SMA and SMAHC materials is used in the finite element code ABAQUS to perform nonlinear static analysis of the chevron prototypes. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured chevron deflection performance, thereby validating the design tool. Although the performance results presented in this paper fall short of the requirement, the concept is proven and an approach for achieving the performance objectives is evident.

  10. Design of a virtual reality based adaptive response technology for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Uttama; Bekele, Esubalew; Dohrmann, Elizabeth; Warren, Zachary; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2013-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate potent impairments in social communication skills including atypical viewing patterns during social interactions. Recently, several assistive technologies, particularly virtual reality (VR), have been investigated to address specific social deficits in this population. Some studies have coupled eye-gaze monitoring mechanisms to design intervention strategies. However, presently available systems are designed to primarily chain learning via aspects of one's performance only which affords restricted range of individualization. The presented work seeks to bridge this gap by developing a novel VR-based interactive system with Gaze-sensitive adaptive response technology that can seamlessly integrate VR-based tasks with eye-tracking techniques to intelligently facilitate engagement in tasks relevant to advancing social communication skills. Specifically, such a system is capable of objectively identifying and quantifying one's engagement level by measuring real-time viewing patterns, subtle changes in eye physiological responses, as well as performance metrics in order to adaptively respond in an individualized manner to foster improved social communication skills among the participants. The developed system was tested through a usability study with eight adolescents with ASD. The results indicate the potential of the system to promote improved social task performance along with socially-appropriate mechanisms during VR-based social conversation tasks. PMID:23033333

  11. Design of a Virtual Reality Based Adaptive Response Technology for Children With Autism

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Uttama; Bekele, Esubalew; Dohrmann, Elizabeth; Warren, Zachary; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2013-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate potent impairments in social communication skills including atypical viewing patterns during social interactions. Recently, several assistive technologies, particularly virtual reality (VR), have been investigated to address specific social deficits in this population. Some studies have coupled eye-gaze monitoring mechanisms to design intervention strategies. However, presently available systems are designed to primarily chain learning via aspects of one’s performance only which affords restricted range of individualization. The presented work seeks to bridge this gap by developing a novel VR-based interactive system with Gaze-sensitive adaptive response technology that can seamlessly integrate VR-based tasks with eye-tracking techniques to intelligently facilitate engagement in tasks relevant to advancing social communication skills. Specifically, such a system is capable of objectively identifying and quantifying one’s engagement level by measuring real-time viewing patterns, subtle changes in eye physiological responses, as well as performance metrics in order to adaptively respond in an individualized manner to foster improved social communication skills among the participants. The developed system was tested through a usability study with eight adolescents with ASD. The results indicate the potential of the system to promote improved social task performance along with socially-appropriate mechanisms during VR-based social conversation tasks. PMID:23033333

  12. Design of a knee joint mechanism that adapts to individual physiology.

    PubMed

    Jiun-Yih Kuan; Pasch, Kenneth A; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a new knee joint mechanism, called the Adaptive Coupling Joint (ACJ). The new mechanism has an adaptive trajectory of the center of rotations (COR) that automatically matches those of the attached biological joint. The detailed design is presented as well as characterization results of the ACJ. Conventional exoskeleton and assistive devices usually consider limb joints as a one to three degrees of freedom (DOFs) joint synthesized by multiple one-DOF hinge joints in a single plane. However, the biological joints are complex and usually rotate with respect to a changing COR. As a result, the mismatch between limb joint motion and mechanical interface motion can lead to forces that cause undesired ligament and muscle length changes and internal mechanical changes. These undesired changes contribute to discomfort, as well as to the slippage and sluggish interaction between humans and devices. It is shown that the ACJ can transmit planetary torques from either active or passive devices to the limbs without altering the normal biological joint motion. PMID:25570389

  13. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of SMA Enabled Adaptive Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Cano, Roberto J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents the status and results from an effort to design, fabricate, and test an adaptive jet engine chevron concept based upon embedding shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators in a composite laminate, termed a SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC). The approach for fabricating the adaptive SMAHC chevrons involves embedding prestrained Nitinol actuators on one side of the mid-plane of the composite laminate such that thermal excitation generates a thermal moment and deflects the structure. A glass-epoxy pre-preg/Nitinol ribbon material system and a vacuum hot press consolidation approach are employed. A versatile test system for control and measurement of the chevron deflection performance is described. Projection moire interferometry (PMI) is used for global deformation measurement and infrared (IR) thermography is used for 2-D temperature measurement and feedback control. A recently commercialized constitutive model for SMA and SMAHC materials is used in the finite element code ABAQUS to perform nonlinear static analysis of the chevron prototypes. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured chevron deflection performance, thereby validating the design tool. Although the performance results presented in this paper fall short of the requirement, the concept is proven and an approach for achieving the performance objectives is evident.

  14. The Classroom Adaptation Scale: A Behavior Rating Scale Designed to Screen Primary Grade Children for School Adaptation Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virbickis, Joseph A.

    After a brief historical review of the background and research, the paper focuses on development of a teacher-administered behavior rating scale to screen for school adaptation problems on a large scale basis using as Ss 15 primary grade teachers and their ratings of 315 primary grade children (ages 6-to-10 years) in their classes. A 16-item…

  15. Attosecond control of optical waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuji, Takao; Rauschenberger, Jens; Gohle, Christoph; Apolonski, Alexander; Udem, Thomas; Yakovlev, Vladislav S.; Tempea, Gabriel; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Krausz, Ferenc

    2005-05-01

    A new, monolithic scheme for stabilizing the phase between the carrier wave and the envelope (CE phase) in a train of few-cycle laser pulses is demonstrated. Self-phase modulation and second-harmonic generation or difference-frequency generation in a single periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, that transmits the main laser beam, allows for the CE-phase locking directly in the usable output. The monolithic scheme obviates the need for splitting off a fraction of the laser output for CE-phase control, coupling into microstructured fibre, as well as separation and recombination of spectral components. As a result, the CE-phase error integrated over the spectral range of 0.2 mHz 35 MHz is as small as 0.016 × 2π rad. This implies that the phase of the field oscillations (λ ~ 830 nm) with respect to the pulse peak is locked to within 44 attoseconds, resulting in optical waveform control with subhundred attosecond fidelity for the first time.

  16. Design and application of a new modular adapter for laser diffraction characterization of inhalation aerosols.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A H; Gjaltema, D; Hagedoorn, P; Schaller, M; Witt, W; Frijlink, H W

    2002-12-01

    An inhaler adapter has been designed for the characterization of the aerosol clouds from medical aerosol generators such as nebulizers, dry powder inhalers (dpis) and metered dose inhalers (mdis) with laser diffraction technology. The adapter has a pre-separator, for separation of large particles (i.e. carrier crystals) from the aerosol cloud before it is exposed to the laser beam. It also has a fine particle collector for measuring the emitted mass fraction of fines by chemical detection methods after laser diffraction sizing. The closed system enables flow control through the aerosol generators and all test conditions, including ambient temperature and relative humidity, are automatically recorded. Counter flows minimize particle deposition onto the two windows for the laser beam, which make successive measurements without cleaning of these windows possible. The adapter has successfully been tested for nebulizers, mdis and dpis. In a comparative study with ten nebulizers it was found that these devices differ considerably in droplet size (distribution) of the aerosol cloud for the same 10% aqueous tobramycin solution (volume median diameters ranging from 1.25 to 3.25 microm) when they are used under the conditions recommended by the manufacturers. The droplet size distribution generated by the Sidestream (with PortaNeb compressor) is very constant during nebulization until dry running of the device. Comparative testing of dpis containing spherical pellet type of formulations for the drug (e.g. the AstraZeneca Turbuhaler) with the adapter is fast and simple. But also formulations containing larger carrier material could successfully be measured. Disintegration efficiency of a test inhaler with carrier retainment (acting as a pre-separator) could be measured quite accurately both for a colistin sulfate formulation with 16.7% of a lactose fraction 106-150 microm and for a budesonide formulation with a carrier mixture of Pharmatose 325 and 150 M. Therefore, it is

  17. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer. PMID:27499762

  18. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer. PMID:27499762

  19. CONDITIONING AND PROTECTION CIRCUITRY FOR EXTERNAL MODULATION OF A PREPROGRAMMED GYROTRON CATHODE VOLTAGE COMMAND WAVEFORM

    SciTech Connect

    PONCE,D; FERRON,J.R; LEGG,R.A

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The modulating voltages applied to the DIII-D gyrotrons are controlled by reference signals which are synthesized by arbitrary waveform generators.These generators allow ECH operators to pre-program reference waveforms consisting of ramps, flat tops, and various modulation shapes. This capability is independent of the DIII-D central timing and waveform facilities, which provides the ECH operators operational flexibility. The waveform generators include an amplitude modulation input, providing a means to control the pre-programmed waveform externally. This input is being used to allow the DIII-D plasma control system (PCS) to control gyrotron power in response top selected feedback signals. As the PCS control signal could potentially modulate the gyrotrons beyond operational limits or otherwise in a manner leading to recalcitrant rf generation, the control signal is conditioned so that its effect upon the ECH pre-programmed reference waveform is limited by conditions set by the ECH operators. The design of the circuitry which restricts the range over which the PCS control signal may modulate the reference waveform will be discussed. Test and DIII-D experimental results demonstrating the utility and effectiveness of gyrotron power modulated by the PCS will be presented.

  20. [Study of sharing platform of web-based enhanced extracorporeal counterpulsation hemodynamic waveform data].

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingbo; Hu, Ding; Yu, Donglan; Zheng, Zhensheng; Wang, Kuijian

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced extracorporeal counterpulsation (EECP) information consists of both text and hemodynamic waveform data. At present EECP text information has been successfully managed through Web browser, while the management and sharing of hemodynamic waveform data through Internet has not been solved yet. In order to manage EECP information completely, based on the in-depth analysis of EECP hemodynamic waveform file of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format and its disadvantages in Internet sharing, we proposed the use of the extensible markup language (XML), which is currently the Internet popular data exchange standard, as the storage specification for the sharing of EECP waveform data. Then we designed a web-based sharing system of EECP hemodynamic waveform data via ASP. NET 2.0 platform. Meanwhile, we specifically introduced the four main system function modules and their implement methods, including DICOM to XML conversion module, EECP waveform data management module, retrieval and display of EECP waveform module and the security mechanism of the system. PMID:22295686

  1. Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASoS) engineering and foundations for global design.

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Nancy S.; Finley, Patrick D.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brown, Theresa Jean; Linebarger, John Michael; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Mitchell, Michael David; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2012-01-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex ecological, sociological, economic and/or technical systems which must be recognized and reckoned with to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Design within CASoS requires the fostering of a new discipline, CASoS Engineering, and the building of capability to support it. Towards this primary objective, we created the Phoenix Pilot as a crucible from which systemization of the new discipline could emerge. Using a wide range of applications, Phoenix has begun building both theoretical foundations and capability for: the integration of Applications to continuously build common understanding and capability; a Framework for defining problems, designing and testing solutions, and actualizing these solutions within the CASoS of interest; and an engineering Environment required for 'the doing' of CASoS Engineering. In a secondary objective, we applied CASoS Engineering principles to begin to build a foundation for design in context of Global CASoS

  2. LISA Parameter Estimation using Numerical Merger Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; McWilliams, S.; Baker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Coalescing supermassive black holes are expected to provide the strongest sources for gravitational radiation detected by LISA. Recent advances in numerical relativity provide a detailed description of the waveforms of such signals. We present a preliminary study of LISA's sensitivity to waveform parameters using a hybrid numerical/analytic waveform describing the coalescence of two equal-mass, nonspinning black holes. The Synthetic LISA software package is used to simulate the instrument response and the Fisher information matrix method is used to estimate errors in the waveform parameters. Initial results indicate that inclusion of the merger signal can significantly improve the precision of some parameter estimates. For example, the median parameter errors for an ensemble of systems with total redshifted mass of 10(exp 6) deg M solar mass at a redshift of z is approximately 1 were found to decrease by a factor of slightly more than two when the merger was included.

  3. The optical design of a visible adaptive optics system for the Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopon, Derek

    The Magellan Adaptive Optics system will achieve first light in November of 2012. This AO system contains several subsystems including the 585-actuator concave adaptive secondary mirror, the Calibration Return Optic (CRO) alignment and calibration system, the CLIO 1-5 microm IR science camera, the movable guider camera and active optics assembly, and the W-Unit, which contains both the Pyramid Wavefront Sensor (PWFS) and the VisAO visible science camera. In this dissertation, we present details of the design, fabrication, assembly, alignment, and laboratory performance of the VisAO camera and its optical components. Many of these components required a custom design, such as the Spectral Differential Imaging Wollaston prisms and filters and the coronagraphic spots. One component, the Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector (ADC), required a unique triplet design that had until now never been fabricated and tested on sky. We present the design, laboratory, and on-sky results for our triplet ADC. We also present details of the CRO test setup and alignment. Because Magellan is a Gregorian telescope, the ASM is a concave ellipsoidal mirror. By simulating a star with a white light point source at the far conjugate, we can create a double-pass test of the whole system without the need for a real on-sky star. This allows us to test the AO system closed loop in the Arcetri test tower at its nominal design focal length and optical conjugates. The CRO test will also allow us to calibrate and verify the system off-sky at the Magellan telescope during commissioning and periodically thereafter. We present a design for a possible future upgrade path for a new visible Integral Field Spectrograph. By integrating a fiber array bundle at the VisAO focal plane, we can send light to a pre-existing facility spectrograph, such as LDSS3, which will allow 20 mas spatial sampling and R˜1,800 spectra over the band 0.6-1.05 microm. This would be the highest spatial resolution IFU to date, either

  4. Using Tests Designed to Measure Individual Sensorimotor Subsystem Perfomance to Predict Locomotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. T.; Caldwell, E. E.; Batson, C. D.; Guined, J. R.; DeDios, Y. E.; Stepanyan, V.; Gadd, N. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during the initial exposure to microgravity and during the readapation phase following a return to a gravitational environment. These alterations may lead to disruption in the ability to perform mission critical functions during and after these gravitational transitions. Astronauts show significant inter-subject variation in adaptive capability following gravitational transitions. The way each individual's brain synthesizes the available visual, vestibular and somatosensory information is likely the basis for much of the variation. Identifying the presence of biases in each person's use of information available from these sensorimotor subsystems and relating it to their ability to adapt to a novel locomotor task will allow us to customize a training program designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Eight tests are being used to measure sensorimotor subsystem performance. Three of these use measures of body sway to characterize balance during varying sensorimotor challenges. The effect of vision is assessed by repeating conditions with eyes open and eyes closed. Standing on foam, or on a support surface that pitches to maintain a constant ankle angle provide somatosensory challenges. Information from the vestibular system is isolated when vision is removed and the support surface is compromised, and it is challenged when the tasks are done while the head is in motion. The integration and dominance of visual information is assessed in three additional tests. The Rod & Frame Test measures the degree to which a subject's perception of the visual vertical is affected by the orientation of a tilted frame in the periphery. Locomotor visual dependence is determined by assessing how much an oscillating virtual visual world affects a treadmill-walking subject. In the third of the visual manipulation tests, subjects walk an obstacle course while wearing up-down reversing prisms. The two remaining tests include direct

  5. GRC GSFC TDRSS Waveform Metrics Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Dale J.

    2013-01-01

    The report presents software metrics and porting metrics for the GGT Waveform. The porting was from a ground-based COTS SDR, the SDR-3000, to the CoNNeCT JPL SDR. The report does not address any of the Operating Environment (OE) software development, nor the original TDRSS waveform development at GSFC for the COTS SDR. With regard to STRS, the report presents compliance data and lessons learned.

  6. A Review on Effectiveness and Adaptability of the Design-Build Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Masataka; Miyatake, Ichiro; Baba, Kazuhito; Yokoi, Hiroyuki; Fueta, Toshiharu

    In the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), various approaches have been taken for efficient implementation of public works projects, one of which is the ongoing use of the design-build method on a trial basis, as a means to utilize the technical skills and knowledge of private companies. In 2005, MLIT further introduced the a dvanced technical proposal type, a kind of the comprehensive evaluation method, as part of its efforts to improve tendering and contracting systems. Meanwhile, although the positive effect of the design build method has been reported, it has not been widely published, which may be one of the reasons that the number of MLIT projects using the design-build method is declining year by year. In this context, this paper discusses the result and review of the study concerning the extent of flexibility allowed for the process and design (proposal) of public work projects, and the follow-up surveys of the actual test case projects, conducted as basic researches to examine the measure to expand and promote the use of the design-build method. The study objects were selected from the tunnel construction projects using the shield tunneling method for developing the common utility duct, and the bridge construction projects ordering construction of supers tructure work and substructure work in a single contract. In providing the result and review of the studies, the structures and the temporary installations were separately examined, and effectiveness and adaptability of the design-build method was discussed for each, respectively.

  7. Analysis and Application of LIDAR Waveform Data Using a Progressive Waveform Decomposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Zhang, Z.; Hu, X.; Li, Z.

    2011-09-01

    Due to rich information of a full waveform of airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) data, the analysis of full waveform has been an active area in LiDAR application. It is possible to digitally sample and store the entire reflected waveform of small-footprint instead of only discrete point clouds. Decomposition of waveform data, a key step in waveform data analysis, can be categorized to two typical methods: 1) the Gaussian modelling method such as the Non-linear least-squares (NLS) algorithm and the maximum likelihood estimation using the Exception Maximization (EM) algorithm. 2) pulse detection method—Average Square Difference Function (ASDF). However, the Gaussian modelling methods strongly rely on initial parameters, whereas the ASDF omits the importance of parameter information of the waveform. In this paper, we proposed a fast algorithm—Progressive Waveform Decomposition (PWD) method to extract local maxims and fit the echo with Gaussian function, and calculate other parameters from the raw waveform data. On the one hand, experiments are implemented to evaluate the PWD method and the results demonstrate its robustness and efficiency. On the other hand, with the PWD parametric analysis of the full-waveform instead of a 3D point cloud, some special applications are investigated afterward.

  8. Towards Higher Resolution Global Mantle Waveform Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, A. A.; Romanowicz, B.

    2005-12-01

    Over the last 10 years, we have developed several generations of three-dimensional elastic and anelastic models of the earth's mantle, based on the inversion of surface and body waveforms using an asymptotic normal mode coupling approach (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1996). Until now, the shortest period of analysis of the body waveforms was 32 sec, and we have assumed standard scaling relations between compressional and shear velocities to obtain isotropic and radially anisotropic models of the whole mantle. We have found, surprisingly, that our waveforms have some - albeit weak - ability to resolve the topography of major mantle discontinuities. In order to improve the resolution of our models, extract P velocity information, as well as obtain better constraints on discontinuity topography, it is necessary to extend the analysis to shorter periods. This presents some computational challenges, as the number of coupling terms that need to be included increases rapidly with frequency. It also leads us to rethink our data selection strategy, in particular to allow larger time shifts between observed waveforms and synthetic ones. The latter are computed for a reference earth model and used in an automatic pre-selection step. We present progress in the development of a 3D elastic mantle model based on three component body waveforms down to 16 sec and surface waveforms down to 60 sec.

  9. Optimal Multitrial Prediction Combination and Subject-Specific Adaptation for Minimal Training Brain Switch Designs.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, Loukianos; Blokland, Yvonne; Farquhar, Jason; Bruhn, Jorgen

    2016-06-01

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems are traditionally designed by taking into account user-specific data to enable practical use. More recently, subject independent (SI) classification algorithms have been developed which bypass the subject specific adaptation and enable rapid use of the system. A brain switch is a particular BCI system where the system is required to distinguish from two separate mental tasks corresponding to the on-off commands of a switch. Such applications require a low false positive rate (FPR) while having an acceptable response time (RT) until the switch is activated. In this work, we develop a methodology that produces optimal brain switch behavior through subject specific (SS) adaptation of: a) a multitrial prediction combination model and b) an SI classification model. We propose a statistical model of combining classifier predictions that enables optimal FPR calibration through a short calibration session. We trained an SI classifier on a training synchronous dataset and tested our method on separate holdout synchronous and asynchronous brain switch experiments. Although our SI model obtained similar performance between training and holdout datasets, 86% and 85% for the synchronous and 69% and 66% for the asynchronous the between subject FPR and TPR variability was high (up to 62%). The short calibration session was then employed to alleviate that problem and provide decision thresholds that achieve when possible a target FPR=1% with good accuracy for both datasets. PMID:26529768

  10. First-order design of off-axis reflective ophthalmic adaptive optics systems using afocal telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Vieyra, Armando; Dubra, Alfredo; Williams, David R.; Malacara-Hernández, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopes (SLOs) and optical coherence tomographs are the state-of-the-art retinal imaging instruments, and are essential for early and reliable diagnosis of eye disease. Recently, with the incorporation of adaptive optics (AO), these instruments have started to deliver near diffraction-limited performance in both humans and animal models, enabling the resolution of the retinal ganglion cell bodies, their processes, the cone photoreceptor and the retinal pigment epithelial cells mosaics. Unfortunately, these novel instruments have not delivered consistent performance across human subjects and animal models. One of the limitations of current instruments is the astigmatism in the pupil and imaging planes, which degrades image quality, by preventing the wavefront sensor from measuring aberrations with high spatial content. This astigmatism is introduced by the sequence of off-axis reflective elements, typically spherical mirrors, used for relaying pupil and imaging planes. Expressions for minimal astigmatism on the image and pupil planes in off-axis reflective afocal telescopes formed by pairs of spherical mirrors are presented. The formulas, derived from the marginal ray fans equation, are valid for small angles of incidence (<=15°), and can be used to design laser cavities, spectrographs and vision adaptive optics systems. An example related to this last application is discussed.

  11. Design of Robust Adaptive Unbalance Response Controllers for Rotors with Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knospe, Carl R.; Tamer, Samir M.; Fedigan, Stephen J.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental results have recently demonstrated that an adaptive open loop control strategy can be highly effective in the suppression of unbalance induced vibration on rotors supported in active magnetic bearings. This algorithm, however, relies upon a predetermined gain matrix. Typically, this matrix is determined by an optimal control formulation resulting in the choice of the pseudo-inverse of the nominal influence coefficient matrix as the gain matrix. This solution may result in problems with stability and performance robustness since the estimated influence coefficient matrix is not equal to the actual influence coefficient matrix. Recently, analysis tools have been developed to examine the robustness of this control algorithm with respect to structured uncertainty. Herein, these tools are extended to produce a design procedure for determining the adaptive law's gain matrix. The resulting control algorithm has a guaranteed convergence rate and steady state performance in spite of the uncertainty in the rotor system. Several examples are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach and its advantages over the standard optimal control formulation.

  12. Dynamic modeling, property investigation, and adaptive controller design of serial robotic manipulators modeled with structural compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesar, Delbert; Tosunoglu, Sabri; Lin, Shyng-Her

    1990-01-01

    Research results on general serial robotic manipulators modeled with structural compliances are presented. Two compliant manipulator modeling approaches, distributed and lumped parameter models, are used in this study. System dynamic equations for both compliant models are derived by using the first and second order influence coefficients. Also, the properties of compliant manipulator system dynamics are investigated. One of the properties, which is defined as inaccessibility of vibratory modes, is shown to display a distinct character associated with compliant manipulators. This property indicates the impact of robot geometry on the control of structural oscillations. Example studies are provided to illustrate the physical interpretation of inaccessibility of vibratory modes. Two types of controllers are designed for compliant manipulators modeled by either lumped or distributed parameter techniques. In order to maintain the generality of the results, neither linearization is introduced. Example simulations are given to demonstrate the controller performance. The second type controller is also built for general serial robot arms and is adaptive in nature which can estimate uncertain payload parameters on-line and simultaneously maintain trajectory tracking properties. The relation between manipulator motion tracking capability and convergence of parameter estimation properties is discussed through example case studies. The effect of control input update delays on adaptive controller performance is also studied.

  13. Experimental Investigation on Adaptive Robust Controller Designs Applied to Constrained Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Samuel L.; Pazelli, Tatiana F. P. A. T.; Siqueira, Adriano A. G.; Terra, Marco H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, two interlaced studies are presented. The first is directed to the design and construction of a dynamic 3D force/moment sensor. The device is applied to provide a feedback signal of forces and moments exerted by the robotic end-effector. This development has become an alternative solution to the existing multi-axis load cell based on static force and moment sensors. The second one shows an experimental investigation on the performance of four different adaptive nonlinear ℋ∞ control methods applied to a constrained manipulator subject to uncertainties in the model and external disturbances. Coordinated position and force control is evaluated. Adaptive procedures are based on neural networks and fuzzy systems applied in two different modeling strategies. The first modeling strategy requires a well-known nominal model for the robot, so that the intelligent systems are applied only to estimate the effects of uncertainties, unmodeled dynamics and external disturbances. The second strategy considers that the robot model is completely unknown and, therefore, intelligent systems are used to estimate these dynamics. A comparative study is conducted based on experimental implementations performed with an actual planar manipulator and with the dynamic force sensor developed for this purpose. PMID:23598503

  14. Experimental evaluation of shape memory alloy actuation technique in adaptive antenna design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, W. Neill; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1994-01-01

    Creation of an antenna system that could autonomously adapt contours of reflecting surfaces to compensate for structural loads induced by a variable environment would maximize performance of space-based communication systems. Design of such a system requires the comprehensive development and integration of advanced actuator, sensor, and control technologies. As an initial step in this process, a test has been performed to assess the use of a shape memory alloy as a potential actuation technique. For this test, an existing, offset, cassegrain antenna system was retrofit with a subreflector equipped with shape memory alloy actuators for surface contour control. The impacts that the actuators had on both the subreflector contour and the antenna system patterns were measured. The results of this study indicate the potential for using shape memory alloy actuation techniques to adaptively control antenna performance; both variations in gain and beam steering capabilities were demonstrated. Future development effort is required to evolve this potential into a useful technology for satellite applications.

  15. Flight control design using a blend of modern nonlinear adaptive and robust techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolong

    In this dissertation, the modern control techniques of feedback linearization, mu synthesis, and neural network based adaptation are used to design novel control laws for two specific applications: F/A-18 flight control and reusable launch vehicle (an X-33 derivative) entry guidance. For both applications, the performance of the controllers is assessed. As a part of a NASA Dryden program to develop and flight test experimental controllers for an F/A-18 aircraft, a novel method of combining mu synthesis and feedback linearization is developed to design longitudinal and lateral-directional controllers. First of all, the open-loop and closed-loop dynamics of F/A-18 are investigated. The production F/A-18 controller as well as the control distribution mechanism are studied. The open-loop and closed-loop handling qualities of the F/A-18 are evaluated using low order transfer functions. Based on this information, a blend of robust mu synthesis and feedback linearization is used to design controllers for a low dynamic pressure envelope of flight conditions. For both the longitudinal and the lateral-directional axes, a robust linear controller is designed for a trim point in the center of the envelope. Then by including terms to cancel kinematic nonlinearities and variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments over the flight envelope, a complete nonlinear controller is developed. In addition, to compensate for the model uncertainty, linearization error and variations between operating points, neural network based adaptation is added to the designed longitudinal controller. The nonlinear simulations, robustness and handling qualities analysis indicate that the performance is similar to or better than that for the production F/A-18 controllers. When the dynamic pressure is very low, the performance of both the experimental and the production flight controllers is degraded, but Level I handling qualities are still achieved. A new generation of Reusable Launch Vehicles

  16. Integrated System Design: Promoting the Capacity of Sociotechnical Systems for Adaptation through Extensions of Cognitive Work Analysis.

    PubMed

    Naikar, Neelam; Elix, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for integrated system design, which has the intent of facilitating high levels of effectiveness in sociotechnical systems by promoting their capacity for adaptation. Building on earlier ideas and empirical observations, this approach recognizes that to create adaptive systems it is necessary to integrate the design of all of the system elements, including the interfaces, teams, training, and automation, such that workers are supported in adapting their behavior as well as their structure, or organization, in a coherent manner. Current approaches for work analysis and design are limited in regard to this fundamental objective, especially in cases when workers are confronted with unforeseen events. A suitable starting point is offered by cognitive work analysis (CWA), but while this framework can support actors in adapting their behavior, it does not necessarily accommodate adaptations in their structure. Moreover, associated design approaches generally focus on individual system elements, and those that consider multiple elements appear limited in their ability to facilitate integration, especially in the manner intended here. The proposed approach puts forward the set of possibilities for work organization in a system as the central mechanism for binding the design of its various elements, so that actors can adapt their structure as well as their behavior-in a unified fashion-to handle both familiar and novel conditions. Accordingly, this paper demonstrates how the set of possibilities for work organization in a system may be demarcated independently of the situation, through extensions of CWA, and how it may be utilized in design. This lynchpin, conceptualized in the form of a diagram of work organization possibilities (WOP), is important for preserving a system's inherent capacity for adaptation. Future research should focus on validating these concepts and establishing the feasibility of implementing them in industrial contexts

  17. Integrated System Design: Promoting the Capacity of Sociotechnical Systems for Adaptation through Extensions of Cognitive Work Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naikar, Neelam; Elix, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for integrated system design, which has the intent of facilitating high levels of effectiveness in sociotechnical systems by promoting their capacity for adaptation. Building on earlier ideas and empirical observations, this approach recognizes that to create adaptive systems it is necessary to integrate the design of all of the system elements, including the interfaces, teams, training, and automation, such that workers are supported in adapting their behavior as well as their structure, or organization, in a coherent manner. Current approaches for work analysis and design are limited in regard to this fundamental objective, especially in cases when workers are confronted with unforeseen events. A suitable starting point is offered by cognitive work analysis (CWA), but while this framework can support actors in adapting their behavior, it does not necessarily accommodate adaptations in their structure. Moreover, associated design approaches generally focus on individual system elements, and those that consider multiple elements appear limited in their ability to facilitate integration, especially in the manner intended here. The proposed approach puts forward the set of possibilities for work organization in a system as the central mechanism for binding the design of its various elements, so that actors can adapt their structure as well as their behavior—in a unified fashion—to handle both familiar and novel conditions. Accordingly, this paper demonstrates how the set of possibilities for work organization in a system may be demarcated independently of the situation, through extensions of CWA, and how it may be utilized in design. This lynchpin, conceptualized in the form of a diagram of work organization possibilities (WOP), is important for preserving a system's inherent capacity for adaptation. Future research should focus on validating these concepts and establishing the feasibility of implementing them in industrial

  18. CONFIG - Adapting qualitative modeling and discrete event simulation for design of fault management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Basham, Bryan D.

    1989-01-01

    CONFIG is a modeling and simulation tool prototype for analyzing the normal and faulty qualitative behaviors of engineered systems. Qualitative modeling and discrete-event simulation have been adapted and integrated, to support early development, during system design, of software and procedures for management of failures, especially in diagnostic expert systems. Qualitative component models are defined in terms of normal and faulty modes and processes, which are defined by invocation statements and effect statements with time delays. System models are constructed graphically by using instances of components and relations from object-oriented hierarchical model libraries. Extension and reuse of CONFIG models and analysis capabilities in hybrid rule- and model-based expert fault-management support systems are discussed.

  19. Design of a shape adaptive airfoil actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy strip for airplane tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadeh, R.; Raissi Charmacani, K.; Tabesh, M.

    2011-04-01

    Of the factors that mainly affect the efficiency of the wing during a special flow regime, the shape of its airfoil cross section is the most significant. Airfoils are generally designed for a specific flight condition and, therefore, are not fully optimized in all flight conditions. It is very desirable to have an airfoil with the ability to change its shape based on the current regime. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators activate in response to changes in the temperature and can recover their original configuration after being deformed. This study presents the development of a method to control the shape of an airfoil using SMA actuators. To predict the thermomechanical behaviors of an SMA thin strip, 3D incremental formulation of the SMA constitutive model is implemented in FEA software package ABAQUS. The interactions between the airfoil structure and SMA thin strip actuator are investigated. Also, the aerodynamic performance of a standard airfoil with a plain flap is compared with an adaptive airfoil.

  20. Design of a nonlinear adaptive filter for suppression of shuttle pilot-induced oscillation tendencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. W.; Edwards, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of a longitudinal pilot-induced oscillation (PIO) experienced just prior to touchdown on the final flight of the space shuttle's approach landing tests indicated that the source of the problem was a combination of poor basic handling qualities aggravated by time delays through the digital flight control computer and rate limiting of the elevator actuators due to high pilot gain. A nonlinear PIO suppression (PIOS) filter was designed and developed to alleviate the vehicle's PIO tendencies by reducing the gain in the command path. From analytical and simulator studies it was shown that the PIOS filter, in an adaptive fashion, can attenuate the command path gain without adding phase lag to the system. With the pitch attitude loop of a simulated shuttle model closed, the PIOS filter increased the gain margin by a factor of about two.

  1. Modelling Sensor and Target effects on LiDAR Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosette, J.; North, P. R.; Rubio, J.; Cook, B. D.; Suárez, J.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this research is to explore the influence of sensor characteristics and interactions with vegetation and terrain properties on the estimation of vegetation parameters from LiDAR waveforms. This is carried out using waveform simulations produced by the FLIGHT radiative transfer model which is based on Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport (North, 1996; North et al., 2010). The opportunities for vegetation analysis that are offered by LiDAR modelling are also demonstrated by other authors e.g. Sun and Ranson, 2000; Ni-Meister et al., 2001. Simulations from the FLIGHT model were driven using reflectance and transmittance properties collected from the Howland Research Forest, Maine, USA in 2003 together with a tree list for a 200m x 150m area. This was generated using field measurements of location, species and diameter at breast height. Tree height and crown dimensions of individual trees were calculated using relationships established with a competition index determined for this site. Waveforms obtained by the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) were used as validation of simulations. This provided a base from which factors such as slope, laser incidence angle and pulse width could be varied. This has enabled the effect of instrument design and laser interactions with different surface characteristics to be tested. As such, waveform simulation is relevant for the development of future satellite LiDAR sensors, such as NASA’s forthcoming DESDynI mission (NASA, 2010), which aim to improve capabilities of vegetation parameter estimation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We would like to thank scientists at the Biospheric Sciences Branch of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in particular to Jon Ranson and Bryan Blair. This work forms part of research funded by the NASA DESDynI project and the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NE/F021437/1). REFERENCES NASA, 2010, DESDynI: Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice. http

  2. Adapting Rational Unified Process (RUP) approach in designing a secure e-Tendering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd, Haslina; Robie, Muhammad Afdhal Muhammad; Baharom, Fauziah; Darus, Norida Muhd; Saip, Mohamed Ali; Yasin, Azman

    2016-08-01

    e-Tendering is an electronic processing of the tender document via internet and allow tenderer to publish, communicate, access, receive and submit all tender related information and documentation via internet. This study aims to design the e-Tendering system using Rational Unified Process approach. RUP provides a disciplined approach on how to assign tasks and responsibilities within the software development process. RUP has four phases that can assist researchers to adjust the requirements of various projects with different scope, problem and the size of projects. RUP is characterized as a use case driven, architecture centered, iterative and incremental process model. However the scope of this study only focusing on Inception and Elaboration phases as step to develop the model and perform only three of nine workflows (business modeling, requirements, analysis and design). RUP has a strong focus on documents and the activities in the inception and elaboration phases mainly concern the creation of diagrams and writing of textual descriptions. The UML notation and the software program, Star UML are used to support the design of e-Tendering. The e-Tendering design based on the RUP approach can contribute to e-Tendering developers and researchers in e-Tendering domain. In addition, this study also shows that the RUP is one of the best system development methodology that can be used as one of the research methodology in Software Engineering domain related to secured design of any observed application. This methodology has been tested in various studies in certain domains, such as in Simulation-based Decision Support, Security Requirement Engineering, Business Modeling and Secure System Requirement, and so forth. As a conclusion, these studies showed that the RUP one of a good research methodology that can be adapted in any Software Engineering (SE) research domain that required a few artifacts to be generated such as use case modeling, misuse case modeling, activity

  3. Methodology for design of adaptive interfaces for diagnostic workstations with integrated images and reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harreld, Michael R.; Valentino, Daniel J.; Liu, Brent J.; El-Saden, Suzie; Duckwiler, Gary R.

    1998-06-01

    Diagnostic workstations have generally lacked acceptance due to awkward interfaces, poor usability and lack of clinical data integration. We developed a new methodology for the design and implementation of diagnostic workstations and applied the methodology in diagnostic neuroradiology. The methodology facilitated the objective design and evaluation of optimal diagnostic features, including the integration of images and reports, and the implementation of intelligent and adaptive graphical user interfaces. As a test of this new methodology, we developed and evaluated a neuroradiological diagnostic workstation. The general goals of diagnostic neuroradiologists were modeled and directly used in the design of the UCLA Digital ViewBox, an object-oriented toolkit for medical imaging workstations. For case-specific goals, an object-oriented protocol toolkit was developed for rapid development and integration of new protocols, modes, and tools. Each protocol defines a way to arrange and process data in order to accomplish diagnostic goals that are specific to anatomy (e.g., a spine protocol), or to a suspected pathology (e.g., a tumor protocol). Each protocol was divided into modes that represent diagnostic reading tasks. Each mode was further broken down into functions supporting that task. Via a data mediator engine, the workstation communicated with clinical data repositories, including the UCLA HIS, Clinical RIS/PACS and individual DICOM compatible scanners. The data mediator served to transparently integrate, retrieve, and cache image and report data. Task-oriented Reading protocols automatically present the appropriate diagnostic information and diagnostic tools to the radiologist. We describe a protocol toolkit that enables the rapid design and implementation of customized reading protocols. We also present an intelligent layer that enables the automatic presentation of the appropriate information. This new methodology for diagnostic workstation design led to an

  4. French vertical-flow constructed wetland design: adaptations for tropical climates.

    PubMed

    Molle, P; Latune, R Lombard; Riegel, C; Lacombe, G; Esser, D; Mangeot, L

    2015-01-01

    The French Outermost Regions are under tropical climate yet still have to comply with both French and EU regulations. French vertical-flow constructed wetland systems appear well adapted to the technical specifics of these regions but their adaptation to tropical climate requires new design guidelines to be defined (area needed, number of filters, type of plants, material to be used, etc.). A study was started in 2008, with backing from the national water authorities, to implement full-scale experimental sites and assess the impacts of local context on design and performances. This paper reports the monitoring results on three vertical-flow constructed wetlands fed directly with raw wastewater (known as the 'French system') in Mayotte and French Guiana. The plants, now in operation for between 1 and 6 years, range from 160 to 480 population equivalent (p.e.). Monitoring consisted of 28 daily composite flow samples in different seasons (dry season, rainy season) at the inlet and outlet of each filter. Performances are benchmarked against French mainland area standards from Irstea's database. Results show that performances are improved by warmer temperature for chemical oxygen demand (COD), suspended solids (SS) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) and satisfy national quality objectives with a single stage of filters. Treatment plant footprint can thus be reduced as only two parallel filters are needed. Indeed, warm temperatures allow faster mineralization of the sludge deposit, making it possible to operate at similar rest and feeding period durations. Systems operated using one twin-filter stage can achieve over 90% COD, SS and TKN removal for a total surface of 0.8 m²/p.e. PMID:26442494

  5. Lossless compression of weight vectors from an adaptive filter

    SciTech Connect

    Bredemann, M.V.; Elliott, G.R.; Stearns, S.D.

    1994-08-01

    Techniques for lossless waveform compression can be applied to the transmission of weight vectors from an orbiting satellite. The vectors, which are a part of a hybrid analog/digital adaptive filter, are a representation of the radio frequency background seen by the satellite. An approach is used which treats each adaptive weight as a time-varying waveform.

  6. Application of Adaptive Design Methodology in Development of a Long-Acting Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog (Dulaglutide): Statistical Design and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Skrivanek, Zachary; Berry, Scott; Berry, Don; Chien, Jenny; Geiger, Mary Jane; Anderson, James H.; Gaydos, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Background Dulaglutide (dula, LY2189265), a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, is being developed to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods To foster the development of dula, we designed a two-stage adaptive, dose-finding, inferentially seamless phase 2/3 study. The Bayesian theoretical framework is used to adaptively randomize patients in stage 1 to 7 dula doses and, at the decision point, to either stop for futility or to select up to 2 dula doses for stage 2. After dose selection, patients continue to be randomized to the selected dula doses or comparator arms. Data from patients assigned the selected doses will be pooled across both stages and analyzed with an analysis of covariance model, using baseline hemoglobin A1c and country as covariates. The operating characteristics of the trial were assessed by extensive simulation studies. Results Simulations demonstrated that the adaptive design would identify the correct doses 88% of the time, compared to as low as 6% for a fixed-dose design (the latter value based on frequentist decision rules analogous to the Bayesian decision rules for adaptive design). Conclusions This article discusses the decision rules used to select the dula dose(s); the mathematical details of the adaptive algorithm—including a description of the clinical utility index used to mathematically quantify the desirability of a dose based on safety and efficacy measurements; and a description of the simulation process and results that quantify the operating characteristics of the design. PMID:23294775

  7. 4-bit Bipolar Triangle Voltage Waveform Generator Using Single-Flux-Quantum Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tomoki; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Hiroshi; Maezawa, Masaaki; Mizugaki, Yoshinao

    SFQ digital-to-analog converters (DACs) are one of the candidates for AC voltage standards. We have proposed SFQ-DACs based on frequency modulation (FM). Bipolar output is required for applications of AC voltage standards, while our previous SFQ-DACs generated only positive voltages. In this paper, we present our design of a 4-bit bipolar triangle voltage waveform generator comprising an SFQ-DAC. The waveform generator has two output ports. Synthesized half-period waveforms are alternately generated in one of the output ports. The bipolar output is realized by observing the differential voltage between the ports. We confirmed a 72-μVPP bipolar triangle voltage waveform at the frequency of 35.7 Hz.

  8. Method and Apparatus for Flight Data Acquisition using an Optimized Multiple Frequency Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Bryan D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises a method and apparatus that generates a waveform consisting of an arbitrary number of frequency sweeps combined from adding and subtracting mini frequency sweeps. Optimization routines determine the best combination order of frequency sweep to minimize or maximize design criteria such is aerodynamic surface deflection or maximum command rate of the wave form. The invention allows for arbitrary output timing, or commands per second issued for the desired waveform, arbitrary starting and ending frequencies and amplitudes, arbitrary number of frequency sweep components, arbitrary frequency sweep exponent, arbitrary amplitude sweep exponent, and arbitrary waveform length. For a given frequency range and sweep exponent, amplitude range and sweep exponent, desired total waveform time and number of frequency sweep components, the algorithm can determine the optimum arrangement of the components to minimize the maximum amplitude or rate.

  9. Adaptive Flight Control Design with Optimal Control Modification on an F-18 Aircraft Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Griffin, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to as the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly; however, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect the robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient robustness. A damping term (v) is added in the modification to increase damping as needed. Simulations were conducted on a damaged F-18 aircraft (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) with both the standard baseline dynamic inversion controller and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model.

  10. Adapting water treatment design and operations to the impacts of global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert M.; Li, Zhiwei; Buchberger, Steven G.

    2011-12-01

    It is anticipated that global climate change will adversely impact source water quality in many areas of the United States and will therefore, potentially, impact the design and operation of current and future water treatment systems. The USEPA has initiated an effort called the Water Resources Adaptation Program (WRAP) which is intended to develop tools and techniques that can assess the impact of global climate change on urban drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. A three step approach for assessing climate change impacts on water treatment operation and design is being persude in this effort. The first step is the stochastic characterization of source water quality, the second step is the application of the USEPA Water Treatment Plant model and the third step is the application of cost algorithms to provide a metric that can be used to assess the coat impact of climate change. A model has been validated using data collected from Cincinnati's Richard Miller Water Treatment Plant for the USEPA Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. An analysis of the water treatment processes in response to assumed perturbations in raw water quality identified TOC, pH, and bromide as the three most important parameters affecting performance of the Miller WTP. The Miller Plant was simulated using the EPA WTP model to examine the impact of these parameters on selected regulated water quality parameters. Uncertainty in influent water quality was analyzed to estimate the risk of violating drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs).Water quality changes in the Ohio River were projected for 2050 using Monte Carlo simulation and the WTP model was used to evaluate the effects of water quality changes on design and operation. Results indicate that the existing Miller WTP might not meet Safe Drinking Water Act MCL requirements for certain extreme future conditions. However, it was found that the risk of MCL violations under future conditions could be controlled by

  11. Harmonic minimization waveforms for modulated heating experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, G.; Spasojevic, M.; Cohen, M. B.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-11-01

    Modulated High Frequency (few MHz) heating of the D-region ionosphere under the auroral electrojet is capable of generating extremely low frequency (ELF) radio waves in the few kilohertz range by affecting the conductivity of the D-region. The HF heating is nonlinear and results in the generation of harmonics at integer multiples of the ELF modulation frequency with ∼1% of the total power outside the fundamental when sinusoidal amplitude modulation is applied to the HF carrier. For the purpose of harmonic minimization, we present a modulation scheme designed to create a sinusoidal change in the Hall conductivity at a particular altitude in the ionosphere. The modulation waveform is generated by inverting a numerical HF heating model, starting from the desired conductivity time series, and obtaining the HF power envelope at the bottom of the ionosphere. The inverted envelopes (referred to as inv-sin waveforms) are highly sensitive to the assumed ionospheric density profile and simulations indicate that these waveforms have less harmonic distortion compared to sinusoidal modulation when the actual ionospheric density is similar to or less dense than the one assumed. Experimental results indicate that sinusoidal amplitude modulation may still be preferred since it is more robust to the highly variable ionospheric profile while square wave modulation is more efficient in generation of ELF waves when harmonic distortion is not important. The inv-sin waveforms are more efficient than sinusoidal modulation while still suffering from less harmonic distortion than square wave modulation suggesting a tradeoff between harmonic distortion and ELF generation efficiency.

  12. Interpolation in waveform space: Enhancing the accuracy of gravitational waveform families using numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Kipp; Emberson, J. D.; Hanna, Chad; Keppel, Drew; Pfeiffer, Harald P.

    2013-02-01

    Matched filtering for the identification of compact object mergers in gravitational wave antenna data involves the comparison of the data stream to a bank of template gravitational waveforms. Typically the template bank is constructed from phenomenological waveform models, since these can be evaluated for an arbitrary choice of physical parameters. Recently it has been proposed that singular value decomposition (SVD) can be used to reduce the number of templates required for detection. As we show here, another benefit of SVD is its removal of biases from the phenomenological templates along with a corresponding improvement in their ability to represent waveform signals obtained from numerical relativity (NR) simulations. Using these ideas, we present a method that calibrates a reduced SVD basis of phenomenological waveforms against NR waveforms in order to construct a new waveform approximant with improved accuracy and faithfulness compared to the original phenomenological model. The new waveform family is given numerically through the interpolation of the projection coefficients of NR waveforms expanded onto the reduced basis and provides a generalized scheme for enhancing phenomenological models.

  13. Experimental Design and Primary Data Analysis Methods for Comparing Adaptive Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Qian, Min; Almirall, Daniel; Pelham, William E.; Gnagy, Beth; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Yu, Jihnhee; Murphy, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, research in the area of intervention development has been shifting from the traditional fixed-intervention approach to "adaptive interventions," which allow greater individualization and adaptation of intervention options (i.e., intervention type and/or dosage) over time. Adaptive interventions are operationalized via a sequence…

  14. Rational design and adaptive management of combination therapies for Hepatitis C virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Ruian; Loverdo, Claude; Qi, Hangfei; Sun, Ren; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-06-30

    Recent discoveries of direct acting antivirals against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) have raised hopes of effective treatment via combination therapies. Yet rapid evolution and high diversity of HCV populations, combined with the reality of suboptimal treatment adherence, make drug resistance a clinical and public health concern. We develop a general model incorporating viral dynamics and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics to assess how suboptimal adherence affects resistance development and clinical outcomes. We derive design principles and adaptive treatment strategies, identifying a high-risk period when missing doses is particularly risky for de novo resistance, and quantifying the number of additional doses needed to compensate when doses are missed. Using data from large-scale resistance assays, we demonstrate that the risk of resistance can be reduced substantially by applying these principles to a combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. By providing a mechanistic framework to link patient characteristics to the risk of resistance, these findings show the potential of rational treatment design.

  15. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hwisoo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model. PMID:26076406

  16. Toward Design of an Environment-Aware Adaptive Locomotion-Mode-Recognition System

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lin; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to improve the performance of a locomotion-mode-recognition system based on neuromuscular-mechanical fusion by introducing additional information about the walking environment. Linear-discriminant-analysis-based classifiers were first designed to identify a lower limb prosthesis user’s locomotion mode based on electromyographic signals recorded from residual leg muscles and ground reaction forces measured from the prosthetic pylon. Nine transfemoral amputees who wore a passive hydraulic knee or powered prosthetic knee participated in this study. Information about the walking terrain was simulated and modeled as prior probability based on the principle of maximum entropy and integrated into the discriminant functions of the classifier. When the correct prior knowledge of walking terrain was simulated, the classification accuracy for each locomotion mode significantly increased and no task transitions were missed. In addition, simulated incorrect prior knowledge did not significantly reduce system performance, indicating that our design is robust against noisy and imperfect prior information. Furthermore, these observations were independent of the type of prosthesis applied. The promising results in this study may assist the further development of an environment-aware adaptive system for locomotion-mode recognition for powered lower limb prostheses or orthoses. PMID:22996721

  17. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Hwisoo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model. PMID:26076406

  18. Rational design and adaptive management of combination therapies for Hepatitis C virus infection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ke, Ruian; Loverdo, Claude; Qi, Hangfei; Sun, Ren; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-06-30

    Recent discoveries of direct acting antivirals against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) have raised hopes of effective treatment via combination therapies. Yet rapid evolution and high diversity of HCV populations, combined with the reality of suboptimal treatment adherence, make drug resistance a clinical and public health concern. We develop a general model incorporating viral dynamics and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics to assess how suboptimal adherence affects resistance development and clinical outcomes. We derive design principles and adaptive treatment strategies, identifying a high-risk period when missing doses is particularly risky for de novo resistance, and quantifying the number of additional doses needed to compensatemore » when doses are missed. Using data from large-scale resistance assays, we demonstrate that the risk of resistance can be reduced substantially by applying these principles to a combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. By providing a mechanistic framework to link patient characteristics to the risk of resistance, these findings show the potential of rational treatment design.« less

  19. Circuit Design and Simulation of AN Augmented Adaptive Resonance Theory (aart) Neural Network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ching-Sung

    This dissertation presents circuit implementations for an binary-input adaptive resonance theory neural network architecture, called the augmented ART-1 neural network (AART1-NN). The AART1-NN is a modification of the popular ART1-NN, developed by Carpenter and Grossberg, and it exhibits the same behavior as the ART1-NN. The AART1-NN is a real -time model, and has the ability to classify an arbitrary set of binary input patterns into different clusters. The design of the AART1-NN circuit is based on a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations that constitute the AART1 -NN model. Various ways are examined to implement an efficient and practical AART1-NN in electronic hardware. They include designing circuits of AART1-NN by means of discrete electronic components, such as operational amplifiers, capacitors, and resistors, digital VLSI circuit, and mixed analog/digital VLSI circuit. The implemented circuit prototypes are verified using the PSpice circuit simulator, running on Sun workstations. Results obtained from PSpice circuit simulations are also compared with results obtained by solving the coupled differential equations numerically. The prototype systems developed in this work can be used as building blocks for larger AART1-NN architectures, as well as for other types of ART architectures that involve the AART1-NN model.

  20. Computational design of genomic transcriptional networks with adaptation to varying environments.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Javier; Elena, Santiago F; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2012-09-18

    Transcriptional profiling has been widely used as a tool for unveiling the coregulations of genes in response to genetic and environmental perturbations. These coregulations have been used, in a few instances, to infer global transcriptional regulatory models. Here, using the large amount of transcriptomic information available for the bacterium Escherichia coli, we seek to understand the design principles determining the regulation of its transcriptome. Combining transcriptomic and signaling data, we develop an evolutionary computational procedure that allows obtaining alternative genomic transcriptional regulatory network (GTRN) that still maintains its adaptability to dynamic environments. We apply our methodology to an E. coli GTRN and show that it could be rewired to simpler transcriptional regulatory structures. These rewired GTRNs still maintain the global physiological response to fluctuating environments. Rewired GTRNs contain 73% fewer regulated operons. Genes with similar functions and coordinated patterns of expression across environments are clustered into longer regulated operons. These synthetic GTRNs are more sensitive and show a more robust response to challenging environments. This result illustrates that the natural configuration of E. coli GTRN does not necessarily result from selection for robustness to environmental perturbations, but that evolutionary contingencies may have been important as well. We also discuss the limitations of our methodology in the context of the demand theory. Our procedure will be useful as a novel way to analyze global transcription regulation networks and in synthetic biology for the de novo design of genomes. PMID:22927389

  1. Toward design of an environment-aware adaptive locomotion-mode-recognition system.

    PubMed

    Du, Lin; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Ming; Huang, He

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to improve the performance of a locomotion-mode-recognition system based on neuromuscular-mechanical fusion by introducing additional information about the walking environment. Linear-discriminant-analysis-based classifiers were first designed to identify a lower limb prosthesis user's locomotion mode based on electromyographic signals recorded from residual leg muscles and ground reaction forces measured from the prosthetic pylon. Nine transfemoral amputees who wore a passive hydraulic knee or powered prosthetic knee participated in this study. Information about the walking terrain was simulated and modeled as prior probability based on the principle of maximum entropy and integrated into the discriminant functions of the classifier. When the correct prior knowledge of walking terrain was simulated, the classification accuracy for each locomotion mode significantly increased and no task transitions were missed. In addition, simulated incorrect prior knowledge did not significantly reduce system performance, indicating that our design is robust against noisy and imperfect prior information. Furthermore, these observations were independent of the type of prosthesis applied. The promising results in this study may assist the further development of an environment-aware adaptive system for locomotion-mode recognition for powered lower limb prostheses or orthoses. PMID:22996721

  2. Vrala: designing and prototyping a novel high-efficiency actuator for large adaptive mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Ciro; Marignetti, Fabrizio; Agapito, Guido; Tomassi, Giovanni; Riccardi, Armando

    2010-07-01

    The next-generation Extremely Large Telescopes adaptive optics systems require high-order, long-stroke, quite large deformable mirrors. Higher forces and greater actuator densities than the ones provided by the current technology are needed, still maintaining its requests in terms of accuracy and bandwidth. The electromagnetic "Vrala" actuator can accomplish this very demanding goal. Based on a very simple magnetic circuit, providing a compact device, it allows to deliver a large force with very low power dissipations. With a typical efficiency of about 7 N/W and an overall radius that allows actuator separations as low as 25 mm, the deformable mirror can be actuated on small spatial scales, and/or its thickness can be increased, in order to simplify the manufacturing, with a little thermal impact. This paper will mainly discuss the magnetic design of the proposed actuator, its effects on the thermal response of the device as well as its behavior in a closed loop control system - from the geometrical optimization process to the dynamic performances. A prototype built accordingly to the proposed design has been tested. The test set-up, as well as the first set of the measured data, well matching the results of the numerical simulations, will also be shown.

  3. Design of Field Experiments for Adaptive Sampling of the Ocean with Autonomous Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Ooi, B. H.; Cho, W.; Dao, M. H.; Tkalich, P.; Patrikalakis, N. M.

    2010-05-01

    Due to the highly non-linear and dynamical nature of oceanic phenomena, the predictive capability of various ocean models depends on the availability of operational data. A practical method to improve the accuracy of the ocean forecast is to use a data assimilation methodology to combine in-situ measured and remotely acquired data with numerical forecast models of the physical environment. Autonomous surface and underwater vehicles with various sensors are economic and efficient tools for exploring and sampling the ocean for data assimilation; however there is an energy limitation to such vehicles, and thus effective resource allocation for adaptive sampling is required to optimize the efficiency of exploration. In this paper, we use physical oceanography forecasts of the coastal zone of Singapore for the design of a set of field experiments to acquire useful data for model calibration and data assimilation. The design process of our experiments relied on the oceanography forecast including the current speed, its gradient, and vorticity in a given region of interest for which permits for field experiments could be obtained and for time intervals that correspond to strong tidal currents. Based on these maps, resources available to our experimental team, including Autonomous Surface Craft (ASC) are allocated so as to capture the oceanic features that result from jets and vortices behind bluff bodies (e.g., islands) in the tidal current. Results are summarized from this resource allocation process and field experiments conducted in January 2009.

  4. Gaussian Decomposition of Laser Altimeter Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofton, Michelle A.; Minster, J. Bernard; Blair, J. Bryan

    1999-01-01

    We develop a method to decompose a laser altimeter return waveform into its Gaussian components assuming that the position of each Gaussian within the waveform can be used to calculate the mean elevation of a specific reflecting surface within the laser footprint. We estimate the number of Gaussian components from the number of inflection points of a smoothed copy of the laser waveform, and obtain initial estimates of the Gaussian half-widths and positions from the positions of its consecutive inflection points. Initial amplitude estimates are obtained using a non-negative least-squares method. To reduce the likelihood of fitting the background noise within the waveform and to minimize the number of Gaussians needed in the approximation, we rank the "importance" of each Gaussian in the decomposition using its initial half-width and amplitude estimates. The initial parameter estimates of all Gaussians ranked "important" are optimized using the Levenburg-Marquardt method. If the sum of the Gaussians does not approximate the return waveform to a prescribed accuracy, then additional Gaussians are included in the optimization procedure. The Gaussian decomposition method is demonstrated on data collected by the airborne Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) in October 1997 over the Sequoia National Forest, California.

  5. Which uncertainty? Using expert elicitation and expected value of information to design an adaptive program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, Michael C.; Converse, Sarah J.; Lyons, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Natural resource management is plagued with uncertainty of many kinds, but not all uncertainties are equally important to resolve. The promise of adaptive management is that learning in the short-term will improve management in the long-term; that promise is best kept if the focus of learning is on those uncertainties that most impede achievement of management objectives. In this context, an existing tool of decision analysis, the expected value of perfect information (EVPI), is particularly valuable in identifying the most important uncertainties. Expert elicitation can be used to develop preliminary predictions of management response under a series of hypotheses, as well as prior weights for those hypotheses, and the EVPI can be used to determine how much management could improve if uncertainty was resolved. These methods were applied to management of whooping cranes (Grus americana), an endangered migratory bird that is being reintroduced in several places in North America. The Eastern Migratory Population of whooping cranes had exhibited almost no successful reproduction through 2009. Several dozen hypotheses can be advanced to explain this failure, and many of them lead to very different management responses. An expert panel articulated the hypotheses, provided prior weights for them, developed potential management strategies, and made predictions about the response of the population to each strategy under each hypothesis. Multi-criteria decision analysis identified a preferred strategy in the face of uncertainty, and analysis of the expected value of information identified how informative each strategy could be. These results provide the foundation for design of an adaptive management program.

  6. Structures and Mechanisms Design Concepts for Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yount, Bryan C.; Arnold, James O.; Gage, Peter J.; Mockelman, Jeffrey; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2012-01-01

    System studies have shown that large deployable aerodynamic decelerators such as the Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) concept can revolutionize future robotic and human exploration missions involving atmospheric entry, descent and landing by significantly reducing the maximum heating rate, total heat load, and deceleration loads experienced by the spacecraft during entry [1-3]. ADEPT and the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) [4] share the approach of stowing the entry system in the shroud of the launch vehicle and deploying it to a much larger diameter prior to entry. The ADEPT concept provides a low ballistic coefficient for planetary entry by employing an umbrella-like deployable structure consisting of ribs, struts and a fabric cover that form an aerodynamic decelerator capable of undergoing hypersonic flight. The ADEPT "skin" is a 3-D woven carbon cloth that serves as a thermal protection system (TPS) and as a structural surface that transfers aerodynamic forces to the underlying ribs [5]. This paper focuses on design activities associated with integrating ADEPT components (cloth, ribs, struts and mechanisms) into a system that can function across all configurations and environments of a typical mission concept: stowed during launch, in-space deployment, entry, descent, parachute deployment and separation from the landing payload. The baseline structures and mechanisms were selected via trade studies conducted during the summer and fall of 2012. They are now being incorporated into the design of a ground test article (GTA) that will be fabricated in 2013. It will be used to evaluate retention of the stowed configuration in a launch environment, mechanism operation for release, deployment and locking, and static strength of the deployed decelerator. Of particular interest are the carbon cloth interfaces, underlying hot structure, (Advanced Carbon- Carbon ribs) and other structural components (nose cap, struts, and

  7. Hybrid feedback feedforward: An efficient design of adaptive neural network control.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongping; Liu, Yiqi; Xu, Bin; Yu, Haoyong

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an efficient hybrid feedback feedforward (HFF) adaptive approximation-based control (AAC) strategy for a class of uncertain Euler-Lagrange systems. The control structure includes a proportional-derivative (PD) control term in the feedback loop and a radial-basis-function (RBF) neural network (NN) in the feedforward loop, which mimics the human motor learning control mechanism. At the presence of discontinuous friction, a sigmoid-jump-function NN is incorporated to improve control performance. The major difference of the proposed HFF-AAC design from the traditional feedback AAC (FB-AAC) design is that only desired outputs, rather than both tracking errors and desired outputs, are applied as RBF-NN inputs. Yet, such a slight modification leads to several attractive properties of HFF-AAC, including the convenient choice of an approximation domain, the decrease of the number of RBF-NN inputs, and semiglobal practical asymptotic stability dominated by control gains. Compared with previous HFF-AAC approaches, the proposed approach possesses the following two distinctive features: (i) all above attractive properties are achieved by a much simpler control scheme; (ii) the bounds of plant uncertainties are not required to be known. Consequently, the proposed approach guarantees a minimum configuration of the control structure and a minimum requirement of plant knowledge for the AAC design, which leads to a sharp decrease of implementation cost in terms of hardware selection, algorithm realization and system debugging. Simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed HFF-AAC can perform as good as or even better than the traditional FB-AAC under much simpler control synthesis and much lower computational cost. PMID:26890657

  8. The relative power of genome scans to detect local adaptation depends on sampling design and statistical method.

    PubMed

    Lotterhos, Katie E; Whitlock, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    Although genome scans have become a popular approach towards understanding the genetic basis of local adaptation, the field still does not have a firm grasp on how sampling design and demographic history affect the performance of genome scans on complex landscapes. To explore these issues, we compared 20 different sampling designs in equilibrium (i.e. island model and isolation by distance) and nonequilibrium (i.e. range expansion from one or two refugia) demographic histories in spatially heterogeneous environments. We simulated spatially complex landscapes, which allowed us to exploit local maxima and minima in the environment in 'pair' and 'transect' sampling strategies. We compared F(ST) outlier and genetic-environment association (GEA) methods for each of two approaches that control for population structure: with a covariance matrix or with latent factors. We show that while the relative power of two methods in the same category (F(ST) or GEA) depended largely on the number of individuals sampled, overall GEA tests had higher power in the island model and F(ST) had higher power under isolation by distance. In the refugia models, however, these methods varied in their power to detect local adaptation at weakly selected loci. At weakly selected loci, paired sampling designs had equal or higher power than transect or random designs to detect local adaptation. Our results can inform sampling designs for studies of local adaptation and have important implications for the interpretation of genome scans based on landscape data. PMID:25648189

  9. Wavelet analysis of the impedance cardiogram waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podtaev, S.; Stepanov, R.; Dumler, A.; Chugainov, S.; Tziberkin, K.

    2012-12-01

    Impedance cardiography has been used for diagnosing atrial and ventricular dysfunctions, valve disorders, aortic stenosis, and vascular diseases. Almost all the applications of impedance cardiography require determination of some of the characteristic points of the ICG waveform. The ICG waveform has a set of characteristic points known as A, B, E ((dZ/dt)max) X, Y, O and Z. These points are related to distinct physiological events in the cardiac cycle. Objective of this work is an approbation of a new method of processing and interpretation of the impedance cardiogram waveforms using wavelet analysis. A method of computer thoracic tetrapolar polyrheocardiography is used for hemodynamic registrations. Use of original wavelet differentiation algorithm allows combining filtration and calculation of the derivatives of rheocardiogram. The proposed approach can be used in clinical practice for early diagnostics of cardiovascular system remodelling in the course of different pathologies.

  10. The Focusing DIRC with Waveform Digitizing Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckman, L.L.; Nishimura, K.; Varner, G.S.; Vavra, J.; Aston, D.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; /SLAC

    2012-06-15

    We have tested a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. The prototype's concept is based on the BaBar DIRC with several important improvements: (a) much faster, pixelated photon detectors, (b) a mirror that makes the photon detector smaller and less sensitive to background in future applications, and (c) electronics capable of measuring single photon resolution to {sigma} {approx} 150 ps, which allows for correction due to chromatic error. In this test, the prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from {approx}450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of {approx}2.5 GSa/s. This version of the FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope providing muon tracks with {approx}1 mrad angular resolution and a muon momentum cutoff of {ge} 1.6 GeV/c.

  11. Krylov subspace acceleration of waveform relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsdaine, A.; Wu, Deyun

    1996-12-31

    Standard solution methods for numerically solving time-dependent problems typically begin by discretizing the problem on a uniform time grid and then sequentially solving for successive time points. The initial time discretization imposes a serialization to the solution process and limits parallel speedup to the speedup available from parallelizing the problem at any given time point. This bottleneck can be circumvented by the use of waveform methods in which multiple time-points of the different components of the solution are computed independently. With the waveform approach, a problem is first spatially decomposed and distributed among the processors of a parallel machine. Each processor then solves its own time-dependent subsystem over the entire interval of interest using previous iterates from other processors as inputs. Synchronization and communication between processors take place infrequently, and communication consists of large packets of information - discretized functions of time (i.e., waveforms).

  12. Evaluation of an Adaptive Game that Uses EEG Measures Validated during the Design Process as Inputs to a Biocybernetic Loop

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Kate C.; Fairclough, Stephen H.; Gilleade, Kiel

    2016-01-01

    Biocybernetic adaptation is a form of physiological computing whereby real-time data streaming from the brain and body is used by a negative control loop to adapt the user interface. This article describes the development of an adaptive game system that is designed to maximize player engagement by utilizing changes in real-time electroencephalography (EEG) to adjust the level of game demand. The research consists of four main stages: (1) the development of a conceptual framework upon which to model the interaction between person and system; (2) the validation of the psychophysiological inference underpinning the loop; (3) the construction of a working prototype; and (4) an evaluation of the adaptive game. Two studies are reported. The first demonstrates the sensitivity of EEG power in the (frontal) theta and (parietal) alpha bands to changing levels of game demand. These variables were then reformulated within the working biocybernetic control loop designed to maximize player engagement. The second study evaluated the performance of an adaptive game of Tetris with respect to system behavior and user experience. Important issues for the design and evaluation of closed-loop interfaces are discussed. PMID:27242486

  13. Evaluation of an Adaptive Game that Uses EEG Measures Validated during the Design Process as Inputs to a Biocybernetic Loop.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Kate C; Fairclough, Stephen H; Gilleade, Kiel

    2016-01-01

    Biocybernetic adaptation is a form of physiological computing whereby real-time data streaming from the brain and body is used by a negative control loop to adapt the user interface. This article describes the development of an adaptive game system that is designed to maximize player engagement by utilizing changes in real-time electroencephalography (EEG) to adjust the level of game demand. The research consists of four main stages: (1) the development of a conceptual framework upon which to model the interaction between person and system; (2) the validation of the psychophysiological inference underpinning the loop; (3) the construction of a working prototype; and (4) an evaluation of the adaptive game. Two studies are reported. The first demonstrates the sensitivity of EEG power in the (frontal) theta and (parietal) alpha bands to changing levels of game demand. These variables were then reformulated within the working biocybernetic control loop designed to maximize player engagement. The second study evaluated the performance of an adaptive game of Tetris with respect to system behavior and user experience. Important issues for the design and evaluation of closed-loop interfaces are discussed. PMID:27242486

  14. STEREO database of interplanetary Langmuir electric waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, C.; Henri, P.; Génot, V.; Lormant, N.; Dufourg, N.; Cecconi, B.; Nguyen, Q. N.; Goetz, K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a database of electric waveforms that is available at the Centre de Données de la Physique des Plasmas (CDPP, http://cdpp.eu/). This database is specifically dedicated to waveforms of Langmuir/Z-mode waves. These waves occur in numerous kinetic processes involving electrons in space plasmas. Statistical analysis from a large data set of such waves is then of interest, e.g., to study the relaxation of high-velocity electron beams generated at interplanetary shock fronts, in current sheets and magnetic reconnection region, the transfer of energy between high and low frequencies, the generation of electromagnetic waves. The Langmuir waveforms were recorded by the Time Domain Sampler (TDS) of the WAVES radio instrument on board the STEREO mission. In this paper, we detail the criteria used to identify the Langmuir/Z-mode waves among the whole set of waveforms of the STEREO spacecraft. A database covering the November 2006 to August 2014 period is provided. It includes electric waveforms expressed in the normalized frame (B,B × Vsw,B × (B × Vsw)) with B and Vsw the local magnetic field and solar wind velocity vectors, and the local magnetic field in the variance frame, in an interval of ±1.5 min around the time of the Langmuir event. Quicklooks are also provided that display the three components of the electric waveforms together with the spectrum of E∥, together with the magnitude and components of the magnetic field in the 3 min interval, in the variance frame. Finally, the distribution of the Langmuir/Z-mode waves peak amplitude is also analyzed.

  15. Direct Waveform Inversion: a New Recursive Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the full-waveform inversion (FWI) is to find an Earth's model such that the synthetic waveforms computed using the model fit the observed ones. In practice, such a model is found in the context of the perturbation approach in an iterative fashion. Specifically, to find such a model, one starts from an initial global velocity model and perform model updating iteratively based on the Frechet derivative or single scattering by adjoint methods to minimize some cost function. However, this process often leads to local minima for the nonlinear cost function in the optimization and slow or no convergence when the starting model is far from the true model. To solve for the initial-model dependence and the convergence issue, we show a new direct waveform inversion (DWI) idea to directly invert the waveform data recursively by explicitly enforcing the causality principle. The DWI offers the advantage of assuming no global initial model and no iteration is needed for the model updating. Starting from the source-receiver region, the DWI builds the model outward recursively by fitting the earliest part of the reflection waveforms and the DWI process is always convergent. The DWI combines seismic imaging and velocity model building into one single process and this is in contrast to many industrial applications where seismic imaging/migration and velocity modeling building are done alternatively. The DWI idea is applicable to one-, two-, and three-dimensional spaces. We show numerical examples to support our idea using full waveform data including both free-surface and inter-bed multiples. Using reflection seismic data, we show that the DWI can invert for both velocity and density, separately.

  16. Pathology and failure in the design and implementation of adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Gunderson, Lance H.

    2011-01-01

    The conceptual underpinnings for adaptive management are simple; there will always be inherent uncertainty and unpredictability in the dynamics and behavior of complex ecological systems as a result non-linear interactions among components and emergence, yet management decisions must still be made. The strength of adaptive management is in the recognition and confrontation of such uncertainty. Rather than ignore uncertainty, or use it to preclude management actions, adaptive management can foster resilience and flexibility to cope with an uncertain future, and develop safe to fail management approaches that acknowledge inevitable changes and surprises. Since its initial introduction, adaptive management has been hailed as a solution to endless trial and error approaches to complex natural resource management challenges. However, its implementation has failed more often than not. It does not produce easy answers, and it is appropriate in only a subset of natural resource management problems. Clearly adaptive management has great potential when applied appropriately. Just as clearly adaptive management has seemingly failed to live up to its high expectations. Why? We outline nine pathologies and challenges that can lead to failure in adaptive management programs. We focus on general sources of failures in adaptive management, so that others can avoid these pitfalls in the future. Adaptive management can be a powerful and beneficial tool when applied correctly to appropriate management problems; the challenge is to keep the concept of adaptive management from being hijacked for inappropriate use.

  17. Changing the Waveform of Circadian Rhythms: Considerations for Shift-Work

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth M.; Gorman, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian disruption in shift-work is common and has deleterious effects on health and performance. Current efforts to mitigate these harms reasonably focus on the phase of the circadian pacemaker, which unfortunately in humans, shifts slowly and often incompletely. Temporal reorganization of rhythmic waveform (i.e., the shape of its 24 h oscillation), rather than phase, however, may better match performance demands of shift-workers and can be quickly and feasibly implemented in animals. In fact, a bifurcated pacemaker waveform may permit stable entrainment of a bimodal sleep/wake rhythm promoting alertness in both night and daylight hours. Although bifurcation has yet to be formally assessed in humans, evidence of conserved properties of circadian organization and plasticity predict its occurrence: humans respond to conventional manipulations of waveform (e.g., photoperiodism); behaviorally, the sleep/wake rhythm is adaptable; and finally, the human circadian system likely derives from the same multiple cellular oscillators that permit waveform flexibility in the rodent pacemaker. In short, investigation into untried manipulations of waveform in humans to facilitate adjustment to challenging schedules is justified. PMID:22557994

  18. Data space reduction, quality assessment and searching of seismograms: autoencoder networks for waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Andrew P.; Trampert, Jeannot

    2012-05-01

    What makes a seismogram look like a seismogram? Seismic data sets generally contain waveforms sharing some set of visual characteristics and features - indeed, seismologists routinely exploit this when performing quality control 'by hand'. Understanding and harnessing these characteristics offers the prospect of a deeper understanding of seismic waveforms, and opens up many potential new techniques for processing and working with data. In addition, the fact that certain features are shared between waveforms suggests that it may be possible to transform the data away from the time domain, and represent the same information using fewer parameters. If so, this would be a significant step towards making fully non-linear tomographic inversions computationally tractable. Hinton & Salakhutdinov showed that a particular class of neural network, termed 'autoencoder networks', may be used to find lower-dimensional encodings of complex binary data sets. Here, we adapt their work to the continuous case to allow the use of autoencoders for seismic waveforms, and offer a demonstration in which we compress 512-point waveforms to 32-element encodings. We also demonstrate that the mapping from data to encoding space, and its inverse, are well behaved, as required for many applications. Finally, we sketch a number of potential applications of the technique, which we hope will be of practical interest across all seismological disciplines, and beyond.

  19. Timing detection and seismocardiography waveform extraction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang; Zhang, Jianzhong; Nam, Young-Han

    2012-01-01

    Described herein is a new and robust method to extract heart-beat timing from seismocardiogram (SCG). This timing indicates the precise time location of each heart beat and therefore directly conveys heart rate information. Knowledge of the time location of each occurrence of the underlying SCG waveform allows us to obtain a clean SCG waveform estimate by time averaging noisy segments of an SCG time series. The algorithm can be implemented in wearable SCG-based devices to provide heart monitoring or diagnosis capabilities without relying on any other methodology, such as electrocardiography, as a timing reference. PMID:23366694

  20. Composite Adaptive Fuzzy Output Feedback Control Design for Uncertain Nonlinear Strict-Feedback Systems With Input Saturation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongming; Tong, Shaocheng; Li, Tieshan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a composite adaptive fuzzy output-feedback control approach is proposed for a class of single-input and single-output strict-feedback nonlinear systems with unmeasured states and input saturation. Fuzzy logic systems are utilized to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, and a fuzzy state observer is designed to estimate the unmeasured states. By utilizing the designed fuzzy state observer, a serial-parallel estimation model is established. Based on adaptive backstepping dynamic surface control technique and utilizing the prediction error between the system states observer model and the serial-parallel estimation model, a new fuzzy controller with the composite parameters adaptive laws are developed. It is proved that all the signals of the closed-loop system are bounded and the system output can follow the given bounded reference signal. A numerical example and simulation comparisons with previous control methods are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25438335

  1. Design guidelines for adapting scientific research articles: An example from an introductory level, interdisciplinary program on soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langbeheim, Elon; Safran, Samuel A.; Yerushalmi, Edit

    2013-01-01

    We present design guidelines for using Adapted Primary Literature (APL) as part of current interdisciplinary topics to introductory physics students. APL is a text genre that allows students to comprehend a scientific article, while maintaining the core features of the communication among scientists, thus representing an authentic scientific discourse. We describe the adaptation of a research paper by Nobel Laureate Paul Flory on phase equilibrium in polymer-solvent mixtures that was presented to high school students in a project-based unit on soft matter. The adaptation followed two design strategies: a) Making explicit the interplay between the theory and experiment. b) Re-structuring the text to map the theory onto the students' prior knowledge. Specifically, we map the theory of polymer-solvent systems onto a model for binary mixtures of small molecules of equal size that was already studied in class.

  2. Design of an Adaptive Power Regulation Mechanism and a Nozzle for a Hydroelectric Power Plant Turbine Test Rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Burak; Aytac, Zeynep; Tascioglu, Yigit; Celebioglu, Kutay; Aradag, Selin; ETU Hydro Research Center Team

    2014-11-01

    This study deals with the design of a power regulation mechanism for a Hydroelectric Power Plant (HEPP) model turbine test system which is designed to test Francis type hydroturbines up to 2 MW power with varying head and flow(discharge) values. Unlike the tailor made regulation mechanisms of full-sized, functional HEPPs; the design for the test system must be easily adapted to various turbines that are to be tested. In order to achieve this adaptability, a dynamic simulation model is constructed in MATLAB/Simulink SimMechanics. This model acquires geometric data and hydraulic loading data of the regulation system from Autodesk Inventor CAD models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis respectively. The dynamic model is explained and case studies of two different HEPPs are performed for validation. CFD aided design of the turbine guide vanes, which is used as input for the dynamic model, is also presented. This research is financially supported by Turkish Ministry of Development.

  3. Computational Intelligence and Wavelet Transform Based Metamodel for Efficient Generation of Not-Yet Simulated Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Oltean, Gabriel; Ivanciu, Laura-Nicoleta

    2016-01-01

    The design and verification of complex electronic systems, especially the analog and mixed-signal ones, prove to be extremely time consuming tasks, if only circuit-level simulations are involved. A significant amount of time can be saved if a cost effective solution is used for the extensive analysis of the system, under all conceivable conditions. This paper proposes a data-driven method to build fast to evaluate, but also accurate metamodels capable of generating not-yet simulated waveforms as a function of different combinations of the parameters of the system. The necessary data are obtained by early-stage simulation of an electronic control system from the automotive industry. The metamodel development is based on three key elements: a wavelet transform for waveform characterization, a genetic algorithm optimization to detect the optimal wavelet transform and to identify the most relevant decomposition coefficients, and an artificial neuronal network to derive the relevant coefficients of the wavelet transform for any new parameters combination. The resulted metamodels for three different waveform families are fully reliable. They satisfy the required key points: high accuracy (a maximum mean squared error of 7.1x10-5 for the unity-based normalized waveforms), efficiency (fully affordable computational effort for metamodel build-up: maximum 18 minutes on a general purpose computer), and simplicity (less than 1 second for running the metamodel, the user only provides the parameters combination). The metamodels can be used for very efficient generation of new waveforms, for any possible combination of dependent parameters, offering the possibility to explore the entire design space. A wide range of possibilities becomes achievable for the user, such as: all design corners can be analyzed, possible worst-case situations can be investigated, extreme values of waveforms can be discovered, sensitivity analyses can be performed (the influence of each parameter on the

  4. Computational Intelligence and Wavelet Transform Based Metamodel for Efficient Generation of Not-Yet Simulated Waveforms.

    PubMed

    Oltean, Gabriel; Ivanciu, Laura-Nicoleta

    2016-01-01

    The design and verification of complex electronic systems, especially the analog and mixed-signal ones, prove to be extremely time consuming tasks, if only circuit-level simulations are involved. A significant amount of time can be saved if a cost effective solution is used for the extensive analysis of the system, under all conceivable conditions. This paper proposes a data-driven method to build fast to evaluate, but also accurate metamodels capable of generating not-yet simulated waveforms as a function of different combinations of the parameters of the system. The necessary data are obtained by early-stage simulation of an electronic control system from the automotive industry. The metamodel development is based on three key elements: a wavelet transform for waveform characterization, a genetic algorithm optimization to detect the optimal wavelet transform and to identify the most relevant decomposition coefficients, and an artificial neuronal network to derive the relevant coefficients of the wavelet transform for any new parameters combination. The resulted metamodels for three different waveform families are fully reliable. They satisfy the required key points: high accuracy (a maximum mean squared error of 7.1x10-5 for the unity-based normalized waveforms), efficiency (fully affordable computational effort for metamodel build-up: maximum 18 minutes on a general purpose computer), and simplicity (less than 1 second for running the metamodel, the user only provides the parameters combination). The metamodels can be used for very efficient generation of new waveforms, for any possible combination of dependent parameters, offering the possibility to explore the entire design space. A wide range of possibilities becomes achievable for the user, such as: all design corners can be analyzed, possible worst-case situations can be investigated, extreme values of waveforms can be discovered, sensitivity analyses can be performed (the influence of each parameter on the

  5. Adaption of G-TAG Software for Validating Touch and Go Asteroid Sample Return Design Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars James C.; Acikmese, Behcet; Mandic, Milan

    2012-01-01

    A software tool is used to demonstrate the feasibility of Touch and Go (TAG) sampling for Asteroid Sample Return missions. TAG is a concept whereby a spacecraft is in contact with the surface of a small body, such as a comet or asteroid, for a few seconds or less before ascending to a safe location away from the small body. Previous work at JPL developed the G-TAG simulation tool, which provides a software environment for fast, multi-body simulations of the TAG event. G-TAG is described in Multibody Simulation Software Testbed for Small-Body Exploration and Sampling, (NPO-47196) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 11 (November 2011), p.54. This current innovation adapts this tool to a mission that intends to return a sample from the surface of an asteroid. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the TAG concept, the new software tool was used to generate extensive simulations that demonstrate the designed spacecraft meets key requirements. These requirements state that contact force and duration must be sufficient to ensure that enough material from the surface is collected in the brushwheel sampler (BWS), and that the spacecraft must survive the contact and must be able to recover and ascend to a safe position, and maintain velocity and orientation after the contact.

  6. Design of a Compact, Bimorph Deformable Mirror-Based Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Deng, Guohua; Wei, Ling; Li, Xiqi; Yang, Jinsheng; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) using a bimorph mirror. The simulated AOSLO system achieves diffraction-limited criterion through all the raster scanning fields (6.4 mm pupil, 3° × 3° on pupil). The bimorph mirror-based AOSLO corrected ocular aberrations in model eyes to less than 0.1 μm RMS wavefront error with a closed-loop bandwidth of a few Hz. Facilitated with a bimorph mirror at a stroke of ±15 μm with 35 elements and an aperture of 20 mm, the new AOSLO system has a size only half that of the first-generation AOSLO system. The significant increase in stroke allows for large ocular aberrations such as defocus in the range of ±600° and astigmatism in the range of ±200°, thereby fully exploiting the AO correcting capabilities for diseased human eyes in the future. PMID:27526166

  7. Optimization of reactor network design problem using Jumping Gene Adaptation of Differential Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gujarathi, Ashish M.; Purohit, S.; Srikanth, B.

    2015-06-01

    Detailed working principle of jumping gene adaptation of differential evolution (DE-JGa) is presented. The performance of the DE-JGa algorithm is compared with the performance of differential evolution (DE) and modified DE (MDE) by applying these algorithms on industrial problems. In this study Reactor network design (RND) problem is solved using DE, MDE, and DE-JGa algorithms: These industrial processes are highly nonlinear and complex with reference to optimal operating conditions with many equality and inequality constraints. Extensive computational comparisons have been made for all the chemical engineering problems considered. The results obtained in the present study show that DE-JGa algorithm outperforms the other algorithms (DE and MDE). Several comparisons are made among the algorithms with regard to the number of function evaluations (NFE)/CPU- time required to find the global optimum. The standard deviation and the variance values obtained using DE-JGa, DE and MDE algorithms also show that the DE-JGa algorithm gives consistent set of results for the majority of the test problems and the industrial real world problems.

  8. Analog circuit design and implementation of an adaptive resonance theory (ART) neural network architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ching S.; Liou, Juin J.; Georgiopoulos, Michael; Heileman, Gregory L.; Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents an analog circuit implementation for an adaptive resonance theory neural network architecture, called the augmented ART-1 neural network (AART1-NN). The AART1-NN is a modification of the popular ART1-NN, developed by Carpenter and Grossberg, and it exhibits the same behavior as the ART1-NN. The AART1-NN is a real-time model, and has the ability to classify an arbitrary set of binary input patterns into different clusters. The design of the AART1-NN model. The circuit is implemented by utilizing analog electronic components, such as, operational amplifiers, transistors, capacitors, and resistors. The implemented circuit is verified using the PSpice circuit simulator, running on Sun workstations. Results obtained from the PSpice circuit simulation compare favorably with simulation results produced by solving the differential equations numerically. The prototype system developed here can be used as a building block for larger AART1-NN architectures, as well as for other types of ART architectures that involve the AART1-NN model.

  9. Design and analysis of self-adapted task scheduling strategies in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenzhong; Xiong, Naixue; Chao, Han-Chieh; Hussain, Sajid; Chen, Guolong

    2011-01-01

    In a wireless sensor network (WSN), the usage of resources is usually highly related to the execution of tasks which consume a certain amount of computing and communication bandwidth. Parallel processing among sensors is a promising solution to provide the demanded computation capacity in WSNs. Task allocation and scheduling is a typical problem in the area of high performance computing. Although task allocation and scheduling in wired processor networks has been well studied in the past, their counterparts for WSNs remain largely unexplored. Existing traditional high performance computing solutions cannot be directly implemented in WSNs due to the limitations of WSNs such as limited resource availability and the shared communication medium. In this paper, a self-adapted task scheduling strategy for WSNs is presented. First, a multi-agent-based architecture for WSNs is proposed and a mathematical model of dynamic alliance is constructed for the task allocation problem. Then an effective discrete particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm for the dynamic alliance (DPSO-DA) with a well-designed particle position code and fitness function is proposed. A mutation operator which can effectively improve the algorithm's ability of global search and population diversity is also introduced in this algorithm. Finally, the simulation results show that the proposed solution can achieve significant better performance than other algorithms. PMID:22163971

  10. Adaptation of the quality by design concept in early pharmaceutical development of an intranasal nanosized formulation.

    PubMed

    Pallagi, Edina; Ambrus, Rita; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Csóka, Ildikó

    2015-08-01

    Regulatory science based pharmaceutical development and product manufacturing is highly recommended by the authorities nowadays. The aim of this study was to adapt regulatory science even in the nano-pharmaceutical early development. Authors applied the quality by design (QbD) concept in the early development phase of nano-systems, where the illustration material was meloxicam. The meloxicam nanoparticles produced by co-grinding method for nasal administration were studied according to the QbD policy and the QbD based risk assessment (RA) was performed. The steps were implemented according to the relevant regulatory guidelines (quality target product profile (QTPP) determination, selection of critical quality attributes (CQAs) and critical process parameters (CPPs)) and a special software (Lean QbD Software(®)) was used for the RA, which represents a novelty in this field. The RA was able to predict and identify theoretically the factors (e.g. sample composition, production method parameters, etc.) which have the highest impact on the desired meloxicam-product quality. The results of the practical research justified the theoretical prediction. This method can improve pharmaceutical nano-developments by achieving shorter development time, lower cost, saving human resource efforts and more effective target-orientation. It makes possible focusing the resources on the selected parameters and area during the practical product development. PMID:26134895

  11. Adaptive control design for a class of nonlinear systems based on fuzzy logic systems with scalers and saturators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin-He; Luo, Liang; Fan, Yong-Qing; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Si-Ying

    2014-03-01

    Many practical engineering applications require various types of fuzzy logic systems (FLSs) to design adaptive controllers for nonlinear systems with uncertainties. In this article, we will consider a fundamental theoretical question: is it possible to find a unified adaptive control design method suited to various types of FLSs? In order to solve this problem, we will introduce scalers and saturators at the input and output terminals of FLSs to form the extended FLSs (EFLS). The scalers and saturators have adjustable parameters. By designing the updated laws of these parameters and the estimate values of the fuzzy approximate accuracies, stable adaptive fuzzy controllers can be realised for a class of nonlinear systems with unknown homogeneous drift functions and gains. The proposed design method is only dependent on the outputs of EFLS and the above updated laws, thus increasing its adaptability. The fuzzy control scheme introduced in this article is suitable for all fuzzy systems with or without fuzzy rules. Simulations will also be used to show the validity of the method proposed in this article.

  12. Guiding Learners through Technology-Based Instruction: The Effects of Adaptive Guidance Design and Individual Differences on Learning over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanar, Adam M.; Bell, Bradford S.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive guidance is an instructional intervention that helps learners to make use of the control inherent in technology-based instruction. The present research investigated the interactive effects of guidance design (i.e., framing of guidance information) and individual differences (i.e., pretraining motivation and ability) on learning basic and…

  13. Adapting Evidence-Based Pedagogy to Local Cultural Contexts: A Design Research Study of Policy Borrowing in Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pham, Thanh Thi Hong; Renshaw, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study employs design-based research to investigate how university teachers and their students from Vietnam perceived and adapted an evidence-based pedagogy known as "student-teams achievement division" (STAD). Two hundred and twenty one students and their teachers from three classes at a Vietnamese university participated in this…

  14. Item Selection in Computerized Adaptive Testing: Improving the a-Stratified Design with the Sympson-Hetter Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Chi-Keung; Chang, Hua-Hua; Hau, Kit-Tai

    2002-01-01

    Item exposure control, test-overlap minimization, and the efficient use of item pool are some of the important issues in computerized adaptive testing (CAT) designs. The overexposure of some items and high test-overlap rate may cause both item and test security problems. Previously these problems associated with the maximum information (Max-I)…

  15. L(sub 1) Adaptive Control Design for NASA AirSTAR Flight Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Cao, Chengyu; Hovakimyan, Naira; Zou, Xiaotian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a new L(sub 1) adaptive control architecture that directly compensates for matched as well as unmatched system uncertainty. To evaluate the L(sub 1) adaptive controller, we take advantage of the flexible research environment with rapid prototyping and testing of control laws in the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at the NASA Langley Research Center. We apply the L(sub 1) adaptive control laws to the subscale turbine powered Generic Transport Model. The presented results are from a full nonlinear simulation of the Generic Transport Model and some preliminary pilot evaluations of the L(sub 1) adaptive control law.

  16. Friction Stir Weld Application and Tooling Design for the Multi-purpose Crew Vehicle Stage Adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, John

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), commonly known as the Orion capsule, is planned to be the United States' next manned spacecraft for missions beyond low earth orbit. Following the cancellation of the Constellation program and creation of SLS (Space Launch System), the need arose for the MPCV to utilize the Delta IV Heavy rocket for a test launch scheduled for 2014 instead of the previously planned Ares I rocket. As a result, an adapter (MSA) must be used in conjunction with the MPCV to account for the variation in diameter of the launch vehicles; 5.5 meters down to 5.0 meters. Prior to ight article fabrication, a path nder (test article) will be fabricated to ne tune the associated manufacturing processes. The adapter will be comprised of an aluminum frustum (partial cone) that employs isogrid technology and circumferential rings on each end. The frustum will be fabricated by friction stir welding (FSW) three individual panels together on a Vertical Weld Tool (VWT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Subsequently, each circumferential ring will be friction stir welded to the frustum using a Robotic Weld Tool (RWT). The irregular geometry and large mass of the MSA require that extensive tooling preparation be put into support structures for the friction stir weld. The tooling on the VWT will be comprised of a set of conveyors mounted on pre-existing stanchions so that the MSA will have the ability to be rotated after each of the three friction stir welds. The tooling requirements to friction stir weld the rings with the RWT are somewhat more demanding. To support the mass of the MSA and resist the load of the weld tool, a system of mandrels will be mounted to stanchions and assembled in a circle. The goal of the paper will be to explain the design, fabrication, and assembly of the tooling, to explain the use of friction stir welding on the MSA path nder, and also to discuss the lessons learned and modi cations made in preparation for ight article fabrication

  17. Software defined radio based multi-carrier multi-function waveform for cognitive radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ruolin; Li, Xue; Chakravarthy, Vasu; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an adaptive multicarrier multi-function waveform generator for cognitive radio via software defined radio. Using a USRP (universal software radio peripheral) software defined radio boards and GNU radio software, we implement a multi-carrier waveform generator which can generate multi-function waveforms such as OFDM, NC-OFDM, MC-CDMA, NC-MC-CDMA, CI/MC-CDMA, NCCI/ MC-CDMA, TDCS for cognitive radio. Additionally, we demonstrate a portable overlay cognitive radio using this multicarrier multi-function waveform generator. This cognitive radio is capable of detecting primary users in real time and adaptively adjusting its transmission parameters to avoid interference to primary users. More importantly, this cognitive radio can take advantage of multiple spectrum holes by employing non-contiguous multi-carrier transmission technologies. Additionally, we demonstrate that when the primary user transmission changes, the cognitive radio dynamically adjusts its transmission accordingly. We also demonstrate seamless real time video transmission between two cognitive radio nodes, while avoiding interference from primary users and interference to primary users operating in the same spectrum.

  18. The development of the miniaturized waveform receiver with the function measuring Antenna Impedance in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, H.; Kojima, H.; Fukuhara, H.; Okada, S.; Yamakawa, H.

    2012-04-01

    ) is in attention which is a technique to integrate large scale and complicated circuits. Lots of ASICs have been applied to high energy astrophysics. In this paper, we show our attempt to miniaturize the antennas impedances measurement system and Waveform Capture using the analogue ASIC. We design 8bits segment D/A converter that is implemented inside the waveform receiver ASIC chip. We improve input logic of the D/A converter to generate very weak signals accurately. The designed chip realizes the measurement of the antenna impedance as well as the waveform observation in the board size of business cards.

  19. ADVANCED WAVEFORM SIMULATION FOR SEISMIC MONITORING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Helmberger, Donald V.; Tromp, Jeroen; Rodgers, Arthur J.

    2008-06-17

    Earthquake source parameters underpin several aspects of nuclear explosion monitoring. Such aspects are: calibration of moment magnitudes (including coda magnitudes) and magnitude and distance amplitude corrections (MDAC); source depths; discrimination by isotropic moment tensor components; and waveform modeling for structure (including waveform tomography). This project seeks to improve methods for and broaden the applicability of estimating source parameters from broadband waveforms using the Cut-and-Paste (CAP) methodology. The CAP method uses a library of Green’s functions for a one-dimensional (1D, depth-varying) seismic velocity model. The method separates the main arrivals of the regional waveform into 5 windows: Pnl (vertical and radial components), Rayleigh (vertical and radial components) and Love (transverse component). Source parameters are estimated by grid search over strike, dip, rake and depth and seismic moment or equivalently moment magnitude, MW, are adjusted to fit the amplitudes. Key to the CAP method is allowing the synthetic seismograms to shift in time relative to the data in order to account for path-propagation errors (delays) in the 1D seismic velocity model used to compute the Green’s functions. The CAP method has been shown to improve estimates of source parameters, especially when delay and amplitude biases are calibrated using high signal-to-noise data from moderate earthquakes, CAP+.

  20. A transformer of closely spaced pulsed waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, J.

    1970-01-01

    Passive circuit, using diodes, transistors, and magnetic cores, transforms the voltage of repetitive positive or negative pulses. It combines a pulse transformer with switching devices to effect a resonant flux reset and can transform various pulsed waveforms that have a nonzero average value and are relatively cosely spaced in time.

  1. Tailored Voltage Waveform Capacitively-Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Lafleur, Trevor; Delattre, Pierre-Alexandre; Johnson, Erik

    2012-10-01

    A major limitation of large-area capacitively-coupled plasmas for materials processing is the inability to increase plasma density without increasing ion bombardment energy. Heil et al. (J. Phys. D 41. 165202, (2008)) demonstrated that for a driving voltage comprising one frequency, f, and it's harmonic 2f, the symmetry of the sheaths can be broken (the Electrical Asymmetry Effect, EAE). We have investigated large-area plasmas (50cm dia) in Ar driven by arbitrary voltage waveforms. Specifically we studied waveforms comprising sharp positive pulses (10-20ns wide, 15MHz repetition frequency). The voltage waveform was measured by an HV probe close to the powered electrode edge, the electron density was measured with a microwave hairpin resonator, the ion flux was measured by an array of planar ion flux probes in the grounded counter-electrode, and the power absorbed was determined from the current and voltage waveforms measured by a derivative probe. As well as the expected EAE observed in the electrode self-bias, we were able to demonstrate a dramatic increase in electron density (and concomitant increased power absorption) with reduced pulse-width at constant amplitude, in qualitative agreement with recent PIC simulations (Lafleur et al, APL 100, 194101(2012)).

  2. Waveform Selectivity at the Same Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Anzai, Daisuke; Rushton, Jeremiah J.; Gao, Fei; Kim, Sanghoon; Sievenpiper, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic properties depend on the composition of materials, i.e. either angstrom scales of molecules or, for metamaterials, subwavelength periodic structures. Each material behaves differently in accordance with the frequency of an incoming electromagnetic wave due to the frequency dispersion or the resonance of the periodic structures. This indicates that if the frequency is fixed, the material always responds in the same manner unless it has nonlinearity. However, such nonlinearity is controlled by the magnitude of the incoming wave or other bias. Therefore, it is difficult to distinguish different incoming waves at the same frequency. Here we present a new concept of circuit-based metasurfaces to selectively absorb or transmit specific types of waveforms even at the same frequency. The metasurfaces, integrated with schottky diodes as well as either capacitors or inductors, selectively absorb short or long pulses, respectively. The two types of circuit elements are then combined to absorb or transmit specific waveforms in between. This waveform selectivity gives us another degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves in various fields including wireless communications, as our simulation reveals that the metasurfaces are capable of varying bit error rates in response to different waveforms. PMID:25866071

  3. Waveform selectivity at the same frequency.

    PubMed

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Anzai, Daisuke; Rushton, Jeremiah J; Gao, Fei; Kim, Sanghoon; Sievenpiper, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic properties depend on the composition of materials, i.e. either angstrom scales of molecules or, for metamaterials, subwavelength periodic structures. Each material behaves differently in accordance with the frequency of an incoming electromagnetic wave due to the frequency dispersion or the resonance of the periodic structures. This indicates that if the frequency is fixed, the material always responds in the same manner unless it has nonlinearity. However, such nonlinearity is controlled by the magnitude of the incoming wave or other bias. Therefore, it is difficult to distinguish different incoming waves at the same frequency. Here we present a new concept of circuit-based metasurfaces to selectively absorb or transmit specific types of waveforms even at the same frequency. The metasurfaces, integrated with schottky diodes as well as either capacitors or inductors, selectively absorb short or long pulses, respectively. The two types of circuit elements are then combined to absorb or transmit specific waveforms in between. This waveform selectivity gives us another degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves in various fields including wireless communications, as our simulation reveals that the metasurfaces are capable of varying bit error rates in response to different waveforms. PMID:25866071

  4. Parameters Determination of Oscillatory Impulse Current Waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Nishimura, Seisuke; Seki, Shingo

    This paper proposes numerical techniques to distil waveform parameters out of digitally measured data of oscillatory impulse current. The first method, to be used for liner circuit, based on a curve-fitting technique in which a smooth analytical curve is defined to fit the noise-superposed measured data. The waveform parameters are derived from the curve. The algorithm is examined its performance using a measured waveform data which is obtained from a circuit composed of linear elements only. It is not rare when impulse current is measured in a circuit with non-linear element, namely an arrester. After carefully observed behaviours of the circuit current when the non-linear element turns on and off, authors developed two algorithms capable to determine the parameters from the recorded data obtained from a circuit having a ZnO arrester. The developed algorithm processed the waveform data generated by TDG which is to be issued in 2009 as a part of IEC 61083-2. The details of the algorithm are to be demonstrated in the paper.

  5. Designing monitoring programs in an adaptive management context for regional multiple species conservation plans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, A.J.; Trenham, P.C.; Fisher, R.N.; Hathaway, S.A.; Johnson, B.S.; Torres, S.G.; Moore, Y.C.

    2004-01-01

    critical management uncertainties; and 3) implementing long-term monitoring and adaptive management. Ultimately, the success of regional conservation planning depends on the ability of monitoring programs to confront the challenges of adaptively managing and monitoring complex ecosystems and diverse arrays of sensitive species.

  6. Designing an Adaptive Web-Based Learning System Based on Students' Cognitive Styles Identified Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Jia-Jiunn; Chan, Ya-Chen; Yeh, Shiou-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This study developed an adaptive web-based learning system focusing on students' cognitive styles. The system is composed of a student model and an adaptation model. It collected students' browsing behaviors to update the student model for unobtrusively identifying student cognitive styles through a multi-layer feed-forward neural network (MLFF).…

  7. Designing a Semantic Bliki System to Support Different Types of Knowledge and Adaptive Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shiu-Li; Yang, Chia-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Though blogs and wikis have been used to support knowledge management and e-learning, existing blogs and wikis cannot support different types of knowledge and adaptive learning. A case in point, types of knowledge vary greatly in category and viewpoints. Additionally, adaptive learning is crucial to improving one's learning performance. This study…

  8. Time reversed photonic beamforming of arbitrary waveform ladar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Joseph L.; Zmuda, Henry; Bussjaeger, Rebecca J.; Erdmann, Reinhard K.; Fanto, Michael L.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Malowicki, John E.

    2007-04-01

    Herein is described a novel approach of performing adaptive photonic beam forming of an array of optical fibers with the expressed purpose of performing laser ranging. The beam forming technique leverages the concepts of time reversal, previously implemented in the sonar community, and wherein photonic implementation has recently been described for use by beamforming of ultra-wideband radar arrays. Photonic beam forming is also capable of combining the optical output of several fiber lasers into a coherent source, exactly phase matched on a pre-determined target. By implementing electro-optically modulated pulses from frequency chirped femtosecond-scale laser pulses, ladar waveforms can be generated with arbitrary spectral and temporal characteristics within the limitations of the wide-band system. Also described is a means of generating angle/angle/range measurements of illuminated targets.

  9. Issues in the design and optimization of adaptive optics and laser guide stars for the Keck Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Gavel, D.T.; Olivier, S.S.

    1994-03-01

    We discuss issues in optimizing the design of adaptive optics and laser guide star systems for the Keck Telescope. The initial tip-tilt system will use Keck`s chopping secondary mirror. We describe design constraints, choice of detector, and expected performance of this tip-tilt system as well as its sky coverage. The adaptive optics system is being optimized for wavelengths of I-2.2{mu}m. We are studying adaptive optics concepts which use a wavefront sensor with varying numbers of subapertures, so as to respond to changing turbulence conditions. The goal is to be able to ``gang together`` groups of deformable mirror subapertures under software control, when conditions call for larger subapertures. We present performance predictions as a function of sky coverage and the number of deformable mirror degrees of freedom. We analyze the predicted brightness several candidate laser guide star systems, as a function of laser power and pulse format. These predictions are used to examine the resulting Strehl as a function of observing wavelength and laser type. We discuss laser waste heat and thermal management issues, and conclude with an overview of instruments under design to take advantage of the Keck adaptive optics system.

  10. Optical design for the narrow field infrared adaptive optics system (NFIRAOS) petite on the thirty meter telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, Brian J.; Gavel, Donald T.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ellerbroek, Brent L.

    2005-08-01

    We describe an exploratory optical design for the Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics (AO) System (NFIRAOS) Petite, a proposed adaptive optics system for the Thirty Meter Telescope Project. NFIRAOS will feed infrared spectrograph and wide-field imaging instruments with a diffraction limited beam. The adaptive optics system will require multi-guidestar tomographic wavefront sensing (WFS) and multi-conjugate AO correction. The NFIRAOS Petite design specifications include two small 60 mm diameter deformable mirrors (DM's) used in a woofer/tweeter or multiconjugate arrangement. At least one DM would be a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) DM. The AO system would correct a 10 to 30 arcsec diameter science field as well as laser guide stars (LGS's) located within a 60 arcsec diameter field and low-order or tip/tilt natural guide stars (NGS's) within a 60 arcsec diameter field. The WFS's are located downstream of the DM's so that they can be operated in true closed-loop, which is not necessarily a given in extremely large telescope adaptive optics design. The WFS's include adjustable corrector elements which correct the static aberrations of the AO relay due to field position and LGS distance height.

  11. Optical design for the Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS) Petite on the Thirty Meter Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B; Gavel, D; Dekany, R; Ellerbroek, B

    2005-08-02

    We describe an exploratory optical design for the Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics (AO) System (NFIRAOS) Petite, a proposed adaptive optics system for the Thirty Meter Telescope Project. NFIRAOS will feed infrared spectrograph and wide-field imaging instruments with a diffraction limited beam. The adaptive optics system will require multi-guidestar tomographic wavefront sensing and multi-conjugate AO correction. The NFIRAOS Petite design specifications include two small 60 mm diameter deformable mirrors (DM's) used in a woofer/tweeter or multiconjugate arrangement. At least one DM would be a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) DM. The AO system would correct a 10 to 30 arcsec diameter science field as well as laser guide stars (LGS's) located within a 60 arcsec diameter field and low-order or tip/tilt natural guide stars (NGS's) within a 60 arcsec diameter field. The WFS's are located downstream of the DM's so that they can be operated in true closed-loop, which is not necessarily a given in extremely large telescope adaptive optics design. The WFS's include adjustable corrector elements which correct the static aberrations of the AO relay due to field position and LGS distance height.

  12. JTRS/SCA and Custom/SDR Waveform Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Daniel R.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares two waveform implementations generating the same RF signal using the same SDR development system. Both waveforms implement a satellite modem using QPSK modulation at 1M BPS data rates with one half rate convolutional encoding. Both waveforms are partitioned the same across the general purpose processor (GPP) and the field programmable gate array (FPGA). Both waveforms implement the same equivalent set of radio functions on the GPP and FPGA. The GPP implements the majority of the radio functions and the FPGA implements the final digital RF modulator stage. One waveform is implemented directly on the SDR development system and the second waveform is implemented using the JTRS/SCA model. This paper contrasts the amount of resources to implement both waveforms and demonstrates the importance of waveform partitioning across the SDR development system.

  13. Radar altimeter waveform modeled parameter recovery. [SEASAT-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Satellite-borne radar altimeters include waveform sampling gates providing point samples of the transmitted radar pulse after its scattering from the ocean's surface. Averages of the waveform sampler data can be fitted by varying parameters in a model mean return waveform. The theoretical waveform model used is described as well as a general iterative nonlinear least squares procedures used to obtain estimates of parameters characterizing the modeled waveform for SEASAT-1 data. The six waveform parameters recovered by the fitting procedure are: (1) amplitude; (2) time origin, or track point; (3) ocean surface rms roughness; (4) noise baseline; (5) ocean surface skewness; and (6) altitude or off-nadir angle. Additional practical processing considerations are addressed and FORTRAN source listing for subroutines used in the waveform fitting are included. While the description is for the Seasat-1 altimeter waveform data analysis, the work can easily be generalized and extended to other radar altimeter systems.

  14. Design, development, and testing of a mini solid state adaptive rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ronald M.; Schliesman, Michael; Frye, Phillip

    1997-06-01

    The design principles, analytical models, construction methods and test results for a new type of solid state adaptive rotor (SSAR) are presented. A pair of directionally attached piezoelectric (DAP) torque-plates were fabricated and attached to the root of a 23.5' diameter helicopter rotor assembly. The DAP torque-plate tips were joined to a pair of graphite-epoxy servopaddles which were moved in pitch by the action of the torque-plates. The torque-plates were constructed from a single aluminum substrate and PZT-5H DAP elements mounted symmetrically at 45 degrees. Electrical signals were carried to the DAP torque-plates via a shielded brush and rotating contact assembly. A series of non-rotating static tests were conducted on the rotor, demonstrating servopaddle pitch deflections up to plus or minus 5.8 degrees and good correlation with classical laminated plate theory. Non rotating dynamic testing showed a system natural frequency in excess of 2.5/rev and good correlation with inertial models. Because the servopaddles were aeroelastically tailored to balance out propeller moments, deflection degradation with increasing rotor speed was barely noticeable up to plus or minus 1 degree pitch levels. However, as rotor speed increased, total servopaddle deflections in the rotating frame at 1600 rpm (full speed) were degraded, but still operated up to plus or minus 2.7 degrees in pitch. To conclude the study, the rotor was attached to a converted Kyosho Hyperfly electric helicopter. Flight tests demonstrated fundamental controllability. A system-level comparison showed that the SSAR Hyperfly experienced a 40% drop in flight control system weight, an 8% cut in total gross weight, a 26% decrease in parasite drag and a part count reduction from 94 components to 5.

  15. A reduced amino acid alphabet for understanding and designing protein adaptation to mutation.

    PubMed

    Etchebest, C; Benros, C; Bornot, A; Camproux, A-C; de Brevern, A G

    2007-11-01

    Protein sequence world is considerably larger than structure world. In consequence, numerous non-related sequences may adopt similar 3D folds and different kinds of amino acids may thus be found in similar 3D structures. By grouping together the 20 amino acids into a smaller number of representative residues with similar features, sequence world simplification may be achieved. This clustering hence defines a reduced amino acid alphabet (reduced AAA). Numerous works have shown that protein 3D structures are composed of a limited number of building blocks, defining a structural alphabet. We previously identified such an alphabet composed of 16 representative structural motifs (5-residues length) called Protein Blocks (PBs). This alphabet permits to translate the structure (3D) in sequence of PBs (1D). Based on these two concepts, reduced AAA and PBs, we analyzed the distributions of the different kinds of amino acids and their equivalences in the structural context. Different reduced sets were considered. Recurrent amino acid associations were found in all the local structures while other were specific of some local structures (PBs) (e.g Cysteine, Histidine, Threonine and Serine for the alpha-helix Ncap). Some similar associations are found in other reduced AAAs, e.g Ile with Val, or hydrophobic aromatic residues Trp with Phe and Tyr. We put into evidence interesting alternative associations. This highlights the dependence on the information considered (sequence or structure). This approach, equivalent to a substitution matrix, could be useful for designing protein sequence with different features (for instance adaptation to environment) while preserving mainly the 3D fold. PMID:17565494

  16. SAR processing with non-linear FM chirp waveforms.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-12-01

    Nonlinear FM (NLFM) waveforms offer a radar matched filter output with inherently low range sidelobes. This yields a 1-2 dB advantage in Signal-to-Noise Ratio over the output of a Linear FM (LFM) waveform with equivalent sidelobe filtering. This report presents details of processing NLFM waveforms in both range and Doppler dimensions, with special emphasis on compensating intra-pulse Doppler, often cited as a weakness of NLFM waveforms.

  17. Design of an adaptive control for a magnetorheological fluid brake with model parameters depending on temperature and speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, R.; Terzo, M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes experimental/theoretical activities carried out on a magnetorheological fluid brake (MRFB) prototype. A device model is derived and a detailed evaluation of the influence of temperature and speed on its parameters is performed. It can be seen that temperature and speed act as modifying inputs for the system model and change the value of some of its parameters. More specifically, time constant and torque/current gain are affected by velocity whereas fluid viscosity is only affected by temperature. The presence of the above modifying input suggests the employment of an adaptive approach for MRFB feedback control based on the torque measurement only. Starting from the proposed model, a model reference adaptive control is designed, ensuring that the tracking error converges to zero as time t \\to \\infty . Simulation activity, carried out on the device validated model, confirms the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive controller.

  18. A 6 kV arbitrary waveform generator for the Tevatron Electron Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.

    2011-11-09

    This paper reports on a 6 kV modulator built and installed at Fermilab to drive the electron gun anode for the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL). The TEL was built with the intention of shifting the individual (anti)proton bunch tunes to even out the tune spread among all 36 bunches with the desire of improving Tevatron integrated luminosity. This modulator is essentially a 6 kV arbitrary waveform generator that enables the TEL to define the electron beam intensity on a bunch-by-bunch basis. A voltage waveform is constructed having a 7 μs duration that corresponds to the tune shift requirements of a 12-bunch (anti)proton beam pulse train. This waveform is played out for any one or all three bunch trains in the Tevatron. The programmed waveform voltages transition to different levels at time intervals corresponding to the 395 ns bunch spacing. In addition, complex voltage waveforms can be played out at a sustained rate of 143 kHz over the full 6 kV output range. This paper describes the novel design of the inductive adder topology employing five transformers. It describes the design aspects that minimize switching losses for this multi-kilovolt, high repetition rate and high duty factor application.

  19. A 6 kV arbitrary waveform generator for the Tevatron Electron Lens

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.

    2011-11-09

    This paper reports on a 6 kV modulator built and installed at Fermilab to drive the electron gun anode for the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL). The TEL was built with the intention of shifting the individual (anti)proton bunch tunes to even out the tune spread among all 36 bunches with the desire of improving Tevatron integrated luminosity. This modulator is essentially a 6 kV arbitrary waveform generator that enables the TEL to define the electron beam intensity on a bunch-by-bunch basis. A voltage waveform is constructed having a 7 μs duration that corresponds to the tune shift requirements of amore » 12-bunch (anti)proton beam pulse train. This waveform is played out for any one or all three bunch trains in the Tevatron. The programmed waveform voltages transition to different levels at time intervals corresponding to the 395 ns bunch spacing. In addition, complex voltage waveforms can be played out at a sustained rate of 143 kHz over the full 6 kV output range. This paper describes the novel design of the inductive adder topology employing five transformers. It describes the design aspects that minimize switching losses for this multi-kilovolt, high repetition rate and high duty factor application.« less

  20. Providing Adaptation and Guidance for Design Learning by Problem Solving: The Design Planning Approach in DomoSim-TPC Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redondo, Miguel A.; Bravo, Crescencio; Ortega, Manuel; Verdejo, M. Felisa

    2007-01-01

    Experimental learning environments based on simulation usually require monitoring and adaptation to the actions the users carry out. Some systems provide this functionality, but they do so in a way which is static or cannot be applied to problem solving tasks. In response to this problem, we propose a method based on the use of intermediate…

  1. Design of a new adaptive fuzzy controller and its implementation for the damping force control of a magnetorheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phu, Do Xuan; Shah, Kruti; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive fuzzy controller and its implementation for the damping force control of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper in order to validate the effectiveness of the control performance. An interval type 2 fuzzy model is built, and then combined with modified adaptive control to achieve the desired damping force. In the formulation of the new adaptive controller, an enhanced iterative algorithm is integrated with the fuzzy model to decrease the time of calculation (D Wu 2013 IEEE Trans. Fuzzy Syst. 21 80-99) and the control algorithm is synthesized based on the {{H}^{\\infty }} tracking technique. In addition, for the verification of good control performance of the proposed controller, a cylindrical MR damper which can be applied to the vibration control of a washing machine is designed and manufactured. For the operating fluid, a recently developed plate-like particle-based MR fluid is used instead of a conventional MR fluid featuring spherical particles. To highlight the control performance of the proposed controller, two existing adaptive fuzzy control algorithms proposed by other researchers are adopted and altered for a comparative study. It is demonstrated from both simulation and experiment that the proposed new adaptive controller shows better performance of damping force control in terms of response time and tracking accuracy than the existing approaches.

  2. Continuous-waveform constant-current isolated physiological stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Mark R.; Devine, Jack M.; Harder, Rene; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an isolated continuous-waveform constant-current physiological stimulator that is powered and controlled by universal serial bus (USB) interface. The stimulator is composed of a custom printed circuit board (PCB), 16-MHz MSP430F2618 microcontroller with two integrated 12-bit digital to analog converters (DAC0, DAC1), high-speed H-Bridge, voltage-controlled current source (VCCS), isolated USB communication and power circuitry, two isolated transistor-transistor logic (TTL) inputs, and a serial 16 × 2 character liquid crystal display. The stimulators are designed to produce current stimuli in the range of ±15 mA indefinitely using a 20V source and to be used in ex vivo cardiac experiments, but they are suitable for use in a wide variety of research or student experiments that require precision control of continuous waveforms or synchronization with external events. The device was designed with customization in mind and has features that allow it to be integrated into current and future experimental setups. Dual TTL inputs allow replacement by two or more traditional stimulators in common experimental configurations. The MSP430 software is written in C++ and compiled with IAR Embedded Workbench 5.20.2. A control program written in C++ runs on a Windows personal computer and has a graphical user interface that allows the user to control all aspects of the device. PMID:22559554

  3. Continuous-waveform constant-current isolated physiological stimulator.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, Mark R; Devine, Jack M; Harder, Rene; Sidorov, Veniamin Y

    2012-04-01

    We have developed an isolated continuous-waveform constant-current physiological stimulator that is powered and controlled by universal serial bus (USB) interface. The stimulator is composed of a custom printed circuit board (PCB), 16-MHz MSP430F2618 microcontroller with two integrated 12-bit digital to analog converters (DAC0, DAC1), high-speed H-Bridge, voltage-controlled current source (VCCS), isolated USB communication and power circuitry, two isolated transistor-transistor logic (TTL) inputs, and a serial 16 × 2 character liquid crystal display. The stimulators are designed to produce current stimuli in the range of ±15 mA indefinitely using a 20V source and to be used in ex vivo cardiac experiments, but they are suitable for use in a wide variety of research or student experiments that require precision control of continuous waveforms or synchronization with external events. The device was designed with customization in mind and has features that allow it to be integrated into current and future experimental setups. Dual TTL inputs allow replacement by two or more traditional stimulators in common experimental configurations. The MSP430 software is written in C++ and compiled with IAR Embedded Workbench 5.20.2. A control program written in C++ runs on a Windows personal computer and has a graphical user interface that allows the user to control all aspects of the device. PMID:22559554

  4. Continuous-waveform constant-current isolated physiological stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, Mark R.; Devine, Jack M.; Harder, Rene; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.

    2012-04-01

    We have developed an isolated continuous-waveform constant-current physiological stimulator that is powered and controlled by universal serial bus (USB) interface. The stimulator is composed of a custom printed circuit board (PCB), 16-MHz MSP430F2618 microcontroller with two integrated 12-bit digital to analog converters (DAC0, DAC1), high-speed H-Bridge, voltage-controlled current source (VCCS), isolated USB communication and power circuitry, two isolated transistor-transistor logic (TTL) inputs, and a serial 16 × 2 character liquid crystal display. The stimulators are designed to produce current stimuli in the range of ±15 mA indefinitely using a 20V source and to be used in ex vivo cardiac experiments, but they are suitable for use in a wide variety of research or student experiments that require precision control of continuous waveforms or synchronization with external events. The device was designed with customization in mind and has features that allow it to be integrated into current and future experimental setups. Dual TTL inputs allow replacement by two or more traditional stimulators in common experimental configurations. The MSP430 software is written in C++ and compiled with IAR Embedded Workbench 5.20.2. A control program written in C++ runs on a Windows personal computer and has a graphical user interface that allows the user to control all aspects of the device.

  5. Designing for adaptation to novelty and change: functional information, emergent feature graphics, and higher-level control.

    PubMed

    Hajdukiewicz, John R; Vicente, Kim J

    2002-01-01

    Ecological interface design (EID) is a theoretical framework that aims to support worker adaptation to change and novelty in complex systems. Previous evaluations of EID have emphasized representativeness to enhance generalizability of results to operational settings. The research presented here is complementary, emphasizing experimental control to enhance theory building. Two experiments were conducted to test the impact of functional information and emergent feature graphics on adaptation to novelty and change in a thermal-hydraulic process control microworld. Presenting functional information in an interface using emergent features encouraged experienced participants to become perceptually coupled to the interface and thereby to exhibit higher-level control and more successful adaptation to unanticipated events. The absence of functional information or of emergent features generally led to lower-level control and less success at adaptation, the exception being a minority of participants who compensated by relying on analytical reasoning. These findings may have practical implications for shaping coordination in complex systems and fundamental implications for the development of a general unified theory of coordination for the technical, human, and social sciences. Actual or potential applications of this research include the design of human-computer interfaces that improve safety in complex sociotechnical systems. PMID:12691368

  6. Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.

    2014-09-01

    deweights the contribution of the buoyancy term in the equation for TKE by reducing the ratio of the eddy diffusivity of heat to momentum. This is necessary particularly in the stably stratified free atmosphere where turbulence occurs in thin layers not typically resolvable by the model. The modified MYJ scheme increases the probability and strength of TKE in thermally stable conditions thereby increasing the probability of optical turbulence. Over twelve months of simulations have been generated. Results indicate realistic values of the Fried Coherence Length (ro) are obtained when compared with observations from a Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) instrument. Seeing is worse during day than at night with large ros observed just after sunset and just before sunrise. Three dimensional maps indicate that the vast lava fields, which characterize the Big Island, have a large impact on turbulence generation with a large dependence on elevation. Results from this study are being used to make design decisions for adaptive optics systems. Detailed results of this study will be presented at the conference.

  7. On the Statistical Reliability of Seismic Waveform Tomography - a Crosshole Case Study in Anisotropic Crystalline Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, D. W.; Pratt, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    We study a crosshole seismic survey from the Voisey's Bay area in Newfoundland using traveltime tomography and waveform tomography, and we develop images of the seismic velocity of the subsurface. Our waveform tomography method incorporates one-dimensional elliptical anisotropy; anisotropic traveltime tomography is used to generate a starting model for both the velocity and the anisotropy according to the technique developed by Pratt and Chapman (1992). This approach allows us to largely satisfy the half-cycle criterion for waveform tomography, though there is some evidence of cycle-skipping at large offsets. The waveform data are separated into five full-coverage subsets, creating five complete, independent data sets for the same region. Waveform tomography is then performed using frequencies from 300 to 1400 Hz on each of the five data sets, resulting in five independent velocity models of the subsurface. The five models are averaged to generate a single representative model of the subsurface and an image of the population standard deviation is calculated to provide a measure of the variance of the five models. The population standard deviation between the models is in the range of about 100 m/s over most of the target zone. Areas of higher variance tend to suggest artifacts of the inversion. Areas of lower variance are regions in which we have greater confidence in the result. In this way the averaging of the five independent realizations acted as a filter, picking out those velocity features that are present in all models and smoothing out those found in only one or two. The introduction of the standard deviation as a tool to evaluate the results of waveform tomography provides valuable information on the reliability of the waveform tomography approach. Survey design for redundant full coverage will prove useful in future surveys.

  8. Towards quantized current arbitrary waveform synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirovsky, P.; Fricke, L.; Hohls, F.; Kaestner, B.; Leicht, Ch.; Pierz, K.; Melcher, J.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2013-06-01

    The generation of ac modulated quantized current waveforms using a semiconductor non-adiabatic single electron pump is demonstrated. In standard operation, the single electron pump generates a quantized output current of I = ef, where e is the charge of the electron and f is the pumping frequency. Suitable frequency modulation of f allows the generation of ac modulated output currents with different characteristics. By sinusoidal and saw tooth like modulation of f accordingly modulated quantized current waveforms with kHz modulation frequencies and peak currents up to 100 pA are obtained. Such ac quantized current sources could find applications ranging from precision ac metrology to on-chip signal generation.

  9. Design and study of a thermal infrared camera for an adaptive optics instrument. Circumstellar medium around PMS binaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffray, H.

    1998-10-01

    This thesis work provides a complete study of a 1-5 μm infrared camera designed to be used with the adaptive optics system installed at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) 3.6 m telescope, from the laboratory characterization of the IRCCD 128x128 HgCdTe Focal Plane Array, to astronomical results obtained on a sample of Pre-Main-Sequence binaries.

  10. Improved visualization of outer retinal morphology with aberration cancelling reflective optical design for adaptive optics - optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    We present an aberration cancelling optical design for a reflective adaptive optics - optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) retinal imaging system. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to our previous multimodal AO-OCT/AO-SLO retinal imaging system. The feasibility of new instrumentation for improved visualization of microscopic retinal structures is discussed. Examples of images acquired with this new AO-OCT instrument are presented. PMID:24298411

  11. Waveforms Measured in Confined Thermobaric Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2007-05-04

    Experiments with 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges have been conducted in six different chambers. Both flake Aluminum and TNT were used as the fuel. Static pressure gauges on the chamber wall were the main diagnostic. Waveforms for explosions in air were significantly larger than those in nitrogen - thereby demonstrating a strong thermobaric (combustion) effect. This effect increases as the confinement volume decreases and the mixture richness approaches 1.

  12. Binary Black Holes: Mergers, Dynamics, and Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-04-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, data analysis, and astrophysics.

  13. Acoustofluidic Chemical Waveform Generator and Switch

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eliciting a cellular response to a changing chemical microenvironment is central to many biological processes including gene expression, cell migration, differentiation, apoptosis, and intercellular signaling. The nature and scope of the response is highly dependent upon the spatiotemporal characteristics of the stimulus. To date, studies that investigate this phenomenon have been limited to digital (or step) chemical stimulation with little control over the temporal counterparts. Here, we demonstrate an acoustofluidic (i.e., fusion of acoustics and microfluidics) approach for generating programmable chemical waveforms that permits continuous modulation of the signal characteristics including the amplitude (i.e., sample concentration), shape, frequency, and duty cycle, with frequencies reaching up to 30 Hz. Furthermore, we show fast switching between multiple distinct stimuli, wherein the waveform of each stimulus is independently controlled. Using our device, we characterized the frequency-dependent activation and internalization of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR), a prototypic G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), using epinephrine. The acoustofluidic-based programmable chemical waveform generation and switching method presented herein is expected to be a powerful tool for the investigation and characterization of the kinetics and other dynamic properties of many biological and biochemical processes. PMID:25405550

  14. Waveform Tomography and its Application to Marine Seismic Refraction Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, S.; Canales, J.

    2008-05-01

    We explore the applicability of two-dimensional seismic waveform tomography to conventional deep-water, long- offset (10s of kilometers) seismic refraction experiments in which ocean-bottom receivers and sea-surface sources are usually spaced several kilometers and a few 100s of meters apart, respectively. In particular, we test the application of waveform tomography to ocean-bottom seismometer (hydrophone) data collected along the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 26°N in the vicinity of the active TAG hydrothermal system, which is thought to be located on the hanging wall of an active oceanic detachment fault [e.g., Canales et al., Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 8, Q08004, 2007]. If successful, waveform tomography could provide detailed velocity information related to fluid flow and alternation along the fault zone that cannot be obtained from traveltime tomography analyses. We use the frequency-domain, elastic-wave equation approach of R.G. Pratt [Geophysics, 64, 888-901, 1999]. Initial data processing consisted of spherical divergence corrections, wavelet shaping and predictive deconvolution using a special design and application window data to obtain a smooth, random amplitude spectrum sans the bubble pulse. Other processing steps included filtering, windowing and offset-dependent amplitude normalization with respect to forward modeled synthetics. Forward modeling is done via the central-difference scheme of finite difference method with the primary modeling parameters being the boundary conditions, time-domain damping parameter to prevent wraparound energy, appropriate quality factor and dispersion coefficient. Source and velocity inversion is done at selected frequencies using "efficient waveform inversion" [Sirgue and Pratt, Geophysics, 69, 231-248 2004] to minimize the misfit of data residuals via the gradient method. Inversion parameters (offset weighting, depth tapering, gradient wave-number filtering and masking) were tested and decided on a

  15. Design and optimisation of a (FA)Q-learning-based HTTP adaptive streaming client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, Maxim; Latré, Steven; Famaey, Jeroen; Wu, Tingyao; Van Leekwijck, Werner; De Turck, Filip

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) adaptive streaming (HAS) has become the de facto standard for adaptive video streaming services. A HAS video consists of multiple segments, encoded at multiple quality levels. State-of-the-art HAS clients employ deterministic heuristics to dynamically adapt the requested quality level based on the perceived network conditions. Current HAS client heuristics are, however, hardwired to fit specific network configurations, making them less flexible to fit a vast range of settings. In this article, a (frequency adjusted) Q-learning HAS client is proposed. In contrast to existing heuristics, the proposed HAS client dynamically learns the optimal behaviour corresponding to the current network environment in order to optimise the quality of experience. Furthermore, the client has been optimised both in terms of global performance and convergence speed. Thorough evaluations show that the proposed client can outperform deterministic algorithms by 11-18% in terms of mean opinion score in a wide range of network configurations.

  16. A comparison of adaptive sampling designs and binary spatial models: A simulation study using a census of Bromus inermis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Kathryn M.; Thornton, Jamie; Backus, Vickie M.; Hohmann, Matthew G.; Lehnhoff, Erik A.; Maxwell, Bruce D.; Michels, Kurt; Rew, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Commonly in environmental and ecological studies, species distribution data are recorded as presence or absence throughout a spatial domain of interest. Field based studies typically collect observations by sampling a subset of the spatial domain. We consider the effects of six different adaptive and two non-adaptive sampling designs and choice of three binary models on both predictions to unsampled locations and parameter estimation of the regression coefficients (species–environment relationships). Our simulation study is unique compared to others to date in that we virtually sample a true known spatial distribution of a nonindigenous plant species, Bromus inermis. The census of B. inermis provides a good example of a species distribution that is both sparsely (1.9 % prevalence) and patchily distributed. We find that modeling the spatial correlation using a random effect with an intrinsic Gaussian conditionally autoregressive prior distribution was equivalent or superior to Bayesian autologistic regression in terms of predicting to un-sampled areas when strip adaptive cluster sampling was used to survey B. inermis. However, inferences about the relationships between B. inermis presence and environmental predictors differed between the two spatial binary models. The strip adaptive cluster designs we investigate provided a significant advantage in terms of Markov chain Monte Carlo chain convergence when trying to model a sparsely distributed species across a large area. In general, there was little difference in the choice of neighborhood, although the adaptive king was preferred when transects were randomly placed throughout the spatial domain.

  17. Comparative study of objective functions to overcome noise and bandwidth limitations in full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Tejero, C. E.; Dagnino, D.; Sallarès, V.; Ranero, C. R.

    2015-10-01

    Ongoing works on full waveform inversion (FWI) are yielding an increasing number of objective functions as alternative to the traditional L2-waveform. These studies aim at designing more robust functions and inversion strategies to reduce the intrinsic dependence of the FWI results on (1) the initial model and (2) the lowest frequency present in field data. In this work, we perform a comparative study of five objective functions in time domain under a common 2-D-acoustic FWI scheme using the Marmousi model as benchmark. In particular, we compare results obtained with L2-based functions that consider the minimization of different wave attributes; the waveform-based, non-integration-method; instantaneous envelope; a modified version of the wrapped instantaneous phase and an improved version of the cross-correlation travel time (CCTT) method; and hybrid strategies combining some of them. We evaluate the robustness of these functionals as a function of their performance with and without low frequencies in the data and the presence of random white Gaussian noise. Our results reveal promising strategies to invert noisy data with limited low-frequency content (≥4 Hz), which is the single strategy using the instantaneous phase objective function followed by the hybrid strategies using the instantaneous phase or CCTT as initial models, in particular the combinations [I. Phase + Waveform], [CCTT + Waveform] and [CCTT + I. Phase].

  18. Evaluating a small footprint, waveform-resolving lidar over coastal vegetation communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhl, A.; Brock, J.C.; Wright, C.W.; O'Connell, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532 nm) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor records the time history of the return waveform within a small footprint (20 cm diameter) for each laser pulse, enabling characterization of vegetation canopy structure and "bare earth" topography under a variety of vegetation types. A collection of individual waveforms combined within a synthesized large footprint was used to define three metrics: canopy height (CH), canopy reflection ratio (CRR), and height of median energy (HOME). Bare Earth Elevation (BEE) metric was derived using the individual small-footprint waveforms. All four metrics were tested for reproducibility, which resulted in an average of 95 percent correspondence within two standard deviations of the mean. CH and BEE values were also tested for accuracy using ground-truth data. The results presented in this paper show that combining several individual small-footprint laser pulses to define a composite "large-footprint" waveform is a possible method to depict the vertical structure of a vegetation canopy. ?? 2006 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  19. The Waveform Server: A Web-based Interactive Seismic Waveform Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, R. L.; Clemesha, A.; Lindquist, K. G.; Reyes, J.; Steidl, J. H.; Vernon, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic waveform data has traditionally been displayed on machines that are either local area networked to, or directly host, a seismic networks waveform database(s). Typical seismic data warehouses allow online users to query and download data collected from regional networks passively, without the scientist directly visually assessing data coverage and/or quality. Using a suite of web-based protocols, we have developed an online seismic waveform interface that directly queries and displays data from a relational database through a web-browser. Using the Python interface to Datascope and the Python-based Twisted network package on the server side, and the jQuery Javascript framework on the client side to send and receive asynchronous waveform queries, we display broadband seismic data using the HTML Canvas element that is globally accessible by anyone using a modern web-browser. The system is used to display data from the USArray experiment, a US continent-wide migratory transportable seismic array. We are currently creating additional interface tools to create a rich-client interface for accessing and displaying seismic data that can be deployed to any system running Boulder Real Time Technology's (BRTT) Antelope Real Time System (ARTS). The software is freely available from the Antelope contributed code Git repository. Screenshot of the web-based waveform server interface

  20. Processing Aftershock Sequences Using Waveform Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resor, M. E.; Procopio, M. J.; Young, C. J.; Carr, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    For most event monitoring systems, the objective is to keep up with the flow of incoming data, producing a bulletin with some modest, relatively constant, time delay after present time, often a period of a few hours or less. Because the association problem scales exponentially and not linearly with the number of detections, a dramatic increase in seismicity due to an aftershock sequence can easily cause the bulletin delay time to increase dramatically. In some cases, the production of a bulletin may cease altogether, until the automatic system can catch up. For a nuclear monitoring system, the implications of such a delay could be dire. Given the expected similarity between a mainshock and aftershocks, it has been proposed that waveform correlation may provide a powerful means to simultaneously increase the efficiency of processing aftershock sequences, while also lowering the detection threshold and improving the quality of the event solutions. However, many questions remain unanswered. What are the key parameters for achieving the best correlations between waveforms (window length, filtering, etc.), and are they sequence-dependent? What is the overall percentage of similar events in an aftershock sequence, i.e. what is the maximum level of efficiency that a waveform correlation could be expected to achieve? Finally, how does this percentage of events vary among sequences? Using data from the aftershock sequence for the December 26, 2004 Mw 9.1 Sumatra event, we investigate these issues by building and testing a prototype waveform correlation event detection system that automatically expands its library of known events as new signatures are indentified in the aftershock sequence (by traditional signal detection and event processing). Our system tests all incoming data against this dynamic library, thereby identify any similar events before traditional processing takes place. In the region surrounding the Sumatra event, the NEIC EDR contains 4997 events in the 9

  1. Coupled sensor/platform control design for low-level chemical detection with position-adaptive micro-UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Thomas; Carr, Ryan; Mitra, Atindra K.; Selmic, Rastko R.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the development of Position-Adaptive Sensors [1] for purposes for detecting embedded chemical substances in challenging environments. This concept is a generalization of patented Position-Adaptive Radar Concepts developed at AFRL for challenging conditions such as urban environments. For purposes of investigating the detection of chemical substances using multiple MAV (Micro-UAV) platforms, we have designed and implemented an experimental testbed with sample structures such as wooden carts that contain controlled leakage points. Under this general concept, some of the members of a MAV swarm can serve as external position-adaptive "transmitters" by blowing air over the cart and some of the members of a MAV swarm can serve as external position-adaptive "receivers" that are equipped with chemical or biological (chem/bio) sensors that function as "electronic noses". The objective can be defined as improving the particle count of chem/bio concentrations that impinge on a MAV-based position-adaptive sensor that surrounds a chemical repository, such as a cart, via the development of intelligent position-adaptive control algorithms. The overall effect is to improve the detection and false-alarm statistics of the overall system. Within the major sections of this paper, we discuss a number of different aspects of developing our initial MAV-Based Sensor Testbed. This testbed includes blowers to simulate position-adaptive excitations and a MAV from Draganfly Innovations Inc. with stable design modifications to accommodate our chem/bio sensor boom design. We include details with respect to several critical phases of the development effort including development of the wireless sensor network and experimental apparatus, development of the stable sensor boom for the MAV, integration of chem/bio sensors and sensor node onto the MAV and boom, development of position-adaptive control algorithms and initial tests at IDCAST (Institute for the Development and

  2. Design of adaptive reconfigurable control systems using extended-Kalman-filter-based system identification and eigenstructure assignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xudong; Syrmos, Vassilis L.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, an adaptive reconfigurable control system based on extended Kalman filter approach and eigenstructure assignments is proposed. System identification is carried out using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) approach. An eigenstructure assignment (EA) technique is applied for reconfigurable feedback control law design to recover the system dynamic performance. The reconfigurable feedforward controllers are designed to achieve the steady-state tracking using input weighting approach. The proposed scheme can identify not only actuator and sensor variations, but also changes in the system structures using the extended Kalman filtering method. The overall design is robust with respect to uncertainties in the state-space matrices of the reconfigured system. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed reconfigurable control system design technique, an aircraft longitudinal vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) control system is used to demonstrate the reconfiguration procedure.

  3. Design implementation and control of MRAS error dynamics. [Model-Reference Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, B. K.; Boland, J. S., III

    1974-01-01

    Use is made of linearized error characteristic equation for model-reference adaptive systems to determine a parameter adjustment rule for obtaining time-invariant error dynamics. Theoretical justification of error stability is given and an illustrative example included to demonstrate the utility of the proposed technique.

  4. Multidisciplinary Procedures for Designing Housing Adaptations for People with Mobility Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Sukkay, Sasicha

    2016-01-01

    Based on a 2013 statistic published by Thai with Disability foundation, five percent of Thailand's population are disabled people. Six hundred thousand of them have mobility disability, and the number is increasing every year. To support them, the Thai government has implemented a number of disability laws and policies. One of the policies is to better disabled people's quality of life by adapting their houses to facilitate their activities. However, the policy has not been fully realized yet-there is still no specific guideline for housing adaptation for people with disabilities. This study is an attempt to address the lack of standardized criteria for such adaptation by developing a number of effective ones. Our development had 3 objectives: first, to identify the body functioning of a group of people with mobility disability according to the international classification functioning concept (ICF); second, to perform post-occupancy evaluation of this group and their houses; and third, with the collected data, to have a group of multidisciplinary experts cooperatively develop criteria for housing adaptation. The major findings were that room dimensions and furniture materials really had an impact on accessibility and toilet as well as bed room were the most difficult areas to access. PMID:27534326

  5. Best Design for Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing with the Bifactor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Dong Gi; Weiss, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Most computerized adaptive tests (CATs) have been studied using the framework of unidimensional item response theory. However, many psychological variables are multidimensional and might benefit from using a multidimensional approach to CATs. This study investigated the accuracy, fidelity, and efficiency of a fully multidimensional CAT algorithm…

  6. Item Pool Design for an Operational Variable-Length Computerized Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Wei; Reckase, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    For computerized adaptive tests (CATs) to work well, they must have an item pool with sufficient numbers of good quality items. Many researchers have pointed out that, in developing item pools for CATs, not only is the item pool size important but also the distribution of item parameters and practical considerations such as content distribution…

  7. One Feature of Adaptive Lesson Study in Thailand: Designing a Learning Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inprasitha, Maitree

    2011-01-01

    In Thailand, the Center for Research in Mathematics Education (CRME) has been implementing Japanese Lesson Study (LS) since 2002. An adaptive feature of this implementation was the incorporation of four phases of the Open Approach as a teaching approach within the three steps of the LS process. Four phases of this open approach are: 1) Posing…

  8. Optimal Item Pool Design for a Highly Constrained Computerized Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Item pool quality has been regarded as one important factor to help realize enhanced measurement quality for the computerized adaptive test (CAT) (e.g., Flaugher, 2000; Jensema, 1977; McBride & Wise, 1976; Reckase, 1976; 2003; van der Linden, Ariel, & Veldkamp, 2006; Veldkamp & van der Linden, 2000; Xing & Hambleton, 2004). However, studies are…

  9. A Monte Carlo Approach to the Design, Assembly, and Evaluation of Multistage Adaptive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.; Armstrong, Ronald D.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an application of Monte Carlo methods for developing and assembling multistage adaptive tests (MSTs). A major advantage of the Monte Carlo assembly over other approaches (e.g., integer programming or enumerative heuristics) is that it provides a uniform sampling from all MSTs (or MST paths) available from a given item pool.…

  10. Rationally Designed 2-in-1 Nanoparticles Can Overcome Adaptive Resistance in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron; Kulkarni, Ashish; Kohandel, Mohammad; Pandey, Prithvi; Rao, Poornima; Natarajan, Siva Kumar; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2016-06-28

    The development of resistance is the major cause of mortality in cancer. Combination chemotherapy is used clinically to reduce the probability of evolution of resistance. A similar trend toward the use of combinations of drugs is also emerging in the application of cancer nanomedicine. However, should a combination of two drugs be delivered from a single nanoparticle or should they be delivered in two different nanoparticles for maximal efficacy? We explored these questions in the context of adaptive resistance, which emerges as a phenotypic response of cancer cells to chemotherapy. We studied the phenotypic dynamics of breast cancer cells under cytotoxic chemotherapeutic stress and analyzed the data using a phenomenological mathematical model. We demonstrate that cancer cells can develop adaptive resistance by entering into a predetermined transitional trajectory that leads to phenocopies of inherently chemoresistant cancer cells. Disrupting this deterministic program requires a unique combination of inhibitors and cytotoxic agents. Using two such combinations, we demonstrate that a 2-in-1 nanomedicine can induce greater antitumor efficacy by ensuring that the origins of adaptive resistance are terminated by deterministic spatially constrained delivery of both drugs to the target cells. In contrast, a combination of free-form drugs or two nanoparticles, each carrying a single payload, is less effective, arising from a stochastic distribution to cells. These findings suggest that 2-in-1 nanomedicines could emerge as an important strategy for targeting adaptive resistance, resulting in increased antitumor efficacy. PMID:27257911

  11. Design and analysis of an adaptive lens that mimics the performance of the crystalline lens in the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Alvarado, Agustin; Cruz-Félix, Angel S.; Iturbide-Jiménez, F.; Martínez-López, M.; Ramírez-Como, M.; Armengol-Cruz, V.; Vásquez-Báez, I.

    2014-09-01

    Tunable lenses are optical systems that have attracted much attention due to their potential applications in such areas like ophthalmology, machine vision, microscopy and laser processing. In recent years we have been working in the analysis and performance of a liquid-filled variable focal length lens, this is a lens that can modify its focal length by changing the amount of water within it. Nowadays we extend our study to a particular adaptive lens known as solid elastic lens (SEL) that it is formed by an elastic main body made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS Sylgard 184). In this work, we present the design, simulation and analysis of an adaptive solid elastic lens that in principle imitates the accommodation process of the crystalline lens in the human eye. For this work, we have adopted the parameters of the schematic eye model developed in 1985 by Navarro et al.; this model represents the anatomy of the eye as close as possible to reality by predicting an acceptable and accurate quantity of spherical and chromatic aberrations without any shape fitting. An opto-mechanical analysis of the accommodation process of the adaptive lens is presented, by simulating a certain amount of radial force applied onto the SEL using the finite element method with the commercial software SolidWorks®. We also present ray-trace diagrams of the simulated compression process of the adaptive lens using the commercial software OSLO®.

  12. Design and analysis on thermal adaptive clamping device for PPMgLN crystal used in solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Conglin; Chen, Yongliang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The quality of clamping device for PPMgLN crystal has a vital influence on the optical property of solid-state laser. It has highly requirements of work stability and environmental adaptation ability, especially the thermal adaptation under high temperature differences. To achieve thermal adaptation, structural stiffness will be unavoidably weakened. How to keep both enough stiffness and thermal adaptation as far as possible is the key design point and also difficult point. In this paper, a kind of flexible thermal release unit which can work permanent under 130+/-10°C is studied. Thermal compensation principle and flexible thermal release theory are applied. Analysis results indicate that this device can effectively decreased the thermal stress of the crystal from 85MPa to 0.66MPa. The results of the vibration resistance test on the optical axis direction of the crystal indicate that the device can provide at least 5.62N to resistant 57.2g impact vibration and 18.5g impact vibration in the side direction, well satisfied the requirements of ability to resistant 6g impact vibration.

  13. Broadband Waveform Sensitivity Kernels for Large-Scale Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, T.; Stähler, S. C.; van Driel, M.; Hosseini, K.; Auer, L.; Sigloch, K.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic sensitivity kernels, i.e. the basis for mapping misfit functionals to structural parameters in seismic inversions, have received much attention in recent years. Their computation has been conducted via ray-theory based approaches (Dahlen et al., 2000) or fully numerical solutions based on the adjoint-state formulation (e.g. Tromp et al., 2005). The core problem is the exuberant computational cost due to the large number of source-receiver pairs, each of which require solutions to the forward problem. This is exacerbated in the high-frequency regime where numerical solutions become prohibitively expensive. We present a methodology to compute accurate sensitivity kernels for global tomography across the observable seismic frequency band. These kernels rely on wavefield databases computed via AxiSEM (abstract ID# 77891, www.axisem.info), and thus on spherically symmetric models. As a consequence of this method's numerical efficiency even in high-frequency regimes, kernels can be computed in a time- and frequency-dependent manner, thus providing the full generic mapping from perturbed waveform to perturbed structure. Such waveform kernels can then be used for a variety of misfit functions, structural parameters and refiltered into bandpasses without recomputing any wavefields. A core component of the kernel method presented here is the mapping from numerical wavefields to inversion meshes. This is achieved by a Monte-Carlo approach, allowing for convergent and controllable accuracy on arbitrarily shaped tetrahedral and hexahedral meshes. We test and validate this accuracy by comparing to reference traveltimes, show the projection onto various locally adaptive inversion meshes and discuss computational efficiency for ongoing tomographic applications in the range of millions of observed body-wave data between periods of 2-30s.

  14. Seismic Structure of India from Regional Waveform Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, V.; Maggi, A.; Priestley, K.; Rai, S.

    2003-12-01

    We use a neighborhood adaptive grid search procedure and reflectivity synthetics to model regional distance range (500-2000~km) seismograms recorded in India and to determine the variation in the crust and uppermost mantle structure across the subcontinent. The portions of the regional waveform which are most influenced by the crust and uppermost mantle structure are the 10-100~s period Pnl and fundamental mode surface waves. We use the adaptive grid search algorithm to match both portions of the seismogram simultaneously. This procedure results in a family of 1-D path average crust and upper mantle velocity and attenuation models whose propagation characteristics closely match those of the real Earth. Our data set currently consist of ˜20 seismograms whose propagation paths are primarily confined to the Ganges Basin in north India and the East Dharwar Craton of south India. The East Dharwar Craton has a simple and uniform structure consisting of a 36+/-2 km thick two layer crust, and an uppermost mantle with a sub-Moho velocity of 4.5~km/s. The structure of northern India is more complicated, with pronounced low velocities in the upper crustal layer due to the large sediment thicknesses in the Ganges basin.

  15. Designing Smart Artifacts for Adaptive Mediation of Social Viscosity: Triadic Actor-Network Enactments as a Basis for Interaction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salamanca, Juan

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of ubiquitous computing, interaction design has broadened its object of inquiry into how smart computational artifacts inconspicuously act in people's everyday lives. Although user-centered design approaches remains useful for exploring how people cope with interactive systems, they cannot explain how this new breed of…

  16. Utilizing micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) micro-shutter designs for adaptive coded aperture imaging (ACAI) technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledet, Mary M.; Starman, LaVern A.; Coutu, Ronald A., Jr.; Rogers, Stanley

    2009-08-01

    Coded aperture imaging (CAI) has been used in both the astronomical and medical communities for years due to its ability to image light at short wavelengths and thus replacing conventional lenses. Where CAI is limited, adaptive coded aperture imaging (ACAI) can recover what is lost. The use of photonic micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) for creating adaptive coded apertures has been gaining momentum since 2007. Successful implementation of micro-shutter technologies would potentially enable the use of adaptive coded aperture imaging and non-imaging systems in current and future military surveillance and intelligence programs. In this effort, a prototype of MEMS microshutters has been designed and fabricated onto a 3 mm x 3 mm square of silicon substrate using the PolyMUMPSTM process. This prototype is a line-drivable array using thin flaps of polysilicon to cover and uncover an 8 x 8 array of 20 μm apertures. A characterization of the micro-shutters to include mechanical, electrical and optical properties is provided. This prototype, its actuation scheme, and other designs for individual microshutters have been modeled and studied for feasibility purposes. In addition, microshutters fabricated from an Al-Au alloy on a quartz wafer were optically tested and characterized with a 632 nm HeNe laser.

  17. Design, layout, and early results of a feasibility experiment for sodium-layer laser-guide-star adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Avicola, K.; Brase, J.M.

    1994-02-01

    The authors describe the design and the early results of a feasibility experiment for sodium-layer laser-guide-star adaptive optics. Copper-vapor-laser-pumped dye lasers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program are used to create the guide star. The laser beam is projected upward from a beam director that is located {approximately}5 m from a 0.5-m telescope and forms an irradiance spot {approximately} 2 m in diameter at the atmospheric-sodium layer (at an altitude of 95 km). The laser guide star is approximately fifth magnitude and is visible to the naked eye at the top of the Rayleigh-scattered laser beam. To date, the authors have made photometric measurements and open-loop wave-front-sensor measurements of the laser guide star. They give an overview of the experiment`s design and the laser systems, describe the experimental setup, show preliminary photometric and open-loop wave-front-sensor data on the guide star, and present predictions of closed-loop adaptive-optics performance based on these experimental data. The long-term goal of this effort is to develop laser guide stars and adaptive optics for use with large astronomical telescopes. 26 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Design and adaptation of a novel supercritical extraction facility for operation in a glove box for recovery of radioactive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V. Suresh; Kumar, R.; Sivaraman, N.; Ravisankar, G.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2010-09-15

    The design and development of a novel supercritical extraction experimental facility adapted for safe operation in a glove box for the recovery of radioactive elements from waste is described. The apparatus incorporates a high pressure extraction vessel, reciprocating pumps for delivering supercritical fluid and reagent, a back pressure regulator, and a collection chamber. All these components of the system have been specially designed for glove box adaptation and made modular to facilitate their replacement. Confinement of these materials must be ensured in a glove box to protect the operator and prevent contamination to the work area. Since handling of radioactive materials under high pressure (30 MPa) and temperature (up to 333 K) is involved in this process, the apparatus needs elaborate safety features in the design of the equipment, as well as modification of a standard glove box to accommodate the system. As a special safety feature to contain accidental leakage of carbon dioxide from the extraction vessel, a safety vessel has been specially designed and placed inside the glove box. The extraction vessel was enclosed in the safety vessel. The safety vessel was also incorporated with pressure sensing and controlling device.

  19. Design and adaptation of a novel supercritical extraction facility for operation in a glove box for recovery of radioactive elements.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V Suresh; Kumar, R; Sivaraman, N; Ravisankar, G; Vasudeva Rao, P R

    2010-09-01

    The design and development of a novel supercritical extraction experimental facility adapted for safe operation in a glove box for the recovery of radioactive elements from waste is described. The apparatus incorporates a high pressure extraction vessel, reciprocating pumps for delivering supercritical fluid and reagent, a back pressure regulator, and a collection chamber. All these components of the system have been specially designed for glove box adaptation and made modular to facilitate their replacement. Confinement of these materials must be ensured in a glove box to protect the operator and prevent contamination to the work area. Since handling of radioactive materials under high pressure (30 MPa) and temperature (up to 333 K) is involved in this process, the apparatus needs elaborate safety features in the design of the equipment, as well as modification of a standard glove box to accommodate the system. As a special safety feature to contain accidental leakage of carbon dioxide from the extraction vessel, a safety vessel has been specially designed and placed inside the glove box. The extraction vessel was enclosed in the safety vessel. The safety vessel was also incorporated with pressure sensing and controlling device. PMID:20886994

  20. Uncertainty and Resolution in Full-Waveform, Continuous, Geoacoustic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganse, Andrew A.

    The ocean geoacoustic inverse problem is the estimation of physical properties of the ocean bottom from a set of acoustic receptions in the water column. The problem is considered in the context of equipment and spatial scales relevant to naval sonar. This dissertation explores uncertainty, resolution, and regularization in estimating (possibly piece-wise) continuous profiles of ocean bottom properties from full-waveform acoustic pressure time-series in shallow-water experiments. Solving for a continuous solution in full-waveform seismic and acoustic problems is not in itself new. But analyses of uncertainty, resolution, and regularization were not included in previous works in this category of ocean geoacoustic problem. Besides quantifying the quality of individual inversion results, they also provide an important tool: Methods and details in these topics build to a pre-experiment design analysis based on the problem resolution, which can be estimated without measurements (i.e. before the experiment takes place). The resolution of the bottom inversion is calculated as a function of array configuration, source depth, and range. Array configurations include 40-element horizontal line arrays (HLAs) from 200-1200m long towed at 10m depth, with source range defined as that to closest HLA element, and single and multiple vertical line arrays (VLAs) which cover the water depth. Monte Carlo analyses of the inversion within the local minimum show the extent to which the linear descriptions of uncertainty and resolution used in the experiment design analysis are valid approximations. Since full-waveform geoacoustic inversion is a nonlinear inverse problem, the resolution analysis results are dependent on the choice of bottom model for which they are calculated. Resolution analyses for six widely differing bottom profiles are compared, and at the geometries and frequencies considered in this dissertation, the results and conclusions from the point of view of experiment

  1. The design of an active-adaptive tuned vibration absorber based on magnetorheological elastomer and its vibration attenuation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, G. J.; Gong, X. L.; Kang, C. J.; Xuan, S. H.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents an active-adaptive tuned vibration absorber (AATVA) which is based on magnetorheological elastomer (MRE). A voice coil motor is attached to a conventional MRE adaptive tuned vibration absorber (ATVA) to improve its performance. In this study, two feedback types of the activation force were analyzed and the stability condition was obtained. In order to eliminate the time delay effect during the signal processing, a phase-lead compensator was incorporated. Based on the analysis, an MRE AATVA prototype was designed and its dynamic properties were experimentally investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that its resonant frequency could vary from 11 to 18 Hz and its damping ratio decreased to roughly 0.05 from 0.19 by adding the activation force. Besides, its vibration reduction abilities at the first two resonant frequencies of the experimental platform could reach 5.9 dB and 7.9 dB respectively.

  2. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ayati, Moosa; Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi; Khaloozadeh, Hamid

    2011-11-30

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  3. Interpretive Research Aiming at Theory Building: Adopting and Adapting the Case Study Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz Andrade, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Although the advantages of case study design are widely recognised, its original positivist underlying assumptions may mislead interpretive researchers aiming at theory building. The paper discusses the limitations of the case study design for theory building and explains how grounded theory systemic process adds to the case study design. The…

  4. Teaching as Designing: Preparing Pre-Service Teachers for Adaptive Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Michelle E.

    2016-01-01

    This conceptual article explores teaching as design work, arguing that a critical thing teachers do is design systems that enable their students to learn. Designing occurs when teachers generate new learning activities or modify curricular programs to create coherence for themselves and their students. Nonetheless, few teacher education programs…

  5. Use of physiological constraints to identify quantitative design principles for gene expression in yeast adaptation to heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Vilaprinyo, Ester; Alves, Rui; Sorribas, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Background Understanding the relationship between gene expression changes, enzyme activity shifts, and the corresponding physiological adaptive response of organisms to environmental cues is crucial in explaining how cells cope with stress. For example, adaptation of yeast to heat shock involves a characteristic profile of changes to the expression levels of genes coding for enzymes of the glycolytic pathway and some of its branches. The experimental determination of changes in gene expression profiles provides a descriptive picture of the adaptive response to stress. However, it does not explain why a particular profile is selected for any given response. Results We used mathematical models and analysis of in silico gene expression profiles (GEPs) to understand how changes in gene expression correlate to an efficient response of yeast cells to heat shock. An exhaustive set of GEPs, matched with the corresponding set of enzyme activities, was simulated and analyzed. The effectiveness of each profile in the response to heat shock was evaluated according to relevant physiological and functional criteria. The small subset of GEPs that lead to effective physiological responses after heat shock was identified as the result of the tuning of several evolutionary criteria. The experimentally observed transcriptional changes in response to heat shock belong to this set and can be explained by quantitative design principles at the physiological level that ultimately constrain changes in gene expression. Conclusion Our theoretical approach suggests a method for understanding the combined effect of changes in the expression of multiple genes on the activity of metabolic pathways, and consequently on the adaptation of cellular metabolism to heat shock. This method identifies quantitative design principles that facilitate understating the response of the cell to stress. PMID:16584550

  6. Insights Into GLAS Waveforms Using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, D.; Khalsa, S. S.; Swick, R.; Haran, T.; Scambos, T.; Korn, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument aboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation (ICESat) satellite was launched on 12 January 2003. The primary objective of the ICESat mission is to provide global measurements of polar ice sheet elevation to discern changes in ice volume and ice sheet mass balance over time. Secondary objectives of the mission are to measure sea ice thickness, cloud and atmospheric properties, land topography, vegetation canopy heights, ocean surface topography, and surface reflectivity. The GLAS instrument has three lasers, each of which has a 1064 nm laser channel for surface altimetry and dense cloud heights, and a 532 nm lidar channel for the vertical distribution of clouds and aerosols. The laser emits a pulse every 0.02 seconds, and receives a return signal. Laser footprints are roughly 70 meters in diameter and spaced 170 meters apart and are assigned terrestrial positions at the 10s of meters level of accuracy. As an aid to data selection we demonstrate how GLAS footprints, waveforms and quality information can be displayed in Google Earth. We represent the approximate spatial coverage of each laser shot on the Earth's surface, allowing users to assess the shot in the context of the surface characteristics gleaned from the underlying image and topography in Google Earth. Each footprint can be expanded to show the associated waveform, summarizing the detected return signal, along with numerical values for latitude and longitude, elevation, and date/time. Surface characteristics such as tree canopy, low- level dust or clouds, snow or ice cover, extreme surface roughness, have significant, easily-visible effects on the waveform. This application will provide extremely useful information, and will facilitate a detailed data preview before ordering or processing.

  7. Design optimization of long period waveguide grating devices for refractive index sensing using adaptive particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semwal, Girish; Rastogi, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Grating assisted surface plasmon resonance waveguide grating has been designed and optimized for the sensing application. Adaptive particle swarm optimization in conjunction with derivative free method for mode computation has been used for design optimization of LPWG sensor. Effect of metal thickness and cladding layer thickness on the core mode and surface plasmon mode has been analyzed in detail. Results have been utilized as benchmarks for deciding the bounds of these variables in the optimization process. Two waveguides structures have been demonstrated for the grating assisted surface plasmon resonance refractive index sensor. The sensitivity of the designed sensors has been achieved 3.5×104 nm/RIU and 5.0×104 nm/RIU with optimized waveguide and grating parameters.

  8. Full Waveform Inversion with Optimal Basis Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Chang, Qianshun; Sheng, Ping

    2003-03-01

    Based on the approach suggested by Tarantola, and Gauthier etal., we show that the alternate use of the step (linear) function basis and the block function (quasi-δ function) basis can give accurate full waveform inversion results for the layered acoustic systems, starting from a uniform background. Our method is robust against additive white noise (up to 20% of the signal) and can resolve layers that are comparable to or smaller than a wavelength in thickness. The physical reason for the success of our approach is illustrated through a simple example.

  9. Interferometric control of parametrically amplified waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Khadka, Utsab; Xiao Min; Zheng Huaibin

    2011-10-15

    Using atomic coherence, four-wave-mixing radiation is generated between the excited states of a ladder-type configuration in rubidium atomic vapor. By using all-optical phase control between the two frequency-swept driving beams connecting the two lower levels, the generated signal is phase modulated across its bandwidth. When homodyned with a local oscillator, such phase control looks promising for applications including waveform shaping and high-resolution metrology. Experimental observations of signal line shape symmetrization, linewidth narrowing, and bandwidth switching are demonstrated.

  10. Anisotropy effects on 3D waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stekl, I.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the recent years 3D waveform inversion has become achievable procedure for seismic data processing. A number of datasets has been inverted and presented (Warner el al 2008, Ben Hadj at all, Sirgue et all 2010) using isotropic 3D waveform inversion. However the question arises will the results be affected by isotropic assumption. Full-wavefield inversion techniques seek to match field data, wiggle-for-wiggle, to synthetic data generated by a high-resolution model of the sub-surface. In this endeavour, correctly matching the travel times of the principal arrivals is a necessary minimal requirement. In many, perhaps most, long-offset and wide-azimuth datasets, it is necessary to introduce some form of p-wave velocity anisotropy to match the travel times successfully. If this anisotropy is not also incorporated into the wavefield inversion, then results from the inversion will necessarily be compromised. We have incorporated anisotropy into our 3D wavefield tomography codes, characterised as spatially varying transverse isotropy with a tilted axis of symmetry - TTI anisotropy. This enhancement approximately doubles both the run time and the memory requirements of the code. We show that neglect of anisotropy can lead to significant artefacts in the recovered velocity models. We will present inversion results of inverting anisotropic 3D dataset by assuming isotropic earth and compare them with anisotropic inversion result. As a test case Marmousi model extended to 3D with no velocity variation in third direction and with added spatially varying anisotropy is used. Acquisition geometry is assumed as OBC with sources and receivers everywhere at the surface. We attempted inversion using both 2D and full 3D acquisition for this dataset. Results show that if no anisotropy is taken into account although image looks plausible most features are miss positioned in depth and space, even for relatively low anisotropy, which leads to incorrect result. This may lead to

  11. Weigh-In-Motion Waveform Capture Systems

    2007-09-01

    Input data is generated from multiple weight sensor signals embedded in a thin weighing pad. This information is then reduced to total weight and position of a wheel rolling over the pad. This produces a signal which includes both the wheel weight and it inertial effects due to vehicle bounce, engine noise, and other mechanical vibrations. In order to extract accurate weight information of the wheel from the extraneous information, it is necessary to firstmore » capture the waveform and then perform a form of modal analysis. This program captures the above data and formats it into a useable form for analysis.« less

  12. Optical design trade-offs of the multi conjugate adaptive optics relay for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombini, Matteo; Diolaiti, Emiliano; De Rosa, Adriano

    2014-08-01

    The scope of this paper is to describe some possible design concepts of the post optical relay inside the multi conjugate adaptive optics module for the European Extremely Large Telescope. The module is planned to be placed at the Nasmyth focus of the telescope. The optical relay must re-image the telescope focal plane with diffraction limited performance and low geometric distortion, for a field of view of 75" and for a wavelength range between 0.8 and 2.4μm. A technical annular field of view with inner diameter of 75" and outer diameter of 160" to search 3 for natural guide stars is also required. Wavefront sensing is performed by means of 6 laser guide stars arranged on a circle of at least 120" diameter while wavefront correction is performed by two deformable mirrors inside the relay, in addition to the telescope adaptive mirror. The final optical design will be a trade-off among adaptive optics performance, optical interface requirements, mechanical interface requirements and technological feasibility of key hardware components. The size of the deformable mirrors and the image quality of the layer conjugates are important design drivers, related to the design of the collimating optics after the input focal plane and to the deformable mirrors tilt respect to the chief ray. The optical interface at the output focal plane must be acceptable for the client instruments, in terms of field curvature, focal ratio and exit pupil position. The number of optical surfaces inside the relay has to be as small as possible to limit thermal background. Splitting of the laser guide star channel from the science light channel may be achieved either in wavelength, by means of a dichroic placed close to a pupil image, or in field, by means of an perforated dichroic placed at an intermediate focal plane. The laser guide star beams have to be focused with acceptable optical performance on a fixed image plane compensating the effects of the sodium layer range variation with Zenith

  13. Breast ultrasound waveform tomography: using both transmission and reflection data, and numerical virtual point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Lin, Youzuo; Zhang, Zhigang; Labyed, Yassin; Tan, Sirui; Nguyen, Nghia; Hanson, Kenneth; Sandoval, Daniel; Williamson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound transmission tomography usually generates low-resolution breast images. We improve sound-speed reconstructions using ultrasound waveform tomography with both transmission and reflection data. We validate the improvement using computer-generated synthetic-aperture ultrasound transmission and reflection data for numerical breast phantoms. Our tomography results demonstrate that using both transmission and reflection data in ultrasound waveform tomography greatly enhances the resolution and accuracy of tomographic reconstructions compared to ultrasound waveform tomography using either transmission data or reflection data alone. To verify the capability of our novel ultrasound waveform tomography, we design and manufacture a new synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays for clinical studies. The distance of the two transducer arrays is adjustable for accommodating different sizes of the breast. The parallel transducer arrays also allow us to easily scan the axillary region to evaluate the status of axillary lymph nodes and detect breast cancer in the axillary region. However, synthetic-aperture ultrasound reflection data acquired by firing each transducer element sequentially are usually much weaker than transmission data, and have much lower signal-to-noise ratios than the latter. We develop a numerical virtual-point-source method to enhance ultrasound reflection data using synthetic-aperture ultrasound data acquired by firing each transducer element sequentially. Synthetic-aperture ultrasound reflection data for a breast phantom obtained using our numerical virtual-point-source method reveals many coherent ultrasound reflection waveforms that are weak or invisible in the original synthetic-aperture ultrasound data. Ultrasound waveform tomography using both transmission and reflection data together with numerical virtual-point-source method has great potential to produce high-resolution tomographic

  14. A seamless acquisition digital storage oscilloscope with three-dimensional waveform display

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Kuojun Guo, Lianping; Tian, Shulin; Zeng, Hao; Qiu, Lei

    2014-04-15

    In traditional digital storage oscilloscope (DSO), sampled data need to be processed after each acquisition. During data processing, the acquisition is stopped and oscilloscope is blind to the input signal. Thus, this duration is called dead time. With the rapid development of modern electronic systems, the effect of infrequent events becomes significant. To capture these occasional events in shorter time, dead time in traditional DSO that causes the loss of measured signal needs to be reduced or even eliminated. In this paper, a seamless acquisition oscilloscope without dead time is proposed. In this oscilloscope, three-dimensional waveform mapping (TWM) technique, which converts sampled data to displayed waveform, is proposed. With this technique, not only the process speed is improved, but also the probability information of waveform is displayed with different brightness. Thus, a three-dimensional waveform is shown to the user. To reduce processing time further, parallel TWM which processes several sampled points simultaneously, and dual-port random access memory based pipelining technique which can process one sampling point in one clock period are proposed. Furthermore, two DDR3 (Double-Data-Rate Three Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory) are used for storing sampled data alternately, thus the acquisition can continue during data processing. Therefore, the dead time of DSO is eliminated. In addition, a double-pulse test method is adopted to test the waveform capturing rate (WCR) of the oscilloscope and a combined pulse test method is employed to evaluate the oscilloscope's capture ability comprehensively. The experiment results show that the WCR of the designed oscilloscope is 6 250 000 wfms/s (waveforms per second), the highest value in all existing oscilloscopes. The testing results also prove that there is no dead time in our oscilloscope, thus realizing the seamless acquisition.

  15. Optimization of inflow waveform phase-difference for minimized total cavopulmonary power loss.

    PubMed

    Dur, Onur; DeGroff, Curt G; Keller, Bradley B; Pekkan, Kerem

    2010-03-01

    The Fontan operation is a palliative surgical procedure performed on children, born with congenital heart defects that have yielded only a single functioning ventricle. The total cavo-pulmonary connection (TCPC) is a common variant of the Fontan procedure, where the superior vena cava (SVC) and inferior vena cava (IVC) are routed directly into the pulmonary arteries (PA). Due to the limited pumping energy available, optimized hemodynamics, in turn, minimized power loss, inside the TCPC pathway is required for the best optimal surgical outcomes. To complement ongoing efforts to optimize the anatomical geometric design of the surgical Fontan templates, here, we focused on the characterization of power loss changes due to the temporal variations in between SVC and IVC flow waveforms. An experimentally validated pulsatile computational fluid dynamics solver is used to quantify the effect of phase-shift between SVC and IVC inflow waveforms and amplitudes on internal energy dissipation. The unsteady hemodynamics of two standard idealized TCPC geometries are presented, incorporating patient-specific real-time PC-MRI flow waveforms of "functional" Fontan patients. The effects of respiration and pulsatility on the internal energy dissipation of the TCPC pathway are analyzed. Optimization of phase-shift between caval flows is shown to lead to lower energy dissipation up to 30% in these idealized models. For physiological patient-specific caval waveforms, the power loss is reduced significantly (up to 11%) by the optimization of all three major harmonics at the same mean pathway flow (3 L/min). Thus, the hemodynamic efficiency of single ventricle circuits is influenced strongly by the caval flow waveform quality, which is regulated through respiratory dependent physiological pathways. The proposed patient-specific waveform optimization protocol may potentially inspire new therapeutic applications to aid postoperative hemodynamics and improve the well being of the Fontan

  16. A reconfigurable arbitrary waveform generator using PWM modulation for ultrasound research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In ultrasound imaging systems, the digital transmit beamformer is a critical module that generates accurate control over several transmission parameters. However, such transmit front-end module is not typically accessible to ultrasound researchers. To overcome this difficulty, we have been developing a compact and fully programmable digital transmit system using the pulse-width modulation (PWM) technique for generating simultaneous arbitrary waveforms, specifically designed for research purposes. Methods In this paper we present a reconfigurable arbitrary waveform generator (RAWG) for ultrasound research applications that exploits a high frequency PWM scheme implemented in a low-cost FPGA, taking advantage of its flexibility and parallel processing capability for independent controlling of multiple transmission parameters. The 8-channel platform consists of a FPGA-based development board including an USB 2.0 interface and an arbitrary waveform generator board with eight MD2130 beamformer source drivers for individual control of waveform, amplitude apodization, phase angle and time delay trigger. Results To evaluate the efficiency of our system, we used equivalent RC loads (1 kΩ and 220 pF) to produce arbitrary excitation waveforms with the Gaussian and Tukey profiles. The PWM carrier frequency was set at 160 MHz featuring high resolution while keeping a minimum time delay of 3.125 ns between pulses to enable the acoustic beam to be focused and/or steered electronically. Preliminary experimental results show that the RAWG can produce complex arbitrary pulses with amplitude over 100 Vpp and central frequency up to 20 MHz with satisfactory linearity of the amplitude apodization, as well as focusing phase adjustment capability with angular resolution of 7.5°. Conclusions The initial results of this study showed that the proposed research system is suitable for generating simultaneous arbitrary waveforms, providing extensive user control with direct

  17. A seamless acquisition digital storage oscilloscope with three-dimensional waveform display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kuojun; Tian, Shulin; Zeng, Hao; Qiu, Lei; Guo, Lianping

    2014-04-01

    In traditional digital storage oscilloscope (DSO), sampled data need to be processed after each acquisition. During data processing, the acquisition is stopped and oscilloscope is blind to the input signal. Thus, this duration is called dead time. With the rapid development of modern electronic systems, the effect of infrequent events becomes significant. To capture these occasional events in shorter time, dead time in traditional DSO that causes the loss of measured signal needs to be reduced or even eliminated. In this paper, a seamless acquisition oscilloscope without dead time is proposed. In this oscilloscope, three-dimensional waveform mapping (TWM) technique, which converts sampled data to displayed waveform, is proposed. With this technique, not only the process speed is improved, but also the probability information of waveform is displayed with different brightness. Thus, a three-dimensional waveform is shown to the user. To reduce processing time further, parallel TWM which processes several sampled points simultaneously, and dual-port random access memory based pipelining technique which can process one sampling point in one clock period are proposed. Furthermore, two DDR3 (Double-Data-Rate Three Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory) are used for storing sampled data alternately, thus the acquisition can continue during data processing. Therefore, the dead time of DSO is eliminated. In addition, a double-pulse test method is adopted to test the waveform capturing rate (WCR) of the oscilloscope and a combined pulse test method is employed to evaluate the oscilloscope's capture ability comprehensively. The experiment results show that the WCR of the designed oscilloscope is 6 250 000 wfms/s (waveforms per second), the highest value in all existing oscilloscopes. The testing results also prove that there is no dead time in our oscilloscope, thus realizing the seamless acquisition.

  18. Design and Experimental Evaluation of a Robust Position Controller for an Electrohydrostatic Actuator Using Adaptive Antiwindup Sliding Mode Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Min; Park, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jong Shik

    2013-01-01

    A robust control scheme is proposed for the position control of the electrohydrostatic actuator (EHA) when considering hardware saturation, load disturbance, and lumped system uncertainties and nonlinearities. To reduce overshoot due to a saturation of electric motor and to realize robustness against load disturbance and lumped system uncertainties such as varying parameters and modeling error, this paper proposes an adaptive antiwindup PID sliding mode scheme as a robust position controller for the EHA system. An optimal PID controller and an optimal anti-windup PID controller are also designed to compare control performance. An EHA prototype is developed, carrying out system modeling and parameter identification in designing the position controller. The simply identified linear model serves as the basis for the design of the position controllers, while the robustness of the control systems is compared by experiments. The adaptive anti-windup PID sliding mode controller has been found to have the desired performance and become robust against hardware saturation, load disturbance, and lumped system uncertainties and nonlinearities. PMID:23983640

  19. On the accuracy and precision of numerical waveforms: effect of waveform extraction methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tony; Fong, Heather; Kumar, Prayush; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Boyle, Michael; Hemberger, Daniel A.; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela

    2016-08-01

    We present a new set of 95 numerical relativity simulations of non-precessing binary black holes (BBHs). The simulations sample comprehensively both black-hole spins up to spin magnitude of 0.9, and cover mass ratios 1–3. The simulations cover on average 24 inspiral orbits, plus merger and ringdown, with low initial orbital eccentricities e\\lt {10}-4. A subset of the simulations extends the coverage of non-spinning BBHs up to mass ratio q = 10. Gravitational waveforms at asymptotic infinity are computed with two independent techniques: extrapolation and Cauchy characteristic extraction. An error analysis based on noise-weighted inner products is performed. We find that numerical truncation error, error due to gravitational wave extraction, and errors due to the Fourier transformation of signals with finite length of the numerical waveforms are of similar magnitude, with gravitational wave extraction errors dominating at noise-weighted mismatches of ∼ 3× {10}-4. This set of waveforms will serve to validate and improve aligned-spin waveform models for gravitational wave science.

  20. Adaptation of G-TAG Software for Validating Touch-and-Go Comet Surface Sampling Design Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandic, Milan; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The G-TAG software tool was developed under the R&TD on Integrated Autonomous Guidance, Navigation, and Control for Comet Sample Return, and represents a novel, multi-body dynamics simulation software tool for studying TAG sampling. The G-TAG multi-body simulation tool provides a simulation environment in which a Touch-and-Go (TAG) sampling event can be extensively tested. TAG sampling requires the spacecraft to descend to the surface, contact the surface with a sampling collection device, and then to ascend to a safe altitude. The TAG event lasts only a few seconds but is mission-critical with potentially high risk. Consequently, there is a need for the TAG event to be well characterized and studied by simulation and analysis in order for the proposal teams to converge on a reliable spacecraft design. This adaptation of the G-TAG tool was developed to support the Comet Odyssey proposal effort, and is specifically focused to address comet sample return missions. In this application, the spacecraft descends to and samples from the surface of a comet. Performance of the spacecraft during TAG is assessed based on survivability and sample collection performance. For the adaptation of the G-TAG simulation tool to comet scenarios, models are developed that accurately describe the properties of the spacecraft, approach trajectories, and descent velocities, as well as the models of the external forces and torques acting on the spacecraft. The adapted models of the spacecraft, descent profiles, and external sampling forces/torques were more sophisticated and customized for comets than those available in the basic G-TAG simulation tool. Scenarios implemented include the study of variations in requirements, spacecraft design (size, locations, etc. of the spacecraft components), and the environment (surface properties, slope, disturbances, etc.). The simulations, along with their visual representations using G-View, contributed to the Comet Odyssey New Frontiers proposal