Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive weighted diamond

  1. Bilinear nodal transport method in weighted diamond difference form

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Nodal methods have been developed and implemented for the numerical solution of the discrete ordinates neutron transport equation. Numerical testing of these methods and comparison of their results to those obtained by conventional methods have established the high accuracy of nodal methods. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the linear-linear approximation is the most computationally efficient, practical nodal approximation. Indeed, this claim has been substantiated by comparing the accuracy in the solution, and the CPU time required to achieve convergence to that solution by several nodal approximations, as well as the diamond difference scheme. Two types of linear-linear nodal methods have been developed in the literature: analytic linear-linear (NLL) methods, in which the transverse-leakage terms are derived analytically, and approximate linear-linear (PLL) methods, in which these terms are approximated. In spite of their higher accuracy, NLL methods result in very complicated discrete-variable equations that exhibit a high degree of coupling, thus requiring special solution algorithms. On the other hand, the sacrificed accuracy in PLL methods is compensated for by the simple discrete-variable equations and diamond-difference-like solution algorithm. In this paper the authors outline the development of an NLL nodal method, the bilinear method, which can be written in a weighted diamond difference form with one spatial weight per dimension that is analytically derived rather than preassigned in an ad hoc fashion.

  2. Physiological adaptations to weight loss and factors favouring weight regain

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, F L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem and predisposes individuals to several comorbidities that can affect life expectancy. Interventions based on lifestyle modification (for example, improved diet and exercise) are integral components in the management of obesity. However, although weight loss can be achieved through dietary restriction and/or increased physical activity, over the long term many individuals regain weight. The aim of this article is to review the research into the processes and mechanisms that underpin weight regain after weight loss and comment on future strategies to address them. Maintenance of body weight is regulated by the interaction of a number of processes, encompassing homoeostatic, environmental and behavioural factors. In homoeostatic regulation, the hypothalamus has a central role in integrating signals regarding food intake, energy balance and body weight, while an ‘obesogenic' environment and behavioural patterns exert effects on the amount and type of food intake and physical activity. The roles of other environmental factors are also now being considered, including sleep debt and iatrogenic effects of medications, many of which warrant further investigation. Unfortunately, physiological adaptations to weight loss favour weight regain. These changes include perturbations in the levels of circulating appetite-related hormones and energy homoeostasis, in addition to alterations in nutrient metabolism and subjective appetite. To maintain weight loss, individuals must adhere to behaviours that counteract physiological adaptations and other factors favouring weight regain. It is difficult to overcome physiology with behaviour. Weight loss medications and surgery change the physiology of body weight regulation and are the best chance for long-term success. An increased understanding of the physiology of weight loss and regain will underpin the development of future strategies to support overweight and obese individuals in their

  3. Adaptive Mallow's optimization for weighted median filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachuri, Raghu; Rao, Sathyanarayana S.

    2002-05-01

    This work extends the idea of spectral optimization for the design of Weighted Median filters and employ adaptive filtering that updates the coefficients of the FIR filter from which the weights of the median filters are derived. Mallows' theory of non-linear smoothers [1] has proven to be of great theoretical significance providing simple design guidelines for non-linear smoothers. It allows us to find a set of positive weights for a WM filter whose sample selection probabilities (SSP's) are as close as possible to a SSP set predetermined by Mallow's. Sample selection probabilities have been used as a basis for designing stack smoothers as they give a measure of the filter's detail preserving ability and give non-negative filter weights. We will extend this idea to design weighted median filters admitting negative weights. The new method first finds the linear FIR filter coefficients adaptively, which are then used to determine the weights of the median filter. WM filters can be designed to have band-pass, high-pass as well as low-pass frequency characteristics. Unlike the linear filters, however, the weighted median filters are robust in the presence of impulsive noise, as shown by the simulation results.

  4. Evolution of cooperation on adaptively weighted networks.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lang; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Wang, Bing; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-03-01

    Recent studies have explored interactions between evolutionary game dynamics and population structure. Yet most studies so far mainly paid attention to unweighted and static networks. Here we explore evolutionary games played on dynamically weighted networks. Players update their strategies according to the payoffs they obtain. Players also update weights of their adjacent links depending on payoffs they gain through those links; profitable links are reinforced whereas unprofitable ones are weakened. The system is characterized by two time scales, the one for strategy update, β(S), and the other for weight adjustment, β(W). We find that, under a mean-field approximation, the asymptotic behavior of the system is described by the replicator equation with an effective payoff matrix, which is a combination of the original game matrix A and its transpose, A(T). Both analytical and numerical results show that such an adaptive weight adjustment mechanism dramatically promotes evolution of cooperation. PMID:21163270

  5. Three dimensional laser microfabrication in diamond using a dual adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Richard D; Salter, Patrick S; Jesacher, Alexander; Booth, Martin J

    2011-11-21

    Femtosecond laser fabrication of controlled three dimensional structures deep in the bulk of diamond is facilitated by a dual adaptive optics system. A deformable mirror is used in parallel with a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to compensate the extreme aberrations caused by the refractive index mismatch between the diamond and the objective immersion medium. It is shown that aberration compensation is essential for the generation of controlled micron-scale features at depths greater than 200 μm, and the dual adaptive optics approach demonstrates increased fabrication efficiency relative to experiments using a single adaptive element. PMID:22109438

  6. Adaptive transitions and environmental change in the northern Great Basin: A view from Diamond Swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Musil, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of sedentary prehistoric occupations in association with wetland settings in the Great Basin has been the focus of continued debate. Theoretical discussions concerning the nature of hunter-gatherer adaptations to wetland environments have been based on two models: (1) Stress-based or push models, which argue that hunter-gatherer populations would reduce mobility as a response to less favorable conditions, and (2) abundance-based or pull models, which argue that hunter-gatherers would have been attracted to localized environments of diverse and plentiful resources. Archaeological evidence from Diamond Swamp provides insight into human adaptive transitions in wetland environments. Archaeological data from Diamond Swamp revealed a series of cultural components representing significant portions of the Holocene. The components at the Dunn and McCoy Creek sites consist of collections of artifactual, faunal, and floral materials, in association with semi-subterranean pithouse features dated between 3500 and 900 BP. These occupations correspond to periods of increased moisture and higher water tables. During periods of climatic amelioration semi-sedentary occupations occurred with the expansion of highly productive marsh and juniper grassland vegetation zones. The component at the McCoy Creek Site corresponds to a period of decreasing moisture punctuated by periodic drought, evidenced by the presence of a less substantial wickiup occupation dated at 500 BP. This occupation is indicative of a transition to a more mobile, less intensive occupational episode. The study provides evidence that transitions to sedentary pithouse villages in Diamond Swamp are best accounted for by the abundance-based model. A shift towards a less substantial, more mobile, occupation occurred with a decline in effective moisture. The research reflects adaptations made by local hunter-gatherer populations to long term environmental change within a typical Great Basin wetlands setting.

  7. Adaptive tool servo diamond turning for enhancing machining efficiency and surface quality of freeform optics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwei; To, Suet

    2015-08-10

    Fast tool servo/ slow tool servo (FTS/STS) diamond turning is a very promising technique for the generation of freeform optics. However, the currently adopted constant scheme for azimuth sampling and side-feeding motion possesses no adaptation to surface shape variation, leading to the non-uniform surface quality and low machining efficiency. To overcome this defect, this paper reports on a novel adaptive tool servo (ATS) diamond turning technique which is essentially based on the novel two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) FTS/STS. In the ATS, the sampling interval and the side-feeding motion are actively controlled at any cutting point to adapt the machining process to shape variation of the desired surface, making both the sampling induced interpolation error and the side-feeding induced residual tool mark be within the desired tolerances. Characteristic of the required cutting motion suggests that besides the conventional z-axis servo motion, another servo motion along the x-axis synthesizing by the c-axis is mandatory for implementing the ATS. Comparative studies of surface generation of typical micro-structured surfaces in FTS/STS and ATS are thoroughly conducted both theoretically and experimentally. The result demonstrates that the ATS outperforms the FTS/STS with improved surface quality while simultaneously enhanced machining efficiency.

  8. Self-adaptive grain recognition of diamond grinding wheel and its grains assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Changcai; Zhou, Lijun; Yu, Qing; Huang, Hui; Ye, Ruifang

    2013-10-01

    An improved Canny operator based on the method of Maximum Classes Square Error is adopted to get a self-adaptive threshold for grain recognition. First, a grinding wheel surface was measured by using a vertical scanning white light interferometric (WLI) system and reconstructed with an improved centroid algorithm; then the grains were extracted using the proposed method based on the fact that the peak intensity difference (ΔI) between maximum and minimum intensities on interferometric curve from diamond is larger than that from bond due to different reflective characteristics of different materials; third the grain protrusion parameters are investigated for grinding performance analysis. The experiments proved that the proposed grain recognition method is effective and assessment parameters are useful for understanding grinding performance.

  9. Adaptive spatially dependent weighting scheme for tomosynthesis reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levakhina, Yulia; Duschka, Robert; Vogt, Florian; Barkhausen, JOErg; Buzug, Thorsten M.

    2012-03-01

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is an x-ray limited-angle imaging technique. An accurate image reconstruction in tomosynthesis is a challenging task due to the violation of the tomographic sufficiency conditions. A classical "shift-and-add" algorithm (or simple backprojection) suffers from blurring artifacts, produced by structures located above and below the plane of interest. The artifact problem becomes even more prominent in the presence of materials and tissues with a high x-ray attenuation, such as bones, microcalcifications or metal. The focus of the current work is on reduction of ghosting artifacts produced by bones in the musculoskeletal tomosynthesis. A novel dissimilarity concept and a modified backprojection with an adaptive spatially dependent weighting scheme (ωBP) are proposed. Simulated data of software phantom, a structured hardware phantom and a human hand raw-data acquired with a Siemens Mammomat Inspiration tomosynthesis system were reconstructed using conventional backprojection algorithm and the new ωBP-algorithm. The comparison of the results to the non-weighted case demonstrates the potential of the proposed weighted backprojection to reduce the blurring artifacts in musculoskeletal DT. The proposed weighting scheme is not limited to the tomosynthesis limitedangle geometry. It can also be adapted for Computed Tomography (CT) and included in iterative reconstruction algorithms (e.g. SART).

  10. Measuring quartz solubility by in situ weight-loss determination using a hydrothermal diamond cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Halan M.; Henderson, Grant S.; Brenan, James M.

    2004-12-01

    The solubility of quartz was determined using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) within the temperature and pressure ranges of 126 to 490°C and up to 8.9 kbar, respectively. A novel approach has been used to measure the amount of dissolved silica. The quartz was abraded into spheres which have a diameter of ˜40 μm. The spheres were then placed in pure water inside the diamond anvil cell and heated externally. Because the transparency of the diamonds allows direct observation of the sample chamber during the experiment, we were able to estimate the amount of quartz dissolved in the water at various stages of the dissolution process by measuring the decrease in the sphere's diameter over time. Experiments were performed along isochores between 0.92 and 0.99 g/cm 3. The maximum solubility measured was 0.165 molal. The experimental solubility data were limited to 370°C because of overestimation of solubilities above this temperature. Reprecipitation of silica inside the HDAC sample chamber and the refaceting of the spheres to trigonal form at temperatures above 350°C are major contributors to the overestimation.

  11. Iterative Re-Weighted Instance Transfer for Domain Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.; Rottensteiner, F.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    Domain adaptation techniques in transfer learning try to reduce the amount of training data required for classification by adapting a classifier trained on samples from a source domain to a new data set (target domain) where the features may have different distributions. In this paper, we propose a new technique for domain adaptation based on logistic regression. Starting with a classifier trained on training data from the source domain, we iteratively include target domain samples for which class labels have been obtained from the current state of the classifier, while at the same time removing source domain samples. In each iteration the classifier is re-trained, so that the decision boundaries are slowly transferred to the distribution of the target features. To make the transfer procedure more robust we introduce weights as a function of distance from the decision boundary and a new way of regularisation. Our methodology is evaluated using a benchmark data set consisting of aerial images and digital surface models. The experimental results show that in the majority of cases our domain adaptation approach can lead to an improvement of the classification accuracy without additional training data, but also indicate remaining problems if the difference in the feature distributions becomes too large.

  12. On adaptive weighted polynomial preconditioning for Hermitian positive definite matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Bernd; Freund, Roland W.

    1992-01-01

    The conjugate gradient algorithm for solving Hermitian positive definite linear systems is usually combined with preconditioning in order to speed up convergence. In recent years, there has been a revival of polynomial preconditioning, motivated by the attractive features of the method on modern architectures. Standard techniques for choosing the preconditioning polynomial are based only on bounds for the extreme eigenvalues. Here a different approach is proposed, which aims at adapting the preconditioner to the eigenvalue distribution of the coefficient matrix. The technique is based on the observation that good estimates for the eigenvalue distribution can be derived after only a few steps of the Lanczos process. This information is then used to construct a weight function for a suitable Chebyshev approximation problem. The solution of this problem yields the polynomial preconditioner. In particular, we investigate the use of Bernstein-Szego weights.

  13. SNR-adaptive stream weighting for audio-MES ASR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Seung

    2008-08-01

    Myoelectric signals (MESs) from the speaker's mouth region have been successfully shown to improve the noise robustness of automatic speech recognizers (ASRs), thus promising to extend their usability in implementing noise-robust ASR. In the recognition system presented herein, extracted audio and facial MES features were integrated by a decision fusion method, where the likelihood score of the audio-MES observation vector was given by a linear combination of class-conditional observation log-likelihoods of two classifiers, using appropriate weights. We developed a weighting process adaptive to SNRs. The main objective of the paper involves determining the optimal SNR classification boundaries and constructing a set of optimum stream weights for each SNR class. These two parameters were determined by a method based on a maximum mutual information criterion. Acoustic and facial MES data were collected from five subjects, using a 60-word vocabulary. Four types of acoustic noise including babble, car, aircraft, and white noise were acoustically added to clean speech signals with SNR ranging from -14 to 31 dB. The classification accuracy of the audio ASR was as low as 25.5%. Whereas, the classification accuracy of the MES ASR was 85.2%. The classification accuracy could be further improved by employing the proposed audio-MES weighting method, which was as high as 89.4% in the case of babble noise. A similar result was also found for the other types of noise.

  14. Language Model Combination and Adaptation Using Weighted Finite State Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Gales, M. J. F.; Hieronymus, J. L.; Woodland, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    In speech recognition systems language model (LMs) are often constructed by training and combining multiple n-gram models. They can be either used to represent different genres or tasks found in diverse text sources, or capture stochastic properties of different linguistic symbol sequences, for example, syllables and words. Unsupervised LM adaption may also be used to further improve robustness to varying styles or tasks. When using these techniques, extensive software changes are often required. In this paper an alternative and more general approach based on weighted finite state transducers (WFSTs) is investigated for LM combination and adaptation. As it is entirely based on well-defined WFST operations, minimum change to decoding tools is needed. A wide range of LM combination configurations can be flexibly supported. An efficient on-the-fly WFST decoding algorithm is also proposed. Significant error rate gains of 7.3% relative were obtained on a state-of-the-art broadcast audio recognition task using a history dependently adapted multi-level LM modelling both syllable and word sequences

  15. Fuzzy ART and Fuzzy ARTMAP with adaptively weighted distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampidis, Dimitrios; Anagnostopoulos, Georgios C.; Georgiopoulos, Michael; Kasparis, Takis

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modification of the Fuzzy ARTMAP (FAM) neural network, namely, the Fuzzy ARTMAP with adaptively weighted distances (FAMawd) neural network. In FAMawd we substitute the regular L1-norm with a weighted L1-norm to measure the distances between categories and input patterns. The distance-related weights are a function of a category's shape and allow for bias in the direction of a category's expansion during learning. Moreover, the modification to the distance measurement is proposed in order to study the capability of FAMawd in achieving more compact knowledge representation than FAM, while simultaneously maintaining good classification performance. For a special parameter setting FAMawd simplifies to the original FAM, thus, making FAMawd a generalization of the FAM architecture. We also present an experimental comparison between FAMawd and FAM on two benchmark classification problems in terms of generalization performance and utilization of categories. Our obtained results illustrate FAMawd's potential to exhibit low memory utilization, while maintaining classification performance comparable to FAM.

  16. An Adaptive Weighting Algorithm for Interpolating the Soil Potassium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Du, Peijun; Zhao, Zhuowen; Zhang, Lianpeng

    2016-01-01

    The concept of spatial interpolation is important in the soil sciences. However, the use of a single global interpolation model is often limited by certain conditions (e.g., terrain complexity), which leads to distorted interpolation results. Here we present a method of adaptive weighting combined environmental variables for soil properties interpolation (AW-SP) to improve accuracy. Using various environmental variables, AW-SP was used to interpolate soil potassium content in Qinghai Lake Basin. To evaluate AW-SP performance, we compared it with that of inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging, and OK combined with different environmental variables. The experimental results showed that the methods combined with environmental variables did not always improve prediction accuracy even if there was a strong correlation between the soil properties and environmental variables. However, compared with IDW, OK, and OK combined with different environmental variables, AW-SP is more stable and has lower mean absolute and root mean square errors. Furthermore, the AW-SP maps provided improved details of soil potassium content and provided clearer boundaries to its spatial distribution. In conclusion, AW-SP can not only reduce prediction errors, it also accounts for the distribution and contributions of environmental variables, making the spatial interpolation of soil potassium content more reasonable. PMID:27051998

  17. Constraint optimized weight adaptation for Gaussian mixture reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. D.; Chang, K. C.; Smith, Chris

    2010-04-01

    Gaussian mixture model (GMM) has been used in many applications for dynamic state estimation such as target tracking or distributed fusion. However, the number of components in the mixture distribution tends to grow rapidly when multiple GMMs are combined. In order to keep the computational complexity bounded, it is necessary to approximate a Gaussian mixture by one with reduced number of components. Gaussian mixture reduction is traditionally conducted by recursively selecting two components that appear to be most similar to each other and merging them. Different definitions on similarity measure have been used in literature. For the case of one-dimensional Gaussian mixtures, Kmeans algorithms and some variations are recently proposed to cluster Gaussian mixture components in groups, use a center component to represent all in each group, readjust parameters in the center components, and finally perform weight optimization. In this paper, we focus on multi-dimensional Gaussian mixture models. With a variety of reduction algorithms and possible combinations, we developed a hybrid algorithm with constraint optimized weight adaptation to minimize the integrated squared error (ISE). In additions, with extensive simulations, we showed that the proposed algorithm provides an efficient and effective Gaussian mixture reduction performance in various random scenarios.

  18. Analysis of modified SMI method for adaptive array weight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, R. L.; Moses, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive array is applied to the problem of receiving a desired signal in the presence of weak interference signals which need to be suppressed. A modification, suggested by Gupta, of the sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm controls the array weights. In the modified SMI algorithm, interference suppression is increased by subtracting a fraction F of the noise power from the diagonal elements of the estimated covariance matrix. Given the true covariance matrix and the desired signal direction, the modified algorithm is shown to maximize a well-defined, intuitive output power ratio criterion. Expressions are derived for the expected value and variance of the array weights and output powers as a function of the fraction F and the number of snapshots used in the covariance matrix estimate. These expressions are compared with computer simulation and good agreement is found. A trade-off is found to exist between the desired level of interference suppression and the number of snapshots required in order to achieve that level with some certainty. The removal of noise eigenvectors from the covariance matrix inverse is also discussed with respect to this application. Finally, the type and severity of errors which occur in the covariance matrix estimate are characterized through simulation.

  19. An Adaptive Weighting Algorithm for Interpolating the Soil Potassium Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Du, Peijun; Zhao, Zhuowen; Zhang, Lianpeng

    2016-04-01

    The concept of spatial interpolation is important in the soil sciences. However, the use of a single global interpolation model is often limited by certain conditions (e.g., terrain complexity), which leads to distorted interpolation results. Here we present a method of adaptive weighting combined environmental variables for soil properties interpolation (AW-SP) to improve accuracy. Using various environmental variables, AW-SP was used to interpolate soil potassium content in Qinghai Lake Basin. To evaluate AW-SP performance, we compared it with that of inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging, and OK combined with different environmental variables. The experimental results showed that the methods combined with environmental variables did not always improve prediction accuracy even if there was a strong correlation between the soil properties and environmental variables. However, compared with IDW, OK, and OK combined with different environmental variables, AW-SP is more stable and has lower mean absolute and root mean square errors. Furthermore, the AW-SP maps provided improved details of soil potassium content and provided clearer boundaries to its spatial distribution. In conclusion, AW-SP can not only reduce prediction errors, it also accounts for the distribution and contributions of environmental variables, making the spatial interpolation of soil potassium content more reasonable.

  20. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward L; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A

    2013-08-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than what the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the subpopulation that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, that is, increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors and to develop strategies to minimize their effect. PMID:23470300

  1. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yung-Hsiu

    This dissertation describes improvements in the growth of single crystal diamond by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Heteroepitaxial (001) diamond was grown on 1 cm. 2 a-plane sapphiresubstrates using an epitaxial (001) Ir thin-film as a buffer layer. Low-energy ion bombardment of the Ir layer, a process known as bias-enhanced nucleation, is a key step in achieving a high density of diamond nuclei. Bias conditions were optimized to form uniformly-high nucleation densities across the substrates, which led to well-coalesced diamond thin films after short growth times. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) was used as a means of decreasing diamond internal stress by impeding the propagation of threading dislocations into the growing material. Its use in diamond growth requires adaptation to the aggressive chemical and thermal environment of the hydrogen plasma in a CVD reactor. Three ELO variants were developed. The most successful utilized a gold (Au) mask prepared by vacuum evaporation onto the surface of a thin heteroepitaxial diamond layer. The Au mask pattern, a series of parallel stripes on the micrometer scale, was produced by standard lift-off photolithography. When diamond overgrows the mask, dislocations are largely confined to the substrate. Differing degrees of confinement were studied by varying the stripe geometry and orientation. Significant improvement in diamond quality was found in the overgrown regions, as evidenced by reduction of the Raman scattering linewidth. The Au layer was found to remain intact during diamond overgrowth and did not chemically bond with the diamond surface. Besides impeding the propagation of threading dislocations, it was discovered that the thermally-induced stress in the CVD diamond was significantly reduced as a result of the ductile Au layer. Cracking and delamination of the diamond from the substrate was mostly eliminated. When diamond was grown to thicknesses above 0.1 mm it was found that

  2. Hegira adaptation of the NCHS weight and height charts.

    PubMed

    Osman, M I; Magbool, G; Kaul, K K

    1993-03-01

    The ages of Saudi children are recorded and based on the Hegira calendar. When charted on the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) weight and height charts, children will be at disadvantage since the Hegira year is shorter than the Gregorian year. In this paper, centiles for the NCHS reference population are estimated for age in Hegira years from 2-18 for height and weight for both sexes using mathematical interpolation. Charts are prepared for use in hospitals and health centers for children whose ages have been reported based on the Hegira calendar. PMID:17588024

  3. Hegira adaptation of the NCHS weight and height charts.

    PubMed

    Osman, M I; Magbool, G; Kaul, K K

    1993-03-01

    The ages of Saudi children are recorded and based on the Hegira calendar. When charted on the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) weight and height charts, children will be at disadvantage since the Hegira year is shorter than the Gregorian year. In this paper, centiles for the NCHS reference population are estimated for age in Hegira years from 2-18 for height and weight for both sexes using mathematical interpolation. Charts are prepared for use in hospitals and health centers for children whose ages have been reported based on the Hegira calendar.

  4. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  5. Adaptation of a weighted regression approach to evaluate water quality trends in anestuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    To improve the description of long-term changes in water quality, a weighted regression approach developed to describe trends in pollutant transport in rivers was adapted to analyze a long-term water quality dataset from Tampa Bay, Florida. The weighted regression approach allows...

  6. Adaptation of a Weighted Regression Approach to Evaluate Water Quality Trends in an Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    To improve the description of long-term changes in water quality, we adapted a weighted regression approach to analyze a long-term water quality dataset from Tampa Bay, Florida. The weighted regression approach, originally developed to resolve pollutant transport trends in rivers...

  7. To Weight or Not to Weight? Balancing Influence of Initial Items in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hua-Hua; Ying, Zhiliang

    2008-01-01

    It has been widely reported that in computerized adaptive testing some examinees may get much lower scores than they would normally if an alternative paper-and-pencil version were given. The main purpose of this investigation is to quantitatively reveal the cause for the underestimation phenomenon. The logistic models, including the 1PL, 2PL, and…

  8. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Statistics on the production, consumption, cost, trade, and government stockpile of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are provided. The outlook for the industrial diamond market is also considered.

  9. Moment preserving adaptive particle weights using octree velocity distributions for PIC simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Robert Scott; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2012-11-27

    The ratio of computational to physical particles is of primary concern to statistical particle based simulations such as DSMC and PIC. An adaptive computational particle weight algorithm is presented that conserves mass, momentum, and energy. This algorithm is then enhanced with an octree adaptive mesh in velocity space to mitigate artificial thermalization. The new octree merge is compared to a merge that randomly selects merge partners for a bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution. Results for crossing beams in a fixed potential well along with an electrostatic PIC version with and without MCC collisions based ionizing breakdown show the advantages of the merge algorithm to both fixed particle weights and randomly selected merge partners.

  10. An Efficient Adaptive Weighted Switching Median Filter for Removing High Density Impulse Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Madhu S.; Ameera Mol, P. M.

    2014-09-01

    Restoration of images corrupted by impulse noise is a very active research area in image processing. In this paper, an Efficient Adaptive Weighted Switching Median filter for restoration of images that are corrupted by high density impulse noise is proposed. The filtering is performed as a two phase process—a detection phase followed by a filtering phase. In the proposed method, noise detection is done by HEIND algorithm proposed by Duan et al. The filtering algorithm is then applied to the pixels which are detected as noisy by the detection algorithm. All uncorrupted pixels in the image are left unchanged. The filtering window size is chosen adaptively depending on the local noise distribution around each corrupted pixels. Noisy pixels are replaced by a weighted median value of uncorrupted pixels in the filtering window. The weight value assigned to each uncorrupted pixels depends on its closeness to the central pixel.

  11. Adaptive thermogenesis in human body weight regulation: more of a concept than a measurable entity?

    PubMed

    Dulloo, A G; Jacquet, J; Montani, J-P; Schutz, Y

    2012-12-01

    According to Lavoisier, 'Life is combustion'. But to what extent humans adapt to changes in food intake through adaptive thermogenesis--by turning down the rate of heat production during energy deficit (so as to conserve energy) or turning it up during overnutrition (so as to dissipate excess calories)--has been one of the most controversial issues in nutritional sciences over the past 100 years. The debate nowadays is not whether adaptive thermogenesis exists or not, but rather about its quantitative importance in weight homoeostasis and its clinical relevance to the pathogenesis and management of obesity. Such uncertainties are likely to persist in the foreseeable future primarily because of limitations to unobtrusively measure changes in energy expenditure and body composition with high enough accuracy and precision, particularly when even small inter-individual variations in thermogenesis can, in dynamic systems and over the long term, be important in the determining weight maintenance in some and obesity and weight regain in others. This paper reviews the considerable body of evidence, albeit fragmentary, suggesting the existence of quantitatively important adaptive thermogenesis in several compartments of energy expenditure in response to altered food intake. It then discusses the various limitations that lead to over- or underestimations in its assessment, including definitional and semantics, technical and methodological, analytical and statistical. While the role of adaptive thermogenesis in human weight regulation is likely to remain more a concept than a strictly 'quantifiable' entity in the foreseeable future, the evolution of this concept continues to fuel exciting hypothesis-driven mechanistic research which contributes to advance knowledge in human metabolism and which is bound to result in improved strategies for the management of a healthy body weight.

  12. Diamonds in detonation soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, N. Roy; Phillips, Dave; Johnson, J. D.; Volk, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Diamonds 4 to 7 nm in diameter have been identified and partially isolated from soot formed in detonations of carbon-forming composite explosives. The morphology of the soot has been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the identity of the diamond has been established by the electron diffraction pattern of the TEM samples and by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the isolated solid. Graphite is also present in the form of ribbons of turbostatic structure with a thickness of 2 to 4 nm. A fraction, about 25 percent of the soot by weight, was recovered from the crude soot after oxidation of the graphite with fuming perchloric acid. This fraction showed a distinct XRD pattern of diamond and the diffuse band of amorphous carbon. The IR spectrum of these diamonds closely matches that of diamonds recovered from meteorites (Lewis et al., 1987), perhaps indicating similar surface properties after the oxidation. If these diamonds are produced in the detonation itself or during the initial expansion, they exhibit a phenomenal crystal growth rate (5 nm/0.00001 s equal 1.8 m/hr) in a medium with a very low hydrogen/carbon ratio. Because the diamonds will be carried along with the expanding gases, they will be accelerated to velocities approaching 8 km/s.

  13. Stereo matching based on adaptive support-weight approach in RGB vector space.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yingnan; Zhao, Yan; Chen, Hexin

    2012-06-01

    Gradient similarity is a simple, yet powerful, data descriptor which shows robustness in stereo matching. In this paper, a RGB vector space is defined for stereo matching. Based on the adaptive support-weight approach, a matching algorithm, which uses the pixel gradient similarity, color similarity, and proximity in RGB vector space to compute the corresponding support-weights and dissimilarity measurements, is proposed. The experimental results are evaluated on the Middlebury stereo benchmark, showing that our algorithm outperforms other stereo matching algorithms and the algorithm with gradient similarity can achieve better results in stereo matching. PMID:22695592

  14. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Estimated 2011 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2011, natural industrial diamonds were produced in more than 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 13 countries. About 98 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. China is the world's leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by Russia and the United States.

  15. Diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopedic applications: Tribological behaviors of vacuum arc diamond-like carbon-coated titanium alloy against medical-grade ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianzong

    An extensive and detailed investigation of tribological behaviors of vacuum arc carbon coated Ti6Al4V against medical grade ultra high molecular weight polyethylene were conducted in this work in order to investigate the potential use of diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopedic applications. Further, the gas plasma sterilization and surface modification technique were evaluated as an alternative to the currently used gamma-radiation technique which has previously shown degradation effects on the mechanical properties of the UHMWPE. In addition, an emerging polymer surface modification technique using high-energy ion-implantation is explored to modify the surface of the UHMWPE for improved wear performance. The experiments were performed using a standard pin-on-disk wear tester under both dry and distilled water lubricated condition. The evolution of friction and wear processes are interpreted in the context of in situ recorded coefficient of friction and microscopic images of worn surfaces. Sliding wear tests demonstrated the existence of two distinct friction and wear regimes which comprise physically different dominant mechanisms: an adhesive and abrasive mechanism activated early in the run-in stage, followed by fatigue processes which developed later microscopically in the (quasi) steady-state sliding stage. The effects of surface roughness, distilled water lubricant, coating structure, polymer sterilization and surface modification on the tribological behaviors are presented and discussed in light of these results. Explanations based on theories of sliding contact stress fields, temperature profiles, as well as lubrication and coating fracture mechanics are presented to discuss and support the experimental results. It is revealed that, largely depending on material structures and surface roughness of both articulating components, significantly improved friction and wear performance can be achieved by optimal design of their process

  16. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was 630 million carats. Natural industrial diamond deposits were found in more than 35 countries. Synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries. More than 81% of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States.

  17. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.44 billion carats in 2010. Natural industrial diamond deposits have been found in more than 35 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries.

  18. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated 2012 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2012, natural industrial diamonds were produced in at least 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 12 countries. About 99 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Belarus, China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. During 2012, China was the world’s leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by the United States and Russia. In 2012, the two U.S. synthetic producers, one in Pennsylvania and the other in Ohio, had an estimated output of 103 million carats, valued at about $70.6 million. This was an estimated 43.7 million carats of synthetic diamond bort, grit, and dust and powder with a value of $14.5 million combined with an estimated 59.7 million carats of synthetic diamond stone with a value of $56.1 million. Also in 2012, nine U.S. firms manufactured polycrystalline diamond (PCD) from synthetic diamond grit and powder. The United States government does not collect or maintain data for either domestic PCD producers or domestic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond producers for quantity or value of annual production. Current trade and consumption quantity data are not available for PCD or for CVD diamond. For these reasons, PCD and CVD diamond are not included in the industrial diamond quantitative data reported here.

  19. Regularized estimate of the weight vector of an adaptive antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolayev, V. T.; Flaksman, A. G.; Sorokin, I. S.

    2013-02-01

    We consider an adaptive antenna array (AAA) with the maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the output. The antenna configuration is assumed to be arbitrary. A rigorous analytical solution for the optimal weight vector of the AAA is obtained if the input process is defined by the noise correlation matrix and the useful-signal vector. On the basis of this solution, the regularized estimate of the weight vector is derived by using a limited number of input noise samples, which can be either greater or smaller than the number of array elements. Computer simulation results of adaptive signal processing indicate small losses in the SNR compared with the optimal SNR value. It is shown that the computing complexity of the proposed estimate is proportional to the number of noise samples, the number of external noise sources, and the squared number of array elements.

  20. Adaptive smoothing of multi-shell diffusion weighted magnetic resonance data by msPOAS

    PubMed Central

    Becker, S.M.A.; Tabelow, K.; Mohammadi, S.; Weiskopf, N.; Polzehl, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel multi-shell position-orientation adaptive smoothing (msPOAS) method for diffusion weighted magnetic resonance data. Smoothing in voxel and diffusion gradient space is embedded in an iterative adaptive multiscale approach. The adaptive character avoids blurring of the inherent structures and preserves discontinuities. The simultaneous treatment of all q-shells improves the stability compared to single-shell approaches such as the original POAS method. The msPOAS implementation simplifies and speeds up calculations, compared to POAS, facilitating its practical application. Simulations and heuristics support the face validity of the technique and its rigorousness. The characteristics of msPOAS were evaluated on single and multi-shell diffusion data of the human brain. Significant reduction in noise while preserving the fine structure was demonstrated for diffusion weighted images, standard DTI analysis and advanced diffusion models such as NODDI. MsPOAS effectively improves the poor signal-to-noise ratio in highly diffusion weighted multi-shell diffusion data, which is required by recent advanced diffusion micro-structure models. We demonstrate the superiority of the new method compared to other advanced denoising methods. PMID:24680711

  1. Spacetime diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Daiqin; Ralph, T. C.

    2016-02-01

    We show that the particle-number distribution of diamond modes, modes that are localized in a finite spacetime region, are thermal for the Minkowski vacuum state of a massless scalar field, an analogue to the Unruh effect. The temperature of the diamond is inversely proportional to its size. An inertial observer can detect this thermal radiation by coupling to the diamond modes using an appropriate energy-scaled detector. We further investigate the correlations between various diamonds and find that entanglement between adjacent diamonds dominates.

  2. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. A review of the state of the global industrial diamond industry in 1999 is presented. World consumption of industrial diamond has increased annually in recent years, with an estimated 500 million carats valued between $650 million and $800 million consumed in 1999. In 1999, the U.S. was the world's largest market for industrial diamond and was also one of the world's main producers; the others were Ireland, Russia, and South Africa. Uses of industrial diamonds are discussed, and prices of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are reported.

  3. Consequences and risks of <1000-g birth weight for neuropsychological skills, achievement, and adaptive functioning.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H Gerry; Klein, Nancy; Drotar, Dennis; Schluchter, Mark; Hack, Maureen

    2006-12-01

    A cohort of 219 children with extremely low birth weight (<1000 g, extremely low birth weight [ELBW]) born from 1992 to 1995 was followed to mean age 8 years to evaluate outcomes and identify risk factors. We compared 204 of these children with 176 term-born normal birth weight (NBW) controls on neuropsychological skills, academic achievement, and adaptive behavior. The ELBW group had worse outcomes than the NBW on all measures. Within the ELBW group, lower scores on NEPSY tests of executive function and memory were related to <750 g birth weight, B (SE) = -0.93 (0.36), p =.010; cranial ultrasound abnormality, B = -1.03 (0.22), p =.002; postnatal steroid therapy, B = -1.00 (0.33), p =.003; and necrotizing enterocolitis, B = -2.26 (0.75), p =.008. A lower score on the Test of Motor Proficiency was related to chronic lung disease, B = -7.33 (1.98), p <.001. Neuropsychological skills mediated the effects of neonatal risk on achievement and adaptive functioning. The findings document the neuropsychological consequences of ELBW at school age in a recently born cohort and identify risks for adverse outcomes.

  4. Analysis of Modified SMI Method for Adaptive Array Weight Control. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, Ronald Louis

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive array is used to receive a desired signal in the presence of weak interference signals which need to be suppressed. A modified sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm controls the array weights. The modification leads to increased interference suppression by subtracting a fraction of the noise power from the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix. The modified algorithm maximizes an intuitive power ratio criterion. The expected values and variances of the array weights, output powers, and power ratios as functions of the fraction and the number of snapshots are found and compared to computer simulation and real experimental array performance. Reduced-rank covariance approximations and errors in the estimated covariance are also described.

  5. An adaptive weighted ensemble procedure for efficient computation of free energies and first passage rates.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Divesh; Bahar, Ivet

    2012-09-14

    We introduce an adaptive weighted-ensemble procedure (aWEP) for efficient and accurate evaluation of first-passage rates between states for two-state systems. The basic idea that distinguishes aWEP from conventional weighted-ensemble (WE) methodology is the division of the configuration space into smaller regions and equilibration of the trajectories within each region upon adaptive partitioning of the regions themselves into small grids. The equilibrated conditional∕transition probabilities between each pair of regions lead to the determination of populations of the regions and the first-passage times between regions, which in turn are combined to evaluate the first passage times for the forward and backward transitions between the two states. The application of the procedure to a non-trivial coarse-grained model of a 70-residue calcium binding domain of calmodulin is shown to efficiently yield information on the equilibrium probabilities of the two states as well as their first passage times. Notably, the new procedure is significantly more efficient than the canonical implementation of the WE procedure, and this improvement becomes even more significant at low temperatures.

  6. 16 CFR 23.17 - Misrepresentation of weight and “total weight.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and “total weight.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the weight of a diamond. (b) It is..., marking, or labeling to describe the weight of a diamond, unless the weight is also stated as decimal... weight for a diamond and is equivalent to 200 milligrams (1/5 gram). A point is one one hundredth...

  7. 16 CFR 23.17 - Misrepresentation of weight and “total weight.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and “total weight.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the weight of a diamond. (b) It is..., marking, or labeling to describe the weight of a diamond, unless the weight is also stated as decimal... weight for a diamond and is equivalent to 200 milligrams (1/5 gram). A point is one one hundredth...

  8. 16 CFR 23.17 - Misrepresentation of weight and “total weight.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and “total weight.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the weight of a diamond. (b) It is..., marking, or labeling to describe the weight of a diamond, unless the weight is also stated as decimal... weight for a diamond and is equivalent to 200 milligrams (1/5 gram). A point is one one hundredth...

  9. 16 CFR 23.17 - Misrepresentation of weight and “total weight.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and “total weight.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the weight of a diamond. (b) It is..., marking, or labeling to describe the weight of a diamond, unless the weight is also stated as decimal... weight for a diamond and is equivalent to 200 milligrams (1/5 gram). A point is one one hundredth...

  10. 16 CFR 23.17 - Misrepresentation of weight and “total weight.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and “total weight.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the weight of a diamond. (b) It is..., marking, or labeling to describe the weight of a diamond, unless the weight is also stated as decimal... weight for a diamond and is equivalent to 200 milligrams (1/5 gram). A point is one one hundredth...

  11. Weighted log-rank statistic to compare shared-path adaptive treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Kelley M; Wahed, Abdus S

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive treatment strategies (ATSs) more closely mimic the reality of a physician's prescription process where the physician prescribes a medication to his/her patient, and based on that patient's response to the medication, modifies the treatment. Two-stage randomization designs, more generally, sequential multiple assignment randomization trial designs, are useful to assess ATSs where the interest is in comparing the entire sequence of treatments, including the patient's intermediate response. In this paper, we introduce the notion of shared-path and separate-path ATSs and propose a weighted log-rank statistic to compare overall survival distributions of multiple two-stage ATSs, some of which may be shared-path. Large sample properties of the statistic are derived and the type I error rate and power of the test are compared with the standard log-rank test through simulation. PMID:23178734

  12. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    World production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 648 million carats in 2006, with 79 percent of the production coming from Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa, and the U.S. U.S. consumption was was an estimated 602 million carats, imports were over 391 million carats, and exports were about 83 million carats. About 87 percent of the industrial diamonds market uses synthetic diamonds, which are expected to become less expensive as technology improves and competition from low-cost producers increases.

  13. Intention to change dietary habits, and weight loss among Norwegian-Pakistani women participating in a culturally adapted intervention.

    PubMed

    Råberg Kjøllesdal, M K; Hjellset, V T; Bjørge, B; Holmboe-Ottesen, G; Wandel, M

    2011-12-01

    The aim was to explore the relationships between degree of participation in a culturally adapted lifestyle intervention and stages of change for healthy eating and weight loss among Pakistani immigrant women in Norway. The intervention lasted 7 months and included 198 women, randomized into control and intervention groups. The odds of losing weight from baseline to follow-up, and being in action stages of change (compared to pre-action stages) with regard to intake of amount and type of fat, sugar and white flour at follow-up, increased significantly with number of group sessions attended. Those in action stage of reducing intake of fat and increasing intake of vegetables, as well as of reducing weight, were significantly more likely than others to have experienced weight loss at follow-up. Participation in the culturally adapted intervention was related to increase in intentions to change dietary behaviours and to weight loss.

  14. [The artificial feeding with adapted milks of infants born with a very low body weight].

    PubMed

    Marinova, M; Rankova, S; Apostolova, S; Iarŭkova, N

    1989-01-01

    43 children, born with a weight of 690 to 1000 g, were observed for a period of 20 to 67 days during the first trimester after delivery. The children were divided into two groups in accordance with the feeding. 27 children of the first group received Humana 0; 26 children of the second group were fed with Bebe 0, sweetened with 5% of sugar for increased energy. All children received the adapted milks well. There were no manifestations of intolerance. The mean daily addition of weight was 28.5 g for children, fed with Humana 0 and 27.3 g for those fed with Bebe 0 and this was enough to assure optimal physical development of children. The children, fed with Bebe 0, received considerably larger amount of carbohydrates. The protein intake in both groups was almost equal. There were no considerable differences in respect to KEB. Higher intake of energy (p less than 0.01) was found in children, fed with Bebe 0, without gaining additional body mass.

  15. Adaptations to a diet-based weight-reducing programme in obese women resistant to weight loss.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, A; Lepage, C; Panahi, S; Couture, C; Drapeau, V

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess energy intake, resting metabolic rate (RMR), appetite sensations, eating behaviours and sleep duration and quality in obese women resistant to body weight loss when subjected to a diet-based weight-reducing programme. A pooled cohort of obese women (n = 75; aged 39 ± 8 years; body mass index: 33 ± 4 kg m(-2)) participated in a 12-16-week diet-based weight loss programme targeting a daily energy deficit of 500-700 kcal d(-1). Women were classified in tertiles a posteriori based on the response of their body weight to dietary supervision (high, moderate and low responders). Post-intervention, mean weight loss was 3.3 ± 2.8 kg and explained by the 2.9 ± 2.6 kg reduction in fat mass. Mean weight loss was 6.2 ± 1.6, 3.4 ± 0.6 and 0.2 ± 1.4 kg in participants classified in the high, middle and low tertiles, respectively. Women in the low tertile reduced their daily energy intake and susceptibility to hunger during the programme to a lesser extent than those in the high tertile and had higher fasting hunger in response to the dietary intervention. Women in the high tertile maintained their RMR, which was in contrast to the significant decrease predicted by their weight loss. They also reported a significant improvement in sleep quality and an increase in sleep duration compared with other tertiles. The differences in the response of body weight to dietary supervision may be explained, in part, by variations in energy intake, eating behaviours, appetite sensations and sleep duration and quality.

  16. Burst noise reduction of image by decimation and adaptive weighted median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Fumitaka; Meguro, Mitsuhiko; Hamada, Nozomu

    2000-12-01

    The removal of noise in image is one of the important issues, and useful as a preprocessing for edge detection, motion estimation and so on. Recently, many studies on the nonlinear digital filter for impulsive noise reduction have been reported. The median filter, the representative of the nonlinear filters, is very effective for removing impulsive noise and preserving sharp edge. In some cases, burst (i.e., successive) impulsive noise is added to image, and this type of noise is difficult to remove by using the median filter. In this paper, we propose an Adaptive Weighted Median (AWM) filter with Decimation (AWM-D filter) for burst noise reduction. This method can also be applied to recover large destructive regions, such as blotch and scratch. The proposed filter is an extension of the Decimated Median (DM) filter, which is useful for reducing successive impulsive noise. The DM filter can split long impulsive noise sequences into short ones, and remove burst noise in spite of the short filter window. Nevertheless, the DM filter also has two disadvantages. One is that the signals without added noise is unnecessary filtered. The other is that the position information in the window is not considered in the weight determinative process, as common in the median type filter. To improve detail-preserving property of the DM filter, we use the noise detection procedure and the AWM-D filter, which can be tuned by Least Mean Absolute (LMA) algorithm. The AWM-D filter preserves details more precisely than the median-type filter, because the AWM-D filter has the weights that can control the filter output. Through some simulations, the higher performance of the proposed filter is shown compared with the simple median, the WM filter, and the DM filter.

  17. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. Supply and demand data for industrial diamond are provided. Topics discussed are consumption, prices, imports and exports, government stockpiles, and the outlook for 2004.

  18. Diamond nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Beha, Katja; Wolfer, Marco; Becker, Merle C; Siyushev, Petr; Jamali, Mohammad; Batalov, Anton; Hinz, Christopher; Hees, Jakob; Kirste, Lutz; Obloh, Harald; Gheeraert, Etienne; Naydenov, Boris; Jakobi, Ingmar; Dolde, Florian; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Twittchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Dregely, Daniel; Giessen, Harald; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Nebel, Christoph E; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition. PMID:23365803

  19. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  20. Advanced Diamond Anvil Techniques (Customized Diamond Anvils)

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    A complete set of diamond-based fabrication tools now exists for making a wide range of different types of diamond anvils which are tailored for various high-P applications. Current tools include: CVD diamond deposition (making diamond); Diamond polishing, laser drilling, plasma etching (removal of diamond); and Lithography, 3D laser pantography (patterning features onto diamond); - Metal deposition (putting electrical circuits and metal masks onto diamond). Current applications include the following: Electrical Conductivity; Magnetic Susceptibility; and High-P/High-T. Future applications may include: NMR; Hall Effect; de Haas - Shubnikov (Fermi surface topology); Calorimetry; and thermal conductivity.

  1. Structure-adaptive CBCT reconstruction using weighted total variation and Hessian penalties

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qi; Sun, Nanbo; Sun, Tao; Wang, Jing; Tan, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of normal tissues to high radiation during cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging increases the risk of cancer and genetic defects. Statistical iterative algorithms with the total variation (TV) penalty have been widely used for low dose CBCT reconstruction, with state-of-the-art performance in suppressing noise and preserving edges. However, TV is a first-order penalty and sometimes leads to the so-called staircase effect, particularly over regions with smooth intensity transition in the reconstruction images. A second-order penalty known as the Hessian penalty was recently used to replace TV to suppress the staircase effect in CBCT reconstruction at the cost of slightly blurring object edges. In this study, we proposed a new penalty, the TV-H, which combines TV and Hessian penalties for CBCT reconstruction in a structure-adaptive way. The TV-H penalty automatically differentiates the edges, gradual transition and uniform local regions within an image using the voxel gradient, and adaptively weights TV and Hessian according to the local image structures in the reconstruction process. Our proposed penalty retains the benefits of TV, including noise suppression and edge preservation. It also maintains the structures in regions with gradual intensity transition more successfully. A majorization-minimization (MM) approach was designed to optimize the objective energy function constructed with the TV-H penalty. The MM approach employed a quadratic upper bound of the original objective function, and the original optimization problem was changed to a series of quadratic optimization problems, which could be efficiently solved using the Gauss-Seidel update strategy. We tested the reconstruction algorithm on two simulated digital phantoms and two physical phantoms. Our experiments indicated that the TV-H penalty visually and quantitatively outperformed both TV and Hessian penalties.

  2. Structure-adaptive CBCT reconstruction using weighted total variation and Hessian penalties

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qi; Sun, Nanbo; Sun, Tao; Wang, Jing; Tan, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of normal tissues to high radiation during cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging increases the risk of cancer and genetic defects. Statistical iterative algorithms with the total variation (TV) penalty have been widely used for low dose CBCT reconstruction, with state-of-the-art performance in suppressing noise and preserving edges. However, TV is a first-order penalty and sometimes leads to the so-called staircase effect, particularly over regions with smooth intensity transition in the reconstruction images. A second-order penalty known as the Hessian penalty was recently used to replace TV to suppress the staircase effect in CBCT reconstruction at the cost of slightly blurring object edges. In this study, we proposed a new penalty, the TV-H, which combines TV and Hessian penalties for CBCT reconstruction in a structure-adaptive way. The TV-H penalty automatically differentiates the edges, gradual transition and uniform local regions within an image using the voxel gradient, and adaptively weights TV and Hessian according to the local image structures in the reconstruction process. Our proposed penalty retains the benefits of TV, including noise suppression and edge preservation. It also maintains the structures in regions with gradual intensity transition more successfully. A majorization-minimization (MM) approach was designed to optimize the objective energy function constructed with the TV-H penalty. The MM approach employed a quadratic upper bound of the original objective function, and the original optimization problem was changed to a series of quadratic optimization problems, which could be efficiently solved using the Gauss-Seidel update strategy. We tested the reconstruction algorithm on two simulated digital phantoms and two physical phantoms. Our experiments indicated that the TV-H penalty visually and quantitatively outperformed both TV and Hessian penalties. PMID:27699100

  3. Conductivity image enhancement in MREIT using adaptively weighted spatial averaging filter

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), we reconstruct conductivity images using magnetic flux density data induced by externally injected currents. Since we extract magnetic flux density data from acquired MR phase images, the amount of measurement noise increases in regions of weak MR signals. Especially for local regions of MR signal void, there may occur excessive amounts of noise to deteriorate the quality of reconstructed conductivity images. In this paper, we propose a new conductivity image enhancement method as a postprocessing technique to improve the image quality. Methods Within a magnetic flux density image, the amount of noise varies depending on the position-dependent MR signal intensity. Using the MR magnitude image which is always available in MREIT, we estimate noise levels of measured magnetic flux density data in local regions. Based on the noise estimates, we adjust the window size and weights of a spatial averaging filter, which is applied to reconstructed conductivity images. Without relying on a partial differential equation, the new method is fast and can be easily implemented. Results Applying the novel conductivity image enhancement method to experimental data, we could improve the image quality to better distinguish local regions with different conductivity contrasts. From phantom experiments, the estimated conductivity values had 80% less variations inside regions of homogeneous objects. Reconstructed conductivity images from upper and lower abdominal regions of animals showed much less artifacts in local regions of weak MR signals. Conclusion We developed the fast and simple method to enhance the conductivity image quality by adaptively adjusting the weights and window size of the spatial averaging filter using MR magnitude images. Since the new method is implemented as a postprocessing step, we suggest adopting it without or with other preprocessing methods for application studies where conductivity

  4. Bayer patterned high dynamic range image reconstruction using adaptive weighting function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hee; Lee, Suk Ho; Song, Ki Sun; Kang, Moon Gi

    2014-12-01

    It is not easy to acquire a desired high dynamic range (HDR) image directly from a camera due to the limited dynamic range of most image sensors. Therefore, generally, a post-process called HDR image reconstruction is used, which reconstructs an HDR image from a set of differently exposed images to overcome the limited dynamic range. However, conventional HDR image reconstruction methods suffer from noise factors and ghost artifacts. This is due to the fact that the input images taken with a short exposure time contain much noise in the dark regions, which contributes to increased noise in the corresponding dark regions of the reconstructed HDR image. Furthermore, since input images are acquired at different times, the images contain different motion information, which results in ghost artifacts. In this paper, we propose an HDR image reconstruction method which reduces the impact of the noise factors and prevents ghost artifacts. To reduce the influence of the noise factors, the weighting function, which determines the contribution of a certain input image to the reconstructed HDR image, is designed to adapt to the exposure time and local motions. Furthermore, the weighting function is designed to exclude ghosting regions by considering the differences of the luminance and the chrominance values between several input images. Unlike conventional methods, which generally work on a color image processed by the image processing module (IPM), the proposed method works directly on the Bayer raw image. This allows for a linear camera response function and also improves the efficiency in hardware implementation. Experimental results show that the proposed method can reconstruct high-quality Bayer patterned HDR images while being robust against ghost artifacts and noise factors.

  5. Diamond Measuring Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulic, J.F.

    2000-01-27

    The fundamental goal of this project was to develop additional capabilities to the diamond measuring prototype, work out technical difficulties associated with the original device, and perform automated measurements which are accurate and repeatable. For this project, FM and T was responsible for the overall system design, edge extraction, and defect extraction and identification. AccuGem provided a lab and computer equipment in Lawrence, 3D modeling, industry expertise, and sets of diamonds for testing. The system executive software which controls stone positioning, lighting, focusing, report generation, and data acquisition was written in Microsoft Visual Basic 6, while data analysis and modeling were compiled in C/C++ DLLs. All scanning parameters and extracted data are stored in a central database and available for automated analysis and reporting. The Phase 1 study showed that data can be extracted and measured from diamond scans, but most of the information had to be manually extracted. In this Phase 2 project, all data required for geometric modeling and defect identification were automatically extracted and passed to a 3D modeling module for analysis. Algorithms were developed which automatically adjusted both light levels and stone focus positioning for each diamond-under-test. After a diamond is analyzed and measurements are completed, a report is printed for the customer which shows carat weight, summarizes stone geometry information, lists defects and their size, displays a picture of the diamond, and shows a plot of defects on a top view drawing of the stone. Initial emphasis of defect extraction was on identification of feathers, pinpoints, and crystals. Defects were plotted color-coded by industry standards for inclusions (red), blemishes (green), and unknown defects (blue). Diamonds with a wide variety of cut quality, size, and number of defects were tested in the machine. Edge extraction, defect extraction, and modeling code were tested for

  6. Robust dynamic myocardial perfusion CT deconvolution using adaptive-weighted tensor total variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Changfei; Zeng, Dong; Bian, Zhaoying; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Xinyu; Zhang, Hua; Lu, Lijun; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic myocardial perfusion computed tomography (MPCT) is a promising technique for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease by assessing the myocardial perfusion hemodynamic maps (MPHM). Meanwhile, the repeated scanning of the same region results in a relatively large radiation dose to patients potentially. In this work, we present a robust MPCT deconvolution algorithm with adaptive-weighted tensor total variation regularization to estimate residue function accurately under the low-dose context, which is termed `MPD-AwTTV'. More specifically, the AwTTV regularization takes into account the anisotropic edge property of the MPCT images compared with the conventional total variation (TV) regularization, which can mitigate the drawbacks of TV regularization. Subsequently, an effective iterative algorithm was adopted to minimize the associative objective function. Experimental results on a modified XCAT phantom demonstrated that the present MPD-AwTTV algorithm outperforms and is superior to other existing deconvolution algorithms in terms of noise-induced artifacts suppression, edge details preservation and accurate MPHM estimation.

  7. Steps Ahead: Adaptation of physical activity and dietary guidelines for reducing unhealthy weight gain in the Lower Misissippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of our study was to test the effectiveness of adapting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) (DG), with and without a physical activity (PA) component, in reducing weight gain in the Lower Mississippi Delta region (LMD) of the United States. A sample of 121 White and African-Americ...

  8. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer. PMID:27499762

  9. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer. PMID:27499762

  10. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer.

  11. An adaptive method with weight matrix as a function of the state to design the rotatory flexible system control law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Luiz C. G.; Bigot, P.

    2016-10-01

    One of the most well-known techniques of optimal control is the theory of Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR). This method was originally applied only to linear systems but has been generalized for non-linear systems: the State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) technique. One of the advantages of SDRE is that the weight matrix selection is the same as in LQR. The difference is that weights are not necessarily constant: they can be state dependent. Then, it gives an additional flexibility to design the control law. Many are applications of SDRE for simulation or real time control but generally SDRE weights are chosen constant so no advantage of this flexibility is taken. This work serves to show through simulation that state dependent weights matrix can improve SDRE control performance. The system is a non-linear flexible rotatory beam. In a brief first part SDRE theory will be explained and the non-linear model detailed. Then, influence of SDRE weight matrix associated with the state Q will be analyzed to get some insight in order to assume a state dependent law. Finally, these laws are tested and compared to constant weight matrix Q. Based on simulation results; one concludes showing the benefits of using an adaptive weight Q rather than a constant one.

  12. Low-dose leptin reverses skeletal muscle, autonomic, and neuroendocrine adaptations to maintenance of reduced weight

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Michael; Goldsmith, Rochelle; Bloomfield, Daniel; Magnano, Anthony; Weimer, Louis; Heymsfield, Steven; Gallagher, Dympna; Mayer, Laurel; Murphy, Ellen; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance of a reduced body weight is accompanied by decreased energy expenditure that is due largely to increased skeletal muscle work efficiency. In addition, decreased sympathetic nervous system tone and circulating concentrations of leptin, thyroxine, and triiodothyronine act coordinately to favor weight regain. These “weight-reduced” phenotypes are similar to those of leptin-deficient humans and rodents. We examined metabolic, autonomic, and neuroendocrine phenotypes in 10 inpatient subjects (5 males, 5 females [3 never-obese, 7 obese]) under 3 sets of experimental conditions: (a) maintaining usual weight by ingesting a liquid formula diet; (b) maintaining a 10% reduced weight by ingesting a liquid formula diet; and (c) receiving twice-daily subcutaneous doses of leptin sufficient to restore 8 am circulating leptin concentrations to pre–weight-loss levels and remaining on the same liquid formula diet required to maintain a 10% reduced weight. During leptin administration, energy expenditure, skeletal muscle work efficiency, sympathetic nervous system tone, and circulating concentrations of thyroxine and triiodothyronine returned to pre–weight-loss levels. These responses suggest that the weight-reduced state may be regarded as a condition of relative leptin insufficiency. Prevention of weight regain might be achievable by strategies relevant to reversing this leptin-insufficient state. PMID:16322796

  13. Diamonds: Exploration, mines and marketing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, George H.; Janse, A. J. A. (Bram)

    2009-11-01

    The beauty, value and mystique of exceptional quality diamonds such as the 603 carat Lesotho Promise, recovered from the Letseng Mine in 2006, help to drive a multi-billion dollar diamond exploration, mining and marketing industry that operates in some 45 countries across the globe. Five countries, Botswana, Russia, Canada, South Africa and Angola account for 83% by value and 65% by weight of annual diamond production, which is mainly produced by four major companies, De Beers, Alrosa, Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton (BHPB), which together account for 78% by value and 72% by weight of annual diamond production for 2007. During the last twelve years 16 new diamond mines commenced production and 4 re-opened. In addition, 11 projects are in advanced evaluation and may begin operations within the next five years. Exploration for diamondiferous kimberlites was still energetic up to the last quarter of 2008 with most work carried out in Canada, Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Botswana. Many kimberlites were discovered but no new economic deposits were outlined as a result of this work, except for the discovery and possible development of the Bunder project by Rio Tinto in India. Exploration methods have benefitted greatly from improved techniques of high resolution geophysical aerial surveying, new research into the geochemistry of indicator minerals and further insights into the formation of diamonds and the relation to tectonic/structural events in the crust and mantle. Recent trends in diamond marketing indicate that prices for rough diamonds and polished goods were still rising up to the last quarter of 2008 and subsequently abruptly sank in line with the worldwide financial crisis. Most analysts predict that prices will rise again in the long term as the gap between supply and demand will widen because no new economic diamond discoveries have been made recently. The disparity between high rough and polished prices and low share prices of publicly

  14. Diamond knife.

    PubMed

    Rowsey, J J; Balyeat, H D; Yeisley, K P

    1982-04-01

    We present a new diamond knife which allows for reasonably precise incisions in cornea or sclera. The knife may be ultrasonically cleaned and is sharper than any metal knife whose edge we have examined to date by scanning electron microscopy. The edge is approximately 0.1 micron in width, compared to 1-5 micron width edges of most metal knives. We feel that this prototype will allow investigators to recommend special modifications to the manufacturer of their own choice. PMID:6285246

  15. Diamond Tours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On April 24, a group traveling with Diamond Tours visited StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in South Mississippi. The trip marked Diamond Tours' return to StenniSphere since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29, 2005. About 25 business professionals from Georgia enjoyed the day's tour of America's largest rocket engine test complex, along with the many displays and exhibits at the museum. Before Hurricane Katrina, the nationwide company brought more than 1,000 visitors to StenniSphere each month. That contributed to more than 100,000 visitors from around the world touring the space center each year. In past years StenniSphere's visitor relations specialists booked Diamond Tours two or three times a week, averaging 40 to 50 people per visit. SSC was established in the 1960s to test the huge engines for the Saturn V moon rockets. Now 40 years later, the center tests every main engine for the space shuttle. SSC will soon begin testing the rocket engines that will power spacecraft carrying Americans back to the moon and on to Mars. For more information or to book a tour, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis/home/index.html and click on the StenniSphere logo; or call 800-237-1821 or 228-688-2370.

  16. Validation of self-reported weights and heights in the avoiding diabetes after pregnancy trial (ADAPT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials that test the effectiveness of mobile health-based weight loss programs are attractive to participants, funders, and researchers because of the low implementation cost, minimal participant burden, and the ability to recruit participants from longer distances. Collecting weight data from geographically dispersed participants is a challenge. Relying on participant self-report is one approach to data collection, but epidemiologic studies indicate that self-reported anthropometric data may be inaccurate. Methods We provided women enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of postpartum weight loss after gestational diabetes with a digital scale and training to collect and report weight via a web-based survey. To validate self-reported weights and heights, we visited 30 randomly selected women in their homes, with a reference scale and stadiometer, a mean of 34 days after the self-report. We ran linear regression models to identify characteristics that were associated with underreporting or overreporting of anthropometric measures. Results Of the 30 women we visited, 11 women (37%) were assigned to the weight loss intervention group and 19 women (63%) were in the control group. Mean age was 38.5 years (SD 4.5). The overall mean difference between participants’ self-reported weights and the weights obtained at their home visit was 0.70 kg (+1.92). Women assigned to the intervention group underreported their weight in comparison with the control group by 1.29 kg (95% CI −2.52, −0.06). The overall difference in collected to self-reported height was −0.56 cm (±1.91). No characteristics were associated with underreporting or overreporting of height. Conclusions Our research suggests that by providing a digital scale and developing a weight collection protocol, researchers can train women to collect and record their own study weights with reasonable validity. To achieve the level of validity required for clinical

  17. An Adaptive CBPR Approach to Create Weight Management Materials for a School-Based Health Center Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Andrew L.; Montoya, Carolyn; Davis, Sally; Wallerstein, Nina; Kong, Alberta S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. From our previous clinical work with overweight/obese youth, we identified the need for research to create an effective weight management intervention to address the growing prevalence of adolescent metabolic syndrome. Formative assessment through an adaptive community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach was conducted toward the development of a nutritional and physical activity (DVD) and clinician toolkit for a school-based health center (SBHC) weight management intervention. Methods. We first conducted parent and adolescent interviews on views and experiences about obesity while convening a community advisory council (CAC) recruited from two participating urban New Mexico high schools. Thematic findings from the interviews were analyzed with the CAC to develop culturally and developmentally appropriate intervention materials. Results. Themes from the parent and adolescent interviews included general barriers/challenges, factors influencing motivation, and change facilitators. The CAC and university-based research team reached consensus on the final content of nutrition and physical activity topics to produce a DVD and clinician toolkit through six monthly sessions. These materials used in the SBHC intervention resulted in a greater reduction of body mass index when compared to adolescents receiving standard care. Conclusions. Formative assessment using an adaptive CBPR approach resulted in the creation of culturally and age appropriate weight reduction materials that were acceptable to study participants. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00841334. PMID:23984053

  18. An Adaptive Spectrally Weighted Structure Tensor Applied to Tensor Anisotropic Nonlinear Diffusion for Hyperspectral Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin Quintero, Maider J.

    2013-01-01

    The structure tensor for vector valued images is most often defined as the average of the scalar structure tensors in each band. The problem with this definition is the assumption that all bands provide the same amount of edge information giving them the same weights. As a result non-edge pixels can be reinforced and edges can be weakened…

  19. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond.

    PubMed

    Field, J E

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of

  20. Dynamics of Adaptive Alleles in Divergently Selected Body Weight Lines of Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Mats E.; Johansson, Anna M.; Siegel, Paul B.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2013-01-01

    By studying genomic changes over time in populations subjected to strong artificial directional selection, we can gain insights to the dynamics of beneficial alleles originating from the founder population or emerging as novel mutations undergoing ongoing selection. The Virginia lines are a chicken resource population generated by long-term bi-directional, single-trait selection for juvenile body weight. We studied genome-wide allele frequency changes from generation 40 to 53 using genome-wide genotypes from directional and relaxed selection lines. Overall, there were small changes in allele frequencies at individual loci over the studied time period; but, on average, the changes were greater in lines with larger phenotypic changes. This is consistent with previous findings that much of the response to selection over the first 40 years of selection was attributable to utilization of standing genetic variation at many loci in the genome, indicating a mostly polygenic architecture for body weight. Over the course of the selection experiment, the largest phenotypic response to selection was observed in the high-weight selected line, and in this line we detected a single locus where the allele frequency changed rapidly during a late stage of the experiment. This locus likely contains a novel, beneficial mutation that appeared between generations 40 and 45 and was driven to fixation in 5 to 10 generations. This result illustrates the dependence of continued long-term selection response on standing genetic variation at many loci as well as strong, novel, beneficial mutations. PMID:24170737

  1. Image-adapted visually weighted quantization matrices for digital image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method for performing image compression that eliminates redundant and invisible image components is presented. The image compression uses a Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and each DCT coefficient yielded by the transform is quantized by an entry in a quantization matrix which determines the perceived image quality and the bit rate of the image being compressed. The present invention adapts or customizes the quantization matrix to the image being compressed. The quantization matrix comprises visual masking by luminance and contrast techniques and by an error pooling technique all resulting in a minimum perceptual error for any given bit rate, or minimum bit rate for a given perceptual error.

  2. Adapting a Database of Text Messages to a Mobile-Based Weight Loss Program: The Case of the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Behih, Nawal; Shahzad, Maahd; Anggraini, Aysha

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic. Qatar, a rapidly developing country in the Middle East, has seen a sharp increase in the prevalence of obesity. The increase can be attributed to several reasons, including sedentary lifestyles imposed by a harsh climate and the introduction of Western fast food. Mobile technologies have been used and studied as a technology to support individuals' weight loss. The authors have developed a mobile application that implements three strategies drawn from proven theories of behavioral change. The application is localized to the cultural context of its proposed users. The objective of this paper is to present a method through which we adapted the messaging content of a weight loss application to the context of its users while retaining an effective degree of automation. The adaptation addressed body image, eating and physical exercise habits, and regional/cultural needs. The paper discusses how surveying potential users can be used to build a profile of a target population, find common patterns, and then develop a database of text messages. The text messages are automated and sent to the users at specific times of day, as suggested by the survey results. PMID:24511311

  3. Adaptive-weighted total variation minimization for sparse data toward low-dose x-ray computed tomography image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Fan, Yi; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that by minimizing the total variation (TV) of the to-be-estimated image with some data and other constraints, piecewise-smooth x-ray computed tomography (CT) can be reconstructed from sparse-view projection data without introducing notable artifacts. However, due to the piecewise constant assumption for the image, a conventional TV minimization algorithm often suffers from over-smoothness on the edges of the resulting image. To mitigate this drawback, we present an adaptive-weighted TV (AwTV) minimization algorithm in this paper. The presented AwTV model is derived by considering the anisotropic edge property among neighboring image voxels, where the associated weights are expressed as an exponential function and can be adaptively adjusted by the local image-intensity gradient for the purpose of preserving the edge details. Inspired by the previously reported TV-POCS (projection onto convex sets) implementation, a similar AwTV-POCS implementation was developed to minimize the AwTV subject to data and other constraints for the purpose of sparse-view low-dose CT image reconstruction. To evaluate the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed by computer simulations and phantom experiments. The results show that the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm can yield images with several notable gains, in terms of noise-resolution tradeoff plots and full-width at half-maximum values, as compared to the corresponding conventional TV-POCS algorithm.

  4. Adaptive-weighted total variation minimization for sparse data toward low-dose x-ray computed tomography image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Fan, Yi; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that by minimizing the total variation (TV) of the to-be-estimated image with some data and other constraints, piecewise-smooth x-ray computed tomography (CT) can be reconstructed from sparse-view projection data without introducing notable artifacts. However, due to the piecewise constant assumption for the image, a conventional TV minimization algorithm often suffers from over-smoothness on the edges of the resulting image. To mitigate this drawback, we present an adaptive-weighted TV (AwTV) minimization algorithm in this paper. The presented AwTV model is derived by considering the anisotropic edge property among neighboring image voxels, where the associated weights are expressed as an exponential function and can be adaptively adjusted by the local image-intensity gradient for the purpose of preserving the edge details. Inspired by the previously reported TV-POCS (projection onto convex sets) implementation, a similar AwTV-POCS implementation was developed to minimize the AwTV subject to data and other constraints for the purpose of sparse-view low-dose CT image reconstruction. To evaluate the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed by computer simulations and phantom experiments. The results show that the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm can yield images with several notable gains, in terms of noise-resolution tradeoff plots and full-width at half-maximum values, as compared to the corresponding conventional TV-POCS algorithm.

  5. Toroidal plasma enhanced CVD of diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Zvanya, John Cullen, Christopher Morris, Thomas Krchnavek, Robert R.; Holber, William Basnett, Andrew Basnett, Robert; Hettinger, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    An inductively coupled toroidal plasma source is used as an alternative to microwave plasmas for chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The source, operating at a frequency of 400 kHz, synthesizes diamond films from a mixture of argon, methane, and hydrogen. The toroidal design has been adapted to create a highly efficient environment for diamond film deposition: high gas temperature and a short distance from the sample to the plasma core. Using a toroidal plasma geometry operating in the medium frequency band allows for efficient (≈90%) coupling of AC line power to the plasma and a scalable path to high-power and large-area operation. In test runs, the source generates a high flux of atomic hydrogen over a large area, which is favorable for diamond film growth. Using a deposition temperature of 900–1050 °C and a source to sample distance of 0.1–2.0 cm, diamond films are deposited onto silicon substrates. The results showed that the deposition rate of the diamond films could be controlled using the sample temperature and source to sample spacing. The results also show the films exhibit good-quality polycrystalline diamond as verified by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction results show that the samples exhibit diamond (111) and diamond (022) crystallites. The Raman results show that the sp{sup 3} peak has a narrow spectral width (FWHM 12 ± 0.5 cm{sup −1}) and that negligible amounts of the sp{sup 2} band are present, indicating good-quality diamond films.

  6. Multiscale image fusion using an adaptive similarity-based sensor weighting scheme and human visual system-inspired contrast measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nercessian, Shahan C.; Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of image fusion is to combine multiple source images obtained using different capture techniques into a single image to provide an effective contextual enhancement of a scene for human or machine perception. In practice, considerable value can be gained in the fusion of images that are dissimilar or complementary in nature. However, in such cases, global weighting schemes may not sufficiently weigh the contribution of the pertinent information of the source images, while existing adaptive schemes calculate weights based on the relative amounts of salient features, which can cause severe artifacting or inadequate local luminance in the fusion result. Accordingly, a new multiscale image fusion algorithm is proposed. The approximation coefficient fusion rule of the algorithm is based on a novel similarity based weighting scheme capable of providing improved fusion results when the input source images are either similar or dissimilar to each other. Moreover, the algorithm employs a new detail coefficient fusion rule integrating a parametric multiscale contrast measure. The parametric nature of the contrast measure allows the degree to which psychophysical laws of human vision hold to be tuned based on image-dependent characteristics. Experimental results illustrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm qualitatively and quantitatively.

  7. Adaptive weighted local textural features for illumination, expression, and occlusion invariant face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chen; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2014-03-01

    Biometric features such as fingerprints, iris patterns, and face features help to identify people and restrict access to secure areas by performing advanced pattern analysis and matching. Face recognition is one of the most promising biometric methodologies for human identification in a non-cooperative security environment. However, the recognition results obtained by face recognition systems are a affected by several variations that may happen to the patterns in an unrestricted environment. As a result, several algorithms have been developed for extracting different facial features for face recognition. Due to the various possible challenges of data captured at different lighting conditions, viewing angles, facial expressions, and partial occlusions in natural environmental conditions, automatic facial recognition still remains as a difficult issue that needs to be resolved. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to tackling some of these issues by analyzing the local textural descriptions for facial feature representation. The textural information is extracted by an enhanced local binary pattern (ELBP) description of all the local regions of the face. The relationship of each pixel with respect to its neighborhood is extracted and employed to calculate the new representation. ELBP reconstructs a much better textural feature extraction vector from an original gray level image in different lighting conditions. The dimensionality of the texture image is reduced by principal component analysis performed on each local face region. Each low dimensional vector representing a local region is now weighted based on the significance of the sub-region. The weight of each sub-region is determined by employing the local variance estimate of the respective region, which represents the significance of the region. The final facial textural feature vector is obtained by concatenating the reduced dimensional weight sets of all the modules (sub-regions) of the face image

  8. Diamond nonlinear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, B. J. M.; Bulu, I.; Venkataraman, V.; Deotare, P.; Lončar, M.

    2014-05-01

    Despite progress towards integrated diamond photonics, studies of optical nonlinearities in diamond have been limited to Raman scattering in bulk samples. Diamond nonlinear photonics, however, could enable efficient, in situ frequency conversion of single photons emitted by diamond's colour centres, as well as stable and high-power frequency microcombs operating at new wavelengths. Both of these applications depend crucially on efficient four-wave mixing processes enabled by diamond's third-order nonlinearity. Here, we have realized a diamond nonlinear photonics platform by demonstrating optical parametric oscillation via four-wave mixing using single-crystal ultrahigh-quality-factor (1 × 106) diamond ring resonators operating at telecom wavelengths. Threshold powers as low as 20 mW are measured, and up to 20 new wavelengths are generated from a single-frequency pump laser. We also report the first measurement of the nonlinear refractive index due to the third-order nonlinearity in diamond at telecom wavelengths.

  9. An adaptive diffusion-weighted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging scheme using the multistation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yeji

    2016-02-01

    Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a useful tool in oncology, which enables fast screening of disseminated tumors, lymph nodes or abscesses in the body. Multistation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or continuously moving table (CMT) MRI can be performed to overcome the limited field of view (FOV) of the magnet bore in whole-body DWI. Although CMT-MRI is regarded as a more advanced form of whole-body MRI, it cannot be widely used because most of the available MR systems are not equipped with the required hardware/software to perform CMT. Thus, optimizing the multistation approach for whole-body DWI, which is more widely available and easier to perform with the existing MR systems, is worthwhile. To improve the quality of DW images acquired with the multistation approach, we used different combinations of the built-in body RF coil and the phased-array surface RF coils for reception of the signals in whole-body DWI in this work. If different coils are selectively used in the extended FOV and appropriate reconstruction algorithms are exploited, the screening ability of whole-body DWI can be improved while minimizing the patient's discomfort and the artifacts due to physiological motions.

  10. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg; Fischer, Anne ,; Bennett, Jason; Lowe, Michael

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  11. Effects of additional external weight on posture and movement adaptations to fatigue induced by a repetitive pointing task.

    PubMed

    Cantú, Hiram; Emery, Kim; Côté, Julie N

    2014-06-01

    Fatigue and additional weight are risk factors of injuries by falls. Posture and trunk movement changes occur with fatigue induced by a repetitive pointing task. These changes facilitate arm movement but they may also jeopardize postural stability. When equilibrium is challenged, e.g. with additional weight, strategies that represent less postural threat could develop with fatigue. Nineteen participants performed two sessions (without, with 20% body weight added load (Load)) of a repetitive pointing task until shoulder fatigue (8 on Borg CR-10). There was no difference in time to fatigue between the two sessions. Anterior deltoid, biceps and upper trapezius muscle activity significantly increased with fatigue. Peak medial-lateral center-of-pressure (CoP) velocity and the mean vertical position of the reaching shoulder were both significantly lower with fatigue, though these fatigue-induced decreases were smaller with the added load. Reach-to-reach variability in CoP displacement significantly increased with fatigue, and more so with the added load. With fatigue, significant contralateral shifts occurred at the reaching shoulder and elbow joints, and ranges of motion (RoM) significantly increased at most joints but not at the center-of-mass (CoM). Conversely, Load main effects were mostly seen in CoM dependent measures. Significantly increased variability in mean and range values was seen with fatigue and Load in most of our kinematic and CoP dependent measures, with the most notable effects on CoM dependent measures. Findings suggest that the postural control system adapts to combined perturbing factors of fatigue and added load, likely by using parallel control mechanisms.

  12. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  13. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions. PMID:19745488

  14. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  15. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-04-19

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  16. The Nature of Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, George E.

    1997-10-01

    The paragon of physical perfection and a sparkling example of Earth's forces at work, the diamond has fascinated all realms of society, from starlets to scientists. The Nature of Diamonds is a comprehensive look at nature's most coveted gem. A handsome, large-format book, The Nature of Diamonds is an authoritative and richly-illustrated tribute to the diamond. Leading geologists, gemologists, physicists, and cultural observers cover every facet of the stone, from its formation in the depths of the Earth, its ascent to the surface, and its economic, regal, social, and technological roles. Cutting-edge research takes the reader to the frontiers of diamond exploration and exploitation, from the Arctic wastes to the laboratories where diamonds are created for massive road shredders that rip up and then re-create superhighways. Here also is an overview of cutting, from the rough stones in Roman rings to the highly-faceted stones we see today, and a glimpse into the business of diamonds. Finally, The Nature of Diamonds chronicles scientific and cultural history and explores the diamond as both a sacred and a social symbol, including a picture history of betrothal rings. Wide-ranging illustrations explain the geology of diamonds, chart the history of mining from its origins in India and Brazil through the diamond rush in South Africa and today's high-tech enterprises, and capture the brilliance and beauty of this extraordinary gem. _

  17. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  18. Raman spectroscopy of diamond and doped diamond.

    PubMed

    Prawer, Steven; Nemanich, Robert J

    2004-11-15

    The optimization of diamond films as valuable engineering materials for a wide variety of applications has required the development of robust methods for their characterization. Of the many methods used, Raman microscopy is perhaps the most valuable because it provides readily distinguishable signatures of each of the different forms of carbon (e.g. diamond, graphite, buckyballs). In addition it is non-destructive, requires little or no specimen preparation, is performed in air and can produce spatially resolved maps of the different forms of carbon within a specimen. This article begins by reviewing the strengths (and some of the pitfalls) of the Raman technique for the analysis of diamond and diamond films and surveys some of the latest developments (for example, surface-enhanced Raman and ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy) which hold the promise of providing a more profound understanding of the outstanding properties of these materials. The remainder of the article is devoted to the uses of Raman spectroscopy in diamond science and technology. Topics covered include using Raman spectroscopy to assess stress, crystalline perfection, phase purity, crystallite size, point defects and doping in diamond and diamond films.

  19. Nano-inclusions in diamond: Evidence of diamond genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, R.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Focused Ion Beam technology (FIB) for TEM sample preparation introduced approximately 15 years ago revolutionized the application of TEM in Geosciences. For the first time, FIB enabled cutting samples for TEM use from exactly the location we are interested in. Applied to diamond investigation, this technique revealed the presence of nanometre-sized inclusions in diamond that have been simply unknown before. Nanoinclusions in diamond from different location and origin such as diamonds from the Lower and Upper Mantle, metamorphic diamonds (Kazakhstan, Erzgebirge, Bohemia), diamonds from ophiolites (Tibet, Mongolia, Xinjiang, Ural Mountains), diamonds from igneous rocks (Hawaii, Kamchatka) and impact diamonds (Popigai Crater, Siberia) have been investigated during the last 15 years. The major conclusion of all these TEM studies is, that the nanoinclusions, their phases and phase composition together with the micro- and nanostructure evidence the origin of diamond and genesis of diamond. We can discriminate Five different mechanisms of diamond genesis in nature are observed: Diamond crystallized from a high-density fluid (Upper mantle and metamorphic diamond). Diamond crystallized from carbonatitic melt (Lower mantle diamond). Diamond precipitates from a metal alloy melt (Diamond from ophiolites). Diamond crystallized by gas phase condensation or chemical vapour condensation (CVD) (Lavas from Kamchatka, xenoliths in Hawaiian lavas). Direct transformation of graphite into diamond.

  20. Diamond detector - material science, design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaowei, Mengjia

    diamond valence-band maximum was determined by theoretically calculating the diamond density of states and applying cross section corrections. The diamond-platinum Schottky barrier height was lowered by 0.2 eV after thermal annealing, indicating annealing may increase carrier injection in diamond devices leading to photoconductive gain. In order to adapt our device to soft x-ray applications, efforts are made to develop a thin diamond position monitor for lowering device absorption. In section 5 we have discussed the fabrication and testing of thin diamond x-ray monitors made from diamond plates with nominal thickness of 30microm, which is 1/10th of the thickness of the diamonds we previously used. Calibration results of this detector are presented and discussed in comparison with thicker diamond sensors. Section 6 introduces our effort on the investigation of carrier loss mechanism in diamond detectors. Near edge responsivity in diamond x-ray detectors has been used to confirm the carrier loss mechanism as recombination due to diffusion into the incident electrode. We present a detailed study of the bias dependence of the diamond responsivity across the carbon k-edge. The carrier loss is modeled by incorporating a characteristic recombination length into the absorption model and is shown to agree well with Monte Carlo simulated carrier losses. In addition, nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (nUNCD) grown on the surface of a CVD single crystal diamond as an alternative contact to metal is tested in the similar measurements as the metal contact diamond. nUNCD has a much lower x-ray absorption than metal contacts and is designed to improve the performance of our device. This diamond is calibrated over a wide photon energy range from 0.2 keV to 28 keV, and compared with platinum coated diamond. Results of these studies will be presented and discussed in section 7. Future work has been proposed in the last section in improving the design and fabrication of diamond

  1. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, Ralph L.; Stewart, Delbert D.; Evans, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  2. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, R.L.; Stewart, D.D.; Evans, C.J.

    1992-04-14

    An apparatus is described for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond. 1 figs.

  3. Design and Implementation of a Smart LED Lighting System Using a Self Adaptive Weighted Data Fusion Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Wen-Tsai; Lin, Jia-Syun

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to develop a smart LED lighting system, which is remotely controlled by Android apps via handheld devices, e.g., smartphones, tablets, and so forth. The status of energy use is reflected by readings displayed on a handheld device, and it is treated as a criterion in the lighting mode design of a system. A multimeter, a wireless light dimmer, an IR learning remote module, etc. are connected to a server by means of RS 232/485 and a human computer interface on a touch screen. The wireless data communication is designed to operate in compliance with the ZigBee standard, and signal processing on sensed data is made through a self adaptive weighted data fusion algorithm. A low variation in data fusion together with a high stability is experimentally demonstrated in this work. The wireless light dimmer as well as the IR learning remote module can be instructed directly by command given on the human computer interface, and the reading on a multimeter can be displayed thereon via the server. This proposed smart LED lighting system can be remotely controlled and self learning mode can be enabled by a single handheld device via WiFi transmission. Hence, this proposal is validated as an approach to power monitoring for home appliances, and is demonstrated as a digital home network in consideration of energy efficiency.

  4. Push or Pull? The light-weight architecture of the Daphnia pulex carapace is adapted to withstand tension, not compression.

    PubMed

    Kruppert, Sebastian; Horstmann, Martin; Weiss, Linda C; Schaber, Clemens F; Gorb, Stanislav N; Tollrian, Ralph

    2016-10-01

    Daphnia (Crustacea, Cladocera) are well known for their ability to form morphological adaptations to defend against predators. In addition to spines and helmets, the carapace itself is a protective structure encapsulating the main body, but not the head. It is formed by a double layer of the integument interconnected by small pillars and hemolymphatic space in between. A second function of the carapace is respiration, which is performed through its proximal integument. The interconnecting pillars were previously described as providing higher mechanical stability against compressive forces. Following this hypothesis, we analyzed the carapace structure of D. pulex using histochemistry in combination with light and electron microscopy. We found the distal integument of the carapace to be significantly thicker than the proximal. The pillars appear fibrous with slim waists and broad, sometimes branched bases where they meet the integument layers. The fibrous structure and the slim-waisted shape of the pillars indicate a high capacity for withstanding tensile rather than compressive forces. In conclusion they are more ligaments than pillars. Therefore, we measured the hemolymphatic gauge pressure in D. longicephala and indeed found the hemocoel to have a pressure above ambient. Our results offer a new mechanistic explanation of the high rigidity of the daphniid carapace, which is probably the result of a light-weight construction consisting of two integuments bound together by ligaments and inflated by a hydrostatic hyper-pressure in the hemocoel. J. Morphol. 277:1320-1328, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27418246

  5. Diamond Smoothing Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Diamond smoothing tools have been proposed for use in conjunction with diamond cutting tools that are used in many finish-machining operations. Diamond machining (including finishing) is often used, for example, in fabrication of precise metal mirrors. A diamond smoothing tool according to the proposal would have a smooth spherical surface. For a given finish machining operation, the smoothing tool would be mounted next to the cutting tool. The smoothing tool would slide on the machined surface left behind by the cutting tool, plastically deforming the surface material and thereby reducing the roughness of the surface, closing microcracks and otherwise generally reducing or eliminating microscopic surface and subsurface defects, and increasing the microhardness of the surface layer. It has been estimated that if smoothing tools of this type were used in conjunction with cutting tools on sufficiently precise lathes, it would be possible to reduce the roughness of machined surfaces to as little as 3 nm. A tool according to the proposal would consist of a smoothing insert in a metal holder. The smoothing insert would be made from a diamond/metal functionally graded composite rod preform, which, in turn, would be made by sintering together a bulk single-crystal or polycrystalline diamond, a diamond powder, and a metallic alloy at high pressure. To form the spherical smoothing tip, the diamond end of the preform would be subjected to flat grinding, conical grinding, spherical grinding using diamond wheels, and finally spherical polishing and/or buffing using diamond powders. If the diamond were a single crystal, then it would be crystallographically oriented, relative to the machining motion, to minimize its wear and maximize its hardness. Spherically polished diamonds could also be useful for purposes other than smoothing in finish machining: They would likely also be suitable for use as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, unlubricated sliding-fit bearing inserts.

  6. A feature extraction method of the particle swarm optimization algorithm based on adaptive inertia weight and chaos optimization for Brillouin scattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Zhao, Yu; Fu, Xinghu; Xu, Jinrui

    2016-10-01

    A novel particle swarm optimization algorithm based on adaptive inertia weight and chaos optimization is proposed for extracting the features of Brillouin scattering spectra. Firstly, the adaptive inertia weight parameter of the velocity is introduced to the basic particle swarm algorithm. Based on the current iteration number of particles and the adaptation value, the algorithm can change the weight coefficient and adjust the iteration speed of searching space for particles, so the local optimization ability can be enhanced. Secondly, the logical self-mapping chaotic search is carried out by using the chaos optimization in particle swarm optimization algorithm, which makes the particle swarm optimization algorithm jump out of local optimum. The novel algorithm is compared with finite element analysis-Levenberg Marquardt algorithm, particle swarm optimization-Levenberg Marquardt algorithm and particle swarm optimization algorithm by changing the linewidth, the signal-to-noise ratio and the linear weight ratio of Brillouin scattering spectra. Then the algorithm is applied to the feature extraction of Brillouin scattering spectra in different temperatures. The simulation analysis and experimental results show that this algorithm has a high fitting degree and small Brillouin frequency shift error for different linewidth, SNR and linear weight ratio. Therefore, this algorithm can be applied to the distributed optical fiber sensing system based on Brillouin optical time domain reflection, which can effectively improve the accuracy of Brillouin frequency shift extraction.

  7. Synthesizing Diamond from Liquid Feedstock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua

    2005-01-01

    A relatively economical method of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been developed for synthesizing diamond crystals and films. Unlike prior CVD methods for synthesizing diamond, this method does not require precisely proportioned flows of compressed gas feedstocks or the use of electrical discharges to decompose the feedstocks to obtain free radicals needed for deposition chemical reactions. Instead, the feedstocks used in this method are mixtures of common organic liquids that can be prepared in advance, and decomposition of feedstock vapors is effected simply by heating. The feedstock used in this method is a solution comprising between 90 and 99 weight percent of methanol and the balance of one or more other oxyhydrocarbons that could include ethanol, isopropanol, and/or acetone. This mixture of compounds is chosen so that dissociation of molecules results in the desired proportions of carbon-containing radicals (principally, CH3) and of OH, H, and O radicals. Undesirably, the CVD temperature and pressure conditions thermodynamically favor the growth of graphite over the growth of diamond. The H radicals are desirable because they help to stabilize the growing surface of diamond by shifting the thermodynamic balance toward favoring the growth of diamond. The OH and O radicals are desirable because they preferentially etch graphite and other non-diamond carbon, thereby helping to ensure the net deposition of pure diamond. The non-methanol compounds are included in the solution because (1) methanol contains equal numbers of C and O atoms; (2) an excess of C over O is needed to obtain net deposition of diamond; and (3) the non-methanol molecules contain multiple carbon atoms for each oxygen atom and thus supply the needed excess carbon A typical apparatus used in this method includes a reservoir containing the feedstock liquid and a partially evacuated stainless-steel reaction chamber. The reservoir is connected to the chamber via tubing and a needle valve or

  8. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  9. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    DOEpatents

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  10. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  11. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Messier, R.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  12. A procedure for weighted summation of the derivatives of reflection coefficients in adaptive Schur filter with application to fault detection in rolling element bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Ryszard; Zimroz, Radoslaw

    2013-07-01

    A procedure for feature extraction using adaptive Schur filter for damage detection in rolling element bearings is proposed in the paper. Damaged bearings produce impact signals (shocks) related with local change (loss) of stiffness in pairs: inner/outer race-rolling element. If significant disturbances do not occur (i.e. signal to noise ratio is sufficient), diagnostics is not very complicated and usually envelope analysis is used. Unfortunately, in most industrial examples, these impulsive contributions in vibration are completely masked by noise or other high energy sources. Moreover, impulses may have time varying amplitudes caused by transmission path, load and properties of noise changing in time. Thus, in order to extract time varying signal of interest, the solution would be an adaptive one. The proposed approach is based on the normalized exact least-square time-variant lattice filter (adaptive Schur filter). It is characterized by an extremely fast start-up performance, excellent convergence behavior, and fast parameter tracking capability, making this approach interesting. Schur adaptive filter consists of P sections, estimating, among others, time-varying reflection coefficients (RCs). In this paper it is proposed to use RCs and their derivatives as diagnostic features. However, it is not convenient to analyze simultaneously P signals for P sections, so instead of these, weighted sum of derivatives of RCs can be used. The key question is how to find these weight values for summation procedure. An original contributions are: application of Schur filter to bearings vibration processing, proposal of several features that can be used for detection and mentioned procedure of weighted summation of signal from sections of Schur filter. The method of signal processing is well-adapted for analysis of the non-stationary time-series, so it sounds very promising for diagnostics of machines working in time varying load/speed conditions.

  13. Chaos control of the brushless direct current motor using adaptive dynamic surface control based on neural network with the minimum weights

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shaohua; Wu, Songli; Gao, Ruizhen

    2015-07-15

    This paper investigates chaos control for the brushless DC motor (BLDCM) system by adaptive dynamic surface approach based on neural network with the minimum weights. The BLDCM system contains parameter perturbation, chaotic behavior, and uncertainty. With the help of radial basis function (RBF) neural network to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, the adaptive law is established to overcome uncertainty of the control gain. By introducing the RBF neural network and adaptive technology into the dynamic surface control design, a robust chaos control scheme is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all signals in the closed-loop system are globally uniformly bounded, and the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. Simulation results are provided to show that the proposed approach works well in suppressing chaos and parameter perturbation.

  14. Fabrication of diamond shells

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, Alex V.; Biener, Juergen; Wild, Christoph; Woerner, Eckhard

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for fabricating diamond shells is introduced. The fabrication of such shells is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on predetermined mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removal of the mandrel by an etch process. The resultant shells of the present invention can be configured with a surface roughness at the nanometer level (e.g., on the order of down to about 10 nm RMS) on a mm length scale, and exhibit excellent hardness/strength, and good transparency in the both the infra-red and visible. Specifically, a novel process is disclosed herein, which allows coating of spherical substrates with optical-quality diamond films or nanocrystalline diamond films.

  15. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  16. Diamond Ranch High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betsky, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Highlights award-winning Diamond Ranch High School (California) that was designed and built on a steep site around Los Angeles considered unsatisfactory for building due to its unstable soils. Building organization is discussed, and photos are provided. (GR)

  17. Synthesis of diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, M. F.; Rasquin, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    Shock wave transmitted through a solid exponential horn generates heat and pressure to convert part of a charge of graphite to diamonds. The shock wave is generated in the apparatus by a complex of magnetic fields and eddy currents.

  18. California: Diamond Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... County is billed as the largest earthworks construction project in U.S. history. Construction began in 1995 and involved 31 million ... water storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against ...

  19. PROCESS FOR COLORING DIAMONDS

    DOEpatents

    Dugdale, R.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for coloring substantially colorless diamonds in the blue to blue-green range and comprises the steps of irradiating the colorless diamonds with electrons having an energy within the range 0.5 to 2 Mev to obtain an integrated electron flux of between 1 and 2 x 10/sup 18/ thc diamonds may be irradiated 1 hr when they take on a blue color with a slight green tint: After being heated at about 500 deg C for half an hour they become pure blue. Electrons within this energy range contam sufficient energy to displace the diamond atoms from their normal lattice sites into interstitial sites, thereby causing the color changes.

  20. High-mobility diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstrass, Maurice I.

    1994-04-01

    Recent improvements in the CVD diamond deposition process have made possible the fabrication of diamond photoconductive diodes with carrier mobility and lifetime exceeding the values typical of natural gemstones. One of the more surprising recent results is that the best room-temperature carrier properties have been measured on polycrystalline diamond films. The combined electron- hole mobility, as measured by transient photoconductivity at low carrier densities, is 4000 square centimeters per volt per second at electric field of 200 volts per centimeter and is comparable to that of the best single-crystal IIa natural diamonds. Carrier lifetimes measured under the same conditions are 150 picoseconds for the CVD diamond films. The collection distance within the diamond films, at the highest applied fields, is comparable to the average film grain size, indicative of little or no carrier scattering at grain boundaries. A comparison of SIMS measurements with electrical results suggest that impurity incorporation in the near grain boundary regions are responsible for controlling the carrier mobility.

  1. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  2. Diamond Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175° C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin (˜1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  3. Colour adaptation modifies the long-wave versus middle-wave cone weights and temporal phases in human luminance (but not red-green) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Stromeyer, C F; Chaparro, A; Tolias, A S; Kronauer, R E

    1997-02-15

    1. The human luminance (LUM) mechanism detects rapid flicker and motion, responding to a linear sum of contrast signals, L' and M', from the long-wave (L) and middle-wave (M) cones. The red-green mechanism detects hue variations, responding to a linear difference of L' and M' contrast signals. 2. The two detection mechanisms were isolated to assess how chromatic adaptation affects summation of L' and M' signals in each mechanism. On coloured background (from blue to red), we measured, as a function of temporal frequency, both the relative temporal phase of the L' and M' signals producing optimal summation and the relative L' and M' contrast weights of the signals (at the optimal phase for summation). 3. Within the red-green mechanism at 6 Hz, the phase shift between the L' and M' signals was negligible on each coloured field, and the L' and M' contrast weights were equal and of opposite sign. 4. Relative phase shifts between the L' and M' signals in the LUM mechanism were markedly affected by adapting field colour. For stimuli of 1 cycle deg-1 and 9 Hz, the temporal phase shift was zero on a green-yellow field (approximately 570 nm). On an orange field, the L' signal lagged M' by as much as 70 deg phase while on a green field M' lagged L' by as much as 70 deg. The asymmetric phase shift about yellow adaptation reveals a spectrally opponent process which controls the phase shift. The phase shift occurs at an early site, for colour adaptation of the other eye had no effect, and the phase shift measured monocularly was identical for flicker and motion, thus occurring before the motion signal is extracted (this requires an extra delay). 5. The L' versus M' phase shift in the LUM mechanism was generally greatest at intermediate temporal frequencies (4-12 Hz) and was small at high frequencies (20-25 Hz). The phase shift was greatest at low spatial frequencies and strongly reduced at high spatial frequencies (5 cycle deg-1), indicating that the receptive field surround of

  4. The Diamond Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, Robert M.

    1999-08-01

    Since time immemorial, we have treasured diamonds for their exquisite beauty and unrivaled hardness. Yet, most of the earth's diamonds lie deep underground and totally unaccessible to us--if only we knew how to fabricate them! In The Diamond Makers Robert Hazen vividly recounts the very human desire to exceed nature and create a synthetic diamond. Spanning centuries of ground-breaking science, instances of bitter rivalry, cases of outright fraud and self-delusion, Hazen blends drama and science to reveal the extraordinary technological advances and devastating failures of the diamond industry. Along the way, readers will be introduced to the brilliant, often eccentric and controversial, pioneers of high-pressure research who have harnessed crushing pressures and scorching temperatures to transform almost any carbon-rich material, from road tar to peanut butter, into the most prized of all gems. Robert M. Hazen is the author of fifteen books, including the bestseller, Science Matters: Achieving Scientific Literacy, which he wrote with James Trefil. Dr. Hazen has won numerous awards for his research and scientific writing.

  5. Diamond-Cutter Drill Bits

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Geothermal Energy Program Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies Diamond-Cutter Drill Bits Diamond-cutter drill bits cut through tough rock quicker, reducing the cost of drilling for energy resources The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contributed markedly to the geothermal, oil, and gas industries through the development of the advanced polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drill bit. Introduced in the 1970s by General Electric Company (GE), the PDC bit uses thin, diamond layers bonded to t

  6. Diamond collecting in northern Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of numerous diamond-bearing kimberlite diatremes in the N Front Range of Colorado and Wyoming is of both scientific and economic interest. Species recovered from heavy-mineral concentrates include Cr-diopside, spinel, Mg-ilmenite, pyrope and diamond. A nodule tentatively identified as a graphite-diamond eclogite was also found. -G.W.R.

  7. Making Diamond in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Herbert

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the graphite to diamond transformation and a phase diagram for carbon. Describes high temperature-higher pressure experimental apparatus and growth of diamonds from seed crystals. Reviews properties of the diamond which suggest uses for the synthetic product. Illustrations with text. (GH)

  8. Process for making diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasquin, J. R.; Estes, M. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of a device and process for making industrial diamonds. The device is composed of an exponential horn tapering from a large end to a small end, with a copper plate against the large end. A magnetic hammer abuts the copper plate. The copper plate and magnetic hammer function together to create a shock wave at the large end of the horn. As the wave propagates to the small end, the extreme pressure and temperature caused by the wave transforms the graphite, present in an anvil pocket at the small end, into diamonds.

  9. Dosimetry with diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, G.; Marino, C.; Silvestri, F.; Lavagno, A.; Truc, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present the dosimetry analysis in terms of stability and repeatability of the signal and dose rate dependence of a synthetic single crystal diamond grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique. The measurements carried out by 5 MeV X-ray photons beam show very promising results, even if the dose rate detector response points out that the charge trapping centers distribution is not uniform inside the crystal volume. This handicap that affects the detectors performances, must be ascribed to the growing process. Synthetic single crystal diamonds could be a valuable alternative to air ionization chambers for quality beam control and for intensity modulated radiation therapy beams dosimetry.

  10. Systematic review of behavioral interventions with culturally-adapted strategies to improve diet and weight outcomes in African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Angela; Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa M.; Odoms-Young, Angela M.; Stolley, Melinda R.; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral interventions incorporating features that are culturally salient to African-American women have emerged as one approach to address the high rates of obesity in this group. Yet, the systematic evaluation of this research is lacking. This review identified culturally-adapted strategies reported in behavioral interventions using a prescribed framework and examined the effectiveness of these interventions for diet and weight outcomes among African-American women. Publications from January 1, 1990 through December 31, 2012 were retrieved from four databases, yielding 28 interventions. Seventeen of 28 studies reported significant improvements in diet and/or weight change outcomes in treatment over comparison groups. The most commonly identified strategies reported were ‘socio-cultural’ (reflecting a group’s values and beliefs) and ‘constituent-involving’ (drawing from a group’s experiences). Studies with significant findings commonly reported ‘constituent-involving’ strategies during the formative phases of the intervention. Involving constituents early on may uncover key attributes of a target group and contribute to a greater understanding of the heterogeneity that exists even within racial/ethnic groups. Available evidence does not, however, explain how culturally-adapted strategies specifically influence outcomes. Greater attention to defining and measuring cultural variables and linking them to outcomes or related mediators are important next steps. PMID:25196407

  11. Fluidized bed deposition of diamond

    DOEpatents

    Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Anderson, Wallace E.; Valone, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for coating a substrate with diamond or diamond-like material including maintaining a substrate within a bed of particles capable of being fluidized, the particles having substantially uniform dimensions and the substrate characterized as having different dimensions than the bed particles, fluidizing the bed of particles, and depositing a coating of diamond or diamond-like material upon the substrate by chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor gas mixture, the precursor gas mixture introduced into the fluidized bed under conditions resulting in excitation mechanisms sufficient to form the diamond coating.

  12. Carbonado: natural polycrystalline diamond.

    PubMed

    Trueb, L F; De Wys, E C

    1969-08-22

    Carbonados are porous aggregates of mostly xenomorphic diamond crystallites ranging in diameter from a fraction of a micron to over 20 microns. Crystalline inclusions (up to 3 percent) occur in the pores of the crystallites and consist mainly of orthoclase and small amounts of other igneous, metamorphic, and secondary minerals. PMID:17742270

  13. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  14. DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BOHON, J.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; RAO, T.; WU, Q.

    2007-11-26

    High-average-current linear electron accelerators require photoinjectors capable of delivering tens to hundreds of mA average current, with peak currents of hundreds of amps. Standard photocathodes face significant challenges in meeting these requirements, and often have short operational lifetimes in an accelerator environment. We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission amplifiers for photocathodes, which are intended to increase the achievable average current while protecting the cathode from the accelerator. The amplifier is a thin diamond wafer which converts energetic (few keV) primary electrons into hundreds of electron-hole pairs via secondary electron emission. The electrons drift through the diamond under an external bias and are emitted into vacuum via a hydrogen-terminated surface with negative electron affinity (NEA). Secondary emission gain of over 200 has been achieved. Two methods of patterning diamond, laser ablation and reactive-ion etching (RIE), are being developed to produce the required geometry. A variety of diagnostic techniques, including FTIR, SEM and AFM, have been used to characterize the diamonds.

  15. CVD diamond - fundamental phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams addresses the basic physical processes involved in the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Different methods of deposition are illustrated. For each method, observations are made of the prominent advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Chemical mechanisms of nucleation are introduced.

  16. Potassium in clinopyroxene inclusions from diamonds.

    PubMed

    Harlow, G E; Veblen, D R

    1991-02-01

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy, electron microprobe analyses, and singlecrystal x-ray diffraction data support the conclusion that high potassium contents, up to 1.5 weight percent K(2)O, of some diopside and omphacite inclusions from diamonds represent valid clinopyroxene compositions with K in solid solution. This conclusion contradicts the traditional view of pyroxene crystal chemistry, which holds that K is too large to be incorporated in the pyroxene structure. These diopside and omphacite inclusions have a high degree of crystal perfection and anomalously large unit-cell volumes, and a defect-free structure is observed in K-bearing regions when imaged by transmission electron microscopy. These observations imply that clinopyroxene can be a significant host for K in the mantle and that some clinopyroxene inclusions and their diamond hosts may have grown in a highly K-enriched environment. PMID:17741381

  17. Vacuum encapsulated hermetically sealed diamond amplified cathode capsule and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Rao, Triveni; Walsh, John; Gangone, Elizabeth

    2014-12-30

    A vacuum encapsulated, hermetically sealed cathode capsule for generating an electron beam of secondary electrons, which generally includes a cathode element having a primary emission surface adapted to emit primary electrons, an annular insulating spacer, a diamond window element comprising a diamond material and having a secondary emission surface adapted to emit secondary electrons in response to primary electrons impinging on the diamond window element, a first cold-weld ring disposed between the cathode element and the annular insulating spacer and a second cold-weld ring disposed between the annular insulating spacer and the diamond window element. The cathode capsule is formed by a vacuum cold-weld process such that the first cold-weld ring forms a hermetical seal between the cathode element and the annular insulating spacer and the second cold-weld ring forms a hermetical seal between the annular spacer and the diamond window element whereby a vacuum encapsulated chamber is formed within the capsule.

  18. Vacuum encapsulated, high temperature diamond amplified cathode capsule and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Rao, Triveni; Walsh, Josh; Gangone, Elizabeth

    2015-12-29

    A vacuum encapsulated, hermetically sealed cathode capsule for generating an electron beam of secondary electrons, which generally includes a cathode element having a primary emission surface adapted to emit primary electrons, an annular insulating spacer, a diamond window element comprising a diamond material and having a secondary emission surface adapted to emit secondary electrons in response to primary electrons impinging on the diamond window element, a first high-temperature solder weld disposed between the diamond window element and the annular insulating spacer and a second high-temperature solder weld disposed between the annular insulating spacer and the cathode element. The cathode capsule is formed by a high temperature weld process under vacuum such that the first solder weld forms a hermetical seal between the diamond window element and the annular insulating spacer and the second solder weld forms a hermetical seal between the annular spacer and the cathode element whereby a vacuum encapsulated chamber is formed within the capsule.

  19. Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela; Gutierrez, Humberto; Narayanan, Deepa; Burgess Clifford, Caroline E.; Jain, Puja

    2010-07-13

    Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

  20. Forty years of development in diamond tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The growth of the diamond industry in Western Countries since the First World War is surveyed. The articles described deal specifically with the development of the industrial diamond and diamond tool sector in different countries. All data point to continuing rapid expansion in the diamond tool sector. The West consumes 80 percent of world industrial diamond production. Diamond consumption increased sharply in the U.S. during World War 2. There are 300 diamond manufacturers in the U.S. today. In 1940, there were 25. In Japan, consumption of industrial diamonds has increased several times. In Italy, there has been a 75 fold increase in the production of diamond tools since 1959.

  1. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  2. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  3. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply...

  4. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  5. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  6. Light weight aluminum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catura, R. C.; Vieira, J. R.

    1985-09-01

    Light weight mirror blanks were fabricated by dip-brazing a core of low mass aluminum foam material to thin face sheets of solid aluminum. The blanks weigh 40% of an equivalent size solid mirror and were diamond turned to provide reflective surfaces. Optical interferometry was used to assess their dimensional stability over 7 months. No changes in flatness are observed (to the sensitivity of the measurements of a half wavelength of red light).

  7. Raman investigation of diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li-Ming

    1993-12-31

    Extensive Raman investigations were conducted on a wide range of diamond films whose structures were dilineated by optical and confocal microscopy. The Raman Spectra from one extreme of this range indicates a very intense 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} line diagnostic of bulk crystalline diamond. Microscopy of the corresponding film shows the presence of many large true diamond crystallite. The 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} Raman line at the other extreme of the range, however, is virtually absent. It is replaced, at this extreme, by a very broad Raman contour whose maxima occur near 1355 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1575 cm{sup {minus}1}. Optical microscopy now reveals a complete lack of diamond crystallites. The ratio of the integrated Raman intensity of the 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} diamond line to the integral of the entire broad contour extending from {approx}1200 cm{sup {minus}1} to 1800 cm{sup {minus}1}, with maxima near 1355 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1575 cm{sup {minus}1}, was determined. This ratio rises with increasing diamond crystallite size, and it decreases as true diamond crystallites are replaced by diamond-like, but amorphous, hard carbon, which produces the broad Raman contour. The measured intensity ratio was analyzed in terms of a differential equation related to phonon coupling. The increase of the intensity ratio of the 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} diagnostic diamond peak is due to phono-phonon coupling between the diamond crystallites, as the concentration of the amorphous diamond-like carbon decreases. Confocal microscopy indicates many amorphous-like regions interspersed between diamond crystallites which account for the intensity loss, and agree with the Raman intensity measurements. These Raman measurements crystallinity versus amorphous hard-carbon character of thin diamond film.

  8. Most diamonds were created equal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablon, Brooke Matat; Navon, Oded

    2016-06-01

    Diamonds crystallize deep in the mantle (>150 km), leaving their carbon sources and the mechanism of their crystallization debatable. They can form from elemental carbon, by oxidation of reduced species (e.g. methane) or reduction of oxidized ones (e.g. carbonate-bearing minerals or melts), in response to decreasing carbon solubility in melts or fluids or due to changes in pH. The mechanism of formation is clear for fibrous diamonds that grew from the carbonate-bearing fluids trapped in their microinclusions. However, these diamonds look different and, based on their lower level of nitrogen aggregation, are much younger than most monocrystalline (MC) diamonds. In the first systematic search for microinclusions in MC diamonds we examined twinned crystals (macles), assuming that during their growth, microinclusions were trapped along the twinning plane. Visible mineral inclusions (>10 μm) and nitrogen aggregation levels in these clear macles are similar to other MC diamonds. We found 32 microinclusions along the twinning planes in eight out of 30 diamonds. Eight inclusions are orthopyroxene; four contain >50% K2O (probably as K2(Mg, Ca)(CO3)2); but the major element compositions of the remaining 20 are similar to those of carbonate-bearing high-density fluids (HDFs) found in fibrous diamonds. We conclude that the source of carbon for these macles and for most diamonds is carbonate-bearing HDFs similar to those found here and in fibrous diamonds. Combined with the old ages of MC diamonds (up to 3.5 Ga), our new findings suggest that carbonates have been introduced into the reduced lithospheric mantle since the Archaean and that the mechanism of diamond formation is the same for most diamonds.

  9. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  11. Integrated diamond sapphire laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Walker, Wesley W.; Laycock, Rustin L.; Green, Jason J. A.; Cole, Spencer T.

    2003-10-01

    We use analytic expressions and simulations to examine a model laser gain element formed by integrating diamond and a solid state laser material, such as, Ti:sapphire. The gain element is designed to provide in a single composite structure the thermal management capabilities of diamond and the optical amplification of the laser material. The model results indicate low temperature and a specific radial dependence of the heat transfer coefficient at the material interfaces are needed to access the highest average powers and highest quality optical fields. We outline paths designed to increase average output power of a lowest order mode laser oscillator based on these gain elements to megawatt levels. The long term goal is economically viable solar power delivered safely from space. The short term goal is a design strategy that will facilitate "proof of principle" demonstrations using currently accessible optical pump and thermal management capabilities.

  12. Nanocrystalline diamond for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitura, Stanislaw

    1997-06-01

    The unique properties of thin amorphous diamond layers make them perspective candidates for producing advanced micro- electronic devices, coatings for cutting tools and optics. Moreover, due to the highest bicompatibility of carbon resulting from the presence of this element in human body, it appears to be a potential biomaterial. Until present the amorphous diamond has found industrial applications in some areas. One of the applications of the carbon layers are coatings for medical implants. The studies of carbon films as coatings for implants in surgery were aimed on the investigations of biological resistance of implants, histopathological investigations on laboratory animals, tests of corrosion resistance, measurements of mechanical properties and a breakdown test in Tyrod solution. The current state of published work in the subject is reviewed in the paper together with a discussion concerning classification of this material.

  13. Hexagonal diamonds in meteorites: implications.

    PubMed

    Hanneman, R E; Strong, H M; Bundy, F P

    1967-02-24

    A new polymorph of carbon, hexagonal diamond, has been discovered in the Canyon Diablo and Goalpara meteorites. This phase had been synthesized recently under specific high-pressure conditions in the laboratory. Our results: provide strong evidence that diamonds found in these meteorites were produced by intense shock pressures acting on crystalline graphite inclusions present within the meteorite before impact, rather than by disintegration of larger, statically grown diamonds, as some theories propose. PMID:17830485

  14. Diamond films for laser hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, S.; Watkins, L.; Ravi, K.; Yokota, S.

    1989-01-01

    Laser-damage experiments were performed on free-standing polycrystalline diamond films prepared by plasma-enhanced CVD. The high laser-induced stress resistance found for this material makes it useful for thin-film coatings for laser optics. Results for diamond-coated silicon substrates demonstrate the enhanced damage threshold imparted by diamond thin-film coatings to materials susceptible to laser damage.

  15. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1994-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond film thickness on the substrate.

  16. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1993-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate is disclosed. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond thickness on the substrate.

  17. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  18. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  19. DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

  20. Changes in body composition and resting energy expenditure after rapid weight loss: is there an energy-metabolism adaptation in obese patients?

    PubMed

    Valtueña, S; Blanch, S; Barenys, M; Solà, R; Salas-Salvadó, J

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess changes in resting energy expenditure (REE) related to changes in fat free mass (FFM) in nine morbid obese (BMI 43 +/- 5.1 kg/m2) hospitalised females on VLCD. REE was measured by 30 min indirect calorimetry before and after 28 days of hospitalisation. Changes in FFM were assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), hydrostatic weighing (HW) and nitrogen balance (N). REE decreased 11.5% from 7.8 +/- 1.0 to 6.9 +/- 0.8 MJ/d. Total weight loss was 8.4 +/- 1.9 kg or 7.4% with an estimated FFM loss of 3.4 +/- 1.8 (BIA), 2.9 +/- 1.9 (HW) and 1.8 +/- 1.0 (N). As the fall in REE was larger than the loss of FFM, it is concluded that morbid obese patients develop an energy saving adaptation during rapid weight loss. PMID:7735338

  1. DIAMOND AMPLIFIER FOR PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO,T.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL,A.; CHANG,X.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,P.D.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    We report a new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. Primary electrons are produced by a photocathode (or other means) and are accelerated to a few thousand electron-volts, then strike a specially prepared diamond window. The large Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) provides a multiplication of the number of electrons by about two orders of magnitude. The secondary electrons drift through the diamond under an electric field and emerge into the accelerating proper of the ''gun'' through a Negative Electron Affinity surface of the diamond. The advantages of the new approach include the following: (1) Reduction of the number of primary electrons by the large SEY, i.e. a very low laser power in a photocathode producing the primaries. (2) Low thermal emittance due to the NEA surface and the rapid thermalization of the electrons. (3) Protection of the cathode from possible contamination from the gun, allowing the use of large quantum efficiency but sensitive cathodes. (4) Protection of the gun from possible contamination by the cathode, allowing the use of superconducting gun cavities. (5) Production of high average currents, up to ampere class. (6) Encapsulated design, making the ''load-lock'' systems unnecessary. This paper presents the criteria that need to be taken into account in designing the amplifier.

  2. Raman barometry of diamond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izraeli, E. S.; Harris, J. W.; Navon, O.

    1999-11-01

    Pressures and temperatures of the diamond source region are commonly estimated using chemical equilibria between coexisting mineral inclusions. Here we present another type of geobarometer, based on determination of the internal pressure in olivine inclusions and the stresses in the surrounding diamond. Using Raman spectroscopy, pressures of 0.13 to 0.65 GPa were measured inside olivine inclusions in three diamonds from the Udachnaya mine in Siberia. Stresses in the diamond surrounding the inclusions indicated similar pressures (0.11-0.41 GPa). Nitrogen concentration and aggregation state in two of the diamonds yielded mantle residence temperatures of ˜1200°C. Using this temperature and the bulk moduli and thermal expansion of olivine and diamond, we calculated source pressures of 4.4-5.2 GPa. We also derived a linear approximation for the general dependence of the source pressure ( P0, GPa) on source temperature ( T0, °C) and the measured internal pressure in the inclusion ( Pi): P0=(3.259×10 -4Pi+3.285×10 -3) T0+0.9246 Pi+0.319. Raman barometry may be applied to other inclusions in diamonds or other inclusion-host systems. If combined with IR determination of the mantle residence temperature of the diamond, it allows estimation of the pressure at the source based on a non-destructive examination of a single diamond containing a single inclusion.

  3. Conversion of fullerenes to diamonds

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1995-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond or diamond-like films on a substrate surface. The method involves the steps of providing a vapor selected from the group of fullerene molecules or an inert gas/fullerene molecule mixture, providing energy to the fullerene molecules consisting of carbon-carbon bonds, the energized fullerene molecules breaking down to form fragments of fullerene molecules including C.sub.2 molecules and depositing the energized fullerene molecules with C.sub.2 fragments onto the substrate with farther fragmentation occurring and forming a thickness of diamond or diamond-like films on the substrate surface.

  4. Diamonds in ophiolites: Contamination or a new diamond growth environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D.; Griffin, W. L.; Yang, J.; Gain, S.; Stern, R. A.; Huang, J.-X.; Jacob, D. E.; Xu, X.; Stokes, A. J.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Pearson, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    For more than 20 years, the reported occurrence of diamonds in the chromites and peridotites of the Luobusa massif in Tibet (a complex described as an ophiolite) has been widely ignored by the diamond research community. This skepticism has persisted because the diamonds are similar in many respects to high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) synthetic/industrial diamonds (grown from metal solvents), and the finding previously has not been independently replicated. We present a detailed examination of the Luobusa diamonds (recovered from both peridotites and chromitites), including morphology, size, color, impurity characteristics (by infrared spectroscopy), internal growth structures, trace-element patterns, and C and N isotopes. A detailed comparison with synthetic industrial diamonds shows many similarities. Cubo-octahedral morphology, yellow color due to unaggregated nitrogen (C centres only, Type Ib), metal-alloy inclusions and highly negative δ13C values are present in both sets of diamonds. The Tibetan diamonds (n = 3) show an exceptionally large range in δ15N (-5.6 to + 28.7 ‰) within individual crystals, and inconsistent fractionation between {111} and {100} growth sectors. This in contrast to large synthetic HPHT diamonds grown by the temperature gradient method, which have with δ15N = 0 ‰ in {111} sectors and + 30 ‰ in {100} sectors, as reported in the literature. This comparison is limited by the small sample set combined with the fact the diamonds probably grew by different processes. However, the Tibetan diamonds do have generally higher concentrations and different ratios of trace elements; most inclusions are a NiMnCo alloy, but there are also some small REE-rich phases never seen in HPHT synthetics. These characteristics indicate that the Tibetan diamonds grew in contact with a C-saturated Ni-Mn-Co-rich melt in a highly reduced environment. The stable isotopes indicate a major subduction-related contribution to the chemical environment. The

  5. Identifying the Source of Gem Diamonds: Requirements for a Certification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigley, J. E.

    2002-05-01

    Recent civil conflicts in several countries, in which profits from the sales of gem diamonds have supported the rival factions, have forced the jewelry industry to confront the need to certify the geographic sources of gem diamonds. The goals of this program are to prohibit the sale of so-called "conflict diamonds", and to prevent the loss of consumer confidence. Efforts to identify unique characteristics of gem diamonds have been hampered so far by the absence of chemical or physical features that are diagnostic of particular sources, and the lack of a representative collection of diamonds from major producing areas that would be required for a rigorous scientific study. The jewelry industry has therefore adopted plans to track gem diamonds from the mine through the manufacturing process to the consumer. Practical requirements for implementation of such a certification system will be summarized. Any proposed solutions for determining the sources of gem diamonds by some analytical technique, or for following diamonds from the mine, must take into account the annual production of several tens of millions of carats of rough diamonds, which are transformed during manufacturing into several hundreds of millions of polished gemstones (with an average weight of only about 0.03 carat, or 0.006 gram).

  6. Transient current electric field profiling of single crystal CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isberg, J.; Gabrysch, M.; Tajani, A.; Twitchen, D. J.

    2006-08-01

    The transient current technique (TCT) has been adapted for profiling of the electric field distribution in intrinsic single crystal CVD diamond. It was found that successive hole transits do not appreciably affect the electric field distribution within the sample. Transits of holes can therefore be used to probe the electric field distribution and also the distribution of trapped charge. Electron transits, on the other hand, cause an accumulation of negative charge in the sample. Illumination with blue or green light was shown to lead to accumulation of positive charge. Low concentrations of trapped charge can be detected in diamond using TCT, corresponding to an ionized impurity concentration below N = 1010 cm-3.

  7. Observation of higher stiffness in nanopolycrystal diamond than monocrystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigaki, Kenichi; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Kusakabe, Koichi; Nakamura, Nobutomo; Hirao, Masahiko; Ledbetter, Hassel

    2013-08-01

    Diamond is the stiffest known material. Here we report that nanopolycrystal diamond synthesized by direct-conversion method from graphite is stiffer than natural and synthesized monocrystal diamonds. This observation departs from the usual thinking that nanocrystalline materials are softer than their monocrystals because of a large volume fraction of soft grain-boundary region. The direct conversion causes the nondiffusional phase transformation to cubic diamond, producing many twins inside diamond grains. We give an ab initio-calculation twinned model that confirms the stiffening. We find that shorter interplane bonds along [111] are significantly strengthened near the twinned region, from which the superstiff structure originates. Our discovery provides a novel step forward in the search for superstiff materials.

  8. Observation of higher stiffness in nanopolycrystal diamond than monocrystal diamond.

    PubMed

    Tanigaki, Kenichi; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Kusakabe, Koichi; Nakamura, Nobutomo; Hirao, Masahiko; Ledbetter, Hassel

    2013-01-01

    Diamond is the stiffest known material. Here we report that nanopolycrystal diamond synthesized by direct-conversion method from graphite is stiffer than natural and synthesized monocrystal diamonds. This observation departs from the usual thinking that nanocrystalline materials are softer than their monocrystals because of a large volume fraction of soft grain-boundary region. The direct conversion causes the nondiffusional phase transformation to cubic diamond, producing many twins inside diamond grains. We give an ab initio-calculation twinned model that confirms the stiffening. We find that shorter interplane bonds along [111] are significantly strengthened near the twinned region, from which the superstiff structure originates. Our discovery provides a novel step forward in the search for superstiff materials.

  9. Thermal diffusivity of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Winfree, William P.; Crews, B. Scott

    1990-01-01

    A laser pulse technique to measure the thermal diffusivity of diamond films deposited on a silicon substrate is developed. The effective thermal diffusivity of diamond film on silicon was measured by observing the phase and amplitude of the cyclic thermal waves generated by the laser pulses. An analytical model is developed to calculate the effective in-plane (face-parallel) diffusivity of a two layer system. The model is used to reduce the effective thermal diffusivity of the diamond/silicon sample to a value for the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of the diamond film. Phase and amplitude measurements give similar results. The thermal conductivity of the films is found to be better than that of type 1a natural diamond.

  10. High efficiency diamond solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2008-05-06

    A photovoltaic device and method of making same. A layer of p-doped microcrystalline diamond is deposited on a layer of n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond such as by providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a first atmosphere containing about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 99% by volume H.sub.2 with dopant quantities of a boron compound, subjecting the atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer on the substrate, providing a second atmosphere of about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 89% by volume Ar and about 10% by volume N.sub.2, subjecting the second atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond layer on the p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer. Electrodes and leads are added to conduct electrical energy when the layers are irradiated.

  11. Impurity-to-band activation energy in phosphorus doped diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, I.; Pinault-Thaury, M.-A.; Kociniewski, T.; Lusson, A.; Chikoidze, E.; Jomard, F.; Dumont, Y.; Chevallier, J.; Barjon, J.

    2013-08-01

    The value of the impurity-to-band activation energy EA of a dopant is a basic feature of the electrical conductivity of semiconductors. Various techniques were used to determine EA in n-type diamond doped with phosphorus, giving values of EA varying from 0.43 eV to 0.63 eV, the value EA of 0.6 eV being commonly accepted for the ionization energy of phosphorus donors in diamond. Nevertheless, up to now, the dispersion of the experimental values of EA remains unexplained. In this work, we investigate the electrical properties of a set of n-type diamond homoepitaxial films with different phosphorus concentrations by Hall effect measurements in order to deduce EA and to understand the evolution of this energy with the dopant concentration. We show that, below 2 × 1019 cm-3 phosphorus, the decrease of EA is mainly controlled by the concentration of ionized defects resulting from the donor compensation. The role of ionized defects in the decrease of EA is analyzed on the basis of existing models adapted to the case of diamond. The proposed model provides a correct description of the experimental data. It can be used to quantitatively predict the activation energy of phosphorus in n-type diamond for given donor and compensating acceptor concentrations.

  12. Electron energy loss spectrometry of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) measurements on diamond residues from carbonaceous meteorites designed to elucidate the structure and composition of interstellar diamonds. Dynamic effective medium theory is used to model the dielectric properties of the diamonds and in particular to synthesize the observed spectra as mixtures of diamond and various pi-bonded carbons. The results are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the idea that diamonds and their surfaces are the only contributors to the electron energy loss spectra of the diamond residues and that these peculiar spectra are the result of the exceptionally small grain size and large specific surface area of the interstellar diamonds.

  13. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  14. Inscription of 3D waveguides in diamond using an ultrafast laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courvoisier, Arnaud; Booth, Martin J.; Salter, Patrick S.

    2016-07-01

    Three dimensional waveguides within the bulk of diamond are manufactured using ultrafast laser fabrication. High intensities within the focal volume of the laser cause breakdown of the diamond into a graphitic phase leading to a stress induced refractive index change in neighboring regions. Type II waveguiding is thus enabled between two adjacent graphitic tracks, but supporting just a single polarization state. We show that adaptive aberration correction during the laser processing allows the controlled fabrication of more complex structures beneath the surface of the diamond which can be used for 3D waveguide splitters and Type III waveguides which support both polarizations.

  15. CVD Diamond Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gat, R.

    2009-01-22

    The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerating structures: high RF breakdown field, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) cylindrical diamond structures have been manufactured with dimensions corresponding to fundamental TM{sub 01} mode frequencies in the GHz to THz range. Surface treatments are being developed to reduce the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient below unity to reduce the possibility of multipactor. The diamond CVD cylindrical waveguide technology developed here can be applied to a variety of other high frequency, large-signal applications.

  16. Tailoring nanocrystalline diamond film properties

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; McCauley, Thomas G.; Zhou, Dan; Krauss, Alan R.

    2003-07-15

    A method for controlling the crystallite size and growth rate of plasma-deposited diamond films. A plasma is established at a pressure in excess of about 55 Torr with controlled concentrations of hydrogen up to about 98% by volume, of unsubstituted hydrocarbons up to about 3% by volume and an inert gas of one or more of the noble gases and nitrogen up to about 98% by volume. The volume ratio of inert gas to hydrogen is preferably maintained at greater than about 4, to deposit a diamond film on a suitable substrate. The diamond film is deposited with a predetermined crystallite size and at a predetermined growth rate.

  17. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1994-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic hydrogen defect free diamond or diamond like films on a substrate. The method involves providing vapor containing fullerene molecules with or without an inert gas, providing a device to impart energy to the fullerene molecules, fragmenting at least in part some of the fullerene molecules in the vapor or energizing the molecules to incipient fragmentation, ionizing the fullerene molecules, impinging ionized fullerene molecules on the substrate to assist in causing fullerene fragmentation to obtain a thickness of diamond on the substrate.

  18. Translation, adaptation, validation and performance of the American Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire Short Form (WEL-SF) to a Norwegian version: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, John R.; Nielsen, Hans J.; Natvig, Gerd K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Researchers have emphasized a need to identify predictors that can explain the variability in weight management after bariatric surgery. Eating self-efficacy has demonstrated predictive impact on patients’ adherence to recommended eating habits following multidisciplinary treatment programs, but has to a limited extent been subject for research after bariatric surgery. Recently an American short form version (WEL-SF) of the commonly used Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire (WEL) was available for research and clinical purposes. Objectives. We intended to translate and culturally adapt the WEL-SF to Norwegian conditions, and to evaluate the new versions’ psychometrical properties in a Norwegian population of morbidly obese patients eligible for bariatric surgery. Design. Cross-sectional Methods. A total of 225 outpatients selected for Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) were recruited; 114 non-operated and 111 operated patients, respectively. The questionnaire was translated through forward and backward procedures. Structural properties were assessed performing principal component analysis (PCA), correlation and regression analysis were conducted to evaluate convergent validity and sensitivity, respectively. Data was assessed by mean, median, item response, missing values, floor- and ceiling effect, Cronbach’s alpha and alpha if item deleted. Results. The PCA resulted in one factor with eigenvalue > 1, explaining 63.0% of the variability. The WEL-SF sum scores were positively correlated with the Self-efficacy and quality of life instruments (p < 0.001). The WEL-SF was associated with body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.001) and changes in BMI (p = 0.026). A very high item response was obtained with only one missing value (0.4%). The ceiling effect was in average 0.9 and 17.1% in the non-operated and operated sample, respectively. Strong internal consistency (r = 0.92) was obtained, and Cronbach’s alpha remained high (0.86–0.92) if single items

  19. Method of dehalogenation using diamonds

    DOEpatents

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

  20. Diamond family of nanoparticle superlattices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyan; Tagawa, Miho; Xin, Huolin L; Wang, Tong; Emamy, Hamed; Li, Huilin; Yager, Kevin G; Starr, Francis W; Tkachenko, Alexei V; Gang, Oleg

    2016-02-01

    Diamond lattices formed by atomic or colloidal elements exhibit remarkable functional properties. However, building such structures via self-assembly has proven to be challenging because of the low packing fraction, sensitivity to bond orientation, and local heterogeneity. We report a strategy for creating a diamond superlattice of nano-objects via self-assembly and demonstrate its experimental realization by assembling two variant diamond lattices, one with and one without atomic analogs. Our approach relies on the association between anisotropic particles with well-defined tetravalent binding topology and isotropic particles. The constrained packing of triangular binding footprints of truncated tetrahedra on a sphere defines a unique three-dimensional lattice. Hence, the diamond self-assembly problem is solved via its mapping onto two-dimensional triangular packing on the surface of isotropic spherical particles. PMID:26912698

  1. Diamond family of nanoparticle superlattices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyan; Tagawa, Miho; Xin, Huolin L; Wang, Tong; Emamy, Hamed; Li, Huilin; Yager, Kevin G; Starr, Francis W; Tkachenko, Alexei V; Gang, Oleg

    2016-02-01

    Diamond lattices formed by atomic or colloidal elements exhibit remarkable functional properties. However, building such structures via self-assembly has proven to be challenging because of the low packing fraction, sensitivity to bond orientation, and local heterogeneity. We report a strategy for creating a diamond superlattice of nano-objects via self-assembly and demonstrate its experimental realization by assembling two variant diamond lattices, one with and one without atomic analogs. Our approach relies on the association between anisotropic particles with well-defined tetravalent binding topology and isotropic particles. The constrained packing of triangular binding footprints of truncated tetrahedra on a sphere defines a unique three-dimensional lattice. Hence, the diamond self-assembly problem is solved via its mapping onto two-dimensional triangular packing on the surface of isotropic spherical particles.

  2. Method of Dehalogenation using Diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

    1999-02-26

    A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

  3. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  4. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  5. Bayesian integrated testing strategy (ITS) for skin sensitization potency assessment: a decision support system for quantitative weight of evidence and adaptive testing strategy.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna S; Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy; Strickland, Judy; Ashikaga, Takao; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The presented Bayesian network Integrated Testing Strategy (ITS-3) for skin sensitization potency assessment is a decision support system for a risk assessor that provides quantitative weight of evidence, leading to a mechanistically interpretable potency hypothesis, and formulates adaptive testing strategy for a chemical. The system was constructed with an aim to improve precision and accuracy for predicting LLNA potency beyond ITS-2 (Jaworska et al., J Appl Toxicol 33(11):1353-1364, 2013) by improving representation of chemistry and biology. Among novel elements are corrections for bioavailability both in vivo and in vitro as well as consideration of the individual assays' applicability domains in the prediction process. In ITS-3 structure, three validated alternative assays, DPRA, KeratinoSens and h-CLAT, represent first three key events of the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization. The skin sensitization potency prediction is provided as a probability distribution over four potency classes. The probability distribution is converted to Bayes factors to: 1) remove prediction bias introduced by the training set potency distribution and 2) express uncertainty in a quantitative manner, allowing transparent and consistent criteria to accept a prediction. The novel ITS-3 database includes 207 chemicals with a full set of in vivo and in vitro data. The accuracy for predicting LLNA outcomes on the external test set (n = 60) was as follows: hazard (two classes)-100 %, GHS potency classification (three classes)-96 %, potency (four classes)-89 %. This work demonstrates that skin sensitization potency prediction based on data from three key events, and often less, is possible, reliable over broad chemical classes and ready for practical applications.

  6. Bayesian integrated testing strategy (ITS) for skin sensitization potency assessment: a decision support system for quantitative weight of evidence and adaptive testing strategy.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna S; Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy; Strickland, Judy; Ashikaga, Takao; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The presented Bayesian network Integrated Testing Strategy (ITS-3) for skin sensitization potency assessment is a decision support system for a risk assessor that provides quantitative weight of evidence, leading to a mechanistically interpretable potency hypothesis, and formulates adaptive testing strategy for a chemical. The system was constructed with an aim to improve precision and accuracy for predicting LLNA potency beyond ITS-2 (Jaworska et al., J Appl Toxicol 33(11):1353-1364, 2013) by improving representation of chemistry and biology. Among novel elements are corrections for bioavailability both in vivo and in vitro as well as consideration of the individual assays' applicability domains in the prediction process. In ITS-3 structure, three validated alternative assays, DPRA, KeratinoSens and h-CLAT, represent first three key events of the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization. The skin sensitization potency prediction is provided as a probability distribution over four potency classes. The probability distribution is converted to Bayes factors to: 1) remove prediction bias introduced by the training set potency distribution and 2) express uncertainty in a quantitative manner, allowing transparent and consistent criteria to accept a prediction. The novel ITS-3 database includes 207 chemicals with a full set of in vivo and in vitro data. The accuracy for predicting LLNA outcomes on the external test set (n = 60) was as follows: hazard (two classes)-100 %, GHS potency classification (three classes)-96 %, potency (four classes)-89 %. This work demonstrates that skin sensitization potency prediction based on data from three key events, and often less, is possible, reliable over broad chemical classes and ready for practical applications. PMID:26612363

  7. Synthesis and mechanical properties of nano-polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvy, H.; Chen, J.

    2010-12-01

    The sample of nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD) has been synthesized at the Center for the Study of Matter at Extreme Conditions using a 500t multi-anvil press equipped with a Walker module. A rod of polycrystalline graphite (99.9995%; Alfa Aesar) was used as starting material. The sample was directly inserted into the Re furnace of a 8mm octahedral edge length cell assembly. Tungsten carbide cubes with 3mm truncation edge length were used as anvils. The graphite sample converted directly into diamond at 19 GPa and 2400C. The temperature was maintained for 30 seconds. The recovered sample is transparent indicating that all graphite has been converted into cubic diamond. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction confirm the total conversion and purity of the sample. The latter has been mounted in epoxy and was finely polished for nano-indentation hardness test using metal-bonding diamond abrasive disks. In this study we do not measure the hardness of the material using the traditional method (impression hardness) which consist in measuring the dimension of the indent impression after indentation. We use depth-sensing nanoindentation. Our indenter used is equipped with piezo controller which monitor dynamically the depth of the indent during the hardness test. This method is considered to be more accurate and more adapted to elastic material. The hardness test has been performed using a Hysitron TriboIndenter. The probe is a diamond Berkovich tip (three sided pyramid) with 100 nm tip radius. NPD hardness and Young’s modulus has been compared with commercially available polycrystalline superhard material used in high-pressure devices as anvils: a cubic boron nitrite anvil (cBN) from Linatec (Ukraine) and a sintered polycrystalline diamond anvil (PCD) from Ringwood Superabrasives Pty Ltd (USA). The results show the superior hardness and elastic properties of NPD on cBN and PCD.

  8. Biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited diamond.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Tsai, C; Gerberich, W W; Kruckeberg, L; Kania, D R

    1995-04-01

    The biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited (CVD) diamond surfaces has been assessed. Our results indicate that CVD diamond is as biocompatible as titanium (Ti) and 316 stainless steel (SS). First, the amount of adsorbed and 'denatured' fibrinogen on CVD diamond was very close to that of Ti and SS. Second, both in vitro and in vivo there appears to be less cellular adhesion and activation on the surface of CVD diamond surfaces compared to Ti and SS. This evident biocompatibility, coupled with the corrosion resistance and notable mechanical integrity of CVD diamond, suggests that diamond-coated surfaces may be highly desirable in a number of biomedical applications. PMID:7654876

  9. A procedure for diamond turning KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R.C.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-07-07

    A procedure and the equipment necessary for single-point diamond flycutting (loosely referred to as diamond turning) potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are described. It is based on current KDP diamond turning activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), drawing upon knowledge from the Nova crystal finishing development during the 1980`s and incorporating refinements from our efforts during 1995. In addition to describing a step-by-step process for diamond turning KDP, specific discussions are included on the necessary diamond tool geometry and edge sharpness, cutting fluid, and crystal preparation, handling, cleaning, and inspection. The authors presuppose that the reader is already familiar with diamond turning practices.

  10. Wear mechanism of diamond coated cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Leyendecker, T.; Lemmer, O.; Esser, S.

    1995-12-31

    Since Diamond Coatings were introduced into the market in 1989, five years experience in industrial applications of diamond coated cutting tools enables to present an overview of tool life and wear behavior of diamond coated cutting tools due to different cutting conditions and workpiece-materials. Machining reinforced plastics, presintered ceramic compacts, aluminum alloys, metal-matrix composites and graphite, different wear behavior occurs at the cutting edges of diamond coated tools. Having a good adhesion fatigue and chemical wear of Diamond coatings determines life time of the tools. By a profound pretreatment procedure CVD Diamond coated tools can compete with conventional PCD-tools.

  11. Ion Microscopy on Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredotti, Claudio

    Because of its physical properties (strong radiation hardness, wide energy gap with a consequent extremely low dark current, very large electron and hole mobility) diamond is a very good candidate for nuclear particle detection, particularly in harsh environments or in conditions of strong radiation damage. Being commonly polycrystalline, diamond samples obtained by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) are not homogeneous, not only from the morphological point of view, but also from the electronic one. As a consequence, as it was indicated quite early starting from 1995, charge collection properties such as charge collection efficiency (cce) are not uniform, but they are depending on the site hit by incoming particle. Moreover, these properties are influenced by previous irradiations which are used in order to improve them and, finally, they are also dependent on the thickness of the sample, since the electronic non uniformity extends also in depth by affecting the profile of the electrical field from top to bottom electrode of the nuclear detector in the standard "sandwich" arrangement. By the use of focussed ion beams, it is possible to investigate these non uniformities by the aid of techniques like IBIC (Ion Beam Induced Charge) and IBIL (Ion Beam Induced Luminescence) with a space resolution of the order of 1 m. This relatively new kind of microscopy, which is called "ion microscopy", is capable not only to give 2D maps of cce, which can be quite precisely compared with morphological images obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (generally the grains display a much better cce than intergrain regions), but also to give the electric field profile from one electrode to the other one in a "lateral" arrangement of the ion beam. IBIL, by supplying 2D maps of luminescence intensity at different wavelength, can give information about the presence of specific radiative recombination centers and their distribution in the material. Finally, a new technique called XBIC (X

  12. The Zigbee wireless ECG measurement system design with a motion artifact remove algorithm by using adaptive filter and moving weighted factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeokjun; Oh, Sechang; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-04-01

    , a filter including a moving weighted factor, peak to peak detection, and interpolation techniques. In addition, this paper introduces an adaptive filter in order to extract clear ECG signal by using extracted baseline noise signal and measured signal from sensor.

  13. Combined single-crystalline and polycrystalline CVD diamond substrates for diamond electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A. L. Gorbachev, A. M.; Dukhnovsky, M. P.; Muchnikov, A. B.; Ratnikova, A. K.; Fedorov, Yu. Yu.

    2012-02-15

    The fabrication of diamond substrates in which single-crystalline and polycrystalline CVD diamond form a single wafer, and the epitaxial growth of diamond films on such combined substrates containing polycrystalline and (100) single-crystalline CVD diamond regions are studied.

  14. New profilable bond system for diamond and CBN grinding wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macina, R.

    Attempts to use diamond or CBN grinding wheels for full cut or deep cutting processes in the machining of hard materials, were initially limited to grinding wheels coated by electrodeposition. The tool body was provided with the required profile and the diamond or CBN coating was electrodeposited in accordance with known methods. Success could be achieved with these grinding wheels in certain cases. The greater projection of abrasive grit obtained with electrodeposited coatings as opposed to impregnated coatings was removed by subsequent profiling with diamond profile grinding wheels, so that accurate tolerances for workpieces could be achieved up to a certain limit. The grain wear of the engaged tools is uneven and commences in those areas that are subjected to the greatest load such as at the edges or the projected radii so that recoating usually becomes necessary when the coating has worn away at only one point. For all practical purposes this amounts to a new coating. Efforts were therefore directed towards adapting the conventional grinding technique, involving the crushing of a profile onto the wheel periphery with the aid of a crushing device mounted on a grinding machine, to diamond and CBN grinding wheels. A prerequisite for this was to develop a bonding material which could be profiled by crushing. This method opened up new possibilities, particularly for deep and full cut grinding.

  15. Are diamond nanoparticles cytotoxic?

    PubMed

    Schrand, Amanda M; Huang, Houjin; Carlson, Cataleya; Schlager, John J; Omacr Sawa, Eiji; Hussain, Saber M; Dai, Liming

    2007-01-11

    Finely divided carbon particles, including charcoal, lampblack, and diamond particles, have been used for ornamental and official tattoos since ancient times. With the recent development in nanoscience and nanotechnology, carbon-based nanomaterials (e.g., fullerenes, nanotubes, nanodiamonds) attract a great deal of interest. Owing to their low chemical reactivity and unique physical properties, nanodiamonds could be useful in a variety of biological applications such as carriers for drugs, genes, or proteins; novel imaging techniques; coatings for implantable materials; and biosensors and biomedical nanorobots. Therefore, it is essential to ascertain the possible hazards of nanodiamonds to humans and other biological systems. We have, for the first time, assessed the cytotoxicity of nanodiamonds ranging in size from 2 to 10 nm. Assays of cell viability such as mitochondrial function (MTT) and luminescent ATP production showed that nanodiamonds were not toxic to a variety of cell types. Furthermore, nanodiamonds did not produce significant reactive oxygen species. Cells can grow on nanodiamond-coated substrates without morphological changes compared to controls. These results suggest that nanodiamonds could be ideal for many biological applications in a diverse range of cell types.

  16. Are diamond nanoparticles cytotoxic?

    PubMed

    Schrand, Amanda M; Huang, Houjin; Carlson, Cataleya; Schlager, John J; Omacr Sawa, Eiji; Hussain, Saber M; Dai, Liming

    2007-01-11

    Finely divided carbon particles, including charcoal, lampblack, and diamond particles, have been used for ornamental and official tattoos since ancient times. With the recent development in nanoscience and nanotechnology, carbon-based nanomaterials (e.g., fullerenes, nanotubes, nanodiamonds) attract a great deal of interest. Owing to their low chemical reactivity and unique physical properties, nanodiamonds could be useful in a variety of biological applications such as carriers for drugs, genes, or proteins; novel imaging techniques; coatings for implantable materials; and biosensors and biomedical nanorobots. Therefore, it is essential to ascertain the possible hazards of nanodiamonds to humans and other biological systems. We have, for the first time, assessed the cytotoxicity of nanodiamonds ranging in size from 2 to 10 nm. Assays of cell viability such as mitochondrial function (MTT) and luminescent ATP production showed that nanodiamonds were not toxic to a variety of cell types. Furthermore, nanodiamonds did not produce significant reactive oxygen species. Cells can grow on nanodiamond-coated substrates without morphological changes compared to controls. These results suggest that nanodiamonds could be ideal for many biological applications in a diverse range of cell types. PMID:17201422

  17. Organophosphonate biofunctionalization of diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Caterino, R; Csiki, R; Wiesinger, M; Sachsenhauser, M; Stutzmann, M; Garrido, J A; Cattani-Scholz, A; Speranza, Giorgio; Janssens, S D; Haenen, K

    2014-08-27

    The modification of the diamond surface with organic molecules is a crucial aspect to be considered for any bioapplication of this material. There is great interest in broadening the range of linker molecules that can be covalently bound to the diamond surface. In the case of protein immobilization, the hydropathicity of the surface has a major influence on the protein conformation and, thus, on the functionality of proteins immobilized at surfaces. For electrochemical applications, particular attention has to be devoted to avoid that the charge transfer between the electrode and the redox center embedded in the protein is hindered by a thick insulating linker layer. This paper reports on the grafting of 6-phosphonohexanoic acid on OH-terminated diamond surfaces, serving as linkers to tether electroactive proteins onto diamond surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the formation of a stable layer on the surface. The charge transfer between electroactive molecules and the substrate is studied by electrochemical characterization of the redox activity of aminomethylferrocene and cytochrome c covalently bound to the substrate through this linker. Our work demonstrates that OH-terminated diamond functionalized with 6-phosphonohexanoic acid is a suitable platform to interface redox-proteins, which are fundamental building blocks for many bioelectronics applications.

  18. Diamond nucleation under bias conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckel, R.; Stammler, M.; Janischowsky, K.; Ley, L.; Albrecht, M.; Strunk, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    The so-called bias pretreatment allows the growth of heteroepitaxial diamond films by plasma chemical vapor deposition on silicon (100) surfaces. We present plan-view and cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs of the substrate surface at different phases of the bias pretreatment. These observations are augmented by measurements of the etch rates of Si, SiC, and different carbon modifications under plasma conditions and the size distribution of oriented diamond crystals grown after bias pretreatment. Based on these results a new model for diamond nucleation under bias conditions is proposed. First, a closed layer of nearly epitaxially oriented cubic SiC with a thickness of about 10 nm is formed. Subplantation of carbon into this SiC layer causes a supersaturation with carbon and results in the subcutaneous formation of epitaxially oriented nucleation centers in the SiC layer. Etching of the SiC during the bias pretreatment as well as during diamond growth brings these nucleation centers to the sample surface and causes the growth of diamonds epitaxially oriented on the Si/SiC substrate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Ultimate Atomic Bling: Nanotechnology of Diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, Jeremy

    2010-05-25

    Diamonds exist in all sizes, from the Hope Diamond to minuscule crystals only a few atoms across. The smallest of these diamonds are created naturally by the same processes that make petroleum. Recently, researchers discovered that these 'diamondoids' are formed in many different structural shapes, and that these shapes can be used like LEGO blocks for nanotechnology. This talk will discuss the discovery of these nano-size diamonds and highlight current SLAC/Stanford research into their applications in electronics and medicine.

  20. Nanocrystalline diamond synthesized from C60

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovinskaia, N.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Langehorst, F.; Jacobsen, S.; Liebske, C.

    2010-11-30

    A bulk sample of nanocrystalline cubic diamond with crystallite sizes of 5-12 nm was synthesized from fullerene C{sub 60} at 20(1) GPa and 2000 C using a multi-anvil apparatus. The new material is at least as hard as single crystal diamond. It was found that nanocrystalline diamond at high temperature and ambient pressure kinetically is more stable with respect to graphitization than usual diamonds.

  1. Diamond and diamond-like films for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of transparency templates which describe the goals of the Office of Transportation Materials (OTM) Tribology Program. The positions of personnel on the OTM are listed. The role and mission of the OTM is reviewed. The purpose of the Tribology Program is stated to be `to obtain industry input on program(s) in tribology/advanced lubricants areas of interest`. The objective addressed here is to identify opportunities for cost effective application of diamond and diamond-like carbon in transportation systems.

  2. Characterization of single-crystal diamond grown from the vapor phase on substrates of natural diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Altukhov, A. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Dukhnovsky, M. P.; Zemlyakov, V. E.; Ziablyuk, K. N.; Mitenkin, A. V.; Muchnikov, A. B. Radishev, D. B.; Ratnikova, A. K.; Fedorov, Yu. Yu.

    2011-03-15

    The results of studies of single-crystal diamond layers with orientation (100) grown on substrates of IIa-type natural diamond by chemical-vapor deposition and of semiconductor diamond obtained subsequently by doping by implantation of boron ions are reported. Optimal conditions of postimplantation annealing of diamond that provide the hole mobility of 1150 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} (the highest mobility obtained so far for semiconductor diamond after ion implantation) are given.

  3. Diamond Drilling Specification Manual and Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    This publication presents the standards required of a person practicing diamond drilling in western Canada and provides an outline for teaching the skills and knowledge. It is divided into two parts. The Diamond Drilling Specification Manual establishes the levels of skill and knowledge required in the four certified levels of diamond drilling.…

  4. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  5. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  6. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  7. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  8. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  9. Diamond device architectures for UV laser monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatori, S.; Girolami, M.; Oliva, P.; Conte, G.; Bolshakov, A.; Ralchenko, V.; Konov, V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper reviews the status of diamond detectors for UV laser monitoring and imaging. Single pixel detectors, position sensitive architectures, optically activated switches and sensor arrays for beam positioning and imaging are analyzed. The performances of natural diamond and synthetic diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition are compared to evaluate the suitability of such an outstanding material for the described applications.

  10. Ultratough single crystal boron-doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hemley, Russell J; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Yan, Chih-Shiue; Liang, Qi

    2015-05-05

    The invention relates to a single crystal boron doped CVD diamond that has a toughness of at least about 22 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing single crystal boron doped CVD diamond. The growth rate of the diamond can be from about 20-100 .mu.m/h.

  11. Monte Carlo study of microdosimetric diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solevi, Paola; Magrin, Giulio; Moro, Davide; Mayer, Ramona

    2015-09-01

    Ion-beam therapy provides a high dose conformity and increased radiobiological effectiveness with respect to conventional radiation-therapy. Strict constraints on the maximum uncertainty on the biological weighted dose and consequently on the biological weighting factor require the determination of the radiation quality, defined as the types and energy spectra of the radiation at a specific point. However the experimental determination of radiation quality, in particular for an internal target, is not simple and the features of ion interactions and treatment delivery require dedicated and optimized detectors. Recently chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond detectors have been suggested as ion-beam therapy microdosimeters. Diamond detectors can be manufactured with small cross sections and thin shapes, ideal to cope with the high fluence rate. However the sensitive volume of solid state detectors significantly deviates from conventional microdosimeters, with a diameter that can be up to 1000 times the height. This difference requires a redefinition of the concept of sensitive thickness and a deep study of the secondary to primary radiation, of the wall effects and of the impact of the orientation of the detector with respect to the radiation field. The present work intends to study through Monte Carlo simulations the impact of the detector geometry on the determination of radiation quality quantities, in particular on the relative contribution of primary and secondary radiation. The dependence of microdosimetric quantities such as the unrestricted linear energy L and the lineal energy y are investigated for different detector cross sections, by varying the particle type (carbon ions and protons) and its energy.

  12. Monte Carlo study of microdosimetric diamond detectors.

    PubMed

    Solevi, Paola; Magrin, Giulio; Moro, Davide; Mayer, Ramona

    2015-09-21

    Ion-beam therapy provides a high dose conformity and increased radiobiological effectiveness with respect to conventional radiation-therapy. Strict constraints on the maximum uncertainty on the biological weighted dose and consequently on the biological weighting factor require the determination of the radiation quality, defined as the types and energy spectra of the radiation at a specific point. However the experimental determination of radiation quality, in particular for an internal target, is not simple and the features of ion interactions and treatment delivery require dedicated and optimized detectors. Recently chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond detectors have been suggested as ion-beam therapy microdosimeters. Diamond detectors can be manufactured with small cross sections and thin shapes, ideal to cope with the high fluence rate. However the sensitive volume of solid state detectors significantly deviates from conventional microdosimeters, with a diameter that can be up to 1000 times the height. This difference requires a redefinition of the concept of sensitive thickness and a deep study of the secondary to primary radiation, of the wall effects and of the impact of the orientation of the detector with respect to the radiation field. The present work intends to study through Monte Carlo simulations the impact of the detector geometry on the determination of radiation quality quantities, in particular on the relative contribution of primary and secondary radiation. The dependence of microdosimetric quantities such as the unrestricted linear energy L and the lineal energy y are investigated for different detector cross sections, by varying the particle type (carbon ions and protons) and its energy. PMID:26309235

  13. Monte Carlo study of microdosimetric diamond detectors.

    PubMed

    Solevi, Paola; Magrin, Giulio; Moro, Davide; Mayer, Ramona

    2015-09-21

    Ion-beam therapy provides a high dose conformity and increased radiobiological effectiveness with respect to conventional radiation-therapy. Strict constraints on the maximum uncertainty on the biological weighted dose and consequently on the biological weighting factor require the determination of the radiation quality, defined as the types and energy spectra of the radiation at a specific point. However the experimental determination of radiation quality, in particular for an internal target, is not simple and the features of ion interactions and treatment delivery require dedicated and optimized detectors. Recently chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond detectors have been suggested as ion-beam therapy microdosimeters. Diamond detectors can be manufactured with small cross sections and thin shapes, ideal to cope with the high fluence rate. However the sensitive volume of solid state detectors significantly deviates from conventional microdosimeters, with a diameter that can be up to 1000 times the height. This difference requires a redefinition of the concept of sensitive thickness and a deep study of the secondary to primary radiation, of the wall effects and of the impact of the orientation of the detector with respect to the radiation field. The present work intends to study through Monte Carlo simulations the impact of the detector geometry on the determination of radiation quality quantities, in particular on the relative contribution of primary and secondary radiation. The dependence of microdosimetric quantities such as the unrestricted linear energy L and the lineal energy y are investigated for different detector cross sections, by varying the particle type (carbon ions and protons) and its energy.

  14. Development of Designer Diamond Technology for High Pressure High Temperature Experiments in Support of Stockpile Stewardship Program

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh, K.

    2009-10-28

    The role of nitrogen in the fabrication of designer diamond was systematically investigated by adding controlled amount of nitrogen in hydrogen/methane/oxygen plasma. This has led to a successful recipe for reproducible fabrication of designer diamond anvils for high-pressure high-temperature research in support of stockpile stewardship program. In the three-year support period, several designer diamonds fabricated with this new growth chemistry were utilized in high-pressure experiments at UAB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The designer diamond anvils were utilized in high-pressure studies on heavy rare earth metals, high pressure melting studies on metals, and electrical resistance measurements on iron-based layered superconductors under high pressures. The growth chemistry developed under NNSA support can be adapted for commercial production of designer diamonds.

  15. Deep ultraviolet diamond Raman laser.

    PubMed

    Granados, Eduardo; Spence, David J; Mildren, Richard P

    2011-05-23

    We present a synchronously pumped diamond Raman laser operating at 275.7 nm pumped by the 4th harmonic of a mode locked Nd:YVO4 laser. The laser had a threshold pump pulse energy of 5.8 nJ and generated up to 0.96 nJ pulses at 10.3% conversion efficiency. The results agree well with a numerical model that includes two-photon absorption of the pump and Stokes beams and uses a Raman gain coefficient of diamond of 100 cm/GW. We also report on the observation of nanometer scale two-photon assisted etching of the diamond crystal surfaces. PMID:21643343

  16. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  17. Superconductivity in CVD Diamond Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2005-03-01

    The recent news of superconductivity 2.3K in heavily boron-doped diamond synthesized by high pressure sintering was received with considerable surprise (1). Opening up new possibilities for diamond-based electrical devices, a systematic investigation of these phenomena clearly needs to be achieved. Application of diamond to actual devices requires it to be made into the form of wafers or thin films. We show unambiguous evidence for superconductivity in a heavily boron-doped diamond thin film deposited by the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method (2). An advantage of the MPCVD deposited diamond is that it can control boron concentration in its wider range, particularly in (111) oriented films. The temperature dependence of resistivity for (111) and (100) homoepitaxial thin films were measured under several magnetic fields. Superconducting transition temperatures of (111) homoepitaxial film are determined to be 11.4K for Tc onset and 7.2K for zero resistivity. And the upper critical field is estimated to be about 8T. These values are 2-3 times higher than these ever reported (1,3). On other hand, for (100) homoepitaxial film, Tc onset and Tc zero resistivity were estimated to be 6.3 and 3.2K respectively. The superconductivity in (100) film was strongly suppressed even at the same boron concentration. These differences of superconductivity in film orientation will be discussed. These findings established the superconductivity as a universal property of boron-doped diamond, demonstrating that device application is indeed a feasible challenge. 1. E. A. Ekimov et al. Nature, 428, 542 (2004). 2. Y. Takano et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 2851 (2004). 3. E. Bustarret et al., ond-mat 0408517.

  18. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  19. Thermal Conductivity Of Natural Type IIa Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan; Vining, Cronin; Zoltan, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Report describes application of flash diffusivity method to measure thermal conductivity of 8.04 x 8.84 x 2.35-mm specimen of natural, white, type-IIa diamond at temperatures between 500 and 1,250 K. Provides baseline for comparison to isotopically pure (12C) diamond. Results used as reference against which diamond films produced by chemical-vapor deposition at low pressures can be compared. High thermal conductivity of diamond exploited for wide variety of applications, and present results also used to estimate heat-conduction performances of diamond films in high-temperature applications.

  20. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  1. Radiation monitoring with CVD diamonds in BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, A. J.; Bruinsma, M.; Burchat, P.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Kirkby, D.; Petersen, B. A.; Pulliam, T.

    2005-10-01

    The BABAR experiment has been using two polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposition (pCVD) diamonds for radiation monitoring for nearly 2 years. In July 2005, an additional 12 diamond based radiation sensors will be installed inside the BABAR detector. These diamonds will take over the function of 12 silicon PIN-diodes that are currently used in the radiation protection and monitoring system. We describe our highly successful experience with using pCVD diamond radiation sensors in a high energy physics experiment. We also detail our findings of persistent signal currents and magnetically suppressed erratic dark currents in pCVD diamond based radiation sensors.

  2. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOEpatents

    Casstevens, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machining optical quality inishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  3. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOEpatents

    Casstevens, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machine optical quality finishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  4. Recent results on CVD diamond radiation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilhammer, P.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; v. d. Eijk, R.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fish, D.; Fried, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Knopfle, K. T.; Krammer, M.; Manfredi, P. F.; Meier, D.; LeNormand; Pan, L. S.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Plano, R.; Re, V.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Roff; Rudge, A.; Schieber, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G. B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Turchetta, R.; RD 42 Collaboration

    1998-02-01

    CVD diamond radiation sensors are being developed for possible use in trackers in the LHC experiments. The diamond promises to be radiation hard well beyond particle fluences that can be tolerated by Si sensors. Recent results from the RD 42 collaboration on charge collection distance and on radiation hardness of CVD diamond samples will be reported. Measurements with diamond tracking devices, both strip detectors and pixel detectors, will be discussed. Results from beam tests using a diamond strip detector which was read out with fast, 25 ns shaping time, radiation-hard pipeline electronics will be presented.

  5. CVD diamond film oxidation resistance research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Longwei; Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Lijun; Pan, Xiufang; Sun, Yiqing; Wang, Jinye; Sun, Hongtao

    2013-12-01

    Diamond films were deposited on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system, and its oxidation experiments were carried out in atmospheric environmental condition by using a muffle furnace. Inatmospheric environment (the temperature is from 400°C to 900°C) the oxidation resistance of diamond thin films was investigated. The results indicate that under the atmospheric environment diamond thin film surface morphology did not change after 6 hours at 400°C. Diamond thin film surface morphology began to change after 2 hours at 600°C, and when time was extended to 4 hours, the diamond thin film surface morphology changed significantly. The surface morphology of diamond films began to change after 15 minutes at a 700°C condition and when time was extended to 6 hours diamond films were all destroyed. All the diamond films on the silicon substrate disappeared completely in 20 minutes at 900°C. The intact crystal face is the reason that natural diamond has stable chemical property. The crystal face of synthetic diamond film has a lot of defects, especially on the side. Oxidation of the diamond films begin with the grain boundary and defects.

  6. Superhard material comparable in hardness to diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Badzian, A.R.

    1988-12-19

    Superhard boron suboxides, with hardness close to that of diamond, were synthesized from boron/boron oxide mixtures. Such hardness is expected when a material's molar volume approaches the value characteristic for diamond. These materials consist of boron-rich phases belonging to the boron-oxygen system. The phase which contains 4 at. % oxygen and a crystal structure related to ..beta..rhombohedral boron can scratch diamond faces. During scratching of diamond the suboxide is worn also, and the wear debris is amorphized. Wear on the lt. slash/100/ diamond faces results from a cleavage mechanism which leaves a rough surface covered with cleaved lt. slash/111/ microfaces. The lt. slash/100/ faces are more easily abraded than the lt. slash/111/ diamond faces. Wear on lt. slash/111/ faces consumes much more energy and leaves grooves of plastically deformed diamond.

  7. Superhard material comparable in hardness to diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badzian, Andrzej R.

    1988-12-01

    Superhard boron suboxides, with hardness close to that of diamond, were synthesized from boron/boron oxide mixtures. Such hardness is expected when a material's molar volume approaches the value characteristic for diamond. These materials consist of boron-rich phases belonging to the boron-oxygen system. The phase which contains 4 at. % oxygen and a crystal structure related to β-rhombohedral boron can scratch diamond faces. During scratching of diamond the suboxide is worn also, and the wear debris is amorphized. Wear on the {100} diamond faces results from a cleavage mechanism which leaves a rough surface covered with cleaved {111} microfaces. The {100} faces are more easily abraded than the {111} diamond faces. Wear on {111} faces consumes much more energy and leaves grooves of plastically deformed diamond.

  8. Boron doped diamond biotechnology: from sensors to neurointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Hébert, C; Scorsone, E; Bendali, A; Kiran, R; Cottance, M; Girard, H A; Degardin, J; Dubus, E; Lissorgues, G; Rousseau, L; Mailley, P; Picaud, S; Bergonzo, P

    2014-01-01

    Boron doped nanocrystalline diamond is known as a remarkable material for the fabrication of sensors, taking advantage of its biocompatibility, electrochemical properties, and stability. Sensors can be fabricated to directly probe physiological species from biofluids (e.g. blood or urine), as will be presented. In collaboration with electrophysiologists and biologists, the technology was adapted to enable structured diamond devices such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs), i.e. common electrophysiology tools, to probe neuronal activity distributed over large populations of neurons or embryonic organs. Specific MEAs can also be used to build neural prostheses or implants to compensate function losses due to lesions or degeneration of parts of the central nervous system, such as retinal implants, which exhibit real promise as biocompatible neuroprostheses for in vivo neuronal stimulations. New electrode geometries enable high performance electrodes to surpass more conventional materials for such applications.

  9. 'Diamond Jenness': A Tough Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic of the target area called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  10. 'Diamond Jenness': Before the Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic of the rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was snapped on sol 177 before NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool, or 'Rat.'

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  11. 'Diamond Jenness': After the Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rock dubbed 'Diamond Jenness.' It was taken on sol 177 (July 23, 2004) after the rover first ground into the rock with its rock abrasion tool, or 'Rat.' The rover later ground into the rock a second time. A sliced spherule, or 'blueberry,' is visible in the upper left corner of the hole.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  12. Designing shallow donors in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    The production of n-type semiconducting diamond has been a long-standing experimental challenge. The first-principles simulation of shallow dopants in semiconductors has been a long-standing theoretical challenge. A desirable theoretical goal is to identify impurities that will act as shallow donors in diamond and assess their experimental viability. I will discuss this identification process for the LiN4 donor complex. It builds a scientific argument from several models and computational results in the absence of computational tools that are both trustworthy and computationally tractable for this task. I will compare the theoretical assessment of viability with recent experimental efforts to co-dope diamond with lithium and nitrogen. Finally, I discuss the computational tools needed to facilitate future work on this problem and some preliminary simulations of donors near diamond surfaces. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program lab managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Diamond Nanophotonics and Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Paul

    2011-10-01

    The diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center is an optically active impurity whose ``atom-like'' properties make it a promising solid state qubit, in which well-defined optical transitions are used to control the quantum state of single NV electron and nuclear spins. These properties have led to impressive demonstrations of quantum information storage in single NV nuclear spins, entanglement between NV electron spins and single photons, and implementations of high resolution optical magnetometers using single NVs. A missing ingredient for implementing quantum information processing architectures with NVs is creating scalable coherent coupling between them. Nanophotonic circuits, in which waveguides function as a ``quantum bus'' between NVs embedded in optical microcavities, offer a chip-based solution to this hurdle. In my talk I will review recent advances in realizing nanophotonic devices in diamond based materials. I will present results demonstrating Purcell enhanced coupling between optical nanocavities and NVs in single crystal diamond, and will discuss opportunities and challenges which lay ahead for diamond quantum optics.

  14. In situ adaptive response to climate and habitat quality variation: spatial and temporal variation in European badger (Meles meles) body weight.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Andrew W; Fogarty, Ursula; O'Keeffe, James; Newman, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Variation in climatic and habitat conditions can affect populations through a variety of mechanisms, and these relationships can act at different temporal and spatial scales. Using post-mortem badger body weight records from 15 878 individuals captured across the Republic of Ireland (7224 setts across ca. 15 000 km(2) ; 2009-2012), we employed a hierarchical multilevel mixed model to evaluate the effects of climate (rainfall and temperature) and habitat quality (landscape suitability), while controlling for local abundance (unique badgers caught/sett/year). Body weight was affected strongly by temperature across a number of temporal scales (preceding month or season), with badgers being heavier if preceding temperatures (particularly during winter/spring) were warmer than the long-term seasonal mean. There was less support for rainfall across different temporal scales, although badgers did exhibit heavier weights when greater rainfall occurred one or 2 months prior to capture. Badgers were also heavier in areas with higher landscape habitat quality, modulated by the number of individuals captured per sett, consistent with density-dependent effects reducing weights. Overall, the mean badger body weight of culled individuals rose during the study period (2009-2012), more so for males than for females. With predicted increases in temperature, and rainfall, augmented by ongoing agricultural land conversion in this region, we project heavier individual badger body weights in the future. Increased body weight has been associated with higher fecundity, recruitment and survival rates in badgers, due to improved food availability and energetic budgets. We thus predict that climate change could increase the badger population across the Republic of Ireland. Nevertheless, we emphasize that, locally, populations could still be vulnerable to extreme weather variability coupled with detrimental agricultural practice, including population management.

  15. In situ adaptive response to climate and habitat quality variation: spatial and temporal variation in European badger (Meles meles) body weight.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Andrew W; Fogarty, Ursula; O'Keeffe, James; Newman, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Variation in climatic and habitat conditions can affect populations through a variety of mechanisms, and these relationships can act at different temporal and spatial scales. Using post-mortem badger body weight records from 15 878 individuals captured across the Republic of Ireland (7224 setts across ca. 15 000 km(2) ; 2009-2012), we employed a hierarchical multilevel mixed model to evaluate the effects of climate (rainfall and temperature) and habitat quality (landscape suitability), while controlling for local abundance (unique badgers caught/sett/year). Body weight was affected strongly by temperature across a number of temporal scales (preceding month or season), with badgers being heavier if preceding temperatures (particularly during winter/spring) were warmer than the long-term seasonal mean. There was less support for rainfall across different temporal scales, although badgers did exhibit heavier weights when greater rainfall occurred one or 2 months prior to capture. Badgers were also heavier in areas with higher landscape habitat quality, modulated by the number of individuals captured per sett, consistent with density-dependent effects reducing weights. Overall, the mean badger body weight of culled individuals rose during the study period (2009-2012), more so for males than for females. With predicted increases in temperature, and rainfall, augmented by ongoing agricultural land conversion in this region, we project heavier individual badger body weights in the future. Increased body weight has been associated with higher fecundity, recruitment and survival rates in badgers, due to improved food availability and energetic budgets. We thus predict that climate change could increase the badger population across the Republic of Ireland. Nevertheless, we emphasize that, locally, populations could still be vulnerable to extreme weather variability coupled with detrimental agricultural practice, including population management. PMID:25846328

  16. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  17. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  18. Multiple Diamond Anvil (MDA) apparatus using nano-polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irifune, T.; Kunimoto, T.; Tange, Y.; Shinmei, T.; Isobe, F.; Kurio, A.; Funakoshi, K.

    2011-12-01

    Thanks to the great efforts by Dave Mao, Bill Bassett, Taro Takahashi, and their colleagues at the University of Rochester through 1960s-70s, diamond anvil cell (DAC) became a major tool to investigate the deep Earth after its invention by scientists at NBS in 1958. DAC can now cover almost the entire pressure and temperature regimes of the Earth's interior, which seems to have solved the longstanding debate on the crystal structure of iron under the P-T conditions of the Earth's inner core. In contrast, various types of static large-volume presses (LVP) have been invented, where tungsten carbide has conventionally been used as anvils. Kawai-type multianvil apparatus (MA), which utilize 6 first-stage harden steel and 8 tungsten carbide anvils, is the most successful LVP, and has been used for accurate measurements of phase transitions, physical properties, element partitioning, etc. at high pressure and temperature. However, pressures using tungsten carbide as the second-stage anvils have been limited to about 30 GPa due to significant plastic deformation of the anvils. Efforts have been made to expand this pressure limit by replacing tungsten carbide anvils with harder sintered diamond (SD) anvils over the last two decades, but the pressures available in KMA with SD anvils have still been limited to below 100 GPa. We succeeded to produce nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD or HIME-Diamond) in 2003, which is known to have ultrahigh hardness, very high toughness and elastic stiffness, high transmittance of light, relatively low thermal conductivity. These properties are feasible for its use as anvils, and some preliminary experiments of application of NPD anvils to laser heated DAC have successfully made in the last few years. We are now able to synthesize NPD rods with about 1cm in both diameter and length using a newly constructed 6000-ton KMA at Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, and have just started to apply this new polycrystalline diamond as anvils

  19. a New Design for Diamond Window Equipped Paris-Edinburgh — First Tests and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchard, M.; Glasmacher, U. A.; Dedera, S.; Trautmann, C.

    2012-12-01

    High pressure cells of the Paris-Edinburgh type are important tools for experimental high pressure studies in material science. Although these cells were originally developed for use in neutron diffraction, today they are also applied in alternative experimental high pressure fields. Their main advantages are their small construction size, limited weight and the relative high reachable pressures with a maximized sample volume. The small construction size also results in very good cost efficiency. The major drawback of these cells is that due to their simple squeezer geometry pressure extrapolations are nearly impossible and, hence, the use of internal standard is mandatory. Consequently, the normal use of Paris-Edinburgh cells is mostly limited to experiments with neutron or synchrotron radiation, during which pressure and temperature are determined by using an internal diffraction standard. To overcome this problem, tone may combine the advantages of diamond anvil cells with those of Paris-Edinburgh-cells by integrating diamond windows into the upper and / or the lower anvil. With such a cell it is possible to retrieve pressure and / or temperature data by measuring the shift of Raman bands or fluorescence lines by spectroscopic methods. Several attempts have been made to build such a cell ([1] and Klotz pers. communication) using different window materials. Until now no final setup has been published. We present a new Paris-Edinburgh cell design especially constructed for use within high energy relativistic heavy ion radiation experiments. This design uses conventional diamond anvils as spectroscopic windows in conjunction with specially designed hardened steel anvils. We have performed first feasibility studies up to 2.5 GPa with a standard Raman spectrometer using a special adapted Raman glass fiber probe. We present results of several mechanical test runs and one experiment with relativistic heavy ion radiation at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum f

  20. Medical applications of diamond particles and surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, R. J.; Boehm, R. D.; Sumant, A. V.

    2011-04-01

    Diamond has been considered for use in several medical applications due to its unique mechanical, chemical, optical, and biological properties. In this paper, methods for preparing synthetic diamond surfaces and particles are described. In addition, recent developments involving the use of diamond in prostheses, sensing, imaging, and drug delivery applications are reviewed. These developments suggest that diamond-containing structures will provide significant improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions over the coming years. Diamond is an allotrope of carbon that is being considered for use in several medical applications. Ramachandran determined that the crystal structure of diamond consists of two close packed interpenetrating face centered cubic lattices; one lattice is shifted with respect to the other along the elemental cube space diagonal by one-quarter of its length. If one approximates carbon atoms as equal diameter rigid spheres, the filling of this construction is 34%. Due to the carbon-carbon distance (1.54 {angstrom}), diamond crystal exhibits the highest atomic density (1.76 x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}) of any solid. The very high bond energy between two carbon atoms (83 kcal/mol) and the directionality of tetrahedral bonds are the main reasons for the high strength of diamond. Diamond demonstrates the highest Vickers hardness value of any material (10,000 kg/mm{sup 2}). The tribological properties of diamond are also impressive; the coefficient of friction of polished diamond is 0.07 in argon and 0.05 in humid air. Diamond is resistant to corrosion except in an oxygen atmosphere at temperatures over 800 C. In addition, type IIa diamond exhibits the highest thermal conductivity of all materials (20 W cm{sup -1} K{sup -1} at room temperature).

  1. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  2. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  3. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  4. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  5. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  6. Optimizing the Growth of (111) Diamond for Diamond Based Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, Eric; Godwin, Patrick; Samarth, Nitin; Snyder, David; de Las Casas, Charles; Awschalom, David D.

    Magnetometers based on nitrogen vacancy (NV) ensembles have recently achieved sub-picotesla sensitivities [Phys. Rev. X 5, 041001(2015)], putting the technique on par with SQUID and MFM magnetometry.Typically these sensors use (100) oriented diamond with NV centers forming along all four (111) crystal orientations.This allows for vector magnetometry, but is a hindrance to the absolute sensitivity. Diamond grown on (111) oriented substrates through microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition(MP-CVD) provides a promising route in this context since such films can exhibit preferential orientation greater than 99% [Appl. Phys. Lett.104, 102407 (2014)]. An important challenge though is to achieve sufficiently high NV center densities required for enhancing the sensitivity of an NV ensemble magnetometer.We report systematic studies of the MP-CVD growth and characterization of (111) oriented diamond, where we vary growth temperature, methane concentration, and nitrogen doping. For each film we study the Nitrogen to NV ratio, the NV- to NV0 ratio, and alignment percentage to minimize sources of decoherence and ensure preferential alignment. From these measurements we determine the optimal growth parameters for high sensitivity, NV center ensemble scalar magnetometry. Funded by NSF-DMR.

  7. Adaptive hormetic response of pre-exposure of mouse brain with low-dose 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray on growth hormone (GH) and body weight induced by subsequent high-dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Zhou, Qingming; Liu, Bing; Li, Wenjian; Li, Xiaoda; Duan, Xin; Yuan, Zhigang; Zhou, Guangming; Min, Fengling

    2006-01-01

    The brain of the Kun-Ming strain mice were irradiated with 0.05 Gy of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray as the pre-exposure dose, and were then irradiated with 2 Gy of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray as challenging irradiation dose at 4 h after per-exposure. Body weight and serum growth hormone (GH) concentration were measured at 35th day after irradiation. The results showed that irradiation of mouse brain with 2 Gy of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray significantly diminished mouse body weight and level of serum GH. The relative biological effectiveness values of a 2 Gy dose of 12C 6+ ion calculated with respect to 60Co γ-ray were 1.47 and 1.34 for body weight and serum GH concentration, respectively. Pre-exposure with a low-dose (0.05 Gy) of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray significantly alleviated reductions of mouse body weight and level of serum GH induced by a subsequent high-dose (2 Gy) irradiation. The data suggested that low-dose ionizing irradiation can induce adaptive hormetic responses to the harmful effects of pituitary by subsequent high-dose exposure.

  8. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  9. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  10. Epitaxial growth of europium monoxide on diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Melville, A.; Heeg, T.; Mairoser, T.; Schmehl, A.; Fischer, M.; Gsell, S.; Schreck, M.; Awschalom, D. D.; Holländer, B.; Schubert, J.; Schlom, D. G.

    2013-11-25

    We report the epitaxial integration of phase-pure EuO on both single-crystal diamond and on epitaxial diamond films grown on silicon utilizing reactive molecular-beam epitaxy. The epitaxial orientation relationship is (001) EuO ‖ (001) diamond and [110] EuO ‖[100] diamond. The EuO layer is nominally unstrained and ferromagnetic with a transition temperature of 68 ± 2 K and a saturation magnetization of 5.5 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons per europium ion on the single-crystal diamond, and a transition temperature of 67 ± 2 K and a saturation magnetization of 2.1 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons per europium ion on the epitaxial diamond film.

  11. Ultrananocrystalline diamond contacts for electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2016-11-01

    A method of forming electrical contacts on a diamond substrate comprises producing a plasma ball using a microwave plasma source in the presence of a mixture of gases. The mixture of gases include a source of a p-type or an n-type dopant. The plasma ball is disposed at a first distance from the diamond substrate. The diamond substrate is maintained at a first temperature. The plasma ball is maintained at the first distance from the diamond substrate for a first time, and a UNCD film, which is doped with at least one of a p-type dopant and an n-type dopant, is disposed on the diamond substrate. The doped UNCD film is patterned to define UNCD electrical contacts on the diamond substrate.

  12. Diamond thermoluminescence properties of different chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Semjonova, L. F.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    It was found that thermoluminescence (TL) glows of diamonds depend on the origin of diamonds and the chondrite metamorphism degree. The investigation of TL of diamonds was continued and the results for diamonds from Murchison CM2, Krymka LL3.0, Kainsaz CO3, and Abee E4 were considered. The diamonds synthesized by CVD-process (samples 133, 159) and by detonation from soot (DDS-B14-89) were also analyzed for comparison. Before the TL measuring samples were annealed at approximately 350 C for a few seconds and then irradiated by gamma-rays of Cs-137 up to dose approximately 200 krad. TL-measurements were performed in the air atmosphere on the standard equipment. TL data for samples are shown. TL glow for some diamonds are also presented.

  13. The Toucan's Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    The Southern constellation Tucana (the Toucan) is probably best known as the home of the Small Magellanic Cloud, one of the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. But Tucana also hosts another famous object that shines thousands of lights, like a magnificent, oversized diamond in the sky: the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. More popularly known as 47 Tuc, it is surpassed in size and brightness by only one other globular cluster, Omega Centauri. Globular clusters are gigantic families of stars, comprising several tens of thousands of stars, all thought to be born at the same time from the same cloud of gas [1]. As such, they constitute unique laboratories for the study of how stars evolve and interact. This is even more so because they are located at the same distance, so the brightness of different types of stars, at different stages in their evolution can be directly compared. The stars in globular clusters are held together by their mutual gravity which gives them their spherical shape, hence their name. Globular clusters are thought to be among the oldest objects in our Milky Way galaxy, and contain therefore mostly old, low-mass stars. ESO PR Photo 20/06 ESO PR Photo 20/06 Globular Cluster 47 Tuc 47 Tucanae is an impressive globular cluster that is visible with the unaided eye from the southern hemisphere. It was discovered in 1751 by the French astronomer Nicholas Louis de Lacaille who cataloged it in his list of southern nebulous objects. Located about 16 000 light years away, it has a total mass of about 1 million times the mass of the Sun and is 120 light years across, making it appear on the sky as big as the full moon. The colour image of 47 Tucanae presented here was taken with FORS1 on ESO's Very Large Telescope in 2001. The image covers only the densest, very central part of the cluster. The globular cluster extends in reality four times further away! As can be seen however, the density of stars rapidly drops off when moving away from the centre. The red

  14. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  15. Diamonds and the african lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Boyd, F R; Gurney, J J

    1986-04-25

    Data and inferences drawn from studies of diamond inclusions, xenocrysts, and xenoliths in the kimberlites of southern Africa are combined to characterize the structure of that portion of the Kaapvaal craton that lies within the mantle. The craton has a root composed in large part of peridotites that are strongly depleted in basaltic components. The asthenosphere boundary shelves from depths of 170 to 190 kilometers beneath the craton to approximately 140 kilometers beneath the mobile belts bordering the craton on the south and west. The root formed earlier than 3 billion years ago, and at that time ambient temperatures in it were 900 degrees to 1200 degrees C; these temperatures are near those estimated from data for xenoliths erupted in the Late Cretaceous or from present-day heat-flow measurements. Many of the diamonds in southern Africa are believed to have crystallized in this root in Archean time and were xenocrysts in the kimberlites that brought them to the surface.

  16. Defect characterization in the diamond cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Zeren, Muzaffer . E-mail: zeren@kou.edu.tr; Karagoez, Sadi

    2006-08-15

    In this study, a general defect characterization in the diamond cutting tools used in natural stone cutting has been investigated. Transverse rupture tests were carried out with different matrix and diamond compositions. In these defect characterization studies on diamond cutting tool materials various microstructural analyses were performed using the techniques of light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersed X-ray spectrography (EDX) and image analysis (IA)

  17. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  18. Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Quan; Yu, Dongli; Xu, Bo; Hu, Wentao; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-06-12

    Although diamond is the hardest material for cutting tools, poor thermal stability has limited its applications, especially at high temperatures. Simultaneous improvement of the hardness and thermal stability of diamond has long been desirable. According to the Hall-Petch effect, the hardness of diamond can be enhanced by nanostructuring (by means of nanograined and nanotwinned microstructures), as shown in previous studies. However, for well-sintered nanograined diamonds, the grain sizes are technically limited to 10-30 nm (ref. 3), with degraded thermal stability compared with that of natural diamond. Recent success in synthesizing nanotwinned cubic boron nitride (nt-cBN) with a twin thickness down to ∼3.8 nm makes it feasible to simultaneously achieve smaller nanosize, ultrahardness and superior thermal stability. At present, nanotwinned diamond (nt-diamond) has not been fabricated successfully through direct conversions of various carbon precursors (such as graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon and C60). Here we report the direct synthesis of nt-diamond with an average twin thickness of ∼5 nm, using a precursor of onion carbon nanoparticles at high pressure and high temperature, and the observation of a new monoclinic crystalline form of diamond coexisting with nt-diamond. The pure synthetic bulk nt-diamond material shows unprecedented hardness and thermal stability, with Vickers hardness up to ∼200 GPa and an in-air oxidization temperature more than 200 °C higher than that of natural diamond. The creation of nanotwinned microstructures offers a general pathway for manufacturing new advanced carbon-based materials with exceptional thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  19. Study of diamond film growth and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharial

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to study diamond film growth and its properties in order to enhance the laser damage threshold of substrate materials. Calculations were performed to evaluate laser induced thermal stress parameter, R(sub T) of diamond. It is found that diamond has several orders of magnitude higher in value for R(sub T) compared to other materials. Thus, the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of diamond is much higher. Diamond films were grown using a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) system at various conditions of gas composition, pressure, temperature, and substrate materials. A 0.5 percent CH4 in H2 at 20 torr were ideal conditions for growing of high quality diamond films on substrates maintained at 900 C. The diamond films were polycrystalline which were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The top surface of the growing film is always rough due to the facets of polycrystalline film while the back surface of the film replicates the substrate surface. An analytical model based on two dimensional periodic heat flow was developed to calculate the effective in-plane (face parallel) diffusivity of a two layer system. The effective diffusivity of diamond/silicon samples was measured using a laser pulse technique. The thermal conductivity of the films was measured to be 13.5 W/cm K, which is better than that of a type Ia natural diamond. Laser induced damage experiments were performed on bare Si substrates, diamond film coated Si, and diamond film windows. Significant improvements in the LIDT were obtained for diamond film coated Si compared to the bare Si.

  20. Rapid Sintering of Nano-Diamond Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, A.; Nauyoks, S; Zerda, T; Zaporozhets, O

    2009-01-01

    Diamond compacts were sintered from nano-size diamond crystals at high pressure, 8 GPa, and temperature above 1500 degrees C for very short times ranging from 5 to 11 s. Structure and mechanical properties of the compacts have been characterized. Although we have not completely avoided graphitization of diamonds, the amount of graphite produced was low, less than 2%, and despite relatively high porosity, the compacts were characterized by high hardness, bulk and Young moduli.

  1. Diamond detector for alpha-particle spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dueñas, J A; de la Torre Pérez, J; Martín Sánchez, A; Martel, I

    2014-08-01

    An artificially grown high purity diamond was used as a detector for alpha-particle spectrometry. Diamond detectors can match the performance of silicon detectors employed in standard continuous air monitoring systems. Its radiation hardness and electronic properties make them ideal to work under extreme condition such as high temperature and ambient lights. A 50 μm thickness single-crystal diamond detector has been compared with a 300 μm passivated implanted planar silicon detector, under ambient conditions.

  2. Mineral resource of the month: diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents information on diamond, which is regarded as the world's most popular gemstone. It states that there is strength in the covalent bonding between its carbon atoms, resulting to the strength of its physical properties. The presence of colors in diamonds may be attributed to the impurities that settle in the crystal lattice. Diamonds have been used as decorative items since the ancient era.

  3. Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Quan; Yu, Dongli; Xu, Bo; Hu, Wentao; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-06-01

    Although diamond is the hardest material for cutting tools, poor thermal stability has limited its applications, especially at high temperatures. Simultaneous improvement of the hardness and thermal stability of diamond has long been desirable. According to the Hall-Petch effect, the hardness of diamond can be enhanced by nanostructuring (by means of nanograined and nanotwinned microstructures), as shown in previous studies. However, for well-sintered nanograined diamonds, the grain sizes are technically limited to 10-30 nm (ref. 3), with degraded thermal stability compared with that of natural diamond. Recent success in synthesizing nanotwinned cubic boron nitride (nt-cBN) with a twin thickness down to ~3.8 nm makes it feasible to simultaneously achieve smaller nanosize, ultrahardness and superior thermal stability. At present, nanotwinned diamond (nt-diamond) has not been fabricated successfully through direct conversions of various carbon precursors (such as graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon and C60). Here we report the direct synthesis of nt-diamond with an average twin thickness of ~5 nm, using a precursor of onion carbon nanoparticles at high pressure and high temperature, and the observation of a new monoclinic crystalline form of diamond coexisting with nt-diamond. The pure synthetic bulk nt-diamond material shows unprecedented hardness and thermal stability, with Vickers hardness up to ~200 GPa and an in-air oxidization temperature more than 200 °C higher than that of natural diamond. The creation of nanotwinned microstructures offers a general pathway for manufacturing new advanced carbon-based materials with exceptional thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  4. [Distribution of nitrogen and hydrogen in diamond and its significance to nucleation and growth of diamond].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Jun; Peng, Ming-Sheng; Meng, Yu-Fei; Yuan, Zhi-Zhong; Su, Yu-Wei; Li, Hong-Zhong

    2007-06-01

    From the center to the rim of natural diamond there are differences in nitrogen and C-H bond contents, suggesting that diamond was formed under varying substance conditions. Both the nitrogen and C-H bond contents tend to decrease from the center to the rim as a whole, indicaing that nitrogen and hydrogen are expended little by little during the formation of diamond. But in the middle area of the sample both the nitrogen and C-H bond contents have a tendency to increase. This implies that nitrogen and hydrogen are added into the environment of diamond formation, meanwhile nitrogen is added earlier. So the procedure of diamond formation may be divided into three stages, namely nucleation and growth in the early stage, growth in the middle stage and in the late stage. In the early and late stages nitrogen and hydrogen are consumed in the environment of diamond formation. In the middle stage nitrogen and hydrogen must be replenished for the growth of diamond, and nitrogen should be replenished earlier than hydrogen. Hydrogen is useful to the nucleation and growth of diamond. During the formation of diamond the compounds of nitrogen and hydrogen do not exist. So we must avoid the formation of compounds of nitrogen and hydrogen for the nucleation and growth of diamond if we plan to introduce hydrogen to the synthesis of diamond at high temperature and high pressure (HPHT). Implanted hydrogen in graphite for the HPHT synthesis of diamond is a good choice.

  5. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  6. Diamond Machining Applications And Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Roland J.

    1983-12-01

    Aspheric surface generation and precision machining have been important technologies at Hughes Optical Products, Inc. (formerly Optical Division, Bell & Howell Company) for over twenty years. Present machining capabilities and supporting services which are available on a custom basis are described. A variety of applications of diamond machining are illustrated, involving not only the usual reflective materials such as aluminum, copper, and electroless nickel but also such IR refractive materials as germanium, silicon, and chalcogenide glasses.

  7. Thin film diamond microstructure applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roppel, T.; Ellis, C.; Ramesham, R.; Jaworske, D.; Baginski, M. E.; Lee, S. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Selective deposition and abrasion, as well as etching in atomic oxygen or reduced-pressure air, have been used to prepare patterned polycrystalline diamond films which, on further processing by anisotropic Si etching, yield the microstructures of such devices as flow sensors and accelerometers. Both types of sensor have been experimentally tested in the respective functions of hot-wire anemometer and both single- and double-hinged accelerometer.

  8. Entanglement, holography and causal diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Haehl, Felix M.; Heller, Michal P.; Myers, Robert C.

    2016-08-01

    We argue that the degrees of freedom in a d-dimensional CFT can be reorganized in an insightful way by studying observables on the moduli space of causal diamonds (or equivalently, the space of pairs of timelike separated points). This 2 d-dimensional space naturally captures some of the fundamental nonlocality and causal structure inherent in the entanglement of CFT states. For any primary CFT operator, we construct an observable on this space, which is defined by smearing the associated one-point function over causal diamonds. Known examples of such quantities are the entanglement entropy of vacuum excitations and its higher spin generalizations. We show that in holographic CFTs, these observables are given by suitably defined integrals of dual bulk fields over the corresponding Ryu-Takayanagi minimal surfaces. Furthermore, we explain connections to the operator product expansion and the first law of entanglemententropy from this unifying point of view. We demonstrate that for small perturbations of the vacuum, our observables obey linear two-derivative equations of motion on the space of causal diamonds. In two dimensions, the latter is given by a product of two copies of a two-dimensional de Sitter space. For a class of universal states, we show that the entanglement entropy and its spin-three generalization obey nonlinear equations of motion with local interactions on this moduli space, which can be identified with Liouville and Toda equations, respectively. This suggests the possibility of extending the definition of our new observables beyond the linear level more generally and in such a way that they give rise to new dynamically interacting theories on the moduli space of causal diamonds. Various challenges one has to face in order to implement this idea are discussed.

  9. (Chemically vapor deposited diamond films)

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L. Jr.

    1990-09-22

    The NATO-ASI on Diamond and Diamond-Like Films and Coatings'' was an opportunity for us to learn the latest research results from ongoing programs in the leading laboratories of the world and relate them to our work. Specific examples are given in the comprehensive report which follows. The meeting format provided an ideal environment to meet and interact with our international counterparts. It is clear that our studies are well regarded, and that we have established an excellent reputation in a short time. New opportunities for collaboration were identified. A panel discussion at the end of the meeting addressed the needs and opportunities in the synthesis of CVD diamond. The key scientific needs are those related to modeling the nucleation and growth processes and to elucidation of the critical roles of atomic hydrogen and the mechanisms of carbon addition to the growing surfaces. The development and more extensive use of in situ diagnostics for both surface and gas phases are important to solving these issues. The more immediate practical questions concern the identification of the growth-rate-limiting steps, the relation of growth parameters to the resulting film structure, and the dependence of properties on structure.

  10. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector on diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Atikian, Haig A.; Burek, Michael J.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Lončar, Marko; Eftekharian, Amin; Jafari Salim, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-03-24

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are fabricated directly on diamond substrates and their optical and electrical properties are characterized. Dark count performance and photon count rates are measured at varying temperatures for 1310 nm and 632 nm photons. A multi-step diamond surface polishing procedure is reported, involving iterative reactive ion etching and mechanical polishing to create a suitable diamond surface for the deposition and patterning of thin film superconducting layers. Using this approach, diamond substrates with less than 300 pm Root Mean Square surface roughness are obtained.

  11. Growth of diamond by atomic vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Satoshi; Inuzuka, Tadao; Sawabe, Atsuhito; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    1990-01-01

    Diamond has been synthesized by a new vacuum deposition method called atomic vapor deposition (AVD). In AVD, most of the evaporated carbon is decomposed to atomic carbon. Diamond growth has been achieved on Si(100) surfaces using AVD at a substrate temperature of 800 C in a hydrogen atmosphere at 0.0002 torr. The average diamond crystalline size, as determined by TEM, is 2000 A with a number density of 2 x 10 to the 8th/sq cm. It is found that diamond can be deposited at low pressure by the deposition of atomic carbon with the aid of hydrogen.

  12. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  13. Processing of diamond by laser beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Masanori; Hirata, Atsushi

    1998-10-01

    YAG and ArF excimer laser beams, of which wavelengths are 1.06 micrometers and 193 nm respectively, have been applied to processing of a variety of diamonds. Cutting and smoothing of natural, CVD and sintered diamonds have been performed. CVD diamond films were prepared by arc discharge plasma jet CVD and microwave plasma CVD, and sintered diamonds contain metallic or ceramic binder have been used. Fundamental removal processes of diamond with YAG and ArF excimer laser have been investigated using natural single crystal and CVD diamonds in various atmospheres changing laser irradiation conditions such as average power, energy density and pulse repetition rates. Cutting of natural and CVD diamonds with YAG laser proceeds at higher peal power that occurs at lower pulse repetition rates. Smooth surfaces are obtained by excimer laser irradiation at the incident angle of 80 percent. In the cases of the processing with YAG laser, the effect of local heating by laser beam irradiation mainly assists the diamond processing, and diamond appears to be removed after graphitization and oxidization following vaporization in the atmosphere contains oxygen. The temperature measurement was carried out at backside of irradiation surface, and increase of temperature when YAG laser beam was irradiated was larger than that when excimer laser was irradiated. On the contrary, the detection of C, C2, C+, O2 and CO from the emission at the irradiation area with ArF excimer laser beam suggest that processing partly proceeds by the separation of carbon atoms from the surface of diamond after braking bonds between carbon atoms caused by laser beam. Cutting of sintered diamond with metallic binder was difficult because metallic binder remains in the groove while ceramic binder was easily removed. Processing technique using laser beams has been applied to surface planing, chip preparation and edge formation of CVD diamond and curved surface formation on sintered diamond. Surface planing was

  14. All diamond self-aligned thin film transistor

    DOEpatents

    Gerbi, Jennifer

    2008-07-01

    A substantially all diamond transistor with an electrically insulating substrate, an electrically conductive diamond layer on the substrate, and a source and a drain contact on the electrically conductive diamond layer. An electrically insulating diamond layer is in contact with the electrically conductive diamond layer, and a gate contact is on the electrically insulating diamond layer. The diamond layers may be homoepitaxial, polycrystalline, nanocrystalline or ultrananocrystalline in various combinations.A method of making a substantially all diamond self-aligned gate transistor is disclosed in which seeding and patterning can be avoided or minimized, if desired.

  15. Plasma test on industrial diamond powder in hydrogen and air for fracture strength study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Rohit Asuri Sudharshana

    Diamonds are the most precious material all over the world. Ever since their discovery, the desire for natural diamonds has been great; recently, the demand has steeply increased, leading to scarcity. For example, in 2010, diamonds worth $50 billion were marketed. This increased demand has led to discovering alternative sources to replace diamonds. The diamond, being the hardest material on earth, could be replaced with no other material except another diamond. Thus, the industrial or synthetic diamond was invented. Because of extreme hardness is one of diamond's properties, diamonds are used in cutting operations. The fracture strength of diamond is one of the crucial factors that determine its life time as a cutting tool. Glow discharge is one of the techniques used for plasma formation. The glow discharge process is conducted in a vacuum chamber by ionizing gas atoms. Ions penetrate into the atomic structure, ejecting a secondary electron. The objective of this study is to determine the change in fracture strength of industrial diamond powder before and after plasma treatment. This study focuses mainly on the change in crystal defects and crushing strength (CS) of industrial diamond powder after the penetration of hydrogen gas, air and hydrogen-air mixture ions into the sample powder. For this study, an industrial diamond powder sample of 100 carats weight, along with its average fracture strength value was received from Engis Corporation, Illinois. The sample was divided into parts, each weighing 10-12 carats. At the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), a plasma test was conducted on six sample parts for a total of 16 hours on each part. The three gas types mentioned above were used during plasma tests, with the pressure in vacuum chamber between 200 mTorr and 2 Torr. The plasma test on four sample parts was in the presence of hydrogen-air mixture. The first sample had chamber pressures between 200 mTorr and 400 mTorr. The remaining three samples had chamber

  16. PREFACE: Science's gem: diamond science 2009 Science's gem: diamond science 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainwood, Alison; Newton, Mark E.; Stoneham, Marshall

    2009-09-01

    Natural diamond has been valued for its appearance and mechanical properties for at least two thousand years. As a gem stone diamond is unsurpassed. However, scientific work, especially in the last 20 years, has demonstrated that diamond has numerous surprising properties and many unique ones. Some of the extreme properties have been known for many years, but the true scale of diamond's other highly desirable features is still only coming to light as control in the synthesis of diamond, and hence material perfection, improves. The ultimate prize for man-made diamond is surely not in the synthesis of gem stones, but in delivering technological solutions enabled by diamond to the challenges facing our society today. If the special properties are to be exploited to their full potential, at least four crucial factors must be considered. First, there must be sufficient scientific understanding of diamond to make applications effective, efficient and economical. Secondly, the means of fabrication and control of properties have to be achieved so that diamond's role can be optimised. Thirdly, it is not enough that its properties are superior to existing materials: they must be so much better that it is worth initiating new technologies to exploit them. Finally, any substantial applications will have to address the society's major needs worldwide. The clear technology drivers for the 21st century come from the biomedical technologies, the demand for energy subject to global constraints, and the information technologies, where perhaps diamond will provide the major enabling technology [1]. The papers in this volume concern the solid state physics of diamond, and primarily concern the first two factors: understanding, and control of properties. They address many of the outstanding basic problems, such as the identification of existing defects, which affect the material's properties, both desirable and less so. Regarding future substantial applications, one paper discusses

  17. Properties of chemical vapor infiltration diamond deposited in a diamond powder matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Tallant, D.R.; Hills, C.R.; Staley, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors have developed two techniques: electrophoretic deposition and screen printing, to form nonmined diamond powder precursors on substrates. They then densify these precursors in a hot filament assisted reactor. Analysis indicated that a hot filament assisted chemical vapor infiltration process forms intergranular diamond deposits with properties that are to some degree different from predominantly hot-filament-assisted CVD material.

  18. Formation of diamond in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Stachel, Thomas; Harris, Jeff W

    2009-09-01

    The principal sources of natural diamonds are peridotitic (about 2/3 of diamonds) and eclogitic (1/3) domains located at 140-200 km depth in the subcratonic lithospheric mantle. There, diamonds probably form during redox reactions in the presence of melt (likely for eclogitic and lherzolitic diamonds) or under subsolidus conditions in the presence of CHO fluids (likely for harzburgitic diamonds). Co-variations of δ(13)C and the nitrogen content of diamonds suggest that two modes of formation may have been operational in peridotitic sources: (1) reduction of carbonates, that during closed system fractionation drives diamond compositions to higher δ(13)C values and lower nitrogen concentrations and (2) oxidation of methane, that in a closed system leads to a trend of decreasing δ(13)C with decreasing nitrogen. The present day redox state of subcratonic lithospheric mantle is generally too reduced to allow for methane oxidation to be a widespread process. Therefore, reduction of carbonate dissolved in melts and fluids is likely the dominant mode of diamond formation for the Phanerozoic (545 Ma-present) and Proterozoic (2.5 Ga-545 Ma). Model calculations indicate, however, that for predominantly Paleoarchean (3.6-3.2 Ga) to Mesoarchean (3.2-2.8 Ga) harzburgitic diamonds, methane reduction is the principal mode of precipitation. This suggests that the reduced present day character (oxygen fugacity below carbonate stability) of peridotitic diamond sources may be a secondary feature, possibly acquired during reducing Archean (>2.5 Ga) metasomatism. Recycling of biogenic carbonates back into the mantle through subduction only became an important process in the Paleoproterozoic (2.5-1.6 Ga) and diamonds forming during carbonate reduction, therefore, may predominantly be post-Archean in age. For eclogitic diamonds, open system fractionation processes involving separation of a CO(2) fluid appear to dominate, but in principal the same two modes of formation

  19. Formation of diamond in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Stachel, Thomas; Harris, Jeff W

    2009-09-01

    The principal sources of natural diamonds are peridotitic (about 2/3 of diamonds) and eclogitic (1/3) domains located at 140-200 km depth in the subcratonic lithospheric mantle. There, diamonds probably form during redox reactions in the presence of melt (likely for eclogitic and lherzolitic diamonds) or under subsolidus conditions in the presence of CHO fluids (likely for harzburgitic diamonds). Co-variations of δ(13)C and the nitrogen content of diamonds suggest that two modes of formation may have been operational in peridotitic sources: (1) reduction of carbonates, that during closed system fractionation drives diamond compositions to higher δ(13)C values and lower nitrogen concentrations and (2) oxidation of methane, that in a closed system leads to a trend of decreasing δ(13)C with decreasing nitrogen. The present day redox state of subcratonic lithospheric mantle is generally too reduced to allow for methane oxidation to be a widespread process. Therefore, reduction of carbonate dissolved in melts and fluids is likely the dominant mode of diamond formation for the Phanerozoic (545 Ma-present) and Proterozoic (2.5 Ga-545 Ma). Model calculations indicate, however, that for predominantly Paleoarchean (3.6-3.2 Ga) to Mesoarchean (3.2-2.8 Ga) harzburgitic diamonds, methane reduction is the principal mode of precipitation. This suggests that the reduced present day character (oxygen fugacity below carbonate stability) of peridotitic diamond sources may be a secondary feature, possibly acquired during reducing Archean (>2.5 Ga) metasomatism. Recycling of biogenic carbonates back into the mantle through subduction only became an important process in the Paleoproterozoic (2.5-1.6 Ga) and diamonds forming during carbonate reduction, therefore, may predominantly be post-Archean in age. For eclogitic diamonds, open system fractionation processes involving separation of a CO(2) fluid appear to dominate, but in principal the same two modes of formation

  20. Micro-Raman Analysis of Irradiated Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Owing to its unique and robust physical properties, diamond is a much sought after material for use in advanced technologies, even in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). The volume and weight savings promised by MEMS-based devices are of particular interest to spaceflight applications. However, much basic materials science research remains to be completed in this field. Results of micro-Raman analysis of proton (10(exp 15) - 10(exp 17) H(+)/sq cm doses) irradiated chemical vapor deposited (CVD) films are presented and indicate that their microstructure is retained even after high radiation exposure.

  1. Diamond Growth in the Subduction Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, H.; Frost, D. J.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Leroy, C.; Estève, I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural diamonds are fabulous probes of the deep Earth Interior. They are the evidence of the deep storage of volatile elements, carbon at first, but also hydrogen and chlorine trapped as hydrous fluids in inclusions. The study of diamond growth processes in the lithosphere and mantle helps for our understanding of volatile elements cycling between deep reservoirs. We know now that inclusion-bearing diamonds similar to diamonds found in nature (i.e. polycrystalline, fibrous and coated diamonds) can grow in hydrous fluids or melts (Bureau et al., GCA 77, 202-214, 2012). Therefore, we propose that the best environment to promote such diamonds is the subduction factory, where highly hydrous fluids or melts are present. When oceanic plates are subducted in the lithosphere, they carry an oceanic crust soaked with seawater. While the slabs are traveling en route to the mantle, dehydration processes generate saline fluids highly concentrated in NaCl. In the present study we have experimentally shown that diamonds can grow from the saline fluids (up to 30 g/l NaCl in water) generated in subducted slabs. We have performed multi-anvil press experiments at 6-7 GPa and from 1300 to 1400°C during 6:00 hours to 30:00 hours. We observed large areas of new diamond grown in epitaxy on pure diamond seeds in salty hydrous carbonated melts, forming coated gems. The new rims are containing multi-component primary inclusions. Detailed characterizations of the diamonds and their inclusions have been performed and will be presented. These experimental results suggest that multi-component salty fluids of supercritical nature migrate with the slabs, down to the deep mantle. Such fluids may insure the first stage of the deep Earth's volatiles cycling (C, H, halogen elements) en route to the transition zone and the lower mantle. We suggest that the subduction factory may also be a diamond factory.

  2. The provenance of Borneo's enigmatic alluvial diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Lloyd; Graham, Ian; Tanner, Dominique; Hall, Robert; Armstrong, Richard; Yaxley, Greg; Barron, Larry; Spencer, Lee; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2016-04-01

    Gem-quality diamonds occur in several alluvial deposits across central and southern Borneo. Borneo has been a known source of diamonds for centuries, but the location of their primary igneous source remains enigmatic. Numerous geological models have been proposed to explain the distribution of Borneo's diamonds. To assess these models, we used a variety of techniques to examine heavy minerals from Kalimantan's Cempaka paleoalluvial diamond deposit. This involved collecting U-Pb isotopic data, fission track and trace element geochemistry of zircon as well as major element geochemical data of spinels and morphological descriptions of zircon and diamond. Our results indicate that the Cempaka diamonds were likely derived from at least two sources, one which was relatively local and/or involved little reworking, and the other more distal recording several periods of reworking. The distal diamond source is interpreted to be diamond-bearing pipes that intruded the basement of a block that: (1) rifted from northwest Australia (East Java or SW Borneo) and the diamonds were recycled into its sedimentary cover, or: (2) were emplaced elsewhere (e.g. NW Australia) and transported to a block (e.g. East Java or SW Borneo). Both of these scenarios require the diamonds to be transported with the block when it rifted from NW Australia in the Late Jurassic. The 'local' diamonds could be associated with ophiolitic rocks that are exposed in the nearby Meratus Mountains, or could be diamondiferous diatremes associated with eroded Miocene high-K alkaline intrusions north of the Barito Basin. If this were the case, these intrusions would indicate that the lithosphere beneath SW Borneo is thick (~150 km or greater).

  3. Nature of diamonds in Yakutian eclogites: views from eclogite tomography and mineral inclusions in diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Mahesh; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Misra, Kula C.; Carlson, William D.; Sobolev, Nikolai V.

    2004-09-01

    We have performed dissections of two diamondiferous eclogites (UX-1 and U33/1) from the Udachnaya kimberlite, Yakutia in order to understand the nature of diamond formation and the relationship between the diamonds, their mineral inclusions, and host eclogite minerals. Diamonds were carefully recovered from each xenolith, based upon high-resolution X-ray tomography images and three-dimensional models. The nature and physical properties of minerals, in direct contact with diamonds, were investigated at the time of diamond extraction. Polished sections of the eclogites were made, containing the mould areas of the diamonds, to further investigate the chemical compositions of the host minerals and the phases that were in contact with diamonds. Major- and minor-element compositions of silicate and sulfide mineral inclusions in diamonds show variations among each other, and from those in the host eclogites. Oxygen isotope compositions of one garnet and five clinopyroxene inclusions in diamonds from another Udachnaya eclogite (U51) span the entire range recorded for eclogite xenoliths from Udachnaya. In addition, the reported compositions of almost all clinopyroxene inclusions in U51 diamonds exhibit positive Eu anomaly. This feature, together with the oxygen isotopic characteristics, is consistent with the well-established hypothesis of subduction origin for Udachnaya eclogite xenoliths. It is intuitive to expect that all eclogite xenoliths in a particular kimberlite should have common heritage, at least with respect to their included diamonds. However, the variation in the composition of multiple inclusions within diamonds, and among diamonds, from the same eclogite indicates the involvement of complex processes in diamond genesis, at least in the eclogite xenoliths from Yakutia that we have studied.

  4. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.

    1982-01-01

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  5. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Liu, Shengzhong; Pan, Xianzheng; Zuiker, Christopher D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  6. Double bevel construction of a diamond anvil

    DOEpatents

    Moss, William C.

    1988-01-01

    A double or multiple bevel culet geometry is used on a diamond anvil in a high pressure cell apparatus to provide increased sample pressure and stability for a given force applied to the diamond tables. Double or multiple bevel culet geometries can also be used for sapphire or other hard crystal anvils. Pressures up to and above 5 Megabars can be reached.

  7. Double bevel construction of a diamond anvil

    DOEpatents

    Moss, W.C.

    1988-10-11

    A double or multiple bevel culet geometry is used on a diamond anvil in a high pressure cell apparatus to provide increased sample pressure and stability for a given force applied to the diamond tables. Double or multiple bevel culet geometries can also be used for sapphire or other hard crystal anvils. Pressures up to and above 5 Megabars can be reached. 8 figs.

  8. The World According to Jared Diamond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the book, "Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies" (Jared Diamond). Examines the strengths of the book, focusing on its distinctive aspects, while also offering criticism. States that the final chapter is the most problematic part of Diamond's work. (CMK)

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; and platelets, which are necessary for normal blood clotting. In Shwachman-Diamond syndrome , the bone marrow malfunctions and does not ... 06349.x. Citation on PubMed Dror Y. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2005 Dec;45(7):892-901. Review. ...

  10. Diamond film growth from fullerene precursors

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Liu, Shengzhong; Krauss, Alan R.; Pan, Xianzheng

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a fullerene vapor, providing a noble gas stream and combining the gas with the fullerene vapor, passing the combined fullerene vapor and noble gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the fullerene and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  11. Structures of diamond-like phases

    SciTech Connect

    Greshnyakov, V. A.; Belenkov, E. A.

    2011-07-15

    The diamond-like phases containing carbon atoms with the same degree of hybridization, which is close to sp{sup 3}, are classified. It is found that twenty such phases can exist, and ten of them are described for the first time. Molecular mechanics and semi-empirical quantum-mechanical methods are used to calculate the geometrically optimized structures of diamond-like phase clusters and to determine their structural parameters and properties, such as the density, the bulk modulus, and the sublimation energy. The difference between the properties of the diamond-like phases and those of diamond is found to be determined by the difference between the structures of these phases and diamond.

  12. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, Felix

    2016-09-01

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  13. Carbon transport in diamond anvil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Prakapenka, V.B.; Shen, G.; Dubrovinsky, L.S.

    2010-11-10

    High-pressure-induced carbon transport from diamond anvils into the pressure chamber of diamond anvil cells (DACs) was studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Depending on experimental conditions (temperature and pressure), various carbon phases (amorphous carbon, diamond, microcrystalline or nanocrystalline graphite) were detected in the originally carbon-free samples. Temperature-induced growth of a graphite phase at the sample/diamond interface was observed in situ at high pressure in an externally heated DAC. In laser-heated samples inside the pressure-transmitting medium, at pressures above 6 GPa there was transport of carbon from the diamond culet surface into the heated part of the sample. These observations suggest that account should be taken of possible carbon diffusion in high-pressure research with DACs, such as high-pressure melting, element partitioning, phase transformations, chemical reactions, and electrical resistivity.

  14. Design and production of diamond devices

    SciTech Connect

    Haenni, W.; Dan, J.P.; Perret, A.

    1995-12-31

    The outstanding properties of thin diamond films (hardness, chemical inertness, high thermal conductivity, high transparency, etc.) make them a good candidate for sensors, electronic or micromechanical devices, either self-standing or as part of microsystems. The structuring of diamond films and production of devices based on their properties has been described several times in the literature. Intrinsic as well as p-type doped diamond layers are now routinely deposited by different suppliers. To make full use of these layers in microtechnical products, it is necessary to further master suitable structuring techniques. Two methods have been developed and tested namely, selective area deposition (SAD) and direct etching of blanket-deposited diamond films. Both of these complementary approaches are described here, aiming at the production of thin diamond film structures suitable for example, to manufacture chemical sensors, cantilever beams or electrodes.

  15. Weight Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... obese. Achieving a healthy weight can help you control your cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. It ... use more calories than you eat. A weight-control strategy might include Choosing low-fat, low-calorie ...

  16. Body Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... sign of a medical problem. Causes for sudden weight loss can include Thyroid problems Cancer Infectious diseases Digestive diseases Certain medicines Sudden weight gain can be due to medicines, thyroid problems, ...

  17. Opalescent Diamonds Enriched in Hydrocarbon Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, I.; Tsao, C.

    2006-05-01

    We studied a large number of diamonds from Liaoning, China. These diamonds are not gem-quality, do not have sharp corners and sharp edges, they are not suitable for making cutting tools. Such industrial diamonds are usually crushed to form abrasives, thus, they might escape the scrutiny of researchers. In China, diamonds were routinely soaked in HF overnight to remove mud and other substances, and no oil and grease were used in the processing. It is not uncommon to see iridescence in pink, pale yellow and grey diamonds. The most common opalescent colors are alternating sharp bands of intense pink and indigo blue, and, less frequently, bands of yellow and blue-green, all may appear in the same diamond. As the bands have uniform thickness, their colors might not be due simply to optical effects, but rather, might be chemically related. We had chosen 10 diamonds to study their FT-IR spectra. Six of the crystals exhibited a group of hydrocarbons (HCs) peaks located just below 3000 cm-1, while all but one had a C-H stretch peak at 3107 cm-1. Two other diamonds had weak HCs peaks, but a very strong peak at 3107 cm-1. Two more diamonds had very weak HCs and C-H stretch peaks. To sum up, when a spectrum has strong HCs peaks, the C-H stretch peak is weak, and vice versa. There seems to be a chemical relationship between the substances represented by these peaks. Our observations indicate that hydrocarbon fluids might have been trapped during crystallization, but subsequently unmixed into well- organized thin bands. If fluids observed in the opalescent diamonds were soaked up in the mantle, then the amount of hydrocarbons existing in Earth's mantle might be quite appreciable in some environment.

  18. 16 CFR 23.13 - Disclosure of treatments to diamonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. 23.13... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.13 Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. A diamond is a gemstone product. Treatments to diamonds should be disclosed in the manner prescribed in §...

  19. 16 CFR 23.13 - Disclosure of treatments to diamonds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disclosure of treatments to diamonds 23.13... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.13 Disclosure of treatments to diamonds A diamond is a gemstone product. Treatments to diamonds should be disclosed in the manner prescribed in §...

  20. 16 CFR 23.13 - Disclosure of treatments to diamonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. 23.13... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.13 Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. A diamond is a gemstone product. Treatments to diamonds should be disclosed in the manner prescribed in §...

  1. 16 CFR 23.13 - Disclosure of treatments to diamonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. 23.13... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.13 Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. A diamond is a gemstone product. Treatments to diamonds should be disclosed in the manner prescribed in §...

  2. 16 CFR 23.13 - Disclosure of treatments to diamonds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disclosure of treatments to diamonds 23.13... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.13 Disclosure of treatments to diamonds A diamond is a gemstone product. Treatments to diamonds should be disclosed in the manner prescribed in §...

  3. Microstructure and thermal properties of copper–diamond composites with tungsten carbide coating on diamond particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Qiping; He, Xinbo Ren, Shubin; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Qian; Wu, Mao; Qu, Xuanhui

    2015-07-15

    An effective method for preparing tungsten carbide coating on diamond surfaces was proposed to improve the interface bonding between diamond and copper. The WC coating was formed on the diamond surfaces with a reaction medium of WO{sub 3} in mixed molten NaCl–KCl salts and the copper–diamond composites were obtained by vacuum pressure infiltration of WC-coated diamond particles with pure copper. The microstructure of interface bonding between diamond and copper was discussed. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of the obtained copper–diamond composites were investigated. Results indicated that the thermal conductivity of as-fabricated composite reached 658 W m{sup −} {sup 1} K{sup −} {sup 1}. Significant reduction in coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite compared with that of pure copper was obtained. - Highlights: • WC coating was successfully synthesized on diamond particles in molten salts. • WC coating obviously promoted the wettability of diamond and copper matrix. • WC coating greatly enhanced the thermal conductivity of Cu–diamond composite. • The composites are suitable candidates for heat sink applications.

  4. Adapting machine learning techniques to censored time-to-event health record data: A general-purpose approach using inverse probability of censoring weighting.

    PubMed

    Vock, David M; Wolfson, Julian; Bandyopadhyay, Sunayan; Adomavicius, Gediminas; Johnson, Paul E; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Models for predicting the probability of experiencing various health outcomes or adverse events over a certain time frame (e.g., having a heart attack in the next 5years) based on individual patient characteristics are important tools for managing patient care. Electronic health data (EHD) are appealing sources of training data because they provide access to large amounts of rich individual-level data from present-day patient populations. However, because EHD are derived by extracting information from administrative and clinical databases, some fraction of subjects will not be under observation for the entire time frame over which one wants to make predictions; this loss to follow-up is often due to disenrollment from the health system. For subjects without complete follow-up, whether or not they experienced the adverse event is unknown, and in statistical terms the event time is said to be right-censored. Most machine learning approaches to the problem have been relatively ad hoc; for example, common approaches for handling observations in which the event status is unknown include (1) discarding those observations, (2) treating them as non-events, (3) splitting those observations into two observations: one where the event occurs and one where the event does not. In this paper, we present a general-purpose approach to account for right-censored outcomes using inverse probability of censoring weighting (IPCW). We illustrate how IPCW can easily be incorporated into a number of existing machine learning algorithms used to mine big health care data including Bayesian networks, k-nearest neighbors, decision trees, and generalized additive models. We then show that our approach leads to better calibrated predictions than the three ad hoc approaches when applied to predicting the 5-year risk of experiencing a cardiovascular adverse event, using EHD from a large U.S. Midwestern healthcare system.

  5. Adapting machine learning techniques to censored time-to-event health record data: A general-purpose approach using inverse probability of censoring weighting.

    PubMed

    Vock, David M; Wolfson, Julian; Bandyopadhyay, Sunayan; Adomavicius, Gediminas; Johnson, Paul E; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Models for predicting the probability of experiencing various health outcomes or adverse events over a certain time frame (e.g., having a heart attack in the next 5years) based on individual patient characteristics are important tools for managing patient care. Electronic health data (EHD) are appealing sources of training data because they provide access to large amounts of rich individual-level data from present-day patient populations. However, because EHD are derived by extracting information from administrative and clinical databases, some fraction of subjects will not be under observation for the entire time frame over which one wants to make predictions; this loss to follow-up is often due to disenrollment from the health system. For subjects without complete follow-up, whether or not they experienced the adverse event is unknown, and in statistical terms the event time is said to be right-censored. Most machine learning approaches to the problem have been relatively ad hoc; for example, common approaches for handling observations in which the event status is unknown include (1) discarding those observations, (2) treating them as non-events, (3) splitting those observations into two observations: one where the event occurs and one where the event does not. In this paper, we present a general-purpose approach to account for right-censored outcomes using inverse probability of censoring weighting (IPCW). We illustrate how IPCW can easily be incorporated into a number of existing machine learning algorithms used to mine big health care data including Bayesian networks, k-nearest neighbors, decision trees, and generalized additive models. We then show that our approach leads to better calibrated predictions than the three ad hoc approaches when applied to predicting the 5-year risk of experiencing a cardiovascular adverse event, using EHD from a large U.S. Midwestern healthcare system. PMID:26992568

  6. Visuo-postural adaptation during the acquisition of a visually guided weight-shifting task: age-related differences in global and local dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hatzitaki, Vassilia; Konstadakos, Stylianos

    2007-10-01

    The effects of aging on the acquisition of a novel visuo-postural coordination task were addressed at two levels: (a) changes in the intersegmental coordination (local dynamics) (b) changes in the coupling of postural sway to the visual driving stimulus (global dynamics). Twelve elderly (age: 71.2 +/- 6.4 years; height: 169.3 +/- 3.8 cm; mass: 72.4 +/- 6.1 kg) and 12 young women (age: 27.1 +/- 4.9 years; height: 178.3 +/- 2.9 cm; mass: 56.7 +/- 4.1 kg) practiced a visually guided Weight-Shifting (WS) task while standing on a dual force platform. The participants were asked to keep the vertical force applied by each limb within a +/-30% force boundary that was visually specified by a target sine-wave signal. Practice consisted of three blocks of five trials performed in 1-day, followed by a block of five trials performed 24 h later. Ground reaction forces and segment (shank, pelvis, and upper trunk) angular kinematics were synchronously sampled through an A/D acquisition board and further analyzed employing spectral and coherence analysis. Elderly women had longer WS cycles, lower response gain, and higher within-trial variability, suggesting a weaker coupling between the visual stimulus and the response force. Spectral analysis of the ground reaction forces confirmed that regardless of age, visuo-postural coupling improved with practice. However, the recruitment of local degrees of freedom was different between the two age groups. With practice, young performers increased peak coherence between the pelvis and the upper trunk and reduced peak power of segment oscillations in the pitch direction. On the other hand, elderly women decreased active upper trunk rotation while shifting control to the lower limb. It is suggested that different functional coordination solutions are possible for attaining the same overall task goal. These solutions are determined by age-related constraints in the physiological systems supporting postural control.

  7. Diamonds and the african lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Boyd, F R; Gurney, J J

    1986-04-25

    Data and inferences drawn from studies of diamond inclusions, xenocrysts, and xenoliths in the kimberlites of southern Africa are combined to characterize the structure of that portion of the Kaapvaal craton that lies within the mantle. The craton has a root composed in large part of peridotites that are strongly depleted in basaltic components. The asthenosphere boundary shelves from depths of 170 to 190 kilometers beneath the craton to approximately 140 kilometers beneath the mobile belts bordering the craton on the south and west. The root formed earlier than 3 billion years ago, and at that time ambient temperatures in it were 900 degrees to 1200 degrees C; these temperatures are near those estimated from data for xenoliths erupted in the Late Cretaceous or from present-day heat-flow measurements. Many of the diamonds in southern Africa are believed to have crystallized in this root in Archean time and were xenocrysts in the kimberlites that brought them to the surface. PMID:17743571

  8. Diamond formation - Where, when and how?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2015-04-01

    Geothermobarometric calculations for a worldwide database of inclusions in diamond indicate that formation of the dominant harzburgitic diamond association occurred predominantly (90%) under subsolidus conditions. Diamonds in eclogitic and lherzolitic lithologies grew in the presence of a melt, unless their formation is related to strongly reducing CHO fluids that would increase the solidus temperature or occurred at pressure-temperature conditions below about 5 GPa and 1050 °C. Three quarters of peridotitic garnet inclusions in diamond classify as "depleted" due to their low Y and Zr contents but, based on LREEN-HREEN ratios invariably near or greater than one, they nevertheless reflect re-enrichment through either highly fractionated fluids or small amounts of melt. The trace element signatures of harzburgitic and lherzolitic garnet inclusions are broadly consistent with formation under subsolidus and supersolidus conditions, respectively. Diamond formation may be followed by cooling in the range of ~ 60-180 °C as a consequence of slow thermal relaxation or, in the case of the Kimberley area in South Africa, possibly uplift due to extension in the lithospheric mantle. In other cases, diamond formation and final residence took place at comparable temperatures or even associated with small temperature increases over time. Diamond formation in peridotitic substrates can only occur at conditions at least as reducing as the EMOD buffer. Evaluation of the redox state of 225 garnet peridotite xenoliths from cratons worldwide indicates that the vast majority of samples deriving from within the diamond stability field represent fO2 conditions below EMOD. Modeling reveals that less than 50 ppm fluid are required to completely reset the redox state of depleted cratonic peridotite to that of the fluid. Consequently, the overall reduced state of diamond stable peridotites implies that the last fluids to interact with the deep cratonic lithosphere were generally reducing in

  9. The Geopolitical Setting of Conflict Diamonds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    2002-05-01

    September 11, 2001 will live in infamy. Ideological differences have also led to senseless atrocities in Angola, Congo Republic, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. Hundreds of thousands have died, scores mutilated, and millions displaced. These have gone virtually unnoticed for decades. Unnoticed that is until it became evident that these barbaric acts were fueled by the sale or bartering of diamonds for arms, or by more ingenious ways that are less traceable. There is no end in sight. Industry has long recognized that about 20% of diamonds reaching the open market are smuggled from operating mines, and more recently that an additional 4% originates from conflict diamond sources. Diamond identification by laser inscription, ion implantation, or certification protocols are subject to fraudulent tampering. And these applied methods are thwarted if cutting and polishing centers are infiltrated, or if terrorist facilities are independently established. Mark ups are substantial (40-60%) from raw material to finished product. Tracking the paths of rough stones from mines to faceted gems is impractical because some 30-50 million cts of top quality material, or about 100 million stones, would require branding each year. Moreover, the long standing tradition of site-holdings and the bourse system of mixing or matching diamonds, inadvertently ensures regional anonymity. Conflict diamonds are mined in primary kimberlites and from widely dispersed alluvial fields in tropical jungle. Landscapes, eroded by 1-5 vertical km over 100 Ma, have transformed low grade primary deposits into unconsolidated sedimentary bonanzas. The current value of stones retrieved, by motivated diggers and skillful jiggers, in rebel held territories, is impossible to determine, but in 1993 amounted to tens of millions USD. Diamonds over 100 cts continue to surface at premier prices. Borders are porous, diamonds flow easily, and armed networks are permeable and mobile. Diamonds form at great depths (over 200 km

  10. Dislocation electrical conductivity of synthetic diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonenko, S. N. Samsonenko, N. D.

    2009-05-15

    A relationship between the electric resistance of single-crystal homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films and their internal structure has been investigated. It is established that the electrical conductivity of undoped homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films is directly related to the dislocation density in them. A relation linking the resistivity {rho} ({approx}10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} {omega} cm) with the dislocation density {gamma} ({approx}10{sup 14}-4 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -2}) is obtained. The character of this correlation is similar for both groups of homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films. Thin ({approx}1-8 {mu}m) homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films with small-angle dislocation boundaries between mosaic blocks exhibit dislocation conductivity. The activation energy of dislocation acceptor centers was calculated from the temperature dependence of the conductivity and was found to be {approx}0.3 eV. The conduction of thick diamond films (h > 10 {mu}m) with the resistivity {rho} {approx} 10{sup 8} {omega} cm is determined by the conduction of intercrystallite boundaries, which have a nondiamond hydrogenated structure. The electronic properties of the diamond films are compared with those of natural semiconductor diamonds of types IIb and Ic, in which dislocation acceptor centers have activation energies in the range 0.2-0.35 eV and are responsible for hole conduction.

  11. Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

  12. Phosphorylated nano-diamond/ Polyimide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Vezir Kahraman, Memet

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a novel route to synthesize polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond films with improved thermal and mechanical properties was developed. Surface phosphorylation of nano-diamond was performed in dichloromethane. Phosphorylation dramatically enhanced the thermal stability of nano-diamond. Poly(amic acid) (PAA), which is the precursor of PI, was successfully synthesized with 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-oxydianiline (4,4'-ODA) in the solution of N,N- dimethylformamide (DMF). Pure BTDA-ODA polyimide films and phosphorylated nanodiamond containing BTDA-ODA PI films were prepared. The PAA displayed good compatibility with phosphorylated nano-diamond. The morphology of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structure of polyimide and polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the phosphorylated nano-diamond was successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA results showed that the thermal stability of (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond film was increased.

  13. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2012-09-04

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  14. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2009-08-11

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  15. Artifact Diamond Its Allure And Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Max N.

    1989-01-01

    While the preponderance of the mechanical, optical, and electronic properties of natural diamond have been known for over a decade, only recently has artifact diamond in technologically useful form factors become an exciting possibility. The advent of sacrificial, lattice matched crystalline substrates provides the basis not only for semiconducting applications of diamond, but for optical mirrors, lenses, and windows as well. As a semiconductor, diamond has the highest resistivity, the highest saturated electron velocity, the highest thermal conductivity, the lowest dielectric constant, the highest dielectric strength, the greatest hardness, the largest bandgap and the smallest lattice constant of any material. It also has electron and hole mobilities greater than those of silicon. Its figure of merit as a microwave power amplifier is unexcelled and exceeds that of silicon by a multiplier of 8200. For integrated circuit potential, its thermal conductivity, saturated velocity, and dielectric constant also place it in the premier position (32 times that of silicon, 46 times that of GaAs). Although not verified, its radiation hardness should also be unmatched. Aside from its brilliant sparkle as a gemstone, there has been little use of diamond in the field of optics. Processing of the diamond surface now appears to be as simple as that of any other material --albeit with different techniques. In fact, it may be possible to etch diamond far more controllably (at economically viable rates) than any other material as the product of the etch is gaseous and the etched trough is self-cleaning. Other properties of diamond make it an ideal optical material. Among them are its unmatched thermal conductivity, its extremely low absorption loss above 228 nanometers, and unmatched Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, tensile strength, hardness, thermal shock, and modulus of elasticity. If the recently-found mechanisms by which erbium impurities in III-V junctions can be made to "lase

  16. Diamond-NICAM-SPRINTARS: downscaling and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, J.

    2012-12-01

    As a part of initiative "Research Program on Climate Change Adaptation" (RECCA) which investigates how predicted large-scale climate change may affect a local weather, and further examines possible atmospheric hazards that cities may encounter due to such a climate change, thus to guide policy makers on implementing new environmental measures, a "Development of Seamless Chemical AssimiLation System and its Application for Atmospheric Environmental Materials" (SALSA) project is funded by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and is focused on creating a regional (local) scale assimilation system that can accurately recreate and predict a transport of carbon dioxide and other air pollutants. In this study, a regional model of the next generation global cloud-resolving model NICAM (Non-hydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model) (Tomita and Satoh, 2004) is used and ran together with a transport model SPRINTARS (Spectral Radiation Transport Model for Aerosol Species) (Takemura et al, 2000) and a chemical transport model CHASER (Sudo et al, 2002) to simulate aerosols across urban cities (over a Kanto region including metropolitan Tokyo). The presentation will mainly be on a "Diamond-NICAM" (Figure 1), a regional climate model version of the global climate model NICAM, and its dynamical downscaling methodologies. Originally, a global NICAM can be described as twenty identical equilateral triangular-shaped panels covering the entire globe where grid points are at the corners of those panels, and to increase a resolution (called a "global-level" in NICAM), additional points are added at the middle of existing two adjacent points, so a number of panels increases by fourfold with an increment of one global-level. On the other hand, a Diamond-NICAM only uses two of those initial triangular-shaped panels, thus only covers part of the globe. In addition, NICAM uses an adaptive mesh scheme and its grid size can gradually decrease, as the grid

  17. Charge multiplication effect in thin diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skukan, N.; Grilj, V.; Sudić, I.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Makino, T.; Kambayashi, Y.; Andoh, Y.; Onoda, S.; Sato, S.; Ohshima, T.; Kamiya, T.; Jakšić, M.

    2016-07-01

    Herein, we report on the enhanced sensitivity for the detection of charged particles in single crystal chemical vapour deposition (scCVD) diamond radiation detectors. The experimental results demonstrate charge multiplication in thin planar diamond membrane detectors, upon impact of 18 MeV O ions, under high electric field conditions. Avalanche multiplication is widely exploited in devices such as avalanche photo diodes, but has never before been reproducibly observed in intrinsic CVD diamond. Because enhanced sensitivity for charged particle detection is obtained for short charge drift lengths without dark counts, this effect could be further exploited in the development of sensors based on avalanche multiplication and radiation detectors with extreme radiation hardness.

  18. Photoinduced laser etching of a diamond surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, V V; Komlenok, M S; Pimenov, S M; Konov, V I

    2007-11-30

    Nongraphitising ablation of the surface of a natural diamond single crystal irradiated by nanosecond UV laser pulses is studied experimentally. For laser fluences below the diamond graphitisation threshold, extremely low diamond etching rates (less than 1nm/1000 pulses) are obtained and the term nanoablation is used just for this process. The dependence of the nanoablation rate on the laser fluence is studied for samples irradiated both in air and in oxygen-free atmosphere. The effect of external heating on the nanoablation rate is analysed and a photochemical mechanism is proposed for describing it. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  19. Observation of twinning in diamond CVD films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, W.; Fabisiak, K.; Orzeszko, S.; Rozploch, F.

    1992-10-01

    Diamond particles prepared by dc-glow-discharge enhanced HF-CVD hybrid method, from a mixture of acetone vapor and hydrogen gas have been examined by TEM, RHEED and dark field method of observation. Results suggest the presence of twinned diamond particles, which can be reconstructed by a sequence of twinning operations. Contrary to the 'stick model' of the lattice, very common five-fold symmetry of diamond microcrystals may be obtained by applying a number of edge dislocations rather than the continuous deformation of many tetrahedral C-C bonds.

  20. The nature and origin of interstellar diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Freund, Friedemann; Shipp, Ruth; Krishnan, Kannan F. M.; Echer, Charles J.

    1988-01-01

    The C-delta component of the Allende meteorite is a microscopic diamond some of whose properties seem in conflict with those expected of diamond. High spatial resolution analytical data are presented here which may help explain such results. Surface and interfacial carbon atoms in the component, which may comprise as much as 25 percent of the total, impart an 'amorphous' character to some spectral data. These data support the proposed high-pressure conversion of amorphous carbon and graphite into diamonds due to grain-grain collisions in the ISM, although a low-pressure mechanism of formation cannot be ruled out.

  1. Supernovae as sources of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Small hydrocarbon grains in the vicinity of a supernova could be annealed by the absorption of several far-ultraviolet photons to produce the tiny diamonds found in meteorites. These freshly-synthesized diamond grains would be bombarded by the heavy ions and neutrals in the supernovae outflow and would thereby acquire the distinctive noble-gas isotopic signature by which they were first isolated. Only diamonds formed relatively close to supernovae would acquire such a signature, since grains formed farther out would be subjected to a much diluted and less energetic plasma environment.

  2. Trace element compositions of submicroscopic inclusions in coated diamond: A tool for understanding diamond petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, Emma; De Schrijver, Isabel; De Corte, Katrien; Jones, Adrian P.; Moens, Luc; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2005-10-01

    Trace element compositions of submicroscopic inclusions in both the core and the coat of five coated diamonds from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, formerly Zaire) have been analyzed by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Plasma Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Both the diamond core and coat inclusions show a general 2-4-fold enrichment in incompatible elements relative to major elements. This level of enrichment is unlikely to be explained by the entrapment of silicate mantle minerals (olivine, garnet, clinopyroxene, phlogopite) alone and thus submicroscopic fluid or glass inclusions are inferred in both the diamond coat and in the gem quality diamond core. The diamond core fluids have elevated High Field Strength Element (Ti, Ta, Zr, Nb) concentrations and are enriched in U relative to inclusions in the diamond coats and relative to chondrite. The core fluids are also moderately enriched in LILE (Ba, Sr, K). Therefore, we suggest that the diamond cores contain inclusions of silicate melt. However, the Ni content and Ni/Fe ratio of the trapped fluid are very high for a silicate melt in equilibrium with mantle minerals; high Ni and Co concentrations in the diamond cores are attributed to the presence of a sulfide phase coexisting with silicate melt in the diamond core inclusions. Inclusions in the diamond coat are enriched in LILE (U, Ba, Sr, K) and La over the diamond core fluids and to chondrite. The coats have incompatible element ratios similar to natural carbonatite (coat fluid: Na/Ba ≈0.66, La/Ta≈130). The coat fluid is also moderately enriched in HFSE (Ta, Nb, Zr) when normalized to chondritic Al. LILE and La enrichment is related to the presence of a carbonatitic fluid in the diamond coat inclusions, which is mixed with a HFSE-rich hydrous silicate fluid similar to that in the core. The composition of the coat fluid is consistent with a genetic link to group 1 kimberlite.

  3. Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

    2002-06-01

    This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater than

  4. Note: Novel diamond anvil cell for electrical measurements using boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, R.; Sasama, Y.; Fujioka, M.; Irifune, T.; Tanaka, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takeya, H.; Takano, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A novel diamond anvil cell suitable for electrical transport measurements under high pressure has been developed. A boron-doped metallic diamond film was deposited as an electrode on a nano-polycrystalline diamond anvil using a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique combined with electron beam lithography. The maximum pressure that can be achieved by this assembly is above 30 GPa. We report electrical transport measurements of Pb up to 8 GPa. The boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes showed no signs of degradation after repeated compression.

  5. Note: Novel diamond anvil cell for electrical measurements using boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, R; Sasama, Y; Fujioka, M; Irifune, T; Tanaka, M; Yamaguchi, T; Takeya, H; Takano, Y

    2016-07-01

    A novel diamond anvil cell suitable for electrical transport measurements under high pressure has been developed. A boron-doped metallic diamond film was deposited as an electrode on a nano-polycrystalline diamond anvil using a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique combined with electron beam lithography. The maximum pressure that can be achieved by this assembly is above 30 GPa. We report electrical transport measurements of Pb up to 8 GPa. The boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes showed no signs of degradation after repeated compression. PMID:27475610

  6. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  7. Electronic Impact of Inclusions in Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, E.M.; Smedley, J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Gaowei, M.; Keister, J.W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dudley, M.; Wu, Q.

    2010-04-07

    X-ray topography data are compared with photodiode responsivity maps to identify potential candidates for electron trapping in high purity, single crystal diamond. X-ray topography data reveal the defects that exist in the diamond material, which are dominated by non-electrically active linear dislocations. However, many diamonds also contain defects configurations (groups of threading dislocations originating from a secondary phase region or inclusion) in the bulk of the wafer which map well to regions of photoconductive gain, indicating that these inclusions are a source of electron trapping which affect the performance of diamond X-ray detectors. It was determined that photoconductive gain is only possible with the combination of an injecting contact and charge trapping in the near surface region. Typical photoconductive gain regions are 0.2 mm across; away from these near-surface inclusions the device yields the expected diode responsivity.

  8. Diamond Analyzed by Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1998-01-01

    Diamond is a promising semiconductor material for novel electronic applications because of its chemical stability and inertness, heat conduction properties, and so-called negative electron affinity (NEA). When a surface has NEA, electrons generated inside the bulk of the material are able to come out into the vacuum without any potential barrier (work function). Such a material would have an extremely high secondary electron emission coefficient o, very high photoelectron (quantum) yield, and would probably be an efficient field emitter. Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films have even more advantages than diamond single crystals. Their fabrication is relatively easy and inexpensive, and they can be grown with high levels of doping--consequently, they can have relatively high conductivity. Because of these properties, diamond can be used for cold cathodes and photocathodes in high-power electronics and in high-frequency and high-temperature semiconductor devices.

  9. The nature and origin of interstellar diamond.

    PubMed

    Blake, D F; Freund, F; Krishnan, K F; Echer, C J; Shipp, R; Bunch, T E; Tielens, A G; Lipari, R J; Hetherington, C J; Chang, S

    1988-04-14

    Microscopic diamond was recently discovered in oxidized acid residues from several carbonaceous chondrite meteorites (for example, the C delta component of the Allende meteorite). Some of the reported properties of C delta seem in conflict with those expected of diamond. Here we present high spatial resolution analytical data which may help to explain such results. The C delta diamond is an extremely fine-grained (0.5-10 nm) single-phase material, but surface and interfacial carbon atoms, which may comprise as much as 25% of the total, impart an 'amorphous' character to some spectral data. These data support the proposed high-pressure conversion of amorphous carbon and graphite into diamonds due to grain-grain collisions in the interstellar medium although a low-pressure mechanism of formation cannot be ruled out.

  10. Tribological properties of smooth diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenov, S. M.; Smolin, A. A.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Konov, V. I.; Bögli, U.; Blatter, A.; Loubnin, E. N.; Maillat, M.; Leijala, A.; Burger, J.; Hintermann, H. E.

    1996-02-01

    The friction and wear properties of smooth diamond coatings sliding against a monocrystalline ruby ball were studied using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The smooth diamond film surface was prepared either by (i) deposition of ultrathin nanocrystalline films in the thickness range from 0.2 to 2 μm or by (ii) postgrowth polishing. Excimer laser surface ablation, microwave plasma etching and mechanical lapping with diamond grit were used for postgrowth polishing. A correlation of film surface properties examined with different techniques (atomic force microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, stylus profilometry) and the tribological properties of the diamond films tested was established. The influence of laser-induced surface graphitization on the friction coefficient of laser-polished films was investigated.

  11. Ion-beam-assisted etching of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efremow, N. N.; Geis, M. W.; Flanders, D. C.; Lincoln, G. A.; Economou, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity, low RF loss, and inertness of diamond make it useful in traveling wave tubes operating in excess of 500 GHz. Such use requires the controlled etching of type IIA diamond to produce grating like structures tens of micrometers deep. Previous work on reactive ion etching with O2 gave etching rates on the order of 20 nm/min and poor etch selectivity between the masking material (Ni or Cr) and the diamond. An alternative approach which uses a Xe(+) beam and a reactive gas flux of NO2 in an ion-beam-assisted etching system is reported. An etching rate of 200 nm/min was obtained with an etching rate ratio of 20 between the diamond and an aluminum mask.

  12. CVD diamond substrate for microelectronics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, J.; Gat, R.

    1996-11-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of diamond films has evolved dramatically in recent years, and commercial opportunities for diamond substrates in thermal management applications are promising. The objective of this technology transfer initiative (TTI) is for Applied Science and Technology, Inc. (ASTEX) and AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM&T) to jointly develop and document the manufacturing processes and procedures required for the fabrication of multichip module circuits using CVD diamond substrates, with the major emphasis of the project concentrating on lapping/polishing prior to metallization. ASTEX would provide diamond films for the study, and FM&T would use its experience in lapping, polishing, and substrate metallization to perform secondary processing on the parts. The primary goal of the project was to establish manufacturing processes that lower the manufacturing cost sufficiently to enable broad commercialization of the technology.

  13. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  14. Diamond: An erosion resistant aerospace material

    SciTech Connect

    Jilbert, G.H.; Pickles, C.S.J.; Coad, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD) diamond growth technology has improved to the point where complete diamond infrared domes are now a possibility. However there are still considerable barriers to be overcome to ensure that the erosion resistance of the synthetic material is comparable to that of natural diamond. The Cavendish laboratory uses two systems to assess the erosion resistance of materials. The sand erosion rig uses compressed air to accelerate 300-600 {mu}m sand particles to velocities up to ca. 250 m s{sup -1}. The rain erosion resistance of a sample is evaluated using high velocity jets designed to simulate the effects of spherical raindrop impact. Both techniques have revealed the unique erosion characteristics of CVD diamond.

  15. Astronomers debate diamonds in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    This is not the first time the intriguing carbonaceous compound has been detected in space. A peculiar elite of twelve stars are known to produce it. The star now added by ISO to this elite is one of the best representatives of this exclusive family, since it emits a very strong signal of the compound. Additionally ISO found a second new member of the group with weaker emission, and also observed with a spectral resolution never achieved before other already known stars in this class. Astronomers think these ISO results will help solve the mystery of the true nature of the compound. Their publication by two different groups, from Spain and Canada, has triggered a debate on the topic, both in astronomy institutes and in chemistry laboratories. At present, mixed teams of astrophysicists and chemists are investigating in the lab compounds whose chemical signature or "fingerprint" matches that detected by ISO. Neither diamonds nor fullerenes have ever been detected in space, but their presence has been predicted. Tiny diamonds of pre-solar origin --older than the Solar System-- have been found in meteorites, which supports the as yet unconfirmed theory of their presence in interstellar space. The fullerene molecule, made of 60 carbon atoms linked to form a sphere (hence the name "buckyball"), has also been extensively searched for in space but never found. If the carbonaceous compound detected by ISO is a fullerene or a diamond, there will be new data on the production of these industrially interesting materials. Fullerenes are being investigated as "capsules" to deliver new pharmaceuticals to the body. Diamonds are commonly used in the electronics industry and for the development of new materials; if they are formed in the dust surrounding some stars, at relatively low temperatures and conditions of low pressure, companies could learn more about the ideal physical conditions to produce them. A textbook case The latest star in which the compound has been found is

  16. Weight Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quit Smoking Benefits of Quitting Health Effects of Smoking Secondhand Smoke Withdrawal Ways to Quit QuitGuide Pregnancy & Motherhood Pregnancy & Motherhood Before Your Baby is Born From Birth to 2 Years Quitting for Two SmokefreeMom Healthy Kids Parenting & ... Weight Management Weight Management ...

  17. Weight Watcher!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Doug

    1990-01-01

    The author, using a weight machine in an airport lounge, varies the machine's input parameters of height and gender to generate data sets of ideal weight. These data are later used at in-service workshops and in both primary and secondary classrooms to explore patterns and make predictions. (JJK)

  18. [Serum hormonal levels in diamond-extracting industry workers of Yakutia, with surface and underground type of work].

    PubMed

    Seliatitskaia, V G; Kuz'minova, O I; Nikolaev, Iu A; Galanova, Zh M

    2011-01-01

    The authors studied influence of work type (surface or underground) on serum hormonal levels in male workers of "International" mine within diamond-extracting complex of Yakutia-Sakha Republic. The results obtained show compensation and adaptation changes of endocrine system in males engaged into underground work vs. those of surface work.

  19. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Liu, S.Z.; Pan, X.Z.; Zuiker, C.D.

    1998-12-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 29 figs.

  20. Diamond film growth from fullerene precursors

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Liu, S.; Krauss, A.R.; Pan, X.

    1997-04-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a fullerene vapor, providing a noble gas stream and combining the gas with the fullerene vapor, passing the combined fullerene vapor and noble gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the fullerene and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 10 figs.

  1. Low-stress doped ultrananocrystalline diamond

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Buja, Federico; van Spengen, Willem Merlijn

    2016-10-25

    Nanocrystalline diamond coatings exhibit stress in nano/micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS). Doped nanocrstalline diamond coatings exhibit increased stress. A carbide forming metal coating reduces the in-plane stress. In addition, without any metal coating, simply growing UNCD or NCD with thickness in the range of 3-4 micron also reduces in-plane stress significantly. Such coatings can be used in MEMS applications.

  2. Detection and analysis of diamond fingerprinting feature and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Huang, Guoliang; Li, Qiang; Chen, Shengyi

    2011-01-01

    Before becoming a jewelry diamonds need to be carved artistically with some special geometric features as the structure of the polyhedron. There are subtle differences in the structure of this polyhedron in each diamond. With the spatial frequency spectrum analysis of diamond surface structure, we can obtain the diamond fingerprint information which represents the "Diamond ID" and has good specificity. Based on the optical Fourier Transform spatial spectrum analysis, the fingerprinting identification of surface structure of diamond in spatial frequency domain was studied in this paper. We constructed both the completely coherent diamond fingerprinting detection system illuminated by laser and the partially coherent diamond fingerprinting detection system illuminated by led, and analyzed the effect of the coherence of light source to the diamond fingerprinting feature. We studied rotation invariance and translation invariance of the diamond fingerprinting and verified the feasibility of real-time and accurate identification of diamond fingerprint. With the profit of this work, we can provide customs, jewelers and consumers with a real-time and reliable diamonds identification instrument, which will curb diamond smuggling, theft and other crimes, and ensure the healthy development of the diamond industry.

  3. Distribution and characteristics of diamonds from Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Win, T. T.; Davies, R. M.; Griffin, W. L.; Wathanakul, P.; French, D. H.

    2001-08-01

    Diamonds occur in headless placers at several locations within Myanmar. Twenty-six stones from the Momeik area of northern Myanmar and 111 stones from the Theindaw area of southern Myanmar have been studied to characterise their morphology, crystal forms, colour, degree of resorption, surface features, internal structures, mineral inclusions, and nitrogen content and aggregation state. Most stones grew originally as octahedra, but now show very high degrees of resorption, and highly polished surfaces, reflecting transport in a magma. Etch features are abundant, and breakage and abrasion are common, due to alluvial transport. Brown radiation spots are common, suggesting that these diamonds have a long history in surface environments. Cathodoluminescence (CL) images of plates and whole stones commonly display marked oscillatory zoning of yellow and blue bands, outlining octahedral growth zones. Many other stones show uniform yellow CL. Syngenetic mineral inclusions identified thus far are mainly of peridotitic paragenesis and include olivine, chromite and native iron. Infrared spectroscopy studies show that ˜10% of the diamonds have very low-N contents (Type II diamonds). More N-rich diamonds show high degrees of aggregation (Type IaAB). Both types are consistent with derivation from the upper mantle, rather than from crustal metamorphic sources. The primary source of these diamonds is believed to be an alkaline igneous rock (lamproitic rather than kimberlitic) but they may have reached their present locations via a secondary collector such as a sedimentary rock.

  4. Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy of Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.; Asnin, Vladimir M.; Petukhov, Andre G.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the secondary electron emission spectroscopy study of hydrogenated diamond surfaces for single crystals and chemical vapor-deposited polycrystalline films. One-electron calculations of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces having various hydrogen coverages are presented, the major features of the experimental spectra are explained, and a theoretical model for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces is proposed. An energy shift and a change in the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence (KVV) Auger spectra were observed for diamond surfaces after exposure to an electron beam or by annealing at temperatures higher than 950 C. This change is related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by hydrogen desorption from the surface. A strong negative electron affinity (NEA) effect, which appeared as a large, narrow peak in the low-energy portion of the spectrum of the secondary electron energy distribution, was also observed on the diamond surfaces. A fine structure in this peak, which was found for the first time, reflected the energy structure of the bottom of the conduction band. Further, the breakup of the bulk excitons at the surface during secondary electron emission was attributed to one of the features of this structure. The study demonstrated that the NEA type depends on the extent of hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface, changing from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surface.

  5. High-density fluids and the growth of monocrystalline diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Y.; Kiflawi, I.; Davies, N.; Navon, O.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical nature and composition of the growth medium of monocrystalline (MC) diamonds is still a matter of debate, partially because carbonate-bearing high-density fluids (HDFs) that are common in fibrous diamonds have not been found in MC diamonds. Here we report the first finding of HDF microinclusions in a MC octahedral diamond from Finsch, South Africa and in the MC octahedral core of a coated diamond from Kankan, Guinea; both diamonds carry nitrogen in B-centers. Numerous microinclusions in diamond Finsch_2a_cap1 are restricted to two thin layers parallel to the (1 1 1) face, ∼20 and 200 μm from the diamond rim. Low-Mg carbonatitic HDFs are found along the inner layer while the outer layer trapped saline compositions. The major and trace element compositions of the inclusions and their infrared spectra are highly similar to those of microinclusions found in fibrous diamonds. A few isolated microinclusions of saline compositions are scattered around a sulfide inclusion in the center of the octahedral core of diamond ON-KAN-383. This evidence for the involvement of oxidized fluids in the formation of MC diamonds adds to previous reports on the antiquity of HDFs in fibrous diamonds, the presence of carbonate and halide phases in inclusions in MC diamonds and the similarity of trace element pattern of a MC diamond to those of low-Mg carbonatitic HDF in fibrous diamonds. In addition, we show that the interaction of HDFs with depleted garnets can produce sinusoidal REE patterns which are one of the primary features of lherzolitic and harzburgitic garnet inclusions in MC diamonds. Together, these observations suggest that HDFs are involved in the formation of many types of diamonds from the Archaean to the Phanerozoic. HDFs are trapped in large quantities during rapid, fibrous growth, but must also be present during the growth of many MC diamonds.

  6. Raman spectroscopic investigation of graphitization of diamond during spark plasma sintering of UO2-diamond composite nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhichao; Subhash, Ghatu; Tulenko, James S.

    2016-07-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) was utilized to investigate the graphitization of diamond particles within a UO2-diamond composite processed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). While pure diamond gives a sharp Raman peak at 1331.6 cm-1, the graphitized diamond shows broad peaks either at 1350 cm-1 (G-peak) or 1580 cm-1 (D-peak). The degree of graphitization was quantified by calculating the area beneath the diamond and graphite peaks. It was found that more than 20% of diamond was graphitized on the surface of the UO2-diamond pellet and only around 10% diamond was graphitized in the interior regions of the pellet. This current study highlights the necessity to review the implications of these results carefully while implementing UO2-diamond composite nuclear fuel.

  7. Diamond Field Emission Source using Transfer Mold Technique Prepared by Diamond Powder Seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Sachiaki; Matsuba, Yohei; Takahashi, Kohro

    Diamond thin films fabricated by MPCVD (microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition) are available for use as a field emitter material, because of its high mechanical quality, thermal conductivity, chemical stability, environmental tolerance, and NEA (negative electron affinity). Diode and triode emitter arrays using P-doped polycrystalline diamond were manufactured on a SiO2/Si(100) substrate with reverse pyramids formed by the transfer mold technique. As the diamond nucleation process, spin-coat seeding with pure diamond powder dispersed in isoamyl acetate has been introduced in place of the bias method. SEM (scanning electron microscopy) images and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the crystal quality of the diamond thin film fabricated by spin-coat seeding is superior to that fabricated by the bias method. The diamond crystal completely grew on top of the diode emitter by the US (ultrasonic) treatment in a diamond powder solution before spin-coat seeding. The tip radius was smaller than 50 nm. The beginning voltage of the emission of the diode emitter is 3 V after the DC glow discharge treatment in H2, which is lower than that of an emitter array fabricated by the bias method, 40 V. On the other hand, the emission of the diamond triode emitter starts at a gate voltage of only 0.5 V, and the emission current of 50∼60 mA is obtained at a gate voltage of 2 V.

  8. Germanium: a new catalyst for diamond synthesis and a new optically active impurity in diamond.

    PubMed

    Palyanov, Yuri N; Kupriyanov, Igor N; Borzdov, Yuri M; Surovtsev, Nikolay V

    2015-01-01

    Diamond attracts considerable attention as a versatile and technologically useful material. For many demanding applications, such as recently emerged quantum optics and sensing, it is important to develop new routes for fabrication of diamond containing defects with specific optical, electronic and magnetic properties. Here we report on successful synthesis of diamond from a germanium-carbon system at conditions of 7 GPa and 1,500-1,800 °C. Both spontaneously nucleated diamond crystals and diamond growth layers on seeds were produced in experiments with reaction time up to 60 h. We found that diamonds synthesized in the Ge-C system contain a new optical centre with a ZPL system at 2.059 eV, which is assigned to germanium impurities. Photoluminescence from this centre is dominated by zero-phonon optical transitions even at room temperature. Our results have widened the family of non-metallic elemental catalysts for diamond synthesis and demonstrated the creation of germanium-related optical centres in diamond. PMID:26435400

  9. Electrical Resistivity of Natural Diamond and Diamond Films Between Room Temperature and 1200 C: Status Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of diamond films has been measured between room temperature and 1200 C. The films were grown by either microwave Plasma CVD or combustion flame at three different places. The resistivities of the current films are compared to those measured for both natural IIa diamond and films grown only one to two years ago.

  10. Germanium: a new catalyst for diamond synthesis and a new optically active impurity in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Palyanov, Yuri N.; Kupriyanov, Igor N.; Borzdov, Yuri M.; Surovtsev, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    Diamond attracts considerable attention as a versatile and technologically useful material. For many demanding applications, such as recently emerged quantum optics and sensing, it is important to develop new routes for fabrication of diamond containing defects with specific optical, electronic and magnetic properties. Here we report on successful synthesis of diamond from a germanium-carbon system at conditions of 7 GPa and 1,500–1,800 °C. Both spontaneously nucleated diamond crystals and diamond growth layers on seeds were produced in experiments with reaction time up to 60 h. We found that diamonds synthesized in the Ge-C system contain a new optical centre with a ZPL system at 2.059 eV, which is assigned to germanium impurities. Photoluminescence from this centre is dominated by zero-phonon optical transitions even at room temperature. Our results have widened the family of non-metallic elemental catalysts for diamond synthesis and demonstrated the creation of germanium-related optical centres in diamond. PMID:26435400

  11. EXELFS analysis of natural diamond and diamond films on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, A.D.; Araiza, L.C.; Borja, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this work, we report the EXELFS results obtained from a polycrystalline diamond film grown on smooth silicon substrates using the Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HF-CVD) technique in a two-step deposition process published elsewhere. In order to evaluate the quality of the thin film obtained, these results were compared with results obtained from natural diamond.

  12. Toward deep blue nano hope diamonds: heavily boron-doped diamond nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Steffen; Janssen, Wiebke; Turner, Stuart; Lu, Ying-Gang; Yeap, Weng Siang; Verbeeck, Jo; Haenen, Ken; Krueger, Anke

    2014-06-24

    The production of boron-doped diamond nanoparticles enables the application of this material for a broad range of fields, such as electrochemistry, thermal management, and fundamental superconductivity research. Here we present the production of highly boron-doped diamond nanoparticles using boron-doped CVD diamond films as a starting material. In a multistep milling process followed by purification and surface oxidation we obtained diamond nanoparticles of 10-60 nm with a boron content of approximately 2.3 × 10(21) cm(-3). Aberration-corrected HRTEM reveals the presence of defects within individual diamond grains, as well as a very thin nondiamond carbon layer at the particle surface. The boron K-edge electron energy-loss near-edge fine structure demonstrates that the B atoms are tetrahedrally embedded into the diamond lattice. The boron-doped diamond nanoparticles have been used to nucleate growth of a boron-doped diamond film by CVD that does not contain an insulating seeding layer. PMID:24738731

  13. Homoepitaxial Boron Doped Diamond Anvils as Heating Elements in a Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey; Samudrala, Gopi; Smith, Spencer; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Weir, Samuel

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in designer-diamond technology have allowed for the use of electrically and thermally conducting homoepitaxially-grown layers of boron-doped diamond (grown at 1200 °C with a 2% mixture of CH4 in H, resulting in extremely high doping levels ~ 1020/cm3) to be used as heating elements in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). These diamonds allow for precise control of the temperature inside of the diamond anvil itself, particularly when coupled with a cryostat. Furthermore, the unmatched thermally conducting nature of diamond ensures that no significant lateral gradient in temperature occurs across the culet area. Since a thermocouple can easily be attached anywhere on the diamond surface, we can also measure diamond temperatures directly. With two such heaters, one can raise sample temperatures uniformly, or with any desired gradient along the pressure axis while preserving optical access. In our continuing set of benchmark experiments, we use two newly created matching heater anvils with 500 μm culets to analyze the various fluorescence emission lines of ruby microspheres, which show more complicated behavior than traditional ruby chips. We also report on the temperature dependence of the high-pressure Raman modes of paracetamol (C8H9NO2) up to 20 GPa.

  14. Toward deep blue nano hope diamonds: heavily boron-doped diamond nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Steffen; Janssen, Wiebke; Turner, Stuart; Lu, Ying-Gang; Yeap, Weng Siang; Verbeeck, Jo; Haenen, Ken; Krueger, Anke

    2014-06-24

    The production of boron-doped diamond nanoparticles enables the application of this material for a broad range of fields, such as electrochemistry, thermal management, and fundamental superconductivity research. Here we present the production of highly boron-doped diamond nanoparticles using boron-doped CVD diamond films as a starting material. In a multistep milling process followed by purification and surface oxidation we obtained diamond nanoparticles of 10-60 nm with a boron content of approximately 2.3 × 10(21) cm(-3). Aberration-corrected HRTEM reveals the presence of defects within individual diamond grains, as well as a very thin nondiamond carbon layer at the particle surface. The boron K-edge electron energy-loss near-edge fine structure demonstrates that the B atoms are tetrahedrally embedded into the diamond lattice. The boron-doped diamond nanoparticles have been used to nucleate growth of a boron-doped diamond film by CVD that does not contain an insulating seeding layer.

  15. Birth Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the placenta and substance abuse by the mother. Some low birth weight babies may be more at risk for certain health problems. Some may become sick in the first days of life or develop infections. Others may suffer ...

  16. Weight simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Device applies compressive force to bone to minimize loss of bone calcium during weightlessness or bedrest. Force is applied through weights, or hydraulic, pneumatic or electrically actuated devices. Device is lightweight and easy to maintain and operate.

  17. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Seals, R.D.; Price, R.E.

    1997-06-03

    A method and composition is disclosed for the deposition of a thick layer of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate. The softened or molten composition crystallizes on the substrate to form a thick deposition layer comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent and may include at least one secondary constituent. Preferably, the secondary constituents are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) powder and mixtures thereof. 9 figs.

  18. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Seals, Roland D.; Price, R. Eugene

    1997-01-01

    A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

  19. Metal films on the surfaces and within diamond crystals from Arkhangelskaya and Yakutian diamond provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, A. B.; Kriulina, G. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Representative samples of diamonds from five kimberlite pipes (Lomonosovskaya, Archangel'sk, Snegurochka, XXIII Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), and Internationalnaya) of the Arkhangelskaya and Yakutian diamond provinces in Russia have been studied. Thirty-three varieties of metal films have been identified as syngenetic associated minerals. The films consist of 15 chemical elements that occur in the form of native metals and their natural alloys. Remnants of metal films were detected within diamond crystals. The metal films coating diamonds are a worldwide phenomenon. To date, these films have been described from Europe, Asia, South America, and Africa. Native metals, their alloys, and intermetallides are actual companion minerals of diamond.

  20. Status and applications of diamond and diamond-like materials: An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Recent discoveries that make possible the growth of crystalline diamond by chemical vapor deposition offer the potential for a wide variety of new applications. This report takes a broad look at the state of the technology following from these discoveries in relation to other allied materials, such as high-pressure diamond and cubic boron nitride. Most of the potential defense, space, and commercial applications are related to diamond's hardness, but some utilize other aspects such as optical or electronic properties. The growth processes are reviewed, and techniques for characterizing the resulting materials' properties are discussed. Crystalline diamond is emphasized, but other diamond-like materials (silicon carbide, amorphous carbon containing hydrogen) are also examined. Scientific, technical, and economic problem areas that could impede the rapid exploitation of these materials are identified. Recommendations are presented covering broad areas of research and development.

  1. Optimum selection of high performance mirror substrates for diamond finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Kenneth S.; Comstock, Lovell E.; Wamboldt, Leonard; Sutherland, James S.

    2016-05-01

    Due to advances in manufacturing processes, the substrate options for high performance diamond machined mirrors are expanding. Fewer compromises have to be made to achieve the needed weight, stiffness and finish while maintaining reasonable costs. In addition to the traditional mirror materials like aluminum and beryllium, there are some less common materials that can now be included in the trade space that fill the cost and performance continuum between wrought aluminum and beryllium mirrors. Aluminum and beryllium, respectively, had been the low cost/fair performance and very high cost/very high performance bounds for substrate selection. These additional substrates provide multiple near net shape blank options and processes, mostly within these bounds, that can be considered in a mirror cost versus performance trade analysis. This paper will include a summary of some advances in manufacturing processes that provide more substrate options for diamond machined mirrors with some sample performance analysis and data. This is merged with the traditional substrate options to illustrate the now larger mirror substrate trade space. Some benchmark structural analysis is provided to back up a generic mirror design trade study.

  2. Selected Topics in CVD Diamond Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Satoshi; Nebel, Christoph E.; Nesladek, Milos

    2006-10-01

    Since the discovery of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond growth in 1976, the steady scientific progress often resulted in surprising new discoveries and breakthroughs. This brought us to the idea to publish the special issue Selected Topics in CVD Diamond Research in physica status solidi (a), reflecting such advancements and interesting results at the leading edge of diamond research.The present issue summarizes this progress in the CVD diamond field by selecting contributions from several areas such as superconductivity, super-excitonic radiation, quantum computing, bio-functionalization, surface electronic properties, the nature of phosphorus doping, transport properties in high energy detectors, CVD growth and properties of nanocrystalline diamond. In all these directions CVD diamond appears to be very competitive in comparison with other semiconducting materials.As Editors of this special issue, we must admit that the selection is biased by our opinion. Nonetheless, we are sure that each contribution introduces new ideas and results which will improve the understanding of the current level of physics and chemistry of this attractive wide-bandgap semiconductor and which will help to bring it closer to applications.All submissions were invited based on the contributions of the authors to their specific research field. The Feature Articles have the format of topical reviews to give the reader a comprehensive summary. Partially, however, they are written in research paper style to report new results of ongoing research.We hope that this issue will attract the attention of a broad community of scientists and engineers, and that it will facilitate the utilization of diamond in electronic applications and technologies of the future.

  3. Kimberlite emplacement record in diamond morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedortchouk, Y.; Chinn, I.

    2015-12-01

    Diamond resorption morphology reflects conditions and events in the host kimberlite magma and in diamond sources in subcratonic mantle. Recent experimental studies on diamond dissolution enable us now to use surface features of diamonds to examine magmatic fluid in kimberlites. This study uses optical and scanning electron microscopy examination of ~750 macro-diamonds from two kimberlites in Orapa cluster, Botswana. Kimberlite A is a simple body filled with coherent kimberlite facies (CK); kimberlite B is a complex body with two facies of coherent kimberlite and a massive volcaniclastic kimberlite facies (MVK). Distinction between kimberlite-induced and mantle-derived resorption was based on: the type of the most abundant resorption style, morphology of crystals with attached kimberlite fragments, and the study of pseudohemimorphic diamonds. Kimberlite-induced resorption is the focus of this work. The three facies in the pipe B show three contrasting diamond resorption types. Resorption in MVK facies leads to glossy rounded surfaces with fine striation and hillocks, and is identical to the resorption style in CK facies of pipe A. This type of resorption is typical for volcaniclastic facies and indicates emplacement in the presence of abundant COH fluid with high H2O:CO2 ratio (>50mol% of H2O). We propose that pipe A is a root zone supplying material to a larger kimberlite body filled with VK. The two CK in pipe B have very different resorption style. One forms similar glossy surfaces but with regular small cavities of rounded outline, while the other seems more corrosive and develops extremely rough features and deep cavities. Comparison to the experimental data suggests that the former had almost pure H2O fluid at low pressure (where solubility of SiO2 is low). The later CK facies was emplaced in the absence or very low abundance of a free fluid, and possibly in melt closer to carbonatitic composition.

  4. Low-temperature deposition of transparent diamond films with a microwave cavity plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulczynski, Michael J.

    1998-10-01

    Low-temperature diamond deposition with Microwave Cavity Plasma Reactor (MCPR) technology was investigated for application to temperature sensitive substrates. The substrate temperature during most CVD diamond deposition processes is typically greater then 600 C; however, there are some applications where temperature sensitive materials are used and the deposition temperature must be maintained below 550 C. These applications include materials like boro-silicate glass, which has a relatively low strain-point temperature, and integrated circuits that contain low melting point components. Experiments were conducted in three areas. The first area was MCPR development, the second was benchmark deposition and characterization of diamond films on silicon substrates and the third was deposition and characterization of diamond films on boro-silicate glass substrates. MCPR development included an investigation of various MCPR configurations that were designed and adapted for uniform, low-temperature diamond deposition over areas as large as 80-cm2. Reactors were investigated with end-feed microwave excitation and side-feed microwave excitation for maximum deposition area and uniformity. Various substrate receptor configurations were also investigated including a substrate heater and cooler. From these investigations, deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, deposition rate, deposition area and deposition uniformity were characterized. The benchmark silicon diamond deposition experiments were conducted for comparison to previous high temperature, >550 C, MCPR research and growth models. Here deposition results such as deposition rate and film quality were compared with applications of diamond growth models by Harris-Goodwin and Bachmann. Additionally, characterization experiments were conducted to investigate film attributes that are critical to optical applications, such as film surface roughness and deposition uniformity. Included as variables in these

  5. n-Type diamond and method for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    A new n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed, which is doped with n-type dopant atoms. Such diamond is advantageously formed by chemical vapor deposition from a source gas mixture comprising a carbon source compound for the diamond, and a volatile hot wire filament for the n-type impurity species, so that the n-type impurity atoms are doped in the diamond during its formation. A corresponding chemical vapor deposition method of forming the n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed. The n-type semiconducting diamond of the invention may be usefully employed in the formation of diamond-based transistor devices comprising pn diamond junctions, and in other microelectronic device applications.

  6. Diamonds, Eclogites, and the Oxidation State of the Earth's Mantle.

    PubMed

    Luth, R W

    1993-07-01

    The reaction dolomite + 2 coesite --><-- diopside + 2 diamond + 2O(2) defines the coexistence of diamond and carbonate in mantle eclogites. The oxygen fugacity of this reaction is approximately 1 log unit higher at a given temperature and pressure than the oxygen fugacities of the analogous reactions that govern the stability of diamond in peridotite. This difference allows diamond-bearing eclogite to coexist with peridotite containing carbonate or carbonate + diamond. This potential coexistence of diamond-bearing eclogite and carbonate-bearing peridotite can explain the presence of carbon-free peridotite interlayered with garnet pyroxenites that contain graphitized diamond in the Moroccan Beni Bousera massif at the Earth's surface and the preferential preservation of diamond-bearing eclogitic relative to peridotitic xenoliths in the Roberts Victor kimberlite. PMID:17750546

  7. FRONT ELEVATION, HOUSE AT NORTHWEST CORNER OF SEVENTEENTH AND DIAMOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT ELEVATION, HOUSE AT NORTHWEST CORNER OF SEVENTEENTH AND DIAMOND STREETS AND THE ATTACHED INTERIOR UNIT (NOS. 1701 AND 1703). - 1700 Block Diamond Street (Houses), North & south sides between Seventeenth & Eighteenth Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF THE DIAMOND MINEYARD LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF THE DIAMOND MINEYARD LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING THE DRIES ON THE LEFT, TAR STORAGE AND TOILET FACILITIES IN THE CENTER, AND A ROPE CLEANING HOUSE ON THE RIGHT - Butte Mineyards, Diamond Mine, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  9. 17. VIEW OF THE DIAMOND MINEYARD LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE DRIES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF THE DIAMOND MINEYARD LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE DRIES ARE ON THE LEFT, WITH THE TAR HOUSE, TOILET, AND ROPE CLAMP CLEANING BUILDING TO THE RIGHT - Butte Mineyards, Diamond Mine, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  10. Diamonds, Eclogites, and the Oxidation State of the Earth's Mantle.

    PubMed

    Luth, R W

    1993-07-01

    The reaction dolomite + 2 coesite --><-- diopside + 2 diamond + 2O(2) defines the coexistence of diamond and carbonate in mantle eclogites. The oxygen fugacity of this reaction is approximately 1 log unit higher at a given temperature and pressure than the oxygen fugacities of the analogous reactions that govern the stability of diamond in peridotite. This difference allows diamond-bearing eclogite to coexist with peridotite containing carbonate or carbonate + diamond. This potential coexistence of diamond-bearing eclogite and carbonate-bearing peridotite can explain the presence of carbon-free peridotite interlayered with garnet pyroxenites that contain graphitized diamond in the Moroccan Beni Bousera massif at the Earth's surface and the preferential preservation of diamond-bearing eclogitic relative to peridotitic xenoliths in the Roberts Victor kimberlite.

  11. The Petrography of Meteoritic Nano-Diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    At least some meteoritic nanodiamonds are likely of presolar origin because of their association with anomalous Xe-HL and Te isotopic components indicative of a supernova (SN) origin. But the abundance of Xe is such that only approx. 1 in 10(exp 6) nano-diamonds contains a Xe atom, and the bulk C-13/C-12 composition of nano-diamond acid residues is chondritic (solar). Therefore, it is possible that a significant fraction of meteoritic nano-diamonds formed within the solar nebula. Nano-diamonds have recently been detected for the first time within the accretion discs of young stars by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). No comparable evidence of nanodiamonds in the interstellar medium has yet been found. We have identified nano-diamonds in acid etched thin-sections of meteorites, polar micrometeorites, and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) with the goal of determining their distribution as a function of heliocentric distance. (It is assumed the meteorites and the polar micrometeorites are from asteroids at 2-4 AU and at least some of the IDPs are from comets at >50AU). We found that nano-diamonds are heterogeneously distributed throughout carbon-rich meteoritic materials (we identified them in some IDPs and not in others), and that their abundance may actually decrease with heliocentric distance, consistent with the hypothesis that some of them formed within the inner solar system and not in a presolar (SN) environment. In order to gain further insight about the origins of meteoritic nano-diamonds we are currently investigating their distribution in unetched thin-sections. We have examined a chondritic cluster IDP (U220GCA), fragments of the Tagish Lake (CM1) meteorite, and a SN graphite spherule (KE3d8) isolated from the Murchison (CM) meteorite. We selected U220GCA because its nano-diamond abundance (in acid etched thin-sections) appears to be as much as approx. 10X higher than in Murchison matrix, Tagish Lake because it has a higher reported nano-diamond

  12. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  13. Diamond Provenance Through Shape, Colour, Surface Features and Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J.

    2002-05-01

    The physical properties of diamond provide a possible means by which run-of-mine productions may be identified. Such properties as shape, the regularity and angularity of the crystal form, the level of transparency, colour, syngenetic inclusion content and surface feature characteristics, all as a function of diamond size, can classify diamond productions. In early work, up to 1500 diamonds in specific sizes ranging from just under 2mm up to 6mm were evaluated. Using this procedure, most of the diamonds from the main mines in southern Africa have now been classified. Within South Africa, the mine at Swartruggens is the only one to have measurable levels of cube-shaped diamonds and an absence of the spinel twin form of diamond, more commonly known as the macle. In Botswana, the proportion of cube related forms at Jwaneng is about four times that at Orapa. Whilst the common diamond colours, colourless, yellow and brown, occur in most mines, there is a marked change in the proportion of transparent green-coated diamonds with depth in mines such as Finsch and Jwaneng. Individual mines may also have very small proportions of distinctive diamond colours, such as pinks at the Argyle mine in Australia and blues in the Premier mine in South Africa. More recently, classification emphasis has shifted away from large numbers of diamonds examined and particular attention has been paid to surface features, which reflect changes to the diamond either whilst still in the kimberlite, or subsequently during transport to an alluvial source. A classification of diamonds at the Venetia mine, South Africa, for example, showed that the proportion of diamonds with the feature referred to as corrosion sculpture, was distinctive between kimberlite types within the mine. With alluvial diamonds, transport causes further defects, particularly a general increase in the proportion of diamonds with surface features referred to as percussion marks and edge abrasion. The above observational

  14. Brazed Diamond Micropowder Bur Fabricated by Supersonic Frequency Induction Heating for Precision Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bojiang; Lou, Jianpeng; Pang, Qian

    2014-04-01

    The common brazed diamond micropowder bur fabricated in a vacuum furnace produces an even brazing alloy surface. The small brazed diamond grits show low outcropping from the brazing alloy surface, and the chip space between them is small. The bur shows a low grinding efficiency and poor heat dissipation. In this study, a brazed diamond micropowder bur was fabricated by supersonic frequency induction heating. The method afforded a fluctuant surface on the brazing alloy. The brazed diamond grits with an outcropping height distributed uniformly on the fluctuant surface. The fluctuant surface showed a certain chip space. These characteristics of the tool increased the grinding efficiency and decreased the temperature of the grinding arc area. The roughness R a of the ceramic tile surface trimmed by the tool cylinder was between 0.09 and 0.12 μm. In the first 90 min, the decrease in the weight of the ceramic tile ground by the tool cylinder was higher than that ground by the tool fabricated in a vacuum furnace. When the ceramic tile was cylindrically ground, the temperature of the grinding arc area measured using a thermocouple remained below 70 °C.

  15. Ultradispersity of diamond at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Raty, Jean-Yves; Galli, Giulia

    2003-12-01

    Nanometre-sized diamond has been found in meteorites, protoplanetary nebulae and interstellar dusts, as well as in residues of detonation and in diamond films. Remarkably, the size distribution of diamond nanoparticles seems to be peaked around 2-5 nm, and to be largely independent of preparation conditions. We have carried out ab initio calculations of the stability of nanodiamond as a function of surface hydrogen coverage and of size. We have found that at about 3 nm, and for a broad range of pressures and temperatures, particles with bare, reconstructed surfaces become thermodynamically more stable than those with hydrogenated surfaces, thus preventing the formation of larger grains. Our findings provide an explanation of the size distribution of extraterrestrial and of terrestrial nanodiamond found in ultradispersed and ultracrystalline diamond films. They also provide an atomistic structural model of these films, based on the topology and structure of 2-3-nm dimond clusters consisting of a diamond core surrounded by a fullerene-like carbon network. PMID:14634641

  16. A diamond nanowire single-photon source.

    PubMed

    Babinec, Thomas M; Hausmann, Birgit J M; Khan, Mughees; Zhang, Yinan; Maze, Jeronimo R; Hemmer, Philip R; Loncar, Marko

    2010-03-01

    The development of a robust light source that emits one photon at a time will allow new technologies such as secure communication through quantum cryptography. Devices based on fluorescent dye molecules, quantum dots and carbon nanotubes have been demonstrated, but none has combined a high single-photon flux with stable, room-temperature operation. Luminescent centres in diamond have recently emerged as a stable alternative, and, in the case of nitrogen-vacancy centres, offer spin quantum bits with optical readout. However, these luminescent centres in bulk diamond crystals have the disadvantage of low photon out-coupling. Here, we demonstrate a single-photon source composed of a nitrogen-vacancy centre in a diamond nanowire, which produces ten times greater flux than bulk diamond devices, while using ten times less power. This result enables a new class of devices for photonic and quantum information processing based on nanostructured diamond, and could have a broader impact in nanoelectromechanical systems, sensing and scanning probe microscopy. PMID:20154687

  17. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  18. Auger Spectroscopy of Hydrogenated Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.; Petukhov, A. G.; Foygel, M.

    1997-01-01

    An energy shift and a change of the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence Auger spectra are observed for diamond surfaces after their exposure to an electron beam, or annealing at temperatures higher then 950 C. The effect is studied for both natural diamond crystals and chemical-vapor-deposited diamond films. A theoretical model is proposed for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces. The observed changes of the carbon Auger line shape are shown to be related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by the hydrogen desorption from the surface. One-electron calculation of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces with various hydrogen coverages are presented. They are based on self-consistent wave functions and matrix elements calculated in the framework of the local-density approximation and the self-consistent linear muffin-tin orbital method with static core-hole effects taken into account. The major features of experimental spectra are explained.

  19. A diamond nanowire single-photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babinec, Thomas M.; Hausmann, Birgit J. M.; Khan, Mughees; Zhang, Yinan; Maze, Jeronimo R.; Hemmer, Philip R.; Lončar, Marko

    2010-03-01

    The development of a robust light source that emits one photon at a time will allow new technologies such as secure communication through quantum cryptography. Devices based on fluorescent dye molecules, quantum dots and carbon nanotubes have been demonstrated, but none has combined a high single-photon flux with stable, room-temperature operation. Luminescent centres in diamond have recently emerged as a stable alternative, and, in the case of nitrogen-vacancy centres, offer spin quantum bits with optical readout. However, these luminescent centres in bulk diamond crystals have the disadvantage of low photon out-coupling. Here, we demonstrate a single-photon source composed of a nitrogen-vacancy centre in a diamond nanowire, which produces ten times greater flux than bulk diamond devices, while using ten times less power. This result enables a new class of devices for photonic and quantum information processing based on nanostructured diamond, and could have a broader impact in nanoelectromechanical systems, sensing and scanning probe microscopy.

  20. Comparative evaluation of CVD diamond technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds occurs from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures in the presence of atomic hydrogen at subatmospheric pressures. Most CVD methods are based on different means of generating and transporting atomic hydrogen in a particular system. Evaluation of these different techniques involves their capital costs, material costs, energy costs, labor costs and the type and quality of diamond that they produce. Currently, there is no universal agreement on which is the best technique and technique selection has been largely driven by the professional background of the user as well as the particular application of interest. This article discusses the criteria for evaluating a process for low-pressure deposition of diamond. Next, a brief history of low-pressure diamond synthesis is reviewed. Several specific processes are addressed, including the hot filament process, hot filament electron-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and plasma generation of atomic hydrogen by glow discharge, microwave discharge, low pressure radio frequency discharge, high pressure DC discharge, high pressure microwave discharge jets, high pressure RF discharge, and high and low pressure flames. Other types of diamond deposition methods are also evaluated. 101 refs., 15 figs.

  1. Extreme ultraviolet transmission of a synthetic diamond thin film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, John V.; Gibson, J. L.; Knowles, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements are presented of a thin film of synthetic diamond at various wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet. The synthetic diamond combines the transmission properties of carbon with the strength, density, and ruggedness of a natural diamond. The Extreme Ultraviolet Transmission (EUV) of a film of the synthetic diamond has shown the existence of a thin surface layer of silicon, probably in the form of silicon carbide, which is not a contaminant layer.

  2. Study of Electron Transport and Amplification in Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Erik M.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2013-03-31

    As a successful completion of this award, my group has demonstrated world-leading electron gain from diamond for use in a diamond-amplified photocathode. Also, using high-resolution photoemission measurements we were able to uncover exciting new physics of the electron emission mechanisms from hydrogen terminated diamond. Our work, through the continued support of HEP, has resulted in a greater understanding of the diamond material science, including current limits, charge transport modeling, and spatial uniformity.

  3. The Mysteries of Diamonds: Bizarre History, Amazing Properties, Unique Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Harris

    2008-06-24

    Diamonds have been a prized material throughout history. They are scarce and beautiful, wars have been fought over them, and they remain today a symbol of wealth and power. Diamonds also have exceptional physical properties which can lead to unique applications in science. There are now techniques to artificially synthesize diamonds of extraordinarily high quality. In this talk, Professor Kagan will discuss the history of diamonds, their bizarre properties, and their manufacture and use for 21st century science.

  4. Alluvial Diamond Resource Potential and Production Capacity Assessment of Ghana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.; Anum, Solomon; Phillips, Emily C.

    2010-01-01

    In May of 2000, a meeting was convened in Kimberley, South Africa, and attended by representatives of the diamond industry and leaders of African governments to develop a certification process intended to assure that rough, exported diamonds were free of conflictual concerns. This meeting was supported later in 2000 by the United Nations in a resolution adopted by the General Assembly. By 2002, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) was ratified and signed by both diamond-producing and diamond-importing countries. Over 70 countries were included as members at the end of 2007. To prevent trade in 'conflict' diamonds while protecting legitimate trade, the KPCS requires that each country set up an internal system of controls to prevent conflict diamonds from entering any imported or exported shipments of rough diamonds. Every diamond or diamond shipment must be accompanied by a Kimberley Process (KP) certificate and be contained in tamper-proof packaging. The objective of this study was to assess the alluvial diamond resource endowment and current production capacity of the alluvial diamond-mining sector in Ghana. A modified volume and grade methodology was used to estimate the remaining diamond reserves within the Birim and Bonsa diamond fields. The production capacity of the sector was estimated using a formulaic expression of the number of workers reported in the sector, their productivity, and the average grade of deposits mined. This study estimates that there are approximately 91,600,000 carats of alluvial diamonds remaining in both the Birim and Bonsa diamond fields: 89,000,000 carats in the Birim and 2,600,000 carats in the Bonsa. Production capacity is calculated to be 765,000 carats per year, based on the formula used and available data on the number of workers and worker productivity. Annual production is highly dependent on the international diamond market and prices, the numbers of seasonal workers actively mining in the sector, and

  5. Effect of diamond on structure and properties of confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batsanov, Stepan S.; Batsanov, Andrei S.

    2016-05-01

    The molar volume of water adsorbed on the surface of micro- and nano-powders of diamond was determined from the measured densities of dry and variously hydrated diamond powders. This volume decreases near the diamond surface and in the first adsorbed monolayer can be as low as half that of bulk water. This effect can be attributed to breakdown of the hydrogen bond network, as confirmed by IR spectroscopy and calorimetrical data for crystal hydrates of diamond.

  6. In situ observation of quasimelting of diamond and reversible graphite-diamond phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Huang, J Y

    2007-08-01

    Because of technique difficulties in achieving the extreme high-pressure and high-temperature (HPHT) simultaneously, direct observation of the structures of carbon at extreme HPHT conditions has not been possible. Banhart and Ajayan discovered remarkably that carbon onions can act as nanoscopic pressure cells to generate high pressures. By heating carbon onions to approximately 700 degrees C and under electron beam irradiation, the graphite-to-diamond transformation was observed in situ by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the highest achievable temperature in a TEM heating holder is less than 1000 degrees C. Here we report that, by using carbon nanotubes as heaters and carbon onions as high-pressure cells, temperatures higher than 2000 degrees C and pressures higher than 40 GPa were achieved simultaneously in carbon onions. At such HPHT conditions and facilitated by electron beam irradiation, the diamond formed in the carbon onion cores frequently changed its shape, size, orientation, and internal structure and moved like a fluid, implying that it was in a quasimelting state. The fluctuation between the solid phase of diamond and the fluid/amorphous phase of diamond-like carbon, and the changes of the shape, size, and orientation of the solid diamond, were attributed to the dynamic crystallization of diamond crystal from the quasimolten state and the dynamic graphite-diamond phase transformations. Our discovery offers unprecedented opportunities to studying the nanostructures of carbon at extreme conditions in situ and at an atomic scale.

  7. Ultra-high vacuum cryotribology of diamond and diamond-like films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggleton, Matthew; Taborek, P.

    2008-03-01

    We have used a sliding block tribometer (described in J.C. Burton, P. Taborek, and J.E. Rutledge, TRIBOLOGY LETTERS 23, 131, 2006) to measure the temperature dependence of the kinetic friction coefficient of single crystal diamond on various types of CVD diamond films including microcrystalline diamond, nanocrystalline diamond, and diamond-like carbon. We have also studied various other solid and fluid lubricants. These measurements have been performed in ultra-high vacuum and at temperatures ranging from 6 to 300 Kelvin. Although microcrystalline diamond has a low friction coefficient in air; in vacuum, the friction coefficient rises to approximately 0.7 and is independent of temperature. Nanocrystalline diamond is a much better tribological material in vacuum, particularly for T>240K. Near 240K there is a reversible transition to a higher friction state. We will discuss the correlation between the tribological properties and the material properties such as sp2/sp3 ratio, hydrogen content, and grain size. This work is supported by Extreme Friction: MURI AFOSR # FA9550-04-1-0381

  8. Composite materials with viscoelastic stiffness greater than diamond.

    PubMed

    Jaglinski, T; Kochmann, D; Stone, D; Lakes, R S

    2007-02-01

    We show that composite materials can exhibit a viscoelastic modulus (Young's modulus) that is far greater than that of either constituent. The modulus, but not the strength, of the composite was observed to be substantially greater than that of diamond. These composites contain bariumtitanate inclusions, which undergo a volume-change phase transformation if they are not constrained. In the composite, the inclusions are partially constrained by the surrounding metal matrix. The constraint stabilizes the negative bulk modulus (inverse compressibility) of the inclusions. This negative modulus arises from stored elastic energy in the inclusions, in contrast to periodic composite metamaterials that exhibit negative refraction by inertial resonant effects. Conventional composites with positive-stiffness constituents have aggregate properties bounded by a weighted average of constituent properties; their modulus cannot exceed that of the stiffest constituent. PMID:17272714

  9. Fast bolometer built in an artificial HPHT diamond matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Klokov, A Yu; Sharkov, A I; Galkina, T I; Khmelnitskii, R A; Dravin, V A; Gippius, Aleksei A

    2010-05-26

    A fast bolometer built in a plate of diamond grown at high pressure by the gradient growth method is developed and fabricated. The parameters of this structure are compared with these of the structures investigated earlier, which were fabricated based on chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond and natural type IIa diamond.

  10. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  11. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  12. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  13. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  14. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  15. Raman Microscopic Characterization of Proton-Irradiated Polycrystalline Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. L.; Davidson, J. L.; Lance, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The microstructural effects of irradiating polycrystalline diamond films with proton dosages ranging from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 17) H(+) per square centimeter was examined. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman microscopy were used to examine the changes in the diamond crystalline lattice as a function of depth. Results indicate that the diamond lattice is retained, even at maximum irradiation levels.

  16. Are small diamonds thermodynamically stable in the interstellar medium?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III

    1987-01-01

    Very small diamond particles (50 A diameter) are shown to be thermodynamically stable with respect to similar sized graphite particles for reasonable values of the surface free energies of diamond and graphite. Small diamonds are likely to be stable against both thermal evaporation and chemical attack in the general interstellar medium. A few of the consequences of these conclusions are examined.

  17. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  18. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  19. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  20. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  1. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  2. 27 CFR 9.166 - Diamond Mountain District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diamond Mountain District... Diamond Mountain District. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Diamond Mountain District.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of...

  3. 27 CFR 9.166 - Diamond Mountain District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diamond Mountain District... Diamond Mountain District. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Diamond Mountain District.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of...

  4. 27 CFR 9.166 - Diamond Mountain District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diamond Mountain District... Diamond Mountain District. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Diamond Mountain District.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of...

  5. 27 CFR 9.166 - Diamond Mountain District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diamond Mountain District... Diamond Mountain District. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Diamond Mountain District.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of...

  6. 27 CFR 9.166 - Diamond Mountain District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diamond Mountain District... Diamond Mountain District. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Diamond Mountain District.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of...

  7. Electrical Characterization of Diamond/Boron Doped Diamond Nanostructures for Use in Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołuński, Ł.; Zwolski, K.; Płotka, P.

    2016-01-01

    The polycrystalline boron doped diamond (BDD) shows stable electrical properties and high tolerance for harsh environments (e.g. high temperature or aggressive chemical compounds) comparing to other materials used in semiconductor devices. In this study authors have designed electronic devices fabricated from non-intentionally (NiD) films and highly boron doped diamond structures. Presented semiconductor devices consist of highly boron doped structures grown on NiD diamond films. Fabricated structures were analyzed by electrical measurements for use in harsh environment applications. Moreover, the boron-doping level and influence of oxygen content on chemical composition of diamond films were particularly investigated. Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (MW PE CVD) has been used for thin diamond films growth. Non-intentionally doped diamond (0 ppm [B]/[C]) films have been deposited on the Si/SiO2 wafers with different content of carbon, boron and oxygen in the gas phase. Then, the shape of the highly doped diamond structures were obtained by pyrolysis of SiO2 on NiD film and standard lithography process. The highly doped structures were obtained for different growth time and [B]/[C] ratio (4000 - 10000 ppm). The narrowest distance between two highly doped structures was 5pm. The standard Ti/Au ohmic contacts were deposited using physical vapour deposition for electrical characterization of NiD/BDD devices. The influence of diffusion boron from highly doped diamond into non-doped/low-doped diamond film was investigated. Surface morphology of designed structures was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope and optical microscope. The resistivity of the NiD and film was studied using four-point probe measurements also DC studies were done.

  8. First principles study of Fe in diamond: A diamond-based half metallic dilute magnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Benecha, E. M.; Lombardi, E. B.

    2013-12-14

    Half-metallic ferromagnetic ordering in semiconductors, essential in the emerging field of spintronics for injection and transport of highly spin polarised currents, has up to now been considered mainly in III–V and II–VI materials. However, low Curie temperatures have limited implementation in room temperature device applications. We report ab initio Density Functional Theory calculations on the properties of Fe in diamond, considering the effects of lattice site, charge state, and Fermi level position. We show that the lattice sites and induced magnetic moments of Fe in diamond depend strongly on the Fermi level position and type of diamond co-doping, with Fe being energetically most favorable at the substitutional site in p-type and intrinsic diamond, while it is most stable at a divacancy site in n-type diamond. Fe induces spin polarized bands in the band gap, with strong hybridization between Fe-3d and C-2s,2p bands. We further consider Fe-Fe spin interactions in diamond and show that substitutional Fe{sup +1} in p-type diamond exhibits a half-metallic character, with a magnetic moment of 1.0 μ{sub B} per Fe atom and a large ferromagnetic stabilization energy of 33 meV, an order of magnitude larger than in other semiconductors, with correspondingly high Curie temperatures. These results, combined with diamond's unique properties, demonstrate that Fe doped p-type diamond is likely to be a highly suitable candidate material for spintronics applications.

  9. High sensitivity of diamond resonant microcantilevers for direct detection in liquids as probed by molecular electrostatic surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Bongrain, Alexandre; Agnès, Charles; Rousseau, Lionel; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Ruffinatto, Sébastien; Omnès, Franck; Mailley, Pascal; Lissorgues, Gaëlle; Bergonzo, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Resonant microcantilevers have demonstrated that they can play an important role in the detection of chemical and biological agents. Molecular interactions with target species on the mechanical microtransducers surface generally induce a change of the beam's bending stiffness, resulting in a shift of the resonance frequency. In most biochemical sensor applications, cantilevers must operate in liquid, even though damping deteriorates the vibrational performances of the transducers. Here we focus on diamond-based microcantilevers since their transducing properties surpass those of other materials. In fact, among a wide range of remarkable features, diamond possesses exceptional mechanical properties enabling the fabrication of cantilever beams with higher resonant frequencies and Q-factors than when made from other conventional materials. Therefore, they appear as one of the top-ranked materials for designing cantilevers operating in liquid media. In this study, we evaluate the resonator sensitivity performances of our diamond microcantilevers using grafted carboxylated alkyl chains as a tool to investigate the subtle changes of surface stiffness as induced by electrostatic interactions. Here, caproic acid was immobilized on the hydrogen-terminated surface of resonant polycrystalline diamond cantilevers using a novel one-step grafting technique that could be also adapted to several other functionalizations. By varying the pH of the solution one could tune the -COO(-)/-COOH ratio of carboxylic acid moieties immobilized on the surface, thus enabling fine variations of the surface stress. We were able to probe the cantilevers resonance frequency evolution and correlate it with the ratio of -COO(-)/-COOH terminations on the functionalized diamond surface and consequently the evolution of the electrostatic potential over the cantilever surface. The approach successfully enabled one to probe variations in cantilevers bending stiffness from several tens to hundreds of

  10. Recent Results with CVD Diamond Trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P. F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R. D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Palmieri, V. G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; RD42 Collaboration

    1999-08-01

    We present recent results on the use of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond microstrip detectors for charged particle tracking. A series of detectors was fabricated using 1 x 1 cm 2 diamonds. Good signal-to-noise ratios were observed using both slow and fast readout electronics. For slow readout electronics, 2 μs shaping time, the most probable signal-to-noise ratio was 50 to 1. For fast readout electronics, 25 ns peaking time, the most probable signal-to-noise ratio was 7 to 1. Using the first 2 x 4 cm 2 diamond from a production CVD reactor with slow readout electronics, the most probable signal-to-noise ratio was 23 to 1. The spatial resolution achieved for the detectors was consistent with the digital resolution expected from the detector pitch.

  11. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease.

  12. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24412987

  13. Outstanding Problems of Presolar Diamond in Meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Amari, Sachiko

    2008-05-21

    Diamond is the first mineral type of presolar grains that were isolated from meteorites, yet it is one of the least understood presolar grain types. An isotopically anomalous component Xe-HL is carried by diamond and is characterized by excesses in both the light, p-process only isotopes (124 and 126) and the heavy, r-process only isotopes (134 and 136). These excesses are always correlated although physical settings of these two processes are quite different and there is little reason to always correlate each other. Furthermore, the r-process Xe and the p-process Xe in diamond inferred from Xe-HL are quite different from what is derived from the solar system abundance as well as stellar models. Further studies are needed to investigate these outstanding problems for over three decades.

  14. Morphological analysis and cell viability on diamond-like carbon films containing nanocrystalline diamond particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, C. N.; Ramos, B. C.; Da-Silva, N. S.; Pacheco-Soares, C.; Trava-Airoldi, V. J.; Lobo, A. O.; Marciano, F. R.

    2013-06-01

    The coating of orthopedic prostheses with diamond like-carbon (DLC) has been actively studied in the past years, in order to improve mechanical, tribological properties and promote the material's biocompatibility. Recently, the incorporation of crystalline diamond nanoparticles into the DLC film has shown effective in combating electrochemical corrosion in acidic medias. This study examines the material's biocompatibility through testing by LDH release and MTT, on in vitro fibroblasts; using different concentrations of diamond nanoparticles incorporated into the DLC film. Propounding its potential use in orthopedics in order to increase the corrosion resistance of prostheses and improve their relationship with the biological environment.

  15. Deep Mantle Fluids Bottled Up in Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Y.; Pearson, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Many mantle xenoliths and mineral inclusions in diamonds reflect refertilisation and enrichment by mantle metasomatism, a key mechanism for controlling abrupt changes in the chemical and physical properties of the continental lithospheric mantle (CLM) globally. However, the nature of the fluids involved can normally only be constrained indirectly from geochemical proxies or calculated using mineral/melt partition coefficients. Direct samples of mantle metasomatic fluids, shielded from any late stage alteration, are encased as microinclusions in fast-growing diamonds - "fibrous diamonds". These trapped high-density fluids (HDFs) provide a unique chemical and physical record for tracing the sources of deep mantle fluids and constraining the processes that shape their nature.Diamond HDFs vary between four major compositional types: saline, silicic and high-Mg plus low-Mg carbonatitic. A strong connection has been established between high-Mg carbonatitic HDFs and a carbonated peridotite source. In addition, the silicic and low-Mg carbonatitic HDFs have been related to hydrous eclogite (±carbonate). However, the compositionally extreme saline fluid endmember remained enigmatic and its source in the deep lithosphere has remained ambiguous. Our new data on fluid-rich diamonds show the geochemical fingerprints of a subducting slab as the source of deep mantle fluids of saline composition. In addition, for the first time, we show that these deep saline fluids are parental, via fluid rock interaction, to in-situ forming carbonatitic and silicic melts in the lithosphere. This model provides a strong platform for resolving the effects of the compositional spectrum of mantle fluids, which alter the deep lithosphere globally and play key roles in diamond formation.

  16. A sub-national scale geospatial analysis of diamond deposit lootability: the case of the Central African Republic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malpeli, Katherine C.; Chirico, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The Central African Republic (CAR), a country with rich diamond deposits and a tumultuous political history, experienced a government takeover by the Seleka rebel coalition in 2013. It is within this context that we developed and implemented a geospatial approach for assessing the lootability of high value-to-weight resource deposits, using the case of diamonds in CAR as an example. According to current definitions of lootability, or the vulnerability of deposits to exploitation, CAR's two major diamond deposits are similarly lootable. However, using this geospatial approach, we demonstrate that the deposits experience differing political geographic, spatial location, and cultural geographic contexts, rendering the eastern deposits more lootable than the western deposits. The patterns identified through this detailed analysis highlight the geographic complexities surrounding the issue of conflict resources and lootability, and speak to the importance of examining these topics at the sub-national scale, rather than relying on national-scale statistics.

  17. Single crystal diamond for infrared sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdi, S.; Kolahdouz, M.; Moeen, M.; Kovi, K. K.; Balmer, R. S.; Radamson, H. H.; Isberg, J.

    2014-10-01

    The synthesis of new materials for thermal infrared (IR) detection has been an intensive research area in recent years. Among new semiconductor materials, synthetic diamond has the ability to function even under very high temperature and high radiation conditions. In the present work, diamond Schottky diodes with boron concentrations in the range of 1014 < B < 1017 cm-3 are presented as candidates for IR thermal sensors with an excellent temperature coefficient of resistance (-8.42%/K) and very low noise levels around 6.6 × 10-15 V2/Hz. This enables huge performance enhancements for a wide variety of systems, e.g., automotive and space applications.

  18. Arsenic-bound excitons in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barjon, J.; Jomard, F.; Morata, S.

    2014-01-01

    A set of new excitonic recombinations is observed in arsenic-implanted diamond. It is composed of two groups of emissions at 5.355/5.361 eV and at 5.215/5.220/5.227 eV. They are respectively attributed to the no-phonon and transverse-optical phonon-assisted recombinations of excitons bound to neutral arsenic donors. From the Haynes rule, an ionization energy of 0.41 eV is deduced for arsenic in diamond, which shows that arsenic is a shallower donor than phosphorus (0.6 eV), in agreement with theory.

  19. Microhabitat use of the diamond darter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Smith, Dustin M.; Taylor, Nate D.

    2013-01-01

    The only known extant population of the diamond darter (Crystallaria cincotta) exists in the lower 37 km of Elk River, WV, USA. Our understanding of diamond darter habitat use was previously limited, because few individuals have been observed during sampling with conventional gears. We quantified microhabitat use of diamond darters based on measurements of water depth, water velocity and per cent substrate composition. Using spotlights at night-time, we sampled 16 sites within the lower 133 km of Elk River and observed a total of 82 diamond darters at 10 of 11 sampling sites within the lower 37 km. Glides, located immediately upstream of riffles, were the primary habitats sampled for diamond darters, which included relatively shallow depths (<1 m), moderate-to-low water velocities (often < 0.5 m·s−1) and a smooth water surface. Microhabitat use (mean ± SE) of diamond darters was estimated for depth (0.47 ± 0.02 m), average velocity (0.27 ± 0.01 m·s−1) and bottom velocity (0.15 ± 0.01 m·s−1). Substrate used (mean ± SE) by diamond darters was predominantly sand intermixed with lesser amounts of gravel and cobble: % sand (52.1 ± 1.6), % small gravel (12.2 ± 0.78), % large gravel (14.2 ± 0.83), % cobble (19.8 ± 0.96) and % boulder (1.6 ± 0.36). Based on our microhabitat use data, conservation and management efforts for this species should consider preserving glide habitats within Elk River. Spotlighting, a successful sampling method for diamond darters, should be considered for study designs of population estimation and long-term monitoring.

  20. Wear Test Of A Preselected Diamond Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, H. H.; Showman, G. A.

    1987-02-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop a set of criteria that would allow the typical user to preselect a diamond-turning tool for the most critical optical finishing operations. A wide variety of tools used in this study had their edge quality evaluated by Nomarski and scanning electron microscopy methods, and the diamond crystal orientation and quality were determined by Laue x-ray methods. One of the tools was subjected to a long-term machining test to evaluate the tool wear process and to correlate the wear observed with changes in the scattering properties of the surface.

  1. High average power switching in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, W.W.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1992-06-01

    Diamond has many properties which make it ideal for a high power solid-state switch. The crystal structure of diamond is relatively well characterized. It is a semiconductor with a band-gap of 5.5 eV at 300{degree}K. The high band-gap of diamond results in a small dark current compared to Si or GaAs. As a result the breakdown field or holding voltage is very high, 1--10 MV/cm. The electron and hole mobility are approximately 2000 cm{sup 2}/v-sec. At room temperature, diamond has the highest thermal conductivity of any solid, 20 W/{degree}K -cm, about five times that of copper. This is ideal for switching because heat dissipation and thermal runaway problems are greatly mitigated. Our switch concept uses a low current (diamond switch. Electron beam control offers much higher efficiency and flexibility than laser control. We obtained experimental results with electron beam activated diamond films which were CVD grown on an n-type silicon substrate. With the substrate biased positive, the switch current was found to follow the electron beam pulse up to fields of about 0.9 MV/cm where ``lock-on`` occurred, i.e., the switch current continued to flow even after the electron beam was turned off. This effect, most likely due to double charge injection, was suppressed by biasing the n-silicon substrate negatively. The switch current then followed the electron beam pulse up to electric fields of 1.8 MV/cm, limited by our electrical circuit, with no evidence of ``lock-on.`` The predictable response of the switch current to the electron beam pulse at extreme,applied fields make electron beam controlled diamond switch a promising candidate for a high power on-off switch. Steady advancements in CVD polycrystalline and single crystal diamond help make this possible.

  2. High average power switching in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, W.W. ); Schoenbach, K.H. )

    1992-06-01

    Diamond has many properties which make it ideal for a high power solid-state switch. The crystal structure of diamond is relatively well characterized. It is a semiconductor with a band-gap of 5.5 eV at 300[degree]K. The high band-gap of diamond results in a small dark current compared to Si or GaAs. As a result the breakdown field or holding voltage is very high, 1--10 MV/cm. The electron and hole mobility are approximately 2000 cm[sup 2]/v-sec. At room temperature, diamond has the highest thermal conductivity of any solid, 20 W/[degree]K -cm, about five times that of copper. This is ideal for switching because heat dissipation and thermal runaway problems are greatly mitigated. Our switch concept uses a low current (diamond switch. Electron beam control offers much higher efficiency and flexibility than laser control. We obtained experimental results with electron beam activated diamond films which were CVD grown on an n-type silicon substrate. With the substrate biased positive, the switch current was found to follow the electron beam pulse up to fields of about 0.9 MV/cm where lock-on'' occurred, i.e., the switch current continued to flow even after the electron beam was turned off. This effect, most likely due to double charge injection, was suppressed by biasing the n-silicon substrate negatively. The switch current then followed the electron beam pulse up to electric fields of 1.8 MV/cm, limited by our electrical circuit, with no evidence of lock-on.'' The predictable response of the switch current to the electron beam pulse at extreme,applied fields make electron beam controlled diamond switch a promising candidate for a high power on-off switch. Steady advancements in CVD polycrystalline and single crystal diamond help make this possible.

  3. Mechanism for direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongxian; Yin, Fuxing; Yu, Tao; Wang, Jian-Tao; Liang, Chunyong

    2014-01-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics with a more reliable reactive LCBOPII potential, we have performed a detailed study on the direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition. Our results reveal a new so-called “wave-like buckling and slipping” mechanism, which controls the transformation from hexagonal graphite to cubic diamond. Based on this mechanism, we have explained how polycrystalline cubic diamond is converted from hexagonal graphite, and demonstrated that the initial interlayer distance of compressed hexagonal graphite play a key role to determine the grain size of cubic diamond. These results can broaden our understanding of the high pressure graphite-to-diamond phase transition. PMID:25088720

  4. Fabrication of freestanding heteroepitaxial diamond substrate via micropatterns and microneedles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida, Hideo; Kim, Seong-Woo; Ikejiri, Kenjiro; Kawamata, Yuki; Koyama, Koji; Kodama, Hideyuki; Sawabe, Atsuhito

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication of a high-quality freestanding diamond substrate was successfully demonstrated via heteroepitaxy by introducing diamond micropatterns and microneedles in the early stage of growth. Micropatterns contributed to a marked reduction in the number of dislocations induced by epitaxial lateral overgrowth, and microneedles relaxed heteroepitaxial strain. Raman spectroscopy indicated the absence of nondiamond carbon inclusions in the obtained freestanding substrate. The full width at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curve for diamond (004) reflections was 0.07°, the lowest value for heteroepitaxial diamond that has been reported so far. The results provide novel insights toward realizing large-diameter single-crystalline diamond substrates.

  5. Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.

    1999-01-01

    A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display.

  6. Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1999-05-11

    A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties is disclosed. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display. 3 figs.

  7. Mechanism for direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongxian; Yin, Fuxing; Yu, Tao; Wang, Jian-Tao; Liang, Chunyong

    2014-08-04

    Using classical molecular dynamics with a more reliable reactive LCBOPII potential, we have performed a detailed study on the direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition. Our results reveal a new so-called "wave-like buckling and slipping" mechanism, which controls the transformation from hexagonal graphite to cubic diamond. Based on this mechanism, we have explained how polycrystalline cubic diamond is converted from hexagonal graphite, and demonstrated that the initial interlayer distance of compressed hexagonal graphite play a key role to determine the grain size of cubic diamond. These results can broaden our understanding of the high pressure graphite-to-diamond phase transition.

  8. Quantum chemical studies of growth mechanisms of ultrananocrystalline diamond.

    SciTech Connect

    Curtiss, L. A.; Zapol, P.; Sternberg, M.; Redfern, P. C.; Horner, D. A.; Gruen, D. M.; Materials Science Division; North Central Coll.

    2004-06-07

    Computational studies of growth mechanisms on diamond surfaces based on C{sub 2} precursor have been reviewed. The investigations have postulated reaction mechanisms with diamond growth occurring by insertion of C{sub 2} into the C-H bonds of the hydrogen-terminated diamond surface or into {pi}-bonded carbon dimers on dehydrogenated diamond surfaces. Reaction barriers for both growth and renucleation at (011) and (100) diamond surfaces had been calculated using quantum chemistry approaches. Preliminary results on growth mechanism involving CN precursors are also reported.

  9. Below-Band-Gap Laser Ablation Of Diamond For TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Thomas; Foote, Marc C.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Fortier, Edward P.; Posthill, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Thin, electron-transparent layers of diamond for examination in transmission electron microscope (TEM) fabricated from thicker diamond substrates by using laser beam to ablate surface of substrate. Involves use of photon energy below band gap. Growing interest in use of diamond as bulk substrate and as coating material in variety of applications has given rise to increasing need for TEM for characterization of diamond-based materials. Below-band-gap laser ablation method helps to satisfy this need. Also applied in general to cutting and etching of diamonds.

  10. Conically shaped single-crystalline diamond backing plates for a diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, G.; Reifler, H.; Steurer, W.

    2005-10-01

    Based on computer-aided design (CAD) and finite-element calculations (FEM), single-crystalline diamond backing plates were tailored as a replacement of beryllium for high-pressure diamond anvil cells with a focus on in-house single-crystal experiments. Although the modified cell has an opening angle of 90°, a very homogeneous stress distribution all over the backing plate was realized to avoid failure. The conically shaped backing plates work well in the targeted pressure range up to Mg2Co3Sn10.15 up to 9.69 GPa. The influence of simultaneous diffraction phenomena in the diamonds (diamond dips) is illustrated by single-counter and area-detector measurements using standard laboratory equipment.

  11. PREFACE: Science's gem: diamond science 2009 Science's gem: diamond science 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainwood, Alison; Newton, Mark E.; Stoneham, Marshall

    2009-09-01

    Natural diamond has been valued for its appearance and mechanical properties for at least two thousand years. As a gem stone diamond is unsurpassed. However, scientific work, especially in the last 20 years, has demonstrated that diamond has numerous surprising properties and many unique ones. Some of the extreme properties have been known for many years, but the true scale of diamond's other highly desirable features is still only coming to light as control in the synthesis of diamond, and hence material perfection, improves. The ultimate prize for man-made diamond is surely not in the synthesis of gem stones, but in delivering technological solutions enabled by diamond to the challenges facing our society today. If the special properties are to be exploited to their full potential, at least four crucial factors must be considered. First, there must be sufficient scientific understanding of diamond to make applications effective, efficient and economical. Secondly, the means of fabrication and control of properties have to be achieved so that diamond's role can be optimised. Thirdly, it is not enough that its properties are superior to existing materials: they must be so much better that it is worth initiating new technologies to exploit them. Finally, any substantial applications will have to address the society's major needs worldwide. The clear technology drivers for the 21st century come from the biomedical technologies, the demand for energy subject to global constraints, and the information technologies, where perhaps diamond will provide the major enabling technology [1]. The papers in this volume concern the solid state physics of diamond, and primarily concern the first two factors: understanding, and control of properties. They address many of the outstanding basic problems, such as the identification of existing defects, which affect the material's properties, both desirable and less so. Regarding future substantial applications, one paper discusses

  12. Low water contents in diamond mineral inclusions: Proto-genetic origin in a dry cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Logvinova, Alla M.; Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Liu, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Rossman, George R.; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Sobolev, Nikolay V.

    2016-01-01

    The mantle is the major reservoir of Earth's water, hosted within Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAMs) (e.g., Bell and Rossman, 1992; Peslier et al., 2010; Peslier, 2010; Nestola and Smyth, 2015), in the form of hydrogen bonded to the silicate's structural oxygen. From whence cometh this water? Is the water in these minerals representative of the Earth's primitive upper mantle or did it come from melting events linked to crustal formation or to more recent metasomatic/re-fertilization events? During diamond formation, NAMs are encapsulated at hundreds of kilometers depth within the mantle, thereby possibly shielding and preserving their pristine water contents from re-equilibrating with fluids and melts percolating through the lithospheric mantle. Here we show that the NAMs included in diamonds from six locales on the Siberian Craton contain measurable and variable H2O concentrations from 2 to 34 parts per million by weight (ppmw) in olivine, 7 to 276 ppmw in clinopyroxene, and 11-17 ppmw in garnets. Our results suggest that if the inclusions were in equilibrium with the diamond-forming fluid, the water fugacity would have been unrealistically low. Instead, we consider the H2O contents of the inclusions, shielded by diamonds, as pristine representatives of the residual mantle prior to encapsulation, and indicative of a protogenetic origin for the inclusions. Hydrogen diffusion in the diamond does not appear to have modified these values significantly. The H2O contents of NAMs in mantle xenoliths may represent some later metasomatic event(s), and are not always representative of most of the continental lithospheric mantle. Results from the present study also support the conclusions of Peslier et al. (2010) and Novella et al. (2015) that the dry nature of the SCLM of a craton may provide stabilization of its thickened continental roots.

  13. X-ray topographic study of diamonds: implications for the genetic nature of inclusions in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrosì, Giovanna; Nestola, Fabrizio; Tempesta, Gioacchino; Bruno, Marco; Scandale, Eugenio; Harris, Jeff W.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, several studies have focused on the growth conditions of the diamonds through the analysis of the mineral inclusions trapped in them (Howell, 2012 and references therein). Nevertheless, to obtain rigorous information about chemical and physical conditions of diamond formation, it is crucial to determine if the crystallization of the inclusions occurred before (protogenetic nature), during (syngenetic nature) or after (epigenetic nature) the growth of diamond (Wiggers de Vries et al., 2011). X-ray topography (XRDT) can be a helpful tool to verify the genetic nature of inclusions in diamond. This technique characterizes the extended defects and reconstructs the growth history of the samples (Agrosì et al., 2013 and references therein) and, consequently contributes to elucidation of the relationship between the inclusions and the host-diamond. With this aim a diamond from the Udachnaya kimberlite, Siberia, was investigated. The diamond crystal was the one previously studied by Nestola et al. (2011) who performed in-situ crystal structure refinement of the inclusions to obtain data about the formation pressure. The inclusions were iso-oriented olivines that did not show evident cracks and subsequently could not be considered epigenetic. Optical observations revealed an anomalous birefringence in the adjacent diamond and the inclusions had typical "diamond-imposed cubo-octahedral" shape for the largest olivine. The diffraction contrast study shows that the diamond exhibits significant deformation fields related to plastic post growth deformation. The crystallographic direction of strains was established applying the extinction criterion. Section topographs were taken to minimize the overlapping of the strain field associate with the different defects and revealed that no dislocations nucleated from the olivine inclusions. Generally, when a solid inclusion has been incorporated in the growing crystal, the associated volume distortion can be minimized by

  14. Noble gases in presolar diamonds I: Three distinct components and their implications for diamond origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    High-purity separates of presolar diamond were prepared from 14 primitive chondrites from 7 compositional groups. Their noble gases were measured using stepped pyrolysis. Three distinct noble gas components are present in diamonds, HL, P3, and P6, each of which is found to consist of five noble gases. P3, released between 200 C and 900 C, has a 'planetary' elemental abundance pattern and roughly 'normal' isotopic ratios. HL, consisting of isotopically anomalous Xe-HL and Kr-H, Ar with high Ar-38/Ar-36, and most of the gas making up Ne-A2 and He-A, is released between 1100 C and 1600 C. HL has 'planetary' elemental ratios, except that it has much more He and Ne than other known 'planetary' components. HL gases are carried in the bulk diamonds, not in some trace phase. P6 has a slightly higher median release temperature than HL and is not cleanly separated from HL by stepped pyrolysis. Our data suggest that P6 has roughly 'normal' isotopic compositions and 'planetary' elemental ratios. Both P3 and P6 seem to be isotopically distinct from P1, the dominant 'planetary' noble-gas component in primitive chondrites. Release characteristics suggest that HL and P6 are sited in different carriers within the diamond fractions, while P3 may be sited near the surfaces of the diamonds. We find no evidence of separability of Xe-H and Xe-L or other isotopic variations in the HL component. However, because approximately 10(exp 10) diamonds are required to measure a Xe composition, a lack of isotopic variability does not constrain diamonds to come from a single source. In fact, the high abundance of diamonds in primitive chondrites and the presence of at least three distinct noble-gas components strongly suggest that diamonds originated in many sources. Relative abundances of noble-gas components in diamonds correlate with degree of thermal processing, indicating that all meteorites sampled essentially the same mixture of diamonds. That mixture was probably inherited from the Sun

  15. On possibility of diamond formations in radiation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjonova, L. F.; Bolsheva, L. N.; Grachjova, T. V.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of diamond formation in radiation processes was checked by studying diamond contents in carburanium sample. The diamonds were not found and this result is discussed. At present one possible process of formation of nanometer-size diamond crystals in some meteorites and Earth's diamonds (carbonado), the radiation mechanism, is suggested: the formation of diamonds from carbonaceous matter in tracks of U fragment fissions and heavy fragmentation due to the action of energetic particles of cosmic rays. Bjakov et. al. have carried out the calculations and shown that the volume of formed diamonds in carbonaceous chondrites by radiation processes corresponds to discovery of diamond volume in chondrites. The discovery by Ozima et. al. of the unsupported fission of Xe and Kr in carbonado supports the supposition that carbonado could be formed by radiation processes. The possibility of diamond formation in radiation processes leads to the study of diamond contents in Earth's samples enriched by uranium and carbon. The attempt to release the diamonds from carburanium was undertaken.

  16. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  17. Characterization of diamond thin films: Diamond phase identification, surface morphology, and defect structures

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, B.E.; Glass, J.T.

    1989-03-01

    Thin carbon films grown from a low pressure methane-hydrogen gas mixture by microwave plasma enhanced CVD have been examined by Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron and x-ray diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. They were determined to be similar to natural diamond in terms of composition, structure, and bonding. The surface morphology of the diamond films was a function of position on the sample surface and the methane concentration in the feedgas. Well-faceted diamond crystals were observed near the center of the sample whereas a less faceted, cauliflower texture was observed near the edge of the sample, presumably due to variations in temperature across the surface of the sample. Regarding methane concentration effects, threefold /111/ faceted diamond crystals were predominant on a film grown at 0.3% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/ while fourfold /100/ facets were observed on films grown in 1.0% and 2.0% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/. Transmission electron microscopy of the diamond films has shown that the majority of diamond crystals have a very high defect density comprised of /111/ twins, /111/ stacking faults, and dislocations. In addition, cross-sectional TEM has revealed a 50 A epitaxial layer of ..beta..--SiC at the diamond-silicon interface of a film grown with 0.3% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/ while no such layer was observed on a diamond film grown in 2.0% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/.

  18. Radiation-induced diamond crystallization: Origin of carbonados and its implications on meteorite nano-diamonds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ozima, M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1997-01-01

    Ten carbonados from Central Africa were studied for U-Th-Pb systematics. To extract U, Th, and Pb from the samples, we developed a cold combustion technique wherein diamond was burnt in liquid oxygen. The technique gave low blanks; 25-50 pg for Pb, 3 pg for U, and 5 pg for Th. After very thorough acid treatments of the carbonados with hot HNO3, HF, and HCl over one week, most of U, Th, and Pb were removed from the samples. Lead in the acid-leached diamonds was highly radiogenic (206Pb/204Pb up to 470). However, the amounts of U and Th in the acid-leached diamonds are too low to account for the radiogenic Pb even if we assume 4.5 Ga for the age of the diamonds. Therefore, we conclude that the radiogenic Pb was implanted into the diamonds from surroundings by means of recoil energy of radioactive decays of U and Th. From the radiogenic lead isotopic composition, we estimate a minimum age of 2.6 Ga and a maximum age of 3.8 Ga for the formation of the carbonados. The above findings of the implantation of recoiled radiogenic Pb into carbonados is consistent with the process of radiation-induced crystallization which was proposed for carbonado by Kaminsky (1987). We show from some theoretical considerations that when highly energetic particles, such as those emitted from radioactive decay of U and Th, interact with carbonaceous materials, they give rise to cascades of atomic disturbance (over regions of about a few nanometer), and the disturbed atoms are likely to recrystallize to form micro-diamonds because of increasing surface energy due to small size. The radiation-induced diamond formation mechanism may be relevant to the origin of nano-diamonds in primitive meteorites. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  19. ROLE OF DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTERS IN HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO, T.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-09-20

    In this paper we explore the possibility of using diamond secondary emitter in a high average current electron injector to amplify the current from the photocathode and to isolate the cathode and the injector from each other to increase the life time of the cathode and preserve the performance of the injector. Secondary electron yield of 225 and current density of 0.8 a/cm{sup 2} have been measured in the transmission mode from type 2 a natural diamond. Although the diamond will be heated during normal operation in the injector, calculations indicate that by cryogenically cooling the diamond, the temperature gradient along the diamond can be maintained within the acceptable range. The electron energy and temporal distributions are expected to be narrow from this device resulting in high brightness beams. Plans are underway to measure the SEY in emission mode, fabricate photocathode-diamond capsule and test diamond and capsule in superconducting RF injector.

  20. Degassing mechanisms of noble gases from carbonado diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zashu, S.; Hiyagon, H.

    1994-01-01

    Diamonds are unique samples for inferring ancient mantle conditions, because of their enormous stability, antiquity and also of mantle origin. However, as temperatures in the mantle where diamonds have existed are very high (greater than 1000 C) and residence time of some diamonds could be more than a few billion years, it is imperative to examine whether or not diamonds have retained their pristine characteristics, especially those of noble gases, under such extreme conditions. As discussed in a review article by Ozima, there are rather large variations in the diffusivity of helium in diamonds obtained in the early determinations. The data are also limited to temperatures higher than 1200 C. In the present study, we conducted more refined diffusion experiments for He using carbonado diamonds, which have large amounts of radiogenic (4)He approximately 10(exp -2) cu cm STP/g. On the basis of the experimentally estimated diffusion coefficients, we will discuss retentivity of He in diamonds in the mantle condition.

  1. Diamond-bearing Rocks among Mantle Xenoliths in Kimberlites as Indicatory for the Chambers of Diamond-parental Carbonatite Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Kuzyura, Anastasia

    2014-05-01

    Origin of diamond-bearing peridotite and eclogite rocks in kimberlites is cleared up using mantle-carbonatite model of diamond genesis (Litvin, 2007, 2009, 2013). Data of analytical mineralogy of primary inclusions in diamonds and results of physicochemical experiments on syngenetic diamond and inclusion phase relations are co-ordinated in this model (Litvin et al., 2012). It proved that diamond-parental media are presented by changeable carbon-saturated peridotite-carbonatite and eclogite-carbonatite melts. The melts are capable to form not diamonds only but their major and minor inclusions. The upper mantle is mainly composed of diamond-free peridotites which dominate over eclogites as 9 to 5 % (Mathias et al., 1970). Howewer diamond-bearing peridotites and eclogites occur rarely as demonstrated for S.Africa and Yakutia (Sobolev N., 1977). Nevertheless, origin of diamond-bearing rocks belongs to key problems of genetic mineralogy of diamond and mantle petrology due to dissimilar physicochemical and environmental conditions of formation of comparatively diamond-free rocks. Symptomatic that garnets included in diamond and these of diamond-bearing eclogite are compositionally similar (Sobolev V. et al., 1972). Garnets of diamond-bearing eclogites, inclusions in diamonds and intergrowths with them are marked by increased Na2O content (0.10-0.22%) because of Na-majorite component Na2MgSi5O12 (Bobrov & Litvin, 2011). Peridotitic garnets of diamond-bearing rocks, inclusions and intergrowths are indicated by high Cr2O3 and low CaO content over diamond-free ones. This compositional dissimilarity is compatible with formation of diamond-bearing rocks, inclusions and intergrowths in chambers of partially melted peridotite-eclogite-carbonatite-sulphide-carbon system of changeable composition. However, diamond-free rocks are products of upper-mantle magmatism based on carbonatite-free peridotite-eclogite-sulphide-carbon system. Chambers of diamond-parental carbonatite magma

  2. Evolution of diamond resorption in a silicic aqueous fluid at 1-3 GPa: Application to kimberlite emplacement and mantle metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhihai; Fedortchouk, Yana; Hanley, Jacob J.

    2015-06-01

    diameter of f/b trigons developed in the aqueous fluids depends on the diamond weight loss and dissolution kinetics, and does not correlate with their depth. Integration of our AFM data with the theoretical model for trigon formation suggests that the change from point- to flat-bottomed trigons depends on the defect sizes and dissolution conditions. Application of our results to the diamonds from Ekati diamond Mine, Canada, suggests that variations in diamond rounding in different pipes implies variable depth of fluid exsolution; presence of circular pits on diamonds indicates predominantly aqueous fluid during the latest stages of kimberlite emplacement; and comparison to the mantle-derived morphologies on Ekati diamonds implies the importance of CO2-rich fluids and/or carbonate melts during mantle metasomatism. The constrained effect of P on diamond dissolution kinetics indicates that appreciable diamond weight loss can only happen at P < 1 GPa and therefore the conditions at the latest stages of kimberlite emplacement are very important for assessments of diamond preservation in a kimberlite pipe.

  3. Diamond and diamond-like carbon films for advanced electronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, M.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Sullivan, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    Aim of this laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project was to develop diamond and/or diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for electronic applications. Quality of diamond and DLC films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is not adequate for electronic applications. Nucleation of diamond grains during growth typically results in coarse films that must be very thick in order to be physically continuous. DLC films grown by CVD are heavily hydrogenated and are stable to temperatures {le} 400{degrees}C. However, diamond and DLC`s exceptional electronic properties make them candidates for integration into a variety of microelectronic structures. This work studied new techniques for the growth of both materials. Template layers have been developed for the growth of CVD diamond films resulting in a significantly higher nucleation density on unscratched or unprepared Si surfaces. Hydrogen-free DLC with temperature stability {le} 800{degrees}C has been developed using energetic growth methods such as high-energy pulsed-laser deposition. Applications with the largest system impact include electron-emitting materials for flat-panel displays, dielectrics for interconnects, diffusion barriers, encapsulants, and nonvolatile memories, and tribological coatings that reduce wear and friction in integrated micro-electro-mechanical devices.

  4. Comparative studies on photonic band structures of diamond and hexagonal diamond using the multiple scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Zhang, Weiyi; Wang, Zhenlin

    2004-02-01

    Photonic band structures are investigated for both diamond and hexagonal diamond crystals composed of dielectric spheres, and absolute photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in both cases. In agreement with both Karathanos and Moroz's calculations, a large PBG occurs between the eighth and ninth bands in diamond crystal, but a PBG in hexagonal diamond crystal is found to occur between the sixteenth and seventeenth bands because of the doubling of dielectric spheres in the primitive cell. To explore the physical mechanism of how the photonic band gap might be broadened, we have compared the electric field distributions (|E|2) of the 'valence' and 'conduction' band edges. Results show that the field intensity for the 'conduction' band locates in the inner core of the sphere while that of the 'valence' band concentrates in the outer shell. With this motivation, double-layer spheres are designed to enhance the corresponding photonic band gaps; the PBG is increased by 35% for the diamond structure, and 14% for the hexagonal diamond structure.

  5. Physical and Tribological Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.; Jayne, D. T.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Shogrin, B.; Wilbur, P. J.; Wu, R. L. C.; Garscadden, A.; Barnes, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural, polished diamond pin in contact with both as-deposited and carbon-ion-implanted diamond films in ultrahigh vacuum. Diamond films were deposited on silicon, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited diamond films were impacted with carbon ions at an accelerating energy of 60 keV and a current density of 50 micron A/cm(exp 2) for approximately 6 min, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). The results indicate that the carbon ion implantation produced a thin surface layer of amorphous, nondiamond carbon. The nondiamond carbon greatly decreased both friction and wear of the diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films were less than 0.1, factors of 20 to 30 lower than those for the as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films were approximately 0.35, a factor of five lower than those for the as-deposited, coarse-grain diamond films. The wear rates for the carbon-ion-implanted, diamond films were on the order of 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/Nm, factors of 30 to 80 lower than that for the as-deposited diamond films, regardless of grain size. The friction of the carbon-ion-implanted diamond films was greatly reduced because the amorphous, nondiamond carbon, which had a low shear strength, was restricted to the surface layers (less than 0.1 micron thick) and because the underlying diamond materials retained their high hardness. In conclusion, the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films can be used effectively as wear resistant, self-lubricating coatings for ceramics, such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide, in ultrahigh vacuum.

  6. Chrome pyrope: an inclusion in natural diamond.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H O

    1968-06-28

    Electron probe analyses of garnets that are rich in magnesium and that occur as inclusions in natural diamonds show that the chrome-garnet end member, Mg(3)Cr(2)Si(3)O(12), is a major constituent (30 percent). PMID:17817353

  7. CVD diamond detectors for radiation pulse characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, F.; Bergonzo, P.; Jany, C.; Gicquel, A.; Pochet, T.

    Polycrystalline diamond films deposited by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) have been used for the fabrication of resistive photoconductors. Such detectors can be used to measure the intensity and the temporal shape of pulsed radiation such as IR, visible, UV and X-rays. The photodetector response times were characterised under fast Nd:Yag laser pulses ( λ = 266 nm, τL = 30 ps at FWHM). The detector sensitivities were measured under both pulsed UV laser and steady-state X-ray excitations (40 keV). The detector response time strongly depends on the CVD diamond film structural and physical properties, i.e., the film growth conditions. They exhibit a response signal presenting full widths at half maximum down to about 100 ps and decay times down to about 130 ps. The diamond detector responses are compared to the responses measured on typical ultrafast photoconductors made from gallium arsenide pre-irradiated at 3 × 10 15 neutrons/cm 2 as well as from natural type IIa bulk diamond.

  8. NMR in a Diamond Anvil Pressure Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Matthew; Dioguardi, Adam; Weir, Samuel; Bush, Blaine; Dunuwille, Mihindra; Deemyad, Shanti; Curro, Nichlas

    We present recent advances in the use of diamond anvil pressure cells in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. This technique allows access to new regions of the phase diagrams of iron pnictide and heavy fermion materials, and promises to allow NMR experiments under pressures not previously accessible.

  9. Panel focuses on diamond shear bit care

    SciTech Connect

    Park, A.

    1982-10-04

    This article examines drilling parameters and marketability of Stratapax bits. Finds that core bits drill from 2 to 3 times faster than conventional diamond bits, thereby reducing filtrate invasion. Predicts that high speed drilling, downhole motors, deeper wells and slim hole drilling will mean greater Stratapax use.

  10. Diamond Light Source: status and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Materlik, Gerhard; Rayment, Trevor; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Diamond Light Source, a third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facility in the UK, celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2012. A private limited company was set up in April 2002 to plan, construct and operate the new user-oriented SR facility, called in brief Diamond. It succeeded the Synchrotron Radiation Source in Daresbury, a second-generation synchrotron that opened in 1980 as the world's first dedicated X-ray-providing facility, closing finally in 2008, by which time Diamond's accelerators and first beamlines were operating and user experiments were under way. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A gives some examples of the rich diversity of research done in the initial five years, with some glimpses of activity up to 2014. Speakers at the 10 year anniversary symposium were drawn from a small number of major thematic areas and each theme was elaborated by a few speakers whose contributions were placed into a broader context by a leading member of the UK academic community in the role of rapporteur. This introduction gives a summary of the design choices and strategic planning of Diamond as a coherent user facility, a snapshot of its present status and some consideration of future perspectives. PMID:25624517

  11. Impurities and Growth Morphology in Diamond CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koidl, Peter

    1996-03-01

    This paper reports on recent investigations of the structural evolution and morphogical control in the low-pressure deposition of diamond. It will be shown that minor gas contaminations may drastically influence the film structure and morphology. Gas additions that are substitutionally incorporated like nitrogen and boron are of special importance. Nitrogen at concentrations on the ppm level has been found to promote <100> textured growth and thus assists in forming smooth films with coplanar 100 facets.(R. Locher, C. Wild, N. Herres, D. Behr, P. Koidl, Appl. Phys. Lett. 65), 34 (1994) Boron - on the other hand - is shown to have an opposite effect: it destabilizes the 100 surface.(R. Locher, J. Wagner, F. Fuchs, M. Maier, P. Gonon, P. Koidl, Diamond Relat. Mater. 4), 678 (1995) In addition, both types of gas contaminations do influence the twin formation. The structure and morphology of CVD diamond films are strongly affected by competitive growth between 100- and 111-growth sectors as determined by the relative growth rate parameter α = √3 v_100/v_111.(C. Wild, R. Kohl, N. Herres, W. Müller-Sebert, P. Koidl, Diamond Relat. Mater. 3), 373 (1994) Using in-situ interferometry, it has been shown that nitrogen selectively increases the growth rate of 100 faces, while additional boron reduces it. The structural implications of nitrogen and boron additions are discussed as a result of their growth sector dependent reaction and incorporation and the resulting change of α.

  12. DIAMONDS: a new Bayesian nested sampling tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Enrico; De Ridder, Joris

    2015-09-01

    In the context of high-quality asteroseismic data provided by the NASA Kepler Mission, we developed a new code, termed DIAMONDS (high-DImensional And multi-MOdal NesteD Sampling), for fast Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison by means of the Nested Sampling Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm, an efficient and powerful method very suitable for high-dimensional problems (like the peak bagging analysis of solar-like oscillations) and multi-modal problems (i.e. problems that show multiple solutions). We applied the code to the peak bagging analysis of solar-like oscillations observed in a challenging F-type star. By means of DIAMONDS one is able to detect the different backgrounds in the power spectrum of the star (e.g. stellar granulation and faculae activity) and to understand whether one or two oscillation peaks can be identified or not. In addition, we demonstrate a novel approach to peak bagging based on multi-modality, which is able to reduce significantly the number of free parameters involved in the peak bagging model. This novel approach is therefore of great interest for possible future automatization of the entire analysis technique. Software package available at the DIAMONDS code website: http://https://fys.kuleuven.be/ster/Software/Diamonds/.

  13. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (<50 µg/g) nitrogen concentrations were observed in diamonds from Premier and River Ranch. Type II diamonds, i.e. diamonds with no N impurities, which are presumed to have been derived from ultramafic sources, are found in the River Ranch deposit. The macro- and micro-size diamonds from the Klipspringer deposit display similar nitrogen defects, with higher nitrogen concentration and more frequent D components found in the macro-size diamonds. One of the first steps towards reliable carbon isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of <1 ‰ . SIMS isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs

  14. Scuba Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Attitude Adjuster is a system for weight repositioning corresponding to a SCUBA diver's changing positions. Compact tubes on the diver's air tank permit controlled movement of lead balls within the Adjuster, automatically repositioning when the diver changes position. Manufactured by Think Tank Technologies, the system is light and small, reducing drag and energy requirements and contributing to lower air consumption. The Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center helped the company with both technical and business information and arranged for the testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's Weightlessness Environmental Training Facility for astronauts.

  15. Detonation velocity of melt-cast ADN and ADN/nano-diamond cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, R. M.; Forbes, J. W.; Lawrence, G. W.; Deiter, J. S.; Baker, R. N.; Ashwell, K. D.; Sutherland, G. T.

    2000-04-01

    Detonation velocities of confined cylinders of melt-cast ADN/ZnO (99.5/0.5 by weight), ADN/nano-diamond/ZnO (92.4/7.2/0.4), ADN/AN/ZnO (95.5/4.0/0.5) and ADN/AN/ZnO/nano-diamond (88.0/4.5/0.5/7.0) have been measured using a streak camera. Velocities ranging between 3.9 and 4.5 mm/μs were obtained for 1.3 cm diameter samples confined by steel and a 2.5 cm diameter ADN/AN/ZnO cylinder. In one of the samples the detonation was failing as it proceeded through the charge. For the other shots reported, the shock velocities appeared to be steady through the last half of the charge, though the lengths were too short for any definitive statement about the failure diameter to be made.

  16. The Influence of Volcanological and Sedimentological Processes on Diamond Grade Distribution: Examples From the Ekati Diamond Mine, NWT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Cas, R. A.; Ailleres, L.; Oshust, P.

    2009-05-01

    The study of the diamond distribution within two kimberlite pipes, Fox and Koala, from the Ekati Diamond Mine, NWT, Canada, in conjunction with detailed facies models has shown several distinct relationships of deposit type and grade distribution. In both pipes the lithological facies represent grade units which can be distinguished from each other in terms of relative size and abundance of diamonds. Positive correlation of olivine grain size and abundance with diamond grade is seen, indicating that density sorting of fragmental kimberlites occurs both in pyroclastic and resedimented deposits. Though surface geological processes do not control the diamond potential of the erupting magma, they can be responsible for concentrating diamonds into economically significant proportions. A good understanding of the eruption, transport and depositional processes responsible for the individual lithological units and the diamond distribution within them is important for successful resource estimation and may lead to recognition of areas suitable for selective mining, making a marginal deposit economic.

  17. Diamond films grown from fullerene precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Zuiker, C.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1995-07-01

    Fullerene precursors have been shown to result in the growth of diamond films from argon microwave plasmas. In contradistinction to most diamond films grown using conventional methane-hydrogen mixtures, the fullerene-generated films are nanocrystalline and smooth on the nanometer scale. They have recently been shown to have friction coefficients approaching the values of natural diamond. It is clearly important to understand the development of surface morphology during film growth from fullerene precursors and to elucidate the factors leading to surface roughness when hydrogen is present in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) gas mixtures. To achieve these goals, we are measuring surface reflectivity of diamond films growing on silicon substrates over a wide range of plasma processing conditions. A model for the interpretation of the laser interferometric data has been developed, which allows one to determine film growth rate, rms surface roughness, and bulk losses due to scattering and absorption. The rms roughness values determined by reflectivity are in good agreement with atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. A number of techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and near-edge x-ray absorption find structure (NEXAFS) measurements, have been used to characterize the films. A mechanism for diamond-film growth involving the C{sub 2} molecule as a growth species will be presented. The mechanism is based on (1) the observation that the optical emission spectra of the fullerene- containing plasmas are dominated by the Swan bands of C{sub 2} and (2) the ability of C{sub 2} to insert directly into C-H and C-C bonds with low activation barriers, as shown by recent theoretical calculations of reactions of C{sub 2} with carbon clusters.

  18. 78 FR 40627 - Prohibitions and Conditions on the Importation and Exportation of Rough Diamonds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... determine whether they are purchasing ``blood'' diamonds. CBP Response: The Clean Diamond Trade Act... 1515-AD85 Prohibitions and Conditions on the Importation and Exportation of Rough Diamonds AGENCIES: U... exportation of rough diamonds pursuant to the Clean Diamond Trade Act, as implemented by the President...

  19. Discovery of carbonatitic microinclusions in diamonds with highly aggregated nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablon, B. M.; Navon, O.

    2014-12-01

    It is accepted that fibrous diamonds grew from the high-density fluids (HDFs) they trapped as microinclusions. Such fluids are not found in monocrystalline (MC) diamonds, leaving their source of carbon a mystery. Fibrous diamonds carry nitrogen in A centers and are young (106 years), while most MC diamonds carry aggregated nitrogen in both A and B centers and are older (109 years). Weiss et al. (2014) found saline HDFs in the core of a coated diamond from Guinea and carbonatitic and saline fluids in a South African diamond, both with low concentrations of B centers (5-27%). Here we report finding microinclusions with high-Mg carbonatitic HDFs in MC diamonds. The infrared spectrum of these diamonds confirms their highly aggregated nature (>60%). We studied a suite of twinned diamonds, macles, from the Venetia mine in South Africa. The diamonds were polished perpendicular to their twinning plane and cleaned in HF and HNO3. We identified the twinning planes in cathodoluminescence images and methodically searched along and next to these planes, assuming that inclusions were preferentially trapped there. Shallow, sub-surface inclusions were analyzed using a JEOL JXA-8230 EPMA and an EDS detector. In two out of 11 diamonds we found inclusions with high concentrations of MgO (26-31 wt%), CaO (21-34%), K2O (9-16%), FeO (7-12%) and SiO2 (8-13%). These compositions are similar to those of HDFs in fibrous diamonds from Guinea and Yakutia (Weiss et al., 2009; Klein-BenDavid et al., 2009; Zedgenizov et al., 2009). Eight carbonatitic inclusions were found in diamond ON-VNT-608 and three in ON-VNT-605. Five microinclusions in 608 and one in 605 carry high concentrations of SiO2, MgO and FeO, with little else. Their compositions fall close to that of orthopyroxene, suggesting that both diamonds belong to the peridotitic paragenesis. Other inclusions, rich in SiO2 and Al2O3 in variable proportions were found in 8 of the 11 diamonds. The nature of these inclusions is not yet clear

  20. Grade-tonnage and other models for diamond kimberlite pipes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Grade-tonnage and other quantitative models help give reasonable answers to questions about diamond kimberlite pipes. Diamond kimberlite pipes are those diamondiferous kimberlite pipes that either have been worked or are expected to be worked for diamonds. These models are not applicable to kimberlite dikes and sills or to lamproite pipes. Diamond kimberlite pipes contain a median 26 million metric tons (mt); the median diamond grade is 0.25 carat/metric ton (ct/mt). Deposit-specific models suggest that the median of the average diamond size is 0.07 ct and the median percentage of diamonds that are industrial quality is 67 percent. The percentage of diamonds that are industrial quality can be predicted from deposit grade using a regression model (log[industrial diamonds (percent)]=1.9+0.2 log[grade (ct/mt)]). The largest diamond in a diamond kimberlite pipe can be predicted from deposit tonnage using a regression model (log[largest diamond (ct)]=-1.5+0.54 log[size (mt]). The median outcrop area of diamond pipes is 12 hectares (ha). Because the pipes have similar forms, the tonnage of the deposits can be predicted by the outcrop area (log[size (mt)]=6.5+1.0 log[outcrop area (ha)]). Once a kimberlite pipe is identified, the probability is approximately .005 that it can be worked for diamonds. If a newly discovered pipe is a member of a cluster that contains a known diamond kimberlite pipe, the probability that the new discovery can be mined for diamonds is 56 times that for a newly discovered kimberlite pipe in a cluster without a diamond kimberlite pipe. About 30 percent of pipes with worked residual caps at the surface will be worked at depth. Based on the number of discovered deposits and the area of stable craton rocks thought to be well explored in South Africa, about 10-5 diamond kimberlite pipes are present per square kilometer. If this density is applicable to the South American Precambrian Shield, more than 70 undiscovered kimberlite pipes are predicted to

  1. Optimal sensing at the nanoscale with diamond nitrogen vacancy center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen; Wang, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Diamond nitrogen-vacancy center is a leading platform for ultra-precise sensing at the nanoscale. The sensing is essentially a parameter estimation problem: (1) Encoding the unknown parameters into the NV state; (2) Readout the NV state from the fluorescence; (3) Process the data to infer the unknown parameters; (4) Adaptation of (1)-(3) based on the updated knowledge about the unknown parameters. Recently, dynamical decoupling and adaptive measurement have significantly improved the sensitivity and dynamic range by improving steps (1) and (4), respectively. However, a full optimization of all the steps remains lacking, e.g., the widely used approach to step (3) based on averaging the data from repeated fluorescence measurements or from single-shot fluorescence binarized into 0 and 1 is suboptimal. Here we apply quantum metrology techniques, developed in optical phase estimation, to construct a general framework for optimal sensing using the NV center, incorporating the finite detection efficiency and decoherence. It can be readily applied to various sensing tasks, such as dc/ac magnetometry, noise spectroscopy, and single-molecular NMR. For illustration, we demonstrate significant sensitivity improvement in tracking a time-varying magnetic field with the NV center. This work was supported by NSFC (Grant No. 11274036 and No. 11322542) and the MOST (Grant No. 2014CB848700).

  2. Hydrocarbons Encapsulated in Diamonds From China and India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, I.; Tsao, C.; Taj-Eddin, I.

    2005-05-01

    We examined a large number of diamonds from a kimberlite pipe located in Fuxian, China, and alluvial diamonds from Panna, India. We selected 6-10 diamonds from each locality based on certain characteristics: they are white, brilliant, mostly devoid of mineral inclusions, fracture-free, many contain microscopic bubbles, some display etched circular patterns. These diamonds were examined under ultraviolet (UV) light using a fluorescence microscope, then, investigated using a Nicolet 6700 FT-IR spectrometer. Several diamonds emit blue fluorescence when excited with UV light, while others appear dim because they are not fluorescent. It is the latter that render the included bubbles clearly visible, glowing as yellow and blue spherules within the dim diamond host. These fluorescent bubbles are probably filled with hydrocarbon fluids of variable compositions. FT-IR spectra of diamond typically show absorption due to intrinsic diamond lattice vibrations. We found in most of our diamonds used in this study an additional, outstanding group of absorption bands located just below the wavenumber 3000. Peak positions in this region correlate well with symmetric and asymmetric stretching of methylene and methyl groups, attributable to H bonded to C atoms. Comparing them with standard spectral shapes, we found a good match with an alkane molecule composed of saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons. Our observations provide evidence that hydrocarbons might be important components in the deep mantle, but, to transport them up to Earth's surface would require strong capsules which, perhaps, only diamond could provide.

  3. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.; Jackson, Howard E.

    1993-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments in humid air and in dry nitrogen and unidirectional sliding friction experiments in ultrahigh vacuum were conducted with a natural diamond pin in contact with microwave-plasma-deposited diamond films. Diamond films with a surface roughness (R rms) ranging from 15 to 160 nm were produced by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In humid air and in dry nitrogen, abrasion occurred when the diamond pin made grooves in the surfaces of diamond films, and thus the initial coefficients of friction increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. In vacuum the friction for diamond films contacting a diamond pin arose primarily from adhesion between the sliding surfaces. In these cases, the initial and equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were 0.02 to 0.04 in humid air and in dry nitrogen, but 1.5 to 1.8 in vacuum. The wear factor of the diamond films depended on the initial surface roughness, regardless of environment; it increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The wear factors were considerably higher in vacuum than in humid air and in dry nitrogen.

  4. Inclusions of Hydrocarbon Fluids in Diamonds From Wafangdian, Liaoning, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, I. S.; Tsao, C.

    2015-12-01

    We studied a large number of industrial-grade diamonds from Pipe 50 of Liaoning, China. These diamonds are not suitable for polishing into gems or making cutting tools. They are usually crushed to form abrasives, without much scientific scrutiny. We report here fluid inclusions in dozens of diamonds. The first type of fluids occur in the outer rim of diamonds, just below the surface, while their interior is free of visible fluids. Under UV radiation, when a non-fluorescent diamond appeared dim, bubbles of included fluids became visible as yellow and blue spherules. Such diamonds are sometimes encrusted with euhedral micro-diamonds resembling those on thin films grown by CVD. The second type of fluid-rich diamonds display iridescence of pink, blue, green and yellow colors. They show lamellar, filamentous, or tubular structures, some of the tubes are filled with granules, probably grown from fluids in the tubes. An FT-IR investigation of both types yielded similar results. Apart from absorption due to intrinsic diamond lattice vibrations, we found an outstanding group of bands just below wavenumber 3000. This indicates the presence of a saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons of long chain length. Our results seem to implicate that hydrocarbons might be an important component in Earth's mantle, which might even have provided carbon from which diamonds crystllized.

  5. Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, Lisa K.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to

  6. Hydrous mantle transition zone indicated by ringwoodite included within diamond.

    PubMed

    Pearson, D G; Brenker, F E; Nestola, F; McNeill, J; Nasdala, L; Hutchison, M T; Matveev, S; Mather, K; Silversmit, G; Schmitz, S; Vekemans, B; Vincze, L

    2014-03-13

    The ultimate origin of water in the Earth's hydrosphere is in the deep Earth--the mantle. Theory and experiments have shown that although the water storage capacity of olivine-dominated shallow mantle is limited, the Earth's transition zone, at depths between 410 and 660 kilometres, could be a major repository for water, owing to the ability of the higher-pressure polymorphs of olivine--wadsleyite and ringwoodite--to host enough water to comprise up to around 2.5 per cent of their weight. A hydrous transition zone may have a key role in terrestrial magmatism and plate tectonics, yet despite experimental demonstration of the water-bearing capacity of these phases, geophysical probes such as electrical conductivity have provided conflicting results, and the issue of whether the transition zone contains abundant water remains highly controversial. Here we report X-ray diffraction, Raman and infrared spectroscopic data that provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence for the terrestrial occurrence of any higher-pressure polymorph of olivine: we find ringwoodite included in a diamond from Juína, Brazil. The water-rich nature of this inclusion, indicated by infrared absorption, along with the preservation of the ringwoodite, is direct evidence that, at least locally, the transition zone is hydrous, to about 1 weight per cent. The finding also indicates that some kimberlites must have their primary sources in this deep mantle region. PMID:24622201

  7. One step deposition of highly adhesive diamond films on cemented carbide substrates via diamond/β-SiC composite interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Zhuang, Hao; Jiang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Deposition of adherent diamond films on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide substrates has been realized by application of diamond/beta-silicon carbide composite interlayers. Diamond top layers and the interlayers were deposited in one single process by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. Two different kinds of interlayers have been employed, namely, gradient interlayer and interlayer with constant composition. The distribution of diamond and beta-silicon carbide phases was precisely controlled by manipulating the gas phase composition. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to determine the existence of diamond, beta-silicon carbide and cobalt silicides (Co2Si, CoSi) phases, as well as the quality of diamond crystal and the residual stress in the films. Rockwell-C indentation tests were carried out to evaluate the film adhesion. It is revealed that the adhesion of the diamond film is drastically improved by employing the interlayer. This is mainly influenced by the residual stress in the diamond top layer, which is induced by the different thermal expansion coefficient of the film and the substrate. It is even possible to further suppress the stress by manipulating the distribution of diamond and beta-silicon carbide in the interlayer. The most adhesive diamond film on cemented carbide is thus obtained by employing a gradient composite interlayer.

  8. Workshop on diamond and diamond-like-carbon films for the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A.; Moores, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    Applications exist in advanced transportation systems as well as in manufacturing processes that would benefit from superior tribological properties of diamond, diamond-like-carbon and cubic boron nitride coatings. Their superior hardness make them ideal candidates as protective coatings to reduce adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear in advanced diesel engines, gas turbines and spark-ignited engines and in machining and manufacturing tools as well. The high thermal conductivity of diamond also makes it desirable for thermal management not only in tribological applications but also in high-power electronic devices and possibly large braking systems. A workshop has been recently held at Argonne National Laboratory entitled ``Diamond and Diamond-Like-Carbon Films for Transportation Applications`` which was attended by 85 scientists and engineers including top people involved in the basic technology of these films and also representatives from many US industrial companies. A working group on applications endorsed 18 different applications for these films in the transportation area alone. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  9. Diamond based adsorbents and their application in chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peristyy, Anton A; Fedyanina, Olga N; Paull, Brett; Nesterenko, Pavel N

    2014-08-29

    The idea of using diamond and diamond containing materials in separation sciences has attracted a strong interest in the past decade. The combination of a unique range of properties, such as chemical inertness, mechanical, thermal and hydrolytic stability, excellent thermal conductivity with minimal thermal expansion and intriguing adsorption properties makes diamond a promising material for use in various modes of chromatography. This review summarises the recent research on the preparation of diamond and diamond based stationary phases, their properties and chromatographic performance. Special attention is devoted to the dominant retention mechanisms evident for particular diamond containing phases, and their subsequent applicability to various modes of chromatography, including chromatography carried out under conditions of high temperature and pressure.

  10. Diamond particle detectors systems in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, A.

    2015-04-01

    With the first three years of the LHC running complete, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond has been used extensively in beam condition monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. The lessons learned in constructing the ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM), Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM) and the CMS Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) all of which are based on CVD diamond with the goal of elucidating the issues that should be addressed for future diamond based detector systems. The first beam test results of prototype diamond devices with 3D detector geometry should further enhance the radiation tolerance of this material.

  11. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples.

  12. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples. PMID:15766067

  13. Structures and Mechanical Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    A revolution in the diamond technology is in progress, as the low-pressure process becomes an industrial reality. It will soon be possible to take advantage of the demanding properties of diamond to develop a myriad of new applications, particularly for self-lubricating, wear-resistant, and superhard coatings. The production of large diamond films or sheets at low cost, a distinct possibility in the not-too-distant future, may drastically change tribology technology, particularly regarding solid lubricants and lubricating materials and systems. This paper reviews the structures and properties of natural and synthetic diamonds to gain a better understanding of the tribological properties of diamond and related materials. Atomic and crystal structure, impurities, mechanical properties, and indentation hardness of diamond are described.

  14. Precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Paul, H.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the effect of machine parameters and material properties on precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass. The critical grinding depth to initiate the plastic flow-to-brittle fracture regime will be directly measured using plunge-grind tests. This information will be correlated with machine parameters such as wheel bonding and diamond grain size. Multiaxis grinding tests will then be made to provide data more closely coupled with production technology. One important aspect of the material property studies involves measuring fracture toughness at the very short crack sizes commensurate with grinding damage. Short crack toughness value`s can be much less than the long-crack toughness values measured in conventional fracture tests.

  15. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  16. Characterization of boron doped nanocrystalline diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterlevitz, A. C.; Manne, G. M.; Sampaio, M. A.; Quispe, J. C. R.; Pasquetto, M. P.; Iannini, R. F.; Ceragioli, H. J.; Baranauskas, V.

    2008-03-01

    Nanostructured diamond doped with boron was prepared using a hot-filament assisted chemical vapour deposition system fed with an ethyl alcohol, hydrogen and argon mixture. The reduction of the diamond grains to the nanoscale was produced by secondary nucleation and defects induced by argon and boron atoms via surface reactions during chemical vapour deposition. Raman measurements show that the samples are nanodiamonds embedded in a matrix of graphite and disordered carbon grains, while morphological investigations using field electron scanning microscopy show that the size of the grains ranges from 20 to 100 nm. The lowest threshold fields achieved were in the 1.6 to 2.4 V/μm range.

  17. Stability of polarized states for diamond valleytronics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammersberg, J.; Majdi, S.; Kovi, K. K.; Suntornwipat, N.; Gabrysch, M.; Isberg, J.; Twitchen, D. J.

    2014-06-09

    The stability of valley polarized electron states is crucial for the development of valleytronics. A long relaxation time of the valley polarization is required to enable operations to be performed on the polarized states. Here, we investigate the stability of valley polarized states in diamond, expressed as relaxation time. We have found that the stability of the states can be extremely long when we consider the electron-phonon scattering processes allowed by symmetry considerations. We determine electron-phonon coupling constants by Time-of-Flight measurements and Monte Carlo simulations and use these data to map out the relaxation time temperature dependency. The relaxation time for diamond can be microseconds or longer below 100 K and 100 V/cm due to the strong covalent bond, which is highly encouraging for future use in valleytronic applications.

  18. Nanocrystalline diamond coatings for mechanical seals applications.

    PubMed

    Santos, J A; Neto, V F; Ruch, D; Grácio, J

    2012-08-01

    A mechanical seal is a type of seal used in rotating equipment, such as pumps and compressors. It consists of a mechanism that assists the connection of the rotating shaft to the housings of the equipments, preventing leakage or avoiding contamination. A common cause of failure of these devices is end face wear out, thus the use of a hard, smooth and wear resistant coating such as nanocrystalline diamond would be of great importance to improve their working performance and increase their lifetime. In this paper, different diamond coatings were deposited by the HFCVD process, using different deposition conditions. Additionally, the as-grown films were characterized for, quality, morphology and microstructure using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The topography and the roughness of the films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). PMID:22962831

  19. Carbon stardust: From soot to diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1990-01-01

    The formation of carbon dust in the outflow from stars and the subsequent evolution of this so called stardust in the interstellar medium is reviewed. The chemical and physical processes that play a role in carbon stardust formation are very similar to those occurring in sooting flames. Based upon extensive laboratory studies of the latter, the structure and physical and chemical properties of carbon soot are reviewed and possible chemical pathways towards carbon stardust are discussed. Grain-grain collisions behind strong interstellar shocks provide the high pressures required to transform graphite and amorphous carbon grains into diamond. This process is examined and the properties of shock-synthesized diamonds are reviewed. Finally, the interrelationship between carbon stardust and carbonaceous meteorites is briefly discussed.

  20. Latent laser-induced graphitization of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    Basic features and mechanism of femtosecond laser graphitization of diamond surface were studied in the two regimes of irradiation: (1) by an intensive (>10 J/cm2) single shot and (2) by a train of pulses with near-threshold intensity (~1-10 J/cm2). Special attention was paid to the so-called accumulative regime, when multipulse laser treatment results in prolonged delay of an appearance of crystal modification of the crystal. The light absorption mechanisms dominating in each regime are discussed. The experiments with fundamental (800 nm), second (400 nm) and third (266 nm) harmonics of Ti-sapphire laser (100 fs) have revealed that thermally stimulated processes play an essential role in latent diamond graphitization.

  1. Electron spectroscopy of the diamond surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1981-01-01

    The diamond surface is studied by ionization loss spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. For surfaces heated to temperatures not exceeding 900 C, the band gap was found to be devoid of empty states in the absence of electron beam effects. The incident electron beam generates empty states in the band gap and loss of structure in the valence band for these surfaces. A cross section of 1.4 x 10 to the -19th sq cm was obtained for this effect. For surfaces heated to temperatures exceeding 900 C the spectra were identical to those from surfaces modified by the electron beam. The diamond surface undergoes a thermal conversion in its electronic structure at about 900 C.

  2. Transformation of the diamond /110/ surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The diamond surface undergoes a transformation in its electronic structure by a vacuum anneal at approximately 900 C. This transformation is characterized by the appearance of a feature in the band gap region of the energy loss spectrum. The kinetics of the transformation on the (110) surface is studied by observing the growth of this feature with time and temperature. The transformation is found to be consistent with first-order kinetics with an activation energy of 4.8 eV. It is also found that the band gap feature could be removed by exposure of the transformed surface to excited hydrogen. The results are consistent with the polished diamond (110) surface being covered with hydrogen which removes the band gap states and can be thermally desorbed at approximately 900 C.

  3. Single crystal diamond for infrared sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Majdi, S. Kovi, K. K.; Isberg, J.; Kolahdouz, M.; Moeen, M.; Radamson, H. H.; Balmer, R. S.

    2014-10-20

    The synthesis of new materials for thermal infrared (IR) detection has been an intensive research area in recent years. Among new semiconductor materials, synthetic diamond has the ability to function even under very high temperature and high radiation conditions. In the present work, diamond Schottky diodes with boron concentrations in the range of 10{sup 14 }< B < 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} are presented as candidates for IR thermal sensors with an excellent temperature coefficient of resistance (−8.42%/K) and very low noise levels around 6.6 × 10{sup −15} V{sup 2}/Hz. This enables huge performance enhancements for a wide variety of systems, e.g., automotive and space applications.

  4. Superhard BC(3) in cubic diamond structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Hanyu; Li, Quan; Gao, Bo; Wang, Yanchao; Li, Hongdong; Chen, Changfeng; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    We solve the crystal structure of recently synthesized cubic BC(3) using an unbiased swarm structure search, which identifies a highly symmetric BC(3) phase in the cubic diamond structure (d-BC(3)) that contains a distinct B-B bonding network along the body diagonals of a large 64-atom unit cell. Simulated x-ray diffraction and Raman peaks of d-BC(3) are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Calculated stress-strain relations of d-BC(3) demonstrate its intrinsic superhard nature and reveal intriguing sequential bond-breaking modes that produce superior ductility and extended elasticity, which are unique among superhard solids. The present results establish the first boron carbide in the cubic diamond structure with remarkable properties, and these new findings also provide insights for exploring other covalent solids with complex bonding configurations.

  5. Charge state manipulation of qubits in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Grotz, Bernhard; Hauf, Moritz V.; Dankerl, Markus; Naydenov, Boris; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Stutzmann, Martin; Reinhard, Friedemann; Garrido, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond is a promising candidate for a solid-state qubit. However, its charge state is known to be unstable, discharging from the qubit state NV− into the neutral state NV0 under various circumstances. Here we demonstrate that the charge state can be controlled by an electrolytic gate electrode. This way, single centres can be switched from an unknown non-fluorescent state into the neutral charge state NV0, and the population of an ensemble of centres can be shifted from NV0 to NV−. Numerical simulations confirm the manipulation of the charge state to be induced by the gate-controlled shift of the Fermi level at the diamond surface. This result opens the way to a dynamic control of transitions between charge states and to explore hitherto inaccessible states, such as NV+. PMID:22395620

  6. Method to fabricate micro and nano diamond devices

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M; Anderson, Richard J; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Skinner, Jack L; Rye, Michael J

    2014-10-07

    A method including forming a diamond material on the surface of a substrate; forming a first contact and a separate second contact; and patterning the diamond material to form a nanowire between the first contact and the second contact. An apparatus including a first contact and a separate second contact on a substrate; and a nanowire including a single crystalline or polycrystalline diamond material on the substrate and connected to each of the first contact and the second contact.

  7. GENERAL VIEW FROM CENTER OF DIAMOND STREET LOOKING WEST TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW FROM CENTER OF DIAMOND STREET LOOKING WEST TOWARDS THIRTY-SECOND STREET. AN AUGUST 30, 1886 ISSUE OF THE PHILADELPHIA REAL ESTATE RECORD AND BUILDERS’ GUIDE RECORDED THAT REAL ESTATE AGENT F. A. FLOOD KEPT HIS OFFICES AT 3118 DIAMOND STREET, INDICATING THAT THE ROW OF ATTACHED DWELLINGS ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE BLOCK HAD BEEN CONSTRUCTED BY THAT TIME. - 3100 Block Diamond Street (Houses), North & south sides between Thirty-first & Thirty-second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Manufacturing Diamond Under Very High Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    A process for manufacturing bulk diamond has been made practical by the invention of the High Pressure and Temperature Apparatus capable of applying the combination of very high temperature and high pressure needed to melt carbon in a sufficiently large volume. The apparatus includes a reaction cell wherein a controlled static pressure as high as 20 GPa and a controlled temperature as high as 5,000 C can be maintained.

  9. Monolithic diamond optics for single photon detection

    PubMed Central

    Siyushev, P.; Kaiser, F.; Jacques, V.; Gerhardt, I.; Bischof, S.; Fedder, H.; Dodson, J.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we experimentally demonstrate a novel and simple approach that uses off-the-shelf optical elements to enhance the collection efficiency from a single emitter. The key component is a solid immersion lens made of diamond, the host material for single color centers. We improve the excitation and detection of single emitters by one order of magnitude, as predicted by theory. PMID:21221249

  10. Fast and sensitive protein alignment using DIAMOND.

    PubMed

    Buchfink, Benjamin; Xie, Chao; Huson, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    The alignment of sequencing reads against a protein reference database is a major computational bottleneck in metagenomics and data-intensive evolutionary projects. Although recent tools offer improved performance over the gold standard BLASTX, they exhibit only a modest speedup or low sensitivity. We introduce DIAMOND, an open-source algorithm based on double indexing that is 20,000 times faster than BLASTX on short reads and has a similar degree of sensitivity.

  11. Surface roughness of a dental ceramic after polishing with different vehicles and diamond pastes.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Guilherme Brião; Vinha, Dionísio; Panzeri, Heitor; Nonaka, Tomio; Gonçalves, Mariane

    2006-01-01

    During fabrication of bonded ceramic restorations, cervical adaptation, occlusal adjustment and final finishing/polishing are procedures to be performed at the dental office after adhesive cementation. Final adjustments may result in loss of ceramic glaze, which requires new polishing of the ceramic surface, with special attention for selection of adequate materials and instruments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of different vehicles associated with diamond pastes indicated for dental ceramic polishing. Two polishing pastes (Crystar Paste and Diamond Excell) associated with four vehicles (rubber cup, Robinson bristle brush, felt wheel and buff disc) were evaluated. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from Ceramco II dental ceramic. Surface roughness means (Ra) of the ceramic specimens were determined with a rugosimeter. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.01) between the polishing pastes. However, there were statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the tested vehicles. Vehicle-paste interaction showed statistically significant difference (p<0.05) as well. It may be concluded that: 1) Robinson bristle brush, felt wheel and buff disc were efficient vehicles to be used in association with a diamond polishing paste; 2) The use of rubber cup as a vehicle showed poor efficiency for mechanical polishing of the ceramic surfaces; 3) Both pastes provided similar and efficient polishing and may be recommended for use with an appropriated vehicle. PMID:17262123

  12. Cryogenic tests of bimetallic diamond-turned mirrors for the FRIDA integral field unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, Curtis; Eikenberry, Stephen; Cuevas Cardona, Salvador; Chapa, Oscar; Espejo, Carlos; Keiman, Carolina; Sanchez, Beatriz

    2008-07-01

    We describe diamond-turned material tests for the integral field unit (IFU) for the FRIDA instrument (inFRared Imager and Dissector for the Adaptive optics system of the Gran Telescopio Canarias). FRIDA is closely based on the design of the successful FISICA cryogenic infrared image slicing device, which used "monolithic" mirror arrays, diamond turned into single pieces of metal. FRIDA, however, will require better roughness characteristics than the 15nm RMS of FISICA to avoid light scatter in FRIDA's shorter wavelength limit (900nm). Al 6061 seems to be limited to this roughness level by its silicate inclusions so some new combination of materials that are compatible with FRIDA's Al 6061 structure must be found. To this end, we have tested six diamond-turned mirrors with different materials and different platings. We used the Zygo interferometer facility at IA-UNAM to do warm and cold profile measurements of the mirrors to investigate possible bimetallic deformation effects. We present a detailed comparison of the various performance characteristics of the test mirrors.

  13. Noble gas studies in vapor-growth diamonds: Comparison with shock-produced diamonds and the origin of diamonds in ureilites

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Junichi; Fukunaga, Kazuya; Ito, Keisuke )

    1991-07-01

    The authors synthesized vapor-trowth diamonds by two kinds of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using microwave (MWCVD) and hot filament (HFCVD) ionization of gases, and examined elemental abundances and isotopic compositions of the noble gases trapped in the diamonds. It is remarkable that strong differences existed in the noble gas concentrations in the two kinds of CVD diamonds: large amounts of noble gases were trapped in the MWCVD diamonds, but not in the HFCVD diamonds. The heavy noble gases (Ar to Xe) in the MWCVD diamonds were highly fractionated compared with those in the ambient atmosphere, and are in good agreement with the calculated fractionation patterns for plasma at an electron temperature of 7,000-9,000 K. These results strongly suggest that the trapping mechanism of noble gases in CVD diamonds is ion implantation during diamond growth. The degrees of fractionation of heavy noble gases were also in good agreement with those in ureilites. The vapor-growth hypothesis is discussed in comparison with the impact-shock hypothesis as a better model for the origin of diamonds in ureilites. The diamond (and graphite, amorphous carbon, too) may have been deposited on early condensates such as Re, Ir, W, etc. This model explains the chemical features of vein material in ureilites; the refractory siderophile elements are enriched in carbon and noble gases and low in normal siderophiles. The vapor-growth model is also compatible with the oxygen isotopic data of ureilites which suggests that nebular processes are primarily responsible for the composition of ureilites.

  14. Long-term data storage in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Dhomkar, Siddharth; Henshaw, Jacob; Jayakumar, Harishankar; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV−) center in diamond is the focus of widespread attention for applications ranging from quantum information processing to nanoscale metrology. Although most work so far has focused on the NV− optical and spin properties, control of the charge state promises complementary opportunities. One intriguing possibility is the long-term storage of information, a notion we hereby introduce using NV-rich, type 1b diamond. As a proof of principle, we use multicolor optical microscopy to read, write, and reset arbitrary data sets with two-dimensional (2D) binary bit density comparable to present digital-video-disk (DVD) technology. Leveraging on the singular dynamics of NV− ionization, we encode information on different planes of the diamond crystal with no cross-talk, hence extending the storage capacity to three dimensions. Furthermore, we correlate the center’s charge state and the nuclear spin polarization of the nitrogen host and show that the latter is robust to a cycle of NV− ionization and recharge. In combination with super-resolution microscopy techniques, these observations provide a route toward subdiffraction NV charge control, a regime where the storage capacity could exceed present technologies.

  15. Quantum Control over Single Spins in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovitski, V. V.; Fuchs, G. D.; Falk, A. L.; Santori, C.; Awschalom, D. D.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have recently emerged as a unique platform for fundamental studies in quantum information and nanoscience. The special properties of these impurity centers allow robust, room-temperature operation of solid-state qubits and have enabled several remarkable demonstrations in quantum information processing and precision nanoscale sensing. This article reviews the recent advances in magnetic and optical manipulation of the NV center’s quantum spin and their importance for prospective applications. We discuss how quantum control of individual centers can be harnessed for the protection of NV-center spin coherence, for multiqubit quantum operations in the presence of decoherence, and for high-fidelity initialization and readout. We also discuss the progress in resonant optical control, which has led to interfaces between spin and photonic qubits and may lead to spin networks based on diamond photonics. Many of these recently developed diamond-based technologies constitute critical components for the future leap toward practical multiqubit devices.

  16. Unusual inclusions found in a national diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, I.S.

    1985-01-01

    Three pale yellow minerals, 100-200 microns in their longest dimension, were extracted from a diamond 2.5 mm in size and examined in an SEM equipped with an X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. These inclusions were found to be two grains of garnet and a coesite, all of which contain a microscopic grain of Ti-rich biotite, a small amount of sanidine and a number of other minerals. (1) Garnet-biotite-apatite-rutile-sanidine-(Fe,Ca) melt. Attached to one end of this garnet inclusion is a crystal of biotite (50 x 30 ..mu..m) in which an apatite and a rutile are embedded. A thin lamella of sanidine occurs in the biotite near the garnet boundary. (2) Garnet-biotite-apatite-sanidine-rutile-pyrrhotite-(Fe,Ca,K) phase (unidentified). This garnet inclusion partially encased a biotite crystal while all other phases occur as minute prismatic needles or irregular and globular masses on the inclusion surface. (3) Coesite-biotite-sanidine-calcite. They are considered primary phases because the diamond host contains neither internal nor external fractures. Garnet, coesite, biotite and apatite are syngenetic inclusions in this diamond based on their relatively large sizes and their intergrown relationships. All other phases may also be primary or derived from biotite which, in the presence of sulfur, may produce phlogopite + sanidine + pyrrhotite + rutile. The droplets of melt and thin lamella of sanidine in inclusion (1) seem to be products of incongruent melting of biotite during the emplacement of kimberlite.

  17. Cell micropatterning on superhydrophobic diamond nanowires.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Lionel; Addad, Ahmed; Coffinier, Yannick; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2013-01-01

    Cell micropatterning was achieved in a spatially controlled manner based on heterogeneously wetted superhydrophilic/superhydrophobic diamond nanowire (NW) surfaces. Diamond NWs were synthesized on boron-doped diamond substrates using reactive ion etching and functionalized with octadecyltrichlorosilane to achieve superhydrophobicity. Superhydrophilic motifs of 400×400 μm(2) and 10×10 μm(2) single cell-sized motifs, surrounded by superhydrophobic regions, were then generated by selectively exposing the substrates to UV light. This design allowed successful patterning of single HeLa and MCF-10A cells within the superhydrophilic regions without additional surface modification. To add a further level of complexity, micropatterned co-cultures were obtained using bovine serum albumin to promote cell adhesion. This method is simple and does not require any complicated processing steps such as mask deposition or template removal. Potential applications are in the development of cell-based biological assays in well-controlled and biologically relevant environments. PMID:22922066

  18. Fluid/melt inclusions in alluvial Northeast Siberian diamonds: new approach on diamond formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, Alla M.; Wirth, Richard; Sobolev, Nikolai V.

    2010-05-01

    The origin of alluvial Northeast Siberian diamonds is still a subject of controversy. Fluid/melt inclusions in diamonds are the deepest available samples of mantle fluids and provide the unique information on the medium in which diamonds have grown. These inclusions carry high-density fluids (HDFs), the compositional variability is in the range of hydrous-silicic, carbonatitic (high-Mg and low-Mg) and saline end-members. Previous studies of the bulk composition and internal morphology of microinclusions in alluvial Northeast Siberian diamonds suggested that they contain fluids, but distribution and structure of their constitutional phases could not be determined. We investigated two populations of diamonds from Northeast Siberian Platform placers (Ebelyakh area) using TEM, FTIR, EPMA methods: (I) rounded single-crystals (dodecahedrons, octahedrons and irregular stones with a black central zone rich in microinclusions. Some of them frequently exhibit growth twinning; (II) rounded dark crystals, related to variety V according to the classification by Orlov (1977). This group of stones has their own typical features: dark color due to abundant black microinclusions and high dislocation density; mosaic-block internal structure; very light carbon isotopic composition; the high degree of nitrogen aggregation and nearly total absence of mineral inclusions. Diamonds of the first population are characterized by two types of fluid/melt nanoinclusions:1) multi-phase high- Mg assemblages, which include solid phases (magnesite, dolomite, clinohumite, Fe-spinel, graphite) and fluid bubbles; 2) oriented sulfide melt nanoinclusions in association with halides (KCl, NaCl), high-Si mica and fluid bubbles. All of them ranging between 5 and 200 nm in diameter are reflecting the diamond habit. Sulfides are homogeneous in composition. The Ni/(Ni+Fe) ratio of the inclusions is 0.037±0.04. Still closed fluid bubbles were identified in TEM studies as changing absorption contrast due to

  19. Magnetically Orchestrated Formation of Diamond at Lower Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Reginald B.; Lochner, Eric; Goddard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Man's curiosity and fascination with diamonds date back to ancient times. The knowledge of the many properties of diamond is recorded during Biblical times. Antoine Lavoisier determined the composition of diamond by burning in O2 to form CO2. With the then existing awareness of graphite as carbon, the race began to convert graphite to diamond. The selective chemical synthesis of diamond has been pursued by Cagniard, Hannay, Moisson and Parson. On the basis of the thermodynamically predicted equilibrium line of diamond and graphite, P W Bridgman attempted extraordinary conditions of high temperature (>2200°C) and pressure (>100,000 atm) for the allotropic conversion of graphite to diamond. H T Hall was the first to successfully form bulk diamond by realizing the kinetic restrictions to Bridgman's (thermodynamic) high pressure high temperature direct allotropic conversion. Moreover, Hall identified catalysts for the faster kinetics of diamond formation. H M Strong determined the import of the liquid catalyst during Hall's catalytic synthesis. W G Eversole discovered the slow metastable low pressure diamond formation by pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition with the molecular hydrogen etching of the rapidly forming stable graphitic carbon. J C Angus determined the import of atomic hydrogen for faster etching for faster diamond growth at low pressure. S Matsumoto has developed plasma and hot filament technology for faster hydrogen and carbon radical generations at low pressure for faster diamond formation. However the metastable low pressure chemical vapor depositions by plasma and hot filament are prone to polycrystalline films. From Bridgman to Hall to Eversole, Angus and Matsumoto, much knowledge has developed of the importance of pressure, temperature, transition metal catalyst, liquid state of metal (metal radicals atoms) and the carbon radical intermediates for diamond synthesis. Here we advance this understanding of diamond formation by demonstrating the external

  20. Bases of the Mantle-Carbonatite Conception of Diamond Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Spivak, Anna; Kuzyura, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    In the mantle-carbonatite conception of diamond genesis, the results of physic-chemical experiments are coordinated with the data of analytic mineralogy of primary inclusions in natural diamonds. Generalization of the solutions of principal genetic problems constitutes the bases of the conception. The solutions are following: (1) it is grounded that diamond-parental melts of the upper mantle have peridotite/eclogite - carbonatite - carbon compositions, of the transition zone - (wadsleite↔ringwoodite) - majorite - stishovite - carbonatite - carbon compositions, and of the lower mantle - periclase/wustite - bridgmanite - Ca-perovskite -stishovite - carbonatite - carbon compositions; (2) a construction of generalized diagrams for the diamond-parental media, which reveal changeable compositions of the growth melts of diamonds and associated phases, their genetic relations to the mantle substance, and classification connections of the primary inclusions in natural diamonds; (3) experimental equilibrium phase diagrams of syngenesis of diamonds and primary inclusions, which characterize the nucleation and growth conditions of diamonds and a capture of paragenetic and xenogenetic minerals by the growing diamonds; (4) a determination of the phase diagrams of diamonds and inclusions syngenesis under the regime of fractional crystallization, which discover the regularities of ultrabasic-basic evolution and paragenesis transitions in the diamond-forming systems of the upper and lower mantle. The evidence of the physic-chemically united mode of diamond genesis at the mantle depths with different mineralogy is obtained. References. Litvin Yu.A. (2007). High-pressure mineralogy of diamond genesis. In: Advances in High-Pressure Mineralogy (edited by Eiji Ohtani), Geological Society of America Special paper 421, 83-103. Litvin Yu.A. (2012). Experimental study of physic-chemical conditions of natural diamond formation on an example of the eclogite-carbonatite-sulphide-diamond