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Sample records for adaptor molecules myd88

  1. The Adaptor Protein Myd88 Is a Key Signaling Molecule in the Pathogenesis of Irinotecan-Induced Intestinal Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Deysi V. T.; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C. P.; Carvalho, Cibele B. M.; Borges, Vanessa F.; Wanderley, Carlos W. S.; Bem, Amanda X. C.; Leite, Caio A. V. G.; Teixeira, Maraiza A.; Batista, Gabriela L. P.; Silva, Rangel L.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Brito, Gerly A. C.; Almeida, Paulo R. C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a common side effect of irinotecan-based anticancer regimens. Mucositis causes cell damage, bacterial/endotoxin translocation and production of cytokines including IL–1 and IL–18. These molecules and toll-like receptors (TLRs) activate a common signaling pathway that involves the Myeloid Differentiation adaptor protein, MyD88, whose role in intestinal mucositis is unknown. Then, we evaluated the involvement of TLRs and MyD88 in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. MyD88-, TLR2- or TLR9-knockout mice and C57BL/6 (WT) mice were given either saline or irinotecan (75 mg/kg, i.p. for 4 days). On day 7, animal survival, diarrhea and bacteremia were assessed, and following euthanasia, samples of the ileum were obtained for morphometric analysis, myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and measurement of pro-inflammatory markers. Irinotecan reduced the animal survival (50%) and induced a pronounced diarrhea, increased bacteremia, neutrophil accumulation in the intestinal tissue, intestinal damage and more than twofold increased expression of MyD88 (200%), TLR9 (400%), TRAF6 (236%), IL–1β (405%), IL–18 (365%), COX–2 (2,777%) and NF-κB (245%) in the WT animals when compared with saline-injected group (P<0.05). Genetic deletion of MyD88, TLR2 or TLR9 effectively controlled the signs of intestinal injury when compared with irinotecan-administered WT controls (P<0.05). In contrast to the MyD88-/- and TLR2-/- mice, the irinotecan-injected TLR9-/- mice showed a reduced survival, a marked diarrhea and an enhanced expression of IL–18 versus irinotecan-injected WT controls. Additionally, the expression of MyD88 was reduced in the TLR2-/- or TLR9-/- mice. This study shows a critical role of the MyD88-mediated TLR2 and TLR9 signaling in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. PMID:26440613

  2. Characterization, genomic organization, and expression profiles of MyD88, a key adaptor molecule in the TLR signaling pathways in miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy).

    PubMed

    Tang, Da; Gao, Yunhang; Wang, Rixin; Sun, Yuena; Xu, Tianjun

    2012-12-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is an important adaptor protein in the TLR signaling pathways. In the present study, we firstly cloned and characterized Miichthys miiuy MyD88 (Mimi-MyD88) cDNA and gene. The Mimi-MyD88 gene was 3,470 bp consisting of five exons and four introns. The cDNA was composed of 1,627 bp with an 867-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 288 amino acid residues. The theoretical molecular mass and isoelectric point of this polypeptide were 33.25 and 4.96 kDa. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence showed that the conserved death domain and the typical Toll/IL-1 receptor domain are very similar to those presented in other mammals, amphibians, and fishes. To identify potential role of MyD88 in fish innate immunological surveillance, the constitutive Mimi-MyD88 mRNA is detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results demonstrated that Mimi-MyD88 is broadly expressed in ten normal tissues, with the lowest expression was observed in kidney and the highest was in liver. The transcriptional expression also revealed that Mimi-MyD88 was significantly up-regulated in liver, kidney, and spleen after challenge by Gram-negative bacteria, Vibrio anguillarum. Via contrasted the expression of MyD88 and TLR2 in kidney, we evaluated TLR2 plays an indispensable role in MyD88 transcription, but not absolutely dominant. The combined expression still indicated that MyD88 plays a universal role in keeping immune surveillance for pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that Mimi-MyD88 gene is classified into the piscine cluster and most closely related to large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. PMID:23053604

  3. Two adaptor molecules of MyD88 and TRAF6 in Apostichopus japonicus Toll signaling cascade: molecular cloning and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yali; Li, Chenghua; Zhang, Peng; Shao, Yina; Su, Xiurong; Li, Ye; Li, Taiwu

    2013-12-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) are two key adaptor molecules in Toll-like receptor signal transduction that triggers downstream cascades involved in innate immunity. Here we reported the isolation and characterization the full-length cDNAs of MyD88 and TRAF6 from sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (denoted as AjMyD88 and AjTRAF6, respectively). Both of two factors shared a remarkable high degree of structural conservation with their mammalian and Drosophila orthologs, such as a typical death domain (DD) and a conservative Toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain for the deduced amino acid of AjMyD88, a zinc finger of RING-type, two zinc fingers of TRAF-type, a coiled-coil region, and a MATH domain for that of AjTRAF6. Constitutive expression patterns were also observed in the two genes with different expression levels. AjMyD88 mRNA transcripts were higher expressed in intestine and respiratory trees, and AjTRAF6 were abundant in coelomocytes and tentacle. During Vibrio splendidus challenge experiment, the expression levels of two genes were increased significantly with larger amplitude and longer duration in AjTRAF6. The peak expression levels were detected at 6 h for AjMyD88 with 1.80-fold increase, and at 24 h for AjTRAF6 with 2.73-fold increase compared with that in the control group. All these results suggested that AjMyD88 and AjTRAF6 might be involved into immune response toward V. splendidus challenge. PMID:23886491

  4. Pivotal Role of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4, Its Adaptor Molecule MyD88, and Inflammasome Complex in Experimental Tubule-Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tarcio Teodoro; Semedo, Patricia; Hayashida, Caroline Yuri; Bechara, Luiz Roberto Grassmann; Elias, Rosa Maria; Barreto, Claudiene Rodrigues; Silva-Cunha, Claudia; Hyane, Meire Ioshie; Gonçalves, Giselle Martins; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Fujihara, Clarice; Zatz, Roberto; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Zamboni, Dario S.; Camara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2011-01-01

    Tubule-interstitial nephritis (TIN) results in decreased renal function and interstitial inflammation, which ultimately leads to fibrosis. Excessive adenine intake can cause TIN because xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) can convert this purine into an insoluble compound, which precipitates in the tubuli. Innate immune sensors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR) and inflammasome complex, play a crucial role in the initiation of inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of TLR-2 and -4, Myd88 and inflammasome complex in an experimental model of TIN. Here, we show that wild-type (WT) mice fed adenine-enriched food exhibited significant renal dysfunction and enhanced cellular infiltration accompanied by collagen deposition. They also presented higher gene and protein expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, TLR-2, -4, MyD88, ASC and Caspase-1 KO mice showed renoprotection associated with expression of inflammatory molecules at levels comparable to controls. Furthermore, treatment of WT animals with allopurinol, an XDH inhibitor, led to reduced levels of uric acid, oxidative stress, collagen deposition and a downregulation of the NF-kB signaling pathway. We concluded that MyD88 signaling and inflammasome participate in the development of TIN. Furthermore, inhibition of XDH seems to be a promising way to therapeutically target the developing inflammatory process. PMID:22194975

  5. TLR adaptor MyD88 is essential for pathogen control during oral toxoplasma gondii infection but not adaptive immunity induced by a vaccine strain of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Sukhumavasi, Woraporn; Egan, Charlotte E; Warren, Amy L; Taylor, Gregory A; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Denkers, Eric Y

    2008-09-01

    TLR adaptor MyD88 activation is important in host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii during i.p. infection, but the function of this signaling pathway during oral infection, in which mucosal immunity assumes a predominant role, has not been examined. In this study, we show that MyD88(-/-) mice fail to control the parasite and succumb within 2 wk of oral infection. Early during infection, T cell IFN-gamma production, recruitment of neutrophils and induction of p47 GTPase IGTP (Irgm3) in the intestinal mucosa were dependent upon functional MyD88. Unexpectedly, these responses were MyD88-independent later during acute infection. In particular, CD4(+) T cell IFN-gamma reached normal levels independently of MyD88, despite continued absence of IL-12 in these animals. The i.p. vaccination of MyD88(-/-) mice with an avirulent T. gondii uracil auxotroph elicited robust IFN-gamma responses and protective immunity to challenge with a high virulence T. gondii strain. Our results demonstrate that MyD88 is required to control Toxoplasma infection, but that the parasite can trigger adaptive immunity without the need for this TLR adaptor molecule. PMID:18714019

  6. Reduced photoreceptor death and improved retinal function during retinal degeneration in mice lacking innate immunity adaptor protein MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Sarah; Patel, Amit K.; Lee, Tinthu; Hackam, Abigail S.

    2015-01-01

    The injury inflammatory response mediated by the innate immune system is an important contributor to neurodegeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) and retina. A major branch of the innate immune system is regulated by the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are receptors for endogenous damage associated molecules released from injured cells as well as pathogen-derived molecules, and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1R), which are activated by IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-18 cytokines. TLRs and IL-1R are expressed on immune and non-immune cell types and act as first responders to cell damage, which results in tissue repair, or inflammation and apoptosis. Both TLR and IL-1R require the adaptor protein myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) for signaling. Although inflammation is implicated in neuronal death in the retina, the role of MyD88-dependent TLR and IL-1R signaling in retinal degeneration is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the role of MyD88-mediated signaling in neuronal degeneration in the retinal degeneration 1 (rd1) mouse model, which exhibits a phenotype of rapid photoreceptor death and inflammation. To generate rd1 mice lacking the MyD88 gene, rd1 were bred with MyD88 knockout mice (MyD88-/-) for several generations to produce rd1/MyD88+/+ and rd1/MyD88-/- genotypes. Chemokine mRNA expression levels were analyzed by qRT-PCR, and recruitment of activated microglia was quantified by immunodetection of the IBA-1 protein. Retinal outer nuclear layer cell counts were performed to quantify photoreceptor degeneration, and retinal function was assessed using electroretinograms (ERG). Our results revealed that retinal expression of Ccl2, Ccl4, Ccl7 and Cxcl10 was reduced by 2 to 8-fold in rd1/MyD88-/- mice compared with rd1/MyD88+/+ mice (p<0.05), which coincided with attenuated microglial activation, higher numbers of photoreceptors and higher retina responses to photopic and scotopic stimuli. At later ages, rd1/MyD88

  7. Innate immune adaptor MyD88 mediates neutrophil recruitment and myocardial injury after ischemia-reperfusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Zhao, Huailong; Xu, Xinhua; Buys, Emmanuel S; Raher, Michael J; Bopassa, Jean C; Thibault, Helene; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Schmidt, Ulrich; Chao, Wei

    2008-09-01

    MyD88 is an adaptor protein critical for innate immune response against microbial infection and in certain noninfectious tissue injury. The present study examined the role of MyD88 in myocardial inflammation and injury after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). I/R was produced by coronary artery ligation for 30 min followed by reperfusion. The ratios of area at risk to left ventricle (LV) were similar between wild-type (WT) and MyD88-deficient (MyD88-/-) mice. However, 24 h after I/R, the ratios of myocardial infarction to area at risk were 58% less in MyD88(-/-) than in WT mice (14 +/- 2% vs. 33 +/- 6%, P = 0.01). Serial echocardiographic studies demonstrated that there was no difference in baseline LV contractile function between the two groups. Twenty-four hours after I/R, LV ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS) in WT mice were reduced by 44% and 62% (EF, 51 +/- 2%, and FS, 22 +/- 1%, P < 0.001), respectively, and remained depressed on the seventh day after I/R. In comparison, EF and FS in MyD88(-/-) mice were 67 +/- 3% and 33 +/- 2%, respectively, after I/R (P < 0.001 vs. WT). Similarly, LV function, as demonstrated by invasive hemodynamic measurements, was better preserved in MyD88(-/-) compared with WT mice after I/R. Furthermore, when compared with WT mice, MyD88(-/-) mice subjected to I/R had a marked decrease in myocardial inflammation as demonstrated by attenuated neutrophil recruitment and decreased expression of the proinflammatory mediators keratinocyte chemoattractant, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and ICAM-1. Taken together, these data suggest that MyD88 modulates myocardial inflammatory injury and contributes to myocardial infarction and LV dysfunction during I/R. PMID:18660455

  8. Innate immune adaptor MyD88 mediates neutrophil recruitment and myocardial injury after ischemia-reperfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Feng , Yan; Zhao, Huailong; Xu, Xinhua; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Raher, Michael J.; Bopassa, Jean C.; Thibault, Helene; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Schmidt, Ulrich; Chao, Wei

    2008-01-01

    MyD88 is an adaptor protein critical for innate immune response against microbial infection and in certain noninfectious tissue injury. The present study examined the role of MyD88 in myocardial inflammation and injury after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). I/R was produced by coronary artery ligation for 30 min followed by reperfusion. The ratios of area at risk to left ventricle (LV) were similar between wild-type (WT) and MyD88-deficient (MyD88−/−) mice. However, 24 h after I/R, the ratios of myocardial infarction to area at risk were 58% less in MyD88−/− than in WT mice (14 ± 2% vs. 33 ± 6%, P = 0.01). Serial echocardiographic studies demonstrated that there was no difference in baseline LV contractile function between the two groups. Twenty-four hours after I/R, LV ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS) in WT mice were reduced by 44% and 62% (EF, 51 ± 2%, and FS, 22 ± 1%, P < 0.001), respectively, and remained depressed on the seventh day after I/R. In comparison, EF and FS in MyD88−/− mice were 67 ± 3% and 33 ± 2%, respectively, after I/R (P < 0.001 vs. WT). Similarly, LV function, as demonstrated by invasive hemodynamic measurements, was better preserved in MyD88−/− compared with WT mice after I/R. Furthermore, when compared with WT mice, MyD88−/− mice subjected to I/R had a marked decrease in myocardial inflammation as demonstrated by attenuated neutrophil recruitment and decreased expression of the proinflammatory mediators keratinocyte chemoattractant, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and ICAM-1. Taken together, these data suggest that MyD88 modulates myocardial inflammatory injury and contributes to myocardial infarction and LV dysfunction during I/R. PMID:18660455

  9. Toll-Like Receptor Adaptor MyD88 is Essential for Pathogen Control During Oral Toxoplasma gondii Infection but not Adaptive Immunity Induced by a Vaccine Strain of the Parasite1

    PubMed Central

    Sukhumavasi, Woraporn; Egan, Charlotte E.; Warren, Amy L.; Taylor, Gregory A.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.; Denkers, Eric Y.

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR)/MyD88 activation is important in host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii during i. p. infection, but the function of this signaling pathway during oral infection, in which mucosal immunity assumes a predominant role, has not been examined. Here, we show that MyD88−/− mice fail to control the parasite and succumb within two weeks of oral infection. Early during infection, T cell IFN-γ production, recruitment of neutrophils and induction of p47 GTPase Irgm3/IGTP in the intestinal mucosa were dependent upon functional MyD88. Unexpectedly, these responses were MyD88-independent later during acute infection. In particular, CD4+ T cell IFN-γ reached normal levels independently of MyD88, despite continued absence of IL-12 in these animals. Intraperitoneal vaccination of MyD88−/− mice with an avirulent T. gondii uracil axotroph elicited robust IFN-γ responses and protective immunity to challenge with a high virulence T. gondii strain. Our results demonstrate that MyD88 is required to control Toxoplasma infection, but that the parasite can trigger adaptive immunity without the need for this TLR adaptor molecule. PMID:18714019

  10. Adjuvanticity of the oil-in-water emulsion MF59 is independent of Nlrp3 inflammasome but requires the adaptor protein MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Seubert, Anja; Calabro, Samuele; Santini, Laura; Galli, Barbara; Genovese, Alessia; Valentini, Sara; Aprea, Susanna; Colaprico, Annalisa; D'Oro, Ugo; Giuliani, Marzia M.; Pallaoro, Michele; Pizza, Mariagrazia; O'Hagan, Derek T.; Wack, Andreas; Rappuoli, Rino; De Gregorio, Ennio

    2011-01-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions have been successfully used to increase the efficacy, immunogenicity, and cross-protection of human vaccines; however, their mechanism of action is still largely unknown. Nlrp3 inflammasome has been previously associated to the activity of alum, another adjuvant broadly used in human vaccines, and MyD88 adaptor protein is required for the adjuvanticity of most Toll-like receptor agonists. We compared the contribution of Nlrp3 and MyD88 to the adjuvanticity of alum, the oil-in-water emulsion MF59, and complete Freund's adjuvant in mice using a three-component vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (rMenB). Although the basal antibody responses to the nonadjuvanted rMenB vaccine were largely dependent on Nlrp3, the high-level antibody responses induced by alum, MF59, or complete Freund's adjuvant did not require Nlrp3. Surprisingly, we found that MF59 requires MyD88 to enhance bactericidal antibody responses to the rMenB vaccine. Because MF59 did not activate any of the Toll-like receptors in vitro, we propose that MF59 requires MyD88 for a Toll-like receptor-independent signaling pathway. PMID:21690334

  11. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of MyD88-dependent signaling pathways using a computational screen

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Mark A.; Lee, Michael S.; Kissner, Teri L.; Alam, Shahabuddin; Waugh, David S.; Saikh, Kamal U.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used high-throughput computational screening to discover drug-like inhibitors of the host MyD88 protein-protein signaling interaction implicated in the potentially lethal immune response associated with Staphylococcal enterotoxins. We built a protein-protein dimeric docking model of the Toll-interleukin receptor (TIR)-domain of MyD88 and identified a binding site for docking small molecules. Computational screening of 5 million drug-like compounds led to testing of 30 small molecules; one of these molecules inhibits the TIR-TIR domain interaction and attenuates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human primary cell cultures. Compounds chemically similar to this hit from the PubChem database were observed to be more potent with improved drug-like properties. Most of these 2nd generation compounds inhibit Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-induced TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-1β production at 2–10 μM in human primary cells. Biochemical analysis and a cell-based reporter assay revealed that the most promising compound, T6167923, disrupts MyD88 homodimeric formation, which is critical for its signaling function. Furthermore, we observed that administration of a single dose of T6167923 completely protects mice from lethal SEB-induced toxic shock. In summary, our in silico approach has identified anti-inflammatory inhibitors against in vitro and in vivo toxin exposure with promise to treat other MyD88-related pro-inflammatory diseases. PMID:26381092

  12. MyD88 expression in the rat dental follicle: Implications for osteoclastogenesis and tooth eruption

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dawen; Yao, Shaomian; Wise, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is a key adaptor molecule in the interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-18 Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Because it is present in dental follicle (DF) cells in vitro, the purpose of this study was to determine its chronological expression in vivo, as well as its possible role in osteoclastogenesis and tooth eruption. An oligo DNA microarray was used to determine gene expression of MyD88 in vivo in the DFs from the first mandibular molars of postnatal rats from days 1–11. The results showed that MyD88 was expressed maximally at day 3. Using siRNA to knock down MyD88 expression in the DF cells also reduced the gene expression of nuclear factor-kappa B-1 (NFKB1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1). IL-1α up-regulated the expression of NFKB1, MCP-1 and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), but knockdown of MyD88 nullified this IL-1α effect. Conditioned medium from DF cells with MyD88 knocked down reduced chemotactic activity for mononuclear cells and reduced osteoclastogenesis as opposed to controls. In conclusion, the maximal expression of MyD88 at day 3 in the DF may contribute to the major burst of osteoclastogenesis needed for eruption by up-regulating MCP-1 and RANKL expression. PMID:20662905

  13. Deubiquitinase CYLD acts as a negative regulator for bacterium NTHi-induced inflammation by suppressing K63-linked ubiquitination of MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Miyata, Masanori; Lim, Jae Hyang; Li, Jian-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) acts as a crucial adaptor molecule for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor signaling. In contrast to the well-studied positive regulation of MyD88 signaling, how MyD88 signaling is negatively regulated still remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that MyD88 protein undergoes lysine 63 (K63)-linked polyubiquitination, which is functionally critical for mediating TLR–MyD88-dependent signaling. Deubiquitinase CYLD negatively regulates MyD88-mediated signaling by directly interacting with MyD88 and deubiquitinating nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi)-induced K63-linked polyubiquitination of MyD88 at lysine 231. Importantly, we further confirmed this finding in the lungs of mice in vivo by using MyD88−/−CYLD−/− mice. Understanding how CYLD deubiquitinates K63-linked polyubiquitination of MyD88 may not only bring insights into the negative regulation of TLR–MyD88-dependent signaling, but may also lead to the development of a previously unidentified therapeutic strategy for uncontrolled inflammation. PMID:26719415

  14. TLR signaling adaptor protein MyD88 in primary sensory neurons contributes to persistent inflammatory and neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing-Jun; Liu, Tong; Chen, Gang; Wang, Bing; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Yin, Cui; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that neuro-immune and neuro-glial interactions are critically involved in chronic pain sensitization. It is well studied how immune/glial mediators sensitize pain, but how sensory neurons control neuroinflammation remains unclear. We employed Myd88 conditional knockout (CKO) mice, in which Myd88 was deleted in sodium channel subunit Nav1.8-expressing primary sensory neurons, to examine the unique role of neuronal MyD88 in regulating acute and chronic pain, and possible underlying mechanisms. We found that baseline pain and the formalin induced acute inflammatory pain were intact in CKO mice. However, the late phase inflammatory pain following complete Freund's adjuvant injection and the late phase neuropathic pain following chronic constriction injury (CCI), were reduced in CKO mice. CCI induced up-regulation of MyD88 and chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 expression in DRG neurons and macrophage infiltration into DRGs, and microglia activation in spinal dorsal horns in wild-type mice, but all these changes were compromised in CKO mice. Finally, the pain hypersensitivity induced by intraplantar IL-1β was reduced in CKO mice. Our findings suggest that MyD88 in primary sensory neurons plays an active role in regulating IL-1β signaling and neuroinflammation in the peripheral and the central nervous systems, and contributes to the maintenance of persistent pain. PMID:27312666

  15. TLR signaling adaptor protein MyD88 in primary sensory neurons contributes to persistent inflammatory and neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing-Jun; Liu, Tong; Chen, Gang; Wang, Bing; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Yin, Cui; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that neuro-immune and neuro-glial interactions are critically involved in chronic pain sensitization. It is well studied how immune/glial mediators sensitize pain, but how sensory neurons control neuroinflammation remains unclear. We employed Myd88 conditional knockout (CKO) mice, in which Myd88 was deleted in sodium channel subunit Nav1.8-expressing primary sensory neurons, to examine the unique role of neuronal MyD88 in regulating acute and chronic pain, and possible underlying mechanisms. We found that baseline pain and the formalin induced acute inflammatory pain were intact in CKO mice. However, the late phase inflammatory pain following complete Freund’s adjuvant injection and the late phase neuropathic pain following chronic constriction injury (CCI), were reduced in CKO mice. CCI induced up-regulation of MyD88 and chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 expression in DRG neurons and macrophage infiltration into DRGs, and microglia activation in spinal dorsal horns in wild-type mice, but all these changes were compromised in CKO mice. Finally, the pain hypersensitivity induced by intraplantar IL-1β was reduced in CKO mice. Our findings suggest that MyD88 in primary sensory neurons plays an active role in regulating IL-1β signaling and neuroinflammation in the peripheral and the central nervous systems, and contributes to the maintenance of persistent pain. PMID:27312666

  16. Mycobacterial Phosphatidylinositol Mannosides Negatively Regulate Host Toll-like Receptor 4, MyD88-dependent Proinflammatory Cytokines, and TRIF-dependent Co-stimulatory Molecule Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Doz, Emilie; Rose, Stéphanie; Court, Nathalie; Front, Sophie; Vasseur, Virginie; Charron, Sabine; Gilleron, Martine; Puzo, Germain; Fremaux, Isabelle; Delneste, Yves; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernhard; Martin, Olivier R.; Quesniaux, Valerie F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates host immune responses through proteins and complex glycolipids. Here, we report that the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor phosphatidyl-myo-inositol hexamannosides PIM6 or PIM2 exert potent anti-inflammatory activities. PIM strongly inhibited the Toll-like receptor (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88)-mediated release of NO, cytokines, and chemokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin 12 (IL-12) p40, IL-6, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, and also IL-10 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. This effect was independent of the presence of TLR2. PIM also reduced the LPS-induced MyD88-independent, TIR domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon β (TRIF)-mediated expression of co-stimulatory receptors. PIM inhibited LPS/TLR4-induced NFκB translocation. Synthetic PIM1 and a PIM2 mimetic recapitulated these in vitro activities and inhibited endotoxin-induced airway inflammation, TNF and keratinocyte-derived chemokine secretion, and neutrophil recruitment in vivo. Mannosyl, two acyl chains, and phosphatidyl residues are essential for PIM anti-inflammatory activity, whereas the inosityl moiety is dispensable. Therefore, PIM exert potent antiinflammatory effects both in vitro and in vivo that may contribute to the strategy developed by mycobacteria for repressing the host innate immunity, and synthetic PIM analogs represent powerful anti-inflammatory leads. PMID:19561082

  17. Immunogenicity and efficacy of a plasmid DNA rabies vaccine incorporating Myd88 as a genetic adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Ullas, Padinjaremattathil Thankappan; Desai, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (Myd88), a ubiquitous Toll-like receptor adaptor molecule, has been reported to play important roles in B cell responses to infections and vaccination. The present study evaluated the effects of genetic adjuvanting with Myd88 on the immune responses to a plasmid DNA rabies vaccine. Materials and Methods Plasmids encoding rabies glycoprotein alone (pIRES-Rgp) or a fragment of Myd88 gene in addition (pIRES-Rgp-Myd) were constructed and administered intramuscularly or intrademally in Swiss albino mice (on days 0, 7, and 21). Rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA) titres were estimated in the mice sera on days 14 and 28 by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. The protective efficacy of the constructs was evaluated by an intracerebral challenge with challenge virus standard virus on day 35. Results Co-expression of Myd88 increased RVNA responses to pIRES-Rgp by 3- and 2-folds, following intramuscular and intradermal immunization, respectively. pIRES-Rgp protected 80% of the mice following intramuscular and intradermal immunizations, while pIRES-Rgp-Myd afforded 100% protection following similar administrations. Conclusion Genetic adjuvanting with Myd88 enhanced the RVNA responses and protective efficacy of a plasmid DNA rabies vaccine. This strategy might be useful for rabies vaccination of canines in the field, and needs further evaluation. PMID:25003094

  18. Functional analysis of a zebrafish myd88 mutant identifies key transcriptional components of the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    van der Vaart, Michiel; van Soest, Joost J; Spaink, Herman P; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2013-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an important class of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize microbial and danger signals. Their downstream signaling upon ligand binding is vital for initiation of the innate immune response. In human and mammalian models, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MYD88) is known for its central role as an adaptor molecule in interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R) and TLR signaling. The zebrafish is increasingly used as a complementary model system for disease research and drug screening. Here, we describe a zebrafish line with a truncated version of MyD88 as the first zebrafish mutant for a TLR signaling component. We show that this immune-compromised mutant has a lower survival rate under standard rearing conditions and is more susceptible to challenge with the acute bacterial pathogens Edwardsiella tarda and Salmonella typhimurium. Microarray and quantitative PCR analysis revealed that expression of genes for transcription factors central to innate immunity (including NF-ĸB and AP-1) and the pro-inflammatory cytokine Il1b, is dependent on MyD88 signaling during these bacterial infections. Nevertheless, expression of immune genes independent of MyD88 in the myd88 mutant line was sufficient to limit growth of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain. In the case of infection with the chronic bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium marinum, we show that MyD88 signaling has an important protective role during early pathogenesis. During mycobacterial infection, the myd88 mutant shows accelerated formation of granuloma-like aggregates and increased bacterial burden, with associated lower induction of genes central to innate immunity. This zebrafish myd88 mutant will be a valuable tool for further study of the role of IL1R and TLR signaling in the innate immunity processes underlying infectious diseases, inflammatory disorders and cancer. PMID:23471913

  19. MyD88 adaptor-like (Mal) functions in the epithelial barrier and contributes to intestinal integrity via protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Corr, S C; Palsson-McDermott, E M; Grishina, I; Barry, S P; Aviello, G; Bernard, N J; Casey, P G; Ward, J B J; Keely, S J; Dandekar, S; Fallon, P G; O'Neill, L A J

    2014-01-01

    MyD88 adapter-like (Mal)-deficient mice displayed increased susceptibility to oral but not intraperitoneal infection with Salmonella Typhimurium. Bone marrow chimeras demonstrated that mice with Mal-deficient non-hematopoietic cells were more susceptible to infection, indicating a role for Mal in non-myeloid cells. We observed perturbed barrier function in Mal(-/-) mice, as indicated by reduced electrical resistance and increased mucosa blood permeability following infection. Altered expression of occludin, Zonula occludens-1, and claudin-3 in intestinal epithelia from Mal(-/-) mice suggest that Mal regulates tight junction formation, which may in part contribute to intestinal integrity. Mal interacted with several protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in a Caco-2 model of intestinal epithelia and inhibition of Mal or PKC increased permeability and bacterial invasion via a paracellular route, while a pan-PKC inhibitor increased susceptibility to oral infection in mice. Mal signaling is therefore beneficial to the integrity of the intestinal barrier during infection. PMID:23612054

  20. MyD88 Deficiency Markedly Worsens Tissue Inflammation and Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with Treponema pallidum, the Agent of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Adam C.; Dunne, Dana W.; Zeiss, Caroline J.; Bockenstedt, Linda K.; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.; Fikrig, Erol

    2013-01-01

    Research on syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by the non-cultivatable spirochete Treponema pallidum, has been hampered by the lack of an inbred animal model. We hypothesized that Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent responses are essential for clearance of T. pallidum and, consequently, compared infection in wild-type (WT) mice and animals lacking MyD88, the adaptor molecule required for signaling by most TLRs. MyD88-deficient mice had significantly higher pathogen burdens and more extensive inflammation than control animals. Whereas tissue infiltrates in WT mice consisted of mixed mononuclear and plasma cells, infiltrates in MyD88-deficient animals were predominantly neutrophilic. Although both WT and MyD88-deficient mice produced antibodies that promoted uptake of treponemes by WT macrophages, MyD88-deficient macrophages were deficient in opsonophagocytosis of treponemes. Our results demonstrate that TLR-mediated responses are major contributors to the resistance of mice to syphilitic disease and that MyD88 signaling and FcR-mediated opsonophagocytosis are linked to the macrophage-mediated clearance of treponemes. PMID:23940747

  1. MyD88-dependent IL-1 receptor signaling is essential for gouty inflammation stimulated by monosodium urate crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Jen; Shi, Yan; Hearn, Arron; Fitzgerald, Kate; Golenbock, Douglas; Reed, George; Akira, Shizuo; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2006-01-01

    While it is known that monosodium urate (MSU) crystals cause the disease gout, the mechanism by which these crystals stimulate this inflammatory condition has not been clear. Here we find that the Toll/IL-1R (TIR) signal transduction adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) is required for acute gouty inflammation. In contrast, other TIR adaptor molecules, TIRAP/Mal, TRIF, and TRAM, are not required for this process. The MyD88-dependent TLR1, -2, -4, -6, -7, -9, and -11 and IL-18 receptor (IL-18R) are not essential for MSU-induced inflammation. Moreover, MSU does not stimulate HEK cells expressing TLR1–11 to activate NF-κB. In contrast, mice deficient in the MyD88-dependent IL-1R showed reduced inflammatory responses, similar to those observed in MyD88-deficient mice. Similarly, mice treated with IL-1 neutralizing antibodies also showed reduced MSU-induced inflammation, demonstrating that IL-1 production and IL-1R activation play essential roles in MSU-triggered inflammation. IL-1R deficiency in bone marrow–derived cells did not affect the inflammatory response; however, it was required in non–bone marrow–derived cells. These results indicate that IL-1 is essential for the MSU-induced inflammatory response and that the requirement of MyD88 in this process is primarily through its function as an adaptor molecule in the IL-1R signaling pathway. PMID:16886064

  2. Oncogenically active MYD88 mutations in human lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Vu N.; Young, Ryan M.; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Xiao, Wenming; Lim, Kian-Huat; Kohlhammer, Holger; Xu, Weihong; Yang, Yandan; Zhao, Hong; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Romesser, Paul; Wright, George; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Fisher, Richard I.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, J. R.; Weisenburger, Denny D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains the least curable form of this malignancy despite recent advances in therapy1. Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB and JAK kinase signalling promotes malignant cell survival in these lymphomas, but the genetic basis for this signalling is incompletely understood. Here we describe the dependence of ABC DLBCLs on MYD88, an adaptor protein that mediates toll and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor signalling2,3, and the discovery of highly recurrent oncogenic mutations affecting MYD88 in ABC DLBCL tumours. RNA interference screening revealed that MYD88 and the associated kinases IRAK1 and IRAK4 are essential for ABC DLBCL survival. High-throughput RNA resequencing uncovered MYD88 mutations in ABC DLBCL lines. Notably, 29% of ABC DLBCL tumours harboured the same amino acid substitution, L265P, in the MYD88 Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain at an evolutionarily invariant residue in its hydrophobic core. This mutation was rare or absent in other DLBCL subtypes and Burkitt’s lymphoma, but was observed in 9% of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. At a lower frequency, additional mutations were observed in the MYD88 TIR domain, occurring in both the ABC and germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL subtypes. Survival of ABC DLBCL cells bearing the L265P mutation was sustained by the mutant but not the wild-type MYD88 isoform, demonstrating that L265P is a gain-of-function driver mutation. The L265P mutant promoted cell survival by spontaneously assembling a protein complex containing IRAK1 and IRAK4, leading to IRAK4 kinase activity, IRAK1 phosphorylation, NF-κB signalling, JAK kinase activation of STAT3, and secretion of IL-6, IL-10 and interferon-β. Hence, theMYD88 signalling pathway is integral to the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL, supporting the development of inhibitors of IRAK4 kinase and other components of this pathway for the treatment of tumours bearing oncogenic MYD88 mutations

  3. Regulatory T cell expressed MyD88 is critical for prolongation of allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Borges, Christopher M; Reichenbach, Dawn K; Kim, Beom Seok; Misra, Aditya; Blazar, Bruce R; Turka, Laurence A

    2016-08-01

    MyD88 signaling directly promotes T-cell survival and is required for optimal T-cell responses to pathogens. To examine the role of T-cell-intrinsic MyD88 signals in transplantation, we studied mice with targeted T-cell-specific MyD88 deletion. Contrary to expectations, we found that these mice were relatively resistant to prolongation of graft survival with anti-CD154 plus rapamycin in a class II-mismatched system. To specifically examine the role of MyD88 in Tregs, we created a Treg-specific MyD88-deficient mouse. Transplant studies in these animals replicated the findings observed with a global T-cell MyD88 knockout. Surprisingly, given the role of MyD88 in conventional T-cell survival, we found no defect in the survival of MyD88-deficient Tregs in vitro or in the transplant recipients and also observed intact cell homing and expression of Treg effector molecules. MyD88-deficient Tregs also fail to protect allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients from chronic graft-versus-host disease, confirming the observations of defective regulation seen in a solid organ transplant system. Together, our data define MyD88 as having a divergent requirement for cell survival in non-Tregs and Tregs, and a yet-to-be defined survival-independent requirement for Treg function during the response to alloantigen. PMID:27112509

  4. Identification of MyD88 as a novel target of miR-155, involved in negative regulation of Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Xiao, Bin; Liu, Zhen; Li, Na; Zhu, En-Dong; Li, Bo-Sheng; Xie, Qing-Hua; Zhuang, Yuan; Zou, Quan-Ming; Mao, Xu-Hu

    2010-04-16

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) has been implicated as a central regulator of the immune system. We have previously reported that miR-155 negatively regulates Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation, but the molecular mechanism of miR-155 regulating the inflammation is not fully clear. Here, we identified myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88) as a target gene of miR-155, and found that miR-155 decreased MyD88 expression at the protein but not the mRNA message level, suggesting that the miR-155-mediated inhibition is a post-transcriptional event. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-155 led to significantly reduced IL-8 production induced by H. pylori infection. Thus, we have demonstrated that miR-155 can negatively regulate inflammation by targeting a key adaptor molecule MyD88 in inflammatory pathways. PMID:20219467

  5. Molecular cloning and expression studies of the adapter molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Yun; Hu, Guo-Bin; Yu, Chang-Hong; Li, Song; Liu, Qiu-Ming; Zhang, Shi-Cui

    2015-10-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is an adapter protein involved in the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). In this study, a full length cDNA of MyD88 was cloned from turbot, Scophthalmus maximus. It is 1619 bp in length and contains an 858-bp open reading frame that encodes a peptide of 285 amino acid residues. The putative turbot (Sm)MyD88 protein possesses a N-terminal death domain and a C-terminal Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain known to be important for the functions of MyD88 in mammals. Phylogenetic analysis grouped SmMyD88 with other fish MyD88s. SmMyD88 mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues of healthy turbots, with higher levels observed in immune-relevant organs. To explore the role of SmMyD88, its gene expression profile in response to stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) or turbot reddish body iridovirus (TRBIV) was studied in the head kidney, spleen, gills and muscle over a 7-day time course. The results showed an up-regulation of SmMyD88 transcript levels by the three immunostimulants in all four examined tissues, with the induction by CpG-ODN strongest and initiated earliest and inducibility in the muscle very weak. Additionally, TRBIV challenge resulted in a quite high level of SmMyD88 expression in the spleen, whereas the two synthetic immunostimulants induced the higher levels in the head kidney. These data provide insights into the roles of SmMyD88 in the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathway of the innate immune system in turbot. PMID:26025195

  6. MyD88 Deficiency Alters Expression of Antimicrobial Factors in Mouse Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Into, Takeshi; Takigawa, Toshiya; Niida, Shumpei; Shibata, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    The surfaces of oral mucosa are protected from infections by antimicrobial proteins and natural immunoglobulins that are constantly secreted in saliva, serving as principal innate immune defense in the oral cavity. MyD88 is an important adaptor protein for signal transduction downstream of Toll-like receptors and TACI, receptors for regulation of innate immunity and B cell responses, respectively. Although MyD88-mediated signaling has a regulatory role in the intestinal mucosal immunity, its specific role in the oral cavity has remained elusive. In the present study, we assessed the influence of MyD88 deficiency on the oral innate defense, particularly the expression of antimicrobial proteins in salivary glands and production of salivary basal immunoglobulins, in mice. Microarray analysis of the whole tissues of submandibular glands revealed that the expression of several genes encoding salivary antimicrobial proteins, such as secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), S100A8, and lactotransferrin, was reduced due to MyD88 deficiency. Histologically, SLPI-expressing acinar cells were evidently decreased in the glands from MyD88 deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that B cell populations, including B-1 cells and IgA+ plasma cells, residing in submandibular glands were increased by MyD88 deficiency. The level of salivary anti-phosphorylcholine IgA was elevated in MyD88 deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. Thus, this study provides a detailed description of the effect of MyD88 deficiency on expression of several salivary antimicrobial factors in mice, illustrating the role for MyD88-mediated signaling in the innate immune defense in the oral cavity. PMID:25415419

  7. Immobilization stress-induced anorexia is mediated independent of MyD88.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Toru; Yamawaki, Yosuke; Kimura, Hitomi; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-09-01

    MyD88 is an adaptor protein for the toll-like receptor, which is involved in regulating innate immune function. Lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of toll-like receptor 4 signaling induces hypothalamic signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and anorexia through MyD88. In the present study, we investigated the possible role of MyD88 in psychological stress-induced anorexia. We found that immobilization stress inhibited food intake in both wild-type mice and MyD88-deficient mice. Immobilization stress slightly increased STAT3 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus, but it was weaker than the lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in STAT3 phosphorylation. These observations suggest that the mechanisms involved in psychological stress-induced anorexia may be regulated differently from those involved in anorexia that is induced by infection. PMID:27391428

  8. Characterization of bbtTICAM from amphioxus suggests the emergence of a MyD88-independent pathway in basal chordates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Manyi; Yuan, Shaochun; Huang, Shengfeng; Li, Jun; Xu, Liqun; Huang, Huiqing; Tao, Xin; Peng, Jian; Xu, Anlong

    2011-01-01

    The MyD88-independent pathway, one of the two crucial TLR signaling routes, is thought to be a vertebrate innovation. However, a novel Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) adaptor, designated bbtTICAM, which was identified in the basal chordate amphioxus, links this pathway to invertebrates. The protein architecture of bbtTICAM is similar to that of vertebrate TICAM1 (TIR-containing adaptor molecule-1, also known as TRIF), while phylogenetic analysis based on the TIR domain indicated that bbtTICAM is the oldest ortholog of vertebrate TICAM1 and TICAM2 (TIR-containing adaptor molecule-2, also known as TRAM). Similar to human TICAM1, bbtTICAM activates NF-κB in a MyD88-independent manner by interacting with receptor interacting protein (RIP) via its RHIM motif. Such activation requires bbtTICAM to form homodimers in endosomes, and it may be negatively regulated by amphioxus SARM (sterile α and armadillo motif-containing protein) and TRAF2. However, bbtTICAM did not induce the production of type I interferon. Thus, our study not only presents the ancestral features of vertebrate TICAM1 and TICAM2, but also reveals the evolutionary origin of the MyD88-independent pathway from basal chordates, which will aid in understanding the development of the vertebrate TLR network. PMID:21931360

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Limits Escherichia coli-Induced Inflammatory Responses via Attenuating MyD88-Dependent and MyD88-Independent Pathway Activation in Bovine Endometrial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingchao; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Mengling; Fu, Yunhe; Wang, Jiufeng

    2016-08-01

    Intrauterine Escherichia coli infection after calving reduces fertility and causes major economic losses in the dairy industry. We investigated the protective effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 on E. coli-induced cell damage and inflammation in primary bovine endometrial epithelial cells (BEECs). L. rhamnosus GR-1 reduced ultrastructure alterations and the percentage of BEECs apoptosis after E. coli challenge. Increased messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of immune response indicators, including pattern recognition receptors (toll-like receptor [TLR]2, TLR4, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain [NOD]1, and NOD2), inflammasome proteins (NOD-like receptor family member pyrin domain-containing protein 3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, and caspase-1), TLR4 downstream adaptor molecules (myeloid differentiation antigen 88 [MyD88], toll-like receptor adaptor molecule 2 [TICAM2]), nuclear transcription factor kB (NF-kB), and the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, and interferon (IFN)-β, was observed following E. coli challenge. However, these increases were attenuated by L. rhamnosus GR-1 pretreatment. Our data indicate that L. rhamnosus GR-1 ameliorates the E. coli-induced disruption of cellular ultrastructure, subsequently reducing the percentage of BEECs apoptosis and limiting inflammatory responses, partly via attenuation of MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent pathway activation. Certain probiotics could potentially prevent postpartum uterine diseases in dairy cows, ultimately reducing the use of antibiotics. PMID:27236308

  10. A liquid crystal of ascorbyl palmitate, used as vaccine platform, provides sustained release of antigen and has intrinsic pro-inflammatory and adjuvant activities which are dependent on MyD88 adaptor protein.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Vallecillo, María F; Minguito de la Escalera, María M; Aguirre, María V; Ullio Gamboa, Gabriela V; Palma, Santiago D; González-Cintado, Leticia; Chiodetti, Ana L; Soldano, Germán; Morón, Gabriel; Allemandi, Daniel A; Ardavín, Carlos; Pistoresi-Palencia, María C; Maletto, Belkys A

    2015-09-28

    Modern subunit vaccines require the development of new adjuvant strategies. Recently, we showed that CpG-ODN formulated with a liquid crystal nanostructure formed by self-assembly of 6-O-ascorbyl palmitate (Coa-ASC16) is an attractive system for promoting an antigen-specific immune response to weak antigens. Here, we showed that after subcutaneous injection of mice with near-infrared fluorescent dye-labeled OVA antigen formulated with Coa-ASC16, the dye-OVA was retained at the injection site for a longer period than when soluble dye-OVA was administered. Coa-ASC16 alone elicited a local inflammation, but how this material triggers this response has not been described yet. Although it is known that some materials used as a platform are not immunologically inert, very few studies have directly focused on this topic. In this study, we explored the underlying mechanisms concerning the interaction between Coa-ASC16 and the immune system and we found that the whole inflammatory response elicited by Coa-ASC16 (leukocyte recruitment and IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 production) was dependent on the MyD88 protein. TLR2, TLR4, TLR7 and NLRP3-inflammasome signaling were not required for induction of this inflammatory response. Coa-ASC16 induced local release of self-DNA, and in TLR9-deficient mice IL-6 production was absent. In addition, Coa-ASC16 revealed an intrinsic adjuvant activity which was affected by MyD88 and IL-6 absence. Taken together these results indicate that Coa-ASC16 used as a vaccine platform is effective due to the combination of the controlled release of antigen and its intrinsic pro-inflammatory activity. Understanding how Coa-ASC16 works might have significant implications for rational vaccine design. PMID:26188153

  11. In Vitro Reconstitution of the Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor (TIR) Domain Complex Between TLR5/6 and Myd88.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae-Ho; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily conserved receptors with trimodular structure to respond to endogenous ligands and exogenous ligands from microbial pathogens. The highly conserved cytoplasmic C-terminal Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain of TLRs plays a crucial role in inflammatory reactions. In myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88)- dependent signaling pathway, the interaction of TLRsTIR with cytosolic adaptor protein, MyD88TIR recruits IL-1R-associated kinases (IRAK) for subsequent activation of transcription factors nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) and activation protein 1 (AP-1) and other effector molecules. In the present investigation, TLR5TIR, TLR6TIR and MyD88TIR genes were subcloned and overexpressed in bacterium Escherichia coli strain BL- 21 (DE3). The purification and biochemical characterization of TLR5TIR and TLR6TIR&, and MyD88TIR proteins were also performed. The protein-protein interactions between TIR domains of TLR5 and TLR6 with MyD88, respectively, were evaluated in vitro at physiological pH and salt concentration. The in vitro reconstitution results showed that under physiological pH and salt concentration, MyD88TIR interacted with TLR5TIR, and did not interact with TLR6TIR protein. Both TIR domain-containing TLR5 and TLR6 proteins were prone to aggregation in a temperature-dependent manner at room temperature. At normal physiological pH and salt concentration, with the addition of binding partner MyD88TIR to TLR5/6TIR, time-dependent aggregation was not observed in both TLRsTIR at both room temperature and 4 ºC for 2 d, influencing the solubility of TLR5/6TIR. Moreover, TLR5TIR alone exhibited increase in solubility of the protein with increase in the salt concentration of the buffered solution from 0.025 M to 1.25 M at room temperature. PMID:26548862

  12. The role of the MYD88-dependent pathway in MPTP-induced brain dopaminergic degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence supports a significant role of inflammation in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathophysiology, with several inflammatory pathways being suggested as playing a role in the dopaminergic degeneration seen in humans and animal models of the disease. These include tumor necrosis factor, prostaglandins and oxidative-related stress components. However, the role of innate immunity has not been established in PD. Methods Based on the fact that the myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) is the most common adaptor protein implicated in toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, critical in the innate immune response, we undertook a study to investigate the potential contribution of this specific pathway to MPTP-induced brain dopaminergic degeneration using MyD88 knock out mice (MyD88-/-), following our observations that the MyD88-dependent pathway was critical for MPTP dopaminergic toxicity in the enteric nervous system. Post-mortem analyses assessing nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration and inflammation were performed using HPLC, western blots, autoradiography and immunofluorescence. Results Our results demonstrate that MyD88-/- mice are as vulnerable to MPTP-induced dopamine and DOPAC striatal depletion as wild type mice. Furthermore, MyD88-/- mice show similar striatal dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase loss, as well as dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta in response to MPTP. To evaluate the extent of the inflammatory response created by the MPTP regimen utilized, we further performed bioluminescence imaging using TLR2-luc/gfp transgenic mice and microglial density analysis, which revealed a modest brain microglial response following MPTP. This was accompanied by a significant astrocytic reaction in the striatum, which was of similar magnitude both in wild type and MyD88-/- mice. Conclusions Our results suggest that subacute MPTP-induced dopaminergic degeneration observed in the central nervous

  13. Requirement for MyD88 signaling in B cells and dendritic cells for germinal center anti-nuclear antibody production in Lyn-deficient mice1

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhaolin; Gross, Andrew J.; Lamagna, Chrystelle; Ramos-Hernández, Natalia M.; Scapini, Patrizia; Ji, Ming; Shao, Haitao; Lowell, Clifford A.; Hou, Baidong; DeFranco, Anthony L.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular tyrosine kinase Lyn mediates inhibitory receptor function in B cells and myeloid cells, and Lyn−/− mice spontaneously develop an autoimmune and inflammatory disease that closely resembles human systemic lupus erythematosus. TLR signaling pathways have been implicated in the production of anti-nuclear antibodies in SLE and mouse models of it. We used a conditional allele of Myd88 to determine whether the autoimmunity of Lyn−/− mice is dependent on TLR/MyD88 signaling in B cells and/or in dendritic cells (DCs). The production of IgG anti-nuclear antibodies, as well as the deposition of these antibodies in the glomeruli of the kidneys, leading to glomerulonephritis in Lyn−/− mice were completely abolished by selective deletion of Myd88 in B cells and the autoantibody production and glomerulonepritis were delayed or decreased by deletion of Myd88 in DCs. The reduced autoantibody production in mice lacking MyD88 in B cells or DCs was accompanied by a dramatic decrease of the spontaneous germinal center (GC) response, suggesting that autoantibodies in Lyn−/− mice may depend on GC responses. Consistent with this view, IgG anti-nuclear antibodies were absent if T cells were deleted (TCRβ−/− TCRδ−/− mice) or if T cells were unable to contribute to GC responses due to mutation of the adaptor molecule SAP. Thus, the autoimmunity of Lyn−/− mice was dependent on T cells and on TLR/MyD88 signaling in B cells and in DCs, supporting a model whereby DC hyperactivity combines with defects in tolerance in B cells to lead to a T cell-dependent systemic autoimmunity in Lyn−/− mice. PMID:24379120

  14. Differential requirements of MyD88 and TRIF pathways in TLR4-mediated immune responses in murine B cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Nagai, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yasuharu; Ikutani, Masashi; Hirai, Yoshikatsu; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    LPS stimulates the TLR4/Myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) complex and promotes a variety of immune responses in B cells. TLR4 has two main signaling pathways, MyD88 and Toll/IL-1R (TIR)-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) pathways, but relatively few studies have examined these pathways in B cells. In this study, we investigated MyD88- or TRIF-dependent LPS responses in B cells by utilizing their knockout mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) B cells, MyD88(-/-) B cells were markedly impaired in up-regulation of CD86 and proliferation induced by lipid A moiety of LPS. TRIF(-/-) B cells were also impaired in these responses compared with WT B cells, but showed better responses than MyD88(-/-) B cells. Regarding class switch recombination (CSR) elicited by lipid A plus IL-4, MyD88(-/-) B cells showed similar patterns of CSR to WT B cells. However, TRIF(-/-) B cells showed the impaired in the CSR. Compared with WT and MyD88(-/-) B cells, TRIF(-/-) B cells exhibited reduced cell division, fewer IgG1(+) cells per division, and decreased activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aicda) mRNA expression in response to lipid A plus IL-4. Finally, IgG1 production to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-LPS immunization was impaired in TRIF(-/-) mice, while MyD88(-/-) mice exhibited increased IgG1 production. Thus, MyD88 and TRIF pathways differently regulate TLR4-induced immune responses in B cells. PMID:25448706

  15. Ultraviolet radiation signaling through TLR4/MyD88 constrains DNA repair and plays a role in cutaneous immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Harberts, Erin; Zhou, Hua; Fishelevich, Rita; Liu, Juan; Gaspari, Anthony A

    2015-04-01

    UV radiation (UVR) induces DNA damage, leading to the accumulation of mutations in epidermal keratinocytes and immunosuppression, which contribute to the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer. We reported previously that the TLR4-MyD88 signaling axis is necessary for UV-induced apoptosis. In the dinitrofluorobenzene contact hypersensitivity model, UV-irradiated MyD88-deficient (MyD88(-/-)) C57BL/6 mice had intact ear swelling, exaggerated inflammation, and higher levels of dinitrofluorobenzene-specific IgG2a compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Even with normal UV-induced, dendritic cell migration, DNA damage in the local lymph nodes was less pronounced in MyD88(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. Cultured, UV-irradiated WT APCs showed cleavage (inactivation) of the DNA damage-recognition molecule PARP, whereas PARP persisted in MyD88(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) APCs. Epidermal DNA from in vivo UV-irradiated MyD88(-/-) mice had an increased resolution rate of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Both in vitro treatment of MyD88(-/-) APCs with and intradermal in vivo injections of PARP inhibitor, PJ-34, caused WT-level cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer repair. Lymphoblasts deficient in DNA repair (derived from a xeroderma pigmentosum group A patient) failed to augment DNA repair after MyD88 knockdown after UVR, in contrast to lymphoblasts from a healthy control. These data suggest that interference with the TLR4/MyD88 pathway may be a useful tool in promoting DNA repair and maintaining immune responses following UVR-induced damage. PMID:25716994

  16. Two myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) isoforms identified in ducks.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan; Sun, Jianhe

    2015-10-01

    MyD88 is an adaptor protein involved in the interleukin-1 receptor-induced and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In this study, we identified two isoforms of MyD88 gene, designated DuMyD88-X1 and DuMyD88-X2, from duck cells. Both variants were determined to have a death domain at the N-terminal and a Toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain at the C-terminal; however, the TIR domain of DuMyD88-X2 was incomplete and was 81 amino acids shorter than DuMyD88-X1. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR revealed broad expression of both MyD88s. During Newcastle disease virus (NDV) challenge experiments, expression of the two genes increased significantly, with DuMyD88-X1 having a larger amplitude and longer duration. Overexpression of DuMyD88-X1 and DuMyD88-X2 induced the activation of NF-κB and IL-6 in vitro, suggesting that DuMyD88-X1 and DuMyD88-X2 may be important in the innate immune response. The results verify the existence of a MyD88-dependent signaling pathway in ducks and contribute to understanding the potential role of MyD88s in the innate immune response. PMID:26004012

  17. Cloning, Characterization, and Expression Analysis of MyD88 in Rana dybowskii.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shudong; Shi, Xuecan; Zhang, Jingyu; Chai, Longhui; Xiao, Xianghong

    2016-05-01

    immunity in R. dybowskii. This report firstly characterized one adaptor molecule of the TLR signaling pathways in R. dybowskii, thereby providing reference for further researches on the amphibian innate immune system. PMID:26811029

  18. Compartment-specific and sequential role of MyD88 and CARD9 in chemokine induction and innate defense during respiratory fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Jhingran, Anupam; Kasahara, Shinji; Shepardson, Kelly M; Junecko, Beth A Fallert; Heung, Lena J; Kumasaka, Debra K; Knoblaugh, Sue E; Lin, Xin; Kazmierczak, Barbara I; Reinhart, Todd A; Cramer, Robert A; Hohl, Tobias M

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus forms ubiquitous airborne conidia that humans inhale on a daily basis. Although respiratory fungal infection activates the adaptor proteins CARD9 and MyD88 via C-type lectin, Toll-like, and interleukin-1 family receptor signals, defining the temporal and spatial pattern of MyD88- and CARD9-coupled signals in immune activation and fungal clearance has been difficult to achieve. Herein, we demonstrate that MyD88 and CARD9 act in two discrete phases and in two cellular compartments to direct chemokine- and neutrophil-dependent host defense. The first phase depends on MyD88 signaling because genetic deletion of MyD88 leads to delayed induction of the neutrophil chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL5, delayed neutrophil lung trafficking, and fatal pulmonary damage at the onset of respiratory fungal infection. MyD88 expression in lung epithelial cells restores rapid chemokine induction and neutrophil recruitment via interleukin-1 receptor signaling. Exogenous CXCL1 administration reverses murine mortality in MyD88-deficient mice. The second phase depends predominately on CARD9 signaling because genetic deletion of CARD9 in radiosensitive hematopoietic cells interrupts CXCL1 and CXCL2 production and lung neutrophil recruitment beyond the initial MyD88-dependent phase. Using a CXCL2 reporter mouse, we show that lung-infiltrating neutrophils represent the major cellular source of CXCL2 during CARD9-dependent recruitment. Although neutrophil-intrinsic MyD88 and CARD9 function are dispensable for neutrophil conidial uptake and killing in the lung, global deletion of both adaptor proteins triggers rapidly progressive invasive disease when mice are challenged with an inoculum that is sub-lethal for single adapter protein knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that distinct signal transduction pathways in the respiratory epithelium and hematopoietic compartment partially overlap to ensure optimal chemokine induction, neutrophil recruitment, and fungal clearance within

  19. Compartment-Specific and Sequential Role of MyD88 and CARD9 in Chemokine Induction and Innate Defense during Respiratory Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jhingran, Anupam; Kasahara, Shinji; Shepardson, Kelly M.; Junecko, Beth A. Fallert; Heung, Lena J.; Kumasaka, Debra K.; Knoblaugh, Sue E.; Lin, Xin; Kazmierczak, Barbara I.; Reinhart, Todd A.; Cramer, Robert A.; Hohl, Tobias M.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus forms ubiquitous airborne conidia that humans inhale on a daily basis. Although respiratory fungal infection activates the adaptor proteins CARD9 and MyD88 via C-type lectin, Toll-like, and interleukin-1 family receptor signals, defining the temporal and spatial pattern of MyD88- and CARD9-coupled signals in immune activation and fungal clearance has been difficult to achieve. Herein, we demonstrate that MyD88 and CARD9 act in two discrete phases and in two cellular compartments to direct chemokine- and neutrophil-dependent host defense. The first phase depends on MyD88 signaling because genetic deletion of MyD88 leads to delayed induction of the neutrophil chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL5, delayed neutrophil lung trafficking, and fatal pulmonary damage at the onset of respiratory fungal infection. MyD88 expression in lung epithelial cells restores rapid chemokine induction and neutrophil recruitment via interleukin-1 receptor signaling. Exogenous CXCL1 administration reverses murine mortality in MyD88-deficient mice. The second phase depends predominately on CARD9 signaling because genetic deletion of CARD9 in radiosensitive hematopoietic cells interrupts CXCL1 and CXCL2 production and lung neutrophil recruitment beyond the initial MyD88-dependent phase. Using a CXCL2 reporter mouse, we show that lung-infiltrating neutrophils represent the major cellular source of CXCL2 during CARD9-dependent recruitment. Although neutrophil-intrinsic MyD88 and CARD9 function are dispensable for neutrophil conidial uptake and killing in the lung, global deletion of both adaptor proteins triggers rapidly progressive invasive disease when mice are challenged with an inoculum that is sub-lethal for single adapter protein knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that distinct signal transduction pathways in the respiratory epithelium and hematopoietic compartment partially overlap to ensure optimal chemokine induction, neutrophil recruitment, and fungal clearance within

  20. SARM modulates MyD88-mediated TLR activation through BB-loop dependent TIR-TIR interactions.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Emil; Ding, Jeak Ling; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognise invading pathogens and initiate an innate immune response by recruiting intracellular adaptor proteins via heterotypic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain interactions. Of the five TIR domain-containing adaptor proteins identified, Sterile α- and armadillo-motif-containing protein (SARM) is functionally unique; suppressing immune signalling instead of promoting it. Here we demonstrate that the recombinantly expressed and purified SARM TIR domain interacts with both the major human TLR adaptors, MyD88 and TRIF. A single glycine residue located in the BB-loop of the SARM TIR domain, G601, was identified as essential for interaction. A short peptide derived from this motif was also found to interact with MyD88 in vitro. SARM expression in HEK293 cells was found to significantly suppress lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated upregulation of inflammatory cytokines, IL-8 and TNF-α, an effect lost in the G601A mutant. The same result was observed with cytokine activation initiated by MyD88 expression and stimulation of TLR2 with lipoteichoic acid (LTA), suggesting that SARM is capable of suppressing both TRIF- and MyD88- dependent TLR signalling. Our findings indicate that SARM acts on a broader set of target proteins than previously thought, and that the BB-loop motif is functionally important, giving further insight into the endogenous mechanisms used to suppress inflammation in immune cells. PMID:26592460

  1. SARM1, Not MyD88, Mediates TLR7/TLR9-Induced Apoptosis in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Piyali; Winkler, Clayton W; Taylor, Katherine G; Woods, Tyson A; Nair, Vinod; Khan, Burhan A; Peterson, Karin E

    2015-11-15

    Neuronal apoptosis is a key aspect of many different neurologic diseases, but the mechanisms remain unresolved. Recent studies have suggested a mechanism of innate immune-induced neuronal apoptosis through the stimulation of endosomal TLRs in neurons. TLRs are stimulated both by pathogen-associated molecular patterns as well as by damage-associated molecular patterns, including microRNAs released by damaged neurons. In the present study, we identified the mechanism responsible for TLR7/TLR9-mediated neuronal apoptosis. TLR-induced apoptosis required endosomal localization of TLRs but was independent of MyD88 signaling. Instead, apoptosis required the TLR adaptor molecule SARM1, which localized to the mitochondria following TLR activation and was associated with mitochondrial accumulation in neurites. Deficiency in SARM1 inhibited both mitochondrial accumulation in neurites and TLR-induced apoptosis. These studies identify a non-MyD88 pathway of TLR7/ TLR9 signaling in neurons and provide a mechanism for how innate immune responses in the CNS directly induce neuronal damage. PMID:26423149

  2. MyD88 Shapes Vaccine Immunity by Extrinsically Regulating Survival of CD4+ T Cells during the Contraction Phase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huafeng; Hung, Chiung Yu; Sinha, Meenal; Lee, Linda M.; Wiesner, Darin L.; LeBert, Vanessa; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Suresh, Marulasiddappa; DeFranco, Anthony L.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Klein, Bruce S.; Wüthrich, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Soaring rates of systemic fungal infections worldwide underscore the need for vaccine prevention. An understanding of the elements that promote vaccine immunity is essential. We previously reported that Th17 cells are required for vaccine immunity to the systemic dimorphic fungi of North America, and that Card9 and MyD88 signaling are required for the development of protective Th17 cells. Herein, we investigated where, when and how MyD88 regulates T cell development. We uncovered a novel mechanism in which MyD88 extrinsically regulates the survival of activated T cells during the contraction phase and in the absence of inflammation, but is dispensable for the expansion and differentiation of the cells. The poor survival of activated T cells in Myd88-/- mice is linked to increased caspase3-mediated apoptosis, but not to Fas- or Bim-dependent apoptotic pathways, nor to reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Moreover, TLR3, 7, and/or 9, but not TLR2 or 4, also were required extrinsically for MyD88-dependent Th17 cell responses and vaccine immunity. Similar MyD88 requirements governed the survival of virus primed T cells. Our data identify unappreciated new requirements for eliciting adaptive immunity and have implications for designing vaccines. PMID:27542117

  3. Genetics Home Reference: MyD88 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and pus production (abscesses) on internal organs. In addition, affected individuals can have localized infections of the ears, nose, or throat. Although fever is a common reaction to bacterial infections, many people with MyD88 deficiency ...

  4. Role of interleukin-1 receptor 1/MyD88 signalling in the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Parpaleix, Aurélien; Amsellem, Valérie; Houssaini, Amal; Abid, Shariq; Breau, Marielle; Marcos, Elisabeth; Sawaki, Daigo; Delcroix, Marion; Quarck, Rozenn; Maillard, Aurélie; Couillin, Isabelle; Ryffel, Bernhard; Adnot, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PA-SMC) proliferation and inflammation are key components of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Interleukin (IL)-1β binds to IL-1 receptor (R)1, thereby recruiting the molecular adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) (involved in IL-1R1 and Toll-like receptor signal transduction) and inducing IL-1, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α synthesis through nuclear factor-κB activation.We investigated the IL-1R1/MyD88 pathway in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension.Marked IL-1R1 and MyD88 expression with predominant PA-SMC immunostaining was found in lungs from patients with idiopathic PAH, mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and SM22-5-HTT(+) mice. Elevations in lung IL-1β, IL-1R1, MyD88 and IL-6 preceded pulmonary hypertension in hypoxic mice. IL-1R1(-/-), MyD88(-/-) and control mice given the IL-1R1 antagonist anakinra were protected similarly against hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and perivascular macrophage recruitment. Anakinra reversed pulmonary hypertension partially in SM22-5-HTT(+) mice and markedly in monocrotaline-treated rats. IL-1β-mediated stimulation of mouse PA-SMC growth was abolished by anakinra and absent in IL-1R1(-/-) and MyD88(-/-) mice. Gene deletion confined to the myeloid lineage (M.lys-Cre MyD88(fl/fl) mice) decreased pulmonary hypertension severity versus controls, suggesting IL-1β-mediated effects on PA-SMCs and macrophages. The growth-promoting effect of media conditioned by M1 or M2 macrophages from M.lys-Cre MyD88(fl/fl) mice was attenuated.Pulmonary vessel remodelling and inflammation during pulmonary hypertension require IL-1R1/MyD88 signalling. Targeting the IL-1β/IL-1R1 pathway may hold promise for treating human PAH. PMID:27418552

  5. Dendritic cell specific targeting of MyD88 signalling pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arnold-Schrauf, Catharina; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity. During infection, DCs recognise pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family. TLRs mainly signal via the adaptor protein MyD88. This signalling pathway is required for immune protection during many infections, which are lethal in the absence of MyD88. However, the cell type specific importance of this pathway during both innate and adaptive immune responses against pathogens in vivo remains ill-defined. We discuss recent findings from conditional KO or gain-of-function mouse models targeting TLR/MyD88 signalling pathways in DCs and other myeloid cells during infection. While the general assumption that MyD88-dependent recognition by DCs is essential for inducing protective immunity holds true in some instances, the results surprisingly indicate a much more complex context-dependent requirement for this pathway in DCs and other myeloid or lymphoid cell-types in vivo. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of Cre-mediated DC targeting approaches and their possible limitations. We also present future perspectives on the development of new genetic mouse models to target distinct DC subsets in vivo. Such models will serve to understand the functional heterogeneity of DCs in vivo. PMID:25403892

  6. MyD88 Mediates Instructive Signaling in Dendritic Cells and Protective Inflammatory Response during Rickettsial Infection.

    PubMed

    Bechelli, Jeremy; Smalley, Claire; Zhao, Xuemei; Judy, Barbara; Valdes, Patricia; Walker, David H; Fang, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Spotted fever group rickettsiae cause potentially life-threatening infections throughout the world. Several members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family are involved in host response to rickettsiae, and yet the mechanisms by which these TLRs mediate host immunity remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we found that host susceptibility of MyD88(-/-)mice to infection with Rickettsia conorii or Rickettsia australis was significantly greater than in wild-type (WT) mice, in association with severely impaired bacterial clearance in vivo R. australis-infected MyD88(-/-)mice showed significantly lower expression levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-1β, accompanied by significantly fewer inflammatory infiltrates of macrophages and neutrophils in infected tissues, than WT mice. The serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were significantly reduced, while monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and RANTES were significantly increased in infected MyD88(-/-)mice compared to WT mice. Strikingly, R. australis infection was incapable of promoting increased expression of MHC-II(high)and production of IL-12p40 in MyD88(-/-)bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) compared to WT BMDCs, although costimulatory molecules were upregulated in both types of BMDCs. Furthermore, the secretion levels of IL-1β by Rickettsia-infected BMDCs and in the sera of infected mice were significantly reduced in MyD88(-/-)mice compared to WT controls, suggesting that in vitro and in vivo production of IL-1β is MyD88 dependent. Taken together, our results suggest that MyD88 signaling mediates instructive signals in DCs and secretion of IL-1β and type 1 immune cytokines, which may account for the protective inflammatory response during rickettsial infection. PMID:26755162

  7. Lung epithelial MyD88 drives early pulmonary clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a flagellin dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Anas, Adam A; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Claushuis, Theodora A M; de Vos, Alex F; Florquin, Sandrine; de Boer, Onno J; Hou, Baidong; Van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a flagellated pathogen frequently causing pneumonia in hospitalized patients and sufferers of chronic lung disease. Here we investigated the role of the common Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor myeloid differentiation factor (MyD)88 in myeloid vs. lung epithelial cells in clearance of P. aeruginosa from the airways. Mice deficient for MyD88 in lung epithelial cells (Sftpccre-MyD88-lox mice) or myeloid cells (LysMcre-MyD88-lox mice) and bone marrow chimeric mice deficient for TLR5 (the receptor recognizing Pseudomonas flagellin) in either parenchymal or hematopoietic cells were infected with P. aeruginosa via the airways. Sftpccre-MyD88-lox mice demonstrated a reduced influx of neutrophils into the bronchoalveolar space and an impaired early antibacterial defense after infection with P. aeruginosa, whereas the response of LysMcre-MyD88-lox mice did not differ from control mice. The immune-enhancing role of epithelial MyD88 was dependent on recognition of pathogen-derived flagellin by epithelial TLR5, as demonstrated by an unaltered clearance of mutant P. aeruginosa lacking flagellin from the lungs of Sftpccre-MyD88-lox mice and an impaired bacterial clearance in bone marrow chimeric mice lacking TLR5 in parenchymal cells. These data indicate that early clearance of P. aeruginosa from the airways is dependent on flagellin-TLR5-MyD88-dependent signaling in respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:27288486

  8. The adaptor molecule Trif contributes to murine host defense during Leptospiral infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Priya A; Devlin, Amy A; Miller, Jennifer C; Scholle, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease and is caused by pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus, including Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans). Humans, domestic and wild animals are susceptible to acute or chronic infection. The innate immune response is a critical defense mechanism against Leptospira interrogans, and has been investigated in mouse models. Murine Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to be key factors in sensing and responding to L. interrogans infection. Specifically, TLR2, TLR4 and the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 are essential for host defense against L. interrogans; however, the role of the TLR adaptor molecule TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon β (TRIF) in the response to L. interrogans has not been previously determined. In the present study, TRIF was found to play an important role during leptospiral infection. Following challenge with L. interrogans, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited delayed weight gain compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in L. interrogans burden in the kidneys, lungs, and blood at early time points (less than 7days post infection). Multiple components of the innate immune responses were dampened in response to leptospiral infection including transcription and production of cytokines, and the humoral response, which suggested that TRIF contributes to expression and production of cytokines important for the host defense against L. interrogans. PMID:27259371

  9. Differential induction of the toll-like receptor 4-MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways by endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Zughaier, Susu M; Zimmer, Shanta M; Datta, Anup; Carlson, Russell W; Stephens, David S

    2005-05-01

    The biological response to endotoxin mediated through the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-MD-2 receptor complex is directly related to lipid A structure or configuration. Endotoxin structure may also influence activation of the MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways of TLR4. To address this possibility, human macrophage-like cell lines (THP-1, U937, and MM6) or murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with picomolar concentrations of highly purified endotoxins. Harvested supernatants from previously stimulated cells were also used to stimulate RAW 264.7 or 23ScCr (TLR4-deficient) macrophages (i.e., indirect induction). Neisseria meningitidis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) was a potent direct inducer of the MyD88-dependent pathway molecules tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP-3alpha), and the MyD88-independent molecules beta interferon (IFN-beta), nitric oxide, and IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10). Escherichia coli 55:B5 and Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) at the same pmole/ml lipid A concentrations induced comparable levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and MIP-3alpha, but significantly less IFN-beta, nitric oxide, and IP-10. In contrast, LPS from Salmonella enterica serovars Minnesota and Typhimurium induced amounts of IFN-beta, nitric oxide, and IP-10 similar to meningococcal LOS but much less TNF-alpha and MIP-3alpha in time course and dose-response experiments. No MyD88-dependent or -independent response to endotoxin was seen in TLR4-deficient cell lines (C3H/HeJ and 23ScCr) and response was restored in TLR4-MD-2-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Blocking the MyD88-dependent pathway by DNMyD88 resulted in significant reduction of TNF-alpha release but did not influence nitric oxide release. IFN-beta polyclonal antibody and IFN-alpha/beta receptor 1 antibody significantly reduced nitric oxide release. N

  10. Conformational dynamics of cancer-associated MyD88-TIR domain mutant L252P (L265P) allosterically tilts the landscape toward homo-dimerization.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Chendi; Qi, Ruxi; Wei, Guanghong; Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-09-01

    MyD88 is an essential adaptor protein, which mediates the signaling of the toll-like and interleukin-1 receptors' superfamily. The MyD88 L252P (L265P) mutation has been identified in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The identification of this mutation has been a major advance in the diagnosis of patients with aldenstrom macroglobulinemia and related lymphoid neoplasms. Here we used computational methods to characterize the conformational effects of the mutation. Our molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the mutation allosterically quenched the global conformational dynamics of the toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain, and readjusted its salt bridges and dynamic community network. Specifically, the mutation changed the orientation and reduced the fluctuation of α-helix 3, possibly through eliminating/weakening ~8 salt bridges and enhancing the salt bridge D225-K258. Using the energy landscape of the TIR domains of MyD88, we identified two dynamic conformational basins, which correspond to the binding sites used in homo- and hetero-oligomerization, respectively. Our results indicate that the mutation stabilizes the core of the homo-dimer interface of the MyD88-TIR domain, and increases the population of homo-dimer-compatible conformational states in MyD88 family proteins. However, the dampened motion restricts its ability to heterodimerize with other TIR domains, thereby curtailing physiological signaling. In conclusion, the L252P both shifts the landscape toward homo-dimerization and restrains the dynamics of the MyD88-TIR domain, which disfavors its hetero-dimerization with other TIR domains. We further put these observations within the framework of MyD88-mediated cell signaling. PMID:27503954

  11. B-cell-specific conditional expression of Myd88p.L252P leads to the development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Gero; Liedgens, Paul; Korovkina, Darya; Seeger, Jens M; Al-Baldawi, Yussor; Al-Maarri, Mona; Fritz, Christian; Vlantis, Katerina; Bezhanova, Svetlana; Scheel, Andreas H; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Reimann, Maurice; Möller, Peter; López, Cristina; Schlesner, Matthias; Lohneis, Philipp; Weber, Alexander N R; Trümper, Lorenz; Staudt, Louis M; Ortmann, Monika; Pasparakis, Manolis; Siebert, Reiner; Schmitt, Clemens A; Klatt, Andreas R; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Schäfer, Stephan C; Persigehl, Thorsten; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Odenthal, Margarete; Büttner, Reinhard; Frenzel, Lukas P; Kashkar, Hamid; Reinhardt, H Christian

    2016-06-01

    The adaptor protein MYD88 is critical for relaying activation of Toll-like receptor signaling to NF-κB activation. MYD88 mutations, particularly the p.L265P mutation, have been described in numerous distinct B-cell malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Twenty-nine percent of activated B-cell-type DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL), which is characterized by constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, carry the p.L265P mutation. In addition, ABC-DLBCL frequently displays focal copy number gains affecting BCL2 Here, we generated a novel mouse model in which Cre-mediated recombination, specifically in B cells, leads to the conditional expression of Myd88(p.L252P) (the orthologous position of the human MYD88(p.L265P) mutation) from the endogenous locus. These mice develop a lymphoproliferative disease and occasional transformation into clonal lymphomas. The clonal disease displays the morphologic and immunophenotypical characteristics of ABC-DLBCL. Lymphomagenesis can be accelerated by crossing in a further novel allele, which mediates conditional overexpression of BCL2 Cross-validation experiments in human DLBCL samples revealed that both MYD88 and CD79B mutations are substantially enriched in ABC-DLBCL compared with germinal center B-cell DLBCL. Furthermore, analyses of human DLBCL genome sequencing data confirmed that BCL2 amplifications frequently co-occurred with MYD88 mutations, further validating our approach. Finally, in silico experiments revealed that MYD88-mutant ABC-DLBCL cells in particular display an actionable addiction to BCL2. Altogether, we generated a novel autochthonous mouse model of ABC-DLBCL that could be used as a preclinical platform for the development and validation of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL. PMID:27048211

  12. Impaired Innate Immunity in Tlr4−/− Mice but Preserved CD8+ T Cell Responses against Trypanosoma cruzi in Tlr4-, Tlr2-, Tlr9- or Myd88-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; Klezewsky, Weberton; da Silva, Raquel N.; Neves, Fabieni S.; Cavalcanti, Gisele S.; Boscardin, Silvia; Nunes, Marise P.; Santiago, Marcelo F.; Nóbrega, Alberto; Rodrigues, Maurício M.; Bellio, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The murine model of T. cruzi infection has provided compelling evidence that development of host resistance against intracellular protozoans critically depends on the activation of members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family via the MyD88 adaptor molecule. However, the possibility that TLR/MyD88 signaling pathways also control the induction of immunoprotective CD8+ T cell-mediated effector functions has not been investigated to date. We addressed this question by measuring the frequencies of IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cells specific for H-2Kb-restricted immunodominant peptides as well as the in vivo Ag-specific cytotoxic response in infected animals that are deficient either in TLR2, TLR4, TLR9 or MyD88 signaling pathways. Strikingly, we found that T. cruzi-infected Tlr2−/−, Tlr4−/−, Tlr9−/− or Myd88−/− mice generated both specific cytotoxic responses and IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cells at levels comparable to WT mice, although the frequency of IFN-γ+CD4+ cells was diminished in infected Myd88−/− mice. We also analyzed the efficiency of TLR4-driven immune responses against T. cruzi using TLR4-deficient mice on the C57BL genetic background (B6 and B10). Our studies demonstrated that TLR4 signaling is required for optimal production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) in the spleen of infected animals and, as a consequence, Tlr4−/− mice display higher parasitemia levels. Collectively, our results indicate that TLR4, as well as previously shown for TLR2, TLR9 and MyD88, contributes to the innate immune response and, consequently, resistance in the acute phase of infection, although each of these pathways is not individually essential for the generation of class I-restricted responses against T. cruzi. PMID:20442858

  13. Selective utilization of Toll-like receptor and MyD88 signaling in B cells for enhancement of the anti-viral germinal center response

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Baidong; Saudan, Philippe; Ott, Gary; Wheeler, Matthew L.; Ji, Ming; Kuzmich, Lili; Lee, Linda M.; Coffman, Robert L.; Bachmann, Martin F.; DeFranco, Anthony L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The contribution of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling to T cell-dependent (TD) antibody responses was assessed by using mice lacking the TLR signaling adaptor MyD88 in individual cell types. When a soluble TLR9 ligand was used as adjuvant for a protein antigen, MyD88 was required in dendritic cells but not in B cells to enhance the TD antibody response, regardless of the inherent immunogenicity of the antigen. In contrast, a TLR9 ligand contained within a virus-like particle substantially augmented the TD germinal center IgG antibody response, and this augmentation required B cell MyD88. The ability of B cells to discriminate between antigens based the physical form of a TLR ligand likely reflects an adaptation to facilitate strong anti-viral antibody responses. PMID:21353603

  14. Penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose ameliorates inflammation by inhibiting MyD88/NF-κB and MyD88/MAPK signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se-Eun; Hyam, Supriya R; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The gallnut of Rhus chinensis MILL and its main constituent penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (PGG) inhibited NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated peritoneal and colonic macrophages. Here we have investigated PGG mechanisms underlying anti-inflammatory effects of PGG in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Approach Male C57BL/6 mice (18–22 g, 6 weeks old) were used to prepare peritoneal and colonic macrophages and for the induction of colitis by intrarectal administration of 2,3,4-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS). A range of inflammatory markers and transcription factors were evaluated by elisa, immunoblotting, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Key Results Expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 or Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding to TLR-4 in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages was not affected by PGG. However PGG inhibited binding of an anti-MyD88 antibody to peritoneal macrophages, but did not reduce binding of anti–IL-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK1) and IRAK4 antibodies to the macrophages with or without transfection with MyD88 siRNA. PGG potently reduced the activation of IRAK1, NF-κB, and MAPKs in LPS- or pepetidoglycan-stimulated peritoneal and colonic macrophages. PGG suppressed IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages, while increasing expression of the anti-inflammatorycytokine IL-10. Oral administration of PGG inhibited colon shortening and myeloperoxidase activity in mice with TNBS-induced colitis, along with reducing NF-κB activation and IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels, whereas it increased IL-10. Conclusions and Implications PGG reduced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathways by directly interacting with the MyD88 adaptor protein. PGG may ameliorate inflammatory diseases such as colitis. PMID:23941302

  15. Therapeutic Inhibition of Pro-Inflammatory Signaling and Toxicity to Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B by a Synthetic Dimeric BB-Loop Mimetic of MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Kissner, Teri L.; Ruthel, Gordon; Alam, Shahabuddin; Mann, Enrique; Ajami, Dariush; Rebek, Mitra; Larkin, Eileen; Fernandez, Stefan; Ulrich, Robert G.; Ping, Sun; Waugh, David S.; Rebek, Julius; Saikh, Kamal U.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) exposure triggers an exaggerated pro-inflammatory cytokine response that often leads to toxic shock syndrome (TSS) associated with organ failure and death. MyD88 mediates pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling induced by SEB exposure and MyD88−/− mice are resistant to SEB intoxication, suggesting that MyD88 may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention. We targeted the BB loop region of the Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain of MyD88 to develop small-molecule therapeutics. Here, we report that a synthetic compound (EM-163), mimic to dimeric form of BB-loop of MyD88 attenuated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2 and IL-6 production in human primary cells, whether administered pre- or post-SEB exposure. Results from a direct binding assay, and from MyD88 co-transfection/co-immunoprecipitation experiments, suggest that EM-163 inhibits TIR-TIR domain interaction. Additional results indicate that EM-163 prevents MyD88 from mediating downstream signaling. In an NF-kB-driven reporter assay of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated MyD88 signaling, EM-163 demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of reporter activity as well as TNF-α and IL-1β production. Importantly, administration of EM-163 pre- or post exposure to a lethal dose of SEB abrogated pro-inflammatory cytokine responses and protected mice from toxic shock-induced death. Taken together, our results suggest that EM-163 exhibits a potential for therapeutic use against SEB intoxication. PMID:22848400

  16. Inhibition of myeloid differentiation factor 88(MyD88) by ST2825 provides neuroprotection after experimental traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-Sheng; Li, Hua; Zhang, Ding-Ding; Yan, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Zi-Huan; Zhou, Chen-Hui; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Chen, Qiang; Jiang, Tian-Wei; Liu, Jing-Peng; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-07-15

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88(MyD88) is an endogenous adaptor protein that plays an important role in coordinating intracellular inflammatory responses induced by agonists of the Toll-like receptor and interleukin-1 receptor families. MyD88 has been reported to be essential for neuronal death in animal models and may represent a therapeutic target for pharmacologic inhibition following traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of the current study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of MyD88 specific inhibitor ST2825 in an experimental mouse model of TBI. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of high concentration (20μg/μL) ST2825 (15min post TBI) attenuated the development of TBI in mice, markedly improved neurological function and reduced brain edema. Decreased neural apoptosis and increased neuronal survival were also observed. Biochemically, the high concentration of ST2825 significantly reduced the levels of MyD88, further decreased TAK1, p-TAK1, nuclear p65 and increased IκB-α. Additionally, ST2825 significantly reduced the levels of Iba-1 and inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-1β. These data provide an experimental rationale for evaluation of MyD88 as a drug target and highlight the potential therapeutic implications of ST2825 in TBI. PMID:27155455

  17. Fas (CD95) Induces Macrophage Pro-Inflammatory Chemokine Production via a MyD88-dependent, Caspase-independent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Altemeier, William A.; Zhu, Xiaodong; Berrington, William R.; Harlan, John M.; Liles, W. Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the prototypical death receptor, Fas (CD95), can induce both caspase-dependent cell death and production of pro-inflammatory chemokines, leading to neutrophil recruitment and end-organ injury. The precise mechanism(s), by which Fas upregulates chemokine production and release, is currently unclear. We hypothesized that Fas-induced chemokine release by macrophages is dependent on the MyD88 adapter molecule and independent of caspase activity. To test this hypothesis, we measured chemokine response to Fas activation both in RAW 264.7 cells with RNAi-attenuated MyD88 expression and in MyD88-deficient primary macrophages. We found that Fas-induced chemokine release was abrogated in the absence of MyD88. In vivo, MyD88−/− mice had impaired CXCL1/KC release and polymorphonuclear cell recruitment in response to intratracheal treatment with the Fas-activating monoclonal antibody, Jo-2. Furthermore, Fas-induced chemokine release was not dependent on either IL-1 receptor signaling or on caspase activity. We conclude that MyD88 plays an integral role in Fas-induced macrophage-mediated inflammation. PMID:17576821

  18. Andrographolide alleviates imiquimod-induced psoriasis in mice via inducing autophagic proteolysis of MyD88.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fenli; Tan, Tao; Tan, Yang; Sun, Yang; Wu, Xingxin; Xu, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with excessive activation of toll-like receptors (TLRs), which play important roles in developing psoriasis. Targeting TLR signaling remains a challenge for treating psoriasis. Here, we found that andrographolide (Andro), a small-molecule natural product, alleviated imiquimod- but not interleukin 23 (IL-23)-induced psoriasis in mice with reducing expressions of IL-23 and IL-1β in the skin. The improvement in imiquimod-induced psoriasis by Andro was not observed in microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (MAP1LC3B) knockout mice. Furthermore, Andro inhibited mRNA expressions of IL-23, IL-6 and IL-1β but not CD80 and CD86 in bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a MAP1LC3B-dependent manner. In addition, Andro inhibited imiquimod-induced mRNA expressions of IL-23, IL-6, IL-1β, CD80 and CD86 in BMDCs from mice. Interestingly, Andro induced a degradation of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and blocked the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) to MyD88 upon LPS stimulation in BMDCs from mice. Blockade of autophagic proteolysis using NH4Cl or MAP1LC3B(-/-) BMDCs abolished the Andro-induced MyD88 degradation. In conclusion, Andro controls activation of MyD88-dependent cytokines and alleviates psoriasis in mice via inducing autophagic proteolysis of MyD88, which could be a novel strategy to treat psoriasis. PMID:27265145

  19. The categorization and mutual modulation of expanded MyD88s in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Mengqiang; Zhang, Huan; Li, Meijia; Wang, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-07-01

    MyD88 serves as a critical cytosolic adaptor mediating activation of NF-κB in innate immunity. It has been found that there is a considerable expansion of MyD88 in Crassostrea gigas. In the present study, four typical MyD88 genes in Crassostrea gigas (CgMyD88-A to CgMyD88-D) were successfully cloned and their potential functions were investigated together with another two known ones (CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2). Multiple alignments revealed that CgMyD88-B and CgMyD88-C remained the conserved DD and TIR domains, while there was a significant variation of E51Q in the DD of CgMyD88-A, and some variations in both DD and TIR domains of CgMyD88-D, respectively. Both truncated CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2 lacked Box II in their only TIR domains. Expression pattern analysis showed that CgMyD88-B and CgMyD88-C genes possessed higher expression in normal tissues, compared with the other four. When oysters were under bacteria challenge, CgMyD88-B, CgMyD88-C, CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2 were firstly induced, while CgMyD88-A and CgMyD88-D were suppressed. Dual luciferase reporter assays showed that CgMyD88-B and CgMyD88-C could promote the activation of NF-κB signaling pathway, while the other four CgMyD88 genes failed or even suppressed the activities of CgMyD88-B and CgMyD88-C on the activation of NF-κB signaling. It was deduced that after oysters were challenged by bacteria, CgMyD88-B and CgMyD88-C could rapidly and efficiently activate NF-κB signaling pathway to elicit anti-pathogen responses before suppressor CgMyD88 genes (CgMyD88-T1 and CgMyD88-T2) exceeding their expression level. These results suggested that there was mutual modulation of expanded CgMyD88 genes on activating NF-κB signaling pathway in oyster C. gigas. PMID:27074442

  20. HCK is a survival determinant transactivated by mutated MYD88, and a direct target of ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Buhrlage, Sara J; Tan, Li; Liu, Xia; Chen, Jie; Xu, Lian; Tsakmaklis, Nicholas; Chen, Jiaji G; Patterson, Christopher J; Brown, Jennifer R; Castillo, Jorge J; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Shuai; Cohen, Philip; Hunter, Zachary R; Gray, Nathanael; Treon, Steven P

    2016-06-23

    Activating mutations in MYD88 are present in ∼95% of patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), as well as other B-cell malignancies including activated B-cell (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). In WM, mutated MYD88 triggers activation of Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK). Ibrutinib, a pleiotropic kinase inhibitor that targets BTK, is highly active in patients with mutated MYD88. We observed that mutated MYD88 WM and ABC DLBCL cell lines, as well as primary WM cells show enhanced hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) transcription and activation, and that HCK is activated by interleukin 6 (IL-6). Over-expression of mutated MYD88 triggers HCK and IL-6 transcription, whereas knockdown of HCK reduced survival and attenuated BTK, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT, and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in mutated MYD88 WM and/or ABC DLBCL cells. Ibrutinib and the more potent HCK inhibitor A419259, blocked HCK activation and induced apoptosis in mutated MYD88 WM and ABC DLBCL cells. Docking and pull-down studies confirmed that HCK was a target of ibrutinib. Ibrutinib and A419259 also blocked adenosine triphosphate binding to HCK, whereas transduction of mutated MYD88 expressing WM cells with a mutated HCK gatekeeper greatly increased the half maximal effective concentration for ibrutinib and A419259. The findings support that HCK expression and activation is triggered by mutated MYD88, supports the growth and survival of mutated MYD88 WM and ABC DLBCL cells, and is a direct target of ibrutinib. HCK represents a novel target for therapeutic development in MYD88-mutated WM and ABC DLBCL, and possibly other diseases driven by mutated MYD88. PMID:27143257

  1. LFP-20, a porcine lactoferrin peptide, ameliorates LPS-induced inflammation via the MyD88/NF-κB and MyD88/MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zong, Xin; Song, Deguang; Wang, Tenghao; Xia, Xi; Hu, Wangyang; Han, Feifei; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-10-01

    LFP-20 is one of the 20 amino acid anti-microbial peptides identified in the N terminus of porcine lactoferrin. Apart from its extensively studied direct anti-bacterial activity, its potential as an activator of immune-related cellular functions is unknown. Therefore, this study investigated its anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated pig alveolar macrophages in vitro and systemic inflammation in an in vivo mouse model. We found that the inhibitory effects of LFP-20 on production of pro-inflammatory cytokines were independent of its LPS-binding activity. However, they were associated with NF-κB and MAPK-dependent signaling. Furthermore, LFP-20 might directly influence MyD88 levels to block its interaction with NF-κB and MAPK-dependent signaling molecules that might alter LPS-mediated inflammatory responses in activated macrophages. Taken together, our data indicated that LFP-20 prevents the LPS-induced inflammatory response by inhibiting MyD88/NF-κB and MyD88/MAPK signaling pathways, and sheds light on the potential use of LFP-20 in the therapy of LPS-mediated sepsis. PMID:26003437

  2. Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) MyD88 and Tollip: intracellular localization and signal transduction function.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Wei; Wang, Zheng; Mo, Ze-Quan; Li, Xia; Luo, Xiao-Chun; Dan, Xue-Ming; Li, An-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Toll-interacting protein (Tollip) are two important regulatory proteins of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. In this paper, a Tollip sequence of grouper (Epinephelus coioides) was identified and the signal transduction functions of Tollip and MyD88 were studied. The full length of E. coioides Tollip (EcTollip) cDNA with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1734 nucleotides encoded a putative protein of 274 amino acid residues. The EcTollip protein had conservative domains with mammalian homologous proteins, and high identity (78%-95%) with other vertebrates. MyD88 and Tollip were distributed in the HeLa cytoplasm in a highly condensed form. Over-expression of MyD88 could activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and its function was dependent on the death domain and ID domain on the N-terminal. Some important functional sites of mammalian MyD88 also affected fish MyD88 signal transduction. Tollip impaired NF-κB signals activated by MyD88, and its activity was dependent on the coupling of ubiquitin to the endoplasmic reticulum degradation (CUE) domain on the C-terminal. These results suggest that MyD88 and Tollip of fish and mammals are conservative on function during evolution. PMID:25449381

  3. Pyogenic Bacterial Infections in Humans with MyD88 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    von Bernuth, Horst; Picard, Capucine; Jin, Zhongbo; Pankla, Rungnapa; Xiao, Hui; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Chrabieh, Maya; Mustapha, Imen Ben; Ghandil, Pegah; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Sirvent, Nicolas; Guedes, Margarida; Vitor, Artur Bonito; Herrero-Mata, María José; Aróstegui, Juan Ignacio; Rodrigo, Carlos; Alsina, Laia; Ruiz-Ortiz, Estibaliz; Juan, Manel; Fortuny, Claudia; Yagüe, Jordi; Antón, Jordi; Pascal, Mariona; Chang, Huey-Hsuan; Janniere, Lucile; Rose, Yoann; Garty, Ben-Zion; Chapel, Helen; Issekutz, Andrew; Maródi, László; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Banchereau, Jacques; Abel, Laurent; Li, Xiaoxia; Chaussabel, Damien; Puel, Anne; Casanova1, Jean-Laurent

    2009-01-01

    MyD88 is a key downstream adapter for most Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1Rs). MyD88 deficiency in mice leads to susceptibility to a broad range of pathogens in experimental settings of infection. We describe a distinct situation in a natural setting of human infection. Nine children with autosomal recessive MyD88 deficiency suffered from life-threatening, often recurrent pyogenic bacterial infections, including invasive pneumococcal disease. However, these patients were otherwise healthy, with normal resistance to other microbes. Their clinical status improved with age, but not due to any cellular leakiness in MyD88 deficiency. The MyD88-dependent TLRs and IL-1Rs are therefore essential for protective immunity to a small number of pyogenic bacteria, but redundant for host defense to most natural infections. PMID:18669862

  4. TLR2, TLR4 AND MyD88 Mediate Allergic Airway Disease (AAD) and Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Suppression of AAD

    PubMed Central

    Thorburn, Alison N.; Tseng, Hsin-Yi; Donovan, Chantal; Hansbro, Nicole G.; Jarnicki, Andrew G.; Foster, Paul S.; Gibson, Peter G.; Hansbro, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exposure to non-pathogenic Streptococcus pneumoniae and vaccination are inversely associated with asthma. Studies in animal models demonstrate that airway administration of S. pneumoniae (live or killed), or its vaccines or components, suppresses the characteristic features of asthma in mouse models of allergic airway disease (AAD). These components could be developed into immunoregulatory therapies. S. pneumoniae components are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and TLR4, and both induce inflammatory cell responses through the adaptor protein myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). The involvement of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 in the pathogenesis of AAD and asthma is incompletely understood, and has not been studied in S. pneumoniae-mediated suppression of AAD. We investigated the role of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 in the development of AAD and S. pneumoniae-mediated suppression of AAD. Methods and Findings OVA-induced AAD and killed S. pneumoniae-mediated suppression of AAD were assessed in wild-type, TLR2-/-, TLR4-/-, TLR2/4-/- and MyD88-/- BALB/c mice. During OVA-induced AAD, TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 were variously involved in promoting eosinophil accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood, and T-helper type (Th)2 cytokine release from mediastinal lymph node T cells and splenocytes. However, all were required for the induction of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR). In S. pneumoniae-mediated suppression of AAD, TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 were variously involved in the suppression of eosinophilic and splenocyte Th2 responses but all were required for the reduction in AHR. Conclusions These results highlight important but complex roles for TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 in promoting the development of OVA-induced AAD, but conversely in the S. pneumoniae-mediated suppression of AAD, with consistent and major contributions in both the induction and suppression of AHR. Thus, TLR signaling is likely required for both the development of asthma and the

  5. Fas activation in alveolar epithelial cells induces KC (CXCL1) release by a MyD88-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Farnand, Alex W; Eastman, Alison J; Herrero, Raquel; Hanson, Josiah F; Mongovin, Steve; Altemeier, William A; Matute-Bello, Gustavo

    2011-09-01

    Activation of the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system is associated with activation of apoptotic and proinflammatory pathways that lead to the development of acute lung injury. Previous studies in chimeric mice and macrophage-depleted mice suggested that the main effector cell in Fas-mediated lung injury is not a myeloid cell, but likely an epithelial cell. The goal of this study was to determine whether epithelial cells release proinflammatory cytokines after Fas activation, and to identify the relevant pathways. Incubation of the murine alveolar epithelial cell line, MLE-12, with the Fas-activating monoclonal antibody, Jo2, resulted in release of the CXC chemokine, KC, in a dose-dependent manner. KC release was not prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk. Silencing of the adaptor protein, MyD88, with small interfering (si)RNA resulted in attenuation of KC release in response to Jo2. Fas activation resulted in phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), and pharmacologic inhibition of ERK and JNK attenuated KC release in a dose-response manner. Similarly, primary human small airways epithelial cells released IL-8 in response to soluble FasL, and this was abrogated by inhibition of JNK and ERK. In vivo confirmatory studies showed that MyD88-null mice are protected from Fas-induced acute lung injury. In summary, we conclude that Fas induces KC release in MLE-12 cells by a mechanism requiring MyD88, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and likely activator protein-1. PMID:21257927

  6. MyD88 Signaling Contributes to Early Pulmonary Responses to Aspergillus fumigatus▿

    PubMed Central

    Bretz, Camille; Gersuk, Geoff; Knoblaugh, Sue; Chaudhary, Neelkamal; Randolph-Habecker, Julie; Hackman, Robert C.; Staab, Janet; Marr, Kieren A.

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors and the β-glucan receptor, dectin-1, mediate macrophage inflammatory responses to Aspergillus fumigatus through MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling mechanisms; however, pulmonary inflammatory responses in MyD88-deficient mice challenged with A. fumigatus are poorly defined. The role of MyD88 signaling in early pulmonary inflammation and fungal clearance was evaluated in C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) and MyD88-deficient (MyD88−/−) mice. Early (<48 h) after infection, MyD88−/− mice had higher fungal burdens than those of WT mice, although fungal burdens rapidly declined (>72 h) in both. MyD88−/− mice had less consolidated inflammation, with fewer NK cells, in lung tissue early (24 h) after infection than did WT mice. At the latter time point, MyD88−/− mouse lungs were characterized by a large amount of necrotic cellular debris and fibrin, while WT lungs had organized inflammation. Although there were equivalent numbers of macrophages in WT and MyD88−/− mouse lung tissues, MyD88−/− cells demonstrated delayed uptake of green fluorescent protein-expressing A. fumigatus (GFP-Af293); histologically, MyD88−/− mouse lungs had more hyphal invasion of terminal airways and vessels, the appearance of bronchiolar epithelial cell necrosis, and necrotizing vasculitis. MyD88−/− lung homogenates contained comparatively decreased amounts of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, KC, and gamma interferon and paradoxically increased amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α. These data indicate that the MyD88-dependent pathway mediates acute pulmonary fungal clearance, inflammation, and tissue injury very early after infection. Resolution of abnormalities within a 3-day window demonstrates the importance of redundant signaling pathways in mediating pulmonary inflammatory responses to fungi. PMID:18039832

  7. MyD88-dependent pro-inflammatory activity in Vi polysaccharide vaccine against typhoid promotes Ab switching to IgG.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rohini; Akhade, Ajay Suresh; Yadav, Jitender; Qadri, Ayub

    2015-10-01

    Vi capsular polysaccharide is currently in use as a vaccine against human typhoid caused by Salmonella Typhi. The vaccine efficacy correlates with IgG anti-Vi Abs. We have recently reported that Vi can generate inflammatory responses through activation of the TLR2/TLR1 complex. In the present study, we show that immunization with Vi produces IgM as well as IgG Abs in wild type mice. This ability is not compromised in mice deficient in T cells. However, immunization of mice lacking the TLR adaptor protein, MyD88, with Vi elicits only IgM Abs. These results suggest that MyD88-dependent pro-inflammatory ability of the Vi vaccine might be vital in generating IgG Abs with this T-independent Ag. PMID:26303218

  8. Myd88 deficiency influences murine tracheal epithelial metaplasia and submucosal gland abundance.

    PubMed

    Giangreco, Adam; Lu, Liwen; Mazzatti, Dawn J; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Nye, Emma; Teixeira, Vitor Hugo; Janes, Sam M

    2011-06-01

    Tracheal epithelial remodelling, excess mucus production, and submucosal gland hyperplasia are features of numerous lung diseases, yet their origins remain poorly understood. Previous studies have suggested that NF-κB signalling may regulate airway epithelial homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether deletion of the NF-κB signalling pathway protein myeloid differentiation factor 88 (Myd88) influenced tracheal epithelial cell phenotype. We compared wild-type and Myd88-deficient or pharmacologically inhibited adult mouse tracheas and determined that in vivo Myd88 deletion resulted in increased submucosal gland number, secretory cell metaplasia, and excess mucus cell abundance. We also found that Myd88 was required for normal resolution after acute tracheal epithelial injury. Microarray analysis revealed that uninjured Myd88-deficient tracheas contained 103 transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to wild-type and all injured whole tracheal samples. These clustered into several ontologies and networks that are known to functionally influence epithelial cell phenotype. Comparing these transcripts to those expressed in airway progenitor cells revealed only five common genes, suggesting that Myd88 influences tracheal epithelial homeostasis through an extrinsic mechanism. Overall, this study represents the first identification of Myd88 as a regulator of adult tracheal epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:21557220

  9. Liver Fibrosis Occurs Through Dysregulation of MyD88-dependent Innate B cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Manoj; Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Velazquez, Victoria M.; Tedesco, Dana; Elrod, Elizabeth; Han, Jin-Hwan; Sharma, Prachi; Ibegbu, Chris; Gewirtz, Andrew; Anania, Frank; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S.; Grakoui, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver disease mediated by activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) leads to liver fibrosis. Here, we postulated that the immune regulatory properties of HSCs might promote the profibrogenic activity of B cells. Fibrosis is completely attenuated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated B cell deficient μMT mice showing that B cells are required. The retinoic acid produced by HSCs augmented B cell survival, plasma cell marker CD138 expression, and IgG production. These activities were reversed following the addition of the retinoic acid inhibitor, LE540. Transcriptional profiling of fibrotic liver B cells revealed an increased expression of genes related to NF-κB activation, proinflammatory cytokine production and CD40 signaling suggesting that these B cells are activated and may be acting as inflammatory cells. Biological validation experiments also revealed increased activation (CD44 and CD86 expressions), constitutive IgG production and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP1-α. Likewise targeted deletion of B-cell-intrinsic MyD88 signaling, an innate adaptor with involvement in RA signaling, resulted in reduced infiltration of migratory CD11c+ dendritic cells and Ly6C++ monocytes, and hence reduced liver pathology. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that liver fibrosis occurs through a mechanism of HSC-mediated augmentation of innate B cell activity and highlight B cells as an important ‘first responders’ of the intrahepatic immune environment. PMID:25711908

  10. Trichinella spiralis Excretory-Secretory Products Protect against Polymicrobial Sepsis by Suppressing MyD88 via Mannose Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Du, Linlin; Liu, Lihua; Yu, Yang; Shan, Hui; Li, Leiqing

    2014-01-01

    Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis) or its excretory-secretory products (TsES) protect hosts from autoimmune diseases, which depend on inducing host T helper (Th) 2 immune response and inhibiting inflammatory factors. Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) evoked by infection. Little is known about the effects of helminths or their excretory-secretory products on sepsis. Here, we investigated the effects of TsES in a mice model of polymicrobial sepsis. TsES improved survival, reduced organ injury, and enhanced bacterial clearance in septic mice. To investigate the molecular mechanism, macrophages from septic patients or the control group were incubated with TsES. TsES reduced sepsis-inducing inflammatory cytokines mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR) in vitro by suppressing TLR adaptor-transducer myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and nuclear factor- (NF-)-κB. Furthermore, TsES upregulated mannose receptor (MR) expression during sepsis. MR blocking attenuated the effects of TsES on MyD88 and NF-κB expression. In vivo, MR RNAi reduced the survival rate of septic mice treated with TsES, suggesting that TsES-mediated protection against polymicrobial sepsis is dependent on MR. Thus, TsES administration might be a potential therapeutic strategy for treating sepsis. PMID:25054155

  11. MyD88 and TRIF mediate divergent inflammatory and regenerative responses to skeletal muscle ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Ulka; Cui, Xiangdong; Xu, Jia; Xu, Jun; Tzeng, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that MyD88 KO mice appear protected from ischemic muscle injury while TRIF KO mice exhibit sustained necrosis after femoral artery ligation (FAL). However, our previous data did not differentiate whether the protective effect of absent MyD88 signaling was secondary to attenuated injury after FAL or quicker recovery from the insult. The purpose of this study was to delineate these different possibilities. On the basis of previous findings, we hypothesized that MyD88 signaling promotes enhanced inflammation while TRIF mediates regeneration after skeletal muscle ischemia. Our results show that after FAL, both MyD88 KO mice and TRIF KO mice have evidence of ischemia, as do their control counterparts. However, MyD88 KO mice had lower levels of serum IL‐6 24 h after FAL, while TRIF KO mice demonstrated sustained serum IL‐6 up to 1 week after injury. Additionally, MyD88 KO mice had higher nuclear content and larger myofibers than control animals 1 week after injury. IL‐6 is known to have differential effects in myoblast function, and can inhibit proliferation and differentiation. In tibialis anterior muscle harvested from injured animals, IL‐6 levels were higher and the proliferative marker MyoD was lower in TRIF KO mice by PCR. Furthermore, expression of MyD88 appeared to be higher in skeletal muscle of TRIF KO mice. In vitro, we showed that myoblast differentiation and proliferation were attenuated in response to IL‐6 treatment giving credence to the finding that low IL‐6 in MyD88 KO mice may be responsible for larger myocyte sizes 1 week after FAL. We conclude that MyD88 and TRIF work in concert to mediate a balanced response to ischemic injury. PMID:24844636

  12. Opposing roles of RAGE and Myd88 signaling in extensive liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shan; Zhang, Qing Yin; Huang, Jianzhong; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Rosario, Rosa; Ananthakrishnan, Radha; Yan, Shi Fang; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Emond, Jean C.; Friedman, Richard A.; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    In extensive liver resection secondary to primary or metastatic liver tumors, or in living donor liver transplantation, strategies to quell deleterious inflammatory responses and facilitate regeneration are essential. The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) and myeloid differentiating factor 88 (Myd88) are implicated in the inflammatory response. To establish the contributions of RAGE vs. Myd88 signaling in extensive liver resection, we probed the effect of RAGE and/or Myd88, the latter primarily a key transducer of major toll-like receptors and also implicated in interleukin-1 (Il1) signaling, in a murine model of extensive (85%) hepatectomy. We report that, although Myd88 is thoroughly essential for survival via regulation of NF-κB and TNF-α, deletion of RAGE significantly improved survival compared to wild-type, Myd88-null, or RAGE-null/Myd88-null mice. RAGE opposes Myd88 signaling at multiple levels: by suppression of p65 levels, thereby reducing activation of NF-κB and consequent production of cyclin D1, and by suppression of Il6-mediated phosphorylation of Stat3, thereby down-regulating Pim1 and suppressing the hyperplastic response. Further, RAGE-dependent suppression of glyoxalase1, a detoxification pathway for pre-AGEs, enhances AGE levels and suppresses Il6 action. We conclude that blockade of RAGE may rescue liver remnants from the multiple signals that preclude adaptive proliferation triggered primarily by Myd88 signaling pathways.—Zeng, S., Zhang, Q. Y., Huang, J., Vedantham, S., Rosario, R., Ananthakrishnan, R., Yan, S. F., Ramasamy, R., DeMatteo, R. P., Emond, J. C., Friedman, R. A., Schmidt, A. M. Opposing roles of RAGE and Myd88 signaling in extensive liver resection. PMID:22075646

  13. Mucus clearance, MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent immunity modulate lung susceptibility to spontaneous bacterial infection and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Kelly, E. Jane; Klem, Erich R.; Dang, Hong; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Boucher, Richard C.; Randell, Scott H.; O’Neal, Wanda K.

    2012-01-01

    It has been postulated that mucus stasis is central to the pathogenesis of obstructive lung diseases. In Scnn1b-transgenic (Scnn1b-Tg+) mice, airway-targeted overexpression of the epithelial Na+ channel β subunit causes airway surface dehydration, which results in mucus stasis and inflammation. Bronchoalveolar lavage from neonatal Scnn1b-Tg+ mice, but not wild-type littermates, contained increased mucus, bacteria, and neutrophils, which declined with age. Scnn1b-Tg+ mice lung bacterial flora included environmental and oropharyngeal species, suggesting inhalation and/or aspiration as routes of entry. Genetic deletion of the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor adapter molecule MyD88 in Scnn1b-Tg+ mice did not modify airway mucus obstruction, but caused defective neutrophil recruitment and increased bacterial infection, which persisted into adulthood. Scnn1b-Tg+ mice derived into germ-free conditions exhibited mucus obstruction similar to conventional Scnn1b-Tg+ mice and sterile inflammation. Collectively, these data suggest that dehydration-induced mucus stasis promotes infection, compounds defects in other immune mechanisms, and alone is sufficient to trigger airway inflammation. PMID:22419116

  14. MyD88 Deficiency Ameliorates β-Amyloidosis in an Animal Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeong-Eun; Kou, Jinghong; Song, Min; Pattanayak, Abhinandan; Jin, Jingji; Lalonde, Robert; Fukuchi, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    The accumulation of β-amyloid protein (Aβ) in the brain is thought to be a primary etiologic event in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Fibrillar Aβ plaques, a hallmark of AD abnormality, are closely associated with activated microglia. Activated microglia have contradictory roles in the pathogenesis of AD, being either neuroprotective (by clearing harmful Aβ and repairing damaged tissues) or neurotoxic (by producing proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species). Aβ aggregates can activate microglia by interacting with multiple toll-like receptors (TLRs), the pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Because the adapter protein MyD88 is essential for the downstream signaling of all TLRs, except TLR3, we investigated the effects of MyD88 deficiency (MyD88−/−) on Aβ accumulation and microglial activation in an AD mouse model. MyD88 deficiency decreased Aβ load and microglial activation in the brain. The decrease in Aβ load in an MyD88−/− AD mouse model was associated with increased and decreased protein expression of apolipoprotein E (apoE) and CX3CR1, respectively, compared with that in an MyD88 wild-type AD mouse model. These results suggest that MyD88 deficiency may reduce Aβ load by enhancing the phagocytic capability of microglia through fractalkine (the ligand of CX3CR1) signaling and by promoting apoE-mediated clearance of Aβ from the brain. These findings also suggest that chronic inflammatory responses induced by Aβ accumulation via the MyD88–dependent signaling pathway exacerbate β-amyloidosis in AD. PMID:21763676

  15. Intrinsic MyD88-Akt1-mTOR Signaling Coordinates Disparate Tc17 and Tc1 Responses during Vaccine Immunity against Fungal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Nanjappa, Som Gowda; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Galles, Kevin; Wüthrich, Marcel; Suresh, M.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections have skyrocketed in immune-compromised patients lacking CD4+ T cells, underscoring the need for vaccine prevention. An understanding of the elements that promote vaccine immunity in this setting is essential. We previously demonstrated that vaccine-induced IL-17A+ CD8+ T cells (Tc17) are required for resistance against lethal fungal pneumonia in CD4+ T cell-deficient hosts, whereas the individual type I cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and GM-CSF, are dispensable. Here, we report that T cell-intrinsic MyD88 signals are crucial for these Tc17 cell responses and vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in mice. In contrast, IFN-γ+ CD8+ cell (Tc1) responses are largely normal in the absence of intrinsic MyD88 signaling in CD8+ T cells. The poor accumulation of MyD88-deficient Tc17 cells was not linked to an early onset of contraction, nor to accelerated cell death or diminished expression of anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Instead, intrinsic MyD88 was required to sustain the proliferation of Tc17 cells through the activation of mTOR via Akt1. Moreover, intrinsic IL-1R and TLR2, but not IL-18R, were required for MyD88 dependent Tc17 responses. Our data identify unappreciated targets for augmenting adaptive immunity against fungi. Our findings have implications for designing fungal vaccines and immune-based therapies in immune-compromised patients. PMID:26367276

  16. Intrinsic MyD88-Akt1-mTOR Signaling Coordinates Disparate Tc17 and Tc1 Responses during Vaccine Immunity against Fungal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Som Gowda; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Galles, Kevin; Wüthrich, Marcel; Suresh, M; Klein, Bruce S

    2015-09-01

    Fungal infections have skyrocketed in immune-compromised patients lacking CD4+ T cells, underscoring the need for vaccine prevention. An understanding of the elements that promote vaccine immunity in this setting is essential. We previously demonstrated that vaccine-induced IL-17A+ CD8+ T cells (Tc17) are required for resistance against lethal fungal pneumonia in CD4+ T cell-deficient hosts, whereas the individual type I cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and GM-CSF, are dispensable. Here, we report that T cell-intrinsic MyD88 signals are crucial for these Tc17 cell responses and vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in mice. In contrast, IFN-γ+ CD8+ cell (Tc1) responses are largely normal in the absence of intrinsic MyD88 signaling in CD8+ T cells. The poor accumulation of MyD88-deficient Tc17 cells was not linked to an early onset of contraction, nor to accelerated cell death or diminished expression of anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Instead, intrinsic MyD88 was required to sustain the proliferation of Tc17 cells through the activation of mTOR via Akt1. Moreover, intrinsic IL-1R and TLR2, but not IL-18R, were required for MyD88 dependent Tc17 responses. Our data identify unappreciated targets for augmenting adaptive immunity against fungi. Our findings have implications for designing fungal vaccines and immune-based therapies in immune-compromised patients. PMID:26367276

  17. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ≤50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ≤50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome. PMID:24782504

  18. Toll-like Receptor 4 and MyD88 Dependent Signaling Mechanisms of the Innate Immune System are Essential for the Response to Lipopolysaccharide by Epithelial and Stromal Cells of the Bovine Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, James G; Turner, Matthew L; Goetze, Leopold; Bryant, Clare E; Sheldon, I Martin

    2015-01-01

    Infection of the bovine endometrium with Gram-negative bacteria commonly causes uterine disease. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on cells of the immune system bind Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), stimulating the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and the chemokine IL-8. As the endometrium is the first barrier to infection of the uterus, the signaling cascade triggered by LPS and the subsequent expression of inflammatory mediators was investigated in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, and the key pathways identified using short interfering RNA (siRNA) and biochemical inhibitors. Treatment of endometrial cells with ultrapure LPS stimulated an inflammatory response characterized by increased IL1B, IL6 and IL8 mRNA expression, and IL-6 protein accumulation in epithelial cells; and increased IL1B and IL8 mRNA expression, and IL-6 and IL-8 protein accumulation in stromal cells. Treatment of endometrial cells with LPS also induced the degradation of IκB and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, as well as rapid phosphorylation of MAPK3/1 and MAPK14. Knockdown of TLR4 or its signaling adaptor molecule, MYD88, using siRNA reduced the inflammatory response to LPS in epithelial and stromal cells. Biochemical inhibition of MAPK3/1, but not JNK, or MAPK14, reduced LPS-induced IL1B, IL6 and IL8 expression in endometrial cells. In conclusion, epithelial and stromal cells have an intrinsic role in innate immune surveillance in the endometrium, and in the case of LPS this recognition occurs via TLR4 and MyD88 dependent cell signaling pathways. PMID:22053092

  19. Consequences of the recurrent MYD88(L265P) somatic mutation for B cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, James Q; Jeelall, Yogesh S; Beutler, Bruce; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher C

    2014-03-10

    MYD88(L265P) has recently been discovered as an extraordinarily frequent somatic mutation in benign monoclonal IgM gammopathy, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. In this study, we analyze the consequences for antigen-activated primary B cells of acquiring MYD88(L265P). The mutation induced rapid B cell division in the absence of exogenous TLR ligands and was inhibited by Unc93b1(3d) mutation and chloroquine or TLR9 deficiency, indicating continued dependence on upstream TLR9 activation. Proliferation and NF-κB activation induced by MYD88(L265P) were nevertheless rapidly countered by the induction of TNFAIP3, an NF-κB inhibitor frequently inactivated in MYD88(L265P)-bearing lymphomas, and extinguished by Bim-dependent apoptosis. MYD88(L265P) caused self-reactive B cells to accumulate in vivo only when apoptosis was opposed by Bcl2 overexpression. These results reveal checkpoints that fortify TLR responses against aberrant B cell proliferation in response to ubiquitous TLR and BCR self-ligands and suggest that tolerance failure requires the accumulation of multiple somatic mutations. PMID:24534189

  20. Antimony-Resistant Leishmania donovani Exploits miR-466i To Deactivate Host MyD88 for Regulating IL-10/IL-12 Levels during Early Hours of Infection.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Budhaditya; Paul, Joydeep; Mukherjee, Sandip; Mukhopadhyay, Rupkatha; Das, Shantanabha; Naskar, Kshudiram; Sundar, Shyam; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Saha, Bhaskar; Roy, Syamal

    2015-09-15

    Infection with antimony-resistant Leishmania donovani (Sb(R)LD) induces aggressive pathology in the mammalian hosts as compared with ones with antimony-sensitive L. donovani (Sb(S)LD) infection. Sb(R)LD, but not Sb(S)LD, interacts with TLR2/TLR6 to induce IL-10 by exploiting p50/c-Rel subunits of NF-κB in infected macrophages (Mϕs). Most of the TLRs exploit the universal adaptor protein MyD88 to activate NF-κB. We now show that infection of Mϕs from MyD88(-/-) mice with Sb(R)LD gave rise to significantly higher intracellular parasite number coupled with elevated IL-10/IL-12 ratio in the culture supernatant as compared with infection in wild type (WT) Mϕs. Τhese attributes were not seen with Sb(S)LD in similar experiments. Further, Sb(R)LD infection upregulated miR-466i, which binds with 3'-untranslated region, leading to the downregulation of MyD88. Infection of MyD88(-/-) Mϕ or IL-12(-/-) Mϕ with Sb(R)LD induced IL-10 surge at 4 h, whereas the same in WT Mϕ started from 12 h. Thus, absence of IL-12 in MyD88(-/-) mice favored early binding of NF-κB subunits to the IL-10 promoter, resulting in IL-10 surge. Infection of MyD88(-/-) mice with Sb(R)LD showed significantly higher organ parasites coupled with ill-defined and immature hepatic granulomas, whereas in WT mice there were less organ parasites and the granulomas were well defined. From the survival kinetics it was observed that Sb(R)LD-infected MyD88(-/-) mice died by 60 d postinfection, whereas the WT mice continued to survive. Our results demonstrate that Sb(R)LD has evolved a unique strategy to evade host antileishmanial immune repertoire by manipulating host MyD88 to its advantage. PMID:26283478

  1. MyD88 in lung resident cells governs airway inflammatory and pulmonary function responses to organic dust treatment.

    PubMed

    Poole, Jill A; Wyatt, Todd A; Romberger, Debra J; Staab, Elizabeth; Simet, Samantha; Reynolds, Stephen J; Sisson, Joseph H; Kielian, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation of organic dusts within agriculture environments contributes to the development and/or severity of airway diseases, including asthma and chronic bronchitis. MyD88 KO (knockout) mice are nearly completely protected against the inflammatory and bronchoconstriction effects induced by acute organic dust extract (ODE) treatments. However, the contribution of MyD88 in lung epithelial cell responses remains unclear. In the present study, we first addressed whether ODE-induced changes in epithelial cell responses were MyD88-dependent by quantitating ciliary beat frequency and cell migration following wounding by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. We demonstrate that the normative ciliary beat slowing response to ODE is delayed in MyD88 KO tracheal epithelial cells as compared to wild type (WT) control. Similarly, the normative ODE-induced slowing of cell migration in response to wound repair was aberrant in MyD88 KO cells. Next, we created MyD88 bone marrow chimera mice to investigate the relative contribution of MyD88-dependent signaling in lung resident (predominately epithelial cells) versus hematopoietic cells. Importantly, we demonstrate that ODE-induced airway hyperresponsiveness is MyD88-dependent in lung resident cells, whereas MyD88 action in hematopoietic cells is mainly responsible for ODE-induced TNF-α release. MyD88 signaling in lung resident and hematopoietic cells are necessary for ODE-induced IL-6 and neutrophil chemoattractant (CXCL1 and CXCL2) release and neutrophil influx. Collectively, these findings underscore an important role for MyD88 in lung resident cells for regulating ciliary motility, wound repair and inflammatory responses to ODE, and moreover, show that airway hyperresponsiveness appears uncoupled from airway inflammatory consequences to organic dust challenge in terms of MyD88 involvement. PMID:26376975

  2. Uncoupling between Inflammatory and Fibrotic Responses to Silica: Evidence from MyD88 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Sandra; Yakoub, Yousof; Devosse, Raynal; Uwambayinema, Francine; Couillin, Isabelle; Ryffel, Bernard; Marbaix, Etienne; Lison, Dominique; Huaux, François

    2014-01-01

    The exact implication of innate immunity in granuloma formation and irreversible lung fibrosis remains to be determined. In this study, we examined the lung inflammatory and fibrotic responses to silica in MyD88-knockout (KO) mice. In comparison to wild-type (WT) mice, we found that MyD88-KO animals developed attenuated lung inflammation, neutrophil accumulation and IL-1β release in response to silica. Granuloma formation was also less pronounced in MyD88-KO mice after silica. This limited inflammatory response was not accompanied by a concomitant attenuation of lung collagen accumulation after silica. Histological analyses revealed that while pulmonary fibrosis was localized in granulomas in WT animals, it was diffusely distributed throughout the parenchyma in MyD88-KO mice. Robust collagen accumulation was also observed in mice KO for several other components of innate immunity (IL-1R, IL-1, ASC, NALP3, IL-18R, IL-33R, TRIF, and TLR2-3-4,). We additionally show that pulmonary fibrosis in MyD88-KO mice was associated with the accumulation of pro-fibrotic regulatory T lymphocytes (T regs) and pro-fibrotic cytokine expression (TGF-β, IL-10 and PDGF-B), not with T helper (Th) 17 cell influx. Our findings indicate that the activation of MyD88-related innate immunity is central in the establishment of particle-induced lung inflammatory and granuloma responses. The development of lung fibrosis appears uncoupled from inflammation and may be orchestrated by a T reg-associated pathway. PMID:25050810

  3. MyD88 Polymorphisms and Association with Susceptibility to Salmonella Pullorum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian-Qing; Wang, Fei; Jin, Jie; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Ran, Jin-Shan; Feng, Ze-Qing; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88), a universal adapter protein, plays an important role in activating the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and regulating the expression of proinflammatory genes like tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which were highly involved in Salmonella Pullorum infection. To detect the relationship between polymorphisms of the MyD88 gene and Salmonella Pullorum disease, we screened the coding region (CDS) of the MYD88 gene by DNA pool construction and sequencing based on case-control study. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the sequenced fragment (5 exons), 7 known loci and one novel mutation named G4810372T (SNP8), were found in the fifth exon. In addition, we found 7 nonsynonymous substitutions. The allele frequency of only one SNP, g.4810191C > T (SNP1), was significantly different (P < 0.05) between case and control groups. The genotype frequencies of SNP1 (g.4810191C > T) and SNP3 (g.4810257G > T) were of significant difference between the case and the control groups (P < 0.05). Collectively, SNPs of the MyD88 gene were significantly associated with susceptibility to Salmonella Pullorum infection, which can be used as a disease-resistant marker in chicken. These results provided a theoretical basis for future research on chicken breeding by marker-assisted selection. PMID:26881204

  4. Sepsis Induces Hematopoietic Stem Cell Exhaustion and Myelosuppression through Distinct Contributions of TRIF and MYD88.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huajia; Rodriguez, Sonia; Wang, Lin; Wang, Soujuan; Serezani, Henrique; Kapur, Reuben; Cardoso, Angelo A; Carlesso, Nadia

    2016-06-14

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a central role in host responses to bacterial infection, but the precise mechanism(s) by which its downstream signaling components coordinate the bone marrow response to sepsis is poorly understood. Using mice deficient in TLR4 downstream adapters MYD88 or TRIF, we demonstrate that both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous MYD88 activation are major causes of myelosuppression during sepsis, while having a modest impact on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) functions. In contrast, cell-intrinsic TRIF activation severely compromises HSC self-renewal without directly affecting myeloid cells. Lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of MYD88 or TRIF contributes to cell-cycle activation of HSC and induces rapid and permanent changes in transcriptional programs, as indicated by persistent downregulation of Spi1 and CebpA expression after transplantation. Thus, distinct mechanisms downstream of TLR4 signaling mediate myelosuppression and HSC exhaustion during sepsis through unique effects of MyD88 and TRIF. PMID:27264973

  5. MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 signal pathway in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chuqiang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Le; Tang, Long; Li, Shuangqing; Yang, Yixi; Yang, Fuguo; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is a common and remitting problem. One of the primary causes of LBP is thought to be degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88)-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal pathway in the mechanism of IVD degeneration. IVD nucleus pulposus cells isolated and cultured from the lumbar vertebrae of Wistar rats were stimulated by various doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 µg/ml) to simulate IVD degeneration. Cells were rinsed and cultured in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the levels of TLR4, MyD88, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression after 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 h of incubation. Additionally, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses were used to determine the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα, and IL-1β protein expression after 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation. The levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β mRNA all increased in the cells stimulated by 10 µg/ml LPS at 3, 6 and 9 h (all P<0.001). Furthermore, the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β protein all increased at 24, 48 and 72 h (all P<0.001). Additionally, the mRNA and protein levels of TLR4, MyD88, TNFα and IL-1β increased significantly in the cells stimulated by 1, 10 and 100 µg/ml LPS compared with the control group, and reached a peak in the 10 µg/ml LPS group (all P<0.001). These results suggest that the MyD88-dependent TLR4 signal pathway is a target pathway in IVD degeneration. This pathway is time phase- and dose-dependent, and when activated can lead to the release of inflammatory factors that participate in IVD degeneration. PMID:27446251

  6. Expression of TLR4-MyD88 and NF-κB in the Iris during Endotoxin-Induced Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shang; Lu, Hong; Hu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Wei; Xu, Yingzhi; Wang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To observe the expression of Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor kappa B p65 (NF-κB p65) in iris tissue during endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) and evaluate the significance of these factors in uveitis. Methods. Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (0 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h, n = 10/group). Animal model of acute anterior uveitis was established by a hind footpad injection of 200 μg Cholera vibrio LPS. Expression of TLR4, MyD88, and NF-κB p65 in iris ciliary body tissue was detected through immunohistochemical staining. Results. Expression of TLR4 was not detected in normal iris-ciliary body complex, TLR4 positive cells with round morphology appeared in the iris stroma 12 hours after injection, significantly increased (P < .001) 48 hours after injection, and decreased gradually 72 hours after injection. Expression of MyD88 and NF-κB p65 is consistent with the change of the TLR4. Conclusions. The increased expression of TLR4 and its downstream signal transduction moleculesMyD88, NF-κB p65 indicate the potential role of pathway in the pathogenesis of acute anterior uveitis (AAU). PMID:20847811

  7. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus infection exacerbates NSCLC cell metastasis by up-regulating TLR4/MyD88 pathway.

    PubMed

    An, J; Li, Z; Dong, Y; Ren, J; Guo, K

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is a major public health problem worldwide, which brings to a more great threat for cancer patients. It's necessary to give attentions to lung cancer combined with MRSA. This study mainly focuses on the influences of MRSA on lung cancer cells (A549). We first found that MRSA infection can enhance metastasis ability of A549 cell and increase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP2 and MMP9) expressions in MRSA-infected A549 cell. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been reported to play an important role in tumor cell initiation and migration, and regulate the expression of MMPs in tumors. Our further research indicates that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/molecules myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) signaling was up-regulated in MRSA-infected A549 cell. After silencing TLR4 or MyD88 gene, the enhanced metastasis ability of A549 cell by MRSA was decreased significantly; Also, MMP2 and MMP9 expression increase was reversed. In conclusion, MRSA infection can enhance NSCLC cell metastasis by up-regulating TLR4/MyD88 signaling. PMID:27545207

  8. LPS INHIBITION OF GLUCOSE PRODUCTION THROUGH THE TLR4, MYD88, NFκB PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Raetzsch, Carl F.; Brooks, Natasha L.; Alderman, J. McKee; Moore, Kelli S.; Hosick, Peter A.; Klebanov, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Bear, James E.; Baldwin, Albert S.; Mackman, Nigel; Combs, Terry P.

    2010-01-01

    Acute exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can cause hypoglycemia and insulin resistance; the underlying mechanisms however, are unclear. We set out to determine whether insulin resistance is linked to hypoglycemia through TLR4, MyD88 and NFκB, a cell signaling pathway that mediates LPS induction of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. LPS induction of hypoglycemia was blocked in TLR4−/− and MyD88−/− mice but not in TNFα−/− mice. Both glucose production and glucose utilization were decreased during hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia was associated with the activation of NFκB in the liver. LPS inhibition of glucose production was blocked in hepatocytes isolated from TLR4−/− and MyD88−/− mice and hepatoma cells expressing an IκB mutant that interferes with NFκB activation. Thus, LPS-induced hypoglycemia was mediated by the inhibition of glucose production from the liver through the TLR4, MyD88, NFκB pathway, independent of LPS induced TNFα. LPS inhibition of glucose production was not blocked by pharmacologic inhibition of the insulin signaling intermediate PI3K in hepatoma cells. Insulin injection caused a similar reduction of circulating glucose in TLR4−/− and TLR4+/+ mice. These two results suggest that LPS and insulin inhibit glucose production by separate pathways. Recovery from LPS induced hypoglycemia was linked to glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia in TLR4+/+ mice, but not in TLR4−/− mice. Conclusion Insulin resistance is linked to the inhibition of glucose production by the TLR4, MyD88 and NFκB pathway. PMID:19492426

  9. Early MyD88-dependent induction of interleukin-17A expression during Salmonella colitis.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Godinez, Ivan; Xavier, Mariana N; Winter, Maria G; Winter, Sebastian E; Tsolis, Renée M; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-08-01

    The development of T helper 17 (T(H)17) cells is a well-established adaptive mechanism for the production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), a cytokine involved in neutrophil recruitment. However, pathways contributing to mucosal expression of IL-17A during the initial phase of a bacterial infection have received less attention. Here we used the mouse colitis model of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium infection to investigate the contribution of myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) to inflammation and mucosal IL-17A expression. Expression of IL-23 in the cecal mucosa during S. Typhimurium colitis was dependent on the presence of MyD88. Furthermore, initial expression of IL-17A at 24 h after S. Typhimurium infection was dependent on MyD88 and the receptor for IL-1β. IL-23 and IL-1β synergized in inducing expression of IL-17A in splenic T cells in vitro. In the intestinal mucosa, IL-17A was produced by three distinct T cell populations, including δγ T cells, T(H)17 cells, and CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells. The absence of IL-1β signaling or IL-17 signaling reduced CXC chemokine expression but did not alter the overall severity of pathological lesions in the cecal mucosa. In contrast, cecal pathology and neutrophil recruitment were markedly reduced in Myd88-deficient mice during the initial phases of S. Typhimurium infection. Collectively, these data demonstrate that MyD88-dependent mechanisms, including an initial expression of IL-17A, are important for orchestrating early inflammatory responses during S. Typhimurium colitis. PMID:21576324

  10. Myxoma virus induces type I interferon production in murine plasmacytoid dendritic cells via a TLR9/MyD88-, IRF5/IRF7-, and IFNAR-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Peihong; Cao, Hua; Merghoub, Taha; Avogadri, Francesca; Wang, Weiyi; Parikh, Tanvi; Fang, Chee-Mun; Pitha, Paula M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Hu, Xiaoyu; Houghton, Alan N; Shuman, Stewart; Deng, Liang

    2011-10-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Myxoma virus is a rabbit poxvirus that belongs to the Leporipoxvirus genus. It causes a lethal disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits but cannot sustain any detectable infection in nonlagomorphs. Vaccinia virus is a prototypal orthopoxvirus that was used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox. Myxoma virus is nonpathogenic in mice, whereas systemic infection with vaccinia virus can be lethal even in immunocompetent mice. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are potent type I interferon (IFN)-producing cells that play important roles in antiviral innate immunity. How poxviruses are sensed by pDCs to induce type I IFN production is not well understood. Here we report that infection of primary murine pDCs with myxoma virus, but not with vaccinia virus, induces IFN-α, IFN-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70) production. Using pDCs derived from genetic knockout mice, we show that the myxoma virus-induced innate immune response requires the endosomal DNA sensor TLR9 and its adaptor MyD88, transcription factors IRF5 and IRF7, and the type I IFN positive-feedback loop mediated by IFNAR1. It is independent of the cytoplasmic RNA sensing pathway mediated by the mitochondrial adaptor molecule MAVS, the TLR3 adaptor TRIF, or the transcription factor IRF3. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we demonstrate that myxoma virus-induced type I IFN and IL-12p70 production in murine pDCs is also dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. Furthermore, our results reveal that the N-terminal Z-DNA/RNA binding domain of vaccinia virulence factor E3, which is missing in the orthologous M029 protein expressed by myxoma virus, plays an inhibitory role in poxvirus sensing and innate cytokine production by murine pDCs. PMID:21835795

  11. Reduced MyD88 dependency of ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant in a DNA prime-protein boost HIV vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Buglione-Corbett, Rachel; Pouliot, Kimberly; Marty-Roix, Robyn; Li, Wei; West, Kim; Wang, Shixia; Morelli, Adriana Baz; Lien, Egil; Lu, Shan

    2014-01-01

    ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant is an integrated adjuvant system due to its ability to both facilitate antigen delivery and immunomodulate the innate and adaptive immune responses to vaccination. ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant strongly induces both humoral and cell-mediated immunity in formulation with a range of antigens in pre-clinical and clinical evaluations. In this study, we describe the adaptive and innate immune responses associated with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant in the context of a previously described HIV-1 vaccine, DP6-001. The DP6-001 vaccine consists of a unique pentavalent HIV-1 Env DNA prime-protein boost regimen. This study demonstrates the potent induction of vaccine-specific antibodies in a mouse model, as well as broadly neutralizing antibodies in immunized rabbits. In addition, we identify a potentially critical role for DNA priming in the induction of the vaccine-specific immune response as well as the serum cytokine profiles associated with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant. Most interestingly, DNA prime immunizations made ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant less dependent on the central innate immune adaptor MyD88, revealing a previously unknown mechanism that may expand our knowledge on the use of adjuvants. PMID:24513632

  12. MyD88 in macrophages is critical for abscess resolution in staphylococcal skin infection.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, Reinhild; Seidl, Maximilian; Prinz, Marco; Henneke, Philipp

    2015-03-15

    When Staphylococcus aureus penetrates the epidermis and reaches the dermis, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMLs) accumulate and an abscess is formed. However, the molecular mechanisms that orchestrate initiation and termination of inflammation in skin infection are incompletely understood. In human myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) deficiency, staphylococcal skin and soft tissue infections are a leading and potentially life-threatening problem. In this study, we found that MyD88-dependent sensing of S. aureus by dermal macrophages (Mϕ) contributes to both timely escalation and termination of PML-mediated inflammation in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infection. Mϕs were key to recruit PML within hours in response to staphylococci, irrespective of bacterial viability. In contrast with bone marrow-derived Mϕs, dermal Mϕs did not require UNC-93B or TLR2 for activation. Moreover, PMLs, once recruited, were highly activated in an MyD88-independent fashion, yet failed to clear the infection if Mϕs were missing or functionally impaired. In normal mice, clearance of the infection and contraction of the PML infiltrate were accompanied by expansion of resident Mϕs in a CCR2-dependent fashion. Thus, whereas monocytes were dispensable for the early immune response to staphylococci, they contributed to Mϕ renewal after the infection was overcome. Taken together, MyD88-dependent sensing of staphylococci by resident dermal Mϕs is key for a rapid and balanced immune response, and PMLs are dependent on intact Mϕ for full function. Renewal of resident Mϕs requires both local control of bacteria and inflammatory monocytes entering the skin. PMID:25681348

  13. Clinical Features and Outcome of Patients With IRAK-4 and MyD88 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Capucine; von Bernuth, Horst; Ghandil, Pegah; Chrabieh, Maya; Levy, Ofer; Arkwright, Peter D.; McDonald, Douglas; Geha, Raif S.; Takada, Hidetoshi; Krause, Jens C.; Creech, C. Buddy; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Ehl, Stephan; Maŕodi, Ĺaszĺo; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Al-Hajjar, Sami; Al-Ghonaium, Abdulaziz; Day-Good, Noorbibi K.; Holland, Steven M.; Gallin, John; Chapel, Helen; Speert, David P.; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Colino, Elena; Garty, Ben-Zion; Roifman, Chaim; Hara, Toshiro; Yoshikawa, Hideto; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Domachowske, Joseph; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Tang, Mimi; Smart, Joanne; Zitnik, Simona Eva; Hoarau, Cyrille; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Thrasher, Adrian; Davies, E. Graham; Bethune, Claire; Sirvent, Nicolas; de Ricaud, Dominique; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Vasconcelos, J́ulia; Guedes, Margarida; Vitor, Artur Bonito; Rodrigo, Carlos; AlmaŸan, Francisco; Ḿendez, Maria; Aŕostegui, Juan Ignacio; Alsina, Laia; Fortuny, Claudia; Reichenbach, Janine; Verbsky, James W; Bossuyt, Xavier; Doffinger, Rainer; Abel, Laurent; Puel, Anne; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-4 and myeloid differentiation factor (MyD)88 deficiencies impair Toll-like receptor (TLR)- and interleukin-1 receptor-mediated immunity. We documented the clinical features and outcome of 48 patients with IRAK-4 deficiency and 12 patients with MyD88 deficiency, from 37 kindreds in 15 countries. The clinical features of IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiency were indistinguishable. There were no severe viral, parasitic, and fungal diseases, and the range of bacterial infections was narrow. Noninvasive bacterial infections occurred in 52 patients, with a high incidence of infections of the upper respiratory tract and the skin, mostly caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. The leading threat was invasive pneumococcal disease, documented in 41 patients (68%) and causing 72 documented invasive infections (52.2%). P. aeruginosa and Staph. aureus documented invasive infections also occurred (16.7% and 16%, respectively, in 25% and 25% of patients). Systemic signs of inflammation were usually weak or delayed. The first invasive infection occurred before the age of 2 years in 53 (88.3%) and in the neonatal period in 19 (32.7%) patients. Multiple or recurrent invasive infections were observed in most survivors (n = 36/50, 72%). PMID:21057262

  14. Microbiota signalling through MyD88 is necessary for a systemic neutrophilic inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Karmarkar, Dipti; Rock, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we have found that intestinal flora strongly influence peritoneal neutrophilic inflammatory responses to diverse stimuli, including pathogen-derived particles like zymosan and sterile irritant particles like crystals. When germ-free and flora-deficient (antibiotic-treated) mice are challenged with zymosan intraperitoneally, neutrophils are markedly impaired in their ability to extravasate from blood into the peritoneum. In contrast, in these animals, neutrophils can extravasate in response to an intraperitoneal injection of the chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 2. Neutrophil recruitment upon inflammatory challenge requires stimulation by microbiota through a myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) -dependent pathway. MyD88 signalling is crucial during the development of the immune system but depending upon the ligand it may be dispensable at the time of the actual inflammatory challenge. Furthermore, pre-treatment of flora-deficient mice with a purified MyD88-pathway agonist is sufficient to restore neutrophil migration. In summary, this study provides insight into the role of gut microbiota in influencing acute inflammation at sites outside the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23909393

  15. Epithelial-specific blockade of MyD88-dependent pathway causes spontaneous small intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianfeng; Xu, Jingyue; Zhu, Weiming; Gao, Xiang; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2010-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role for Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling at the intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) level for intestinal protection against exogenous injury or pathogenic infection. We hypothesized that MyD88 dependent TLR signaling at intestinal epithelium is critical for mucosal immune homeostasis. In the current study, a transgenic mouse model was generated in which a dominant-negative mutant of MyD88 (dnMyD88) was driven by an intestinal epithelial-specific murine villin promoter. Aged transgenic mice spontaneously developed chronic small intestinal inflammation, as revealed by increased CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes, neutrophil and macrophage infiltration, increased production of cytokines as TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-1beta, and IL-17, crypt abscesses, lymphedema, and Goblet cell depletion. The chronic inflammation was not due to increased epithelial apoptosis or permeability, but to a decreased Paneth cell-derived alpha-defensins (cryptdins) and RegIII-gamma and increased commensal bacteria translocation. Thus, epithelial MyD88-dependent pathway plays an essential role in limiting mucosal microflora penetration and preventing mucosal immunoregulation disturbance in vivo. PMID:20452828

  16. Small-molecule control of protein degradation using split adaptors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph H; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2011-11-18

    Targeted intracellular degradation provides a method to study the biological function of proteins and has numerous applications in biotechnology. One promising approach uses adaptor proteins to target substrates with genetically encoded degradation tags for proteolysis. Here, we describe an engineered split-adaptor system, in which adaptor assembly and delivery of substrates to the ClpXP protease depends on a small molecule (rapamycin). This degradation system does not require modification of endogenous proteases, functions robustly over a wide range of adaptor concentrations, and does not require new synthesis of adaptors or proteases to initiate degradation. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system in E. coli by degrading tagged variants of LacI repressor and FtsA, an essential cell-division protein. In the latter case, addition of rapamycin causes pronounced filamentation because daughter cells cannot divide. Strikingly, washing rapamycin away reverses this phenotype. Our system is highly modular, with clearly defined interfaces for substrate binding, protease binding, and adaptor assembly, providing a clear path to extend this system to other degradation tags, proteases, or induction systems. Together, these new reagents should be useful in controlling protein degradation in bacteria. PMID:21866931

  17. Small-molecule control of protein degradation using split adaptors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph H.; Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted intracellular degradation provides a method to study the biological function of proteins and has numerous applications in biotechnology. One promising approach uses adaptor proteins to target substrates with genetically encoded degradation tags for proteolysis. Here, we describe an engineered split-adaptor system, in which adaptor assembly and delivery of substrates to the ClpXP protease depends on a small molecule (rapamycin). This degradation system does not require modification of endogenous proteases, functions robustly over a wide range of adaptor concentrations, and does not require new synthesis of adaptors or proteases to initiate degradation. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system in E. coli by degrading tagged variants of LacI repressor and FtsA, an essential cell-division protein. In the latter case, addition of rapamycin causes pronounced filamentation because daughter cells cannot divide. Strikingly, washing rapamycin away reverses this phenotype. Our system is highly modular, with clearly-defined interfaces for substrate binding, protease binding, and adaptor assembly, providing a clear path to extend this system to other degradation tags, proteases, or induction systems. Together, these new reagents should be useful in controlling protein degradation in bacteria. PMID:21866931

  18. MyD88 expression by CNS-resident cells is pivotal for eliciting protective immunity in brain abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sarita; Nichols, Jessica R; Esen, Nilufer; Liu, Shuliang; Phulwani, Nirmal K; Syed, Mohsin Md.; Wood, William H; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Aldrich, Amy; Kielian, Tammy

    2009-01-01

    MyD88 KO (knockout) mice are exquisitely sensitive to CNS (central nervous system) infection with Staphylococcus aureus, a common aetiological agent of brain abscess, exhibiting global defects in innate immunity and exacerbated tissue damage. However, since brain abscesses are typified by the involvement of both activated CNS-resident and infiltrating immune cells, in our previous studies it has been impossible to determine the relative contribution of MyD88-dependent signalling in the CNS compared with the peripheral immune cell compartments. In the present study we addressed this by examining the course of S. aureus infection in MyD88 bone marrow chimaera mice. Interestingly, chimaeras where MyD88 was present in the CNS, but not bone marrow-derived cells, mounted pro-inflammatory mediator expression profiles and neutrophil recruitment equivalent to or exceeding that detected in WT (wild-type) mice. These results implicate CNS MyD88 as essential in eliciting the initial wave of inflammation during the acute response to parenchymal infection. Microarray analysis of infected MyD88 KO compared with WT mice revealed a preponderance of differentially regulated genes involved in apoptotic pathways, suggesting that the extensive tissue damage characteristic of brain abscesses from MyD88 KO mice could result from dysregulated apoptosis. Collectively, the findings of the present study highlight a novel mechanism for CNS-resident cells in initiating a protective innate immune response in the infected brain and, in the absence of MyD88 in this compartment, immunity is compromised. PMID:19570030

  19. Helical assembly in the MyD88-IRAK4-IRAK2 complex in TLR/IL-1R signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Su-Chang; Lo, Yu-Chih; Wu, Hao

    2010-08-23

    MyD88, IRAK4 and IRAK2 are critical signalling mediators of the TLR/IL1-R superfamily. Here we report the crystal structure of the MyD88-IRAK4-IRAK2 death domain (DD) complex, which surprisingly reveals a left-handed helical oligomer that consists of 6 MyD88, 4 IRAK4 and 4 IRAK2 DDs. Assembly of this helical signalling tower is hierarchical, in which MyD88 recruits IRAK4 and the MyD88-IRAK4 complex recruits the IRAK4 substrates IRAK2 or the related IRAK1. Formation of these Myddosome complexes brings the kinase domains of IRAKs into proximity for phosphorylation and activation. Composite binding sites are required for recruitment of the individual DDs in the complex, which are confirmed by mutagenesis and previously identified signalling mutations. Specificities in Myddosome formation are dictated by both molecular complementarity and correspondence of surface electrostatics. The MyD88-IRAK4-IRAK2 complex provides a template for Toll signalling in Drosophila and an elegant mechanism for versatile assembly and regulation of DD complexes in signal transduction.

  20. Novel Toll/IL-1 Receptor Homologous Region Adaptors Act as Negative Regulators in Amphioxus TLR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jian; Tao, Xin; Li, Rui; Hu, Jingru; Ruan, Jie; Wang, Ruihua; Yang, Manyi; Yang, Rirong; Dong, Xiangru; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong; Yuan, Shaochun

    2015-10-01

    Studies have shown that the basal chordate amphioxus possesses an extraordinarily complex TLR system, including 39 TLRs and at least 40 Toll/IL-1R homologous region (TIR) adaptors. Besides homologs to MyD88 and TIR domain-containing adaptor molecule (TICAM), most amphioxus TIR adaptors exhibit domain architectures that are not observed in other species. To reveal how these novel TIR adaptors function in amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt), four representatives, bbtTIRA, bbtTIRB, bbtTIRC, and bbtTIRD, were selected for functional analyses. We found bbtTIRA to show a unique inhibitory role in amphioxus TICAM-mediated pathway by interacting with bbtTICAM and bbt receptor interacting protein 1b, whereas bbtTIRC specifically inhibits the amphioxus MyD88-dependent pathway by interacting with bbtMyD88 and depressing the polyubiquitination of bbt TNFR-associated factor 6. Although both bbtTIRB and bbtTIRD are located on endosomes, the TIR domain of bbtTIRB can interact with bbtMyD88 in the cytosol, whereas the TIR domain of bbtTIRD is enclosed in endosome, suggesting that bbtTIRD may be a redundant gene in amphioxus. This study indicated that most expanded TIR adaptors play nonredundant regulatory roles in amphioxus TLR signaling, adding a new layer to understanding the diversity and complexity of innate immunity at basal chordate. PMID:26324776

  1. Adaptor Protein-3-Mediated Trafficking of TLR2 Ligands Controls Specificity of Inflammatory Responses but Not Adaptor Complex Assembly.

    PubMed

    Petnicki-Ocwieja, Tanja; Kern, Aurelie; Killpack, Tess L; Bunnell, Stephen C; Hu, Linden T

    2015-11-01

    Innate immune engagement results in the activation of host defenses that produce microbe-specific inflammatory responses. A long-standing interest in the field of innate immunity is to understand how varied host responses are generated through the signaling of just a limited number of receptors. Recently, intracellular trafficking and compartmental partitioning have been identified as mechanisms that provide signaling specificity for receptors by regulating signaling platform assembly. We show that cytokine activation as a result of TLR2 stimulation occurs at different intracellular locations and is mediated by the phagosomal trafficking molecule adaptor protein-3 (AP-3). AP-3 is required for trafficking TLR2 purified ligands or the Lyme disease causing bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, to LAMP-1 lysosomal compartments. The presence of AP-3 is necessary for the activation of cytokines such as IL-6 but not TNF-α or type I IFNs, suggesting induction of these cytokines occurs from a different compartment. Lack of AP-3 does not interfere with the recruitment of TLR signaling adaptors TRAM and MyD88 to the phagosome, indicating that the TLR-MyD88 signaling complex is assembled at a prelysosomal stage and that IL-6 activation depends on proper localization of signaling molecules downstream of MyD88. Finally, infection of AP-3-deficient mice with B. burgdorferi resulted in altered joint inflammation during murine Lyme arthritis. Our studies further elucidate the effects of phagosomal trafficking on tailoring immune responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26423153

  2. Association of polymorphisms in the MyD88, IRAK4 and TRAF6 genes and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy in a southern Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Guo, Congcong; Zhang, Liju; Nie, Lihong; Zhang, Na; Xiao, Di; Ye, Xingguang; Ou, Meiling; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Baohuan; Wang, Man; Lin, Hansheng; Yang, Guang; Jing, Chunxia

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been linked to a state of low-grade inflammation resulting from abnormalities in the innate immune pathway. MyD88 is an essential adaptor protein for TLR signaling, which is involved in activating NF-κB through IRAK4 and TRAF6. To investigate the effects of the MyD88, IRAK4 and TRAF6 polymorphisms in the susceptibility of T2DM and diabetic vascular complications, eight SNPs were analyzed in 553 T2DM patients and 553 matched healthy controls. Gene-gene interactions and haplotype associations were also evaluated. We found a significant increased risk of T2DM for the AG genotype of rs6853 in MyD88 gene and the CT genotype of rs4251532 in IRAK4 gene. Significant association was also found between rs16928973 in TRAF6 gene and diabetic nephropathy (DN) under the allelic model. Moreover, the TA haplotype in TRAF6 was negatively associated with DN. No significant gene-gene interactions were found. In conclusion, our results indicate that the polymorphisms in TLR-MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway confer genetic susceptibility to T2DM and DN. PMID:27062898

  3. Gliadin stimulation of murine macrophage inflammatory gene expression and intestinal permeability are MyD88-dependent: role of the innate immune response in Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Karen E; Sapone, Anna; Fasano, Alessio; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2006-02-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of TLR signaling in intestinal homeostasis. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered in susceptible individuals by the ingestion of gliadin-containing grains. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that gliadin initiates this response by stimulating the innate immune response to increase intestinal permeability and by up-regulating macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine production. To this end, intestinal permeability and the release of zonulin (an endogenous mediator of gut permeability) in vitro, as well as proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine release by primary murine macrophage cultures, were measured. Gliadin and its peptide derivatives, 33-mer and p31-43, were found to be potent inducers of both a zonulin-dependent increase in intestinal permeability and macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion. Gliadin-induced zonulin release, increased intestinal permeability, and cytokine production were dependent on myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule in the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathways, but were neither TLR2- nor TLR4-dependent. Our data support the following model for the innate immune response to gliadin in the initiation of CD. Gliadin interaction with the intestinal epithelium increases intestinal permeability through the MyD88-dependent release of zonulin that, in turn, enables paracellular translocation of gliadin and its subsequent interaction with macrophages within the intestinal submucosa. There, the interaction of gliadin with macrophages elicits a MyD88-dependent proinflammatory cytokine milieu that facilitates the interaction of T cells with APCs, leading ultimately to the Ag-specific adaptive immune response seen in patients with CD. PMID:16456012

  4. A TIR Domain Protein from E. faecalis Attenuates MyD88-Mediated Signaling and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Baghdayan, Arto S.; Payne, Sarah J.; Shankar, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor signaling, mediated by functional Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains, plays a critical role in activating the innate immune response responsible for controlling and clearing infection. Bacterial protein mimics of components of this signaling pathway have been identified and function through inhibition of interactions between Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and their adaptor proteins, mediated by TIR domains. A previously uncharacterized gene, which we have named tcpF (for TIR domain-containing protein in E. faecalis) was identified in the genome of Enterococcus faecalis V583, and predicted to encode a protein resembling mammalian and bacterial TIR proteins. We overexpressed and purified TcpF from E. coli and found that the recombinant protein could bind to phosphatidylinositol phosphates in vitro, suggesting a mechanism by which TcpF may be anchored to the plasma membrane in close proximity to TIR domains of TLRs and adaptor proteins. Purified TcpF was also found to interact specifically with the TIR adaptor protein MyD88, and this interaction was dependent on the BB loop domain in the Box 2 region of TcpF. Despite no evidence of TcpF being a secreted protein, recombinant TcpF was effectively able to enter RAW264.7 cells in vitro although the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be determined. Overexpression of TcpF in mammalian cells suppressed the NF-κB activation induced by bacterial lipoteichoic acid. A mutant lacking the tcpF gene was attenuated for survival in macrophages, with increased ability to activate NF-κB compared to the wild type strain. Complementation in trans restored growth, and inhibition of NF-κB, to that of wild type levels. No appreciable difference in bacterial persistence, dissemination or pathogenesis was observed between the wild type and mutant in a mouse peritonitis model however, which suggested either a subtle role for TcpF or functional overlap with other redundant factor(s) in this virulence model. PMID

  5. MYD88 L265P and CXCR4 mutations in lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma identify cases with high disease activity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Janine; Federmann, Birgit; Schindler, Natalie; Steinhilber, Julia; Bonzheim, Irina; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2015-06-01

    Recurrent mutations in MYD88 have been identified in >90% of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL). Recently, WHIM (warts, hypogammaglobulinaemia, infections, myelokathexis) syndrome-like mutations in CXCR4 have been described in 28% of LPL cases, and seem to impact clinical presentation and response to therapy. We investigated the presence of the MYD88 L265P mutation in 90 decalcified, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) bone marrow (BM) biopsies, including 51 cases of LPL, 14 cases of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), 13 cases of marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) and 12 normal controls. In addition, the C-terminal domain of CXCR4 was sequenced in LPL cases. MYD88 L265P was found in 49/51 (96%) LPL cases and in 1/13 (7·6%) MZL (splenic type), whereas all CLL samples remained negative. The two MYD88 wild type LPL cases were associated with cold agglutinin disease. Mutations in CXCR4 were detected in 17/47 (36·2%) LPL cases, which showed a higher extent of BM infiltration and lower leucocyte counts (P = 0·02), haemoglobin (P = 0·05) and platelet counts (P = 0·01). In conclusion the detection of MYD88 L265P mutation in FFPE samples is reliable and useful for subtyping small B-cell lymphomas in BM biopsies. In addition, the presence of CXCR4 mutations identifies a subgroup of LPL patients with higher disease activity. PMID:25819228

  6. Intestinal epithelial MyD88 is a sensor switching host metabolism towards obesity according to nutritional status

    PubMed Central

    Everard, Amandine; Geurts, Lucie; Caesar, Robert; Van Hul, Matthias; Matamoros, Sébastien; Duparc, Thibaut; Denis, Raphael G. P.; Cochez, Perrine; Pierard, Florian; Castel, Julien; Bindels, Laure B.; Plovier, Hubert; Robine, Sylvie; Muccioli, Giulio G.; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Dumoutier, Laure; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Luquet, Serge; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Cani, Patrice D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a cluster of metabolic disorders, low-grade inflammation and altered gut microbiota. Whether host metabolism is controlled by intestinal innate immune system and the gut microbiota is unknown. Here we report that inducible intestinal epithelial cell-specific deletion of MyD88 partially protects against diet-induced obesity, diabetes and inflammation. This is associated with increased energy expenditure, an improved glucose homeostasis, reduced hepatic steatosis, fat mass and inflammation. Protection is transferred following gut microbiota transplantation to germ-free recipients. We also demonstrate that intestinal epithelial MyD88 deletion increases anti-inflammatory endocannabinoids, restores antimicrobial peptides production and increases intestinal regulatory T cells during diet-induced obesity. Targeting MyD88 after the onset of obesity reduces fat mass and inflammation. Our work thus identifies intestinal epithelial MyD88 as a sensor changing host metabolism according to the nutritional status and we show that targeting intestinal epithelial MyD88 constitutes a putative therapeutic target for obesity and related disorders. PMID:25476696

  7. Simultaneous targeting of MyD88 and Nur77 as an effective approach for the treatment of inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Uzma, Saqib; Baig, Mirza S

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) has long been considered a central player in the inflammatory pathway. Recent studies clearly suggest that it is an important therapeutic target in inflammation. On the other hand, a recent study on the interaction between the orphan nuclear receptor (Nur77) and p38α, leading to increased lipopolysaccharide-induced hyperinflammatory response, suggests this binary complex as a therapeutic target. In this study, we have designed inhibitors that can inhibit both MyD88 and Nur77 at the same time. Since both MyD88 and Nur77 are an integral part of the pathways involving lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NF-κB-mediated inflammation, we tried to target both proteins with the same library in order to retrieve compounds having dual inhibitory properties. To perform this, we developed a homodimeric model of MyD88 and, along with the crystal structure of Nur77, screened a virtual library of compounds from the traditional Chinese medicine database containing ~61,000 compounds. We analyzed the resulting hits for their efficacy for dual binding and probed them for developing a common pharmacophore model that could be used as a prototype to screen compound libraries as well as to guide combinatorial library design to search for ideal dual-target inhibitors. Thus, our study explores the identification of novel leads having dual inhibiting effects due to binding to both MyD88 and Nur77 targets. PMID:27217723

  8. Recurrent candidiasis and early-onset gastric cancer in a patient with a genetically defined partial MYD88 defect.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; van der Post, Rachel S; de Voer, Richarda M; Kets, C Marleen; Jansen, Trees J G; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Schreibelt, Gerty; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Netea, Mihai G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. A woman who suffered from recurrent candidiasis throughout her life developed diffuse-type gastric cancer at the age of 23 years. Using whole-exome sequencing we identified a germline homozygous missense variant in MYD88. Immunological assays on peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed an impaired immune response upon stimulation with Candida albicans, characterized by a defective production of the cytokine interleukin-17. Our data suggest that a genetic defect in MYD88 results in an impaired immune response and may increase gastric cancer risk. PMID:26700889

  9. IL-1R/TLR2 through MyD88 Divergently Modulates Osteoclastogenesis through Regulation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells c1 (NFATc1) and B Lymphocyte-induced Maturation Protein-1 (Blimp1).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihong; Su, Lingkai; Xu, Qingan; Katz, Jenny; Michalek, Suzanne M; Fan, Mingwen; Feng, Xu; Zhang, Ping

    2015-12-11

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) and the receptor for interleukin-1 (IL-1R) signaling play an important role in bacteria-mediated bone loss diseases including periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteomyelitis. Recent studies have shown that TLR ligands inhibit the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation from un-committed osteoclast precursors, whereas IL-1 potentiates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. However, IL-1R and TLR belong to the same IL-1R/TLR superfamily, and activate similar intracellular signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the distinct effects of IL-1 and Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) on RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. Our results show that LPS-PG and IL-1 differentially regulate RANKL-induced activation of osteoclast genes encoding Car2, Ctsk, MMP9, and TRAP, as well as expression of NFATc1, a master transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis. Regulation of osteoclast genes and NFATc1 by LPS-PG and IL-1 is dependent on MyD88, an important signaling adaptor for both TLR and IL-1R family members. Furthermore, LPS-PG and IL-1 differentially regulate RANKL-costimulatory receptor OSCAR (osteoclast-associated receptor) expression and Ca(2+) oscillations induced by RANKL. Moreover, LPS-PG completely abrogates RANKL-induced gene expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp1), a global transcriptional repressor of anti-osteoclastogenic genes encoding Bcl6, IRF8, and MafB. However, IL-1 enhances RANKL-induced blimp1 gene expression but suppresses the gene expression of bcl6, irf8, and mafb. Our study reveals the involvement of multiple signaling molecules in the differential regulation of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by TLR2 and IL-1 signaling. Understanding the signaling cross-talk among TLR, IL-1R, and RANK is critical for identifying therapeutic strategies to control bacteria-mediated bone loss. PMID:26483549

  10. MyD88 Is Required for Protection from Lethal Infection with a Mouse-Adapted SARS-CoV

    PubMed Central

    Funkhouser, William; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizou; Baric, Ralph S.; Heise, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    A novel human coronavirus, SARS-CoV, emerged suddenly in 2003, causing approximately 8000 human cases and more than 700 deaths worldwide. Since most animal models fail to faithfully recapitulate the clinical course of SARS-CoV in humans, the virus and host factors that mediate disease pathogenesis remain unclear. Recently, our laboratory and others developed a recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoV (rMA15) that was lethal in BALB/c mice. In contrast, intranasal infection of young 10-week-old C57BL/6 mice with rMA15 results in a nonlethal infection characterized by high titer replication within the lungs, lung inflammation, destruction of lung tissue, and loss of body weight, thus providing a useful model to identify host mediators of protection. Here, we report that mice deficient in MyD88 (MyD88−/−), an adapter protein that mediates Toll-like receptor (TLR), IL-1R, and IL-18R signaling, are far more susceptible to rMA15 infection. The genetic absence of MyD88 resulted in enhanced pulmonary pathology and greater than 90% mortality by day 6 post-infection. MyD88−/− mice had significantly higher viral loads in lung tissue throughout the course of infection. Despite increased viral loads, the expression of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines within lung tissue and recruitment of inflammatory monocytes/macrophages to the lung was severely impaired in MyD88−/− mice compared to wild-type mice. Furthermore, mice deficient in chemokine receptors that contribute to monocyte recruitment to the lung were more susceptible to rMA15-induced disease and exhibited severe lung pathology similar to that seen in MyD88−/−mice. These data suggest that MyD88-mediated innate immune signaling and inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung are required for protection from lethal rMA15 infection. PMID:19079579

  11. Early MyD88-Dependent Induction of Interleukin-17A Expression during Salmonella Colitis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Keestra, A. Marijke; Godinez, Ivan; Xavier, Mariana N.; Winter, Maria G.; Winter, Sebastian E.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2011-01-01

    The development of T helper 17 (TH17) cells is a well-established adaptive mechanism for the production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), a cytokine involved in neutrophil recruitment. However, pathways contributing to mucosal expression of IL-17A during the initial phase of a bacterial infection have received less attention. Here we used the mouse colitis model of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium infection to investigate the contribution of myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) to inflammation and mucosal IL-17A expression. Expression of IL-23 in the cecal mucosa during S. Typhimurium colitis was dependent on the presence of MyD88. Furthermore, initial expression of IL-17A at 24 h after S. Typhimurium infection was dependent on MyD88 and the receptor for IL-1β. IL-23 and IL-1β synergized in inducing expression of IL-17A in splenic T cells in vitro. In the intestinal mucosa, IL-17A was produced by three distinct T cell populations, including δγ T cells, TH17 cells, and CD4−CD8− T cells. The absence of IL-1β signaling or IL-17 signaling reduced CXC chemokine expression but did not alter the overall severity of pathological lesions in the cecal mucosa. In contrast, cecal pathology and neutrophil recruitment were markedly reduced in Myd88-deficient mice during the initial phases of S. Typhimurium infection. Collectively, these data demonstrate that MyD88-dependent mechanisms, including an initial expression of IL-17A, are important for orchestrating early inflammatory responses during S. Typhimurium colitis. PMID:21576324

  12. Neohesperidin dihydrochalcone down-regulates MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling by inhibiting endotoxin-induced trafficking of TLR4 to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaomin; Fu, Juanli; Song, Xiufang; Shi, Qiong; Su, Chuanyang; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is a lethal clinical syndrome characterized by the activation of macrophages and the increased production of inflammatory mediators. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC), a widely-used low caloric artificial sweetener against FHF. An FHF experimental model was established in mice by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactosamine (d-GalN) (400mg/kg)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS) (10 μg/kg). Mice were orally administered NHDC for 6 continuous days and at 1h before d-GalN/LPS administration. RAW264.7 macrophages were used as an in vitro model. Cells were pre-treated with NHDC for 1h before stimulation with LPS (10 μg/ml) for 6h. d-GalN/LPS markedly increased the serum transaminase activities and levels of oxidative and inflammatory markers, which were significantly attenuated by NHDC. Mechanistic analysis indicated that NHDC inhibited LPS-induced myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and TIR-containing adapter molecule (TRIF)-dependent signaling. Transient transfection of TLR4 or MyD88 siRNA inhibited the downstream inflammatory signaling. This effect could also be achieved by the pretreatment with NHDC. The fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry results suggested that NHDC potently inhibited the binding of LPS to TLR4 in RAW264.7 macrophages. In addition, the inhibitory effect of NHDC on LPS-induced translocation of TLR4 into lipid raft domains played an important role in the amelioration of production of downstream pro-inflammatory molecules. Furthermore, the activation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) by NHDC inhibited TLR4 signaling. In conclusion, our results suggest that NHDC attenuates d-GalN/LPS-induced FHF by inhibiting the TLR4-mediated inflammatory pathway, demonstrating a new application of NHDC as a hepatoprotective agent. PMID:26453923

  13. IL-1beta induces a MyD88-dependent and ceramide-mediated activation of Src in anterior hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher N; Tabarean, Iustin; Gaidarova, Svetlana; Behrens, M Margarita; Bartfai, Tamas

    2006-09-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), acting at IL-1R1 receptors, affects neuronal signaling under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The molecular mechanism of the rapid synaptic actions of IL-1beta in neurons is not known. We show here that within minutes of IL-1beta exposure, the firing rate of anterior hypothalamic (AH) neurons in culture was inhibited. This effect was prevented by pre-exposure of the cells to the Src family inhibitor, PP2, suggesting the involvement of Src in the hyperpolarizing effects of IL-1beta. The IL-1beta stimulation of neurons induced a rapid increase in the phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase Src and kinase suppressor of Ras (ceramide activated protein kinase (CAPK)/KSR) in neurons grown on glia from IL-1RI(-/-) mice. These effects of IL-1beta were dependent on the association of the cytosolic adaptor protein, MyD88, to the IL-1 receptor, and on the activation of the neutral sphingomyelinase, leading to production of ceramide. A cell-permeable analog of ceramide mimicked the effects of IL-1beta on the cultured AH neurons. These results suggest that ceramide may be the second messenger of the fast IL-1beta actions in AH neurons, and that this IL-1beta/ceramide pathway may underlie the fast non-transcription-dependent, electrophysiological effects of IL-1beta observed in AH neurons in vivo. PMID:16771830

  14. MyD88-dependent expansion of an immature GR-1+CD11b+ population induces T cell suppression and Th2 polarization in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Delano, Matthew J.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Weinstein, Jason S.; Coco, Dominique; Nagaraj, Srinivas; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M.; O'Malley, Kerri A.; Wynn, James L.; Antonenko, Svetlana; Al-Quran, Samer Z.; Swan, Ryan; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Atkinson, Mark A.; Ramphal, Reuben; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Reeves, Wesley H.; Ayala, Alfred; Phillips, Joseph; LaFace, Drake; Heyworth, Paul G.; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2007-01-01

    Polymicrobial sepsis alters the adaptive immune response and induces T cell suppression and Th2 immune polarization. We identify a GR-1+CD11b+ population whose numbers dramatically increase and remain elevated in the spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow during polymicrobial sepsis. Phenotypically, these cells are heterogeneous, immature, predominantly myeloid progenitors that express interleukin 10 and several other cytokines and chemokines. Splenic GR-1+ cells effectively suppress antigen-specific CD8+ T cell interferon (IFN) γ production but only modestly suppress antigen-specific and nonspecific CD4+ T cell proliferation. GR-1+ cell depletion in vivo prevents both the sepsis-induced augmentation of Th2 cell–dependent and depression of Th1 cell–dependent antibody production. Signaling through MyD88, but not Toll-like receptor 4, TIR domain–containing adaptor-inducing IFN-β, or the IFN-α/β receptor, is required for complete GR-1+CD11b+ expansion. GR-1+CD11b+ cells contribute to sepsis-induced T cell suppression and preferential Th2 polarization. PMID:17548519

  15. The Double-Stranded RNA Bluetongue Virus Induces Type I Interferon in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells via a MYD88-Dependent TLR7/8-Independent Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruscanu, Suzana; Pascale, Florentina; Bourge, Mickael; Hemati, Behzad; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Urien, Céline; Bonneau, Michel; Takamatsu, Haru; Hope, Jayne; Mertens, Peter; Meyer, Gilles; Stewart, Meredith; Roy, Polly; Meurs, Eliane F.; Dabo, Stéphanie; Zientara, Stéphan; Breard, Emmanuel; Sailleau, Corinne; Chauveau, Emilie; Vitour, Damien; Charley, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), especially plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), produce large amounts of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) upon infection with DNA or RNA viruses, which has impacts on the physiopathology of the viral infections and on the quality of the adaptive immunity. However, little is known about the IFN-α/β production by DCs during infections by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. We present here novel information about the production of IFN-α/β induced by bluetongue virus (BTV), a vector-borne dsRNA Orbivirus of ruminants, in sheep primary DCs. We found that BTV induced IFN-α/β in skin lymph and in blood in vivo. Although BTV replicated in a substantial fraction of the conventional DCs (cDCs) and pDCs in vitro, only pDCs responded to BTV by producing a significant amount of IFN-α/β. BTV replication in pDCs was not mandatory for IFN-α/β production since it was still induced by UV-inactivated BTV (UV-BTV). Other inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-12p40, were also induced by UV-BTV in primary pDCs. The induction of IFN-α/β required endo-/lysosomal acidification and maturation. However, despite being an RNA virus, UV-BTV did not signal through Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) for IFN-α/β induction. In contrast, pathways involving the MyD88 adaptor and kinases dsRNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) were implicated. This work highlights the importance of pDCs for the production of innate immunity cytokines induced by a dsRNA virus, and it shows that a dsRNA virus can induce IFN-α/β in pDCs via a novel TLR-independent and Myd88-dependent pathway. These findings have implications for the design of efficient vaccines against dsRNA viruses. PMID:22438548

  16. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair IgM responses against T-independent bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Simchoni, Noa; Black, Samuel; Radigan, Lin; Overbey, Jessica R; Bagiella, Emilia; Bussel, James B; Bossuyt, Xavier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Meyts, Isabelle; Cerutti, Andrea; Picard, Capucine; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2014-12-01

    IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair interleukin 1 receptor and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and lead to heightened susceptibility to invasive bacterial infections. Individuals with these primary immunodeficiencies have fewer immunoglobulin M (IgM)(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells, a population that resembles murine splenic marginal zone B cells that mount T-independent antibody responses against bacterial antigens. However, the significance of this B-cell subset in humans is poorly understood. Using both a 610 carbohydrate array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that patients with IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies have reduced serum IgM, but not IgG antibody, recognizing T-independent bacterial antigens. Moreover, the quantity of specific IgM correlated with IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B-cell frequencies. As with mouse marginal zone B cells, human IgM(+)CD27(+) B cells activated by TLR7 or TLR9 agonists produced phosphorylcholine-specific IgM. Further linking splenic IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells with production of T-independent IgM, serum from splenectomized subjects, who also have few IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells, had reduced antibacterial IgM. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impaired TLR-induced proliferation of this B-cell subset, suggesting a means by which loss of this activation pathway leads to reduced cell numbers. Thus, by bolstering the IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B-cell subset, IRAK-4 and MyD88 promote optimal T-independent IgM antibody responses against bacteria in humans. PMID:25320238

  17. Pneumoviruses infect eosinophils and elicit MyD88-dependent release of chemoattractant cytokines and interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophils are recruited to the lung in response to infection with pneumovirus pathogens and have been associated with both the pathophysiologic sequelae of infection and, more recently, with accelerated virus clearance. Here, we demonstrate that the pneumovirus pathogens, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), can infect human and mouse eosinophils, respectively, and that virus infection of eosinophils elicits the release of disease-related proinflammatory mediators from eosinophils. RSV replication in human eosinophils results in the release of infectious virions and in the release of the proinflammatory mediator, interleukin-6 (IL-6). PVM replication in cultured bone marrow eosinophils (bmEos) likewise results in release of infectious virions and the proinflammatory mediators IL-6, IP-10, CCL2, and CCL3. In contrast to the findings reported in lung tissue of RSV-challenged mice, PVM replication is accelerated in MyD88 gene-deleted bmEos, whereas release of cytokines is diminished. Interestingly, exogenous IL-6 suppresses virus replication in MyD88 gene-deleted bmEos, suggesting a role for a MyD88-dependent cytokine-mediated feedback circuit in modulating this response. Taken together, our findings suggest that eosinophils are targets of virus infection and may have varied and complex contributions to the pathogenesis and resolution of pneumovirus disease. PMID:19652202

  18. Inhibition of IL-1R1/MyD88 signalling promotes mesenchymal stem cell-driven tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Mikaël M.; Maruyama, Kenta; Kuhn, Gisela A.; Satoh, Takashi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Müller, Ralph; Akira, Shizuo

    2016-01-01

    Tissue injury and the healing response lead to the release of endogenous danger signals including Toll-like receptor (TLR) and interleukin-1 receptor, type 1 (IL-1R1) ligands, which modulate the immune microenvironment. Because TLRs and IL-1R1 have been shown to influence the repair process of various tissues, we explored their role during bone regeneration, seeking to design regenerative strategies integrating a control of their signalling. Here we show that IL-1R1/MyD88 signalling negatively regulates bone regeneration, in the mouse. Furthermore, IL-1β which is released at the bone injury site, inhibits the regenerative capacities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Mechanistically, IL-1R1/MyD88 signalling impairs MSC proliferation, migration and differentiation by inhibiting the Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin pathway. Lastly, as a proof of concept, we engineer a MSC delivery system integrating inhibitors of IL-1R1/MyD88 signalling. Using this strategy, we considerably improve MSC-based bone regeneration in the mouse, demonstrating that this approach may be useful in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27001940

  19. Inhibition of IL-1R1/MyD88 signalling promotes mesenchymal stem cell-driven tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Martino, Mikaël M; Maruyama, Kenta; Kuhn, Gisela A; Satoh, Takashi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Müller, Ralph; Akira, Shizuo

    2016-01-01

    Tissue injury and the healing response lead to the release of endogenous danger signals including Toll-like receptor (TLR) and interleukin-1 receptor, type 1 (IL-1R1) ligands, which modulate the immune microenvironment. Because TLRs and IL-1R1 have been shown to influence the repair process of various tissues, we explored their role during bone regeneration, seeking to design regenerative strategies integrating a control of their signalling. Here we show that IL-1R1/MyD88 signalling negatively regulates bone regeneration, in the mouse. Furthermore, IL-1β which is released at the bone injury site, inhibits the regenerative capacities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Mechanistically, IL-1R1/MyD88 signalling impairs MSC proliferation, migration and differentiation by inhibiting the Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin pathway. Lastly, as a proof of concept, we engineer a MSC delivery system integrating inhibitors of IL-1R1/MyD88 signalling. Using this strategy, we considerably improve MSC-based bone regeneration in the mouse, demonstrating that this approach may be useful in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27001940

  20. Vaccinia virus protein A46R targets multiple Toll-like-interleukin-1 receptor adaptors and contributes to virulence.

    PubMed

    Stack, Julianne; Haga, Ismar R; Schröder, Martina; Bartlett, Nathan W; Maloney, Geraldine; Reading, Patrick C; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Smith, Geoffrey L; Bowie, Andrew G

    2005-03-21

    Viral immune evasion strategies target key aspects of the host antiviral response. Recently, it has been recognized that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have a role in innate defense against viruses. Here, we define the function of the vaccinia virus (VV) protein A46R and show it inhibits intracellular signalling by a range of TLRs. TLR signalling is triggered by homotypic interactions between the Toll-like-interleukin-1 resistance (TIR) domains of the receptors and adaptor molecules. A46R contains a TIR domain and is the only viral TIR domain-containing protein identified to date. We demonstrate that A46R targets the host TIR adaptors myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88 adaptor-like, TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF), and the TRIF-related adaptor molecule and thereby interferes with downstream activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor kappaB. TRIF mediates activation of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and induction of IFN-beta by TLR3 and TLR4 and suppresses VV replication in macrophages. Here, A46R disrupted TRIF-induced IRF3 activation and induction of the TRIF-dependent gene regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted. Furthermore, we show that A46R is functionally distinct from another described VV TLR inhibitor, A52R. Importantly, VV lacking the A46R gene was attenuated in a murine intranasal model, demonstrating the importance of A46R for VV virulence. PMID:15767367

  1. Poly(I:C) Induces Antiviral Immune Responses in Japanese Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) That Require TLR3 and MDA5 and Is Negatively Regulated by Myd88

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-xia; Zhang, Bao-cun; Sun, Li

    2014-01-01

    Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) is a ligand of toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 that has been used as an immunostimulant in humans and mice against viral diseases based on its ability to enhance innate and adapt immunity. Antiviral effect of poly(I:C) has also been observed in teleost, however, the underling mechanism is not clear. In this study, we investigated the potential and signaling mechanism of poly(I:C) as an antiviral agent in a model of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) infected with megalocytivirus. We found that poly(I:C) exhibited strong antiviral activity and enhanced activation of head kidney macrophages and peripheral blood leukocytes. In vivo studies showed that (i) TLR3 as well as MDA5 knockdown reduced poly(I:C)-mediated immune response and antiviral activity to significant extents; (ii) when Myd88 was overexpressed in flounder, poly(I:C)-mediated antiviral activity was significantly decreased; (iii) when Myd88 was inactivated, the antiviral effect of poly(I:C) was significantly increased. Cellular study showed that (i) the NF-κB activity induced by poly(I:C) was upregulated in Myd88-overexpressing cells and unaffected in Myd88-inactivated cells; (ii) Myd88 overexpression inhibited and upregulated the expression of poly(I:C)-induced antiviral genes and inflammatory genes respectively; (iii) Myd88 inactivation enhanced the expression of the antiviral genes induced by poly(I:C). Taken together, these results indicate that poly(I:C) is an immunostimulant with antiviral potential, and that the immune response of poly(I:C) requires TLR3 and MDA5 and is negatively regulated by Myd88 in a manner not involving NK-κB. These results provide insights to the working mechanism of poly(I:C), TLR3, and Myd88 in fish. PMID:25393122

  2. MyD88-Dependent Silencing of Transgene Expression During the Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Helper-Dependent Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Bertin, Terry K.; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Christian; Guenther, Margaretha; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Activation of the host innate immune response after systemic administration of adenoviral vectors constitutes a principal impediment to successful clinical gene replacement therapies. Although helper-dependent adenoviruses (HDAds) lack all viral functional genes, systemic administration of a high dose of HDAd still elicits a potent innate immune response in host animals. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate receptors that sense microbial products and trigger the maturation of antigen-presenting cells and cytokine production via MyD88-dependent signaling (except TLR3). Here we show that mice lacking MyD88 exhibit a dramatic reduction in proinflammatory cytokines after intravenous injection of a high dose of HDAd, and show significantly reduced induction of the adaptive immune response when compared with wild-type and TLR2-deficient mice. Importantly, MyD88–/– mice also show significantly higher and longer sustained transgene expression than do wild-type mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using wild-type and MyD88-deficient primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed significant MyD88-dependent transcriptional silencing of the HDAd-encoded transgenes. Our results demonstrate that MyD88 signaling, activated by systemic delivery of HDAd, initiates an innate immune response that suppresses transgene expression at the transcriptional level before initiation of the adaptive immune response. PMID:19824822

  3. Natural Killer Cell Sensing of Infected Cells Compensates for MyD88 Deficiency but Not IFN-I Activity in Resistance to Mouse Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Cocita, Clément; Guiton, Rachel; Bessou, Gilles; Chasson, Lionel; Boyron, Marilyn; Crozat, Karine; Dalod, Marc

    2015-05-01

    In mice, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and natural killer (NK) cells both contribute to resistance to systemic infections with herpes viruses including mouse Cytomegalovirus (MCMV). pDCs are the major source of type I IFN (IFN-I) during MCMV infection. This response requires pDC-intrinsic MyD88-dependent signaling by Toll-Like Receptors 7 and 9. Provided that they express appropriate recognition receptors such as Ly49H, NK cells can directly sense and kill MCMV-infected cells. The loss of any one of these responses increases susceptibility to infection. However, the relative importance of these antiviral immune responses and how they are related remain unclear. In humans, while IFN-I responses are essential, MyD88 is dispensable for antiviral immunity. Hence, a higher redundancy has been proposed in the mechanisms promoting protective immune responses against systemic infections by herpes viruses during natural infections in humans. It has been assumed, but not proven, that mice fail to mount protective MyD88-independent IFN-I responses. In humans, the mechanism that compensates MyD88 deficiency has not been elucidated. To address these issues, we compared resistance to MCMV infection and immune responses between mouse strains deficient for MyD88, the IFN-I receptor and/or Ly49H. We show that selective depletion of pDC or genetic deficiencies for MyD88 or TLR9 drastically decreased production of IFN-I, but not the protective antiviral responses. Moreover, MyD88, but not IFN-I receptor, deficiency could largely be compensated by Ly49H-mediated antiviral NK cell responses. Thus, contrary to the current dogma but consistent with the situation in humans, we conclude that, in mice, in our experimental settings, MyD88 is redundant for IFN-I responses and overall defense against a systemic herpes virus infection. Moreover, we identified direct NK cell sensing of infected cells as one mechanism able to compensate for MyD88 deficiency in mice. Similar mechanisms likely contribute to protect MyD88- or IRAK4-deficient patients from viral infections. PMID:25954804

  4. Induction of diabetes in the RIP-B7.1 mouse model is critically dependent on TLR3 and MyD88 pathways and is associated with alterations in the intestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Alkanani, Aimon K; Hara, Naoko; Lien, Egil; Ir, Diana; Kotter, Cassandra V; Robertson, Charles E; Wagner, Brandie D; Frank, Daniel N; Zipris, Danny

    2014-02-01

    RIP-B7.1 transgenic mice express B7.1 costimulatory molecules in pancreatic islets and develop diabetes after treatment with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a synthetic double-stranded RNA and agonist of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 and retinoic acid-inducible protein I. We used this model to investigate the role of TLR pathways and intestinal microbiota in disease progression. RIP-B7.1 mice homozygous for targeted disruption of TLR9, TLR3, and myeloid differentiation factor-88 (MyD88), and most of the wild-type RIP-B7.1 mice housed under normal conditions remained diabetes-free after poly I:C administration. However, the majority of TLR9-deficient mice and wild-type animals treated with poly I:C and an antibiotic developed disease. In sharp contrast, TLR3- and MyD88-deficient mice were protected from diabetes following the same treatment regimen. High-throughput DNA sequencing demonstrated that TLR9-deficient mice treated with antibiotics plus poly I:C had higher bacterial diversity compared with disease-resistant mice. Furthermore, principal component analysis suggested that TLR9-deficient mice had distinct gut microbiome compared with the diabetes-resistant mice. Finally, the administration of sulfatrim plus poly I:C to TLR9-deficient mice resulted in alterations in the abundance of gut bacterial communities at the phylum and genus levels. These data imply that the induction of diabetes in the RIP-B7.1 model is critically dependent on TLR3 and MyD88 pathways, and involves modulation of the intestinal microbiota. PMID:24353176

  5. Retinol-Binding Protein 4 Induces Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy by Activating TLR4/MyD88 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Lin; Cao, Yang; Bao, Ji-Zhang; Liu, Zheng-Xia; Wang, Lian-Sheng; Yang, Qin; Lu, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Insulin resistance plays a major role in the development and progression of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Heart failure in turn promotes insulin resistance and increases the risk for diabetes. The vicious cycle determines significant mortality in patients with heart failure and diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms for the vicious cycle are not fully elucidated. Here we show that circulating levels and adipose expression of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), an adipokine that contributes to systemic insulin resistance, were elevated in cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction and angiotensin-II (Ang-II) infusion. Ang-II increased RBP4 expression in adipocytes, which was abolished by losartan, an Ang-II receptor blocker. The elevated RBP4 in cardiac hypertrophy may have pathophysiological consequences because RBP4 increased cell size, enhanced protein synthesis, and elevated the expression of hypertrophic markers including Anp, Bnp, and Myh7 in primary cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, RBP4 induced the expression and activity of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in cardiomyocytes, resulting in enhanced inflammation and reactive oxygen species production. Inhibition or knockdown of the TLR4/MyD88 pathway attenuated inflammatory and hypertrophic responses to RBP4 stimulation. Importantly, RBP4 also reduced the expression of glucose transporter-4 and impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in cardiomyocytes. This impairment was ameliorated in cardiomyocytes from TLR4 knockout mice. Therefore, RBP4 may be a critical modulator promoting the vicious cycle of insulin resistance and heart failure by activating TLR4/MyD88-mediated inflammatory pathways. Potentially, lowering RBP4 might break the vicious cycle and improve both insulin resistance and cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27100622

  6. Dioscin reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory liver injury via regulating TLR4/MyD88 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Hu, Changsheng; Yin, Lianhong; Tao, Xufeng; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Han, Xu; Xu, Youwei; Zhao, Yanyan; Wang, Changyuan; Peng, Jinyong

    2016-07-01

    We previously reported the effects of dioscin against carbon tetrachloride-, acetaminophen- and alcohol-induced acute liver damage. However, its effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory liver injury remains unknown. In the present work, liver injury in mice and rats was induced by LPS, and dioscin was intragastrically administered for 7days. In vitro, the AML-12 cells and HepG-2 cells were treated with LPS after dioscin treatment. The results showed that dioscin not only markedly reduced serum ALT, AST levels and relative liver weights, but also restored cell injury caused by LPS. In mechanism study, dioscin significantly attenuated inflammation through down-regulating the levels of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), phosphorylated inhibitor of nuclear factor κB kinase (p-IKK), phosphorylated inhibitor of nuclear factor κB alpha (p-IκBα), phosphorylated nuclear factor κB p65 (p-NF-κB p65), high-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB-1), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). TLR4 overexpression was also decreased by dioscin, leading to the markedly decreased levels of MyD88, IRAK1, TRAF6, p-IKK, p-IκBα, p-NF-κB p65 and HMGB-1. Suppression of MyD88 by ST2825 eliminated the inhibitory effects of dioscin on the levels of IRAK1, TRAF6, p-IKK, p-IκBα, p-NF-κB p65, HMGB-1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Our results suggested that dioscin exhibited protective effect against LPS-induced liver injury via altering TLR4/MyD88 pathway, which should be developed as one potent candidate for the treatment of acute inflammatory liver injury in the future. PMID:27135544

  7. Desert dust induces TLR signaling to trigger Th2-dominant lung allergic inflammation via a MyD88-dependent signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Ichinose, Takamichi; Song, Yuan; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Bekki, Kanae; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Seiichi; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa; Shibamoto, Takayuki; Sun, Guifan

    2016-04-01

    Asian sand dust (ASD) is known to exacerbate asthma, although its mechanism is not yet well understood. In this study, when the effects on inflammatory response by LPS present in ASD was investigated by measuring the gene expression of cytokines and chemokines in RAW264.7 cells treated with ASD and/or polymyxin B (PMB), the ASD effects were attenuated by PMB, but not completely. When an in vitro study was performed using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from WT, TLR2(-/-), TLR4(-/-), and MyD88(-/-) BALB/c mice and BMDMs from WT, TLR2(-/-), TLR4(-/-), TLR2/4(-/-), TLR7/9(-/-), and MyD88(-/-) C57BL/6J mice, cytokine (IL-6, IL-12) production in BMDMs was higher in ASD-stimulated TLR2(-/-) cells than in TLR4(-/-) cells, whereas it was lower or undetectable in TLR2/4(-/-) and MyD88(-/-) cells. These results suggest that ASD causes cytokine production predominantly in a TLR4/MyD88-dependent pathway. When WT and TLRs 2(-/-), 4(-/-), and MyD88(-/-) BALB/c mice were intratracheally challenged with OVA and/or ASD, ASD caused exacerbation of lung eosinophilia along with Th2 cytokine and eosinophil-relevant chemokine production. Serum OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 similar to WT was observed in TLRs 2(-/-), 4(-/-) mice, but not in MyD88(-/-) mice. The Th2 responses in TLR2(-/-) mice were attenuated remarkably by PMB. These results indicate that ASD exacerbates lung eosinophilia in a MyD88-dependent pathway. TLRs 2 and 4 signaling may be important in the increase in lung eosinophilia. Also, the TLR4 ligand LPS and TLR2 ligand like β-glucan may be strong candidates for exacerbation of lung eosinophilia. PMID:26882889

  8. SNP-SNP Interaction between TLR4 and MyD88 in Susceptibility to Coronary Artery Disease in the Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dandan; Sun, Liping; Xu, Qian; Gong, Yuehua; Wang, Honghu; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent signaling pathway plays a role in the initiation and progression of coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated SNP–SNP interactions between the TLR4 and MyD88 genes in CAD susceptibility and assessed whether the effects of such interactions were modified by confounding risk factors (hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection). Participants with CAD (n = 424) and controls (n = 424) without CAD were enrolled. Polymerase chain restriction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was performed on genomic DNA to detect polymorphisms in TLR4 (rs10116253, rs10983755, and rs11536889) and MyD88 (rs7744). H. pylori infections were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the cardiovascular risk factors for each subject were evaluated clinically. The significant interaction between TLR4 rs11536889 and MyD88 rs7744 was associated with an increased CAD risk (p value for interaction = 0.024). In conditions of hyperglycemia, the interaction effect was strengthened between TLR4 rs11536889 and MyD88 rs7744 (p value for interaction = 0.004). In hyperlipidemic participants, the interaction strength was also enhanced for TLR4 rs11536889 and MyD88 rs7744 (p value for interaction = 0.006). Thus, the novel interaction between TLR4 rs11536889 and MyD88 rs7744 was related with an increased risk of CAD, that could be strengthened by the presence of hyperglycemia or hyperlipidemia. PMID:26959040

  9. Loss of MyD88 alters neuroinflammatory response and attenuates early Purkinje cell loss in a spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Tomonori; Mogushi, Kaoru; Iijima-Tsutsui, Kumiko; Ishikawa, Kinya; Sakurai, Miyano; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Watase, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease, caused by an expansion of CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine (PolyQ) tract in the Cav2.1 voltage-gated calcium channel. Its key pathological features include selective degeneration of the cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs), a common target for PolyQ-induced toxicity in various SCAs. Mutant Cav2.1 confers toxicity primarily through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism; however, its molecular basis remains elusive. Here, we studied the cerebellar gene expression patterns of young Sca6-MPI118Q/118Q knockin (KI) mice, which expressed mutant Cav2.1 from an endogenous locus and recapitulated many phenotypic features of human SCA6. Transcriptional signatures in the MPI118Q/118Q mice were distinct from those in the Sca1154Q/2Q mice, a faithful SCA1 KI mouse model. Temporal expression profiles of the candidate genes revealed that the up-regulation of genes associated with microglial activation was initiated before PC degeneration and was augmented as the disease progressed. Histological analysis of the MPI118Q/118Q cerebellum showed the predominance of M1-like pro-inflammatory microglia and it was concomitant with elevated expression levels of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 7. Genetic ablation of MyD88, a major adaptor protein conveying TLR signaling, altered expression patterns of M1/M2 microglial phenotypic markers in the MPI118Q/118Q cerebellum. More importantly, it ameliorated PC loss and partially rescued motor impairments in the early disease phase. These results suggest that early neuroinflammatory response may play an important role in the pathogenesis of SCA6 and its modulation could pave the way for slowing the disease progression during the early stage of the disease. PMID:26034136

  10. MyD88 Dependence of Beryllium-Induced Dendritic Cell Trafficking and CD4+ T Cell Priming

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Amy S.; Mack, Douglas G.; Crawford, Frances; Fontenot, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Beryllium exposure results in beryllium hypersensitivity in a subset of exposed individuals, leading to granulomatous inflammation and fibrosis in the lung. In addition to its antigenic properties, beryllium has potent adjuvant activity that contributes to sensitization via unknown pathways. Here, we show that beryllium induces cellular death and release of IL-1α and DNA into the lung. Release of IL-1α was inflammasome-independent and required for beryllium-induced neutrophil recruitment into the lung. Beryllium enhanced classical dendritic cell (cDC) migration from the lung to draining LNs in an IL-1R-independent manner, and the accumulation of activated cDCs in the LN was associated with increased priming of CD4+ T cells. DC migration was reduced in TLR9KO mice; however, cDCs in the LNs of TLR9-deficient mice were highly activated, suggesting a role for more than one innate receptor in the effects on DCs. The adjuvant effects of beryllium on CD4+ T cell priming were similar in WT, IL-1R, caspase-1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR7, and TLR9 deficient mice. In contrast, DC migration, activation and the adjuvant effects of beryllium were significantly reduced in MyD88KO mice. Collectively, these data suggest that beryllium exposure results in the release of DAMPs that engage MyD88-dependent receptors to enhance pulmonary DC function. PMID:25760420

  11. MyD88-deficient Hydra reveal an ancient function of TLR signaling in sensing bacterial colonizers

    PubMed Central

    Franzenburg, Sören; Fraune, Sebastian; Künzel, Sven; Baines, John F.; Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Bosch, Thomas C. G.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is one of the most important signaling cascades of the innate immune system of vertebrates. Studies in invertebrates have focused on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and there is little information regarding the evolutionary origin and ancestral function of TLR signaling. In Drosophila, members of the Toll-like receptor family are involved in both embryonic development and innate immunity. In C. elegans, a clear immune function of the TLR homolog TOL-1 is controversial and central components of vertebrate TLR signaling including the key adapter protein myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) and the transcription factor NF-κB are not present. In basal metazoans such as the cnidarians Hydra magnipapillata and Nematostella vectensis, all components of the vertebrate TLR signaling cascade are present, but their role in immunity is unknown. Here, we use a MyD88 loss-of-function approach in Hydra to demonstrate that recognition of bacteria is an ancestral function of TLR signaling and that this process contributes to both host-mediated recolonization by commensal bacteria as well as to defense against bacterial pathogens. PMID:23112184

  12. Deletion of FADD in Macrophages and Granulocytes Results in RIP3- and MyD88-Dependent Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    He, Tina H.; Sun, Yuefang; Winoto, Astar

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells, which include monocytes, macrophages, and granulocytes, are important innate immune cells, but the mechanism and downstream effect of their cell death on the immune system is not completely clear. Necroptosis is an alternate form of cell death that can be triggered when death receptor-mediated apoptosis is blocked, for example, in stimulated Fas-associated Death Domain (FADD) deficient cells. We report here that mice deficient for FADD in myeloid cells (mFADD-/-) exhibit systemic inflammation with elevated inflammatory cytokines and increased levels of myeloid and B cell populations while their dendritic and T cell numbers are normal. These phenotypes were abolished when RIP3 deficiency was introduced, suggesting that systemic inflammation is caused by RIP3-dependent necroptotic and/or inflammatory activity. We further found that loss of MyD88 can rescue the systemic inflammation observed in these mice. These phenotypes are surprisingly similar to that of dendritic cell (DC)-specific FADD deficient mice with the exception that DC numbers are normal in mFADD-/- mice. Together these data support the notion that innate immune cells are constantly being stimulated through the MyD88-dependent pathway and aberrations in their cell death machinery can result in systemic effects on the immune system. PMID:25874713

  13. Rare Circulating Cells in Familial Waldenström Macroglobulinemia Displaying the MYD88 L265P Mutation Are Enriched by Epstein-Barr Virus Immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Pertesi, Maroulio; Galia, Perrine; Nazaret, Nicolas; Vallée, Maxime; Garderet, Laurent; Leleu, Xavier; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Foll, Matthieu; Byrnes, Graham; Lachuer, Joel; McKay, James D.; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The MYD88 L265P is a recurrent somatic mutation in neoplastic cells from patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia (WM). We identified the MYD88 L265P mutation in three individuals from unrelated families, but its presence did not explain the disease segregation within these WM pedigrees. We observed the mutation in these three individuals at high allele fractions in DNA extracted from EBV-immortalized Lymphoblastoid cell lines established from peripheral blood (LCL), but at much lower allele fractions in DNA extracted directly from peripheral blood, suggesting that this mutation is present in a clonal cell subpopulation rather than of germ-line origin. Furthermore, we observed that the MYD88 L265P mutation is enriched in WM families, detected in 40.5% of patients with familial WM or MGUS (10/22 WM, 5/15 MGUS), compared to 3.5% of patients with familial MM or MGUS (0/72 MM, 4/41 MGUS) (p = 10−7). The mutant allele frequency increased with passages in vitro after immortalization with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) consistent with the MYD88 L265P described gain-of-function proposed for this mutation. The MYD88 L265P mutation appears to be frequently present in circulating cells in patients with WM, and MGUS, and these cells are amenable to immortalization by EBV. PMID:26352266

  14. NOD2 Signaling Contributes to the Innate Immune Response Against Helper-Dependent Adenovirus Vectors Independently of MyD88 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Cela, Racel; Bertin, Terry K.; Sule, Gautam; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Rodgers, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We previously demonstrated that Toll-like receptor/myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) signaling is required for maximal innate and acquired [T helper cell type 1 (Th1)] immune responses following systemic administration of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds). However, MyD88-deficient mice injected with HDAdLacZ exhibited only partial reduction of innate immune cytokine expression compared with wild-type mice, suggesting MyD88-independent pathways also respond to HDAds. We now show that NOD2, a nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)–like receptor known to detect muramyl dipeptides in bacterial peptidoglycans, also contributes to innate responses to HDAds, but not to humoral or Th1 immune responses. We established NOD2/MyD88 double-deficient mice that, when challenged with HDAds, showed a significant reduction of the innate response compared with mice deficient for either gene singly, suggesting that NOD2 signaling contributes to the innate response independently of MyD88 signaling following systemic administration of HDAds. In addition, NOD2-deficient mice exhibited significantly higher transgene expression than did wild-type mice at an early time point (before development of an acquired response), but not at a later time point (after development of an acquired response). These results indicate that the intracellular sensor NOD2 is required for innate responses to HDAds and can limit transgene expression during early phases of infection. PMID:21561248

  15. Carnosic acid inhibits TLR4-MyD88 signaling pathway in LPS-stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi-Young

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Carnosic acid (CA), found in rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis) leaves, is known to exhibit anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory activities. However, whether its anti-inflammatory potency can contribute to the amelioration of obesity has not been elucidated. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of CA on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathways in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. MATERIALS/METHODS 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with CA (0-20 µM) for 1 h, followed by treatment with LPS for 30 min; mRNA expression of adipokines and protein expression of TLR4-related molecules were then measured. RESULTS LPS-stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes showed elevated mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and CA significantly inhibited the expression of these adipokine genes. LPS-induced up regulation of TLR4, myeloid differentiation factor 88, TNF receptor-associated factor 6, and nuclear factor-κB, as well as phosphorylated extracellular receptor-activated kinase were also suppressed by pre-treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with CA. CONCLUSIONS Results of this study suggest that CA directly inhibits TLR4-MyD88-dependent signaling pathways and decreases the inflammatory response in adipocytes. PMID:25324930

  16. Activation of MyD88-dependent TLR1/2 signaling by misfolded α-synuclein, a protein linked to neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Stefano G.; Béraud, Dawn; Davenport, Connor; Cheng, Kui; Yin, Hang; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson’s disease and diffuse Lewy body disease, are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by selective neuronal death, abnormal accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein, and sustained microglial activation. In addition to inducing neuronal toxicity, higher-ordered oligomeric α-synuclein causes proinflammatory responses in the brain parenchyma by triggering microglial activation, which may exacerbate pathogenic processes by establishing a chronic neuroinflammatory milieu. Here, we found that higher-ordered oligomeric α-synuclein induced a proinflammatory microglial phenotype by directly engaging the heterodimer TLR1/2 (Toll-like receptor 1 and 2) at the cell membrane, leading to the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) and the increased production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in a MyD88-dependent manner. Blocking signaling by the TLR1/2 heterodimer with the small molecule inhibitor, CU-CPT22, reduced the expression and secretion of these inflammatory cytokines from cultured primary mouse microglia. Candesartan cilexetil, a drug approved for treating hypertension and that inhibits the expression of TLR2, reversed the activated proinflammatory phenotype of primary microglia exposed to oligomeric α-synuclein, supporting the possibility of repurposing this drug for synucleinopathies. PMID:25969543

  17. Interleukin-1 receptor but not Toll-like receptor 2 is essential for MyD88-dependent Th17 immunity to Coccidioides infection.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chiung-Yu; Jiménez-Alzate, María del Pilar; Gonzalez, Angel; Wüthrich, Marcel; Klein, Bruce S; Cole, Garry T

    2014-05-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A)-producing CD4(+) T helper (Th17) cells have been shown to be essential for defense against pulmonary infection with Coccidioides species. However, we have just begun to identify the required pattern recognition receptors and understand the signal pathways that lead to Th17 cell activation after fungal infection. We previously reported that Card9(-/-) mice vaccinated with formalin-killed spherules failed to acquire resistance to Coccidioides infection. Here, we report that both MyD88(-/-) and Card9(-/-) mice immunized with a live, attenuated vaccine also fail to acquire protective immunity to this respiratory disease. Like Card9(-/-) mice, vaccinated MyD88(-/-) mice revealed a significant reduction in numbers of both Th17 and Th1 cells in their lungs after Coccidioides infection. Both Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1r1) upstream of MyD88 have been implicated in Th17 cell differentiation. Surprisingly, vaccinated TLR2(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice showed similar outcomes after pulmonary infection with Coccidioides, while vaccinated IL-1r1(-/-) mice revealed a significant reduction in the number of Th17 cells in their infected lungs compared to WT mice. Thus, activation of both IL-1r1/MyD88- and Card9-mediated Th17 immunity is essential for protection against Coccidioides infection. Our data also reveal that the numbers of Th17 cells were reduced in IL-1r1(-/-) mice to a lesser extent than in MyD88(-/-) mice, raising the possibility that other TLRs are involved in MyD88-dependent Th17 immunity to coccidioidomycosis. An antimicrobial action of Th17 cells is to promote early recruitment of neutrophils to infection sites. Our data revealed that neutrophils are required for vaccine immunity to this respiratory disease. PMID:24614655

  18. Inhibitory effect of miR-125b on hepatitis C virus core protein-induced TLR2/MyD88 signaling in THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cheng; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Jie, Sheng-Hua; Tong, Qiao-Xia; Lu, Meng-Ji; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of miR-125b in regulating monocyte immune responses induced by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. METHODS: Monocytic THP-1 cells were treated with various concentrations of recombinant HCV core protein, and cytokines and miR-125b expression in these cells were analyzed. The requirement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) or MyD88 gene for HCV core protein-induced immune responses was determined by the transfection of THP-1 cells with gene knockdown vectors expressing either TLR2 siRNA or MyD88 siRNA. The effect of miR-125b overexpression on TLR2/MyD88 signaling was examined by transfecting THP-1 cells with miR-125b mimic RNA oligos. RESULTS: In response to HCV core protein stimulation, cytokine production was up-regulated and miR-125b expression was down-regulated in THP-1 cells. The modulatory effect of HCV core protein on cellular events was dose-dependent and required functional TLR2 or MyD88 gene. Forced miR-125b expression abolished the HCV core protein-induced enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 expression by 66%, 54%, and 66%, respectively (P < 0.001), by inhibiting MyD88-mediated signaling, including phosphorylation of NF-κBp65, ERK, and P38. CONCLUSION: The inverse correlation between miR-125b and cytokine expression after HCV core challenge suggests that miR-125b may negatively regulate HCV-induced immune responses by targeting TLR2/MyD88 signaling in monocytes. PMID:27158204

  19. Vaccine-Induced Antibody Isotypes Are Skewed by Impaired CD4 T Cell and Invariant NKT Cell Effector Responses in MyD88-Deficient Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Iweala, Onyinye I.; Smith, Donald W.; Matharu, Kabir S.; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Nguyen, Deanna D.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Umetsu, Dale T.; Behar, Samuel M.; Nagler, Cathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    The requirement for TLR signaling in the initiation of an Ag-specific Ab response is controversial. In this report we show that a novel OVA-expressing recombinant Salmonella vaccine (Salmonella-OVA) elicits a Th1-biased cell-mediated and serum Ab response upon oral or i.p. immunization of C57BL/6 mice. In MyD88−/−mice, Th1-dependent Ab responses are greatly reduced while Th2-dependent Ab isotypes are elevated in response to oral and i.p., but not s.c. footpad, immunization. When the T effector response to oral vaccination is examined we find that activated, adoptively transferred Ag-specific CD4+ T cells accumulate in the draining lymph nodes, but fail to produce IFN-γ, in MyD88−/− mice. Moreover, CD1d tetramer staining shows that invariant NKT cells are activated in response to oral Salmonella-OVA vaccination in wild-type, but not MyD88−/−, mice. Treatment with neutralizing Ab to CD1d reduces the OVA-specific Ab response only in MyD88-sufficient wild-type mice, suggesting that both Ag-specific CD4 T cell and invariant NKT cell effector responses to Salmonella-OVA vaccination are MyD88 dependent. Taken together, our data indicate that the type of adaptive immune response generated to this live attenuated vaccine is regulated by both the presence of MyD88-mediated signals and vaccination route, which may have important implications for future vaccine design. PMID:19620295

  20. Blunt Snout Bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) MyD88 and TRAF6: Characterisation, Comparative Homology Modelling and Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Tuan; Liu, Han; Jakovlić, Ivan; Wang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    MyD88 and TRAF6 play an essential role in the innate immune response in most animals. This study reports the full-length MaMyD88 and MaTRAF6 genes identified from the blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) transcriptome profile. MaMyD88 is 2501 base pairs (bp) long, encoding a putative protein of 284 amino acids (aa), including the N-terminal DEATH domain of 78 aa and the C-terminal TIR domain of 138 aa. MaTRAF6 is 2252 bp long, encoding a putative protein of 542 aa, including the N-terminal low-complexity region, RING domain (40 aa), a coiled-coil region (64 aa) and C-terminal MATH domain (147 aa). Coding regions of MaMyD88 and MaTRAF6 genomic sequences consisted of five and six exons, respectively. Physicochemical and functional characteristics of the proteins were analysed. Alpha helices were dominant in the secondary structure of the proteins. Homology models of the MaMyD88 and MaTRAF6 domains were constructed applying the comparative modelling method. RT-qPCR was used to analyse the expression of MaMyD88 and MaTRAF6 mRNA transcripts in response to Aeromonas hydrophila challenge. Both genes were highly upregulated in the liver, spleen and kidney during the first 24 h after the challenge. While MyD88 and TRAF6 have been reported in various aquatic species, this is the first report and characterisation of these genes in blunt snout bream. This research also provides evidence of the important roles of these two genes in the blunt snout bream innate immune system. PMID:25830478

  1. Blunt Snout Bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) MyD88 and TRAF6: characterisation, comparative homology modelling and expression.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tuan; Liu, Han; Jakovlić, Ivan; Wang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    MyD88 and TRAF6 play an essential role in the innate immune response in most animals. This study reports the full-length MaMyD88 and MaTRAF6 genes identified from the blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) transcriptome profile. MaMyD88 is 2501 base pairs (bp) long, encoding a putative protein of 284 amino acids (aa), including the N-terminal DEATH domain of 78 aa and the C-terminal TIR domain of 138 aa. MaTRAF6 is 5474 bp long, encoding a putative protein of 542 aa, including the N-terminal low-complexity region, RING domain (40 aa), a coiled-coil region (64 aa) and C-terminal MATH domain (147 aa). Coding regions of MaMyD88 and MaTRAF6 genomic sequences consisted of five and six exons, respectively. Physicochemical and functional characteristics of the proteins were analysed. Alpha helices were dominant in the secondary structure of the proteins. Homology models of the MaMyD88 and MaTRAF6 domains were constructed applying the comparative modelling method. RT-qPCR was used to analyse the expression of MaMyD88 and MaTRAF6 mRNA transcripts in response to Aeromonas hydrophila challenge. Both genes were highly upregulated in the liver, spleen and kidney during the first 24 h after the challenge. While MyD88 and TRAF6 have been reported in various aquatic species, this is the first report and characterisation of these genes in blunt snout bream. This research also provides evidence of the important roles of these two genes in the blunt snout bream innate immune system. PMID:25830478

  2. The many faces of small B cell lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation and the contribution of MYD88 testing.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Steven H; Kuzu, Isinsu; Dogan, Ahmet; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Chan, John K C; Sander, Birgitta; Ott, German; Xerri, Luc; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Campo, Elias

    2016-03-01

    Plasmacytic differentiation may occur in almost all small B cell lymphomas (SBLs), although it varies from being uniformly present (as in lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL)) to very uncommon (as in mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs)). The discovery of MYD88 L265P mutations in the vast majority of LPLs has had a major impact on the study of these lymphomas. Review of the cases contributed to the 2014 European Association for Haematopathology/Society for Hematopathology slide workshop illustrated how mutational testing has helped refine the diagnostic criteria for LPL, emphasizing the importance of identifying a clonal monotonous lymphoplasmacytic population and highlighting how LPL can still be diagnosed with extensive nodal architectural effacement, very subtle plasmacytic differentiation, follicular colonization, or uncommon phenotypes such as CD5 or CD10 expression. MYD88 L265P mutations were found in 11/11 LPL cases versus only 2 of 28 other SBLs included in its differential diagnosis. Mutational testing also helped to exclude other cases that would have been considered LPL in the past. The workshop also highlighted how plasmacytic differentiation can occur in chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, SOX11 negative MCL, and particularly in marginal zone lymphomas, all of which can cause diagnostic confusion with LPL. The cases also highlighted the difficulty in distinguishing lymphomas with marked plasmacytic differentiation from plasma cell neoplasms. Some SBLs with plasmacytic differentiation can be associated with amyloid, other immunoglobulin deposition, or crystal-storing histiocytosis, which may obscure the underlying neoplasm. Finally, although generally indolent, LPL may transform, with the workshop cases suggesting a role for TP53 abnormalities. PMID:26454445

  3. The many faces of small B cell lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation and the contribution of MYD88 testing

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Isinsu; Dogan, Ahmet; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Chan, John K. C.; Sander, Birgitta; Ott, German; Xerri, Luc; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Campo, Elias

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytic differentiation may occur in almost all small B cell lymphomas (SBLs), although it varies from being uniformly present (as in lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL)) to very uncommon (as in mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs)). The discovery of MYD88 L265P mutations in the vast majority of LPLs has had a major impact on the study of these lymphomas. Review of the cases contributed to the 2014 European Association for Haematopathology/Society for Hematopathology slide workshop illustrated how mutational testing has helped refine the diagnostic criteria for LPL, emphasizing the importance of identifying a clonal monotonous lymphoplasmacytic population and highlighting how LPL can still be diagnosed with extensive nodal architectural effacement, very subtle plasmacytic differentiation, follicular colonization, or uncommon phenotypes such as CD5 or CD10 expression. MYD88 L265P mutations were found in 11/11 LPL cases versus only 2 of 28 other SBLs included in its differential diagnosis. Mutational testing also helped to exclude other cases that would have been considered LPL in the past. The workshop also highlighted how plasmacytic differentiation can occur in chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, SOX11 negative MCL, and particularly in marginal zone lymphomas, all of which can cause diagnostic confusion with LPL. The cases also highlighted the difficulty in distinguishing lymphomas with marked plasmacytic differentiation from plasma cell neoplasms. Some SBLs with plasmacytic differentiation can be associated with amyloid, other immunoglobulin deposition, or crystal-storing histiocytosis, which may obscure the underlying neoplasm. Finally, although generally indolent, LPL may transform, with the workshop cases suggesting a role for TP53 abnormalities. PMID:26454445

  4. Rare Variants in MYD88, IRAK4 and IKBKG and Susceptibility to Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Magda K.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Rautanen, Anna; Crook, Derrick W.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Chapman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Although rare variants within the Toll-like receptor signalling pathway genes have been found to underlie human primary immunodeficiencies associated with selective predisposition to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), the contribution of variants in these genes to IPD susceptibility at the population level remains unknown. Complete re-sequencing of IRAK4, MYD88 and IKBKG genes was undertaken in 164 IPD cases from the UK and 164 geographically-matched population-based controls. 233 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) were identified, of which ten were in coding regions. Four rare coding variants were predicted to be deleterious, two variants in MYD88 and two in IRAK4. The predicted deleterious variants in MYD88 were observed as two heterozygote cases but not seen in controls. Frequencies of predicted deleterious IRAK4 SNVs were the same in cases and controls. Our findings suggest that rare, functional variants in MYD88, IRAK4 or IKBKG do not significantly contribute to IPD susceptibility in adults at the population level. PMID:25886387

  5. Clinicopathological features of 49 primary gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cases; comparison with location, cell-of-origin, and frequency of MYD88 L265P.

    PubMed

    Nagakita, Keina; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Taniguchi, Kohei; Miyata-Takata, Tomoko; Sato, Yasuharu; Tari, Akira; Ohnishi, Nobuhiko; Noujima-Harada, Mai; Omote, Shizuma; Nakamura, Naoya; Iwamuro, Masaya; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Okada, Hiroyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2016-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the most common primary site of extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), with approximately one-third of extranodal DLBCL occurring in the GI tract. We investigated the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemically-assessed cell-of-origin of 49 GI DLBCL cases (stomach, 24; small intestine, 10; colon, 15) and also examined the presence of MYD88 L265P as recently this mutation has been frequently identified in ABC-like DLBCL, particularly in extranodal sites. Small intestinal DLBCL was characterized by the preponderance of women (P = 0.041) and elevated LDH (P = 0.002) and soluble interleukin-2 receptor (P = 0.033). Small intestinal DLBCL more frequently showed anemia (P = 0.031) and elevated CRP (P = 0.029) than gastric DLBCL. ABC-like phenotype was seen in 71.4 % cases (stomach, 79 %; small intestine, 70 %; colon, 60 %). MYD88 L265P was detected in 6.1 % cases; all were primary gastric DLBCL with ABC-like phenotype but had no distinct clinicopathological features. In conclusion, GI DLBCL had different clinicopathological features according to the primary site especially in the small intestine. Also, MYD88 L265P had little involvement in GI DLBCL compared with other extranodal DLBCLs, suggesting that its pathogenesis might be different from that of organs with a high frequency of MYD88 L265P. PMID:27439595

  6. Critical Role of TLR2 and MyD88 for Functional Response of Macrophages to a Group IIA-Secreted Phospholipase A2 from Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    Leiguez, Elbio; Giannotti, Karina Cristina; Moreira, Vanessa; Matsubara, Márcio Hideki; Gutiérrez, José María; Lomonte, Bruno; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Balsinde, Jesús; Teixeira, Catarina

    2014-01-01

    The snake venom MT-III is a group IIA secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) enzyme with functional and structural similarities with mammalian pro-inflammatory sPLA2s of the same group. Previously, we demonstrated that MT-III directly activates the innate inflammatory response of macrophages, including release of inflammatory mediators and formation of lipid droplets (LDs). However, the mechanisms coordinating these processes remain unclear. In the present study, by using TLR2−/− or MyD88−/− or C57BL/6 (WT) male mice, we report that TLR2 and MyD88 signaling have a critical role in MT-III-induced inflammatory response in macrophages. MT-III caused a marked release of PGE2, PGD2, PGJ2, IL-1β and IL-10 and increased the number of LDs in WT macrophages. In MT-III-stimulated TLR2−/− macrophages, formation of LDs and release of eicosanoids and cytokines were abrogated. In MyD88−/− macrophages, MT-III-induced release of PGE2, IL-1β and IL-10 was abrogated, but release of PGD2 and PGJ2 was maintained. In addition, COX-2 protein expression seen in MT-III-stimulated WT macrophages was abolished in both TLR2−/− and MyD88−/− cells, while perilipin 2 expression was abolished only in MyD88−/− cells. We further demonstrated a reduction of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids and a release of the TLR2 agonists palmitic and oleic acid from MT-III-stimulated WT macrophages compared with WT control cells, thus suggesting these fatty acids as major messengers for MT-III-induced engagement of TLR2/MyD88 signaling. Collectively, our findings identify for the first time a TLR2 and MyD88-dependent mechanism that underlies group IIA sPLA2-induced inflammatory response in macrophages. PMID:24718259

  7. The HIV Protease Inhibitor Saquinavir Inhibits HMGB1-Driven Inflammation by Targeting the Interaction of Cathepsin V with TLR4/MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Pribis, John P; Al-Abed, Yousef; Yang, Huan; Gero, Domokos; Xu, Hongbo; Montenegro, Marcelo F; Bauer, Eileen M; Kim, Sodam; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Cai, Changchun; Li, Tunliang; Szoleczky, Petra; Szabo, Csaba; Tracey, Kevin J; Billiar, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) (disulfide form), via activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent signaling, is a strong driver of pathologic inflammation in both acute and chronic conditions. Identification of selective inhibitors of HMGB1-TLR4 signaling could offer novel therapies that selectively target proximal endogenous activators of inflammation. A cell-based screening strategy led us to identify first generation HIV-protease inhibitors (PI) as potential inhibitors of HMGB1-TLR4 driven cytokine production. Here we report that the first-generation HIV-PI saquinavir (SQV), as well as a newly identified mammalian protease inhibitor STO33438 (334), potently block disulfide HMGB1-induced TLR4 activation, as assayed by the production of TNF-α by human monocyte-derived macrophages (THP-1). We further report on the identification of mammalian cathepsin V, a protease, as a novel target of these inhibitors. Cellular as well as recombinant protein studies show that the mechanism of action involves a direct interaction between cathepsin V with TLR4 and its adaptor protein MyD88. Treatment with SQV, 334 or the known cathepsin inhibitor SID26681509 (SID) significantly improved survival in murine models of sepsis and reduced liver damage following warm liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models, both characterized by strong HMGB1-TLR4 driven pathology. The current study demonstrates a novel role for cathepsin V in TLR4 signaling and implicates cathepsin V as a novel target for first-generation HIV-PI compounds. The identification of cathepsin V as a target to block HMGB1-TLR4-driven inflammation could allow for a rapid transition of the discovery from the bench to the bedside. Disulfide HMGB1 drives pathologic inflammation in many models by activating signaling through TLR4. Cell-based screening identified the mammalian protease cathepsin V as a novel therapeutic target to inhibit TLR4-mediated inflammation induced by extracellular HMGB1 (disulfide

  8. Pharmacological inhibition of MyD88 homodimerization counteracts renal ischemia reperfusion-induced progressive renal injury in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Min; Liu, Jian-Hua; Xue, Cheng-Biao; Li, Ming-Qiang; Xing, Shuai; Zhang, Xue; He, Wen-Tao; Jiang, Feng-Chao; Lu, Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The activation of innate immunity via myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) contributes to ischemia reperfusion (I/R) induced acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney injury. However, since there have not yet been any effective therapy, the exact pharmacological role of MyD88 in the prevention and treatment of renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is not known. We designed a small molecular compound, TJ-M2010-2, which inhibited MyD88 homodimerization. We used an established unilateral I/R mouse model. All mice undergoing 80 min ischemia through uninephrectomy died within five days without intervention. However, treatment with TJ-M2010-2 alone significantly improved the survival rate to 58.3%. Co-treatment of TJ-M2010-2 with the CD154 antagonist increased survival rates up to 100%. Twenty-eight days post-I/R of 60 min ischemia without nephrectomy, TJ-M2010-2 markedly attenuated renal interstitial and inhibited TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of renal tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, TJ-M2010-2 remarkably inhibited TLR/MyD88 signaling in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, our findings highlight the promising clinical potential of MyD88 inhibitor in preventing and treating acute or chronic renal I/R injuries, and the therapeutic functionality of dual-system inhibition strategy in IRI-induced AKI. Moreover, MyD88 inhibition ameliorates renal I/R injury-induced tubular interstitial fibrosis by suppressing EMT. PMID:27246399

  9. Dioscin attenuates renal ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting the TLR4/MyD88 signaling pathway via up-regulation of HSP70.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meng; Zheng, Lingli; Qi, Yan; Han, Xu; Xu, Youwei; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Wang, Changyuan; Zhao, Yanyan; Sun, Huijun; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-10-01

    We previously reported the effect of dioscin against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) in rats. However, little is known concerning the role of dioscin in renal IRI. In the present study, rats were subjected to IRI and dioscin was intragastrically administered for seven consecutive days before surgery. In vitro models of hypoxia/reoxygenation were developed in NRK-52E and HK-2 cells, which were prophylactically treated with or without dioscin. The results showed that dioscin significantly decreased serum BUN and Cr levels, and markedly attenuated cell injury. Mechanistic studies showed that dioscin significantly increased HSP70 levels, decreased the levels of TLR4, MyD88, TRAF6, COX-2, JNK, ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and HMGB1, and subsequently decreased the mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, ICAM-1 and IFN-γ. Moreover, HSP70 siRNA or TLR4 DNA reversed the nephroprotective effects of dioscin, while dioscin still significantly down-regulated the TLR4 signaling pathway. Furthermore, by inhibiting MyD88 with ST2825 (a MyD88 inhibitor), renal IRI was significantly attenuated, suggesting that the effect of dioscin against renal IRI depended on MyD88. Our results suggested that dioscin had a potent effect against renal IRI through suppressing the TLR4/MyD88 signaling pathway by up-regulating HSP70. These data provide new insights for investigating the natural product with the nephroprotective effect against IRI, which should be developed as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute kidney injury in the future. PMID:26348276

  10. Deficiency in MyD88 Signaling Results in Decreased Antibody Responses to an Adeno-Associated Virus Vector in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Luo, Xiaoyan; Bird, Andrew; Li, Songtao

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that antibody and T cell responses limit the efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) pseudotype 8 (2/8) vector containing the universally active cytomegalovirus enhancer/chicken β-actin regulatory cassette (AAV2/8-CBhGAA) in treating murine Pompe disease. However, the innate immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated acute immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA and the role of MyD88/TRIF signaling pathway in shaping adaptive immune responses to this vector. We showed here that a small and transient increase in CXCL-1 and IL-1β expression in livers of acid-α-glucosidase knockout (GAAKO) mice 6 h following injection with AAV2/8-CBhGAA. There was a robust antibody response to GAA in wild-type mice injected with this vector. In contrast, the anti-GAA IgG1 response was diminished in MyD88KO mice, and showed a trend toward a decrease in TRIFKO mice. In addition, the vector genome and GAA activity were significantly higher in MyD88KO livers compared with wild-type livers, suggesting reduced cytotoxic T cell responses. Importantly, elevated CD4+ T cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in MyD88KO livers. When adoptively transferred to wild-type mice, these CD4+ T cells have an ability to suppress antibody responses against AAV2/8-CBhGAA and to prevent further immunization against rhGAA. Our study suggests that the MyD88 deficiency leads to the suppression of deleterious immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA, which has implications for gene therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:23514839

  11. Deficiency in MyD88 Signaling Results in Decreased Antibody Responses to an Adeno-Associated Virus Vector in Murine Pompe Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Luo, Xiaoyan; Bird, Andrew; Li, Songtao; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2012-06-01

    We have previously shown that antibody and T cell responses limit the efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) pseudotype 8 (2/8) vector containing the universally active cytomegalovirus enhancer/chicken β-actin regulatory cassette (AAV2/8-CBhGAA) in treating murine Pompe disease. However, the innate immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated acute immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA and the role of MyD88/TRIF signaling pathway in shaping adaptive immune responses to this vector. We showed here that a small and transient increase in CXCL-1 and IL-1β expression in livers of acid-α-glucosidase knockout (GAAKO) mice 6 h following injection with AAV2/8-CBhGAA. There was a robust antibody response to GAA in wild-type mice injected with this vector. In contrast, the anti-GAA IgG1 response was diminished in MyD88KO mice, and showed a trend toward a decrease in TRIFKO mice. In addition, the vector genome and GAA activity were significantly higher in MyD88KO livers compared with wild-type livers, suggesting reduced cytotoxic T cell responses. Importantly, elevated CD4(+) T cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in MyD88KO livers. When adoptively transferred to wild-type mice, these CD4(+) T cells have an ability to suppress antibody responses against AAV2/8-CBhGAA and to prevent further immunization against rhGAA. Our study suggests that the MyD88 deficiency leads to the suppression of deleterious immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA, which has implications for gene therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:23514839

  12. Pharmacological inhibition of MyD88 homodimerization counteracts renal ischemia reperfusion-induced progressive renal injury in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Min; Liu, Jian-Hua; Xue, Cheng-Biao; Li, Ming-Qiang; Xing, Shuai; Zhang, Xue; He, Wen-Tao; Jiang, Feng-Chao; Lu, Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The activation of innate immunity via myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) contributes to ischemia reperfusion (I/R) induced acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney injury. However, since there have not yet been any effective therapy, the exact pharmacological role of MyD88 in the prevention and treatment of renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is not known. We designed a small molecular compound, TJ-M2010-2, which inhibited MyD88 homodimerization. We used an established unilateral I/R mouse model. All mice undergoing 80 min ischemia through uninephrectomy died within five days without intervention. However, treatment with TJ-M2010-2 alone significantly improved the survival rate to 58.3%. Co-treatment of TJ-M2010-2 with the CD154 antagonist increased survival rates up to 100%. Twenty-eight days post-I/R of 60 min ischemia without nephrectomy, TJ-M2010-2 markedly attenuated renal interstitial and inhibited TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of renal tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, TJ-M2010-2 remarkably inhibited TLR/MyD88 signaling in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, our findings highlight the promising clinical potential of MyD88 inhibitor in preventing and treating acute or chronic renal I/R injuries, and the therapeutic functionality of dual-system inhibition strategy in IRI-induced AKI. Moreover, MyD88 inhibition ameliorates renal I/R injury-induced tubular interstitial fibrosis by suppressing EMT. PMID:27246399

  13. Unique properties of the chicken TLR4/MD-2 complex: selective lipopolysaccharide activation of the MyD88-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; van Putten, Jos P M

    2008-09-15

    During evolution, mammals have evolved a powerful innate immune response to LPS. Chickens are much more resistant to LPS-induced septic shock. Herein we report that chickens sense LPS via orthologs of mammalian TLR4 and myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) rather than the previously implicated chicken TLR2 isoform type 2 (chTLR2t2) receptor. Cloning and expression of recombinant chTLR4 and chMD-2 in HeLa 57A cells activated NF-kappaB at concentrations of LPS as low as 100 pg/ml. Differential pairing of chicken and mammalian TLR4 and MD-2 indicated that the protein interaction was species-specific in contrast to the formation of functional human and murine chimeric complexes. The chicken LPS receptor responded to a wide variety of LPS derivatives and to the synthetic lipid A compounds 406 and 506. The LPS specificity resembled the functionality of the murine rather than the human TLR4/MD-2 complex. Polymorphism in chTLR4 (Tyr(383)His and Gln(611)Arg) did not influence the LPS response. Interestingly, LPS consistently failed to activate the MyD88-independent induction of IFN-beta in chicken cells, in contrast to the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) that yielded a potent IFN-beta response. These results suggest that chicken lack a functional LPS-specific TRAM-TRIF (TRIF-related adapter molecule/TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-beta) signaling pathway, which may explain their aberrant response to LPS compared with the mammalian species. PMID:18768894

  14. Heart-resident CCR2+ macrophages promote neutrophil extravasation through TLR9/MyD88/CXCL5 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Hsiao, Hsi-Min; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Saunders, Brian T.; Bharat, Ankit; Goldstein, Daniel R.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Lavine, Kory J.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that maladaptive innate immune responses to sterile tissue injury represent a fundamental mechanism of disease pathogenesis. In the context of cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury, neutrophils enter inflamed heart tissue, where they play an important role in potentiating tissue damage and contributing to contractile dysfunction. The precise mechanisms that govern how neutrophils are recruited to and enter the injured heart are incompletely understood. Using a model of cardiac transplant–mediated ischemia reperfusion injury and intravital 2-photon imaging of beating mouse hearts, we determined that tissue-resident CCR2+ monocyte–derived macrophages are essential mediators of neutrophil recruitment into ischemic myocardial tissue. Our studies revealed that neutrophil extravasation is mediated by a TLR9/MyD88/CXCL5 pathway. Intravital 2-photon imaging demonstrated that CXCL2 and CXCL5 play critical and nonredundant roles in guiding neutrophil adhesion and crawling, respectively. Together, these findings uncover a specific role for a tissue-resident monocyte-derived macrophage subset in sterile tissue inflammation and support the evolving concept that macrophage ontogeny is an important determinant of function. Furthermore, our results provide the framework for targeting of cell-specific signaling pathways in myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:27536731

  15. Salvianolic Acid B Ameliorates Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Through Inhibiting TLR4/MyD88 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujue; Chen, Guang; Yu, Xiangdong; Li, Yunchao; Zhang, Li; He, Zongze; Zhang, Nannan; Yang, Xiuping; Zhao, Yansheng; Li, Na; Qiu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic stroke can activate multiple transcription factors and cause inflammatory reactions, which involve pattern recognition receptors with immunostimulatory effects. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one of the receptors related to innate immunity and several inflammatory reactions. The promising anti- inflammatory activity of salvianolic acid B (SAB) had been previously reported, but its effect on ischemic stroke remains unknown. An oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) model in vitro and a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in vivo were used in this paper, and the results showned that SAB remarkably increased the viabilities of PC12 cells and primary cortical neurons after OGD/R injury and notably prevented cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. SAB also significantly ameliorated NeuN release from primary cortical neurons. Further research indicated that the neuroprotection of SAB was completed through inhibiting the TLR4/MyD88/TRAF6 signaling pathway. The blocking of TLR4 by SAB also restrained NF-kB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These findings supply a new insight that will aid in clarifying the effect of SAB against cerebral I/R injury and provide the development of SAB as a potential candidate for treating ischemic stroke. PMID:27255374

  16. Early activation of MyD88-mediated autophagy sustains HSV-1 replication in human monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Siracusano, Gabriel; Venuti, Assunta; Lombardo, Daniele; Mastino, Antonio; Esclatine, Audrey; Sciortino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway that exerts numerous functions in vital biological processes. Among these, it contributes to both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, pathogens have evolved strategies to manipulate autophagy for their own advantage. By monitoring autophagic markers, we showed that HSV-1 transiently induced autophagosome formation during early times of the infection of monocytic THP-1 cells and human monocytes. Autophagy is induced in THP-1 cells by a mechanism independent of viral gene expression or viral DNA accumulation. We found that the MyD88 signaling pathway is required for HSV-1-mediated autophagy, and it is linked to the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Interestingly, autophagy inhibition by pharmacological modulators or siRNA knockdown impaired viral replication in both THP-1 cells and human monocytes, suggest that the virus exploits the autophagic machinery to its own benefit in these cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that the early autophagic response induced by HSV-1 exerts a proviral role, improving viral production in a semi-permissive model such as THP-1 cells and human monocytes. PMID:27509841

  17. Early activation of MyD88-mediated autophagy sustains HSV-1 replication in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Siracusano, Gabriel; Venuti, Assunta; Lombardo, Daniele; Mastino, Antonio; Esclatine, Audrey; Sciortino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway that exerts numerous functions in vital biological processes. Among these, it contributes to both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, pathogens have evolved strategies to manipulate autophagy for their own advantage. By monitoring autophagic markers, we showed that HSV-1 transiently induced autophagosome formation during early times of the infection of monocytic THP-1 cells and human monocytes. Autophagy is induced in THP-1 cells by a mechanism independent of viral gene expression or viral DNA accumulation. We found that the MyD88 signaling pathway is required for HSV-1-mediated autophagy, and it is linked to the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Interestingly, autophagy inhibition by pharmacological modulators or siRNA knockdown impaired viral replication in both THP-1 cells and human monocytes, suggest that the virus exploits the autophagic machinery to its own benefit in these cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that the early autophagic response induced by HSV-1 exerts a proviral role, improving viral production in a semi-permissive model such as THP-1 cells and human monocytes. PMID:27509841

  18. SF3B1 mutations correlated to cytogenetics and mutations in NOTCH1, FBXW7, MYD88, XPO1 and TP53 in 1160 untreated CLL patients.

    PubMed

    Jeromin, S; Weissmann, S; Haferlach, C; Dicker, F; Bayer, K; Grossmann, V; Alpermann, T; Roller, A; Kohlmann, A; Haferlach, T; Kern, W; Schnittger, S

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed a large cohort of 1160 untreated CLL patients for novel genetic markers (SF3B1, NOTCH1, FBXW7, MYD88, XPO1) in the context of molecular, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic data. NOTCH1 mutations (mut) (12.3%), SF3B1mut (9.0%) and TP53mut (7.1%) were more frequent than XPO1mut (3.4%), FBXW7mut (2.5%) and MYD88mut (1.5%). SF3B1mut, NOTCH1mut, TP53mut and XPO1mut were highly correlated to unmutated, whereas MYD88mut were associated with mutated IGHV status. Associations of diverse cytogenetic aberrations and mutations emerged: (1) SF3B1mut with del(11q), (2) NOTCH1mut and FBXW7mut with trisomy 12 and nearly exclusiveness of SF3B1mut, (3) MYD88mut with del(13q) sole and low frequencies of SF3B1mut, NOTCH1mut and FBXW7mut. In patients with normal karyotype only SF3B1mut were frequent, whereas NOTCH1mut rarely occurred. An adverse prognostic impact on time to treatment (TTT) and overall survival (OS) was observed for SF3B1mut, NOTCH1mut and TP53 disruption. In multivariate analyses SF3B1mut, IGHV mutational status and del(11q) were the only independent genetic markers for TTT, whereas for OS SF3B1mut, IGHV mutational status and TP53 disruption presented with significant impact. Finally, our data suggest that analysis of gene mutations refines the risk stratification of cytogenetic prognostic subgroups and confirms data of a recently proposed model integrating molecular and cytogenetic data. PMID:24113472

  19. Lipopolysaccharide- and Lipoteichoic Acid-mediated Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production and Modulation of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 Expression in Human Endometrial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Nesa; Mirahmadian, Mahroo; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rezania, Simin; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Vafaei, Sedigheh; Kashanian, Maryam; Rasoulzadeh, Zahra; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory processes are supposed to be involved in pathophysiology of spontaneous abortion and preterm labor. Here, we investigated functional responses of human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) and whole endometrial cells (WECs) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Methods Endometrial tissues were obtained from 15 cycling women who underwent laparoscopic tubal ligation. Modulation of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 expression and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by WECs and ESCs in response to LPS and LTA were assessed. Results WECs and ESCs expressed significant levels of TLR4 and MyD88 transcripts but, unlike WECs, ESCs failed to express TLR2 gene. Regardless of positive results of Western blotting, ESCs did not express TLR4 at their surface as judged by flow cytometry. Immunofluorescent staining revealed intracellular localization of TLR4 with predominant perinuclear pattern. LPS stimulation marginally increased TLR4 gene expression in both cell types, whereas such treatment significantly upregulated MyD88 gene expression after 8 hr (p < 0.05). At the protein level, however, LPS activation significantly increased TLR4 expression by ESCs (p < 0.05). LTA stimulation of WECs was accompanied with non-significant increase of TLR2 and MyD88 transcripts. LPS and LTA stimulation of WECs caused significant production of IL-6 and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Similarly, ESCs produced significant amounts of IL-6, IL-8 and also TNF-α in response to LPS activation (p < 0.05). Conclusion Our results provided further evidence of initiation of inflammatory processes following endometrial TLR activation by bacterial components which could potentially be harmful to developing fetus. PMID:25927023

  20. Dioscin alleviates alcoholic liver fibrosis by attenuating hepatic stellate cell activation via the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the activities and underlying mechanisms of dioscin against alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF). In vivo liver fibrosis in mice was induced by an alcoholic liquid diet, and in vitro studies were performed on activated HSC-T6 and LX2 cells treated with lipopolysaccharide. Our results showed that dioscin significantly attenuated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation, improved collagen accumulation, and attenuated inflammation through down-regulating the levels of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α by decreasing Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 expression both in vivo and in vitro. TLR4 overexpression was also decreased by dioscin, leading to the markedly down-regulated levels of MyD88, NF-κB, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type I collagen (COL1A1) in cultured HSCs. Suppression of cellular MyD88 by ST2825 or abrogation of NF-κB by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate eliminated the inhibitory effects of dioscin on the levels of TGF-β1, α-SMA and COL1A1. In a word, dioscin exhibited potent effects against ALF via altering TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway, which provided novel insights into the mechanisms of this compound as an antifibrogenic candidate for the treatment of ALF in the future. PMID:26655640

  1. Blood-Brain Barrier Deterioration and Hippocampal Gene Expression in Polymicrobial Sepsis: An Evaluation of Endothelial MyD88 and the Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Honig, Gerard; Mader, Simone; Chen, Huiyi; Porat, Amit; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Systemic infection can initiate or exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) pathology, even in the absence of overt invasion of bacteria into the CNS. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that human survivors of sepsis have an increased risk of long-term neurocognitive decline. There is thus a need for improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms whereby acute sepsis affects the CNS. In particular, MyD88-dependent activation of brain microvascular endothelial cells and a resulting loss of blood-brain barrier integrity have been proposed to play an important role in the effects of systemic inflammation on the CNS. Signaling through the vagus nerve has also been considered to be an important component of CNS responses to systemic infection. Here, we demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeabilization and hippocampal transcriptional responses during polymicrobial sepsis occur even in the absence of MyD88-dependent signaling in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. We further demonstrate that these transcriptional responses can occur without vagus nerve input. These results suggest that redundant signals mediate CNS responses in sepsis. Either endothelial or vagus nerve activation may be individually sufficient to transmit systemic inflammation to the central nervous system. Transcriptional activation in the forebrain in sepsis may be mediated by MyD88-independent endothelial mechanisms or by non-vagal neuronal pathways. PMID:26790027

  2. Blood-Brain Barrier Deterioration and Hippocampal Gene Expression in Polymicrobial Sepsis: An Evaluation of Endothelial MyD88 and the Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Honig, Gerard; Mader, Simone; Chen, Huiyi; Porat, Amit; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping; Volpe, Bruce T.; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Systemic infection can initiate or exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) pathology, even in the absence of overt invasion of bacteria into the CNS. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that human survivors of sepsis have an increased risk of long-term neurocognitive decline. There is thus a need for improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms whereby acute sepsis affects the CNS. In particular, MyD88-dependent activation of brain microvascular endothelial cells and a resulting loss of blood-brain barrier integrity have been proposed to play an important role in the effects of systemic inflammation on the CNS. Signaling through the vagus nerve has also been considered to be an important component of CNS responses to systemic infection. Here, we demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeabilization and hippocampal transcriptional responses during polymicrobial sepsis occur even in the absence of MyD88-dependent signaling in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. We further demonstrate that these transcriptional responses can occur without vagus nerve input. These results suggest that redundant signals mediate CNS responses in sepsis. Either endothelial or vagus nerve activation may be individually sufficient to transmit systemic inflammation to the central nervous system. Transcriptional activation in the forebrain in sepsis may be mediated by MyD88-independent endothelial mechanisms or by non-vagal neuronal pathways. PMID:26790027

  3. miR-489 inhibits silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis by targeting MyD88 and Smad3 and is negatively regulated by lncRNA CHRF.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuyun; Han, Lei; Yan, Weiwen; Ji, Xiaoming; Han, Ruhui; Yang, Jingjin; Yuan, Jiali; Ni, Chunhui

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an incurable occupational disease associated with inflammation, fibroblast proliferation and the accumulation of extracellular matrix in lung tissues. The dysregulation of lncRNAs and miRNAs has been implicated in many complex diseases; however, the current understanding of their roles in fibrotic lung diseases, especially silicosis, remains limited. Our previous microRNA (miRNA, miR) microarray data have indicated decreased expression levels of miR-489 in lung tissues of silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we further explored the role of miR-489 in a mouse model of silicosis. Interestingly, miR-489 levels were reduced in both macrophages that were exposed to silica and fibroblasts that were exposed to TGF-β1. Additionally, the overexpressed miR-489 carried out its anti-fibrotic role by attenuating inflammation and fibrotic progression in vivo. Our molecular study further demonstrated that miR-489 inhibited silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis primarily by repressing its target genes MyD88 and Smad3. Moreover, the up-regulated lncRNA cardiac hypertrophy-related factor (CHRF) reversed the inhibitory effect of miR-489 on MyD88 and Smad3 and then triggered the inflammation and fibrotic signaling pathways. Overall, our data indicate that the CHRF-miR-489-MyD88 Smad3 signaling axis exerts key functions in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis and may represent a therapeutic target for silicosis. PMID:27506999

  4. miR-489 inhibits silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis by targeting MyD88 and Smad3 and is negatively regulated by lncRNA CHRF

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiuyun; Han, Lei; Yan, Weiwen; Ji, Xiaoming; Han, Ruhui; Yang, Jingjin; Yuan, Jiali; Ni, Chunhui

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an incurable occupational disease associated with inflammation, fibroblast proliferation and the accumulation of extracellular matrix in lung tissues. The dysregulation of lncRNAs and miRNAs has been implicated in many complex diseases; however, the current understanding of their roles in fibrotic lung diseases, especially silicosis, remains limited. Our previous microRNA (miRNA, miR) microarray data have indicated decreased expression levels of miR-489 in lung tissues of silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we further explored the role of miR-489 in a mouse model of silicosis. Interestingly, miR-489 levels were reduced in both macrophages that were exposed to silica and fibroblasts that were exposed to TGF-β1. Additionally, the overexpressed miR-489 carried out its anti-fibrotic role by attenuating inflammation and fibrotic progression in vivo. Our molecular study further demonstrated that miR-489 inhibited silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis primarily by repressing its target genes MyD88 and Smad3. Moreover, the up-regulated lncRNA cardiac hypertrophy-related factor (CHRF) reversed the inhibitory effect of miR-489 on MyD88 and Smad3 and then triggered the inflammation and fibrotic signaling pathways. Overall, our data indicate that the CHRF-miR-489-MyD88 Smad3 signaling axis exerts key functions in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis and may represent a therapeutic target for silicosis. PMID:27506999

  5. TLR4-HMGB1-, MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling in mouse intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; He, Gui-Zhen; Wang, Yu-Kang; Zhu, Qian-Kun; Chen, Wei; Guo, Tai

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize high-mobility group protein 1-toll-like receptor 4 (HMGB1-TLR4) and downstream signaling pathways in intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. METHODS: Forty specific-pathogen-free male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8 per group): sham, control, anti-HMGB1, anti-myeloid differentiation gene 88 (MyD88), and anti-translocating-chain-associating membrane protein (TRIF) antibody groups. Vehicle with the control IgG antibody, anti-HMGB1, anti-MyD88, or anti-TRIF antibodies (all 1 mg/kg, 0.025%) were injected via the caudal vein 30 min prior to ischemia. After anesthetization, the abdominal wall was opened and the superior mesenteric artery was exposed, followed by 60 min mesenteric ischemia and then 60 min reperfusion. For the sham group, the abdominal wall was opened for 120 min without I/R. Levels of serum nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65, interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured, along with myeloperoxidase activity in the lung and liver. In addition,morphologic changes that occurred in the lung and intestinal tissues were evaluated. Levels of mRNA transcripts encoding HMGB1 and NF-κB were measured by real-time quantitative PCR, and levels of HMGB1 and NF-κB protein were measured by Western blot. Results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: Blocking HMGB1, MyD88, and TRIF expression by injecting anti-HMGB1, anti-MyD88, or anti-TRIF antibodies prior to ischemia reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines in serum; NF-κB p65: 104.64 ± 11.89, 228.53 ± 24.85, 145.00 ± 33.63, 191.12 ± 13.22, and 183.73 ± 10.81 (P < 0.05); IL-6: 50.02 ± 6.33, 104.91 ± 31.18, 62.28 ± 6.73, 85.90 ± 17.37, and 78.14 ± 7.38 (P < 0.05); TNF-α, 43.79 ± 4.18, 70.81 ± 6.97, 52.76 ± 5.71, 63.19 ± 5.47, and 59.70 ± 4.63 (P < 0.05) for the sham, control, anti-HMGB1, anti-MyD88, and anti-TRIF groups, respectively (all in pg/mL).Antibodies also alleviated tissue injury in the lung and small intestine compared with the control group in the mouse intestinal I/R model. The administration of anti-HMGB1, anti-MyD88, and anti-TRIF antibodies markedly reduced damage caused by I/R, for which anti-HMGB1 antibody had the most obvious effect. CONCLUSION: HMGB1 and its downstream signaling pathway play important roles in the mouse intestinal I/R injury, and the effect of the TRIF-dependent pathway is slightly greater. PMID:26217083

  6. The TIR-Domain Containing Adaptor TRAM Is Required for TLR7 Mediated RANTES Production

    PubMed Central

    Shevlin, Enda; Miggin, Sinéad M.

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) plays a vital role in the immune response to ssRNA viruses such as human rhinovirus (HRV) and Influenza, against which there are currently no treatments or vaccines with long term efficacy available. Clearly, a more comprehensive understanding of the TLR7 signaling axis will contribute to its molecular targeting. TRIF related adaptor molecule (TRAM) plays a vital role in TLR4 signaling by recruiting TRIF to TLR4, followed by endosomal trafficking of the complex and initiation of IRF3 dependent type I interferon production as well as NF-κB dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Towards understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate TLR7 functionality, we found that TRAM−/− murine macrophages exhibited a transcriptional and translational impairment in TLR7 mediated RANTES, but not TNFα, production. Suppression of TRAM expression in human macrophages also resulted in an impairment in TLR7 mediated CCL5 and IFN-β, but not TNFα, gene induction. Furthermore, suppression of endogenous human TRAM expression in human macrophages significantly impaired RV16 induced CCL5 and IFNβ, but not TNFα gene induction. Additionally, TRAM-G2A dose-dependently inhibited TLR7 mediated activation of CCL5, IFNβ and IFNα reporter genes. TLR7-mediated phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 was impaired in TRAM−/− cells. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that TRAM physically interacts with MyD88 upon TLR7 stimulation, but not under basal conditions. Our results clearly demonstrate that TRAM plays a, hitherto unappreciated, role in TLR7 signaling through a novel signaling axis containing, but not limited to, MyD88, TRAM and IRF3 towards the activation of anti-viral immunity. PMID:25211222

  7. MyD88 mediates in vivo effector functions of alveolar macrophages in acute lung inflammatory responses to carbon nanotube exposure.

    PubMed

    Frank, Evan A; Birch, M Eileen; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are rapidly emerging as high-priority occupational toxicants. CNT powders contain fibrous particles that aerosolize readily in places of manufacture and handling, posing an inhalation risk for workers. Studies using animal models indicate that lung exposure to CNTs causes prolonged inflammatory responses and diffuse alveolar injury. The mechanisms governing CNT-induced lung inflammation are not fully understood but have been suggested to involve alveolar macrophages (AMs). In the current study, we sought to systematically assess the effector role of AMs in vivo in the induction of lung inflammatory responses to CNT exposures and investigate their cell type-specific mechanisms. Multi-wall CNTs characterized for various physicochemical attributes were used as the CNT type. Using an AM-specific depletion and repopulation approach in a mouse model, we unambiguously demonstrated that AMs are major effector cells necessary for the in vivo elaboration of CNT-induced lung inflammation. We further investigated in vitro AM responses and identified molecular targets which proved critical to pro-inflammatory responses in this model, namely MyD88 as well as MAPKs and Ca(2+)/CamKII. We further demonstrated that MyD88 inhibition in donor AMs abrogated their capacity to reconstitute CNT-induced inflammation when adoptively transferred into AM-depleted mice. Taken together, this is the first in vivo demonstration that AMs act as critical effector cell types in CNT-induced lung inflammation and that MyD88 is required for this in vivo effector function. AMs and their cell type-specific mechanisms may therefore represent potential targets for future therapeutic intervention of CNT-related lung injury. PMID:26272622

  8. Card9- and MyD88-Mediated Gamma Interferon and Nitric Oxide Production Is Essential for Resistance to Subcutaneous Coccidioides posadasii Infection.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chiung-Yu; Castro-Lopez, Natalia; Cole, Garry T

    2016-04-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a potentially life-threatening respiratory disease which is endemic to the southwestern United States and arid regions of Central and South America. It is responsible for approximately 150,000 infections annually in the United States alone. Almost every human organ has been reported to harbor parasitic cells of Coccidioides spp. in collective cases of the disseminated form of this mycosis. Current understanding of the mechanisms of protective immunity against lung infection has been largely derived from murine models of pulmonary coccidioidomycosis. However, little is known about the nature of the host response to Coccidioides in extrapulmonary tissue. Primary subcutaneous coccidioidal infection is rare but has been reported to result in disseminated disease. Here, we show that activation of MyD88 and Card9 signal pathways are required for resistance to Coccidioides infection following subcutaneous challenge of C57BL/6 mice, which correlates with earlier findings of the protective response to pulmonary infection. MyD88(-/-) andCard9(-/-) mice recruited reduced numbers of T cells, B cells, and neutrophils to the Coccidioides-infected hypodermis com pared to wild-type mice; however, neutrophils were dispensable for resistance to skin infection. Further studies have shown that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production and activation of Th1 cells characterize resistance to subcutaneous infection. Furthermore, activation of a phagosomal enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase, which is necessary for NO production, is a requisite for fungal clearance in the hypodermis. Collectively, our data demonstrate that MyD88- and Card9-mediated IFN-γ and nitric oxide production is essential for protection against subcutaneous Coccidioides infection. PMID:26857574

  9. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB Pathway, Reactive Oxygen Species, Potassium Efflux Activates NLRP3/ASC Inflammasome during Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mgbemena, Victoria; Tsai, Su-Yu; Chang, Te-Hung; Berton, Michael T.; Morris, Ian R.; Allen, Irving C.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.; Bose, Santanu

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) constitute highly pathogenic virus that cause severe respiratory diseases in newborn, children, elderly and immuno-compromised individuals. Airway inflammation is a critical regulator of disease outcome in RSV infected hosts. Although “controlled” inflammation is required for virus clearance, aberrant and exaggerated inflammation during RSV infection results in development of inflammatory diseases like pneumonia and bronchiolitis. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays an important role in inflammation by orchestrating the pro-inflammatory response. IL-1β is synthesized as an immature pro-IL-1β form. It is cleaved by activated caspase-1 to yield mature IL-1β that is secreted extracellularly. Activation of caspase-1 is mediated by a multi-protein complex known as the inflammasome. Although RSV infection results in IL-1β release, the mechanism is unknown. Here in, we have characterized the mechanism of IL-1β secretion following RSV infection. Our study revealed that NLRP3/ASC inflammasome activation is crucial for IL-1β production during RSV infection. Further studies illustrated that prior to inflammasome formation; the “first signal” constitutes activation of toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2)/MyD88/NF-κB pathway. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB signaling is required for pro-IL-1β and NLRP3 gene expression during RSV infection. Following expression of these genes, two “second signals” are essential for triggering inflammasome activation. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and potassium (K+) efflux due to stimulation of ATP-sensitive ion channel promote inflammasome activation following RSV infection. Thus, our studies have underscored the requirement of TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway (first signal) and ROS/potassium efflux (second signal) for NLRP3/ASC inflammasome formation, leading to caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1β release during RSV infection. PMID:22295065

  10. The effects of MyD88 deficiency on disease phenotype in dysferlin-deficient A/J mice: role of endogenous TLR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ampong, Beryl; Sali, Arpana; Vandermeulen, Jack; Wei, Benjamin; Creeden, Brittany; Huynh, Tony; Quinn, James; Tatem, Kathleen; Rayavarapu, Sree; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    An absence of dysferlin leads to activation of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and skeletal muscle inflammation. Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) is a key mediator of TLR-dependent innate immune signalling. We hypothesized that endogenous TLR ligands released from the leaking dysferlin-deficient muscle fibres engage TLRs on muscle and immune cells and contribute to disease progression. To test this hypothesis, we generated and characterized dysferlin and MyD88 double-deficient mice. Double-deficient mice exhibited improved body weight, grip strength, and maximum muscle contractile force at 6–8 months of age when compared to MyD88-sufficient, dysferlin-deficient A/J mice. Double-deficient mice also showed a decrease in total fibre number, which contributed to the observed increase in the number of central nuclei/fibres. These results indicate that there was less regeneration in the double-deficient mice. We next tested the hypothesis that endogenous ligands, such as single-stranded ribonucleic acids (ssRNAs), released from damaged muscle cells bind to TLR-7/8 and perpetuate the disease progression. We found that injection of ssRNA into the skeletal muscle of pre-symptomatic mice (2 months old) resulted in a significant increase in degenerative fibres, inflammation, and regenerating fibres in A/J mice. In contrast, characteristic histological features were significantly decreased in double-deficient mice. These data point to a clear role for the TLR pathway in the pathogenesis of dysferlin deficiency and suggest that TLR-7/8 antagonists may have therapeutic value in this disease. PMID:23857504

  11. The effects of MyD88 deficiency on disease phenotype in dysferlin-deficient A/J mice: role of endogenous TLR ligands.

    PubMed

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ampong, Beryl; Sali, Arpana; Vandermeulen, Jack; Wei, Benjamin; Creeden, Brittany; Huynh, Tony; Quinn, James; Tatem, Kathleen; Rayavarapu, Sree; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-10-01

    An absence of dysferlin leads to activation of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and skeletal muscle inflammation. Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) is a key mediator of TLR-dependent innate immune signalling. We hypothesized that endogenous TLR ligands released from the leaking dysferlin-deficient muscle fibres engage TLRs on muscle and immune cells and contribute to disease progression. To test this hypothesis, we generated and characterized dysferlin and MyD88 double-deficient mice. Double-deficient mice exhibited improved body weight, grip strength, and maximum muscle contractile force at 6-8 months of age when compared to MyD88-sufficient, dysferlin-deficient A/J mice. Double-deficient mice also showed a decrease in total fibre number, which contributed to the observed increase in the number of central nuclei/fibres. These results indicate that there was less regeneration in the double-deficient mice. We next tested the hypothesis that endogenous ligands, such as single-stranded ribonucleic acids (ssRNAs), released from damaged muscle cells bind to TLR-7/8 and perpetuate the disease progression. We found that injection of ssRNA into the skeletal muscle of pre-symptomatic mice (2 months old) resulted in a significant increase in degenerative fibres, inflammation, and regenerating fibres in A/J mice. In contrast, characteristic histological features were significantly decreased in double-deficient mice. These data point to a clear role for the TLR pathway in the pathogenesis of dysferlin deficiency and suggest that TLR-7/8 antagonists may have therapeutic value in this disease. PMID:23857504

  12. Salmonid Tollip and MyD88 factors can functionally replace their mammalian orthologues in TLR-mediated trout SAA promoter activation.

    PubMed

    Rebl, Alexander; Rebl, Henrike; Liu, Shuzhen; Goldammer, Tom; Seyfert, Hans-Martin

    2011-01-01

    Many functional details of the piscine Toll-like receptor (TLR) signal-mediated activation of immune defense are still elusive. We used an established reconstitution system of mammalian TLR signaling to examine if this system would allow for pathogen-dependent promoter activation of the serum amyloid A (SAA)-encoding gene from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and if the key mediators MyD88 and Tollip from trout can functionally substitute for their mammalian orthologues. Cells of the established human embryonic kidney line HEK-293 were transiently co-transfected with vectors expressing bovine TLR2 or TLR4 factors and a reporter gene driven by the promoter of the trout SAA gene. Escherichia coli stimulation increased reporter gene expression more than 3-fold. Deletion series and point mutations identified in the proximal SAA promoter a composite overlapping binding site for NF-κB and CEBP factors as crucial for promoter activation. Overexpression of NF-κB p65, but not of p50 or different members of the CEBP factor family proved this factor as an essential driver for SAA expression. Overexpression of a transdominant-negative mutant of the trout MyD88 factor reduced TLR-mediated SAA promoter activation confirming functional conservation of its TIR domain. Overexpression of the Tollip factor from trout also quenched TLR-mediated NF-κB and TLR4-mediated SAA promoter activation. The MyD88 mutant and Tollip expression studies confirm the functional homology of both piscine factors and their mammalian counterparts. We provide for the first time evidence that also the Tollip-mediated negative loop of TLR signaling may be conserved in non-mammalian organisms. PMID:20813127

  13. Lipopolysaccharide induced LOX-1 expression via TLR4/MyD88/ROS activated p38MAPK-NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenwen; Ma, Guixin; Chen, Xiuping

    2014-12-01

    Lectin-like receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein (LOX-1) plays a key role in endothelial ox-LDL endocytosis, endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis. In the present study, the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on LOX-1 expression and the underlying molecular pathways were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with LPS and the protein expressions of LOX-1, TLR4, TLR2, MyD88, Nox4, Nox2, PI3K, p38MAPK, JNK, ERK, Nrf1, Nrf2 and p65 were examined by Western blotting. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was examined by flow cytometry with fluorescence probe DCFH2-DA. The role of TLR4, MyD88 and Nox4 were determined with specific siRNA. The endothelial ox-LDL uptake and the endothelial-monocyte adhesion were evaluated with DiI-ox-LDL and Hoechst 33342 respectively. The effect of LPS on LOX-1 expression in aorta tissue was also studied with male C57/BL6 mice by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. The results showed that LPS induced LOX-1 protein expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The mRNA expression of LOX-1 was also upregulated. The protein expression of LOX-1 and phosphorylated p38MAPK, p65 was significantly enhanced by LPS both in vitro and in vivo. LPS induced LOX-1 expression was blocked by siRNA for TLR4, MyD88, and Nox4 and inhibitors for p38MAPK, NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, and NADPH oxidase. Both LPS induced ox-LDL uptake and endothelial-monocyte adhesion were significantly inhibited by anti-LOX-1 antibody. LPS dramatically induced LOX-1 protein expression in aorta tissues. In conclusion, our data suggested that LPS induces LOX-1 expression via TLR4/MyD88/ROS activated p38MAPK/NF-κB pathway in endothelial cells, which provides new regulatory mechanisms for LOX-1 expression. PMID:25135647

  14. The Co-Stimulatory Effects of MyD88-Dependent Toll-Like Receptor Signaling on Activation of Murine γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guorui; Welte, Thomas; Saxena, Vandana; Wicker, Jason; Mann, Brian; Soong, Lynn; Barrett, Alan; Born, Willi; O'Brien, Rebecca; Wang, Tian

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells express several different toll-like receptor (TLR)s. The role of MyD88- dependent TLR signaling in TCR activation of murine γδ T cells is incompletely defined. Here, we report that Pam3CSK4 (PAM, TLR2 agonist) and CL097 (TLR7 agonist), but not lipopolysaccharide (TLR4 agonist), increased CD69 expression and Th1-type cytokine production upon anti-CD3 stimulation of γδ T cells from young adult mice (6-to 10-week-old). However, these agonists alone did not induce γδ T cell activation. Additionally, we noted that neither PAM nor CL097 synergized with anti-CD3 in inducing CD69 expression on γδ T cells of aged mice (21-to 22-month-old). Compared to young γδ T cells, PAM and CL097 increased Th-1 type cytokine production with a lower magnitude from anti-CD3- stimulated, aged γδ T cells. Vγ1+ and Vγ4+ cells are two subpopulations of splenic γδ T cells. PAM had similar effects in anti-CD3-activated control and Vγ4+ subset- depleted γδ T cells; whereas CL097 induced more IFN-γ production from Vγ4+ subset-depleted γδ T cells than from the control group. Finally, we studied the role of MyD88-dependent TLRs in γδ T cell activation during West Nile virus (WNV) infection. γδ T cell, in particular, Vγ1+ subset expansion was significantly reduced in both MyD88- and TLR7- deficient mice. Treatment with TLR7 agonist induced more Vγ1+ cell expansion in wild-type mice during WNV infection. In summary, these results suggest that MyD88-dependent TLRs provide co-stimulatory signals during TCR activation of γδ T cells and these have differential effects on distinct subsets. PMID:25232836

  15. TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling and PPAR-γ within the paraventricular nucleus are involved in the effects of telmisartan in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Bao; Li, Xiang; Huo, Chan-Juan; Su, Qing; Guo, Jing; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Shi, Xiao-Lian; Liu, Jin-Jun; Kang, Yu-Ming

    2016-08-15

    Previous findings from our laboratory and others indicate that the main therapeutic effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) antagonists is to decrease blood pressure and exert anti-inflammatory effects in the cardiovascular system. In this study, we determined whether AT1-R antagonist telmisartan within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates hypertension and hypothalamic inflammation via both the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) in the PVN in hypertensive rats. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated for 4weeks through bilateral PVN infusion with the AT1-R antagonist telmisartan (TEL, 10μg/h), or losartan (LOS, 20μg/h), or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (GW, 100μg/h), or vehicle via osmotic minipump. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was recorded by a tail-cuff occlusion method. PVN tissue and blood were collected for the measurement of AT1-R, PPAR-γ, pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), TLR4, MyD88, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity and plasma norepinephrine (NE), respectively. Hypertensive rats exhibited significantly higher level of AT1-R and lower level of PPAR-γ in the PVN. PVN treatment with TEL attenuated MAP, improved cardiac hypertrophy, reduced TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS levels, and plasma NE in SHR but not in WKY rats. These results were associated with reduced TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB levels and increased PPAR-γ level in the PVN of hypertensive rats. Our findings suggest that TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling and PPAR-γ within the PVN are involved in the beneficial effects of telmisartan in hypertension. PMID:27292124

  16. Positive Correlation between Enhanced Expression of TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB with Insulin Resistance in Placentae of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui; Wang, Chen; Lin, Li; Ma, Jingmei; Yang, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a critical factor of the pathophysiology of Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Studies on key organs involved in IR, such as livers and adipose tissues, showed that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) can regulate insulin sensitivity. As a maternal-fetal interface with multi-functions, placentae could contribute to the development of IR for GDM. Thus, we investigated the expressions of TLR4/Myeloid Differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/Nuclear Factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) in term placentae from 33 GDM women and 36 healthy pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance, evaluated local and systemic IR and furthermore identified the association between placental TLR4 and IR. TLR4 protein was expressed in various cells of term placenta, particularly in syncytiotrophoblast of villi. Compared with normal pregnancy, the expression of TLR4/MyD88/NF-kB pathway increased in the placenta of GDM (p<0.05), and these differences were more pronounced in the maternal section of the placenta and the syncytiotrophoblast of villi. In addition, more severe IR was observed in the placenta of GDM patients than the control group, evidenced with higher pIRS-1(ser312) (p<0.001) and lower IRS-1 (p<0.05) as well as pAkt proteins (p<0.01). The expression of TLR4 in placentae is positively correlated with local IR (pIRS-1: r = 0.76, p <0.001 and pAkt: r = -0.47, p <0.001) and maternal fasting (r = 0.42, p <0.01), one-hour (r = 0.52, p <0.01) and two-hour glucose (r = 0.54, p <0.01) at OGTT. We found an that enhanced expression of the TLR4-MyD88-NF-kB pathway occurs in GDM placentae, which positively correlates with heightened local IR in placentae and higher maternal hyperglycemia. The TLR4/MyD88/NF-kB pathway may play a potential role in the development of IR in placentae of GDM. PMID:27340831

  17. MYD88 L265P in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy, and other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders using conventional and quantitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lian; Hunter, Zachary R.; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yangsheng; Cao, Yang; Liu, Xia; Morra, Enrica; Trojani, Alessandra; Greco, Antonino; Arcaini, Luca; Varettoni, Maria; Brown, Jennifer R.; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Patterson, Christopher J.; Manning, Robert J.; Tripsas, Christina K.; Lindeman, Neal I.

    2013-01-01

    By whole-genome and/or Sanger sequencing, we recently identified a somatic mutation (MYD88 L265P) that stimulates nuclear factor κB activity and is present in >90% of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) patients. MYD88 L265P was absent in 90% of immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients. We therefore developed conventional and real-time allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) assays for more sensitive detection and quantification of MYD88 L265P. Using either assay, MYD88 L265P was detected in 97 of 104 (93%) WM and 13 of 24 (54%) IgM MGUS patients and was either absent or rarely expressed in samples from splenic marginal zone lymphoma (2/20; 10%), CLL (1/26; 4%), multiple myeloma (including IgM cases, 0/14), and immunoglobulin G MGUS (0/9) patients as well as healthy donors (0/40; P < 1.5 × 10−5 for WM vs other cohorts). Real-time AS-PCR identified IgM MGUS patients progressing to WM and showed a high rate of concordance between MYD88 L265P ΔCT and BM disease involvement (r = 0.89, P = .008) in WM patients undergoing treatment. These studies identify MYD88 L265P as a widely present mutation in WM and IgM MGUS patients using highly sensitive and specific AS-PCR assays with potential use in diagnostic discrimination and/or response assessment. The finding of this mutation in many IgM MGUS patients suggests that MYD88 L265P may be an early oncogenic event in WM pathogenesis. PMID:23321251

  18. Toll-pathway in tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) responds to white spot syndrome virus infection: evidence through molecular characterisation and expression profiles of MyD88, TRAF6 and TLR genes.

    PubMed

    Deepika, A; Sreedharan, K; Paria, Anutosh; Makesh, M; Rajendran, K V

    2014-12-01

    The Toll-pathway plays key roles in regulating the innate immune response in invertebrates. Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) are key molecules in this signalling pathway. To investigate the role of Toll-pathway in innate immune response of shrimp, Penaeus monodon, MyD88 (PmMyD88) and TRAF6 (PmTRAF6) were identified and characterised. PmMyD88 cDNA is 1716 bp long with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1449 bp encoding a putative protein of 482 amino acids, with a death domain, a TIR domain and C-terminal extension domain. PmTRAF6 cDNA is 2563 bp long with an ORF of 1785 bp (594 amino acids) with an N-terminal RING-type zinc finger domain, two TRAF-type zinc finger domains, a coiled region and a MATH domain. In healthy shrimp, PmMyD88, PmTRAF6 and PmToll were detected in 15 tissues with the highest expression in midgut, eyestalk and lymphoid organ, respectively. Responses of these genes to WSSV in experimentally-infected P. monodon as well as in cultured haemocytes and also effect of poly I:C on the gene expression in vitro was investigated at six time-points in seven tissues. PmToll showed significant up-regulation at all time-points of infection in six tissues and until 24 h post-infection in vitro. However, poly I:C-induced haemocytes showed up-regulation of the gene until 48 h post-exposure. WSSV caused significant up-regulation of PmMyD88 in most of the tissues tested. The virus challenge as well as poly I:C induction in vitro also resulted in significant up-regulation of the gene. Up-regulated expression of PmTRAF6 was detected in haemocytes and lymphoid organ at late stage of infection. In vitro virus challenge showed significant up-regulation of PmTRAF6 at almost all time-points whereas no significant change in the expression was observed on poly I:C induction. The responses of these key genes, observed in the present study, suggest that Toll-pathway as a whole may play a crucial

  19. Protective Effects of Celastrol on Diabetic Liver Injury via TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB Signaling Pathway in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li-ping; Li, Chun-jun; Sun, Bei; Xie, Yun; Guan, Yue; Ma, Ze-jun; Chen, Li-ming

    2016-01-01

    Immune and inflammatory pathways play a central role in the pathogenesis of diabetic liver injury. Celastrol is a potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agent. So far, there is no evidence regarding the mechanism of innate immune alterations of celastrol on diabetic liver injury in type 2 diabetic animal models. The present study was aimed at investigating protective effects of celastrol on the liver injury in diabetic rats and at elucidating the possible involved mechanisms. We analyzed the liver histopathological and biochemical changes and the expressions of TLR4 mediated signaling pathway. Compared to the normal control group, diabetic rats were found to have obvious steatohepatitis and proinflammatory cytokine activities were significantly upregulated. Celastrol-treated diabetic rats show reduced hepatic inflammation and macrophages infiltration. The expressions of TLR4, MyD88, NF-κB, and downstream inflammatory factors IL-1β and TNFα in the hepatic tissue of treated rats were downregulated in a dose-dependent manner. We firstly found that celastrol treatment could delay the progression of diabetic liver disease in type 2 diabetic rats via inhibition of TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling cascade pathways and its downstream inflammatory effectors. PMID:27057550

  20. Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2 in vivo infection modulates TLR4 responsiveness in differentiated myeloid cells which is associated with decreased MyD88 expression.

    PubMed

    Schaut, Robert G; McGill, Jodi L; Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F; Sacco, Randy E

    2015-10-01

    Symptoms of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection range from subclinical to severe, depending on strain virulence. Several in vitro studies showed BVDV infection impaired leukocyte function. Fewer studies have examined the effects of in vivo BVDV infection on monocyte/macrophage function, especially with strains of differing virulence. We characterized cytokine production by bovine myeloid cells isolated early or late in high (HV) or low virulence (LV) BVDV2 infection. Given BVDV infection may enhance susceptibility to secondary bacterial infection, LPS responses were examined as well. Monocytes from HV and LV infected calves produced higher levels of cytokines compared to cells from controls. In contrast, monocyte-derived macrophage cytokine levels were generally reduced. Modulated cytokine expression in HV BVDV2 macrophages was associated with decreased MyD88 expression, likely due to its interaction with viral NS5A. These data and those of others, suggest that certain Flaviviridae may have evolved strategies for subverting receptor signaling pathways involving MyD88. PMID:26043978

  1. Comparative genomic evidence for duplication of TLR1 subfamily and miiuy croaker TLR1 perceives LPS stimulation via MyD88 and TIRAP.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianjun; Wang, Yanjin; Li, Jinrui; Shu, Chang; Han, Jingjing; Chu, Qing

    2016-09-01

    Being indispensable pattern recognition receptors in innate immune responses in host protection, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in pathogen recognition. Fish TLRs exhibit high variety and distinct features, although little is known about their function on ligand recognition and signaling pathway in fish. This paper reports the evolutionary spectrum of the TLR1 subfamily (referred to as TLR1, TLR6, and TLR10) as determined using the comparative genomic approach. We hypothesized that the TLR1 subfamily underwent two rounds of gene duplication events; the first duplication occurred prior to the divergence of amphibians, and the second one occurred prior to the divergence of eutherians. To further study the function of fish TLR1, we identified miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) TLR1 (mmiTLR1) and determined its potential ability to perceive Vibrio anguillarum and lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Data further suggested that mmiTLR1 is dependent on TIRAP and MyD88 for signal transmission. In addition, immunocytochemistry showed the speculative interaction between MyD88 and mmiTLR1 TIR domain. Overall, we systematically and comprehensively analyzed evolution of TLR1 subfamily and the function of mmiTLR1, which will provide the basis for future scientific research on fish TLRs. PMID:27431585

  2. MyD88 mediates the protective effects of probiotics against the arteriolar thrombosis and leukocyte recruitment associated with experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Daniele G.; Senchenkova, Elena Y.; Russell, Janice; Granger, D. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Several studies in IBD patients and in animal models of IBD have revealed a protective effect of probiotics in reducing clinical symptoms of disease and in blunting the gut inflammation that accompanies this condition. However, the mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of probiotics is currently unknown. Furthermore, the ability of probiotics to influence the enhanced thrombus development that accompanies IBD has not been studied. This study addresses whether the enhanced extra-intestinal thrombosis (induced by light/dye injury) associated with experimental colitis is altered by oral treatment with the probiotic preparation VSL#3 or by the absence of microbiota. Colitis was induced by DSS 3% in Swiss Webster mice, germ free mice, C57BL/6 WT or Myd88−/− mice. In some experiments, mice received VSL#3 for 8 days before and during DSS feeding. Swiss Webster mice were also subjected to a chronic model of DSS colitis and the effect of VSL#3 was evaluated. VSL#3 treatment significantly attenuated the accelerated thrombus formation observed in both acute and chronic models of colitis. VSL#3-treated mice also exhibited attenuated inflammatory response and injury in the colon. The protective effects of VSL#3 on colitis-associated thrombogenesis and inflammation were not evident in MyD88-deficient mice. Our results suggest that improved control of the enteric microflora in IBD may afford protection against the hypercoagulable, prothrombotic state that follows this condition. PMID:25738377

  3. MYD88-DEPENDENT PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY ELICITED BY ADENOVIRUS 5 EXPRESSING THE SURFACE ANTIGEN 1 FROM TOXOPLASMA GONDII IS MEDIATED BY CD8+ T LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Érica A.; Caetano, Bráulia C.; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite widely spread around the world. The Surface Antigens (SAG) 1, 2 and 3 are the main proteins expressed on the surface of T. gondii tachyzoites. Replication-defective adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) is one of the most potent recombinant viral vectors for eliciting T cell-mediated immunity in mice and humans. Here we show that vaccination with rAd5 expressing SAG1 (AdSAG1), but neither SAG2 nor SAG3, induces protective immunity in the highly susceptible C57BL/6 mice challenged with T. gondii. Furthermore, we evaluated different immunological components involved on viral induced protective immunity. We observed that host protection elicited by AdSAG1 is highly dependent on IL-12, IFN-γ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Importantly, the induction of protective immunity (T cell-derived IFN-γ) was also dependent on Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88 (MyD88), and thus, likely to involve Toll-Like receptors. We conclude that protective parasite specific-CD8+ T cells are elicited by a mechanism that involves MyD88-dependent induction of IL-12. PMID:21549794

  4. Frequencies of SF3B1, NOTCH1, MYD88, BIRC3 and IGHV mutations and TP53 disruptions in Chinese with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: disparities with Europeans.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yi; Fan, Lei; Wang, Li; Gale, Robert Peter; Wang, Man; Tian, Tian; Wu, Wei; Yu, Liang; Chen, Yao-Yu; Xu, Wei; Li, Jian-Yong

    2015-03-10

    We studied 307 consecutive Chinese with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in diverse disease-stages before and after diverse therapies for mutations in several CLL-related genes. Mutation frequencies were SF3B1, 5%, NOTCH1, 8%, MYD88, 8%, BIRC3, 2%, TP53, 15% and IGHV, 60%. Several of these frequencies differ from those reported in persons of predominately European descent with CLL. Biological and clinical associations were detected including SF3B1 and NOTCH1 mutations with un-mutated IGHV, MYD88 mutations with mutated IGHV, SF3B1 mutations with fludarabine-resistant CLL and NOTCH1 mutation with advanced Binet disease stage and with +12. The NOTCH1 correlation with briefer survival was confirmed in multivariate analyses but the SF3B1 correlation was confounded by concurrent mutations in TP53 and germline IGHV. We show differences in incidence and prognostic impact of mutations in Chinese and CLL compared with persons of predominately European descent with CLL. These data may give insights into the etiology and biology of CLL and suggests different risk stratification models may be needed for different CLL populations. PMID:25605254

  5. Differential Effect of MyD88 Signal in Donor T Cells on Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect and Graft-versus-Host Disease after Experimental Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Young; Ryu, Da-Bin; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Gyeongsin; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Despite the presence of toll like receptor (TLR) expression in conventional TCRαβ T cells, the direct role of TLR signaling via myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) within T lymphocytes on graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unknown. In the allo-SCT model of C57BL/6 (H-2b) → B6D2F1 (H-2b/d), recipients received transplants of wild type (WT) T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) and splenic T cells from either WT or MyD88 deficient (MyD88KO) donors. Host-type (H-2d) P815 mastocytoma or L1210 leukemia cells were injected either subcutaneously or intravenously to generate a GVHD/GVL model. Allogeneic recipients of MyD88KO T cells demonstrated a greater tumor growth without attenuation of GVHD severity. Moreover, GVHD-induced GVL effect, caused by increasing the conditioning intensity was also not observed in the recipients of MyD88KO T cells. In vitro, the absence of MyD88 in T cells resulted in defective cytolytic activity to tumor targets with reduced ability to produce IFN-γ or granzyme B, which are known to critical for the GVL effect. However, donor T cell expansion with effector and memory T-cell differentiation were more enhanced in GVHD hosts of MyD88KO T cells. Recipients of MyD88KO T cells experienced greater expansion of Foxp3- and IL4-expressing T cells with reduced INF-γ producing T cells in the spleen and tumor-draining lymph nodes early after transplantation. Taken together, these results highlight a differential role for MyD88 deficiency on donor T-cells, with decreased GVL effect without attenuation of the GVHD severity after experimental allo-SCT. PMID:26552489

  6. Differential Effect of MyD88 Signal in Donor T Cells on Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect and Graft-versus-Host Disease after Experimental Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Young; Ryu, Da-Bin; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Gyeongsin; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2015-11-01

    Despite the presence of toll like receptor (TLR) expression in conventional TCRαβ T cells, the direct role of TLR signaling via myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) within T lymphocytes on graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unknown. In the allo-SCT model of C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) → B6D2F1 (H-2(b/d)), recipients received transplants of wild type (WT) T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) and splenic T cells from either WT or MyD88 deficient (MyD88KO) donors. Host-type (H-2(d)) P815 mastocytoma or L1210 leukemia cells were injected either subcutaneously or intravenously to generate a GVHD/GVL model. Allogeneic recipients of MyD88KO T cells demonstrated a greater tumor growth without attenuation of GVHD severity. Moreover, GVHD-induced GVL effect, caused by increasing the conditioning intensity was also not observed in the recipients of MyD88KO T cells. In vitro, the absence of MyD88 in T cells resulted in defective cytolytic activity to tumor targets with reduced ability to produce IFN-γ or granzyme B, which are known to critical for the GVL effect. However, donor T cell expansion with effector and memory T-cell differentiation were more enhanced in GVHD hosts of MyD88KO T cells. Recipients of MyD88KO T cells experienced greater expansion of Foxp3- and IL4-expressing T cells with reduced INF-γ producing T cells in the spleen and tumor-draining lymph nodes early after transplantation. Taken together, these results highlight a differential role for MyD88 deficiency on donor T-cells, with decreased GVL effect without attenuation of the GVHD severity after experimental allo-SCT. PMID:26552489

  7. Clonotypic Analysis of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Sequences in Patients with Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia: Correlation with MYD88 L265P Somatic Mutation Status, Clinical Features, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Roumelioti, Maria; Georgiou, George; Tzenou, Tatiana; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We performed IGH clonotypic sequence analysis in WM in order to determine whether a preferential IGH gene rearrangement was observed and to assess IGHV mutational status in blood and/or bone marrow samples from 36 WM patients. In addition we investigated the presence of MYD88 L265P somatic mutation. After IGH VDJ locus amplification, monoclonal VDJ rearranged fragments were sequenced and analyzed. MYD88 L265P mutation was detected by AS-PCR. The most frequent family usage was IGHV3 (74%); IGHV3-23 and IGHV3-74 segments were used in 26% and 17%, respectively. Somatic hypermutation was seen in 91% of cases. MYD88 L265P mutation was found in 65,5% of patients and absent in the 3 unmutated. These findings did not correlate with clinical findings and outcome. Conclusion. IGH genes' repertoire differed in WM from those observed in other B-cell disorders with a recurrent IGHV3-23 and IGHV3-74 usage; monoclonal IGHV was mutated in most cases, and a high but not omnipresent prevalence of MYD88 L265P mutation was observed. In addition, the identification of 3 patients with unmutated IGHV gene segments, negative for the MYD88 L265P mutation, could support the hypothesis that an extra-germinal B-cell may represent the originating malignant cell in this minority of WM patients. PMID:25197661

  8. Tumor-released autophagosomes induce IL-10-producing B cells with suppressive activity on T lymphocytes via TLR2-MyD88-NF-κB signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meng; Wen, Zhifa; Cheng, Feng; Ma, Jie; Li, Weixia; Ren, Hongyan; Sheng, Yemeng; Dong, Huixia; Lu, Liwei; Hu, Hong-Ming; Wang, Li-Xin

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that tumor cells can release autophagosomes, which transport a broad array of biologically active molecules with potential modulatory effects on immune cell functions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of tumor cells-released autophagosomes (i.e. TRAP) in regulating B cell differentiation and function. TRAPs from murine tumor cell lines were found to induce splenic B cells to differentiate into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs) with a distinct phenotype of CD1d(+) CD5(+), which could potently inhibit CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses in IL-10-depedent manner both in vitro and in vivo. Notably, adoptive transfer of TRAP-induced Bregs abrogated the immune response and antitumor effect induced by OVA-loaded DC vaccinations in E.G7-OVA-bearing mouse model. Mechanistic studies revealed that membrane-bound high-mobility group B1 (HMGB1) on the intact TRAPs was crucial for inducing Breg differentiation via the activation of TLR2-MyD88-NF-κB signal pathway in B cells. Moreover, TRAPs enriched from malignant effusions of cancer patients could induce human B cells to differentiate into IL-10-producing B cells with immunoregulatory functions, the frequency of which were positively correlated with the HMGB1 levels on TRAPs. Together, our findings have demonstrated that TRAPs promote the generation of IL-10(+) Bregs, which may contribute to the suppression of antitumor immunity. PMID:27622036

  9. Telmisartan mediates anti-inflammatory and not cognitive function through PPAR-γ agonism via SARM and MyD88 signaling.

    PubMed

    Prathab Balaji, S; Vijay Chand, C; Justin, A; Ramanathan, M

    2015-10-01

    Telmisartan (TM), an angiotensin II receptor I (AT1) blocker, has been reported to have agonist property with respect to PPAR-γ. Activation of PPAR-γ receptor by TM attenuated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated TLR4 central downstream inflammatory responses. However, the missing link between PPAR-γ and TLR4 signaling with TM stimulation has not been clarified. Hence, the present study has been designed to evaluate the molecular mechanism involving PPARγ-TLR4 signaling with TM stimulation in LPS induced inflammatory model. LPS was administered in rats through ICV and the rats were treated with either PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (GW) or TM or both. After 14days of LPS administration, the rats were subjected to behavioral tests and their brains were isolated for blotting techniques. The protein study includes NF-κB, PPAR-γ receptors, and their downstream proteins (MyD88 & SARM). The pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) levels were measured by ELISA and cresyl violet staining in the hippocampus region to measure the neuroprotective activity. Results have shown that TM significantly increased the motor co-ordination, cognitive functions, and activated SARM and PPAR-γ protein levels. Also, TM treatment decreased the NF-κB, MyD88 activation, and cytokines release in LPS rats. The co-administration of GW attenuated the TM responses in the parameters studied except cognitive functions. TM (10mg/kg) has significantly reduced the LPS mediated inflammatory responses. This resulted in effective regeneration of hippocampal neurons as observed by cresyl violet staining. It can be concluded that the activation of PPAR-γ receptors may increase the SARM and decrease the MyD88 and NF-κB expression. This negative regulation of SARM dependent inflammation control could be a possible mechanism for TM anti-neuroinflammatory activity. This study of TM in neuro-inflammatory model may further confirm the dual activities of TM that controls hypertension and cognition through AT1 blockade and also attenuates neuro-inflammation via PPAR-γ agonistic property. PMID:26264163

  10. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers.

    PubMed

    Tedoldi, Sara; Paterson, Jennifer C; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Natkunam, Yasodha; Rüdiger, Thomas; Angelisova, Pavla; Du, Ming Q; Roberton, Helen; Roncador, Giovanna; Sanchez, Lydia; Pozzobon, Michela; Masir, Noraidah; Barry, Richard; Pileri, Stefano; Mason, David Y; Marafioti, Teresa; Horejsí, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (of which 7 have been identified so far) are involved in receptor signaling in immune cells. They have only a short extracellular region, with most of the molecule comprising a substantial intracytoplasmic region carrying multiple tyrosine residues that can be phosphorylated by Src- or Syk-family kinases. In this paper, we report an immunohistologic study of 6 of these molecules in normal and neoplastic human tissue sections and show that they are restricted to subpopulations of lymphoid cells, being present in either T cells (LAT, LIME, and TRIM), B cells (NTAL), or subsets of both cell types (PAG and SIT). Their expression in neoplastic lymphoid cells broadly reflects that of normal lymphoid tissue, including the positivity of plasma cells and myeloma/plasmacytoma for LIME, NTAL, PAG, and SIT. However, this study also revealed some reactions that may be of diagnostic/prognostic value. For example, lymphocytic lymphoma and mantle-cell lymphoma showed similar profiles but differed clearly from follicle-center lymphoma, whereas PAG tended to be selectively expressed in germinal center-derived subsets of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These molecules represent a potentially important addition to the panel of immunophenotypic markers detectable in routine biopsies that can be used in hematopathologic studies. PMID:16160011

  11. A potential link between TSLP/TSLPR/STAT5 and TLR2/MyD88/NFκB-p65 in human corneal epithelial cells for Aspergillus fumigatus tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Leyi; Wu, Xinyi

    2016-03-01

    Our previous studies reported that pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including the cell surface Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytoplasmic NOD-like receptors (NLRs), recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS) to initiate downstream signal cascades to active immunity responses. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has recently emerged as a key cytokine in the development of type 2 adaptive immune responses. However, the crosstalk between PRRs and TSLP has not been well elucidated in Aspergillus fumigates keratitis. Our studies demonstrated that HCECs not only respond to TSLP, but also initiate immunological regulation through TSLP/TSLPR/STAT5 signaling pathway. In addition, we revealed that zymosan TLR2 agonist enhanced the expression of TSLP and TSLPR and phosphorylation of STAT5. Furthermore, neutralization of TLR2 with monoclonal Ab prevented the production of TSLP and TSLPR and phosphorylation of STAT5 from increasing which induced by A. fumigatus hyphae. Interestingly, we also found that human recombinant TSLP induced the increase of TLR2 downstream signal molecules, and TSLP knockdown could reduce the increase of TLR2 downstream signaling molecules(MyD88 and NF-κB-p65) induced by A. fumigatus hyphae. These studies indicated that HCECs represent a novel target of TSLP, TSLP/TSLPR/STAT5 signaling plays an important role in response to A. fumigatus infection in HCECs, and TLR2 downstream signaling molecules up regulate TSLP/TSLPR/STAT5 signaling as well as TSLP downstream signaling molecules up regulate TLR2/MyD88/NFκB-p65 signaling in this phenomenon. PMID:26874828

  12. Caspase-8 Acts as a Molecular Rheostat to Limit RIPK1- and MyD88-Mediated Dendritic Cell Activation1

    PubMed Central

    Cuda, Carla M.; Misharin, Alexander V.; Gierut, Angelica K.; Saber, Rana; Haines, G. Kenneth; Hutcheson, Jack; Hedrick, Stephen M.; Mohan, Chandra; Budinger, G. Scott; Stehlik, Christian; Perlman, Harris

    2014-01-01

    Caspase-8, an executioner enzyme in the death receptor pathway, has previously been shown to initiate apoptosis and suppress necroptosis. Here, we identify a novel, cell death-independent role for caspase-8 in dendritic cells (DCs); namely, DC-specific expression of caspase-8 prevents the onset of systemic autoimmunity. Failure to express caspase-8 has no effect on the life-span of DCs but instead leads to an enhanced intrinsic activation and subsequently more mature and autoreactive lymphocytes. Uncontrolled toll-like receptor activation in a RIPK1-dependent manner is responsible for the enhanced functionality of caspase-8-deficient DCs, as deletion of TLR signaling mediator, MyD88, ameliorates systemic autoimmunity induced by caspase-8 deficiency. Taken together, these data demonstrate that caspase-8 functions in a cell-type-specific manner and acts uniquely in DCs to maintain tolerance. PMID:24808358

  13. Signalling through MyD88 drives surface expression of the mycobacterial receptors MCL (Clecsf8, Clec4d) and Mincle (Clec4e) following microbial stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kerscher, Bernhard; Dambuza, Ivy M; Christofi, Maria; Reid, Delyth M; Yamasaki, Sho; Willment, Janet A; Brown, Gordon D

    2016-01-01

    The heterodimeric mycobacterial receptors, macrophage C-type lectin (MCL) and macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle), are upregulated at the cell surface following microbial challenge, but the mechanisms underlying this response are unclear. Here we report that microbial stimulation triggers Mincle expression through the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) pathway; a process that does not require MCL. Conversely, we show that MCL is constitutively expressed but retained intracellularly until Mincle is induced, whereupon the receptors form heterodimers which are translocated to the cell surface. Thus this "two-step" model for induction of these key receptors provides new insights into the underlying mechanisms of anti-mycobacterial immunity. PMID:27005451

  14. TLR4, TLR7/8 agonist-induced miR-146a promotes macrophage tolerance to MyD88-dependent TLR agonists.

    PubMed

    Nahid, M Abu; Benso, Lia M; Shin, John D; Mehmet, Huseyin; Hicks, Alexandra; Ramadas, Ravisankar A

    2016-08-01

    TLRs facilitate the recognition of pathogens by immune cells and the initiation of the immune response, leading to the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Production of proinflammatory mediators by innate immune cells, such as macrophages, is tightly regulated to facilitate pathogen clearance while limiting an adverse impact on host tissue. Exposure of innate immune cells to TLR ligands induces a state of temporary refractoriness to a subsequent exposure of a TLR ligand, a phenomenon referred to as "tolerance." This study sought to evaluate the mechanistic regulation of TLR4 and TLR7/8 ligand-induced tolerance to other TLRs by microRNA-146a. With the use of THP-1 macrophages, as well as human classic and alternative macrophages, we demonstrate that priming with a TLR4 agonist (LPS) or a TLR7/8 agonist (R848) induces homologous and heterologous tolerance to various TLR ligands in macrophages, leading to the impaired production of cytokines and chemokines. We also demonstrate that overexpression of microRNA-146a is sufficient to mimic LPS or R848-induced hyporesponsiveness. Conversely, inhibition of microRNA-146a activity leads to LPS- or R848-induced TLR hyper-responsiveness in TLR signaling tolerance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microRNA-146a dampens cytokine production following a primary stimulus with MyD88-dependent but not MyD88-independent TLR pathways. Collectively, these data provide comprehensive evidence of the central role of microRNA-146a in TLR signaling tolerance to plasma membrane, as well as endosomal TLR ligands in human macrophages. PMID:26908827

  15. MyD88 dependence of beryllium-induced dendritic cell trafficking and CD4⁺ T-cell priming.

    PubMed

    McKee, A S; Mack, D G; Crawford, F; Fontenot, A P

    2015-11-01

    Beryllium exposure results in beryllium hypersensitivity in a subset of exposed individuals, leading to granulomatous inflammation and fibrosis in the lung. In addition to its antigenic properties, beryllium has potent adjuvant activity that contributes to sensitization via unknown pathways. Here we show that beryllium induces cellular death and release of interleukin (IL)-1α and DNA into the lung. Release of IL-1α was inflammasome independent and required for beryllium-induced neutrophil recruitment into the lung. Beryllium enhanced classical dendritic cell (cDC) migration from the lung to draining lymph nodes (LNs) in an IL-1R-independent manner, and the accumulation of activated cDCs in the LN was associated with increased priming of CD4(+) T cells. DC migration was reduced in Toll-like receptor 9 knockout (TLR9KO) mice; however, cDCs in the LNs of TLR9-deficient mice were highly activated, suggesting a role for more than one innate receptor in the effects on DCs. The adjuvant effects of beryllium on CD4(+) T-cell priming were similar in wild-type, IL-1R-, caspase-1-, TLR2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, and TLR9-deficient mice. In contrast, DC migration, activation, and the adjuvant effects of beryllium were significantly reduced in myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 knockout (MyD88KO) mice. Collectively, these data suggest that beryllium exposure results in the release of damage-associated molecular patterns that engage MyD88-dependent receptors to enhance pulmonary DC function. PMID:25760420

  16. Measurement of TLR-Induced Macrophage Spreading by Automated Image Analysis: Differential Role of Myd88 and MAPK in Early and Late Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Jens; Held, Christian; Palmisano, Ralf; Teufel, Stefan; David, Jean-Pierre; Wittenberg, Thomas; Lang, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Sensing of infectious danger by toll-like receptors (TLRs) on macrophages causes not only a reprogramming of the transcriptome but also changes in the cytoskeleton important for cell spreading and motility. Since manual determination of cell contact areas from fluorescence micrographs is very time-consuming and prone to bias, we have developed and tested algorithms for automated measurement of macrophage spreading. The two-step method combines identification of cells by nuclear staining with DAPI and cell surface staining of the integrin CD11b. Automated image analysis correlated very well with manual annotation in resting macrophages and early after stimulation, whereas at later time points the automated cell segmentation algorithm and manual annotation showed slightly larger variation. The method was applied to investigate the impact of genetic or pharmacological inhibition of known TLR signaling components. Deficiency in the adapter protein Myd88 strongly reduced spreading activity at the late time points, but had no impact early after LPS-stimulation. A similar effect was observed upon pharmacological inhibition of MEK1, the kinase activating the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK1/2, indicating that ERK1/2 mediates Myd88-dependent macrophages spreading. In contrast, macrophages lacking the MAPK p38 were impaired in the initial spreading response but responded normally 8–24 h after stimulation. The dichotomy of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK effects on early and late macrophage spreading raises the question which of the respective substrate proteins mediate(s) cytoskeletal remodeling and spreading. The automated measurement of cell spreading described here increases the objectivity and greatly reduces the time required for such investigations and is therefore expected to facilitate larger throughput analysis of macrophage spreading, e.g., in siRNA knockdown screens. PMID:22028692

  17. Ligand-independent TLR signals generated by ectopic overexpression of MyD88 generate local and systemic anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Zachary C.; Osada, Takuya; Glass, Oliver; Yang, Xiao Y.; Lei, Gang-jun; Lyerly, H. Kim; Clay, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Although critical for initiating and regulating immune responses, the therapeutic use of individual cytokines as anti-cancer immunotherapeutic agents has achieved only modest clinical success. Consequently, many current strategies have focused on the use of specific immunotherapeutic agonists that engage individual receptors of innate immune networks, such as the Toll Like-Receptor (TLR) system, each resulting in specific patterns of gene expression, cytokine production and inflammatory outcome. However, these immunotherapeutics are constrained by variable cellular TLR expression and responsiveness to particular TLR agonists, as well as the specific cellular context of different tumors. We hypothesized that overexpression of MyD88, a pivotal regulator of multiple TLR signaling pathways, could circumvent these constraints and mimic coordinated TLR signaling across all cell types in a ligand independent fashion. To explore this hypothesis, we generated an adenoviral vector expressing MyD88 and demonstrate that Ad-MyD88 infection elicits extensive Th1-specific transcriptional and secreted cytokine signatures in all murine and human cell types tested in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, in vivo intratumoral injection of Ad-MyD88 into established tumor masses enhanced adaptive immune responses and inhibited local tumor immunosuppression, resulting in significantly inhibited local and systemic growth of multiple tumor types. Finally, Ad-MyD88 infection of primary human dendritic cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and colorectal carcinoma cells elicited significant Th1-type cytokine responses, resulting in enhanced tumor cell lysis and expansion of human tumor antigen-specific T-cells. Thus, Ad-MyD88 initiated robust anti-tumor activity in established murine tumor microenvironments and in human contexts, suggesting its potential effectiveness as a clinical immunotherapeutic strategy. PMID:20823152

  18. Adaptors in toll-like receptor signaling and their potential as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ve, Thomas; Gay, Nicholas J; Mansell, Ashley; Kobe, Bostjan; Kellie, Stuart

    2012-10-01

    To initiate the innate immune response, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) associate with cytoplasmic adaptor proteins through TIR (Toll/interleukin-1 receptor) domain interactions. The four principal signaling adaptor proteins include MyD88, MAL, TRIF and TRAM, and the fifth protein SARM, involved in negative regulation of TLR pathways, is usually considered a part of the TIR domain-containing adaptor protein group. Other TIR domain-containing proteins have also been shown to regulate these signaling pathways, including ST2 and SIGIRR, as well as several bacterial and viral TIR domain-containing proteins that modulate these pathways as virulence factors. TLR pathways and the adaptor proteins are associated with a number of diseases, including infection, sepsis, inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune diseases and cancer. We review our current understanding of the structure and function of adaptor proteins and their regulatory proteins, their association with disease and their potential as therapeutic targets in human disease. PMID:22664090

  19. Enhanced TLR-MYD88 Signaling Stimulates Autoinflammation in SH3BP2 Cherubism Mice and Defines the Etiology of Cherubism

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Mukai, Tomoyuki; Kittaka, Mizuho; Alford, Lisa M.; Masrani, Salome; Ishida, Shu; Yamaguchi, Ken; Yamada, Motohiko; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Reichenberger, Ernst J.; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cherubism is caused by mutations in SH3BP2. Studies of cherubism mice showed that TNF-α-dependent autoinflammation is a major cause for the disorder, but failed to explain why human cherubism lesions are restricted to jaws and regress after puberty. We demonstrate that the inflammation in cherubism mice is MYD88-dependent and is rescued in the absence of TLR2 and TLR4. However, germ-free cherubism mice also develop inflammation. Mutant macrophages are hyper-responsive to PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) and DAMPs (damage-associated molecular patterns) that activate TLRs, resulting in TNF-α overproduction. Phosphorylation of SH3BP2 at Y183 is critical for the TNF-α production. Finally, SYK depletion in macrophages prevents the inflammation. These data suggest that the presence of a large amount of TLR ligands, presumably oral bacteria and DAMPs during jawbone remodeling, may cause the jaw-specific development of human cherubism lesions. Reduced levels of DAMPs after stabilization of jaw remodeling may contribute to the age-dependent regression. PMID:25220465

  20. Gamma-Irradiated Influenza Virus Uniquely Induces IFN-I Mediated Lymphocyte Activation Independent of the TLR7/MyD88 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Yoichi; Chan, Jennifer; Wan, En-Chi; Koskinen, Aulikki; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Hayball, John D.; Regner, Matthias; Müllbacher, Arno; Alsharifi, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Background We have shown previously in mice, that infection with live viruses, including influenza/A and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), induces systemic partial activation of lymphocytes, characterized by cell surface expression of CD69 and CD86, but not CD25. This partial lymphocytes activation is mediated by type-I interferons (IFN-I). Importantly, we have shown that γ-irradiated SFV does not induce IFN-I and the associated lymphocyte activation. Principal Findings Here we report that, in contrast to SFV, γ-irradiated influenza A virus elicits partial lymphocyte activation in vivo. Furthermore, we show that when using influenza viruses inactivated by a variety of methods (UV, ionising radiation and formalin treatment), as well as commercially available influenza vaccines, only γ-irradiated influenza virus is able to trigger IFN-I-dependent partial lymphocyte activation in the absence of the TLR7/MyD88 signalling pathways. Conclusions Our data suggest an important mechanism for the recognition of γ-irradiated influenza vaccine by cytosolic receptors, which correspond with the ability of γ-irradiated influenza virus to induce cross-reactive and cross-protective cytotoxic T cell responses. PMID:21998693

  1. Porcine circovirus type 2 induces type I interferon production via MyD88-IKKα-IRFs signaling rather than NF-κB in porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengmeng; Han, Junyuan; Zhang, Yaqun; Duan, Dianning; Zhang, Shuxia

    2016-02-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-I) plays important roles in host antiviral responses. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) and NF-κB transcription factors are thought to be important in the processes of viral secretion and triggering of interferon production. Recently, studies have shown that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) can induce IFN-I production in vivo and in vitro, but the mechanisms underlying the production of PAMs infected with PCV2 remains unknown. Treatment of these cells with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, allowed us to study the secretion of IFN-α and IFN-β in PAMs infected with PCV2. We found that IFN-α expression was induced following virus infection of PAMs. Notably, even after inhibitor treatment of PAMs infected with PCV2, secretion of IFN-α was significantly higher (P<0.05) compared with the PCV2 infection alone group. Our findings suggest that NF-κB plays a minor role in PCV2-induced type I interferon responses. To further characterize the signaling pathway that drives IFN-I expression in PAMs in response to PCV2, we used siRNA to silence the expression of Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and study the role of MyD88-IKKα-IRF signaling in IFN-I production in PAMs induced by PCV2. Our findings show that PCV2 induced IFN-α mRNA transcription, which is associated with the activities of MyD88, IRF7, and IRF3. Thus, PCV2 can induce IFN-I transcription via the MyD88-IKKα-IRF signaling axis. PMID:26850559

  2. High Mobility Group Box Protein 1 (HMGB1)-Partner Molecule Complexes Enhance Cytokine Production by Signaling Through the Partner Molecule Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hreggvidsdóttir, Hulda Sigridur; Lundberg, Anna M; Aveberger, Ann-Charlotte; Klevenvall, Lena; Andersson, Ulf; Harris, Helena Erlandsson

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear protein high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) promotes inflammation upon extracellular release. HMGB1 induces proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages via Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 signaling in a redox-dependent fashion. Independent of its redox state and endogenous cytokine-inducing ability, HMGB1 can form highly immunostimulatory complexes by interaction with certain proinflammatory mediators. Such complexes have the ability to enhance the induced immune response up to 100-fold, compared with induction by the ligand alone. To clarify the mechanisms for these strong synergistic effects, we studied receptor requirements. Interleukin (IL)-6 production was assessed in supernatants from cultured peritoneal macrophages from mice each deficient in one of the HMGB1 receptors (receptor for advanced glycation end products [RAGE], TLR2 or TLR4) or from wild-type controls. The cultures were stimulated with the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccaride (LPS), the TLR2 ligand Pam3CysSerLys4 (Pam3CSK4), noninflammatory HMGB1 or each TLR ligand in complex with noninflammatory HMGB1. The activity of the HMGB1-TLR ligand complexes relied on engagement of the same receptor as for the noncomplexed TLR ligand, since HMGB1-LPS complexes used TLR4 and HMGB1-Pam3CSK4 complexes used TLR2. Deletion of any of the intracellular adaptor molecules used by TLR2 (myeloid differentiation factor-88 [MyD88], TIR domain–containing adaptor protein [TIRAP]) or TLR4 (MyD88, TIRAP, TIR domain–containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β [TRIF], TRIF-related adaptor molecule [TRAM]) had similar effects on HMGB1 complex activation compared with noncomplexed LPS or Pam3CSK4. This result implies that the enhancing effects of HMGB1-partner molecule complexes are not regulated by the induction of additional signaling cascades. Elucidating HMGB1 receptor usage in processes where HMGB1 acts alone or in complex with other molecules is essential for the understanding of basic HMGB1 biology and

  3. Mycoplasma bovis-derived lipid-associated membrane proteins activate IL-1β production through the NF-κB pathway via toll-like receptor 2 and MyD88.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Suli; Li, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Shao, Jiari; Chen, Ying; Xin, Jiuqing

    2016-02-01

    Mycoplasma bovis causes pneumonia, otitis media, and arthritis in young calves, resulting in economic losses to the cattle industry worldwide. M. bovis pathogenesis results in part from excessive immune responses. Lipid-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) can potently induce host innate immunity. However, interactions between M. bovis-derived LAMPs and Toll-like receptors (TLRs), or signaling pathways eliciting active inflammation and NF-κB activation, are incompletely understood. Here, we found that IL-1β expression was induced in embryonic bovine lung (EBL) cells stimulated with M. bovis-derived LAMPs. Subcellular-localization analysis revealed nuclear p65 translocation following EBL cell stimulation with M. bovis-derived LAMPs. An NF-κB inhibitor reversed M. bovis-derived LAMP-induced IL-1β expression. TLR2 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) overexpression increased LAMP-dependent IL-1β induction. TLR2-neutralizing antibodies reduced IL-1β expression during LAMP stimulation. LAMPs also inhibited IL-1β expression following overexpression of a dominant-negative MyD88 protein. These results suggested that M. bovis-derived LAMPs activate IL-1β production through the NF-κB pathway via TLR2 and MyD88. PMID:26499291

  4. Immune effects of R848: evidences that suggest an essential role of TLR7/8-induced, Myd88- and NF-κB-dependent signaling in the antiviral immunity of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Xia; Sun, Li

    2015-03-01

    The imidazoquinoline compound R848 is a specific agonist of toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/TLR8 that has been used as an immunostimulant in humans against viral diseases. Although R848-induced immune response has been reported in teleost fish, the relevant mechanism is not clear. In this study, we investigated the antiviral potential and the signaling pathway of R848 in a model of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). We found that R848 was able to inhibit the replication of megalocytivirus, stimulated the proliferation of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), enhanced the expression of immune genes, and reduced apoptosis of PBL. When endosomal acidification was blocked by chloroquine (CQ), R848-mediated antiviral activity and immune response were significantly reduced. Likewise, inhibition of Myd88 activation markedly impaired the pro-proliferation and anti-apoptosis effect of R848. Cellular study showed that cultured founder cells treated with R848 exhibited augmented NF-κB activity, which, however, was dramatically reduced in the presence of CQ and Myd88 inhibitor. Furthermore, when NF-κB was inactivated, the effect of R848 on cell proliferation and apoptosis was significantly decreased. Taken together, these results indicate that R848 is an immunostimulant with antiviral property in a teleost species, and that the immune response of R848 is mediated by, most likely, TLR7/TLR8 signaling pathway, in which Myd88 and NK-κB play an essential role. PMID:25475963

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Bee Venom in BV2 Microglial Cells: Mediation of MyD88-Dependent NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jung; Hong, Seung Bok; Park, Jin-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Bee venom has long been used as a traditional folk medicine in Korea. It has been reportedly used for the treatment of arthritis, cancer, and inflammation. Although its anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated inflammatory cells has been reported, the exact mechanism of its anti-inflammatory action has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of bee venom in BV2 microglial cells. We first investigated whether NO production in LPS-activated BV2 cells was inhibited by bee venom, and further iNOS mRNA and protein expressions were determined. The mRNA and protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines were examined using semiquantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Moreover, modulation of the transcription factor NF-κB by bee venom was also investigated using a luciferase assay. LPS-induced NO production in BV2 microglial cells was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner upon pretreatment with bee venom. Bee venom markedly reduced the mRNA expression of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and suppressed LPS-induced activation of MyD88 and IRAK1 and phosphorylation of TAK1. Moreover, NF-κB translocation by IKKα/β phosphorylation and subsequent IκB-α degradation were also attenuated. Thus, collectively, these results indicate that bee venom exerts its anti-inflammatory activity via the IRAK1/TAK1/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27563334

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Bee Venom in BV2 Microglial Cells: Mediation of MyD88-Dependent NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun Ju; Kim, Su Jung; Hong, Seung Bok; Park, Jin-Kyu; Rhee, Man Hee

    2016-01-01

    Bee venom has long been used as a traditional folk medicine in Korea. It has been reportedly used for the treatment of arthritis, cancer, and inflammation. Although its anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated inflammatory cells has been reported, the exact mechanism of its anti-inflammatory action has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of bee venom in BV2 microglial cells. We first investigated whether NO production in LPS-activated BV2 cells was inhibited by bee venom, and further iNOS mRNA and protein expressions were determined. The mRNA and protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines were examined using semiquantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Moreover, modulation of the transcription factor NF-κB by bee venom was also investigated using a luciferase assay. LPS-induced NO production in BV2 microglial cells was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner upon pretreatment with bee venom. Bee venom markedly reduced the mRNA expression of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and suppressed LPS-induced activation of MyD88 and IRAK1 and phosphorylation of TAK1. Moreover, NF-κB translocation by IKKα/β phosphorylation and subsequent IκB-α degradation were also attenuated. Thus, collectively, these results indicate that bee venom exerts its anti-inflammatory activity via the IRAK1/TAK1/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27563334

  7. CARMA1- and MyD88-dependent activation of Jun/ATF-type AP-1 complexes is a hallmark of ABC diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Juilland, Mélanie; Gonzalez, Montserrat; Erdmann, Tabea; Banz, Yara; Jevnikar, Zala; Hailfinger, Stephan; Tzankov, Alexandar; Grau, Michael; Lenz, Georg; Novak, Urban

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the activated B-cell (ABC) type, a molecular subtype characterized by adverse outcome, is constitutive activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor–κB (NF-κB), which controls expression of genes promoting cellular survival and proliferation. Much less, however, is known about the role of the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) in ABC DLBCL. Here, we show that AP-1, like NF-κB, was controlled by constitutive activation of the B-cell receptor signaling component caspase recruitment domain-containing membrane-associated guanylate kinase 1 (CARMA1) and/or the Toll-like receptor signaling component myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in ABC DLBCL cell lines. In contrast to germinal center (GC) B-cell (GCB) DLBCL, ABC DLBCL cell lines expressed high levels of the AP-1 family members c-Jun, JunB, and JunD, which formed heterodimeric complexes with the AP-1 family members activating transcription factor (ATF) 2, ATF3, and ATF7. Inhibition of these complexes by a dominant-negative approach led to impaired growth of a majority of ABC DLBCL cell lines. Individual silencing of c-Jun, ATF2, or ATF3 decreased cellular survival and revealed c-Jun/ATF2-dependent control of ATF3 expression. As a consequence, ATF3 expression was much higher in ABC vs GCB DLBCL cell lines. Samples derived from DLBCL patients showed a clear trend toward high and nuclear ATF3 expression in nodal DLBCL of the non-GC or ABC subtype. These findings identify the activation of AP-1 complexes of the Jun/ATF-type as an important element controlling the growth of ABC DLBCL. PMID:26747248

  8. A Role for the Adaptor Proteins TRAM and TRIF in Toll-like Receptor 2 Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Nadra J.; Vladimer, Gregory I.; Stenvik, Jørgen; Orning, M. Pontus A.; Zeid-Kilani, Maria V.; Bugge, Marit; Bergstroem, Bjarte; Conlon, Joseph; Husebye, Harald; Hise, Amy G.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Espevik, Terje; Lien, Egil

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in sensing invading microbes by host innate immunity. TLR2 recognizes bacterial lipoproteins/lipopeptides, and lipopolysaccharide activates TLR4. TLR2 and TLR4 signal via the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptors MyD88 and MAL, leading to NF-κB activation. TLR4 also utilizes the adaptors TRAM and TRIF, resulting in activation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3. Here, we report a new role for TRAM and TRIF in TLR2 regulation and signaling. Interestingly, we observed that TLR2-mediated induction of the chemokine Ccl5 was impaired in TRAM or TRIF deficient macrophages. Inhibition of endocytosis reduced Ccl5 release, and the data also suggested that TRAM and TLR2 co-localize in early endosomes, supporting the hypothesis that signaling may occur from an intracellular compartment. Ccl5 release following lipoprotein challenge additionally involved the kinase Tbk-1 and Irf3, as well as MyD88 and Irf1. Induction of Interferon-β and Ccl4 by lipoproteins was also partially impaired in cells lacking TRIF cells. Our results show a novel function of TRAM and TRIF in TLR2-mediated signal transduction, and the findings broaden our understanding of how Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptor proteins may participate in signaling downstream from TLR2. PMID:25505250

  9. Comprehensive genomic profiling of orbital and ocular adnexal lymphomas identifies frequent alterations in MYD88 and chromatin modifiers: new routes to targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Cani, Andi K; Soliman, Moaaz; Hovelson, Daniel H; Liu, Chia-Jen; McDaniel, Andrew S; Haller, Michaela J; Bratley, Jarred V; Rahrig, Samantha E; Li, Qiang; Briceño, César A; Tomlins, Scott A; Rao, Rajesh C

    2016-07-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the orbit and ocular adnexa is the most common primary orbital malignancy. Treatments for low- (extra-nodal marginal zone and follicular lymphomas) and high-grade (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) are associated with local and vision-threatening toxicities. High-grade lymphomas relapse frequently and exhibit poor survival rates. Despite advances in genomic profiling and precision medicine, orbital and ocular adnexal lymphomas remain poorly characterized molecularly. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) profiling of 38 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded orbital and ocular adnexal lymphomas obtained from a single-center using a panel targeting near-term, clinically relevant genes. Potentially actionable mutations and copy number alterations were prioritized based on gain- and loss-of-function analyses, and catalogued, approved, and investigational therapies. Of 36 informative samples, including marginal zone lymphomas (n=20), follicular lymphomas (n=9), and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (n=7), 53% harbored a prioritized alteration (median=1, range 0-5/sample). MYD88 was the most frequently altered gene in our cohort, with potentially clinically relevant hotspot gain-of-function mutations identified in 71% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and 25% of marginal zone lymphomas. Prioritized alterations in epigenetic modulators were common and included gain-of-function EZH2 and loss-of-function ARID1A mutations (14% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and 22% of follicular lymphomas contained alterations in each of these two genes). Single prioritized alterations were also identified in the histone methyltransferases KMT2B (follicular lymphoma) and KMT3B (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma). Loss-of-function mutations and copy number alterations in the tumor suppressors TP53 (diffuse large B-cell and follicular lymphoma), CDKN2A (diffuse large B-cell and marginal zone lymphoma), PTEN (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma), ATM (diffuse large B

  10. The Late Endosomal Adaptor Molecule p14 (LAMTOR2) Regulates TGFβ1-Mediated Homeostasis of Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sparber, Florian; Tripp, Christoph H.; Komenda, Kerstin; Scheffler, Julia M.; Clausen, Björn E.; Huber, Lukas A.; Romani, Nikolaus; Stoitzner, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs), a sub-population of dendritic cells (DCs) in the skin, participate in the regulation of immunity and peripheral tolerance. The adaptor molecule p14 is part of the late endosomal/lysosomal adaptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activator/regulator (LAMTOR) complex, which mediates the activation of lysosome-associated extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) and the mTOR cascade. In previous work, we demonstrated that CD11c-specific deficiency of p14 disrupts LC homeostasis by affecting the LAMTOR-mediated ERK and mTOR signaling. In this study, we extended our analysis on p14 deficiency specifically in LCs. Langerin-specific ablation of p14 caused a complete loss of LCs, accompanied by an increased maturational phenotype of LCs. The absence of LCs in p14-deficient mice reduced contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses to the contact sensitizer trinitrochlorobenzene. Analysis using bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) revealed that p14 deficiency in DCs/LCs interfered with the LC-relevant transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) pathway, by lowering TGFβ receptor II expression on BMDCs and LCs, as well as surface binding of TGFβ1 on BMDCs. We conclude that p14 deficiency affects TGFβ1 sensitivity of LCs, which is mandatory for their homeostasis and subsequently for their immunological function during CHS. PMID:25078666

  11. Rifaximin Improves Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Toxicity in Caco-2 Cells by the PXR-Dependent TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Nobile, Nicola; Gigli, Stefano; Seguella, Luisa; Pesce, Marcella; d’Alessandro, Alessandra; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Capoccia, Elena; Steardo, Luca; Cuomo, Rosario; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) caused by Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) lead to severe ulceration, inflammation and bleeding of the colon, and are difficult to treat. Aim: The study aimed to evaluate the effect of rifaximin on TcdA-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and investigate the role of PXR in its mechanism of action. Methods: Caco-2 cells were incubated with TcdA and treated with rifaximin (0.1-10 μM) with or without ketoconazole (10 μM). The transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and viability of the treated cells was determined. Also, the expression of zona occludens-1 (ZO-1), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) was determined. Results: Rifaximin treatment (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μM) caused a significant and concentration-dependent increase in the TEER of Caco-2 cells (360, 480, and 680% vs. TcdA treatment) 24 h after the treatment and improved their viability (61, 79, and 105%). Treatment also concentration-dependently decreased the expression of Bax protein (-29, -65, and -77%) and increased the expression of ZO-1 (25, 54, and 87%) and occludin (71, 114, and 262%) versus TcdA treatment. The expression of TLR4 (-33, -50, and -75%), MyD88 (-29, -60, and -81%) and TAK1 (-37, -63, and -79%) were also reduced with rifaximin versus TcdA treatment. Ketoconazole treatment inhibited these effects. Conclusion: Rifaximin improved TcdA-induced toxicity in Caco-2 cells by the PXR-dependent TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB pathway mechanism, and may be useful in the treatment of CDIs. PMID:27242527

  12. Tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) prothymosin alpha: Cytokine-like activities associated with the intact protein and the C-terminal region that lead to antiviral immunity via Myd88-dependent and -independent pathways respectively.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-cun; Sun, Li

    2015-11-01

    Prothymosin alpha (ProTα) is a small protein that in mammals is known to participate in diverse biological processes including immunomodulation. In teleost, the immunological function of ProTα is unknown. In the current study, we investigated the expression and function of the ProTα (named CsProTα) from the teleost fish tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). We found that CsProTα expression was abundant in immune relevant tissues and upregulated by megalocytivirus infection. Immunoblot detected secretion of CsProTα by peripheral blood leukocytes. Recombinant CsProTα (rCsProTα) as well as the C-terminal 11-residue (Ct11) were able to bind head kidney monocytes (HKM) and induce immune gene expression; however, the induction patterns caused by rCsProTα and Ct11 differed considerably. When introduced in vivo, rCsProTα and Ct11 significantly reduced megalocytivirus infection in fish tissues, whereas rCsProTα antibody significantly promoted viral replication. Blocking of Myd88 activity abolished the virus-inhibitory effect of rCsProTα but not Ct11. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that both the intact protein and the C-terminal segment of a teleost ProTα can act like cytokines and induce antiviral immunity via, however, distinct signaling pathways that differ in the requirement of Myd88. PMID:26162512

  13. Rosmarinic Acid Methyl Ester Inhibits LPS-Induced NO Production via Suppression of MyD88- Dependent and -Independent Pathways and Induction of HO-1 in RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    So, Yangkang; Lee, Seung Young; Han, Ah-Reum; Kim, Jin-Baek; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jin, Chang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of rosmarinic acid methyl ester (RAME) isolated from a mutant cultivar of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton. We found that RAME inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, with an IC50 of 14.25 µM, in RAW 264.7 cells. RAME inhibited the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interferon-β, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Moreover, RAME suppressed the activation of nuclear factor kappa B. These results suggest that the downregulation of iNOS expression by RAME was due to myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent and -independent pathways. Furthermore, RAME induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) through activation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2. Treatment with tin protoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO-1, reversed the RAME-induced suppression of NO production. Taken together, RAME isolated from P. frutescens inhibited NO production in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells through simultaneous induction of HO-1 and inhibition of MyD88-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:27548124

  14. Suppression of OVA-alum induced allergy by Heligmosomoides polygyrus products is MyD88-, TRIF-, regulatory T- and B cell-independent, but is associated with reduced innate lymphoid cell activation.

    PubMed

    McSorley, Henry J; Blair, Natalie F; Robertson, Elaine; Maizels, Rick M

    2015-11-01

    The murine intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus exerts multiple immunomodulatory effects in the host, including the suppression of allergic inflammation in mice sensitized to allergen presented with alum adjuvant. Similar suppression is attained by co-administration of H. polygyrus excretory/secretory products (HES) with the sensitizing dose of ovalbumin (OVA) in alum. We investigated the mechanism of suppression by HES in this model, and found it was maintained in MyD88xTRIF-deficient mice, implying no role for helminth- or host-derived TLR ligands, or IL-1 family cytokines that signal in a MyD88- or TRIF-dependent manner. We also found suppression was unchanged in µMT mice, which lack B2 B cells, and that suppression was not abrogated when regulatory T cells were depleted in Foxp3.LuciDTR-4 mice. However, reduced IL-5 production was seen in the first 12 h after injection of OVA-alum when HES was co-administered, associated with reduced activation of IL-5(+) and IL-13(+) group 2 innate lymphoid cells. Thus, the suppressive effects of HES on alum-mediated OVA sensitization are reflected in the very earliest innate response to allergen exposure in vivo. PMID:25728231

  15. Intramammary infusion of Panax ginseng extract in bovine mammary gland at cessation of milking induces changes in the expression of toll-like receptors, MyD88 and NF-kB during early involution.

    PubMed

    Baravalle, Celina; Silvestrini, Paula; Cadoche, Mónica C; Beccaria, Camila; Andreotti, Carolina S; Renna, María S; Pereyra, Elizabeth A L; Ortega, Hugo H; Calvinho, Luis F; Dallard, Bibiana E

    2015-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore TLR2 and TLR4 participation and MyD88 and NF-κB activation in bovine mammary glands (BMG) treated with Panax ginseng (PG) at involution and verify the effect of PG in the cytokine expression. Quarters were infused at the end of lactation with PG solution (3 mg/ml), placebo or kept as uninoculated controls. Cows were slaughtered at 7 d after cessation of milking and mammary tissue samples were taken. A significant increase of TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, NF-κB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression was observed in PG-treated quarters. Immunostaining of TLR2 and TLR4 was significantly higher in PG mammary tissues. The percentages of immunopositive cells for NF-κB-p65 were significantly higher in PG-treated quarters. The BMG responded to PG extract components possibly by TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathway. These results provide an insight into potential mechanisms by which PG stimulates innate immunity during BMG involution. PMID:25866011

  16. Adaptor protein complexes AP-1 and AP-3 are required by the HHV-7 Immunoevasin U21 for rerouting of class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment.

    PubMed

    Kimpler, Lisa A; Glosson, Nicole L; Downs, Deanna; Gonyo, Patrick; May, Nathan A; Hudson, Amy W

    2014-01-01

    The human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7) U21 gene product binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and reroutes them to a lysosomal compartment. Trafficking of integral membrane proteins to lysosomes is mediated through cytoplasmic sorting signals that recruit heterotetrameric clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which in turn mediate protein sorting in post-Golgi vesicular transport. Since U21 can mediate rerouting of class I molecules to lysosomes even when lacking its cytoplasmic tail, we hypothesize the existence of a cellular protein that contains the lysosomal sorting information required to escort class I molecules to the lysosomal compartment. If such a protein exists, we expect that it might recruit clathrin adaptor protein complexes as a means of lysosomal sorting. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that the μ adaptins from AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in U21-mediated trafficking of class I molecules to lysosomes. These experiments support the idea that a cellular protein(s) is necessary for U21-mediated lysosomal sorting of class I molecules. We also examine the impact of transient versus chronic knockdown of these adaptor protein complexes, and show that the few remaining μ subunits in the cells are eventually able to reroute class I molecules to lysosomes. PMID:24901711

  17. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zawawi, M.S.F.; Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D.; McHugh, K.P.; Haynes, D.R.; Crotti, T.N.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  18. The endothelial adaptor molecule TSAd is required for VEGF-induced angiogenic sprouting through junctional c-Src activation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Emma J; Fukuhara, Daisuke; Weström, Simone; Padhan, Narendra; Sjöström, Elisabet O; van Meeteren, Laurens; He, Liqun; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Dejana, Elisabetta; Bentley, Katie; Spurkland, Anne; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by VEGF binding is critical for vascular morphogenesis. In addition, VEGF disrupts the endothelial barrier by triggering the phosphorylation and turnover of the junctional molecule VE-cadherin, a process mediated by the VEGFR2 downstream effectors T cell-specific adaptor (TSAd) and the tyrosine kinase c-Src. We investigated whether the VEGFR2-TSAd-c-Src pathway was required for angiogenic sprouting. Indeed, Tsad-deficient embryoid bodies failed to sprout in response to VEGF. Tsad-deficient mice displayed impaired angiogenesis specifically during tracheal vessel development, but not during retinal vasculogenesis, and in VEGF-loaded Matrigel plugs, but not in those loaded with FGF. The SH2 and proline-rich domains of TSAd bridged VEGFR2 and c-Src, and this bridging was critical for the localization of activated c-Src to endothelial junctions and elongation of the growing sprout, but not for selection of the tip cell. These results revealed that vascular sprouting and permeability are both controlled through the VEGFR2-TSAd-c-Src signaling pathway in a subset of tissues, which may be useful in developing strategies to control tissue-specific pathological angiogenesis. PMID:27436360

  19. Independent and Cooperative Roles of Adaptor Molecules in Proximal Signaling during FcɛRI-Mediated Mast Cell Activation▿

    PubMed Central

    Kambayashi, Taku; Okumura, Mariko; Baker, Rebecca G.; Hsu, Chih-Jung; Baumgart, Tobias; Zhang, Weiguo; Koretzky, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Activation through FcɛRI, a high-affinity IgE-binding receptor, is critical for mast cell function during allergy. The formation of a multimolecular proximal signaling complex nucleated by the adaptor molecules SLP-76 and LAT1 is required for activation through this receptor. Based on previous T-cell studies, current dogma dictates that LAT1 is required for plasma membrane recruitment and function of SLP-76. Unexpectedly, we found that the recruitment and phosphorylation of SLP-76 were preserved in LAT1−/− mast cells and that SLP-76−/− and LAT1−/− mast cells harbored distinct functional and biochemical defects. The LAT1-like molecule LAT2 was responsible for the preserved membrane localization and phosphorylation of SLP-76 in LAT1−/− mast cells. Although LAT2 supported SLP-76 phosphorylation and recruitment to the plasma membrane, LAT2 only partially compensated for LAT1-mediated cell signaling due to its decreased ability to stabilize interactions with phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ). Comparison of SLP-76−/− LAT1−/− and SLP-76−/− mast cells revealed that some functions of LAT1 could occur independently of SLP-76. We propose that while SLP-76 and LAT1 depend on each other for many of their functions, LAT2/SLP-76 interactions and SLP-76-independent LAT1 functions also mediate a positive signaling pathway downstream of FcɛRI in mast cells. PMID:20606011

  20. Small-Molecule Targeting of E3 Ligase Adaptor SPOP in Kidney Cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong-Qiang; Zheng, Tong; Chen, Baoen; Luo, Cheng; Ouyang, Sisheng; Gong, Shouzhe; Li, Jiafei; Mao, Liu-Liang; Lian, Fulin; Yang, Yong; Huang, Yue; Li, Li; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Bidong; Zhou, Luming; Ding, Hong; Gao, Zhiwei; Zhou, Liqun; Li, Guoqiang; Zhou, Ran; Chen, Ke; Liu, Jingqiu; Wen, Yi; Gong, Likun; Ke, Yuwen; Yang, Shang-Dong; Qiu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Naixia; Ren, Jin; Zhong, Dafang; Yang, Cai-Guang; Liu, Jiang; Jiang, Hualiang

    2016-09-12

    In the cytoplasm of virtually all clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) is overexpressed and misallocated, which may induce proliferation and promote kidney tumorigenesis. In normal cells, however, SPOP is located in the nucleus and induces apoptosis. Here we show that a structure-based design and subsequent hit optimization yield small molecules that can inhibit the SPOP-substrate protein interaction and can suppress oncogenic SPOP-signaling pathways. These inhibitors kill human ccRCC cells that are dependent on oncogenic cytoplasmic SPOP. Notably, these inhibitors minimally affect the viability of other cells in which SPOP is not accumulated in the cytoplasm. Our findings validate the SPOP-substrate protein interaction as an attractive target specific to ccRCC that may yield novel drug discovery efforts. PMID:27622336

  1. CXC195 suppresses proliferation and inflammatory response in LPS-induced human hepatocellular carcinoma cells via regulating TLR4-MyD88-TAK1-mediated NF-κB and MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yiting; Tu, Qunfei; Yan, Wei; Xiao, Dan; Zeng, Zhimin; Ouyang, Yuming; Huang, Long; Cai, Jing; Zeng, Xiaoli; Chen, Ya-Jie; Liu, Anwen

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • CXC195 exhibited significant anti-proliferative effect and induced cell cycle arrest in LPS-induced HepG2 cells. • CXC195 suppressed the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in LPS-induced HepG2 cells. • CXC195 regulated TLR4-MyD88-TAK1-mediated NF-κB and MAPK pathway in LPS-induced HepG2 cells. - Abstract: CXC195 showed strong protective effects in neuronal apoptosis by exerting its antioxidant activity. However, the anti-cancer effects of CXC195 is still with limited acquaintance. Here, we investigated the role of CXC195 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells lines (HepG2) and the possible signaling pathways. CXC195 exhibited significant anti-proliferative effect and induced cell cycle arrest in LPS-induced HepG2 cells. In addition, CXC195 suppressed the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in LPS-induced HepG2 cells, including TNF-α, iNOS, IL-1β, IL-6, CC chemokine ligand (CCL)-2, CCL-22 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Moreover, CXC195 inhibited the expressions and interactions of TLR4, MyD88 and TAK1, NF-κB translocation to nucleus and its DNA binding activity, phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK. Our results suggested that treatment with CXC195 could attenuate the TLR4-mediated proliferation and inflammatory response in LPS-induced HepG2 cells, thus might be beneficial for the treatment of HCC.

  2. Regulatory domains of the A-Myb transcription factor and its interaction with the CBP/p300 adaptor molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Facchinetti, V; Loffarelli, L; Schreek, S; Oelgeschläger, M; Lüscher, B; Introna, M; Golay, J

    1997-01-01

    The A-Myb transcription factor belongs to the Myb family of oncoproteins and is likely to be involved in the regulation of proliferation and/or differentiation of normal B cells and Burkitt's lymphoma cells. To characterize in detail the domains of A-Myb that regulate its function, we have generated a series of deletion mutants and have investigated their trans-activation potential as well as their DNA-binding activity. Our results have allowed us to delineate the trans-activation domain as well as two separate regulatory regions. The boundaries of the trans-activation domain (amino acid residues 218-319) are centred on a sequence rich in charged amino acids (residues 259-281). A region (residues 320-482) localized immediately downstream of the trans-activation domain and containing a newly identified conserved stretch of 48 residues markedly inhibits specific DNA binding. Finally the last 110 residues of A-Myb (residues 643-752), which include a sequence conserved in all mammalian myb genes (region III), negatively regulate the maximal trans-activation potential of A-Myb. We have also investigated the functional interaction between A-Myb and the nuclear adaptor molecule CBP [cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein]. We demonstrate that CBP synergizes with A-Myb in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this co-operative effect can be inhibited by E1A and can also be observed with the CBP homologue p300. We show that this functional synergism requires the presence of the A-Myb charged sequence and that it involves physical interaction between A-Myb and the CREB-binding domain of CBP. PMID:9210395

  3. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of TLR9, MyD88 and TRAF6 genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induction of innate immune pathways is critical for early host defense but there is limited understanding of how teleost fish recognize pathogen molecules and activate these pathways. In mammals, cells of the innate immune system detect pathogenic molecular structures using pattern recognition rece...

  4. Anti-neuroinflammatory effects of citreohybridonol involving TLR4-MyD88-mediated inhibition of NF-кB and MAPK signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Dong-Cheol; Yoon, Chi-Su; Ko, Won Min; Lee, Seung Jun; Sohn, Jae Hak; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2016-05-01

    In the course of searching for anti-neuroinflammatory metabolites from marine fungi, citreohybridonol was isolated from marine-derived fungal strain Toxicocladosporium sp. SF-5699. Citreohybridonol inhibited production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in BV2 cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Citreohybridonol also suppressed the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and other pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the LPS-stimulated cells. In the further study, citreohybridonol disturbed nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of the inhibitor kappa B-α (IκB-α). Citreohybridonol also had inhibitory effect on the LPS-stimulated phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Finally, citreohybridonol suppressed the protein expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) in LPS-induced BV2 cells. These results suggest that citreohybridonol has anti-neuroinflammatory effect in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells by modulating TLR4-mediated several inflammatory pathways such as NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways. PMID:26724567

  5. Inhibitory effects of alternaramide on inflammatory mediator expression through TLR4-MyD88-mediated inhibition of NF-кB and MAPK pathway signaling in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 and BV2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wonmin; Sohn, Jae Hak; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub; Kim, Jong-Su; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2016-01-25

    Alternaramide (1), a novel lipophilic depsipeptide, has been isolated from the extract of the marine-derived fungus Alternaria sp. SF-5016. In the course of extensive biological evaluation of 1, its anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 and BV2 cells were observed. In our initial study of the anti-inflammatory effects of 1, the compound suppressed production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 and BV2 cells. Suppression of NO and PGE2 production was correlated with the inhibitory effect of 1 on expression of LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the protein level in RAW264.7 and BV2 cells. In addition, 1 reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 and BV2 cells. In the evaluation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of 1, the compound was found to suppress the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway in RAW264.7 and BV2 cells stimulated with LPS. This suppression was mediated by disruption of phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB, in the cytoplasm, and blocking of nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p50-p65 heterodimer. Furthermore, 1 inhibited phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), demonstrating its capacity to inhibit MAPK signaling. Finally, 1 markedly reduced expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) at the mRNA and protein levels in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 and BV2 cells. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that 1 modulates several TLR4-mediated inflammatory pathways, demonstrating its potential in the treatment of inflammatory and neuroinflammatory conditions. PMID:26620692

  6. Baculovirus vectors expressing F proteins in combination with virus-induced signaling adaptor (VISA) molecules confer protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Qiao, Lei; Hu, Xiao; Zhao, Kang; Zhang, Yanwen; Chai, Feng; Pan, Zishu

    2016-01-01

    Baculovirus has been exploited for use as a novel vaccine vector. To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of recombinant baculoviruses (rBVs) expressing respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) proteins, four constructs (Bac-tF/64, Bac-CF, Bac-CF/tF64 and Bac-CF/tF64-VISA) were generated. Bac-tF64 displays the F ectodomain (tF) on the envelope of rBVs, whereas Bac-CF expresses full-length F protein in transduced mammalian cells. Bac-CF/tF64 not only displays tF on the envelope but also expresses F in cells. Bac-CF/tF64-VISA comprises Bac-CF/tF64 harboring the virus-induced signaling adaptor (VISA) gene. After administration to BALB/c mice, all four vectors elicited RSV neutralizing antibody (Ab), systemic Ab (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a), and cytokine responses. Compared with Bac-tF64, mice inoculated with Bac-CF and Bac-CF/tF64 exhibited an increased mixed Th1/Th2 cytokine response, increased ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibody responses, and reduced immunopathology upon RSV challenge. Intriguingly, co-expression of VISA reduced Th2 cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) production induced by Bac-CF/tF64, thus relieving lung pathology upon a subsequent RSV challenge. Our results indicated that the Bac-CF/tF64 vector incorporated with the VISA molecule may provide an effective vaccine strategy for protection against RSV. PMID:26643933

  7. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  8. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  9. The B Cell Adaptor Molecule Bam32 Is Critically Important for Optimal Antibody Response and Resistance to Trypanosoma congolense Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Onyilagha, Chukwunonso; Jia, Ping; Jayachandran, Nipun; Hou, Sen; Okwor, Ifeoma; Kuriakose, Shiby; Marshall, Aaron; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bam32, a 32 kDa adaptor molecule, plays important role in B cell receptor signalling, T cell receptor signalling and antibody affinity maturation in germinal centres. Since antibodies against trypanosome variant surface glycoproteins (VSG) are critically important for control of parasitemia, we hypothesized that Bam32 deficient (Bam32-/-) mice would be susceptible to T. congolense infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that T. congolense-infected Bam32-/- mice successfully control the first wave of parasitemia but then fail to control subsequent waves and ultimately succumb to their infection unlike wild type (WT) C57BL6 mice which are relatively resistant. Although infected Bam32-/- mice had significantly higher hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, their serum AST and ALT levels were not different, suggesting that increased liver pathology may not be responsible for the increased susceptibility of Bam32-/- mice to T. congolense. Using direct ex vivo flow cytometry and ELISA, we show that CD4+ T cells from infected Bam32-/- mice produced significantly increased amounts of disease-exacerbating proinflammatory cytokines (including IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6). However, the percentages of regulatory T cells and IL-10-producing CD4+ cells were similar in infected WT and Bam32-/- mice. While serum levels of parasite-specific IgM antibodies were normal, the levels of parasite-specific IgG, (particularly IgG1 and IgG2a) were significantly lower in Bam32-/- mice throughout infection. This was associated with impaired germinal centre response in Bam32-/- mice despite increased numbers of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Adoptive transfer studies indicate that intrinsic B cell defect was responsible for the enhanced susceptibility of Bam32-/- mice to T. congolense infection. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, our data show that Bam32 is important for optimal anti-trypanosome IgG antibody response and suppression of disease-promoting proinflammatory cytokines

  10. Brucella TIR-like protein TcpB/Btp1 specifically targets the host adaptor protein MAL/TIRAP to promote infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenna; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Yang, Mingjuan; Gao, Junguang; Zhan, Shaoxia; Xinying, Du; Huang, Liuyu; Li, Wenfeng; Chen, Zeliang; Li, Juan

    2016-08-26

    Brucella spp. are known to avoid host immune recognition and weaken the immune response to infection. Brucella like accomplish this by employing two clever strategies, called the stealth strategy and hijacking strategy. The TIR domain-containing protein (TcpB/Btp1) of Brucella melitensis is thought to be involved in inhibiting host NF-κB activation by binding to adaptors downstream of Toll-like receptors. However, of the five TIR domain-containing adaptors conserved in mammals, whether MyD88 or MAL, even other three adaptors, are specifically targeted by TcpB has not been identified. Here, we confirmed the effect of TcpB on B.melitensis virulence in mice and found that TcpB selectively targets MAL. By using siRNA against MAL, we found that TcpB from B.melitensis is involved in intracellular survival and that MAL affects intracellular replication of B.melitensis. Our results confirm that TcpB specifically targets MAL/TIRAP to disrupt downstream signaling pathways and promote intra-host survival of Brucella spp. PMID:27311859

  11. Selective interleukin-1 receptor–associated kinase 4 inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and lymphoid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Priscilla N.; Romero, Donna L.; Yang, Yibin; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Chaudhary, Divya; Robinson, Shaughnessy; Miao, Wenyan; Rui, Lixin; Westlin, William F.; Kapeller, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    Pathological activation of the Toll-like receptor signaling adaptor protein MYD88 underlies many autoimmune and inflammatory disease states. In the activated B cell–like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the oncogenic MYD88 L265P mutation occurs in 29% of cases, making it the most prevalent activating mutation in this malignancy. IRAK4 kinase accounts for almost all of the biological functions of MYD88, highlighting IRAK4 as a therapeutic target for diseases driven by aberrant MYD88 signaling. Using innovative structure-based drug design methodologies, we report the development of highly selective and bioavailable small molecule IRAK4 inhibitors, ND-2158 and ND-2110. These small molecules suppressed LPS-induced TNF production, alleviated collagen-induced arthritis, and blocked gout formation in mouse models. IRAK4 inhibition promoted killing of ABC DLBCL lines harboring MYD88 L265P, by down-modulating survival signals, including NF-κB and autocrine IL-6/IL-10 engagement of the JAK–STAT3 pathway. In ABC DLBCL xenograft models, IRAK4 inhibition suppressed tumor growth as a single agent, and in combination with the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib or the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199. Our findings support pharmacological inhibition of IRAK4 as a therapeutic strategy in autoimmune disorders, in a genetically defined population of ABC DLBCL, and possibly other malignancies dependent on aberrant MYD88 signaling. PMID:26621451

  12. Selective interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and lymphoid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Priscilla N; Romero, Donna L; Yang, Yibin; Shaffer, Arthur L; Chaudhary, Divya; Robinson, Shaughnessy; Miao, Wenyan; Rui, Lixin; Westlin, William F; Kapeller, Rosana; Staudt, Louis M

    2015-12-14

    Pathological activation of the Toll-like receptor signaling adaptor protein MYD88 underlies many autoimmune and inflammatory disease states. In the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the oncogenic MYD88 L265P mutation occurs in 29% of cases, making it the most prevalent activating mutation in this malignancy. IRAK4 kinase accounts for almost all of the biological functions of MYD88, highlighting IRAK4 as a therapeutic target for diseases driven by aberrant MYD88 signaling. Using innovative structure-based drug design methodologies, we report the development of highly selective and bioavailable small molecule IRAK4 inhibitors, ND-2158 and ND-2110. These small molecules suppressed LPS-induced TNF production, alleviated collagen-induced arthritis, and blocked gout formation in mouse models. IRAK4 inhibition promoted killing of ABC DLBCL lines harboring MYD88 L265P, by down-modulating survival signals, including NF-κB and autocrine IL-6/IL-10 engagement of the JAK-STAT3 pathway. In ABC DLBCL xenograft models, IRAK4 inhibition suppressed tumor growth as a single agent, and in combination with the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib or the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199. Our findings support pharmacological inhibition of IRAK4 as a therapeutic strategy in autoimmune disorders, in a genetically defined population of ABC DLBCL, and possibly other malignancies dependent on aberrant MYD88 signaling. PMID:26621451

  13. The COPII adaptor protein TMED7 is required to initiate and mediate the anterograde trafficking of Toll-like receptor 4 to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Liaunardy-Jopeace, Ardiyanto; Bryant, Clare E.; Gay, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the receptor for the bacterial product endotoxin, is subject to multiple points of regulation at the levels of signaling, biogenesis, and trafficking. Dysregulation of TLR4 signaling can cause serious inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis. We found that the p24 family protein TMED7 (transmembrane emp24 protein transport domain containing 7) is required for the trafficking of TLR4 from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface through the Golgi. TMED7 formed a stable complex with the ectodomain of TLR4, an interaction that required the coiled-coil and GOLD domains, but not the cytosolic, COP II sorting motif, of TMED7. Depletion of TMED7 reduced TLR4 signaling mediated by the adaptor protein MyD88, but not that mediated by the adaptor proteins TRAM and TRIF. Truncated forms of TMED7 lacking the COP II sorting motif or the transmembrane domain were mislocalized and resulted in constitutive activation of TLR4 signaling. Together, these results support the hypothesis that p24 proteins perform a quality control step by recognizing correctly folded anterograde cargo, such as TLR4, in early secretory compartments and facilitating the translocation of this cargo to the cell surface. PMID:25074978

  14. The innate immunity adaptor SARM translocates to the nucleus to stabilize lamins and prevent DNA fragmentation in response to pro-apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Sethman, Chad R; Hawiger, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Sterile alpha and armadillo-motif containing protein (SARM), a highly conserved and structurally unique member of the MyD88 family of Toll-like receptor adaptors, plays an important role in innate immunity signaling and apoptosis. Its exact mechanism of intracellular action remains unclear. Apoptosis is an ancient and ubiquitous process of programmed cell death that results in disruption of the nuclear lamina and, ultimately, dismantling of the nucleus. In addition to supporting the nuclear membrane, lamins serve important roles in chromatin organization, epigenetic regulation, transcription, nuclear transport, and mitosis. Mutations and other damage that destabilize nuclear lamins (laminopathies) underlie a number of intractable human diseases. Here, we report that SARM translocates to the nucleus of human embryonic kidney cells by using its amino-terminal Armadillo repeat region. Within the nucleus, SARM forms a previously unreported lattice akin to the nuclear lamina scaffold. Moreover, we show that SARM protects lamins from apoptotic degradation and reduces internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in response to signaling induced by the proinflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha. These findings indicate an important link between the innate immunity adaptor SARM and stabilization of nuclear lamins during inflammation-driven apoptosis in human cells. PMID:23923041

  15. Suppression of the TRIF-dependent signaling pathway of Toll-like receptors by luteolin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in induction of immune and inflammatory responses by recognizing invading pathogens. TLRs have two major downstream signaling pathways activated through the interaction with adaptor molecules, MyD88 and TRIF, leading to the expression of proinflammat...

  16. A therapeutic trial of human melanomas with combined small interfering RNAs targeting adaptor molecules p130Cas and paxillin activated under expression of ganglioside GD3.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yusuke; Hamamura, Kazunori; Takei, Yoshifumi; Bhuiyan, Robiul Hasan; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p130Cas and paxillin are crucially involved in the enhanced malignant properties under expression of ganglioside GD3 in melanoma cells. Therefore, molecules existing in the GD3-mediated signaling pathway could be considered as suitable targets for therapeutic intervention in malignant melanoma. The aim of this study was to determine whether blockade of p130Cas and/or paxillin by RNAi suppresses melanoma growth. We found a suitable dose (40 μM siRNA, 25 μl/tumor) of the siRNA to suppress p130Cas in the xenografts generated in nu/nu mice. Based on these results, we performed intratumoral (i.t.) treatment with anti-p130Cas and/or anti-paxillin siRNAs mixed with atelocollagen as a drug delivery system in a xenograft tumor of a human melanoma cell line, SK-MEL-28. Mixture of atelocollagen (1.75%) and an siRNA (500 or 1000 pmol/tumor) was injected into the tumors every 3 days after the first injection. An siRNA against human p130Cas markedly suppressed tumor growth of the xenograft in a dose-dependent manner, whereas siRNA against human paxillin slightly inhibited the tumor growth. A control siRNA against firefly luciferase showed no effect. To our surprise, siRNA against human p130Cas (500 or 1000 pmol/tumor) combined with siRNA against human paxillin dramatically suppressed tumor growth. In agreement with the tumor suppression effects of the anti-p130Cas siRNA, reduction in Ki-67 positive cell number as well as in p130Cas expression was demonstrated by immunohistostaining. These results suggested that blockade of GD3-mediated growth signaling pathways by siRNAs might be a novel and promising therapeutic strategy against malignant melanomas, provided signaling molecules such as p130Cas and paxillin are significantly expressed in individual cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Glycans in personalised medicine" Guest Editor: Professor Gordan Lauc. PMID:27068854

  17. Haptoglobin activates innate immunity to enhance acute transplant rejection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; Song, Yang; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Wu, Terence; Bruce, Can; Scabia, Gaia; Galan, Anjela; Maffei, Margherita; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Immune tolerance to transplanted organs is impaired when the innate immune system is activated in response to the tissue necrosis that occurs during harvesting and implantation procedures. A key molecule in this immune pathway is the intracellular TLR signal adaptor known as myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). After transplantation, MyD88 induces DC maturation as well as the production of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. However, upstream activators of MyD88 function in response to transplantation have not been identified. Here, we show that haptoglobin, an acute phase protein, is an initiator of this MyD88-dependent inflammatory process in a mouse model of skin transplantation. Necrotic lysates from transplanted skin elicited higher inflammatory responses in DCs than did nontransplanted lysates, suggesting DC-mediated responses are triggered by factors released during transplantation. Analysis of transplanted lysates identified haptoglobin as one of the proteins upregulated during transplantation. Expression of donor haptoglobin enhanced the onset of acute skin transplant rejection, whereas haptoglobin-deficient skin grafts showed delayed acute rejection and antidonor T cell priming in a MyD88-dependent graft rejection model. Thus, our results show that haptoglobin release following skin necrosis contributes to accelerated transplant rejection, with potential implications for the development of localized immunosuppressive therapies. PMID:22156194

  18. The Vps27/Hrs/STAM (VHS) Domain of the Signal-transducing Adaptor Molecule (STAM) Directs Associated Molecule with the SH3 Domain of STAM (AMSH) Specificity to Longer Ubiquitin Chains and Dictates the Position of Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Baiady, Nardeen; Padala, Prasanth; Mashahreh, Bayan; Cohen-Kfir, Einav; Todd, Emily A; Du Pont, Kelly E; Berndsen, Christopher E; Wiener, Reuven

    2016-01-22

    The deubiquitinating enzyme associated molecule with the SH3 domain of STAM (AMSH) is crucial for the removal of ubiquitin molecules during receptor-mediated endocytosis and lysosomal receptor sorting. AMSH interacts with signal transducing adapter molecule (STAM) 1 or 2, which enhances the activity of AMSH through an unknown mechanism. This stimulation is dependent on the ubiquitin-interacting motif of STAM. Here we investigate the specific mechanism of AMSH stimulation by STAM proteins and the role of the STAM Vps27/Hrs/STAM domain. We show that, in the presence of STAM, the length of the ubiquitin chains affects the apparent cleavage rate. Through measurement of the chain cleavage kinetics, we found that, although the kcat of Lys(63)-linked ubiquitin chain cleavage was comparable for di- and tri-ubiquitin, the Km value was lower for tri-ubiquitin. This increased affinity for longer chains was dependent on the Vps27/Hrs/STAM domain of STAM and required that the substrate ubiquitin chain contain homogenous Lys(63)-linkages. In addition, STAM directed AMSH cleavage toward the distal isopeptide bond in tri-ubiquitin chains. Finally, we generated a structural model of AMSH-STAM to show how the complex binds Lys(63)-linked ubiquitin chains and cleaves at the distal end. These data show how a deubiquitinating enzyme-interacting protein dictates the efficiency and specificity of substrate cleavage. PMID:26601948

  19. Unexpected Roles for Toll-Like Receptor 4 and TRIF in Intraocular Infection with Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Parkunan, Salai Madhumathi; Randall, C. Blake; Coburn, Phillip S.; Astley, Roger A.; Staats, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infection with Gram-positive bacteria is typically initiated by interactions with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Endophthalmitis, an infection and inflammation of the posterior segment of the eye, can lead to vision loss when initiated by a virulent microbial pathogen. Endophthalmitis caused by Bacillus cereus develops as acute inflammation with infiltrating neutrophils, and vision loss is potentially catastrophic. Residual inflammation observed during B. cereus endophthalmitis in TLR2−/− mice led us to investigate additional innate pathways that may trigger intraocular inflammation. We first hypothesized that intraocular inflammation during B. cereus endophthalmitis would be controlled by MyD88- and TRIF-mediated signaling, since MyD88 and TRIF are the major adaptor molecules for all bacterial TLRs. In MyD88−/− and TRIF−/− mice, we observed significantly less intraocular inflammation than in eyes from infected C57BL/6J mice, suggesting an important role for these TLR adaptors in B. cereus endophthalmitis. These results led to a second hypothesis, that TLR4, the only TLR that signals through both MyD88 and TRIF signaling pathways, contributed to inflammation during B. cereus endophthalmitis. Surprisingly, B. cereus-infected TLR4−/− eyes also had significantly less intraocular inflammation than infected C57BL/6J eyes, indicating an important role for TLR4 in B. cereus endophthalmitis. Taken together, our results suggest that TLR4, TRIF, and MyD88 are important components of the intraocular inflammatory response observed in experimental B. cereus endophthalmitis, identifying a novel innate immune interaction for B. cereus and for this disease. PMID:26195555

  20. Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2014-09-23

    An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is described. The adaptor assembly includes a turbine blade having a blade root and an adaptor body having an adaptor root. The adaptor body defines a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root of the turbine blade such that the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are adjacent to one another when the blade root of the turbine blade is positioned within the slot. Both the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are configured to be received within the root slot of the rotor disk.

  1. Origin of Translation - the Hypothesis of Permanently Attached Adaptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Sanjay

    1981-12-01

    A mechanism for prebiotic translation is proposed in which primeval transfer-RNA (adaptors) are assumed to be permanently associated with messenger nucleic acid molecules. Residual ‘fossil’ evidences are found to be present within the base sequences of contemporary tRNAs, suggesting the existence of inter-primal-tRNA interactions necessary for the mechanism. The structure of proposed primal-tRNA is such that it can not only choose its own amino acid in the absence of aminoacyl synthetase, but can also associate nonspecifically with adjacent primal-tRNA molecules attached to the neighbouring codons. Such associations can give rise, through cooperative binding between message and adaptors to the ‘static template surfaces’ which can direct translation of nucleotide sequences into those of amino acids. The origins of ribosomes and contemporary genetic code are suggested by this hypothesis. Proposed structures and processes are thermodynamically compatible. The approximate date of occurence of the proposed system is calculated, which is consistent with the period of occurence of the earliest organisms with ribosomes.

  2. Structural Basis for Membrane Binding and Remodeling by the Exomer Secretory Vesicle Cargo Adaptor

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cargo adaptor subunits of vesicle coat protein complexes sort transmembrane proteins to distinct membrane compartments in eukaryotic cells. The exomer complex is the only cargo adaptor known to sort proteins at the trans-Golgi network into secretory vesicles. Exomer function is regulated by the Arf1 GTPase, a master regulator of trafficking at the Golgi. We report the structure of exomer bound to two copies of Arf1. Exomer interacts with each Arf1 molecule via two surfaces; one is a non-canonical interface that regulates GTP hydrolysis. The structure uncovers an unexpected membrane-proximal hydrophobic element that exomer uses in cooperation with Arf1 to remodel membranes. Given the constrained motion of the exomer hinge region, we envision that exomer dynamically positions multiple membrane insertion elements to drive membrane fission. In contrast to other known cargo adaptors, exomer therefore couples two functions, cargo sorting and membrane fission, into a single complex. PMID:25203211

  3. THREADED ADAPTOR FOR LUGGED PIPE ENDS

    DOEpatents

    Robb, J.E.

    1962-06-01

    An adaptor is designed for enabling a threaded part to be connected to a member at a region having lugs normally receiving bayonet slots of another part for attachment of the latter. It has been found desirable to replace a closure cap connected in a bayonet joint to the end of a coolant tube containing nuclear- reactor fuel elements, with a threaded valve. An adaptor is used which has J- slots receiving lugs on the end of the reactor tube, a thread for connection with the valve, and gear-tooth section enabling a gear-type of tool to rotate the adaptor to seal the valve to the end of the reactor tube. (AEC)

  4. 21 CFR 870.2350 - Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor. 870... Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor. (a) Identification. An electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor is a passive switching device to which electrocardiograph limb and chest leads may be attached. This device...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2350 - Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor. 870... Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor. (a) Identification. An electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor is a passive switching device to which electrocardiograph limb and chest leads may be attached. This device...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2350 - Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor. 870... Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor. (a) Identification. An electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor is a passive switching device to which electrocardiograph limb and chest leads may be attached. This device...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2350 - Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor. 870... Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor. (a) Identification. An electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor is a passive switching device to which electrocardiograph limb and chest leads may be attached. This device...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2350 - Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor. 870... Electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor. (a) Identification. An electrocardiograph lead switching adaptor is a passive switching device to which electrocardiograph limb and chest leads may be attached. This device...

  10. Styles of Creativity: Adaptors and Innovators in a Singapore Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ee, Jessie; Seng, Tan Oon; Kwang, Ng Aik

    2007-01-01

    Kirton (1976) described two creative styles, namely adaptors and innovators. Adaptors prefer to "do things better" whilst, innovators prefer to "do things differently". This study explored the relationship between two creative styles (adaptor and innovator) and the Big Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness,…

  11. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  15. Identification of a new transmembrane adaptor protein that constitutively binds Grb2 in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Weiguo

    2008-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins couple antigen receptor engagement to downstream signaling cascades in lymphocytes. One example of these proteins is the linker for activation of T cells (LAT), which plays an indispensable role in T cell activation and development. Here, we report identification of a new transmembrane adaptor molecule, namely growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2)-binding adaptor protein, transmembrane (GAPT), which is expressed in B cells and myeloid cells. Similar to LAT, GAPT has an extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail with multiple Grb2-binding motifs. In contrast to other transmembrane adaptor proteins, GAPT is not phosphorylated upon BCR ligation but associates with Grb2 constitutively through its proline-rich region. Targeted disruption of the gapt gene in mice affects neither B cell development nor a nitrophenylacetyl-specific antibody response. However, in the absence of GAPT, B cell proliferation after BCR cross-linking is enhanced. In aged GAPT−/− mice, the number of marginal zone (MZ) B cells is increased, and other B cell subsets are normal. The serum concentrations of IgM, IgG2b, and IgG3 are also elevated in these mice. These data indicate that GAPT might play an important role in control of B cell activation and proper maintenance of MZ B cells. PMID:18559951

  16. Anti-adaptors provide multiple modes for regulation of the RssB adaptor protein

    PubMed Central

    Battesti, Aurelia; Hoskins, Joel R.; Tong, Song; Milanesio, Paola; Mann, Jessica M.; Kravats, Andrea; Tsegaye, Yodit M.; Bougdour, Alexandre; Wickner, Sue; Gottesman, Susan

    2013-01-01

    RpoS, an RNA polymerase σ factor, controls the response of Escherichia coli and related bacteria to multiple stress responses. During nonstress conditions, RpoS is rapidly degraded by ClpXP, mediated by the adaptor protein RssB, a member of the response regulator family. In response to stress, RpoS degradation ceases. Small anti-adaptor proteins—IraP, IraM, and IraD, each made under a different stress condition—block RpoS degradation. RssB mutants resistant to either IraP or IraM were isolated and analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Each of the anti-adaptors is unique in its interaction with RssB and sensitivity to RssB mutants. One class of mutants defined an RssB N-terminal region close to the phosphorylation site and critical for interaction with IraP but unnecessary for IraM and IraD function. A second class, in the RssB C-terminal PP2C-like domain, led to activation of RssB function. These mutants allowed the response regulator to act in the absence of phosphorylation but did not abolish interaction with anti-adaptors. This class of mutants is broadly resistant to the anti-adaptors and bears similarity to constitutively activated mutants found in a very different PP2C protein. The mutants provide insight into how the anti-adaptors perturb RssB response regulator function and activation. PMID:24352426

  17. Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks

    SciTech Connect

    Delvaux, John McConnel; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Joyce, Kilmer Joseph; Tindell, Allan Randall

    2014-06-03

    An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is disclosed. The adaptor assembly may generally include an adaptor body having a root configured to be received within the root slot. The adaptor body may also define a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root. The adaptor body may further define a channel. The adaptor assembly may also include a plate having an outwardly extending foot. The foot may be configured to be received within the channel. Additionally, the plate may be configured to cover at least a portion of the open end of the slot when the foot is received within the channel.

  18. Gain-of-Function Mutations in the Toll-Like Receptor Pathway: TPL2-Mediated ERK1/ERK2 MAPK Activation, a Path to Tumorigenesis in Lymphoid Neoplasms?

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Simon; Martel, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoid neoplasms form a family of cancers affecting B-cells, T-cells, and NK cells. The Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) signaling adapter molecule MYD88 is the most frequently mutated gene in these neoplasms. This signaling adaptor relays signals from TLRs to downstream effector pathways such as the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NFκB) and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways to regulate innate immune responses. Gain-of-function mutations such as MYD88[L265P] activate downstream signaling pathways in absence of cognate ligands for TLRs, resulting in increased cellular proliferation and survival. This article reports an analysis of non-synonymous somatic mutations found in the TLR signaling network in lymphoid neoplasms. In accordance with previous reports, mutations map to MYD88 pro-inflammatory signaling and not TRIF-mediated Type I IFN production. Interestingly, the analysis of somatic mutations found downstream of the core TLR-signaling network uncovered a strong association with the ERK1/2 MAPK cascade. In support of this analysis, heterologous expression of MYD88[L265P] in HEK293 cells led to ERK1/2 MAPK phosphorylation in addition to NFκB activation. Moreover, this activation is dependent on the protein kinase Tumor Promoting Locus 2 (TPL2), activated downstream of the IKK complex. Activation of ERK1/2 would then lead to activation, amongst others, of MYC and hnRNPA1, two proteins previously shown to contribute to tumor formation in lymphoid neoplasms. Taken together, this analysis suggests that TLR-mediated ERK1/2 activation via TPL2 may be a novel path to tumorigenesis. Therefore, the hypothesis proposed is that inhibition of ERK1/2 MAPK activation would prevent tumor growth downstream of MYD88[L265]. It will be interesting to test whether pharmacological inhibitors of this pathway show efficacy in primary tumor cells derived from hematologic malignancies such as Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia, where the majority of the cells carry the MYD88[L265P

  19. TLR4-mediated activation of dendritic cells by the heat shock protein DnaK from Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Ashtekar, Amit R.; Zhang, Ping; Katz, Jannet; Deivanayagam, Champion C. S.; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Michalek, Suzanne M.

    2008-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia, a severe, debilitating disease of humans and other mammals. As this microorganism is also classified as a “category-A pathogen” and a potential biowarfare agent, there is a need for an effective vaccine. Several antigens of F. tularensis, including the heat shock protein DnaK, have been proposed for use in a potential subunit vaccine. In this study, we characterized the innate immune response of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) to F. tularensis DnaK. Recombinant DnaK was produced using a bacterial expression system and purified using affinity, ion-exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. DnaK induced the activation of MAPKs and NF-κB in DC and the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12 p40, as well as low levels of IL-10. DnaK induced phenotypic maturation of DC, as demonstrated by an up-regulation of costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86. DnaK stimulated DC through TLR4 and the adapters MyD88 and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFN-β (TRIF) that mediated differential responses. DnaK induced activation of MAPKs and NF-κB in a MyD88- or TRIF-dependent manner. However, the presence of MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways was essential for an optimal, DnaK-induced cytokine response in DC. In contrast, DnaK induced DC maturation in a TRIF-dependent, MyD88-independent manner. These results provide insight about the molecular interactions between an immunodominant antigen of F. tularensis and host immune cells, which is crucial for the rational design and development of a safe and efficacious vaccine against tularemia. PMID:18708593

  20. Regulation of ubiquitin-dependent cargo sorting by multiple endocytic adaptors at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, Jonathan R.; Wang, Lei; Pramanik, Jhuma; Johnson, Adam; Sarkeshik, Ali; Wang, Yueju; Saengsawang, Witchuda; Yates, John R.; Audhya, Anjon

    2013-01-01

    Endocytic protein trafficking is directed by sorting signals on cargo molecules that are recognized by cytosolic adaptor proteins. However, the steps necessary to segregate the variety of cargoes during endocytosis remain poorly defined. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, we demonstrate that multiple plasma membrane endocytic adaptors function redundantly to regulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis and to recruit components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery to the cell surface to direct the sorting of ubiquitin-modified substrates. Moreover, our data suggest that preassembly of cargoes with the ESCRT-0 complex at the plasma membrane enhances the efficiency of downstream sorting events in the endolysosomal system. In the absence of a heterooligomeric adaptor complex composed of FCHO, Eps15, and intersectin, ESCRT-0 accumulation at the cell surface is diminished, and the degradation of a ubiquitin-modified cargo slows significantly without affecting the rate of its clathrin-mediated internalization. Consistent with a role for the ESCRT machinery during cargo endocytosis, we further show that the ESCRT-0 complex accumulates at a subset of clathrin-coated pits on the surface of human cells. Our findings suggest a unique mechanism by which ubiquitin-modified cargoes are sequestered into the endolysosomal pathway. PMID:23818590

  1. The adaptor protein CIN85 assembles intracellular signaling clusters for B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Julius; Wong, Leo E; Pirkuliyeva, Sona; Schulz, Kathrin; Schwiegk, Claudia; Fünfgeld, Kevser Gencalp; Keppler, Selina; Batista, Facundo D; Urlaub, Henning; Habeck, Michael; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Wienands, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor molecule Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kD (CIN85) regulates signaling from a number of cell surface receptors, such as growth factor receptors and antigen receptors on lymphocytes. Because of its multidomain structure, CIN85 is thought to act as a classical adaptor protein that connects functionally distinct components of a given signaling pathway through diverse protein domains. However, we found that in B lymphocytes, CIN85 functions to oligomerize SLP-65, which is the central effector protein of the B cell receptor (BCR). Therefore, CIN85 trimerizes through a carboxyl-terminal, coiled-coil domain. The multiple Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of trimeric CIN85 molecules associated with multiple SLP-65 molecules, which recruited further CIN85 trimers, thereby perpetuating the oligomerization process. Formation of this oligomeric signaling complex in resting B cells rendered the cells poised for the efficient initiation of intracellular signaling upon BCR stimulation. Our data suggest that the functionality of signaling cascades does not rely solely on the qualitative linkage of their various components but requires a critical number of effectors to become concentrated in signaling complexes. PMID:27353366

  2. Targeted Inhibition of Phospholipase C γ2 Adaptor Function Blocks Osteoclastogenesis and Protects from Pathological Osteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Corinne; Hesker, Pamela; Zhang, Kaihua; Faccio, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C γ2 (PLCγ2) is a critical regulator of innate immune cells and osteoclasts (OCs) during inflammatory arthritis. Both the catalytic domain and the adaptor motifs of PLCγ2 are required for OC formation and function. Due to the high homology between the catalytic domains of PLCγ2 and the ubiquitously expressed PLCγ1, molecules encompassing the adaptor motifs of PLCγ2 were designed to test the hypothesis that uncoupling the adaptor and catalytic functions of PLCγ2 could specifically inhibit osteoclastogenesis and bone erosion. Wild-type (WT) bone marrow macrophages (BMM) that overexpress the tandem Src homology 2 (SH2) domains of PLCγ2 (SH2(N+C)) failed to form mature OCs and resorb bone in vitro. Activation of the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) signaling pathway, which is critical for OC development, was impaired in cells expressing SH2(N+C). Arrest in OC differentiation was evidenced by a reduction of p38 and Iκ-Bα phosphorylation as well as decreased NFATc1 and c-Fos/c-Jun levels. Consistent with our hypothesis, SH2(N+C) abrogated formation of the RANK-Gab2 complex, which mediates NF-κB and AP-1 activation following RANK ligand (RANKL) stimulation. Furthermore, the ability of SH2(N+C) to prevent inflammatory osteolysis was examined in vivo following RANKL or LPS injections over the calvaria. Both models induced osteolysis in the control group, whereas the SH2(N+C)-treated cohort was largely protected from bone erosion. Collectively, these data indicate that inflammatory osteolysis can be abrogated by treatment with a molecule composed of the tandem SH2 domains of PLCγ2. PMID:24081142

  3. Recruitment of the Adaptor Protein Grb2 to EGFR Tetramers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adaptor protein Grb2 binds phosphotyrosines in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) and thereby links receptor activation to intracellular signaling cascades. Here, we investigated how recruitment of Grb2 to EGFR is affected by the spatial organization and quaternary state of activated EGFR. We used the techniques of image correlation spectroscopy (ICS) and lifetime-detected Förster resonance energy transfer (also known as FLIM-based FRET or FLIM–FRET) to measure ligand-induced receptor clustering and Grb2 binding to activated EGFR in BaF/3 cells. BaF/3 cells were stably transfected with fluorescently labeled forms of Grb2 (Grb2–mRFP) and EGFR (EGFR–eGFP). Following stimulation of the cells with EGF, we detected nanometer-scale association of Grb2–mRFP with EGFR–eGFP clusters, which contained, on average, 4 ± 1 copies of EGFR–eGFP per cluster. In contrast, the pool of EGFR–eGFP without Grb2–mRFP had an average cluster size of 1 ± 0.3 EGFR molecules per punctum. In the absence of EGF, there was no association between EGFR–eGFP and Grb2–mRFP. To interpret these data, we extended our recently developed model for EGFR activation, which considers EGFR oligomerization up to tetramers, to include recruitment of Grb2 to phosphorylated EGFR. The extended model, with adjustment of one new parameter (the ratio of the Grb2 and EGFR copy numbers), is consistent with a cluster size distribution where 2% of EGFR monomers, 5% of EGFR dimers, <1% of EGFR trimers, and 94% of EGFR tetramers are associated with Grb2. Together, our experimental and modeling results further implicate tetrameric EGFR as the key signaling unit and call into question the widely held view that dimeric EGFR is the predominant signaling unit. PMID:24697349

  4. Stochastic Detection of MPSA-Gold Nanoparticles Using a α-Hemolysin Nanopore Equipped with a Noncovalent Molecular Adaptor.

    PubMed

    Campos, Elisa J; McVey, Colin E; Astier, Yann

    2016-06-21

    We present the first study of a novel, more sensitive method for the characterization of nanoparticles (NPs). This approach combines detection via a protein nanopore with modification of its interaction behavior using a molecular adaptor. We identify different populations of 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate (MPSA)-modified-gold NPs using the biological nanopores α-hemolysin (αHL) and its M113N mutant equipped with a noncovalently bound γ-cyclodextrin molecule as a stochastic sensor. Identification takes place on the basis of the extent of current blockades and residence times. Here, we demonstrate that noncovalently attached adaptors can be used to change the sensing properties of αHL nanopores, allowing the detection and characterization of different populations of MPSA NPs. This is an advance in sensitivity and diversity of NP sensing, as well as a promising and reliable technology to characterize NPs by using protein nanopores. PMID:27238076

  5. Hook Adaptors Induce Unidirectional Processive Motility by Enhancing the Dynein-Dynactin Interaction.

    PubMed

    Olenick, Mara A; Tokito, Mariko; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Dominguez, Roberto; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2016-08-26

    Cytoplasmic dynein drives the majority of minus end-directed vesicular and organelle motility in the cell. However, it remains unclear how dynein is spatially and temporally regulated given the variety of cargo that must be properly localized to maintain cellular function. Recent work has suggested that adaptor proteins provide a mechanism for cargo-specific regulation of motors. Of particular interest, studies in fungal systems have implicated Hook proteins in the regulation of microtubule motors. Here we investigate the role of mammalian Hook proteins, Hook1 and Hook3, as potential motor adaptors. We used optogenetic approaches to specifically recruit Hook proteins to organelles and observed rapid transport of peroxisomes to the perinuclear region of the cell. This rapid and efficient translocation of peroxisomes to microtubule minus ends indicates that mammalian Hook proteins activate dynein rather than kinesin motors. Biochemical studies indicate that Hook proteins interact with both dynein and dynactin, stabilizing the formation of a supramolecular complex. Complex formation requires the N-terminal domain of Hook proteins, which resembles the calponin-homology domain of end-binding (EB) proteins but cannot bind directly to microtubules. Single-molecule motility assays using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy indicate that both Hook1 and Hook3 effectively activate cytoplasmic dynein, inducing longer run lengths and higher velocities than the previously characterized dynein activator bicaudal D2 (BICD2). Together, these results suggest that dynein adaptors can differentially regulate dynein to allow for organelle-specific tuning of the motor for precise intracellular trafficking. PMID:27365401

  6. Differential expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling molecules in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Ariz; Masir, Noraidah; Elyamany, Ghaleb; Phang, Kean-Chang; Mahe, Etienne; Al-Zahrani, Ali Matar; Shabani-Rad, Meer-Taher; Stewart, Douglas Allan; Mansoor, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system (CNS DLBCL) is a distinct and aggressive lymphoma that is confined to CNS. Since, central nervous system is barrier-protected and immunologically silent; role of TLR/BCR signaling in pathogenesis and biology of CNS DLBCL is intriguing. Genomic mutations in key regulators of TLR/BCR signaling pathway (MYD88/CD79B/CARD11) have recently been reported in this disease. These observations raised possible implications in novel targeted therapies; however, expression pattern of molecules related to TLR/BCR pathways in this lymphoma remains unknown. We have analyzed the expression of 19 genes encoding TLR/BCR pathways and targets in CNS DLBCLs (n = 20) by Nanostring nCounter™ analysis and compared it with expression patterns in purified reactive B-lymphocytes and systemic diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (n = 20). Relative expression of TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, CD79B and BLNK was higher in CNS DLBCLs than in control B-lymphocytes; where as TLR7, MALT1, BCL10, CD79A and LYN was lower in CNS DLBCLs (P < 0.0001). When compared with systemic DLBCL samples, higher expression of TLR9, CD79B, CARD11, LYN and BLNK was noted in CNS DLBCL (>1.5 fold change; P < 0.01). The B cell receptor molecules like BLNK and CD79B were also associated with higher expression of MYD88 dependent TLRs (TLR4/5/9). In conclusion, we have shown over expression of TLR/BCR related genes or their targets, where genomic mutations have commonly been identified in CNS DLBCL. We have also demonstrated that TLR over expression closely relate with up regulation of genes associated with BCR pathway like CD79B/BLNK and CARD11, which play an important role in NF-kB pathway activation. Our results provide an important insight into the possibility of TLR and/or B-cell receptor signaling molecules as possible therapeutic targets in CNS DLBCL. PMID:25391967

  7. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity. PMID:26636078

  8. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Anselm H. C.; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity. PMID:26636078

  9. Interchangeable adaptors regulate mitochondrial dynamin assembly for membrane scission

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Sajjan; Guo, Qian; Kalia, Raghav; Bui, Huyen T.; Eckert, Debra M.; Frost, Adam; Shaw, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission is mediated by the dynamin-related GTPases Dnm1/Drp1 (yeast/mammals), which form spirals around constricted sites on mitochondria. Additional membrane-associated adaptor proteins (Fis1, Mdv1, Mff, and MiDs) are required to recruit these GTPases from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface. Whether these adaptors participate in both GTPase recruitment and membrane scission is not known. Here we use a yeast strain lacking all fission proteins to identify the minimal combinations of GTPases and adaptors sufficient for mitochondrial fission. Although Fis1 is dispensable for fission, membrane-anchored Mdv1, Mff, or MiDs paired individually with their respective GTPases are sufficient to divide mitochondria. In addition to their role in Drp1 membrane recruitment, MiDs coassemble with Drp1 in vitro. The resulting heteropolymer adopts a dramatically different structure with a narrower diameter than Drp1 homopolymers assembled in isolation. This result demonstrates that an adaptor protein alters the architecture of a mitochondrial dynamin GTPase polymer in a manner that could facilitate membrane constriction and severing activity. PMID:23530241

  10. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  11. Dendritic Cell Expression of the Signaling Molecule TRAF6 is Critical for Gut Microbiota-Dependent Immune Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Han, Daehee; Walsh, Matthew C.; Cejas, Pedro J.; Dang, Nicholas N.; Kim, Youngmi F.; Kim, Jihyun; Charrier-Hisamuddin, Laetitia; Chau, Lillian; Zhang, Qin; Bittinger, Kyle; Bushman, Frederic D.; Turka, Laurence A.; Shen, Hao; Reizis, Boris; DeFranco, Anthony L.; Wu, Gary D.; Choi, Yongwon

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The intracellular signaling molecule TRAF6 is critical for Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated activation of dendritic cells (DCs). We now report that DC-specific deletion of TRAF6 (TRAF6ΔDC) resulted, unexpectedly, in loss of mucosal tolerance, characterized by spontaneous development of T helper 2 (Th2) cells in the lamina propria, and eosinophilic enteritis and fibrosis in the small intestine. Loss of tolerance required the presence of gut commensal microbiota, but was independent of DC-expressed MyD88. Further, TRAF6ΔDC mice exhibited decreased regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers in the small intestine, and diminished induction of iTreg cells in response to model antigen. Evidence suggested this defect was associated with diminished DC expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Finally, we demonstrate that aberrant Th2 cell-associated responses in TRAF6ΔDC mice could be mitigated via restoration of Treg cell activity. Collectively, our findings reveal a role for TRAF6 in directing DC maintenance of intestinal immune tolerance through balanced induction of Treg versus Th2 cell immunity. PMID:23791643

  12. Designing Anti-inflammatory Drugs from Parasitic Worms: A Synthetic Small Molecule Analogue of the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62 Prevents Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increasing evidence that parasitic worms may protect humans from developing allergic and autoimmune diseases and the continuing identification of defined helminth-derived immunomodulatory molecules, to date no new anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed from these organisms. We have approached this matter in a novel manner by synthesizing a library of drug-like small molecules based upon phosphorylcholine, the active moiety of the anti-inflammatory Acanthocheilonema viteae product, ES-62, which as an immunogenic protein is unsuitable for use as a drug. Following preliminary in vitro screening for inhibitory effects on relevant macrophage cytokine responses, a sulfone-containing phosphorylcholine analogue (11a) was selected for testing in an in vivo model of inflammation, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Testing revealed that 11a was as effective as ES-62 in protecting DBA/1 mice from developing CIA and mirrored its mechanism of action in downregulating the TLR/IL-1R transducer, MyD88. 11a is thus a novel prototype for anti-inflammatory drug development. PMID:24228757

  13. Characterization and Structure of the Vaccinia Virus NF-κB Antagonist A46 *

    PubMed Central

    Fedosyuk, Sofiya; Grishkovskaya, Irina; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Skern, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Successful vaccinia virus (VACV) replication in the host requires expression of viral proteins that interfere with host immunity, such as antagonists of the activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. Two such VACV proteins are A46 and A52. A46 interacts with the Toll-like receptor/interleukin-1R (TIR) domain of Toll-like receptors and intracellular adaptors such as MAL (MyD88 adapter-like), TRAM (TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-related adaptor molecule), TRIF, and MyD88, whereas A52 binds to the downstream signaling components TRAF6 and IRAK2. Here, we characterize A46 biochemically, determine by microscale thermophoresis binding constants for the interaction of A46 with the TIR domains of MyD88 and MAL, and present the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of A46 residues 87–229. Full-length A46 behaves as a tetramer; variants lacking the N-terminal 80 residues are dimeric. Nevertheless, both bind to the Toll-like receptor domains of MAL and MyD88 with KD values in the low μm range. Like A52, A46 also shows a Bcl-2-like fold but with biologically relevant differences from that of A52. Thus, A46 uses helices α4 and α6 to dimerize, compared with the α1-α6 face used by A52 and other Bcl-2 like VACV proteins. Furthermore, the loop between A46 helices α4-α5 is flexible and shorter than in A52; there is also evidence for an intramolecular disulfide bridge between consecutive cysteine residues. We used molecular docking to propose how A46 interacts with the BB loop of the TRAM TIR domain. Comparisons of A46 and A52 exemplify how subtle changes in viral proteins with the same fold lead to crucial differences in biological activity. PMID:24356965

  14. MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Leyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Fang; Cleveland, Joseph; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Li, Yu; Zhang, Dekai

    2016-01-15

    Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling. PMID:26565030

  15. Toll-like receptor signaling for the induction of mucin expression by lipopolysaccharide in the hen vagina.

    PubMed

    Ariyadi, B; Isobe, N; Yoshimura, Y

    2014-03-01

    We previously reported that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a ligand of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), induced mucin mRNA to enhance the mucosal barrier in the hen vagina. The aim of this study was to determine the intracellular signaling molecules for that mucin induction, and the effect of molting and estrogen on their expression. The expression of TLR4, its adaptor molecules, and transcriptional factors in the vaginal mucosa of laying and molting hens treated with or without estradiol was examined by reverse-transcription PCR. The expression of mucin in the cultured mucosal tissue stimulated by LPS together with inhibitors of transcriptional factors was analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. The expression of TLR4, its adaptor molecule, namely, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) or Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFN-β (TRIF), and transcriptional factors, namely, cFos and cJun, declined in molting hens compared with that in laying hens, and were upregulated by estradiol. In vagina of laying hens, mucin expression was upregulated by LPS, whereas it was suppressed by inhibitors of transcriptional factors, namely, ALLN (an inhibitor of IκB proteolysis), BAY-117085 (an NFκB inhibitor), U0126 [a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor], and transhinone IIA [an activated protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor]. These results suggest that a MyD88-dependent pathway downstream of TLR4 and transcriptional factors of NFκB and AP-1 participate in the induction of mucin expression by LPS in the vaginal mucosa. These signaling functions may decline during molting owing to the decline in the level of circulating estrogen. Such mucin expression system may play a role in the mucosal barrier against infection in the vaginal mucosa. PMID:24604861

  16. Reconstructing the TIR Side of the Myddosome: a Paradigm for TIR-TIR Interactions.

    PubMed

    Vyncke, Laurens; Bovijn, Celia; Pauwels, Ewald; Van Acker, Tim; Ruyssinck, Elien; Burg, Elianne; Tavernier, Jan; Peelman, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Members of the Toll-like receptor and interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor families all signal via Toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain-driven assemblies with adaptors such as MyD88. We here combine the mammalian two-hybrid system MAPPIT and saturation mutagenesis to complement and extend crystallographic and nuclear magnetic resonance data, and reveal how TIR domains interact. We fully delineate the interaction sites on the MyD88 TIR domain for homo-oligomerization and for interaction with Mal and TLR4. Interactions between three sites drive MyD88 homo-oligomerization. The BB-loop interacts with the αE-helix, explaining how BB-loop mimetics inhibit MyD88 signaling. The αC'-helix interacts symmetrically. The MyD88 TIR domains thus assemble into a left-handed helix, compatible with the Myddosome death domain crystal structure. This assembly explains activation of MyD88 by Mal and by an oncogenic mutation, and regulation by phosphorylation. These findings provide a paradigm for the interaction of mammalian TIR domains. PMID:26876098

  17. Overexpression of myeloid differentiation protein 88 in mice induces mild cardiac dysfunction, but no deficit in heart morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W.; Huang, Z.; Jiang, X.; Li, C.; Gao, X.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling involves changes in heart shape, size, structure, and function after injury to the myocardium. The proinflammatory adaptor protein myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88) contributes to cardiac remodeling. To investigate whether excessive MyD88 levels initiate spontaneous cardiac remodeling at the whole-organism level, we generated a transgenic MyD88 mouse model with a cardiac-specific promoter. MyD88 mice (male, 20-30 g, n=∼80) were born at the expected Mendelian ratio and demonstrated similar morphology of the heart and cardiomyocytes with that of wild-type controls. Although heart weight was unaffected, cardiac contractility of MyD88 hearts was mildly reduced, as shown by echocardiographic examination, compared with wild-type controls. Moreover, the cardiac dysfunction phenotype was associated with elevation of ANF and BNP expression. Collectively, our data provide novel evidence of the critical role of balanced MyD88 signaling in maintaining physiological function in the adult heart. PMID:26628395

  18. Toll-like receptor signaling in colorectal cancer: Carcinogenesis to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting-Ting; Ogino, Shuji; Qian, Zhi Rong

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ line encoded innate immune sensors that recognize conserved microbial structures and host alarmins, and signal expression of major histocompatibility complex proteins, costimulatory molecules, and inflammatory mediators by macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and other cell types. These protein receptors are characterized by their ability to respond to invading pathogens promptly by recognizing particular TLR ligands, including flagellin and lipopolysaccharide of bacteria, nucleic acids derived from viruses, and zymosan of fungi. There are 2 major TLR pathways; one is mediated by myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MYD88) adaptor proteins, and the other is independent of MYD88. The MYD88-dependent pathway involves early-phase activation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells 1 (NF-κB1) and all the TLRs, except TLR3, have been shown to activate this pathway. TLR3 and TLR4 act via MYD88-independent pathways with delayed activation of NF-κB signaling. TLRs play a vital role in activating immune responses. TLRs have been shown to mediate inflammatory responses and maintain epithelial barrier homeostasis, and are highly likely to be involved in the activation of a number of pathways following cancer therapy. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers, and accounts for almost half a million deaths annually worldwide. Inflammation is considered a risk factor for many common malignancies including cancers of the colorectum. The key molecules involved in inflammation-driven carcinogenesis include TLRs. As sensors of cell death and tissue remodeling, TLRs may have a universal role in cancer; stimulation of TLRs to activate the innate immune system has been a legitimate therapeutic strategy for some years. TLRs 3/4/7/8/9 are all validated targets for cancer therapy, and a number of companies are developing agonists and vaccine adjuvants. On the other hand, antagonists may favor inhibition

  19. The Clathrin Adaptor Gga2p Is a Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate Effector at the Golgi Exit

    PubMed Central

    Demmel, Lars; Gravert, Maike; Ercan, Ebru; Habermann, Bianca; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Kukhtina, Viktoria; Haucke, Volker; Baust, Thorsten; Sohrmann, Marc; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Klose, Christian; Beck, Mike; Peter, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) is a key regulator of membrane transport required for the formation of transport carriers from the trans-Golgi network (TGN). The molecular mechanisms of PI(4)P signaling in this process are still poorly understood. In a search for PI(4)P effector molecules, we performed a screen for synthetic lethals in a background of reduced PI(4)P and found the gene GGA2. Our analysis uncovered a PI(4)P-dependent recruitment of the clathrin adaptor Gga2p to the TGN during Golgi-to-endosome trafficking. Gga2p recruitment to liposomes is stimulated both by PI(4)P and the small GTPase Arf1p in its active conformation, implicating these two molecules in the recruitment of Gga2p to the TGN, which ultimately controls the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. PI(4)P binding occurs through a phosphoinositide-binding signature within the N-terminal VHS domain of Gga2p resembling a motif found in other clathrin interacting proteins. These data provide an explanation for the TGN-specific membrane recruitment of Gga2p. PMID:18287542

  20. A Big-Five Personality Profile of the Adaptor and Innovator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwang, Ng Aik; Rodrigues, Daphne

    2002-01-01

    A study explored the relationship between two creative types (adaptor and innovator) and the Big Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience), in 164 teachers in Singapore. Adaptors were significantly more conscientious than innovators, while innovators were significantly more…

  1. IL-33 enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokine production from mouse macrophages by regulating lipopolysaccharide receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Espinassous, Quentin; Garcia-de-Paco, Elvira; Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Synguelakis, Monique; von Aulock, Sonja; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Kanellopoulos, Jean

    2009-07-15

    Bacterial LPS triggers monocytes and macrophages to produce several inflammatory cytokines and mediators. However, once exposed to LPS, they become hyporesponsive to a subsequent endotoxin challenge. This phenomenon is defined as LPS desensitization or tolerance. Previous studies have identified some components of the biochemical pathways involved in negative modulation of LPS responses. In particular, it has been shown that the IL-1R-related protein ST2 could be implicated in LPS tolerance. The natural ligand of ST2 was recently identified as IL-33, a new member of the IL-1 family. In this study, we investigated whether IL-33 triggering of ST2 was able to induce LPS desensitization of mouse macrophages. We found that IL-33 actually enhances the LPS response of macrophages and does not induce LPS desensitization. We demonstrate that this IL-33 enhancing effect of LPS response is mediated by the ST2 receptor because it is not found in ST2 knockout mice. The biochemical consequences of IL-33 pretreatment of mouse macrophages were investigated. Our results show that IL-33 increases the expression of the LPS receptor components MD2 (myeloid differentiation protein 2) and TLR-4, the soluble form of CD14 and the MyD88 adaptor molecule. In addition, IL-33 pretreatment of macrophages enhances the cytokine response to TLR-2 but not to TLR-3 ligands. Thus, IL-33 treatment preferentially affects the MyD88-dependent pathway activated by the TLR. PMID:19553541

  2. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P.; Paterson, Neil G.; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-01-01

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  3. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P; Paterson, Neil G; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-08-25

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  4. Toll receptors and pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo

    2003-03-01

    Toll receptors in insects, mammals and plants are key players that sense the invasion of pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in mammals have been established to detect specific components of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that TLRs are involved in the recognition of viral invasion. Signalling pathways via TLRs originate from the conserved Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The TIR domain-containing MyD88 acts as a common adaptor that induces inflammatory cytokines; however, there exists a MyD88-independent pathway that induces type I IFNs in TLR4 and TLR3 signalling. Another TIR domain-containing adaptor, TIRAP/Mal has recently been shown to mediate the MyD88-dependent activation in the TLR4 and TLR2 signalling pathway. Thus, individual TLRs may have their own signalling systems that characterize their specific activities. PMID:12614458

  5. Two Clathrin Adaptor Protein Complexes Instruct Axon-Dendrite Polarity.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengpeng; Merrill, Sean A; Jorgensen, Erik M; Shen, Kang

    2016-05-01

    The cardinal feature of neuronal polarization is the establishment and maintenance of axons and dendrites. How axonal and dendritic proteins are sorted and targeted to different compartments is poorly understood. Here, we identified distinct dileucine motifs that are necessary and sufficient to target transmembrane proteins to either the axon or the dendrite through direct interactions with the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complexes (APs) in C. elegans. Axonal targeting requires AP-3, while dendritic targeting is mediated by AP-1. The axonal dileucine motif binds to AP-3 with higher efficiency than to AP-1. Both AP-3 and AP-1 are localized to the Golgi but occupy adjacent domains. We propose that AP-3 and AP-1 directly select transmembrane proteins and target them to axon and dendrite, respectively, by sorting them into distinct vesicle pools. PMID:27151641

  6. Phosphoinositides, kinases and adaptors coordinating endocytosis in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Paul T; Field, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    In the kinetoplastid parasite Trypanosoma brucei clathrin-mediated endocytosis is essential for survival and aids immune evasion in the mammalian host. The formation of endocytic clathrin coated vesicles in T. brucei is via a unique mechanism owing to an evolutionarily recent loss of the adaptor protein (AP)2 complex, a central hub in endocytic vesicle assembly. Despite this loss, recent studies examining endocytic clathrin coat assembly have highlighted a high degree of conservation between trypanosomes and their mammalian hosts. In particular phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) and its putative effectors, TbCALM and TbEpsinR, are central to clathrin-mediated endocytosis in the trypanosome, just as they are in animal cells. In addition to providing insights into the cell biology of T. brucei, these studies also suggest an ancient, possibly pan-eukaryotic connection between PtdIns(4,5)P2 and endocytosis. PMID:27064836

  7. Shugoshins: Tension-Sensitive Pericentromeric Adaptors Safeguarding Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The shugoshin/Mei-S332 family are proteins that associate with the chromosomal region surrounding the centromere (the pericentromere) and that play multiple and distinct roles in ensuring the accuracy of chromosome segregation during both mitosis and meiosis. The underlying role of shugoshins appears to be to serve as pericentromeric adaptor proteins that recruit several different effectors to this region of the chromosome to regulate processes critical for chromosome segregation. Crucially, shugoshins undergo changes in their localization in response to the tension that is exerted on sister chromosomes by the forces of the spindle that will pull them apart. This has led to the idea that shugoshins provide a platform for activities required at the pericentromere only when sister chromosomes lack tension. Conversely, disassembly of the shugoshin pericentromeric platform may provide a signal that sister chromosomes are under tension. Here the functions and regulation of these important tension-sensitive pericentromeric proteins are discussed. PMID:25452306

  8. Redirecting adenoviruses to tumour cells using therapeutic antibodies: Generation of a versatile human bispecific adaptor.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Snezana; Beale, Emma V; Bonomelli, Camille; Easthope, Iona S; Pritchard, Laura K; Seabright, Gemma E; Caputo, Alessandro T; Scanlan, Christopher N; Dalziel, Martin; Crispin, Max

    2015-12-01

    Effective use of adenovirus-5 (Ad5) in cancer therapy is heavily dependent on the degree to which the virus's natural tropism can be subverted to one that favours tumour cells. This is normally achieved through either engineering of the viral fiber knob or the use of bispecific adaptors that display both adenovirus and tumour antigen receptors. One of the main limitations of these strategies is the need to tailor each engineering event to any given tumour antigen. Here, we explore bispecific adaptors that can utilise established anti-cancer therapeutic antibodies. Conjugates containing bacterially derived antibody binding motifs are efficient at retargeting virus to antibody targets. Here, we develop a humanized strategy whereby we synthesise a re-targeting adaptor based on a chimeric Ad5 ligand/antibody receptor construct. This adaptor acts as a molecular bridge analogous to therapeutic antibody mediated cross-linking of cytotoxic effector and tumour cells during immunotherapy. As a proof or principle, we demonstrate how this adaptor allows efficient viral recognition and entry into carcinoma cells through the therapeutic monoclonal antibodies Herceptin/trastuzumab and bavituximab. We show that targeting can be augmented by use of contemporary antibody enhancement strategies such as the selective elimination of competing serum IgG using "receptor refocusing" enzymes and we envisage that further improvements are achievable by enhancing the affinities between the adaptor and its ligands. Humanized bispecific adaptors offer the promise of a versatile retargeting technology that can exploit both clinically approved adenovirus and therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26391350

  9. Tetraspanins and Transmembrane Adaptor Proteins As Plasma Membrane Organizers—Mast Cell Case

    PubMed Central

    Halova, Ivana; Draber, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains diverse and specialized membrane domains, which include tetraspanin-enriched domains (TEMs) and transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP)-enriched domains. Recent biophysical, microscopic, and functional studies indicated that TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains are involved in compartmentalization of physicochemical events of such important processes as immunoreceptor signal transduction and chemotaxis. Moreover, there is evidence of a cross-talk between TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains. In this review we discuss the presence and function of such domains and their crosstalk using mast cells as a model. The combined data based on analysis of selected mast cell-expressed tetraspanins [cluster of differentiation (CD)9, CD53, CD63, CD81, CD151)] or TRAPs [linker for activation of T cells (LAT), non-T cell activation linker (NTAL), and phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (PAG)] using knockout mice or specific antibodies point to a diversity within these two families and bring evidence of the important roles of these molecules in signaling events. An example of this diversity is physical separation of two TRAPs, LAT and NTAL, which are in many aspects similar but show plasma membrane location in different microdomains in both non-activated and activated cells. Although our understanding of TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these domains are under way. PMID:27243007

  10. Conserved interdomain linker promotes phase separation of the multivalent adaptor protein Nck

    PubMed Central

    Banjade, Sudeep; Wu, Qiong; Mittal, Anuradha; Peeples, William B.; Pappu, Rohit V.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of membranes, the cytosol, and the nucleus of eukaryotic cells can be controlled through phase separation of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Collective interactions of multivalent molecules mediated by modular binding domains can induce gelation and phase separation in several cytosolic and membrane-associated systems. The adaptor protein Nck has three SRC-homology 3 (SH3) domains that bind multiple proline-rich segments in the actin regulatory protein neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and an SH2 domain that binds to multiple phosphotyrosine sites in the adhesion protein nephrin, leading to phase separation. Here, we show that the 50-residue linker between the first two SH3 domains of Nck enhances phase separation of Nck/N-WASP/nephrin assemblies. Two linear motifs within this element, as well as its overall positively charged character, are important for this effect. The linker increases the driving force for self-assembly of Nck, likely through weak interactions with the second SH3 domain, and this effect appears to promote phase separation. The linker sequence is highly conserved, suggesting that the sequence determinants of the driving forces for phase separation may be generally important to Nck functions. Our studies demonstrate that linker regions between modular domains can contribute to the driving forces for self-assembly and phase separation of multivalent proteins. PMID:26553976

  11. The Role of the Clathrin Adaptor AP-1: Polarized Sorting and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Fubito; Hase, Koji; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The selective transport of proteins or lipids by vesicular transport is a fundamental process supporting cellular physiology. The budding process involves cargo sorting and vesicle formation at the donor membrane and constitutes an important process in vesicular transport. This process is particularly important for the polarized sorting in epithelial cells, in which the cargo molecules need to be selectively sorted and transported to two distinct destinations, the apical or basolateral plasma membrane. Adaptor protein (AP)-1, a member of the AP complex family, which includes the ubiquitously expressed AP-1A and the epithelium-specific AP-1B, regulates polarized sorting at the trans-Golgi network and/or at the recycling endosomes. A growing body of evidence, especially from studies using model organisms and animals, demonstrates that the AP-1-mediated polarized sorting supports the development and physiology of multi-cellular units as functional organs and tissues (e.g., cell fate determination, inflammation and gut immune homeostasis). Furthermore, a possible involvement of AP-1B in the pathogenesis of human diseases, such as Crohn’s disease and cancer, is now becoming evident. These data highlight the significant contribution of AP-1 complexes to the physiology of multicellular organisms, as master regulators of polarized sorting in epithelial cells. PMID:25387275

  12. Adaptor Protein 2 Regulates Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Cyst Formation in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Maria R.; Vranych, Cecilia V.; Bisbal, Mariano; Maletto, Belkys A.; Ropolo, Andrea S.; Touz, Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The parasite Giardia lamblia possesses peripheral vacuoles (PVs) that function as both endosomes and lysosomes and are implicated in the adaptation, differentiation, and survival of the parasite in different environments. The mechanisms by which Giardia traffics essential proteins to these organelles and regulates their secretion have important implications in the control of parasite dissemination. In this study, we describe the participation of the heterotetrameric clathrin-adaptor protein gAP2 complex in lysosomal protein trafficking. A specific monoclonal antibody against the medium subunit (gμ2) of gAP2 showed localization of this complex to the PVs, cytoplasm, and plasma membrane in the growing trophozoites. gAP2 also colocalized with clathrin in the PVs, suggesting its involvement in endocytosis. Uptake experiments using standard molecules for the study of endocytosis revealed that gAP2 specifically participated in the endocytosis of LDL. Targeted downregulation of the gene encoding gμ2 in growing and encysting trophozoites resulted in a large decrease in the amount of cell growth and cyst wall formation, suggesting a distinct mechanism in which gAP2 is directly involved in both endocytosis and vesicular trafficking. PMID:20199400

  13. Probing heterobivalent binding to the endocytic AP-2 adaptor complex by DNA-based spatial screening.

    PubMed

    Diezmann, F; von Kleist, L; Haucke, V; Seitz, O

    2015-08-01

    The double helical DNA scaffold offers a unique set of properties, which are particularly useful for studies of multivalency in biomolecular interactions: (i) multivalent ligand displays can be formed upon nucleic acid hybridization in a self-assembly process, which facilitates spatial screening (ii) valency and spatial arrangement of the ligand display can be precisely controlled and (iii) the flexibility of the ligand display can be adjusted by integrating nick sites and unpaired template regions. Herein we describe the use of DNA-based spatial screening for the characterization of the adaptor complex 2 (AP-2), a central interaction hub within the endocytic protein network in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. AP-2 is comprised of a core domain and two, so-called appendage domains, the α- and the β2-ear, which associate with cytoplasmatic proteins required for the formation or maturation of clathrin/AP-2 coated pits. Each appendage domain has two binding grooves which recognize distinct peptide motives with micromolar affinity. This provides opportunities for enhanced interactions with protein molecules that contain two (or more) different peptide motives. To determine whether a particular, spatial arrangement of binding motifs is required for high affinity binding we probed the distance-affinity relationships by means of DNA-programmed spatial screening with self-assembled peptide-DNA complexes. By using trimolecular and tetramolecular assemblies two different peptides were positioned in 2-22 nucleotide distance. The binding data obtained with both recombinant protein in well-defined buffer systems and native AP-2 in brain extract suggests that the two binding sites of the AP-2 α-appendage can cooperate to provide up to 40-fold enhancement of affinity compared to the monovalent interaction. The distance between the two recognized peptide motives was less important provided that the DNA duplex segments were connected by flexible, single strand segments. By

  14. Molecular basis for the specific recognition of the metazoan cyclic GMP-AMP by the innate immune adaptor protein STING

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Heping; Wu, Jiaxi; Chen, Zhijian J.; Chen, Chuo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP containing a unique combination of mixed phosphodiester linkages (2′3′-cGAMP) is an endogenous second messenger molecule that activates the type-I IFN pathway upon binding to the homodimer of the adaptor protein STING on the surface of endoplasmic reticulum membrane. However, the preferential binding of the asymmetric ligand 2′3′-cGAMP to the symmetric dimer of STING represents a physicochemical enigma. Here we show that 2′3′-cGAMP, but not its linkage isomers, adopts an organized free-ligand conformation that resembles the STING-bound conformation and pays low entropy and enthalpy costs in converting into the active conformation. Our results demonstrate that analyses of free-ligand conformations can be as important as analyses of protein conformations in understanding protein–ligand interactions. PMID:26150511

  15. The epsin family of endocytic adaptors promotes fibrosarcoma migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Coon, Brian G; Burgner, John; Camonis, Jacques H; Aguilar, R Claudio

    2010-10-22

    Abnormalities in the process of endocytosis are classically linked to malignant transformation through the deficient down-regulation of signaling receptors. The present study describes a non-classical mechanism that does not require internalization by which endocytic proteins affect cell migration and basement membrane invasion. Specifically, we found that the endocytic adaptor epsin binds and regulates the biological properties of the signaling molecule RalBP1 (Ral-binding protein 1). Epsin interacted with the N terminus of RalBP1 via its characteristic epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain. A combination of siRNA-mediated knock-down and transfection of siRNA-resistant constructs in fibrosarcoma cells demonstrated that impairment of the epsin-RalBP1 interaction led to cell migration and basement membrane invasion defects. We found the ENTH domain was necessary and sufficient to sustain normal cell migration and invasion. Because all the epsin endocytic motifs reside in the C-terminal part of the molecule, these results suggest that this novel regulatory circuit does not require endocytosis. In addition, cells depleted of epsin-RalBP1 complex displayed deficient activation of Rac1 and Arf6 suggesting a signaling function for this novel interaction. Further, overexpression of either epsin or RalBP1 enhanced migration and invasion of fibrosarcoma cells. Collectively, our results indicate that epsin regulates RalBP1 function in Rac1- and Arf6-dependent pathways to ultimately affect cell migration and invasion. We propose that the observed up-regulation of both epsin and RalBP1 in certain cancers contributes to their invasive characteristics. PMID:20709745

  16. The Epsin Family of Endocytic Adaptors Promotes Fibrosarcoma Migration and Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Brian G.; Burgner, John; Camonis, Jacques H.; Aguilar, R. Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in the process of endocytosis are classically linked to malignant transformation through the deficient down-regulation of signaling receptors. The present study describes a non-classical mechanism that does not require internalization by which endocytic proteins affect cell migration and basement membrane invasion. Specifically, we found that the endocytic adaptor epsin binds and regulates the biological properties of the signaling molecule RalBP1 (Ral-binding protein 1). Epsin interacted with the N terminus of RalBP1 via its characteristic epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain. A combination of siRNA-mediated knock-down and transfection of siRNA-resistant constructs in fibrosarcoma cells demonstrated that impairment of the epsin-RalBP1 interaction led to cell migration and basement membrane invasion defects. We found the ENTH domain was necessary and sufficient to sustain normal cell migration and invasion. Because all the epsin endocytic motifs reside in the C-terminal part of the molecule, these results suggest that this novel regulatory circuit does not require endocytosis. In addition, cells depleted of epsin-RalBP1 complex displayed deficient activation of Rac1 and Arf6 suggesting a signaling function for this novel interaction. Further, overexpression of either epsin or RalBP1 enhanced migration and invasion of fibrosarcoma cells. Collectively, our results indicate that epsin regulates RalBP1 function in Rac1- and Arf6-dependent pathways to ultimately affect cell migration and invasion. We propose that the observed up-regulation of both epsin and RalBP1 in certain cancers contributes to their invasive characteristics. PMID:20709745

  17. Oncogenic transformation by the signaling adaptor proteins insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin receptor substrates (IRSs) are adaptor proteins that link signaling from upstream activators to multiple downstream effectors to modulate normal growth, metabolism, survival, and differentiation. Recent cell culture studies have shown that IRSs can interact with, and are functionally require...

  18. Bicaudal D Family of Motor Adaptors: Linking Dynein Motility to Cargo Binding.

    PubMed

    Hoogenraad, Casper C; Akhmanova, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Transport of different intracellular cargoes along cytoskeleton filaments is essential for the morphogenesis and function of a broad variety of eukaryotic cells. Intracellular transport is mediated by cytoskeletal motors including myosin, kinesin, and dynein, which are typically linked to various cargoes by adaptor proteins. Recent studies suggest that adaptor proteins can also act as essential transport cofactors, which control motor activity and coordination. Characterization of the evolutionary conserved Bicaudal D (BICD) family of dynein adaptor proteins has provided important insights into the fundamental mechanisms governing cargo trafficking. This review highlights the advances in the current understanding of how BICD adaptors regulate microtubule-based transport and how they contribute to developmental processes and human disease. PMID:26822037

  19. Clathrin binding by the adaptor Ent5 promotes late stages of clathrin coat maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chao-Wei; Duncan, Mara C.

    2016-01-01

    Clathrin is a ubiquitous protein that mediates membrane traffic at many locations. To function, clathrin requires clathrin adaptors that link it to transmembrane protein cargo. In addition to this cargo selection function, many adaptors also play mechanistic roles in the formation of the transport carrier. However, the full spectrum of these mechanistic roles is poorly understood. Here we report that Ent5, an endosomal clathrin adaptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, regulates the behavior of clathrin coats after the recruitment of clathrin. We show that loss of Ent5 disrupts clathrin-dependent traffic and prolongs the lifespan of endosomal structures that contain clathrin and other adaptors, suggesting a defect in coat maturation at a late stage. We find that the direct binding of Ent5 with clathrin is required for its role in coat behavior and cargo traffic. Surprisingly, the interaction of Ent5 with other adaptors is dispensable for coat behavior but not cargo traffic. These findings support a model in which Ent5 clathrin binding performs a mechanistic role in coat maturation, whereas Ent5 adaptor binding promotes cargo incorporation. PMID:26842894

  20. Inhibition of TLR2 signaling by small molecule inhibitors targeting a pocket within the TLR2 TIR domain.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Pragnesh; Laird, Michelle H W; Schwarz, Ryan S; Greene, Shannon; Dyson, Tristan; Snyder, Greg A; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Chauhan, Jay; Fletcher, Steven; Toshchakov, Vladimir Y; MacKerell, Alexander D; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2015-04-28

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is initiated by dimerization of intracellular Toll/IL-1 receptor resistance (TIR) domains. For all TLRs except TLR3, recruitment of the adapter, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), to TLR TIR domains results in downstream signaling culminating in proinflammatory cytokine production. Therefore, blocking TLR TIR dimerization may ameliorate TLR2-mediated hyperinflammatory states. The BB loop within the TLR TIR domain is critical for mediating certain protein-protein interactions. Examination of the human TLR2 TIR domain crystal structure revealed a pocket adjacent to the highly conserved P681 and G682 BB loop residues. Using computer-aided drug design (CADD), we sought to identify a small molecule inhibitor(s) that would fit within this pocket and potentially disrupt TLR2 signaling. In silico screening identified 149 compounds and 20 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs based on their predicted ability to bind in the BB loop pocket. These compounds were screened in HEK293T-TLR2 transfectants for the ability to inhibit TLR2-mediated IL-8 mRNA. C16H15NO4 (C29) was identified as a potential TLR2 inhibitor. C29, and its derivative, ortho-vanillin (o-vanillin), inhibited TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 signaling induced by synthetic and bacterial TLR2 agonists in human HEK-TLR2 and THP-1 cells, but only TLR2/1 signaling in murine macrophages. C29 failed to inhibit signaling induced by other TLR agonists and TNF-α. Mutagenesis of BB loop pocket residues revealed an indispensable role for TLR2/1, but not TLR2/6, signaling, suggesting divergent roles. Mice treated with o-vanillin exhibited reduced TLR2-induced inflammation. Our data provide proof of principle that targeting the BB loop pocket is an effective approach for identification of TLR2 signaling inhibitors. PMID:25870276

  1. A dual-band adaptor for infrared imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Adam G; Ahn, J.W.; Maingi, Rajesh; Gray, T. K.; Roquemore, L.

    2012-01-01

    A novel imaging adaptor providing the capability to extend a standard single-band infrared (IR) camera into a two-color or dual-band device has been developed for application to high-speed IR thermography on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX). Temperature measurement with two-band infrared imaging has the advantage of being mostly independent of surface emissivity, which may vary significantly in the liquid lithium divertor installed on NSTX as compared to that of an all-carbon first wall. In order to take advantage of the high-speed capability of the existing IR camera at NSTX (1.6-6.2 kHz frame rate), a commercial visible-range optical splitter was extensively modified to operate in the medium wavelength and long wavelength IR. This two-band IR adapter utilizes a dichroic beamsplitter, which reflects 4-6 mu m wavelengths and transmits 7-10 mu m wavelength radiation, each with >95% efficiency and projects each IR channel image side-by-side on the camera's detector. Cutoff filters are used in each IR channel, and ZnSe imaging optics and mirrors optimized for broadband IR use are incorporated into the design. In-situ and ex-situ temperature calibration and preliminary data of the NSTX divertor during plasma discharges are presented, with contrasting results for dual-band vs. single-band IR operation.

  2. A dual-band adaptor for infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    McLean, A G; Ahn, J-W; Maingi, R; Gray, T K; Roquemore, A L

    2012-05-01

    A novel imaging adaptor providing the capability to extend a standard single-band infrared (IR) camera into a two-color or dual-band device has been developed for application to high-speed IR thermography on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX). Temperature measurement with two-band infrared imaging has the advantage of being mostly independent of surface emissivity, which may vary significantly in the liquid lithium divertor installed on NSTX as compared to that of an all-carbon first wall. In order to take advantage of the high-speed capability of the existing IR camera at NSTX (1.6-6.2 kHz frame rate), a commercial visible-range optical splitter was extensively modified to operate in the medium wavelength and long wavelength IR. This two-band IR adapter utilizes a dichroic beamsplitter, which reflects 4-6 μm wavelengths and transmits 7-10 μm wavelength radiation, each with >95% efficiency and projects each IR channel image side-by-side on the camera's detector. Cutoff filters are used in each IR channel, and ZnSe imaging optics and mirrors optimized for broadband IR use are incorporated into the design. In-situ and ex-situ temperature calibration and preliminary data of the NSTX divertor during plasma discharges are presented, with contrasting results for dual-band vs. single-band IR operation. PMID:22667624

  3. A dual-band adaptor for infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, A. G.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Gray, T. K.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2012-05-01

    A novel imaging adaptor providing the capability to extend a standard single-band infrared (IR) camera into a two-color or dual-band device has been developed for application to high-speed IR thermography on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX). Temperature measurement with two-band infrared imaging has the advantage of being mostly independent of surface emissivity, which may vary significantly in the liquid lithium divertor installed on NSTX as compared to that of an all-carbon first wall. In order to take advantage of the high-speed capability of the existing IR camera at NSTX (1.6-6.2 kHz frame rate), a commercial visible-range optical splitter was extensively modified to operate in the medium wavelength and long wavelength IR. This two-band IR adapter utilizes a dichroic beamsplitter, which reflects 4-6 μm wavelengths and transmits 7-10 μm wavelength radiation, each with >95% efficiency and projects each IR channel image side-by-side on the camera's detector. Cutoff filters are used in each IR channel, and ZnSe imaging optics and mirrors optimized for broadband IR use are incorporated into the design. In-situ and ex-situ temperature calibration and preliminary data of the NSTX divertor during plasma discharges are presented, with contrasting results for dual-band vs. single-band IR operation.

  4. A dual-band adaptor for infrared imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, A. G.; Ahn, J-W.; Maingi, R.; Gray, T. K.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2012-05-15

    A novel imaging adaptor providing the capability to extend a standard single-band infrared (IR) camera into a two-color or dual-band device has been developed for application to high-speed IR thermography on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX). Temperature measurement with two-band infrared imaging has the advantage of being mostly independent of surface emissivity, which may vary significantly in the liquid lithium divertor installed on NSTX as compared to that of an all-carbon first wall. In order to take advantage of the high-speed capability of the existing IR camera at NSTX (1.6-6.2 kHz frame rate), a commercial visible-range optical splitter was extensively modified to operate in the medium wavelength and long wavelength IR. This two-band IR adapter utilizes a dichroic beamsplitter, which reflects 4-6 {mu}m wavelengths and transmits 7-10 {mu}m wavelength radiation, each with >95% efficiency and projects each IR channel image side-by-side on the camera's detector. Cutoff filters are used in each IR channel, and ZnSe imaging optics and mirrors optimized for broadband IR use are incorporated into the design. In-situ and ex-situ temperature calibration and preliminary data of the NSTX divertor during plasma discharges are presented, with contrasting results for dual-band vs. single-band IR operation.

  5. Adaptor Protein 1A Facilitates Dengue Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Yasamut, Umpa; Tongmuang, Nopprarat; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai; Junking, Mutita; Noisakran, Sansanee; Puttikhunt, Chunya; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangement of membrane structure induced by dengue virus (DENV) is essential for replication, and requires host cellular machinery. Adaptor protein complex (AP)-1 is a host component, which can be recruited to components required for membrane rearrangement. Therefore, dysfunction of AP-1 may affect membrane organization, thereby decreasing replication of virus in infected cells. In the present study, AP-1-dependent traffic inhibitor inhibited DENV protein expression and virion production. We further clarified the role of AP-1A in the life cycle of DENV by RNA interference. AP-1A was not involved in DENV entry into cells. However, it facilitated DENV RNA replication. Viral RNA level was reduced significantly in Huh7 cells transfected with AP-1A small interfering RNA (siRNA) compared with control siRNA. Transfection of naked DENV viral RNA into Huh7 cells transfected with AP-1A siRNA resulted in less viral RNA and virion production than transfection into Huh7 cells transfected with control siRNA. Huh7 cells transfected with AP-1A siRNA showed greater modification of membrane structures and fewer vesicular packets compared with cells transfected with control siRNA. Therefore, AP-1A may partly control DENV-induced rearrangement of membrane structures required for viral replication. PMID:26090672

  6. Alternative Splicing in CaV2.2 Regulates Neuronal Trafficking via Adaptor Protein Complex-1 Adaptor Protein Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Macabuag, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channels are expressed in neurons and targeted to the plasma membrane of presynaptic terminals, facilitating neurotransmitter release. Here, we find that the adaptor protein complex-1 (AP-1) mediates trafficking of CaV2.2 from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface. Examination of splice variants of CaV2.2, containing either exon 37a (selectively expressed in nociceptors) or 37b in the proximal C terminus, reveal that canonical AP-1 binding motifs, YxxΦ and [DE]xxxL[LI], present only in exon 37a, enhance intracellular trafficking of exon 37a-containing CaV2.2 to the axons and plasma membrane of rat DRG neurons. Finally, we identify differential effects of dopamine-2 receptor (D2R) and its agonist-induced activation on trafficking of CaV2.2 isoforms. D2R slowed the endocytosis of CaV2.2 containing exon 37b, but not exon 37a, and activation by the agonist quinpirole reversed the effect of the D2R. Our work thus reveals key mechanisms involved in the trafficking of N-type calcium channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT CaV2.2 channels are important for neurotransmitter release, but how they are trafficked is still poorly understood. Here, we describe a novel mechanism for trafficking of CaV2.2 from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface which is mediated by the adaptor protein AP-1. Alternative splicing of exon 37 produces CaV2.2-exon 37a, selectively expressed in nociceptors, or CaV2.2-exon 37b, which is the major splice isoform. Our study reveals that canonical AP-1 binding motifs (YxxΦ and [DE]xxxL[LI]), present in exon 37a, but not 37b, enhance intracellular trafficking of exon 37a-containing CaV2.2 to axons and plasma membrane of DRG neurons. Interaction of APs with CaV2.2 channels may also be key underlying mechanisms for differential effects of the dopamine D2 receptor on trafficking of CaV2.2 splice variants. PMID:26511252

  7. The CO donor CORM-2 inhibits LPS-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion in human rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Pei-Ling; Chuang, Yu-Chen; Chen, Yu-Wen; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Infection with Gram-negative bacteria has been recognized as an initiator of rheumatoid arthritis, which is characterized by chronic inflammation and infiltration of immune cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. Here we have investigated the detailed mechanisms of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression induced by LPS and if CO inhibited LPS-induced leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts by suppressing VCAM-1 expression. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) were incubated with LPS and/or the CO-releasing compound CORM-2. Effects of LPS on VCAM-1 levels were determined by analysing mRNA expression, promoter activity, protein expression, and immunohistochemical staining. The molecular mechanisms were investigated by determining the expression, activation, and binding activity of transcriptional factors using target signal antagonists. KEY RESULTS CORM-2 significantly inhibited inflammatory responses in LPS-treated RASFs by down-regulating the expression of adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and leukocyte infiltration. The down-regulation of LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression involved inhibition of the expression of phosphorylated-NF-κB p65 and AP-1 (p-c-Jun, c-Jun and c-Fos mRNA levels). These results were confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to detect NF-κB and AP-1 DNA binding activity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS LPS-mediated formation of the TLR4/MyD88/TRAF6/c-Src complex regulated NF-κB and MAPKs/AP-1 activation leading to VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion. CORM-2, which liberates CO to elicit direct biological activities, attenuated LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression by interfering with NF-κB and AP-1 activation, and significantly reduced LPS-induced immune cell infiltration of the synovium. PMID:24628691

  8. Ascent Heating Thermal Analysis on Spacecraft Adaptor Fairings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao Yen; Yuko, James; Motil, Brian

    2011-01-01

    When the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) is launched, the spacecraft adaptor (SA) fairings that cover the CEV service module (SM) are exposed to aero heating. Thermal analysis is performed to compute the fairing temperatures and to investigate whether the temperatures are within the material limits for nominal ascent aeroheating case. The ascent heating is analyzed by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and engineering codes at Marshall Space Flight Center. The aeroheating environment data used for this work is known as Thermal Environment 3 (TE3) heating data. One of the major concerns is with the SA fairings covering the CEV SM and the SM/crew launch vehicle (CLV) flange interface. The TE3 heating rate is a function of time, wall temperature, and the spatial locations. The implementation of the TE3 heating rate as boundary conditions in the thermal analysis becomes challenging. The ascent heating thermal analysis on SA fairings and SM/CLV flange interface are performed using two commercial software packages: Cullimore & Ring (C&R) Thermal Desktop (TD) 5.1 and MSC Patran 2007r1 b. TD is the pre-and post-processor for SINDA, which is a finite-difference-based solver. In TD, the geometry is built and meshed, the boundary conditions are defined, and then SINDA is used to compute temperatures. MSC Pthermal is a finite-element- based thermal solver. MSC Patran is the pre- and post-processor for Pthermal. Regarding the boundary conditions, the convection, contact resistance, and heat load can be imposed in different ways in both programs. These two software packages are used to build the thermal model for the same analysis to validate each other and show the differences in the modeling details.

  9. Adaptor protein complex 4 deficiency causes severe autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, progressive spastic paraplegia, shy character, and short stature.

    PubMed

    Abou Jamra, Rami; Philippe, Orianne; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Eck, Sebastian H; Graf, Elisabeth; Buchert, Rebecca; Borck, Guntram; Ekici, Arif; Brockschmidt, Felix F; Nöthen, Markus M; Munnich, Arnold; Strom, Tim M; Reis, Andre; Colleaux, Laurence

    2011-06-10

    Intellectual disability inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion represents an important fraction of severe cognitive-dysfunction disorders. Yet, the extreme heterogeneity of these conditions markedly hampers gene identification. Here, we report on eight affected individuals who were from three consanguineous families and presented with severe intellectual disability, absent speech, shy character, stereotypic laughter, muscular hypotonia that progressed to spastic paraplegia, microcephaly, foot deformity, decreased muscle mass of the lower limbs, inability to walk, and growth retardation. Using a combination of autozygosity mapping and either Sanger sequencing of candidate genes or next-generation exome sequencing, we identified one mutation in each of three genes encoding adaptor protein complex 4 (AP4) subunits: a nonsense mutation in AP4S1 (NM_007077.3: c.124C>T, p.Arg42(∗)), a frameshift mutation in AP4B1 (NM_006594.2: c.487_488insTAT, p.Glu163_Ser739delinsVal), and a splice mutation in AP4E1 (NM_007347.3: c.542+1_542+4delGTAA, r.421_542del, p.Glu181Glyfs(∗)20). Adaptor protein complexes (AP1-4) are ubiquitously expressed, evolutionarily conserved heterotetrameric complexes that mediate different types of vesicle formation and the selection of cargo molecules for inclusion into these vesicles. Interestingly, two mutations affecting AP4M1 and AP4E1 have recently been found to cause cerebral palsy associated with severe intellectual disability. Combined with previous observations, these results support the hypothesis that AP4-complex-mediated trafficking plays a crucial role in brain development and functioning and demonstrate the existence of a clinically recognizable syndrome due to deficiency of the AP4 complex. PMID:21620353

  10. The adaptor 3BP2 is required for KIT receptor expression and human mast cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Ainsua-Enrich, Erola; Serrano-Candelas, Eva; Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Picado, César; Sayós, Joan; Rivera, Juan; Martín, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    3BP2 is a cytoplasmic adaptor protein that acts as a positive regulator in mast cell FcεRI-dependent signaling. The KIT receptor whose ligand is the stem cell factor (SCF) is necessary for mast cell development, proliferation and survival as well as for optimal IgE-dependent signal. Activating mutations in KIT have been associated with several diseases including mastocytosis. In the present work, we found that 3BP2 silencing impairs KIT signaling pathways, thus affecting PI3K and MAP kinase pathways in human mast cells from HMC-1, LAD2 (human mast cell lines) and CD34+-derived mast cells. Unexpectedly, silencing of 3BP2 reduces KIT expression in normal human mast cells as well as in HMC-1 cells where KIT is mutated, thus increasing cellular apoptosis and caspase 3/7 activity. 3BP2 silencing reduces KIT transcription expression levels. Interestingly, 3BP2 silencing decreased MITF expression, a transcription factor involved in KIT expression. Reconstitution of 3BP2 in knockdown cells leads to reversal of KIT expression as well as survival phenotype. Accordingly MITF reconstitution enhances KIT expression levels in 3BP2 silenced cells. Moreover, downregulation of KIT expression by miRNA221 overexpression or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib also reduced 3BP2 and MITF expression. Furthermore, KIT tyrosine activity inhibition reduced 3BP2 and MITF expression, demonstrating again a tight and reciprocal relationship between these molecules. Taken together, our results show that 3BP2 regulates human mast cell survival and participates in KIT-mediated signal transduction by directly controlling KIT receptor expression, suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target in mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and deregulated KIT disorders. PMID:25810396

  11. Asc1p, a WD40-domain containing adaptor protein, is required for the interaction of the RNA-binding protein Scp160p with polysomes.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Sonja; Bittins, Margarethe; Frey, Steffen; Seedorf, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Scp160p interacts in an mRNA-dependent manner with translating ribosomes via multiple RNA-binding heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K-homology (KH) domains. In the present study, we show by protein-protein cross-linking that Scp160p is in close proximity to translation elongation factor 1A and the WD40 (Trp-Asp 40)-repeat containing protein Asc1p at ribosomes. Analysis of a truncation mutant revealed that the C-terminus of Scp160p is essential for ribosome binding and that Cys(1067) at the C-terminus of Scp160p is required to obtain these cross-links. The interaction of Scp160p with ribosomes depends on Asc1p. In fast-growing yeast cells, nearly all Asc1p is tightly bound to ribosomes, but it can also be present in a ribosome-free form depending on growth conditions. The functional homologue of Asc1p, mammalian RACK1 (receptor of activated C kinase), was previously characterized as an adaptor protein bridging activated signalling molecules with their substrates. Our results suggest that Scp160p connects specific mRNAs, ribosomes and a translation factor with an adaptor for signalling molecules. These interactions might regulate the translation activity of ribosomes programmed with specific mRNAs. PMID:15012629

  12. The exomer cargo adaptor structure reveals a novel GTPase-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E; Richardson, Brian C; Strassner, Amanda M; Fromme, J Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Cargo adaptors control intracellular trafficking of transmembrane proteins by sorting them into membrane transport carriers. The COPI, COPII, and clathrin cargo adaptors are structurally well characterized, but other cargo adaptors remain poorly understood. Exomer is a specialized cargo adaptor that sorts specific proteins into trans-Golgi network (TGN)-derived vesicles in response to cellular signals. Exomer is recruited to the TGN by the Arf1 GTPase, a universally conserved trafficking regulator. Here, we report the crystal structure of a tetrameric exomer complex composed of two copies each of the Chs5 and Chs6 subunits. The structure reveals the FN3 and BRCT domains of Chs5, which together we refer to as the FBE domain (FN3–BRCT of exomer), project from the exomer core complex. The overall architecture of the FBE domain is reminiscent of the appendage domains of other cargo adaptors, although it exhibits a distinct topology. In contrast to appendage domains, which bind accessory factors, we show that the primary role of the FBE domain is to bind Arf1 for recruitment of exomer to membranes. PMID:23000721

  13. Energy metabolism regulates clathrin adaptors at the trans-Golgi network and endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aoh, Quyen L.; Hung, Chao-wei; Duncan, Mara C.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is a master regulator of cell behavior in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It acts as both a metabolic substrate and a potent regulator of intracellular signaling cascades. Glucose starvation induces the transient delocalization and then partial relocalization of clathrin adaptors at the trans-Golgi network and endosomes. Although these localization responses are known to depend on the protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway, the molecular mechanism of this regulation is unknown. Here we demonstrate that PKA and the AMP-regulated kinase regulate adaptor localization through changes in energy metabolism. We show that genetic and chemical manipulation of intracellular ATP levels cause corresponding changes in adaptor localization. In permeabilized cells, exogenous ATP is sufficient to induce adaptor localization. Furthermore, we reveal distinct energy-dependent steps in adaptor localization: a step that requires the ADP-ribosylation factor ARF, an ATP-dependent step that requires the phosphatidyl-inositol-4 kinase Pik1, and third ATP-dependent step for which we provide evidence but for which the mechanism is unknown. We propose that these energy-dependent mechanisms precisely synchronize membrane traffic with overall proliferation rates and contribute a crucial aspect of energy conservation during acute glucose starvation. PMID:23345590

  14. The Emerging and Diverse Roles of Src-Like Adaptor Proteins in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marton, Nikolett; Baricza, Eszter; Érsek, Barbara; Buzás, Edit I.; Nagy, György

    2015-01-01

    Although Src-like adaptor proteins (SLAP-1 and SLAP-2) were mainly studied in lymphocytes, where they act as negative regulators and provide fine control of receptor signaling, recently, several other functions of these proteins were discovered. In addition to the well-characterized immunoregulatory functions, SLAP proteins appear to have an essential role in the pathogenesis of type I hypersensitivity, osteoporosis, and numerous malignant diseases. Both adaptor proteins are expressed in a wide variety of tissues, where they have mostly inhibitory effects on multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the diverse effects of SLAP proteins. PMID:26339145

  15. The anti-inflammatory drug BAY 11-7082 suppresses the MyD88-dependent signalling network by targeting the ubiquitin system

    PubMed Central

    Strickson, Sam; Campbell, David G.; Emmerich, Christoph H.; Knebel, Axel; Plater, Lorna; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Shpiro, Natalia; Cohen, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The compound BAY 11-7082 inhibits IκBα [inhibitor of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)α] phosphorylation in cells and has been used to implicate the canonical IKKs (IκB kinases) and NF-κB in >350 publications. In the present study we report that BAY 11-7082 does not inhibit the IKKs, but suppresses their activation in LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-stimulated RAW macrophages and IL (interleukin)-1-stimulated IL-1R (IL-1 receptor) HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. BAY 11-7082 exerts these effects by inactivating the E2-conjugating enzymes Ubc (ubiquitin conjugating) 13 and UbcH7 and the E3 ligase LUBAC (linear ubiquitin assembly complex), thereby preventing the formation of Lys63-linked and linear polyubiquitin chains. BAY 11-7082 prevents ubiquitin conjugation to Ubc13 and UbcH7 by forming a covalent adduct with their reactive cysteine residues via Michael addition at the C3 atom of BAY 11-7082, followed by the release of 4-methylbenzene-sulfinic acid. BAY 11-7082 stimulated Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chain formation in cells and protected HIF1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) from proteasomal degradation, suggesting that it inhibits the proteasome. The results of the present study indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of BAY 11-7082, its ability to induce B-cell lymphoma and leukaemic T-cell death and to prevent the recruitment of proteins to sites of DNA damage are exerted via inhibition of components of the ubiquitin system and not by inhibiting NF-κB. PMID:23441730

  16. The anti-inflammatory drug BAY 11-7082 suppresses the MyD88-dependent signalling network by targeting the ubiquitin system.

    PubMed

    Strickson, Sam; Campbell, David G; Emmerich, Christoph H; Knebel, Axel; Plater, Lorna; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Shpiro, Natalia; Cohen, Philip

    2013-05-01

    The compound BAY 11-7082 inhibits IκBα [inhibitor of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)α] phosphorylation in cells and has been used to implicate the canonical IKKs (IκB kinases) and NF-κB in >350 publications. In the present study we report that BAY 11-7082 does not inhibit the IKKs, but suppresses their activation in LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-stimulated RAW macrophages and IL (interleukin)-1-stimulated IL-1R (IL-1 receptor) HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. BAY 11-7082 exerts these effects by inactivating the E2-conjugating enzymes Ubc (ubiquitin conjugating) 13 and UbcH7 and the E3 ligase LUBAC (linear ubiquitin assembly complex), thereby preventing the formation of Lys63-linked and linear polyubiquitin chains. BAY 11-7082 prevents ubiquitin conjugation to Ubc13 and UbcH7 by forming a covalent adduct with their reactive cysteine residues via Michael addition at the C3 atom of BAY 11-7082, followed by the release of 4-methylbenzene-sulfinic acid. BAY 11-7082 stimulated Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chain formation in cells and protected HIF1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) from proteasomal degradation, suggesting that it inhibits the proteasome. The results of the present study indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of BAY 11-7082, its ability to induce B-cell lymphoma and leukaemic T-cell death and to prevent the recruitment of proteins to sites of DNA damage are exerted via inhibition of components of the ubiquitin system and not by inhibiting NF-κB. PMID:23441730

  17. IL-33-induced alterations in murine intestinal function and cytokine responses are MyD88, STAT6, and IL-13-dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IL-33 is a recently identified cytokine member of the IL-1 family. The biological activities of IL-33 are associated with promotion of Th2 and inhibition of Th1/Th17 immune responses. Exogenous IL-33 induces a typical “type 2” immune response in the gastrointestinal tract, yet the underlying mechani...

  18. Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2 in vivo infection modulates TLR4 responsiveness in differentiated Myeloid cells which is associated with decreased MyD88 expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) causes clinical signs in cattle ranging from mild to severe acute infection which can lead to increased susceptibility to secondary bacteria. In this study we examined the effects of BVDV genotype 2 (BVDV2) infection on the ability of myeloid lineage cells derived...

  19. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Regulation of Innate Immune Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Eunshil

    2011-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immune cells play a pivotal role in the first line of host defense system. PRRs recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) to initiate and regulate innate and adaptive immune responses. PRRs include Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs), which have their own features in ligand recognition and cellular location. Activated PRRs deliver signals to adaptor molecules (MyD88, TRIF, MAL/TIRAP, TRAM, IPS-1) which act as important messengers to activate downstream kinases (IKK complex, MAPKs, TBK1, RIP-1) and transcription factors (NF-κB, AP-1, IRF3), which produce effecter molecules including cytokines, chemokines, inflammatory enzymes, and type I interferones. Since excessive PRR activation is closely linked to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases, the role of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators in the prevention of over- or unnecessary activation of PRRs has been widely studied. Intracellular regulators include MyD88s, SOCS1, TOLLIP, A20, and CYLD. Extrinsic regulators have also been identified with their molecular targets in PRR signaling pathways. TLR dimerization has been suggested as an inhibitory target for small molecules such as curcumin, cinnamaldehyde, and sulforaphane. TBK1 kinase can be a target for certain flavonoids such as EGCG, luteolin, quercetin, chrysin, and eriodictyol to regulate TRIF-dependent TLR pathways. This review focuses on the features of PRR signaling pathways and the therapeutic targets of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators in order to provide beneficial strategies for controlling the activity of PRRs and the related inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. PMID:21488180

  20. Randomly broken fragment PCR with 5′ end-directed adaptor for genome walking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wentao; Shang, Ying; Zhu, Pengyu; Zhai, Zhifang; He, Jing; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Many genome walking methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are available, including those with and without restriction enzyme modification. Nevertheless, these methods suffer from low reproducibility, inefficiency, and non-specificity. Here, we present a traceable and efficient PCR strategy: randomly broken fragment PCR with 5′ end-directed adaptor for genome walking. The genome is first fragmented randomly. After blunting ends, the fragments are ligated to the 5′ end-directed adaptors. Semi-nested PCR is then performed. Thus, we can obtain an unknown sequence by cloning the fragments of interest, followed by sequencing. This method effectively bypasses the above-mentioned obstacles and offers the advances: 1) genome fragmentation without using restriction enzymes; 2) enhancement of primer specificity and the prevention of self-ligation between the adaptors by employing a 5′ end-directed adaptor. All of the steps in this new method are straightforward, and the unknown sequence can be definitively obtained by merely applying the method once. PMID:24322619

  1. Randomly broken fragment PCR with 5' end-directed adaptor for genome walking.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Shang, Ying; Zhu, Pengyu; Zhai, Zhifang; He, Jing; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Many genome walking methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are available, including those with and without restriction enzyme modification. Nevertheless, these methods suffer from low reproducibility, inefficiency, and non-specificity. Here, we present a traceable and efficient PCR strategy: randomly broken fragment PCR with 5' end-directed adaptor for genome walking. The genome is first fragmented randomly. After blunting ends, the fragments are ligated to the 5' end-directed adaptors. Semi-nested PCR is then performed. Thus, we can obtain an unknown sequence by cloning the fragments of interest, followed by sequencing. This method effectively bypasses the above-mentioned obstacles and offers the advances: 1) genome fragmentation without using restriction enzymes; 2) enhancement of primer specificity and the prevention of self-ligation between the adaptors by employing a 5' end-directed adaptor. All of the steps in this new method are straightforward, and the unknown sequence can be definitively obtained by merely applying the method once. PMID:24322619

  2. SR proteins are NXF1 adaptors that link alternative RNA processing to mRNA export

    PubMed Central

    Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Botti, Valentina; de Jesus Domingues, Antonio M.; Brandl, Holger; Schwich, Oliver D.; Steiner, Michaela C.; Curk, Tomaz; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Neugebauer, Karla M.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) exports mRNA to the cytoplasm after recruitment to mRNA by specific adaptor proteins. How and why cells use numerous different export adaptors is poorly understood. Here we critically evaluate members of the SR protein family (SRSF1–7) for their potential to act as NXF1 adaptors that couple pre-mRNA processing to mRNA export. Consistent with this proposal, >1000 endogenous mRNAs required individual SR proteins for nuclear export in vivo. To address the mechanism, transcriptome-wide RNA-binding profiles of NXF1 and SRSF1–7 were determined in parallel by individual-nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP). Quantitative comparisons of RNA-binding sites showed that NXF1 and SR proteins bind mRNA targets at adjacent sites, indicative of cobinding. SRSF3 emerged as the most potent NXF1 adaptor, conferring sequence specificity to RNA binding by NXF1 in last exons. Interestingly, SRSF3 and SRSF7 were shown to bind different sites in last exons and regulate 3′ untranslated region length in an opposing manner. Both SRSF3 and SRSF7 promoted NXF1 recruitment to mRNA. Thus, SRSF3 and SRSF7 couple alternative splicing and polyadenylation to NXF1-mediated mRNA export, thereby controlling the cytoplasmic abundance of transcripts with alternative 3′ ends. PMID:26944680

  3. SR proteins are NXF1 adaptors that link alternative RNA processing to mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Botti, Valentina; de Jesus Domingues, Antonio M; Brandl, Holger; Schwich, Oliver D; Steiner, Michaela C; Curk, Tomaz; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) exports mRNA to the cytoplasm after recruitment to mRNA by specific adaptor proteins. How and why cells use numerous different export adaptors is poorly understood. Here we critically evaluate members of the SR protein family (SRSF1-7) for their potential to act as NXF1 adaptors that couple pre-mRNA processing to mRNA export. Consistent with this proposal, >1000 endogenous mRNAs required individual SR proteins for nuclear export in vivo. To address the mechanism, transcriptome-wide RNA-binding profiles of NXF1 and SRSF1-7 were determined in parallel by individual-nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP). Quantitative comparisons of RNA-binding sites showed that NXF1 and SR proteins bind mRNA targets at adjacent sites, indicative of cobinding. SRSF3 emerged as the most potent NXF1 adaptor, conferring sequence specificity to RNA binding by NXF1 in last exons. Interestingly, SRSF3 and SRSF7 were shown to bind different sites in last exons and regulate 3' untranslated region length in an opposing manner. Both SRSF3 and SRSF7 promoted NXF1 recruitment to mRNA. Thus, SRSF3 and SRSF7 couple alternative splicing and polyadenylation to NXF1-mediated mRNA export, thereby controlling the cytoplasmic abundance of transcripts with alternative 3' ends. PMID:26944680

  4. An organized co-assembly of clathrin adaptors is essential for endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Skruzny, Michal; Desfosses, Ambroise; Prinz, Simone; Dodonova, Svetlana O; Gieras, Anna; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Jakobi, Arjen J; Abella, Marc; Hagen, Wim J H; Schulz, Joachim; Meijers, Rob; Rybin, Vladimir; Briggs, John A G; Sachse, Carsten; Kaksonen, Marko

    2015-04-20

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the main trafficking route from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm, is critical to many fundamental cellular processes. Clathrin, coupled to the membrane by adaptor proteins, is thought to play a major structural role in endocytosis by self-assembling into a cage-like lattice around the forming vesicle. Although clathrin adaptors are essential for endocytosis, little is known about their structural role in this process. Here we show that the membrane-binding domains of two conserved clathrin adaptors, Sla2 and Ent1, co-assemble in a PI(4,5)P2-dependent manner to form organized lattices on membranes. We determined the structure of the co-assembled lattice by electron cryo-microscopy and designed mutations that specifically impair the lattice formation in vitro. We show that these mutations block endocytosis in vivo. We suggest that clathrin adaptors not only link the polymerized clathrin to the membrane but also form an oligomeric structure, which is essential for membrane remodeling during endocytosis. PMID:25898165

  5. Glucose regulates clathrin adaptors at the trans-Golgi network and endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aoh, Quyen L.; Graves, Lee M.; Duncan, Mara C.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is a rich source of energy and the raw material for biomass increase. Many eukaryotic cells remodel their physiology in the presence and absence of glucose. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes changes in transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell polarity in response to glucose availability. Upon glucose starvation, translation initiation and cell polarity are immediately inhibited, and then gradually recover. In this paper, we provide evidence that, as in cell polarity and translation, traffic at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes is regulated by glucose via an unknown mechanism that depends on protein kinase A (PKA). Upon glucose withdrawal, clathrin adaptors exhibit a biphasic change in localization: they initially delocalize from the membrane within minutes and later partially recover onto membranes. Additionally, the removal of glucose induces changes in posttranslational modifications of adaptors. Ras and Gpr1 signaling pathways, which converge on PKA, are required for changes in adaptor localization and changes in posttranslational modifications. Acute inhibition of PKA demonstrates that inhibition of PKA prior to glucose withdrawal prevents several adaptor responses to starvation. This study demonstrates that PKA activity prior to glucose starvation primes membrane traffic at the TGN and endosomes in response to glucose starvation. PMID:21832155

  6. Insulin Receptor Substrate Adaptor Proteins Mediate Prognostic Gene Expression Profiles in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Marc A.; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Oh, Annabell S.; Fagan, Dedra H.; Byron, Sara A.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Lee, Adrian V.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Fan, Cheng; Perou, Charles M.; Yee, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Therapies targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have not been developed with predictive biomarkers to identify tumors with receptor activation. We have previously shown that the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) adaptor proteins are necessary for linking IGF1R to downstream signaling pathways and the malignant phenotype in breast cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to identify gene expression profiles downstream of IGF1R and its two adaptor proteins. IRS-null breast cancer cells (T47D-YA) were engineered to express IRS-1 or IRS-2 alone and their ability to mediate IGF ligand-induced proliferation, motility, and gene expression determined. Global gene expression signatures reflecting IRS adaptor specific and primary vs. secondary ligand response were derived (Early IRS-1, Late IRS-1, Early IRS-2 and Late IRS-2) and functional pathway analysis examined. IRS isoforms mediated distinct gene expression profiles, functional pathways, and breast cancer subtype association. For example, IRS-1/2-induced TGFb2 expression and blockade of TGFb2 abrogated IGF-induced cell migration. In addition, the prognostic value of IRS proteins was significant in the luminal B breast tumor subtype. Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that IRS adaptor signatures correlated with poor outcome as measured by recurrence-free and overall survival. Thus, IRS adaptor protein expression is required for IGF ligand responses in breast cancer cells. IRS-specific gene signatures represent accurate surrogates of IGF activity and could predict response to anti-IGF therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26991655

  7. Identification of human proteins functionally conserved with the yeast putative adaptors ADA2 and GCN5.

    PubMed Central

    Candau, R; Moore, P A; Wang, L; Barlev, N; Ying, C Y; Rosen, C A; Berger, S L

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional adaptor proteins are required for full function of higher eukaryotic acidic activators in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that this pathway of activation is evolutionarily conserved. Consistent with this view, we have identified possible human homologs of yeast ADA2 (yADA2) and yeast GCN5 (yGCN5), components of a putative adaptor complex. While there is overall sequence similarity between the yeast and human proteins, perhaps more significant is conservation of key sequence features with other known adaptors. We show several functional similarities between the human and yeast adaptors. First, as shown for yADA2 and yGCN5, human ADA2 (hADA2) and human GCN5 (hGCN5) interacted in vivo in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Moreover, hGCN5 interacted with yADA2 in this assay, suggesting that the human proteins form similar complexes. Second, both yADA2 and hADA2 contain cryptic activation domains. Third, hGCN5 and yGCN5 had similar stabilizing effects on yADA2 in vivo. Furthermore, the region of yADA2 that interacted with yGCN5 mapped to the amino terminus of yADA2, which is highly conserved in hADA2. Most striking, is the behavior of the human proteins in human cells. First, GAL4-hADA2 activated transcription in HeLa cells, and second, either hADA2 or hGCN5 augmented GAL4-VP16 activation. These data indicated that the human proteins correspond to functional homologs of the yeast adaptors, suggesting that these cofactors play a key role in transcriptional activation. PMID:8552087

  8. p130Cas Scaffolds the Signalosome To Direct Adaptor-Effector Cross Talk during Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Trafficking in Human Microvascular Dermal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Sujoy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with cell surface receptors, such as heparan sulfate, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3, and αVβ5), and EphrinA2 (EphA2), and activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), c-Cbl, and RhoA GTPase signal molecules early during lipid raft (LR)-dependent productive macropinocytic entry into human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our recent studies have identified CIB1 as a signal amplifier facilitating EphA2 phosphorylation and subsequent cytoskeletal cross talk during KSHV macropinocytosis. Although CIB1 lacks an enzymatic activity and traditional adaptor domain or known interacting sequence, it associated with the KSHV entry signal complex and the CIB1-KSHV association was sustained over 30 min postinfection. To identify factors scaffolding the EphA2-CIB1 signal axis, the role of major cellular scaffold protein p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate of Src) was investigated. Inhibitor and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that KSHV induced p130Cas in an EphA2-, CIB1-, and Src-dependent manner. p130Cas and Crk were associated with KSHV, LRs, EphA2, and CIB1 early during infection. Live-cell microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated that p130Cas knockdown did not affect KSHV entry but significantly reduced productive nuclear trafficking of viral DNA and routed KSHV to lysosomal degradation. p130Cas aided in scaffolding adaptor Crk to downstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor phospho-C3G possibly to coordinate GTPase signaling during KSHV trafficking. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that p130Cas acts as a bridging molecule between the KSHV-induced entry signal complex and the downstream trafficking signalosome in endothelial cells and suggest that simultaneous targeting of KSHV entry receptors with p130Cas would be an attractive potential avenue for therapeutic intervention in KSHV infection. IMPORTANCE Eukaryotic cell adaptor molecules

  9. Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry kinase ROP16 activates STAT3 and STAT6 resulting in cytokine inhibition and arginase-1-dependent growth control.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Barbara A; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Kim, Sung Guk; Maurer, Kirk J; Yarovinsky, Felix; Herbert, De'Broski R; Bzik, David J; Denkers, Eric Y

    2011-09-01

    The ROP16 kinase of Toxoplasma gondii is injected into the host cell cytosol where it activates signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 and STAT6. Here, we generated a ROP16 deletion mutant on a Type I parasite strain background, as well as a control complementation mutant with restored ROP16 expression. We investigated the biological role of the ROP16 molecule during T. gondii infection. Infection of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages with rop16-deleted (ΔROP16) parasites resulted in increased amounts of IL-12p40 production relative to the ROP16-positive RH parental strain. High level IL-12p40 production in ΔROP16 infection was dependent on the host cell adaptor molecule MyD88, but surprisingly was independent of any previously recognized T. gondii triggered pathway linking to MyD88 (TLR2, TLR4, TLR9, TLR11, IL-1ß and IL-18). In addition, ROP16 was found to mediate the suppressive effects of Toxoplasma on LPS-induced cytokine synthesis in macrophages and on IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide production by astrocytes and microglial cells. Furthermore, ROP16 triggered synthesis of host cell arginase-1 in a STAT6-dependent manner. In fibroblasts and macrophages, failure to induce arginase-1 by ΔROP16 tachyzoites resulted in resistance to starvation conditions of limiting arginine, an essential amino acid for replication and virulence of this parasite. ΔROP16 tachyzoites that failed to induce host cell arginase-1 displayed increased replication and dissemination during in vivo infection. We conclude that encounter between Toxoplasma ROP16 and the host cell STAT signaling cascade has pleiotropic downstream effects that act in multiple and complex ways to direct the course of infection. PMID:21931552

  10. Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry Kinase ROP16 Activates STAT3 and STAT6 Resulting in Cytokine Inhibition and Arginase-1-Dependent Growth Control

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Barbara A.; Fox, Barbara A.; Rommereim, Leah M.; Kim, Sung Guk; Maurer, Kirk J.; Yarovinsky, Felix; Herbert, De'Broski R.; Bzik, David J.; Denkers, Eric Y.

    2011-01-01

    The ROP16 kinase of Toxoplasma gondii is injected into the host cell cytosol where it activates signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 and STAT6. Here, we generated a ROP16 deletion mutant on a Type I parasite strain background, as well as a control complementation mutant with restored ROP16 expression. We investigated the biological role of the ROP16 molecule during T. gondii infection. Infection of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages with rop16-deleted (ΔROP16) parasites resulted in increased amounts of IL-12p40 production relative to the ROP16-positive RH parental strain. High level IL-12p40 production in ΔROP16 infection was dependent on the host cell adaptor molecule MyD88, but surprisingly was independent of any previously recognized T. gondii triggered pathway linking to MyD88 (TLR2, TLR4, TLR9, TLR11, IL-1ß and IL-18). In addition, ROP16 was found to mediate the suppressive effects of Toxoplasma on LPS-induced cytokine synthesis in macrophages and on IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide production by astrocytes and microglial cells. Furthermore, ROP16 triggered synthesis of host cell arginase-1 in a STAT6-dependent manner. In fibroblasts and macrophages, failure to induce arginase-1 by ΔROP16 tachyzoites resulted in resistance to starvation conditions of limiting arginine, an essential amino acid for replication and virulence of this parasite. ΔROP16 tachyzoites that failed to induce host cell arginase-1 displayed increased replication and dissemination during in vivo infection. We conclude that encounter between Toxoplasma ROP16 and the host cell STAT signaling cascade has pleiotropic downstream effects that act in multiple and complex ways to direct the course of infection. PMID:21931552

  11. Genome-wide RNAi screening implicates the E3 ubiquitin ligase Sherpa in mediating innate immune signaling by Toll in Drosophila adults.

    PubMed

    Kanoh, Hirotaka; Tong, Li-Li; Kuraishi, Takayuki; Suda, Yamato; Momiuchi, Yoshiki; Shishido, Fumi; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2015-10-27

    The Drosophila Toll pathway plays important roles in innate immune responses against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. To identify previously uncharacterized components of this pathway, we performed comparative, ex vivo, genome-wide RNA interference screening. In four screens, we overexpressed the Toll adaptor protein dMyd88, the downstream kinase Pelle, or the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) homolog Dif, or we knocked down Cactus, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian inhibitor of NF-κB. On the basis of these screens, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Sherpa as being necessary for the activation of Toll signaling. A loss-of-function sherpa mutant fly exhibited compromised production of antimicrobial peptides and enhanced susceptibility to infection by Gram-positive bacteria. In cultured cells, Sherpa mediated ubiquitylation of dMyd88 and Sherpa itself, and Sherpa and Drosophila SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) were required for the proper membrane localization of an adaptor complex containing dMyd88. These findings highlight a role for Sherpa in Drosophila host defense and suggest the SUMOylation-mediated regulation of dMyd88 functions in Toll innate immune signaling. PMID:26508789

  12. The non-palindromic adaptor-PCR method for the identification of the T-cell receptor genes of an interferon-gamma-secreting T-cell hybridomaspecific for trans-sialidase, an immunodominant Trypanosoma cruzi antigen.

    PubMed

    Hiyane, M I; Boscardin, S B; Rodrigues, M M

    2006-03-01

    Cloning of the T-cell receptor genes is a critical step when generating T-cell receptor transgenic mice. Because T-cell receptor molecules are clonotypical, isolation of their genes requires reverse transcriptase-assisted PCR using primers specific for each different Valpha or Vbeta genes or by the screening of cDNA libraries generated from RNA obtained from each individual T-cell clone. Although feasible, these approaches are laborious and costly. The aim of the present study was to test the application of the non-palindromic adaptor-PCR method as an alternative to isolate the genes encoding the T-cell receptor of an antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma. For this purpose, we established hybridomas specific for trans-sialidase, an immunodominant Trypanosoma cruzi antigen. These T-cell hybridomas were characterized with regard to their ability to secrete interferon-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10 after stimulation with the antigen. A CD3+, CD4+, CD8- interferon-gamma-producing hybridoma was selected for the identification of the variable regions of the T-cell receptor by the non-palindromic adaptor-PCR method. Using this methodology, we were able to rapidly and efficiently determine the variable regions of both T-cell receptor chains. The results obtained by the non-palindromic adaptor-PCR method were confirmed by the isolation and sequencing of the complete cDNA genes and by the recognition with a specific antibody against the T-cell receptor variable beta chain. We conclude that the non-palindromic adaptor-PCR method can be a valuable tool for the identification of the T-cell receptor transcripts of T-cell hybridomas and may facilitate the generation of T-cell receptor transgenic mice. PMID:16501814

  13. Targeted decay of a regulatory small RNA by an adaptor protein for RNase E and counteraction by an anti-adaptor RNA

    PubMed Central

    Göpel, Yvonne; Papenfort, Kai; Reichenbach, Birte; Vogel, Jörg; Görke, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are well established to regulate diverse cellular processes, but how they themselves are regulated is less understood. Recently, we identified a regulatory circuit wherein the GlmY and GlmZ sRNAs of Escherichia coli act hierarchically to activate mRNA glmS, which encodes glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) synthase. Although the two sRNAs are highly similar, only GlmZ is a direct activator that base-pairs with the glmS mRNA, aided by protein Hfq. GlmY, however, does not bind Hfq and activates glmS indirectly by protecting GlmZ from RNA cleavage. This complex regulation feedback controls the levels of GlmS protein in response to its product, GlcN6P, a key metabolite in cell wall biosynthesis. Here, we reveal the molecular basis for the regulated turnover of GlmZ, identifying RapZ (RNase adaptor protein for sRNA GlmZ; formerly YhbJ) as a novel type of RNA-binding protein that recruits the major endoribonuclease RNase E to GlmZ. This involves direct interaction of RapZ with the catalytic domain of RNase E. GlmY binds RapZ through a secondary structure shared by both sRNAs and therefore acts by molecular mimicry as a specific decoy for RapZ. Thus, in analogy to regulated proteolysis, RapZ is an adaptor, and GlmY is an anti-adaptor in regulated turnover of a regulatory small RNA. PMID:23475961

  14. Rapid CD4+ T-cell responses to bacterial flagellin require dendritic cell expression of Syk and CARD9.

    PubMed

    Atif, Shaikh M; Lee, Seung-Joo; Li, Lin-Xi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Gorjestani, Sara; Lin, Xin; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can recognize microbial patterns and utilize adaptor molecules, such as-MyD88 or (TRIF TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β), to initiate downstream signaling that ultimately affects the initiation of adaptive immunity. In addition to this inflammatory role, TLR5 expression on dendritic cells can favor antigen presentation of flagellin peptides and thus increase the sensitivity of flagellin-specific T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Here, we examined the role of alternative signaling pathways that might regulate flagellin antigen presentation in addition to MyD88. These studies suggest a requirement for spleen tyrosine kinase, a noncanonical TLR-signaling adaptor molecule, and its downstream molecule CARD9 in regulating the sensitivity of flagellin-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Thus, a previously unappreciated signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating the dominance of flagellin-specific T-cell responses. PMID:25430631

  15. Rapid CD4+ T-cell responses to bacterial flagellin require dendritic cell expression of Syk and CARD9

    PubMed Central

    Atif, Shaikh M; Lee, Seung-Joo; Li, Lin-Xi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Gorjestani, Sara; Lin, Xin; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can recognize microbial patterns and utilize adaptor molecules, such as-MyD88 or (TRIF TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β), to initiate downstream signaling that ultimately affects the initiation of adaptive immunity. In addition to this inflammatory role, TLR5 expression on dendritic cells can favor antigen presentation of flagellin peptides and thus increase the sensitivity of flagellin-specific T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Here, we examined the role of alternative signaling pathways that might regulate flagellin antigen presentation in addition to MyD88. These studies suggest a requirement for spleen tyrosine kinase, a noncanonical TLR-signaling adaptor molecule, and its downstream molecule CARD9 in regulating the sensitivity of flagellin-specific CD4+ T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Thus, a previously unappreciated signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating the dominance of flagellin-specific T-cell responses. PMID:25430631

  16. The SH3-SAM adaptor HACS1 is up-regulated in B cell activation signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan Xiao; Benn, Sally; Li, Zhi Hua; Wei, Ellen; Masih-Khan, Esther; Trieu, Young; Bali, Meenakshi; McGlade, C Jane; Claudio, Jaime O; Stewart, A Keith

    2004-09-20

    HACS1 is a Src homology 3 and sterile alpha motif domain-containing adaptor that is preferentially expressed in normal hematopoietic tissues and malignancies including myeloid leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. Microarray data showed HACS1 expression is up-regulated in activated human B cells treated with interleukin (IL)-4, CD40L, and anti-immunoglobulin (Ig)M and clustered with genes involved in signaling, including TNF receptor-associated protein 1, signaling lymphocytic activation molecule, IL-6, and DEC205. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that HACS1 is up-regulated by IL-4, IL-13, anti-IgM, and anti-CD40 in human peripheral blood B cells. In murine spleen B cells, Hacs1 can also be up-regulated by lipopolysaccharide but not IL-13. Induction of Hacs1 by IL-4 is dependent on Stat6 signaling and can also be impaired by inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase C, and nuclear factor kappaB. HACS1 associates with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins after B cell activation and binds in vitro to the inhibitory molecule paired Ig-like receptor B. Overexpression of HACS1 in murine spleen B cells resulted in a down-regulation of the activation marker CD23 and enhancement of CD138 expression, IgM secretion, and Xbp-1 expression. Knock down of HACS1 in a human B lymphoma cell line by small interfering ribonucleic acid did not significantly change IL-4-stimulated B cell proliferation. Our study demonstrates that HACS1 is up-regulated by B cell activation signals and is a participant in B cell activation and differentiation. PMID:15381729

  17. Multiple Sclerosis: Modulation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) Expression by Interferon-β Includes Upregulation of TLR7 in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Michael; Paap, Brigitte K.; Thamilarasan, Madhan; Koczan, Dirk; Schott, Eckart; Deuschle, Katrin; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Paul, Friedemann; Zettl, Uwe K.; Ruprecht, Klemens; Lehnardt, Seija

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-β is an established treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) but its mechanisms of action are not well understood. Viral infections are a known trigger of MS relapses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key components of the innate immune system, which sense conserved structures of viruses and other pathogens. Effects of interferon-β on mRNA levels of all known human TLRs (TLR1-10) and the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 were analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of healthy donors by quantitative real-time PCR and by transcriptome analysis in PBMCs of 25 interferon-β-treated patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Regulation of TLR protein expression by interferon-β was investigated by flow cytometry of leukocyte subsets of healthy subjects and of untreated, interferon-β-, or glatiramer acetate-treated patients with MS. Interferon-β specifically upregulated mRNA expression of TLR3, TLR7, and MyD88 and downregulated TLR9 mRNA in PBMCs of healthy donors as well as in PBMCs of patients with MS. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were identified as the major cell type responding to interferon-β with increased expression of TLR7 and MyD88 protein. In line with this, expression of TLR7 protein was increased in pDCs of interferon-β-treated, but not untreated or glatiramer acetate-treated patients with MS. Interferon-β-induced upregulation of TLR7 in pDCs is of functional relevance since pre-treatment of PBMCs with interferon-β resulted in a strongly increased production of interferon-α upon stimulation with the TLR7 agonist loxoribine. Flow cytometry confirmed pDCs as the cellular source of interferon-α production induced by activation of TLR7. Thus, upregulation of TLR7 in pDCs and a consequently increased activation of pDCs by TLR7 ligands represents a novel immunoregulatory mechanism of interferon-β. We hypothesize that this mechanism could contribute to a reduction of virus-triggered relapses in patients with MS. PMID:23950974

  18. Recruitment of the adaptor protein Nck to PECAM-1 couples oxidative stress to canonical NF-κB signaling and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Leskov, Igor L; Yurdagul, Arif; Thiel, Bonnie; Kevil, Christopher G; Stokes, Karen Y; Orr, A Wayne

    2015-02-24

    Oxidative stress stimulates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation and NF-κB-dependent proinflammatory gene expression in endothelial cells during several pathological conditions, including ischemia/reperfusion injury. We found that the Nck family of adaptor proteins linked tyrosine kinase signaling to oxidative stress-induced activation of NF-κB through the classic IκB kinase-dependent pathway. Depletion of Nck prevented oxidative stress induced by exogenous hydrogen peroxide or hypoxia/reoxygenation injury from activating NF-κB in endothelial cells, increasing the abundance of the proinflammatory molecules ICAM-1 (intracellular adhesion molecule-1) and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) and recruiting leukocytes. Nck depletion also attenuated endothelial cell expression of genes encoding proinflammatory factors but not those encoding antioxidants. Nck promoted oxidative stress-induced activation of NF-κB by coupling the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1) to the activation of p21-activated kinase, which mediates oxidative stress-induced NF-κB signaling. Consistent with this mechanism, treatment of mice subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury in the cremaster muscle with a Nck inhibitory peptide blocked leukocyte adhesion and emigration and the accompanying vascular leak. Together, these data identify Nck as an important mediator of oxidative stress-induced inflammation and a potential therapeutic target for ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25714462

  19. Recruitment of the adaptor protein Nck to PECAM-1 couples oxidant stress to canonical NF-κB signaling and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Leskov, Igor L.; Yurdagul, Arif; Thiel, Bonnie; Kevil, Christopher G.; Stokes, Karen Y.; Orr, A. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Oxidant stress drives nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation and NF-κB-dependent proinflammatory gene expression in endothelial cells during several pathological conditions, including ischemia/reperfusion injury. We showed that the Nck family of adaptor proteins linked tyrosine kinase signaling to oxidant stress-induced activation of NF-κB through the classic IκB kinase (IKK)-dependent pathway. Depletion of Nck prevented oxidant stress induced by exogenous peroxide or hypoxia/reoxygenation injury from triggering the activation of NF-κB in endothelial cells, increases in the abundance of the pro-inflammatory molecules ICAM-1 (intracellular adhesion molecule 1) and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1), and leukocyte recruitment. Nck depletion also attenuated endothelial cell expression of genes encoding proinflammatory factors, but not those encoding antioxidants. We further showed that Nck promoted oxidant stress-induced activation of NF-κB by coupling the tyrosine phosphorylation of platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) to the activation of p21 activated kinase, which mediates oxidant stress-induced NF-κB signaling. Consistent with this model, treatment of mice subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury in the cremaster muscle with a Nck inhibitory peptide inhibited leukocyte adhesion and emigration and the accompanying vascular leak. Together, these data identify Nck as an important mediator of oxidant stress-induced inflammation and a potential therapeutic target for ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25714462

  20. ER Adaptor SCAP Translocates and Recruits IRF3 to Perinuclear Microsome Induced by Cytosolic Microbial DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huansha; Liu, Xing; Huang, Lulu; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Heng; Cui, Ye; Tang, Yijun; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING, also known as MITA, ERIS or MPYS) induces the activation of TBK1 kinase and IRF3 transcription factor, upon sensing of microbial DNAs. How IRF3 is recruited onto the STING signalosome remains unknown. We report here that silencing of the ER adaptor SCAP markedly impairs the IRF3-responsive gene expression induced by STING. Scap knockdown mice are more susceptible to HSV-1 infection. Interestingly, SCAP translocates from ER, via Golgi, to perinuclear microsome in a STING-dependent manner. Mechanistically, the N-terminal transmembrane domain of SCAP interacts with STING, and the C-terminal cytosolic domain of SCAP binds to IRF3, thus recruiting IRF3 onto STING signalosome. Mis-localization of SCAP abolishes its antiviral function. Collectively, this study characterizes SCAP as an essential adaptor in the STING signaling pathway, uncovering a critical missing link in DNAs-triggered host antiviral responses. PMID:26900919

  1. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D.; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, peripheral T cells expressing a TCR with low avidity for self-antigens were strongly reduced, whereas an overall impairment of T-cell activation by weak antigenic stimulation was observed. Mechanistically, Nck deletion resulted in a significant decrease in calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation upon TCR engagement. Taken together, our findings unveil a crucial role for the Nck adaptors in shaping the T-cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage and optimal T cell excitability. PMID:20709959

  2. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire.

    PubMed

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-08-31

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, peripheral T cells expressing a TCR with low avidity for self-antigens were strongly reduced, whereas an overall impairment of T-cell activation by weak antigenic stimulation was observed. Mechanistically, Nck deletion resulted in a significant decrease in calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation upon TCR engagement. Taken together, our findings unveil a crucial role for the Nck adaptors in shaping the T-cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage and optimal T cell excitability. PMID:20709959

  3. Exploring structure and interactions of the bacterial adaptor protein YjbH by crosslinking mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Al-Eryani, Yusra; Ib Rasmussen, Morten; Kjellström, Sven; Højrup, Peter; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; von Wachenfeldt, Claes

    2016-09-01

    Adaptor proteins assist proteases in degrading specific proteins under appropriate conditions. The adaptor protein YjbH promotes the degradation of an important global transcriptional regulator Spx, which controls the expression of hundreds of genes and operons in response to thiol-specific oxidative stress in Bacillus subtilis. Under normal growth conditions, the transcription factor is bound to the adaptor protein and therefore degraded by the AAA+ protease ClpXP. If this binding is alleviated during stress, the transcription factor accumulates and turns on genes encoding stress-alleviating proteins. The adaptor protein YjbH is thus a key player involved in these interactions but its structure is unknown. To gain insight into its structure and interactions we have used chemical crosslinking mass spectrometry. Distance constraints obtained from the crosslinked monomer were used to select and validate a structure model of YjbH and then to probe its interactions with other proteins. The core structure of YjbH is reminiscent of DsbA family proteins. One lysine residue in YjbH (K177), located in one of the α-helices outside the thioredoxin fold, crosslinked to both Spx K99 and Spx K117, thereby suggesting one side of the YjbH for the interaction with Spx. Another lysine residue that crosslinked to Spx was YjbH K5, located in the long and presumably very flexible N-terminal arm of YjbH. Our crosslinking data lend support to a model proposed based on site-directed mutagenesis where the YjbH interaction with Spx can stabilize and present the C-terminal region of Spx for protease recognition and proteolysis. Proteins 2016; 84:1234-1245. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27191337

  4. Adaptor Scaffoldins: An Original Strategy for Extended Designer Cellulosomes, Inspired from Nature

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Johanna; Moraïs, Sarah; Lamed, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Designer cellulosomes consist of chimeric cohesin-bearing scaffoldins for the controlled incorporation of recombinant dockerin-containing enzymes. The largest designer cellulosome reported to date is a chimeric scaffoldin that contains 6 cohesins. This scaffoldin represented a technical limit of sorts, since adding another cohesin proved problematic, owing to resultant low expression levels, instability (cleavage) of the scaffoldin polypeptide, and limited numbers of available cohesin-dockerin specificities—the hallmark of designer cellulosomes. Nevertheless, increasing the number of enzymes integrated into designer cellulosomes is critical, in order to further enhance degradation of plant cell wall material. Adaptor scaffoldins comprise an intermediate type of scaffoldin that can both incorporate various enzymes and attach to an additional scaffoldin. Using this strategy, we constructed an efficient form of adaptor scaffoldin that possesses three type I cohesins for enzyme integration, a single type II dockerin for interaction with an additional scaffoldin, and a carbohydrate-binding module for targeting to the cellulosic substrate. In parallel, we designed a hexavalent scaffoldin capable of connecting to the adaptor scaffoldin by the incorporation of an appropriate type II cohesin. The resultant extended designer cellulosome comprised 8 recombinant enzymes—4 xylanases and 4 cellulases—thereby representing a potent enzymatic cocktail for solubilization of natural lignocellulosic substrates. The contribution of the adaptor scaffoldin clearly demonstrated that proximity between the two scaffoldins and their composite set of enzymes is crucial for optimized degradation. After 72 h of incubation, the performance of the extended designer cellulosome was determined to be approximately 70% compared to that of native cellulosomes. PMID:27048796

  5. Inhibition of TLR3 and TLR4 function and expression in human dendritic cells by helminth parasites

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Priyanka Goel; Leifer, Cynthia A.; Mostböck, Sven; Sabzevari, Helen; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Patent lymphatic filariasis is characterized by antigen-specific T-cell unresponsiveness with diminished IFN-γ and IL-2 production and defects in dendritic cell (DC) function. Because Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in pathogen recognition and TLR expression is diminished on B and T cells of filaria-infected individuals, we examined the effect of live microfilariae (mf) on expression and function of TLRs in human DCs. We show that mf-exposed monocyte-derived human DCs (mhDCs) demonstrate marked diminution of TLR3 and TLR4 mRNA expression compared with mf-unexposed mhDCs that translated into loss of function in response to appropriate TLR ligands. Exposure to mf significantly down-regulated production of IFN-α, MIP-1α, IL-12p70, and IL-1α following activation with poly I:C, and of IL-12p40 following activation with poly I:C or LPS. mRNA expression of MyD88, the adaptor molecule involved in TLR4 signaling, was significantly diminished in mhDCs after exposure to mf. Moreover, mf interfered with NF-κB activation (particularly p65 and p50) following stimulation with poly I:C or LPS. These data suggest that mf interfere with mhDC function by altering TLR expression and interfering with both MyD88-dependent signaling and a pathway that ultimately diminishes NF-κB activity. This down-regulated NF-κB activity impairs mhDC-produced cytokines needed for full T-cell activation. PMID:18541719

  6. Induction of immune-related gene expression in Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney cells by secondary metabolites from immunostimulatory Alcaligenes faecalis FY-3.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z-F; Liu, G-L; Zhou, Z; Wang, G-X; Xia, L; Liu, J-L

    2012-08-01

    This study was undertaken to isolate active secondary metabolites from immunostimulatory Alcaligenes faecalis FY-3 and evaluate their activities using grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney (CIK) cells. By applying chromatography techniques and successive recrystallization, three purified metabolites were obtained and identified by spectral data (mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance) as: (1) phenylacetic acid, (2) p-hydroxyphenylacetylamide and (3) cyclo-(Gly-(L)-Pro). CIK cells were stimulated by different concentrations (1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of the isolated compounds, and expression of MyD88, IL-1β, TNF-α, type I-IFN and IL-8 genes at different time points (2, 8 and 24 h) post-stimulation was quantified by real-time PCR. The known immunostimulatory agent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used as a positive control. To analyse whether these compounds are toxic to the cells, the methyl tetrazolium assay was employed to measure changes in cell viability. The obtained results revealed that transcribing level of MyD88, an important adaptor molecule in toll-like receptor signalling pathway, was augmented remarkably by all the three isolated compounds and LPS as early as 2-h exposure. These compounds also induced gene expression of cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α and type I-IFN. Under the experimental conditions, none of the test compounds is toxic to the CIK cells. These findings demonstrate that the immunostimulatory properties of the three metabolites [phenylacetic acid, p-hydroxyphenylacetylamide and cyclo-(Gly-(L)-Pro)] from A. faecalis FY-3 in CIK cells and highlight the potential of using these metabolites as immunostimulants in fish aquaculture. PMID:22606987

  7. Cord factor and peptidoglycan recapitulate the Th17-promoting adjuvant activity of mycobacteria through mincle/CARD9 signaling and the inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Shenderov, Kevin; Barber, Daniel L; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Gurcha, Sudagar S; Jankovic, Dragana; Feng, Carl G; Oland, Sandy; Hieny, Sara; Caspar, Pat; Yamasaki, Sho; Lin, Xin; Ting, Jenny P-Y; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Sher, Alan

    2013-06-01

    Although adjuvants are critical vaccine components, their modes of action are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which the heat-killed mycobacteria in CFA promote Th17 CD4(+) T cell responses. We found that IL-17 secretion by CD4(+) T cells following CFA immunization requires MyD88 and IL-1β/IL-1R signaling. Through measurement of Ag-specific responses after adoptive transfer of OTII cells, we confirmed that MyD88-dependent signaling controls Th17 differentiation rather than simply production of IL-17. Additional experiments showed that CFA-induced Th17 differentiation involves IL-1β processing by the inflammasome, as mice lacking caspase-1, ASC, or NLRP3 exhibit partially defective responses after immunization. Biochemical fractionation studies further revealed that peptidoglycan is the major component of heat-killed mycobacteria responsible for inflammasome activation. By assaying Il1b transcripts in the injection site skin of CFA-immunized mice, we found that signaling through the adaptor molecule caspase activation and recruitment domain 9 (CARD9) plays a major role in triggering pro-IL-1β expression. Moreover, we demonstrated that recognition of the mycobacterial glycolipid trehalose dimycolate (cord factor) by the C-type lectin receptor mincle partially explains this CARD9 requirement. Importantly, purified peptidoglycan and cord factor administered in mineral oil synergized to recapitulate the Th17-promoting activity of CFA, and, as expected, this response was diminished in caspase-1- and CARD9-deficient mice. Taken together, these findings suggest a general strategy for the rational design of Th17-skewing adjuvants by combining agonists of the CARD9 pathway with inflammasome activators. PMID:23630357

  8. Cord factor and peptidoglycan recapitulate the Th17-promoting adjuvant activity of mycobacteria through Mincle/CARD9 signaling and the inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Shenderov, Kevin; Barber, Daniel L; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Gurcha, Sudagar S; Jankovic, Dragana; Feng, Carl G; Oland, Sandy; Hieny, Sara; Caspar, Pat; Yamasaki, Sho; Lin, Xin; Ting, Jenny P-Y; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Sher, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Although adjuvants are critical vaccine components, their modes of action are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which the heat-killed mycobacteria in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) promote T helper 17 (Th17) CD4+ T cell responses. We found that IL-17 secretion by CD4+ T cells following CFA immunization requires MyD88 and IL-1β/IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling. Through measurement of antigen-specific responses after adoptive transfer of OTII cells, we confirmed that MyD88-dependent signaling controls Th17 differentiation rather than simply production of IL-17. Additional experiments showed that CFA-induced Th17 differentiation involves IL-1β processing by the inflammasome, as mice lacking caspase 1, ASC, or NLRP3 exhibit partially defective responses after immunization. Biochemical fractionation studies further revealed that peptidoglycan is the major component of heat-killed mycobacteria responsible for inflammasome activation. By assaying Il1b transcripts in the injection site skin of CFA-immunized mice, we found that signaling through the adaptor molecule CARD9 plays a major role in triggering pro-IL-1β expression. Moreover, we demonstrated that recognition of the mycobacterial glycolipid trehalose dimycolate (cord factor) by the C type lectin receptor mincle partially explains this CARD9 requirement. Importantly, purified peptidoglycan and cord factor administered in mineral oil synergized to recapitulate the Th17-promoting activity of CFA, and, as expected, this response was diminished in caspase 1-and CARD9-deficient mice. Taken together, these findings suggest a general strategy for the rational design of Th17-skewing adjuvants by combining agonists of the CARD9 pathway with inflammasome activators. PMID:23630357

  9. Zinc oxide influences intestinal integrity, the expressions of genes associated with inflammation and TLR4-myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling pathways in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Cai Hong; Song, Ze He; Xiao, Kan; Song, Juan; Jiao, Le Fei; Ke, Ya Lu

    2014-07-01

    This study explored whether zinc oxide (ZnO) supplementation could alleviate weanling-induced intestinal injury through TLR and NOD-like receptor signaling pathways. Twelve early-weanling piglets were allotted to two dietary treatments (control vs 2200 mg Zn/kg from ZnO) for 1 wk. The results showed that supplemental ZnO improved daily gain and feed intake, decreased post weaning scour scores, increased villus height and villus height:crypt depth ratio at the jejunal mucosa, and decreased diamine oxidase activity and endotoxin concentration in plasma. The intestinal mRNA levels of TLR4 and its downstream signals, including MyD88, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 and TNF-α receptor-associated factor 6, were decreased, and the expressions of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were decreased simultaneously in the ZnO-supplemented piglets. Although NF-κB p65 mRNA abundance was not affected by ZnO supplementation, NF-κB p65 protein expression was down-regulated by ZnO. However, ZnO supplementation had no effect on intestinal expressions of NOD1 and NOD2, and their adaptor molecule receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2, as well as protein expressions of caspase-3 and heat shock protein 70. The results indicated that the protective effects of ZnO on intestinal integrity were closely related to decreasing the expressions of genes associated with inflammation through inhibiting the TLR4-MyD88 signaling pathways. PMID:23956359

  10. Syp1 is a conserved endocytic adaptor that contains domains involved in cargo selection and membrane tubulation

    SciTech Connect

    Reider, Amanda; Barker, Sarah L.; Mishra, Sanjay K.; Im, Young Jun; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Hurley, James H.; Traub, Linton M.; Wendland, Beverly

    2010-10-28

    Internalization of diverse transmembrane cargos from the plasma membrane requires a similarly diverse array of specialized adaptors, yet only a few adaptors have been characterized. We report the identification of the muniscin family of endocytic adaptors that is conserved from yeast to human beings. Solving the structures of yeast muniscin domains confirmed the unique combination of an N-terminal domain homologous to the crescent-shaped membrane-tubulating EFC/F-BAR domains and a C-terminal domain homologous to cargo-binding {mu} homology domains ({mu}HDs). In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed membrane-tubulation activity for muniscin EFC/F-BAR domains. The {mu}HD domain has conserved interactions with the endocytic adaptor/scaffold Ede1/eps15, which influences muniscin localization. The transmembrane protein Mid2, earlier implicated in polarized Rho1 signalling, was identified as a cargo of the yeast adaptor protein. These and other data suggest a model in which the muniscins provide a combined adaptor/membrane-tubulation activity that is important for regulating endocytosis.

  11. The adaptor protein Dab2 sorts LDL receptors into coated pits independently of AP-2 and ARH.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Meghan E; Cooper, Jonathan A

    2006-10-15

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis requires cargo-specific adaptor proteins that recognize specific receptors and recruit them into coated pits. ARH [also called low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) adaptor protein] serves as an adaptor for LDLR endocytosis in liver. However, ARH is dispensable for LDL uptake by some other cell types. Here, we show that the adaptor Dab2 plays a major role in LDLR internalization in HeLa cells and fibroblasts. Dab2 mediates internalization of LDLRs but not transferrin receptors independently of ARH and the classic clathrin adaptor AP-2. If Dab2 is absent, ARH can mediate LDLR endocytosis, but its action requires AP-2. Furthermore, the rate of LDLR endocytosis is decreased when Dab2 is absent and Dab2, but not ARH, catalyzes the efficient clustering of LDLR into coated pits. Dab2 activity requires its binding to clathrin, LDLR and phospholipids. Dab2 is also involved in moving LDLRs off filopodia. We suggest that Dab2 is a cargo-specific endocytic adaptor protein, stably associating with phospholipids and clathrin to sort LDLR to nascent-coated pits, whereas ARH might accelerate later steps in LDLR endocytosis in cooperation with AP-2. PMID:16984970

  12. Differential Regulation of Clathrin and Its Adaptor Proteins during Membrane Recruitment for Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Hu, Tianwei; Yan, Xu; Meng, Tingting; Wang, Yutong; Wang, Qingmei; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Gu, Ying; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Gadeyne, Astrid; Lin, Jinxing; Persson, Staffan; Van Damme, Daniël; Li, Chuanyou; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Pan, Jianwei

    2016-05-01

    In plants, clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is dependent on the function of clathrin and its accessory heterooligomeric adaptor protein complexes, ADAPTOR PROTEIN2 (AP-2) and the TPLATE complex (TPC), and is negatively regulated by the hormones auxin and salicylic acid (SA). The details for how clathrin and its adaptor complexes are recruited to the plasma membrane (PM) to regulate CME, however, are poorly understood. We found that SA and the pharmacological CME inhibitor tyrphostin A23 reduce the membrane association of clathrin and AP-2, but not that of the TPC, whereas auxin solely affected clathrin membrane association, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic and pharmacological experiments revealed that loss of AP2μ or AP2σ partially affected the membrane association of other AP-2 subunits and that the AP-2 subunit AP2σ, but not AP2μ, was required for SA- and tyrphostin A23-dependent inhibition of CME Furthermore, we show that although AP-2 and the TPC are both required for the PM recruitment of clathrin in wild-type cells, the TPC is necessary for clathrin PM association in AP-2-deficient cells. These results indicate that developmental signals may differentially modulate the membrane recruitment of clathrin and its core accessory complexes to regulate the process of CME in plant cells. PMID:26945051

  13. New Insights to Clathrin and Adaptor Protein 2 for the Design and Development of Therapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Larsen, Agnete; Zollo, Alen; Jørgensen, Arne L; Sanggaard, Kristian W; Enghild, Jan J; Matrone, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) has been extensively studied for its role as the precursor of the β-amyloid protein (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, our understanding of the normal function of APP is still patchy. Emerging evidence indicates that a dysfunction in APP trafficking and degradation can be responsible for neuronal deficits and progressive degeneration in humans. We recently reported that the Y682 mutation in the 682YENPTY687 domain of APP affects its binding to specific adaptor proteins and leads to its anomalous trafficking, to defects in the autophagy machinery and to neuronal degeneration. In order to identify adaptors that influence APP function, we performed pull-down experiments followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) on hippocampal tissue extracts of three month-old mice incubated with either the 682YENPTY687 peptide, its mutated form, 682GENPTY687 or its phosphorylated form, 682pYENPTY687. Our experiments resulted in the identification of two proteins involved in APP internalization and trafficking: Clathrin heavy chain (hc) and its Adaptor Protein 2 (AP-2). Overall our results consolidate and refine the importance of Y682 in APP normal functions from an animal model of premature aging and dementia. Additionally, they open the perspective to consider Clathrin hc and AP-2 as potential targets for the design and development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26690411

  14. Large hepatitis delta antigen is a novel clathrin adaptor-like protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Chang, Shin C; Yu, I-Chen; Tsay, Yeou-Guang; Chang, Ming-Fu

    2007-06-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a common pathway for viral entry, but little is known about the direct association of viral protein with clathrin in the cytoplasm. In this study, a putative clathrin box known to be conserved in clathrin adaptors was identified at the C terminus of the large hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg-L). Similar to clathrin adaptors, HDAg-L directly interacted with the N terminus of the clathrin heavy chain through the clathrin box. HDAg-L is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein important for the assembly of hepatitis delta virus (HDV). Here, we demonstrated that brefeldin A and wortmannin, inhibitors of clathrin-mediated exocytosis and endosomal trafficking, respectively, specifically blocked HDV assembly but had no effect on the assembly of the small surface antigen of hepatitis B virus. In addition, cytoplasm-localized HDAg-L inhibited the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of transferrin and the degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor. These results indicate that HDAg-L is a new clathrin adaptor-like protein, and it may be involved in the maturation and pathogenesis of HDV coinfection or superinfection with hepatitis B virus through interaction with clathrin. PMID:17376909

  15. Differential Regulation of Clathrin and Its Adaptor Proteins during Membrane Recruitment for Endocytosis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Hu, Tianwei; Yan, Xu; Meng, Tingting; Wang, Yutong; Wang, Qingmei; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Gu, Ying; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Gadeyne, Astrid; Lin, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    In plants, clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is dependent on the function of clathrin and its accessory heterooligomeric adaptor protein complexes, ADAPTOR PROTEIN2 (AP-2) and the TPLATE complex (TPC), and is negatively regulated by the hormones auxin and salicylic acid (SA). The details for how clathrin and its adaptor complexes are recruited to the plasma membrane (PM) to regulate CME, however, are poorly understood. We found that SA and the pharmacological CME inhibitor tyrphostin A23 reduce the membrane association of clathrin and AP-2, but not that of the TPC, whereas auxin solely affected clathrin membrane association, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic and pharmacological experiments revealed that loss of AP2μ or AP2σ partially affected the membrane association of other AP-2 subunits and that the AP-2 subunit AP2σ, but not AP2μ, was required for SA- and tyrphostin A23-dependent inhibition of CME. Furthermore, we show that although AP-2 and the TPC are both required for the PM recruitment of clathrin in wild-type cells, the TPC is necessary for clathrin PM association in AP-2-deficient cells. These results indicate that developmental signals may differentially modulate the membrane recruitment of clathrin and its core accessory complexes to regulate the process of CME in plant cells. PMID:26945051

  16. Fluorescein gonioangiography of the normal canine eye using a dSLR camera adaptor.

    PubMed

    Alario, Anthony F; Pirie, Christopher G

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe fluorescein gonioangiography (FGA) of the normal canine eye using a digital single lens reflex (dSLR) camera adaptor. Dogs were anesthetized using intravenous propofol. Imaging was performed using a Lovac Barkan goniolens, dSLR camera, dSLR camera adaptor, camera lens, and accessory flash. Twelve dogs with a mean age of 2.0 +/- 0.8 years were imaged. No characteristic angiographic phases were observed. Leakage from the peri-limbal capillary network was a common finding and occurred 7.7 +/- 2.2 s post injection in 9 (75%) dogs. In 3 (25%) dogs, filling of the circumferential ciliary artery was observed 10.3 +/- 2.8 s post injection. Dye leakage within the iris base and into the aqueous humor was demonstrated in 4 (33%) and 6 dogs (50%) respectively. No adverse events were noted. This study demonstrates FGA findings in normal canine eyes using a cost effective dSLR camera adaptor. PMID:25823859

  17. Your personalized protein structure: Andrei N. Lupas fused to GCN4 adaptors.

    PubMed

    Deiss, Silvia; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte; Bär, Kerstin; Ewers, Carolin P; Coles, Murray; Albrecht, Reinhard; Hartmann, Marcus D

    2014-06-01

    This work presents a protein structure that has been designed purely for aesthetic reasons, symbolizing decades of coiled-coil research and praising its most fundamental model system, the GCN4 leucine zipper. The GCN4 leucine zipper is a highly stable coiled coil which can be tuned to adopt different oligomeric states via mutation of its core residues. For these reasons it is used in structural studies as a stabilizing fusion adaptor. On the occasion of the 50th birthday of Andrei N. Lupas, we used it to create the first personalized protein structure: we fused the sequence ANDREI-N-LVPAS in heptad register to trimeric GCN4 adaptors and determined its structure by X-ray crystallography. The structure demonstrates the robustness and versatility of GCN4 as a fusion adaptor. We learn how proline can be accommodated in trimeric coiled coils, and put the structure into the context of the other GCN4-fusion structures known to date. PMID:24486584

  18. New Insights to Clathrin and Adaptor Protein 2 for the Design and Development of Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Larsen, Agnete; Zollo, Alen; Jørgensen, Arne L.; Sanggaard, Kristian W.; Enghild, Jan J.; Matrone, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) has been extensively studied for its role as the precursor of the β-amyloid protein (Aβ) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, our understanding of the normal function of APP is still patchy. Emerging evidence indicates that a dysfunction in APP trafficking and degradation can be responsible for neuronal deficits and progressive degeneration in humans. We recently reported that the Y682 mutation in the 682YENPTY687 domain of APP affects its binding to specific adaptor proteins and leads to its anomalous trafficking, to defects in the autophagy machinery and to neuronal degeneration. In order to identify adaptors that influence APP function, we performed pull-down experiments followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) on hippocampal tissue extracts of three month-old mice incubated with either the 682YENPTY687 peptide, its mutated form, 682GENPTY687 or its phosphorylated form, 682pYENPTY687. Our experiments resulted in the identification of two proteins involved in APP internalization and trafficking: Clathrin heavy chain (hc) and its Adaptor Protein 2 (AP-2). Overall our results consolidate and refine the importance of Y682 in APP normal functions from an animal model of premature aging and dementia. Additionally, they open the perspective to consider Clathrin hc and AP-2 as potential targets for the design and development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26690411

  19. Science Signaling Podcast for 12 July 2016: Adaptor proteins limit signaling.

    PubMed

    Wiley, H Steven; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Steven Wiley, senior author of a Research Article that appears in the 12 July 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about how the abundance of adaptor proteins and feedback regulators affect the flow of information downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Information flows through a signaling pathway by sequential interactions between core components of the pathway, many of which have enzymatic activity. Adaptor proteins do not directly participate in relaying the signal and do not have enzymatic activity, but are important for signaling because they facilitate interactions between the core components. Using quantitative methods, Shi et al demonstrated that core components of the EGFR pathway were highly abundant in both normal cells and cancer cells. However, adaptor proteins were present in much lower abundance in both cell types, indicating that it is the abundance of these proteins that limit signaling downstream of EGFR. The authors also found that differences in EGFR signaling between different cell types likely resulted from the variable abundance of feedback regulators.Listen to Podcast. PMID:27405978

  20. Myosin VI and its cargo adaptors – linking endocytosis and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tumbarello, David A.; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2013-01-01

    Summary The coordinated trafficking and tethering of membrane cargo within cells relies on the function of distinct cytoskeletal motors that are targeted to specific subcellular compartments through interactions with protein adaptors and phospholipids. The unique actin motor myosin VI functions at distinct steps during clathrin-mediated endocytosis and the early endocytic pathway – both of which are involved in cargo trafficking and sorting – through interactions with Dab2, GIPC, Tom1 and LMTK2. This multifunctional ability of myosin VI can be attributed to its cargo-binding tail region that contains two protein–protein interaction interfaces, a ubiquitin-binding motif and a phospholipid binding domain. In addition, myosin VI has been shown to be a regulator of the autophagy pathway, because of its ability to link the endocytic and autophagic pathways through interactions with the ESCRT-0 protein Tom1 and the autophagy adaptor proteins T6BP, NDP52 and optineurin. This function has been attributed to facilitating autophagosome maturation and subsequent fusion with the lysosome. Therefore, in this Commentary, we discuss the relationship between myosin VI and the different myosin VI adaptor proteins, particularly with regards to the spatial and temporal regulation that is required for the sorting of cargo at the early endosome, and their impact on autophagy. PMID:23781020

  1. Blockade of Toll-Like Receptors (TLR2, TLR4) Attenuates Pain and Potentiates Buprenorphine Analgesia in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Jurga, Agnieszka M.; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Pilat, Dominika; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that microglial TLR2 and TLR4 play a significant role in nociception. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the contribution of TLR2 and TLR4 and their adaptor molecules to neuropathy and their ability to amplify opioid effectiveness. Behavioral tests (von Frey's and cold plate) and biochemical (Western blot and qRT-PCR) analysis of spinal cord and DRG tissue were conducted after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. Repeated intrathecal administration of LPS-RS (TLR2 and TLR4 antagonist) and LPS-RS Ultrapure (TLR4 antagonist) attenuated allodynia and hyperalgesia. Biochemical analysis revealed time-dependent upregulation of mRNA and/or protein levels of TLR2 and TLR4 and MyD88 and TRIF adaptor molecules, which was paralleled by an increase in IBA-1/CD40-positive cells under neuropathy. LPS-RS and LPS-RS Ultrapure similarly influenced opioid analgesia by enhancing the effectiveness of buprenorphine but not morphine. Summing up, in light of their upregulation over the course of pain, both TLR2 and TLR4 may indeed play a significant role in neuropathy, which could be linked to the observed activation of IBA-1/CD40-positive cells. Blockade of TLR2 and TLR4 produced analgesia and enhanced buprenorphine's effectiveness, which suggests that they may be a putative target for future pharmacological pain relief tools, especially for opioid rotation, when the effect of morphine is tolerated. PMID:26962463

  2. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  3. The Lnk/SH2B adaptor provides a fail-safe mechanism to establish the Insulin receptor-Chico interaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling (IIS) has been described as one of the major pathways involved in growth control and homeostasis in multicellular organisms. Whereas its core components are well established, less is known about the molecular functions of IIS regulators. The adaptor molecule Lnk/SH2B has been implicated in IIS but the mechanism by which it promotes IIS activity has remained enigmatic. Results In this study, we analyse genetic and physical interactions among InR, Chico and Lnk in Drosophila tissues. FRET analysis reveals in vivo binding between all three molecules. Genetically, Lnk acts upstream of Chico. We demonstrate that Chico’s plasma membrane localisation is ensured by both its PH domain and by the interaction with Lnk. Furthermore, Lnk is able to recruit an intracellular InR fragment to the membrane. Conclusions Thus, by acting as a scaffolding molecule that ensures InR and Chico enrichment at the membrane, Lnk provides a fail-safe mechanism for IIS activation. PMID:23590848

  4. Proteins recruited by SH3 domains of Ruk/CIN85 adaptor identified by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Havrylov, Serhiy; Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Malinowska, Agata; Drobot, Lyudmyla; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2009-01-01

    Background Ruk/CIN85 is a mammalian adaptor molecule with three SH3 domains. Using its SH3 domains Ruk/CIN85 can cluster multiple proteins and protein complexes, and, consequently, facilitates organisation of elaborate protein interaction networks with diverse regulatory roles. Previous research linked Ruk/CIN85 with the regulation of vesicle-mediated transport and cancer cell invasiveness. Despite the recent findings, precise molecular functions of Ruk/CIN85 in these processes remain largely elusive and further research is hampered by a lack of complete lists of its partner proteins. Results In the present study we employed a LC-MS/MS-based experimental pipeline to identify a considerable number (over 100) of proteins recruited by the SH3 domains of Ruk/CIN85 in vitro. Most of these identifications are novel Ruk/CIN85 interaction candidates. The identified proteins have diverse molecular architectures and can interact with other proteins, as well as with lipids and nucleic acids. Some of the identified proteins possess enzymatic activities. Functional profiling analyses and literature mining demonstrate that many of the proteins recruited by the SH3 domains of Ruk/CIN85 identified in this work were involved in the regulation of membranes and cytoskeletal structures necessary for vesicle-mediated transport and cancer cell invasiveness. Several groups of the proteins were also associated with few other cellular processes not previously related to Ruk/CIN85, most prominently with cell division. Conclusion Obtained data support the notion that Ruk/CIN85 regulates vesicle-mediated transport and cancer cell invasiveness through the assembly of multimeric protein complexes governing coordinated remodelling of membranes and underlying cytoskeletal structures, and imply its important roles in formation of coated vesicles and biogenesis of invadopodia. In addition, this study points to potential involvement of Ruk/CIN85 in other cellular processes, chiefly in cell division

  5. Valosin-containing protein (VCP)-Adaptor Interactions are Exceptionally Dynamic and Subject to Differential Modulation by a VCP Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Blythe, Emily E; Freiberger, Elyse C; Mamrosh, Jennifer L; Hebert, Alexander S; Reitsma, Justin M; Hess, Sonja; Coon, Joshua J; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    Protein quality control (PQC) plays an important role in stemming neurodegenerative diseases and is essential for the growth of some cancers. Valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 plays a pivotal role in multiple PQC pathways by interacting with numerous adaptors that link VCP to specific PQC pathways and substrates and influence the post-translational modification state of substrates. However, our poor understanding of the specificity and architecture of the adaptors, and the dynamic properties of their interactions with VCP hinders our understanding of fundamental features of PQC and how modulation of VCP activity can best be exploited therapeutically. In this study we use multiple mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches combined with biophysical studies to characterize the interaction of adaptors with VCP. Our results reveal that most VCP-adaptor interactions are characterized by rapid dynamics that in some cases are modulated by the VCP inhibitor NMS873. These findings have significant implications for both the regulation of VCP function and the impact of VCP inhibition on different VCP-adaptor complexes. PMID:27406709

  6. DNA as Tunable Adaptor for siRNA Polyplex Stabilization and Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Heissig, Philipp; Klein, Philipp M; Hadwiger, Philipp; Wagner, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    siRNA and microRNA are promising therapeutic agents, which are engaged in a natural mechanism called RNA interference that modulates gene expression posttranscriptionally. For intracellular delivery of such nucleic acid triggers, we use sequence-defined cationic polymers manufactured through solid phase chemistry. They consist of an oligoethanamino amide core for siRNA complexation and optional domains for nanoparticle shielding and cell targeting. Due to the small size of siRNA, electrostatic complexes with polycations are less stable, and consequently intracellular delivery is less efficient. Here we use DNA oligomers as adaptors to increase size and charge of cargo siRNA, resulting in increased polyplex stability, which in turn boosts transfection efficiency. Extending a single siRNA with a 181-nucleotide DNA adaptor is sufficient to provide maximum gene silencing aided by cationic polymers. Interestingly, this simple strategy was far more effective than merging defined numbers (4-10) of siRNA units into one DNA scaffolded construct. For DNA attachment, the 3' end of the siRNA passenger strand was beneficial over the 5' end. The impact of the attachment site however was resolved by introducing bioreducible disulfides at the connection point. We also show that DNA adaptors provide the opportunity to readily link additional functional domains to siRNA. Exemplified by the covalent conjugation of the endosomolytic influenza peptide INF-7 to siRNA via a DNA backbone strand and complexing this construct with a targeting polymer, we could form a highly functional polyethylene glycol-shielded polyplex to downregulate a luciferase gene in folate receptor-positive cells. PMID:26928236

  7. Distinct adaptor proteins assist exit of Kre2-family proteins from the yeast ER

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Yoichi; Hara, Takehiro; Ishii, Minako; Yoda, Koji

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Svp26 protein of S. cerevisiae is an ER- and Golgi-localized integral membrane protein with 4 potential membrane-spanning domains. It functions as an adaptor protein that facilitates the ER exit of Ktr3, a mannosyltransferase required for biosynthesis of O-linked oligosaccharides, and the ER exit of Mnn2 and Mnn5, mannosyltransferases, which participate in the biosynthesis of N-linked oligosaccharides. Ktr3 belongs to the Kre2 family, which consists of 9 members of type-II membrane proteins sharing sequence similarities. In this report, we examined all Kre2 family members and found that the Golgi localizations of two others, Kre2 and Ktr1, were dependent on Svp26 by immunofluorescence microscopy and cell fractionations in sucrose density gradients. We show that Svp26 functions in facilitating the ER exit of Kre2 and Ktr1 by an in vitro COPII budding assay. Golgi localization of Ktr4 was not dependent on Svp26. Screening null mutants of the genes encoding abundant COPII membrane proteins for those showing mislocalization of Ktr4 in the ER revealed that Erv41 and Erv46 are required for the correct Golgi localization of Ktr4. We provide biochemical evidence that the Erv41-Erv46 complex functions as an adaptor protein for ER exit of Ktr4. This is the first demonstration of the molecular function of this evolutionally conserved protein complex. The domain switching experiments show that the lumenal domain of Ktr4 is responsible for recognition by the Erv41-Erv46 complex. Thus, ER exit of Kre2-family proteins is dependent on distinct adaptor proteins and our results provide new insights into the traffic of Kre2-family mannosyltransferases. PMID:24585773

  8. Evidence for an evolutionary relationship between the large adaptor nucleoporin Nup192 and karyopherins.

    PubMed

    Stuwe, Tobias; Lin, Daniel H; Collins, Leslie N; Hurt, Ed; Hoelz, André

    2014-02-18

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is facilitated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are massive proteinaceous transport channels embedded in the nuclear envelope. Nup192 is a major component of an adaptor nucleoporin subcomplex proposed to link the NPC coat with the central transport channel. Here, we present the structure of the ∼110-kDa N-terminal domain (NTD) of Nup192 at 2.7-Å resolution. The structure reveals an open ring-shaped architecture composed of Huntingtin, EF3, PP2A, and TOR1 (HEAT) and Armadillo (ARM) repeats. A comparison of different conformations indicates that the NTD consists of two rigid halves connected by a flexible hinge. Unexpectedly, the two halves of the ring are structurally related to karyopherin-α (Kap-α) and β-karyopherin family members. Biochemically, we identify a conserved patch that binds an unstructured segment in Nup53 and show that a C-terminal tail region binds to a putative helical fragment in Nic96. The Nup53 segment that binds Nup192 is a classical nuclear localization-like sequence that interacts with Kap-α in a mutually exclusive and mechanistically distinct manner. The disruption of the Nup53 and Nic96 binding sites in vivo yields growth and mRNA export defects, revealing their critical role in proper NPC function. Surprisingly, both interactions are dispensable for NPC localization, suggesting that Nup192 possesses another nucleoporin interaction partner. These data indicate that the structured domains in the adaptor nucleoporin complex are held together by peptide interactions that resemble those found in karyopherin•cargo complexes and support the proposal that the adaptor nucleoporins arose from ancestral karyopherins. PMID:24505056

  9. TLR-2/TLR-4 TREM-1 Signaling Pathway Is Dispensable in Inflammatory Myeloid Cells during Sterile Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Campanholle, Gabriela; Mittelsteadt, Kristen; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Kobayashi, Akio; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Gharib, Sina A.; Heinecke, Jay W.; Hamerman, Jessica A.; Altemeier, William A.; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory macrophages are abundant in kidney disease, stimulating repair, or driving chronic inflammation and fibrosis. Damage associated molecules (DAMPs), released from injured cells engage pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on macrophages, contributing to activation. Understanding mechanisms of macrophage activation during kidney injury may lead to strategies to alleviate chronic disease. We identified Triggering-Receptor-in-Myeloid-cells (TREM)-1, a regulator of TLR signaling, as highly upregulated in kidney inflammatory macrophages and tested the roles of these receptors in macrophage activation and kidney disease. Kidney DAMPs activated macrophages in vitro, independently of TREM-1, but partially dependent on TLR-2/−4, MyD88. In two models of progressive interstitial kidney disease, TREM-1 blockade had no impact on disease or macrophage activation in vivo, but TLR-2/−4, or MyD88 deficiency was anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic. When MyD88 was mutated only in the myeloid lineage, however, there was no bearing on macrophage activation or disease progression. Instead, TLR-2/−4 or MyD88 deficiency reduced activation of mesenchyme lineage cells resulting in reduced inflammation and fibrosis, indicating that these pathways play dominant roles in activation of myofibroblasts but not macrophages. To conclude, TREM-1, TLR2/4 and MyD88 signaling pathways are redundant in myeloid cell activation in kidney injury, but the latter appear to regulate activation of mesenchymal cells. PMID:23844229

  10. Identification of a Regulatory Acidic Motif as the Determinant of Membrane Localization of TICAM-2.

    PubMed

    Funami, Kenji; Matsumoto, Misako; Enokizono, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Noriko; Tatematsu, Megumi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Seya, Tsukasa

    2015-11-01

    TLR4 triggers LPS signaling through the adaptors Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule (TICAM)-2 (also called TRAM) and TICAM-1 (also called TRIF), together with Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) and MyD88. The MyD88 pathway mediates early phase responses to LPS on the plasma membrane, whereas the TICAM pathway mediates late-phase responses, which induce the production of type I IFN and activation of inflammasomes. TICAM-2 bridges TLR4 and TICAM-1 for LPS signaling in the endosome. Recently, we identified an acidic motif, E87/D88/D89 in TICAM-2, that provides the interaction surfaces between TICAM-2 and TICAM-1. In the present study, we found additional D91/E92 in TICAM-2, conserved across species, that is crucial for TICAM-1 activation. The D91A/E92A mutant protein was distributed largely to the cytosol, despite myristoylation, suggesting its importance for assistance of membrane localization of TICAM-2. An ectopically expressed D91A/E92A mutant per se failed to activate TICAM-1, unlike its wild-type counterpart that forms self-aggregation, but it still retained the ability to pass LPS-mediated IFN regulatory factor (IRF)3 activation. In a TICAM-2 knockout human cell line expressing TLR4/MD-2 with or without CD14, overexpression of the D91A/E92A mutant did not activate IRF3, but upon LPS stimulation, it induced sufficient TLR4-mediated IRF3 activation with high coefficient colocalization. Hence, the D91/E92 motif guides TICAM-2 membrane localization and self-activation for signaling. Our results suggest the presence of two distinct steps underlying endosomal LPS signaling on TICAM-2 for TICAM-1 activation: TICAM-2 assembling in TLR4 and/or TICAM-2 self-activation. D91A/E92A of TICAM-2 selectively associates the TLR4-dependent TICAM-2 assembling, but not cytosolic TICAM-2 self-aggregation, to activate TICAM-1. PMID:26408662

  11. Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88–Dependent Signaling Is Critical for Acute Organic Dust–Induced Airway Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christopher; Kielian, Tammy; Wyatt, Todd A.; Romberger, Debra J.; West, William W.; Gleason, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Organic dust exposure within agricultural environments results in airway diseases. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 only partly account for the innate response to these complex dust exposures. To determine the central pathway in mediating complex organic dust–induced airway inflammation, this study targeted the common adaptor protein, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and investigated the relative contributions of receptors upstream from this adaptor. Wild-type, MyD88, TLR9, TLR4, IL-1 receptor I (RI), and IL-18R knockout (KO) mice were challenged intranasally with organic dust extract (ODE) or saline, according to an established protocol. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was assessed by invasive pulmonary measurements. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected to quantitate leukocyte influx and cytokine/chemokine (TNF-α, IL-6, chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligands [CXCL1 and CXCL2]) concentrations. Lung tissue was collected for histopathology. Lung cell apoptosis was determined by a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and lymphocyte influx and intercellular adhesion molecule–1 (ICAM-1) expression were assessed by immunohistochemistry. ODE-induced AHR was significantly attenuated in MyD88 KO mice, and neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine production were nearly absent in MyD88 KO animals after ODE challenges. Despite a near-absent airspace inflammatory response, lung parenchymal inflammation was increased in MyD88 KO mice after repeated ODE exposures. ODE-induced epithelial-cell ICAM-1 expression was diminished in MyD88 KO mice. No difference was evident in the small degree of ODE-induced lung-cell apoptosis. Mice deficient in TLR9, TLR4, and IL-18R, but not IL-1IR, demonstrated partial protection against ODE-induced neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine production. Collectively, the acute organic dust–induced airway inflammatory response is highly dependent on MyD88 signaling, and is dictated, in part, by

  12. Inhibition of myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling mediated by histidine-grafted poly(β-amino ester) ester nanovector induces donor-specific liver allograft tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fanguo; Wang, Hanjie; Zhang, Shuangnan; Peng, Yao; Su, Lin; Chang, Jin; Liu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) activate biochemical pathways that evoke activation of innate immunity, which leads to dendritic cell maturation and initiation of adaptive immune responses that provoke allograft rejection. We aimed to prolong allograft survival by selectively inhibiting expression of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), which is an essential adaptor in TLR signaling. We designed and synthesized a novel histidine-grafted poly(β-amino ester) (HGPAE) nanovector, which was shown to be safe and efficient both in vitro and in vivo for the delivery of a plasmid containing shRNA targeting MyD88 (pMyD88). We also demonstrated that the pMyD88/HGPAE complex mediated remarkable inhibition of MyD88 expression in rat liver in vivo. We transplanted Dark Agouti rat livers lacking MyD88 as result of transfection with the pMyD88/HGPAE complex into Lewis rats. The recipients survived longer and graft rejection of the donor liver as well as serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in the recipient were significantly reduced. PMID:26185440

  13. Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor Domain Derived from TcpC (TIR-TcpC) Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis by Down-modulating Th17 Cell Response.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Shweta; Kant, Ravi; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2016-06-01

    Evasion through immunomodulation is one of the several strategies adopted by pathogens to prolong their survival within the host. One such pathogen, Escherichia coli CFT073, utilizes an immunomodulatory protein, TcpC, to combat the host's innate immune defense. TcpC abrogates the function of MyD88 in macrophages, thus perturbing all the signaling processes that involve this adaptor protein. Although central to various signaling pathways initiated by IL-1, IL-18, and toll-like receptors, the precise contribution of MyD88 to the development of autoimmunity, particularly rheumatoid arthritis, still needs extensive exploration. Herein, by using the toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain homologous C-terminal motif of TcpC, i.e. TIR-TcpC, we found MyD88 to be critical for the induction and progression of rheumatoid arthritis through its pivotal role in the development of Th17 cells, the subset of CD4(+) T-cells widely implicated in various autoimmune disorders. The TIR-TcpC mediated inhibition of signaling through MyD88, and subsequent amelioration of experimental autoimmune arthritis was observed to be an outcome of perturbations in the NFκB-RORγt (RAR-related orphan receptor γt) axis. PMID:27022030

  14. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signaling driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology. PMID:26788993

  15. TIR domain-containing adaptor SARM is a late addition to the ongoing microbe–host dialog

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Zmasek, Christian M.; Cai, Xiaohui; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing proteins play important roles in defense against pathogens in both animals and plants, connecting the immunity signaling pathways via a chain of specific protein–protein interactions. Among them is SARM, the only TIR domain-containing adaptor that can negatively regulate TLR signaling. By extensive phylogenetic analysis, we show here that SARM is closely related to bacterial proteins with TIR domains, suggesting that this family has a different evolutionary history from other animal TIR-containing adaptors, possibly emerging via a lateral gene transfer from bacteria to animals. We also show evidence of several similar, independent transfer events, none of which, however, survived in vertebrates. An evolutionary relationship between the animal SARM adaptor and bacterial proteins with TIR domains illustrates the possible role that bacterial TIR-containing proteins play in regulating eukaryotic immune responses and how this mechanism was possibly adapted by the eukaryotes themselves. PMID:21110998

  16. The adaptor protein SAP directly associates with PECAM-1 and regulates PECAM-1-mediated-cell adhesion in T-like cell lines.

    PubMed

    Proust, Richard; Crouin, Catherine; Gandji, Leslie Yewakon; Bertoglio, Jacques; Gesbert, Franck

    2014-04-01

    SAP is a small cytosolic adaptor protein expressed in hematopoietic lineages whose main function is to regulate intracellular signaling pathways induced by the triggering of members of the SLAM receptor family. In this paper, we have identified the adhesion molecule PECAM-1 as a new partner for SAP in a conditional yeast two-hybrid screen. PECAM-1 is an immunoglobulin-like molecule expressed by endothelial cells and leukocytes, which possesses both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about PECAM-1 functions in T cells. We show that SAP directly and specifically interacts with the cytosolic tyrosine 686 of PECAM-1. We generated different T-like cell lines in which SAP or PECAM-1 are expressed or down modulated and we demonstrate that a diminished SAP expression correlates with a diminished PECAM-1-mediated adhesion. Although SAP has mainly been shown to associate with SLAM receptors, we evidence here that SAP is a new actor downstream of PECAM-1. PMID:24388971

  17. Effectiveness of Needleless Vial Adaptors and Blunt Cannulas for Drug Administration in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, M.; Bayuse, T.

    2010-01-01

    Fluid Isolation in the medication vial: Air/ fluid isolation maneuvers were used to move the medication to the septum end of vial. This isolation may be achieved in multiple ways based on the experience of the astronaut with fluid management in microgravity. If vial adaptors/blunt cannula or syringe assembly is inserted into the to vial before fluid isolation commences, the stability of this assembly should be considered in an effort to limit the risk of "slinging off" of the vial during isolation. Alternatively, fluid isolation can be performed prior to attaching the syringe/vial adaptor assembly. Terrestrial practices for medication withdrawal from a nonvented vial require injection of an equivalent amount of air as the expected medication volume prior to withdrawing liquid. In microgravity, this action is still valid, however the injection of additional air into the vial creates a multitude of micro bubbles and increases the volume of medication mixed with air that then must be withdrawn to achieve the desired drug volume in syringe. This practice is more likely to be required when using vials >30ml in size and injection volumes >10mL. It is felt that based on the microgravity flight, the practice of air injection is more of a hindrance than help.

  18. Systematic VCP-UBXD Adaptor Network Proteomics Identifies a Role for UBXN10 in Regulating Ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Malavika; Sergeev, Mikhail; Garnaas, Maija; Lydeard, John R.; Huttlin, Edward L.; Goessling, Wolfram; Shah, Jagesh V.; Harper, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    The AAA-ATPase VCP (also known as p97 or CDC48) uses ATP hydrolysis to “segregate” ubiquitinated proteins from their binding partners. VCP acts via UBX-domain containing adaptors that provide target specificity, but targets and functions of UBXD proteins remain poorly understood. Through systematic proteomic analysis of UBXD proteins in human cells, we reveal a network of over 195 interacting proteins, implicating VCP in diverse cellular pathways. We have explored one such complex between an unstudied adaptor UBXN10 and the intraflagellar transport B (IFT-B) complex, which regulates anterograde transport into cilia. UBXN10 localizes to cilia in a VCP-dependent manner and both VCP and UBXN10 are required for ciliogenesis. Pharmacological inhibition of VCP destabilized the IFT-B complex and increased trafficking rates. Depletion of UBXN10 in zebrafish embryos causes defects in left-right asymmetry, which depends on functional cilia. This study provides a resource for exploring the landscape of UBXD proteins in biology and identifies an unexpected requirement for VCP-UBXN10 in ciliogenesis. PMID:26389662

  19. Adaptor long-range PCR procedure for clone-specific characterization and chromosomal localization.

    PubMed

    Tsoktouridis, Georgios; Merz, Christian A; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2005-06-01

    An efficient adaptor long-range PCR (ALR-PCR) procedure was developed to detect genomic rearrangements in high-plasticity genomic regions between closely related strains of bacteria. The method was precisely optimized using a combination of high-speed experimental steps for the chromosomal localization and elucidation of deletions, inversions, duplications, or inserted sequences within a clone-specific flanking region. The advantages of this strategy are: (i) ready-to-use polymerase mixtures and Master mix (ready-to-use reaction mixtures with polymerase MasterAmp and buffer 2x Premix 4); (ii) a 5-min ligation procedure; (iii) rapid purification of DNA digests; (iv) optimized DNA template concentration protocol to avoid nonspecific amplification and high backgrounds; (v) long-range PCR protocol to obtain at least 9.6 kb single PCR products; (vi) two-step PCR cycling with the same annealing and extension temperature at 68 degrees C; (vii) simple design of the adaptors according to the preferred restriction endonuclease enzyme; and (viii) simple technology and equipment required. The application of this method for a tester-specific suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) clone of Brucella melitensis 16M revealed an 837-bp deletion and a 7255-bp DNA transfer from one chromosomal location to another for Brucella abortus 2308 used as a driver. PMID:16018549

  20. The Adaptor Protein Rai/ShcC Promotes Astrocyte-Dependent Inflammation during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, Cristina; Savino, Maria Teresa; Luccarini, Ilaria; Fanigliulo, Emanuela; Aldinucci, Alessandra; Bonechi, Elena; Benagiano, Marisa; Ortensi, Barbara; Pelicci, Giuliana; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Ballerini, Clara; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana

    2016-07-15

    Th17 cells have been casually associated to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. We have previously demonstrated that Rai/ShcC, a member of the Shc family of adaptor proteins, negatively regulates Th17 cell differentiation and lupus autoimmunity. In this study, we have investigated the pathogenic outcome of the Th17 bias associated with Rai deficiency on multiple sclerosis development, using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model. We found that, unexpectedly, EAE was less severe in Rai(-/-) mice compared with their wild-type counterparts despite an enhanced generation of myelin-specific Th17 cells that infiltrated into the CNS. Nevertheless, when adoptively transferred into immunodeficient Rai(+/+) mice, these cells promoted a more severe disease compared with wild-type encephalitogenic Th17 cells. This paradoxical phenotype was caused by a dampened inflammatory response of astrocytes, which were found to express Rai, to IL-17. The results provide evidence that Rai plays opposite roles in Th17 cell differentiation and astrocyte activation, with the latter dominant over the former in EAE, highlighting this adaptor as a potential novel target for the therapy of multiple sclerosis. PMID:27288534

  1. Structural basis for concerted recruitment and activation of IRF-3 by innate immune adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baoyu; Shu, Chang; Gao, Xinsheng; Sankaran, Banumathi; Du, Fenglei; Shelton, Catherine L; Herr, Andrew B; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Li, Pingwei

    2016-06-14

    Type I IFNs are key cytokines mediating innate antiviral immunity. cGMP-AMP synthase, ritinoic acid-inducible protein 1 (RIG-I)-like receptors, and Toll-like receptors recognize microbial double-stranded (ds)DNA, dsRNA, and LPS to induce the expression of type I IFNs. These signaling pathways converge at the recruitment and activation of the transcription factor IRF-3 (IFN regulatory factor 3). The adaptor proteins STING (stimulator of IFN genes), MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling), and TRIF (TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β) mediate the recruitment of IRF-3 through a conserved pLxIS motif. Here we show that the pLxIS motif of phosphorylated STING, MAVS, and TRIF binds to IRF-3 in a similar manner, whereas residues upstream of the motif confer specificity. The structure of the IRF-3 phosphomimetic mutant S386/396E bound to the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein reveals that the pLxIS motif also mediates IRF-3 dimerization and activation. Moreover, rotavirus NSP1 (nonstructural protein 1) employs a pLxIS motif to target IRF-3 for degradation, but phosphorylation of NSP1 is not required for its activity. These results suggest a concerted mechanism for the recruitment and activation of IRF-3 that can be subverted by viral proteins to evade innate immune responses. PMID:27302953

  2. Nck adaptor proteins control the organization of neuronal circuits important for walking.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, James P; Georgiou, John; Ruston, Julie; Bladt, Friedhelm; Sherman, Andrew; Warner, Neil; Saab, Bechara J; Scott, Rizaldy; Roder, John C; Pawson, Tony

    2007-12-26

    The intracellular signaling targets used by mammalian axon guidance receptors to organize the nervous system in vivo are unclear. The Nck1 and Nck2 SH2/SH3 adaptors (collectively Nck) can couple phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signals to reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and are therefore candidates for linking guidance cues to the regulatory machinery of the cytoskeleton. We find that selective inactivation of Nck in the murine nervous system causes a hopping gait and a defect in the spinal central pattern generator, which is characterized by synchronous firing of bilateral ventral motor neurons. Nck-deficient mice also show abnormal projections of corticospinal tract axons and defective development of the posterior tract of the anterior commissure. These phenotypes are consistent with a role for Nck in signaling initiated by different classes of guidance receptors, including the EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase. Our data indicate that Nck adaptors couple pTyr guidance signals to cytoskeletal events required for the ipsilateral projections of spinal cord neurons and thus for normal limb movement. PMID:18093944

  3. Nephrin Suppresses Hippo Signaling through the Adaptor Proteins Nck and WTIP.

    PubMed

    Keyvani Chahi, Ava; Martin, Claire E; Jones, Nina

    2016-06-10

    Podocytes are key components of the kidney blood filtration barrier, and their ability to withstand hemodynamic strain is proposed to be closely tied to their unique and flexible cytoarchitecture. However, the mechanisms that control such mechanotransduction are poorly understood. We have previously established that tyrosine phosphorylation of the transmembrane protein nephrin promotes recruitment of the Nck1/2 cytoskeletal adaptor proteins and downstream actin remodeling. We now reveal that Nck integrates nephrin with the Hippo kinase cascade through association with the adaptor protein WTIP. Using mutational analysis, we show that Nck sequesters WTIP and its binding partner Lats1 to phosphorylated nephrin, resulting in decreased phospho-activation of Lats1. We further demonstrate that, coincident with nephrin dephosphorylation in a transient model of podocyte injury in mice, Lats1 is rapidly activated, and this precedes significant down-regulation of the transcription regulator Yap. Moreover, we show reduced levels of Yap protein in mice with chronic disruption of nephrin phospho-signaling. Together, these findings support the existence of a dynamic molecular link between nephrin signaling and the canonical Hippo pathway in podocytes, which may facilitate the conversion of mechanical cues to biochemical signals promoting podocyte viability. PMID:27033705

  4. Stepping stone: a cytohesin adaptor for membrane cytoskeleton restraint in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangshu; Lee, Donghoon M.; Yu, Cao Guo; Angers, Stephane; Harris, Tony J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Cytohesin Arf-GEFs are conserved plasma membrane regulators. The sole Drosophila cytohesin, Steppke, restrains Rho1-dependent membrane cytoskeleton activity at the base of plasma membrane furrows of the syncytial embryo. By mass spectrometry, we identified a single major Steppke-interacting protein from syncytial embryos, which we named Stepping stone (Sstn). By sequence, Sstn seems to be a divergent homologue of the mammalian cytohesin adaptor FRMD4A. Our experiments supported this relationship. Specifically, heterophilic coiled-coil interactions linked Sstn and Steppke in vivo and in vitro, whereas a separate C-terminal region was required for Sstn localization to furrows. Sstn mutant and RNAi embryos displayed abnormal, Rho1-dependent membrane cytoskeleton expansion from the base of pseudocleavage and cellularization furrows, closely mimicking Steppke loss-of-function embryos. Elevating Sstn furrow levels had no effect on the steppke phenotype, but elevating Steppke furrow levels reversed the sstn phenotype, suggesting that Steppke acts downstream of Sstn and that additional mechanisms can recruit Steppke to furrows. Finally, the coiled-coil domain of Steppke was required for Sstn binding and in addition homodimerization, and its removal disrupted Steppke furrow localization and activity in vivo. Overall we propose that Sstn acts as a cytohesin adaptor that promotes Steppke activity for localized membrane cytoskeleton restraint in the syncytial Drosophila embryo. PMID:25540427

  5. Endometrial cells sense and react to tissue damage during infection of the bovine endometrium via interleukin 1

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Laura L.; Cronin, James G.; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cells generate inflammatory responses to bacteria when pattern recognition receptors bind pathogen-associated molecules such as lipopolysaccharide. Cells may also respond to tissue damage by sensing damage-associated molecules. Postpartum bacterial infections of the bovine uterus cause endometritis but the risk of disease is increased by tissue trauma triggered by dystocia. Animals that suffered dystocia had increased concentrations of inflammatory mediators IL-8, IL-1β and IL-1α in vaginal mucus 3 weeks postpartum, but they also had more bacteria than normal animals. Ex vivo organ cultures of endometrium, endometrial cells and peripheral blood monocytes did not generate inflammatory responses to prototypical damage molecules, HMGB1 or hyaluronan, or to necrotic cells; although they secreted IL-6 and IL-8 in a concentration-dependent manner when treated with IL-1α. However, necrotic endometrial cells did not accumulate intracellular IL-1α or release IL-1α, except when pre-treated with lipopolysaccharide or bacteria. Endometrial cell inflammatory responses to IL-1α were dependent on the cognate receptor IL-1R1, and the receptor adaptor protein MyD88, and the inflammatory response to IL-1α was independent of the response to lipopolysaccharide. Rather than a typical damage-associated molecule, IL-1α acts to scale the inflammatory response in recognition that there is a combination of pathogen challenge followed by endometrial cell damage. PMID:25395028

  6. Endometrial cells sense and react to tissue damage during infection of the bovine endometrium via interleukin 1.

    PubMed

    Healy, Laura L; Cronin, James G; Sheldon, I Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cells generate inflammatory responses to bacteria when pattern recognition receptors bind pathogen-associated molecules such as lipopolysaccharide. Cells may also respond to tissue damage by sensing damage-associated molecules. Postpartum bacterial infections of the bovine uterus cause endometritis but the risk of disease is increased by tissue trauma triggered by dystocia. Animals that suffered dystocia had increased concentrations of inflammatory mediators IL-8, IL-1β and IL-1α in vaginal mucus 3 weeks postpartum, but they also had more bacteria than normal animals. Ex vivo organ cultures of endometrium, endometrial cells and peripheral blood monocytes did not generate inflammatory responses to prototypical damage molecules, HMGB1 or hyaluronan, or to necrotic cells; although they secreted IL-6 and IL-8 in a concentration-dependent manner when treated with IL-1α. However, necrotic endometrial cells did not accumulate intracellular IL-1α or release IL-1α, except when pre-treated with lipopolysaccharide or bacteria. Endometrial cell inflammatory responses to IL-1α were dependent on the cognate receptor IL-1R1, and the receptor adaptor protein MyD88, and the inflammatory response to IL-1α was independent of the response to lipopolysaccharide. Rather than a typical damage-associated molecule, IL-1α acts to scale the inflammatory response in recognition that there is a combination of pathogen challenge followed by endometrial cell damage. PMID:25395028

  7. Invariant chain is a new chaperone for TLR7 in B cells.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Mira; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2015-12-01

    The innate immune system provides the first barrier against pathogens. Intracellular Toll-like receptors (TLR3, 7 and 9) localise in endosomes and sense nucleotides from viruses and bacteria. This recognition induces their conformational changes resulting in the production of proinflammatory cytokines and MHC class II (MHCII) antigenic presentation. In the absence of stimulation, TLRs are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Upon stimulation, they relocate to the endo-lysosomal compartment, allowing the recruitment of the adaptor molecules, MyD88 or TRIF. Increasing evidences describe a cross talk between proteins that regulate both innate and adaptive immune responses. For example, proteolytic enzymes which are required for breaking down exogenous antigen to generate suitable peptides for MHCII molecules are also essential to activate endosomal TLRs and MHCII molecules were recently described to regulate TLR signalling. But other proteins are possibly involved and regulated differentially between cell types. We have observed that intracellular TLR trafficking and signalling in B cells are different from dendritic cells and macrophages and involved the MHCII chaperone molecule, the invariant chain (Ii). PMID:26198699

  8. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    1987-09-01

    Some 70 different molecular species have so far been detected variously in diffuse interstellar clouds, dense interstellar clouds, and circumstellar shells. Only simple (diatomic and triatomic) species exist in diffuse clouds because of the penetration of destructive UV radiations, whereas more complex (polyatomic) molecules survive in dense clouds as a result of the shielding against this UV radiation provided by dust grains. A current list of interstellar molecules is given together with a few other molecular species that have so far been detected only in circumstellar shells. Also listed are those interstellar species that contain rare isotopes of several elements. The gas phase ion chemistry is outlined via which the observed molecules are synthesized, and the process by which enrichment of the rare isotopes occurs in some interstellar molecules is described.

  9. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  10. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  11. What the Myddosome structure tells us about the initiation of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Gay, Nicholas J; Gangloff, Monique; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2011-03-01

    Signaling by the toll-like receptor (TLR) and interleukin-1 receptor superfamily requires the adapter protein myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88). The recent determination of the structure of the so-called Myddosome provides us with new insights into the structural basis for innate immune signaling. Other information on the biochemistry and genetics of MyD88 and other adapters, such as MyDD adapter-like and TRIF-related adapter molecule, allows us to describe in some detail the signaling process activated by TLRs and provides new insights into the role these important proteins play in innate immunity. PMID:21269878

  12. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  13. Parallel SCF Adaptor Capture Proteomics Reveals a Role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 Activation via BACH1 Repressor Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J.; Shi, Yang; Harper, J. Wade

    2014-01-01

    Modular Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of Parallel Adaptor Capture (PAC) proteomics, and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCFFBXL17 in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. PMID:24035498

  14. Parallel SCF adaptor capture proteomics reveals a role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 activation via BACH1 repressor turnover.

    PubMed

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J; Shi, Yang; Harper, J Wade

    2013-10-10

    Modular cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of parallel adaptor capture (PAC) proteomics and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCF(FBXL17) in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. PMID:24035498

  15. The Hypoxic Regulator of Sterol Synthesis Nro1 Is a Nuclear Import Adaptor

    SciTech Connect

    T Yeh; C Lee; L Amzel; P Espenshade; M Bianchet

    2011-12-31

    Fission yeast protein Sre1, the homolog of the mammalian sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), is a hypoxic transcription factor required for sterol homeostasis and low-oxygen growth. Nro1 regulates the stability of the N-terminal transcription factor domain of Sre1 (Sre1N) by inhibiting the action of the prolyl 4-hydroxylase-like Ofd1 in an oxygen-dependent manner. The crystal structure of Nro1 determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution shows an all-{alpha}-helical fold that can be divided into two domains: a small N-terminal domain, and a larger C-terminal HEAT-repeat domain. Follow-up studies showed that Nro1 defines a new class of nuclear import adaptor that functions both in Ofd1 nuclear localization and in the oxygen-dependent inhibition of Ofd1 to control the hypoxic response.

  16. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cargo-Binding Sites on the μ4-Subunit of Adaptor Protein Complex 4

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Breyan H.; Lin, Yimo; Corales, Esteban A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Mardones, Gonzalo A.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes facilitate protein trafficking by playing key roles in the selection of cargo molecules to be sorted in post-Golgi compartments. Four AP complexes (AP-1 to AP-4) contain a medium-sized subunit (μ1-μ4) that recognizes YXXØ-sequences (Ø is a bulky hydrophobic residue), which are sorting signals in transmembrane proteins. A conserved, canonical region in μ subunits mediates recognition of YXXØ-signals by means of a critical aspartic acid. Recently we found that a non-canonical YXXØ-signal on the cytosolic tail of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) binds to a distinct region of the μ4 subunit of the AP-4 complex. In this study we aimed to determine the functionality of both binding sites of μ4 on the recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP. We found that substitutions in either binding site abrogated the interaction with the APP-tail in yeast-two hybrid experiments. Further characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry showed instead loss of binding to the APP signal with only the substitution R283D at the non-canonical site, in contrast to a decrease in binding affinity with the substitution D190A at the canonical site. We solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the D190A mutant bound to this non-canonical YXXØ-signal. This structure showed no significant difference compared to that of wild-type μ4. Both differential scanning fluorimetry and limited proteolysis analyses demonstrated that the D190A substitution rendered μ4 less stable, suggesting an explanation for its lower binding affinity to the APP signal. Finally, in contrast to overexpression of the D190A mutant, and acting in a dominant-negative manner, overexpression of μ4 with either a F255A or a R283D substitution at the non-canonical site halted APP transport at the Golgi apparatus. Together, our analyses support that the functional recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP is limited to the non

  17. Structural and functional characterization of cargo-binding sites on the μ4-subunit of adaptor protein complex 4.

    PubMed

    Ross, Breyan H; Lin, Yimo; Corales, Esteban A; Burgos, Patricia V; Mardones, Gonzalo A

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes facilitate protein trafficking by playing key roles in the selection of cargo molecules to be sorted in post-Golgi compartments. Four AP complexes (AP-1 to AP-4) contain a medium-sized subunit (μ1-μ4) that recognizes YXXØ-sequences (Ø is a bulky hydrophobic residue), which are sorting signals in transmembrane proteins. A conserved, canonical region in μ subunits mediates recognition of YXXØ-signals by means of a critical aspartic acid. Recently we found that a non-canonical YXXØ-signal on the cytosolic tail of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) binds to a distinct region of the μ4 subunit of the AP-4 complex. In this study we aimed to determine the functionality of both binding sites of μ4 on the recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP. We found that substitutions in either binding site abrogated the interaction with the APP-tail in yeast-two hybrid experiments. Further characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry showed instead loss of binding to the APP signal with only the substitution R283D at the non-canonical site, in contrast to a decrease in binding affinity with the substitution D190A at the canonical site. We solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the D190A mutant bound to this non-canonical YXXØ-signal. This structure showed no significant difference compared to that of wild-type μ4. Both differential scanning fluorimetry and limited proteolysis analyses demonstrated that the D190A substitution rendered μ4 less stable, suggesting an explanation for its lower binding affinity to the APP signal. Finally, in contrast to overexpression of the D190A mutant, and acting in a dominant-negative manner, overexpression of μ4 with either a F255A or a R283D substitution at the non-canonical site halted APP transport at the Golgi apparatus. Together, our analyses support that the functional recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP is limited to the non

  18. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of the DNA Damage Response of Adaptor Protein KIBRA in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mavuluri, Jayadev; Beesetti, Swarnalatha; Surabhi, Rohan; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K

    2016-05-01

    Multifunctional adaptor proteins encompassing various protein-protein interaction domains play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. In this report, we show that KIBRA is a physiologically interacting reversible substrate of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. We identified the site of phosphorylation in KIBRA as threonine 1006, which is embedded within the serine/threonine (S/T) Q consensus motif, by site-directed mutagenesis, and we further confirmed the same with a phospho-(S/T) Q motif-specific antibody. Results from DNA repair functional assays such as the γ-H2AX assay, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Comet assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and clonogenic cell survival assay using stable overexpression clones of wild-type (wt.) KIBRA and active (T1006E) and inactive (T1006A) KIBRA phosphorylation mutants showed that T1006 phosphorylation on KIBRA is essential for optimal DNA double-strand break repair in cancer cells. Further, results from stable retroviral short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) clones of KIBRA and KIBRA knockout (KO) model cells generated by a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 system showed that depleting KIBRA levels compromised the DNA repair functions in cancer cells upon inducing DNA damage. All these phenotypic events were reversed upon reconstitution of KIBRA into cells lacking KIBRA knock-in (KI) model cells. All these results point to the fact that phosphorylated KIBRA might be functioning as a scaffolding protein/adaptor protein facilitating the platform for further recruitment of other DNA damage response factors. In summary, these data demonstrate the imperative functional role of KIBRAper se(KIBRA phosphorylation at T1006 site as a molecular switch that regulates the DNA damage response, possibly via the nonhomologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway), suggesting that KIBRA could be a potential

  19. Molecular basis of substrate selection by the N-end rule adaptor protein ClpS

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Hernández, Giselle; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.

    2009-06-19

    The N-end rule is a conserved degradation pathway that relates the stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid. Here, we present crystal structures of ClpS, the bacterial N-end rule adaptor, alone and engaged with peptides containing N-terminal phenylalanine, leucine, and tryptophan. These structures, together with a previous structure of ClpS bound to an N-terminal tyrosine, illustrate the molecular basis of recognition of the complete set of primary N-end rule amino acids. In each case, the alpha-amino group and side chain of the N-terminal residue are the major determinants of recognition. The binding pocket for the N-end residue is preformed in the free adaptor, and only small adjustments are needed to accommodate N-end rule residues having substantially different sizes and shapes. M53A ClpS is known to mediate degradation of an expanded repertoire of substrates, including those with N-terminal valine or isoleucine. A structure of Met53A ClpS engaged with an N-end rule tryptophan reveals an essentially wild-type mechanism of recognition, indicating that the Met(53) side chain directly enforces specificity by clashing with and excluding beta-branched side chains. Finally, experimental and structural data suggest mechanisms that make proteins with N-terminal methionine bind very poorly to ClpS, explaining why these high-abundance proteins are not degraded via the N-end rule pathway in the cell.

  20. The AP-2 Adaptor β2 Appendage Scaffolds Alternate Cargo Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Keyel, Peter A.; Thieman, James R.; Roth, Robyn; Erkan, Elif; Everett, Eric T.; Watkins, Simon C.; Heuser, John E.

    2008-01-01

    The independently folded appendages of the large α and β2 subunits of the endocytic adaptor protein (AP)-2 complex coordinate proper assembly and operation of endocytic components during clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The β2 subunit appendage contains a common binding site for β-arrestin or the autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) protein. To determine the importance of this interaction surface in living cells, we used small interfering RNA-based gene silencing. The effect of extinguishing β2 subunit expression on the internalization of transferrin is considerably weaker than an AP-2 α subunit knockdown. We show the mild sorting defect is due to fortuitous substitution of the β2 chain with the closely related endogenous β1 subunit of the AP-1 adaptor complex. Simultaneous silencing of both β1 and β2 subunit transcripts recapitulates the strong α subunit RNA interference (RNAi) phenotype and results in loss of ARH from endocytic clathrin coats. An RNAi-insensitive β2-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) expressed in the β1 + β2-silenced background restores cellular AP-2 levels, robust transferrin internalization, and ARH colocalization with cell surface clathrin. The importance of the β appendage platform subdomain over clathrin for precise deposition of ARH at clathrin assembly zones is revealed by a β2-YFP with a disrupted ARH binding interface, which does not restore ARH colocalization with clathrin. We also show a β-arrestin 1 mutant, which engages coated structures in the absence of any G protein-coupled receptor stimulation, colocalizes with β2-YFP and clathrin even in the absence of an operational clathrin binding sequence. These findings argue against ARH and β-arrestin binding to a site upon the β2 appendage platform that is later obstructed by polymerized clathrin. We conclude that ARH and β-arrestin depend on a privileged β2 appendage site for proper cargo recruitment to clathrin bud sites. PMID:18843039

  1. Effectiveness of Needles Vial Adaptors and Blunt Cannulas for Drug Administration in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, Melinda; Bayuse, Tina

    2009-01-01

    The need for a new system of injectable medications aboard the International Space Station (ISS) was identified. It is desired that this system fly medications in their original manufacturer's packaging, allowing the system to comply with United States Pharmacopeia (USP) guidelines while minimizing the resupply frequency due to medication expiration. Pre-filled syringes are desired, however, the evolving nature of the healthcare marketplace requires flexibility in the redesign. If medications must be supplied in a vial, a system is required that allows for the safe withdrawal of medication from the vial into a syringe for administration in microgravity. During two reduced gravity flights, the effectiveness of two versions of a blunt cannula and needleless vial adaptors was evaluated to facilitate the withdrawal of liquid medication from a vial into a syringe for injection. Other parameters assessed included the ability to withdraw the required amount of medication and whether this is dependent on vial size, liquid, or the total volume of fluid within the vial. Injectable medications proposed for flight on ISS were used for this evaluation. Due to differing sizes of vials and the fluid properties of the medications, the needleless vial adaptors proved to be too cumbersome to recommend for use on the ISS. The blunt cannula, specifically the plastic version, proved to be more effective at removing medication from the various sizes of vials and are the recommended hardware for ISS. Fluid isolation within the vials and syringes is an important step in preparing medication for injection regardless of the hardware used. Although isolation is a challenge in the relatively short parabolas during flight, it is not an obstacle for sustained microgravity. This presentation will provide an overview of the products tested as well as the challenges identified during the microgravity flights.

  2. Microbiota regulates type 1 diabetes through Toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Michael P.; Volchkov, Pavel; Kobayashi, Koichi S.; Chervonsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Deletion of the innate immune adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) results in microbiota-dependent protection from the disease: MyD88-negative mice in germ-free (GF), but not in specific pathogen-free conditions develop the disease. These results could be explained by expansion of particular protective bacteria (“specific lineage hypothesis”) or by dominance of negative (tolerizing) signaling over proinflammatory signaling (“balanced signal hypothesis”) in mutant mice. Here we found that colonization of GF mice with a variety of intestinal bacteria was capable of reducing T1D in MyD88-negative (but not wild-type NOD mice), favoring the balanced signal hypothesis. However, the receptors and signaling pathways involved in prevention or facilitation of the disease remained unknown. The protective signals triggered by the microbiota were revealed by testing NOD mice lacking MyD88 in combination with knockouts of several critical components of innate immune sensing for development of T1D. Only MyD88- and TIR-domain containing adapter inducing IFN β (TRIF) double deficient NOD mice developed the disease. Thus, TRIF signaling (likely downstream of Toll-like receptor 4, TLR4) serves as one of the microbiota-induced tolerizing pathways. At the same time another TLR (TLR2) provided prodiabetic signaling by controlling the microbiota, as reduction in T1D incidence caused by TLR2 deletion was reversed in GF TLR2-negative mice. Our results support the balanced signal hypothesis, in which microbes provide signals that both promote and inhibit autoimmunity by signaling through different receptors, including receptors of the TLR family. PMID:26216961

  3. Involvement of TLR2 and TLR4 in inflammatory immune responses induced by fine and coarse ambient air particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Shoenfelt, Joanna; Mitkus, Robert J.; Zeisler, Rolf; Spatz, Rabia O.; Powell, Jan; Fenton, Matthew J.; Squibb, Katherine A.; Medvedev, Andrei E.

    2009-01-01

    Induction of proinflammatory mediators by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient air particulate matter has been suggested to be a key factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and allergic diseases in the lungs. However, receptors and mechanisms underlying these responses have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether TLR2, TLR4, and the key adaptor protein, MyD88, mediate the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to fine and coarse PM. TLR2 deficiency blunted macrophage TNF-α and IL-6 expression in response to fine (PM2.5), while not affecting cytokine-inducing ability of coarse NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM 1648) particles. In contrast, TLR4−/− macrophages showed inhibited cytokine expression upon stimulation with NIST SRM 1648 but exhibited normal responses to PM2.5. Preincubation with polymyxin B markedly suppressed the capacity of NIST SRM 1648 to elicit TNF-α and IL-6, indicating endotoxin as a principal inducer of cytokine responses. Overexpression of TLR2 in TLR2/4-deficient human embryonic kidney 293 cells imparted PM2.5 sensitivity, as judged by IL-8 gene expression, whereas NIST SRM 1648, but not PM2.5 elicited IL-8 expression in 293/TLR4/MD-2 transfectants. Engagement of TLR4 by NIST SRM 1648 induced MyD88-independent expression of the chemokine RANTES, while TLR2-reactive NIST IRM PM2.5 failed to up-regulate this response. Consistent with the shared use of MyD88 by TLR2 and TLR4, cytokine responses of MyD88−/− macrophages to both types of air PM were significantly reduced. These data indicate differential utilization of TLR2 and TLR4 but shared use of MyD88 by fine and coarse air pollution particles. PMID:19406832

  4. [Negative regulation of Toll-like receptor signalling].

    PubMed

    Antosz, Halina; Choroszyńska, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of innate immunity is based on the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) that recognize molecular patterns associated with pathogens (PAMPs). Among PRR receptors Toll-like receptors (TLR) are distinguished. As a result of contact with pathogens, TLRs activate specific intracellular signaling pathways. It happens through proteins such as adaptor molecules, e.g. MyD88, TIRAP, TRIF, TRAM, and IPS-1, which participate in the cascade activation of kinases (IKK, MAP, RIP-1, TBK-1) as well as transcription factors (NF-κB, AP-1) and regulatory factor (IRF3). The result of this activation is the production of active proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, interferons and enzymes. The PRR pathways are controlled by extra- and intracellular molecules to prevent overexpression of PRR. They include soluble receptors (sTLR), transmembrane proteins (ST2, SIGIRR, RP105, TRAIL-R) and intracellular inhibitors (SOCS-1, SOCS-3, sMyD88, TOLLIP, IRAK-M, SARM, A20, β-arrestin, CYLD, SHP). These molecules maintain the balance between activation and inhibition and ensure balancing of the beneficial and adverse effects of antigen recognition. PMID:23619234

  5. Flagellin induces antibody responses through a TLR5- and inflammasome-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    López-Yglesias, Américo Harry; Zhao, Xiaodan; Quarles, Ellen K; Lai, Marvin A; VandenBos, Tim; Strong, Roland K; Smith, Kelly D

    2014-02-15

    Flagellin is a potent immunogen that activates the innate immune system via TLR5 and Naip5/6, and generates strong T and B cell responses. The adaptor protein MyD88 is critical for signaling by TLR5, as well as IL-1Rs and IL-18Rs, major downstream mediators of the Naip5/6 Nlrc4-inflammasome. In this study, we define roles of known flagellin receptors and MyD88 in Ab responses generated toward flagellin. We used mice genetically deficient in flagellin recognition pathways to characterize innate immune components that regulate isotype-specific Ab responses. Using purified flagellin from Salmonella, we dissected the contribution of innate flagellin recognition pathways to promote Ab responses toward flagellin and coadministered OVA in C57BL/6 mice. We demonstrate IgG2c responses toward flagellin were TLR5 and inflammasome dependent; IgG1 was the dominant isotype and partially TLR5 and inflammasome dependent. Our data indicate a substantial flagellin-specific IgG1 response was induced through a TLR5-, inflammasome-, and MyD88-independent pathway. IgA anti-FliC responses were TLR5 and MyD88 dependent and caspase-1 independent. Unlike C57BL/6 mice, flagellin-immunized A/J mice induced codominant IgG1 and IgG2a responses. Furthermore, MyD88-independent, flagellin-induced Ab responses were even more pronounced in A/J MyD88(-/-) mice, and IgA anti-FliC responses were suppressed by MyD88. Flagellin also worked as an adjuvant toward coadministered OVA, but it only promoted IgG1 anti-OVA responses. Our results demonstrate that a novel pathway for flagellin recognition contributes to Ab production. Characterization of this pathway will be useful for understanding immunity to flagellin and the rationale design of flagellin-based vaccines. PMID:24442437

  6. Flagellin induces antibody responses through a TLR5- and inflammasome-independent pathway1

    PubMed Central

    López-Yglesias, Américo Harry; Zhao, Xiaodan; Quarles, Ellen K.; Lai, Marvin A.; VandenBos, Tim; Strong, Roland K.; Smith, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellin is a potent immunogen that activates the innate immune system via TLR5 and Naip5/6, and generates strong T and B cell responses. The adaptor protein MyD88 is critical for signaling by TLR5, as well as IL-1 and IL-18 receptors, major downstream mediators of the Naip5/6 Nlrc4-inflammasome. Herein we define roles of known flagellin receptors and MyD88 in antibody responses generated towards flagellin. We used mice genetically deficient in flagellin recognition pathways to characterize innate immune components that regulate isotype specific antibody responses. Using purified flagellin from Salmonella, we dissected the contribution of innate flagellin recognition pathways to promote antibody responses towards flagellin and co-administered ovalbumin in C57BL/6 mice. We demonstrate IgG2c responses towards flagellin were TLR5- and inflammasome-dependent; IgG1 was the dominant isotype and partially TLR5- and inflammasome-dependent. Our data indicates a substantial flagellin-specific IgG1 response was induced through a TLR5-, inflammasome-, and MyD88-independent pathway. IgA anti-FliC responses were TLR5- & MyD88-dependent and caspase-1-independent. Unlike C57BL/6 mice, flagellin immunized A/J mice induced co-dominant IgG1 and IgG2a responses. Furthermore, MyD88-independent flagellin-induced antibody responses were even more pronounced in A/J MyD88−/− mice, and IgA anti-FliC responses were suppressed by MyD88. Flagellin also worked as an adjuvant toward co-administered ovalbumin, but it only promoted IgG1 anti-OVA responses. Our results demonstrate that a novel pathway for flagellin recognition contributes to antibody production. Characterization of this pathway will be useful for understanding immunity to flagellin and the rationale design of flagellin-based vaccines. PMID:24442437

  7. Therapeutic Administration of KM+ Lectin Protects Mice Against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection via Interleukin-12 Production in a Toll-Like Receptor 2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Coltri, Kely C.; Oliveira, Leandro L.; Pinzan, Camila F.; Vendruscolo, Patrícia E.; Martinez, Roberto; Goldman, Maria Helena; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina

    2008-01-01

    KM+ is a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia that induces interleukin (IL)-12 production by macrophages and protective T helper 1 immune response against Leishmania major infection. In this study, we performed experiments to evaluate the therapeutic activity of jackfruit KM+ (jfKM+) and its recombinant counterpart (rKM+) in experimental paracoccidioidomycosis. To this end, jfKM+ or rKM+ was administered to BALB/c mice 10 days after infection with Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. Thirty days postinfection, lungs from the KM+-treated mice contained significantly fewer colony-forming units and little to no organized granulomas compared to the controls. In addition, lung homogenates from the KM+-treated mice presented higher levels of nitric oxide, IL-12, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α, whereas higher levels of IL-4 and IL-10 were detected in the control group. With mice deficient in IL-12, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, or TLR adaptor molecule MyD88, we demonstrated that KM+ led to protection against P. brasiliensis infection through IL-12 production, which was dependent on TLR2. These results demonstrated a beneficial effect of KM+ on the severity of P. brasiliensis infection and may expand its potential use as a novel immunotherapeutic molecule. PMID:18599609

  8. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  9. Structural Analysis of the Interaction between Dishevelled2 and Clathrin AP-2 Adaptor, A Critical Step in Noncanonical Wnt Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Anan; Xing, Yi; Harrison, Stephen C.; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2010-10-14

    Wnt association with its receptor, Frizzled (Fz), and recruitment by the latter of an adaptor, Dishevelled (Dvl), initiates signaling through at least two distinct pathways (canonical and noncanonical). Endocytosis and compartmentalization help determine the signaling outcome. Our previous work has shown that Dvl2 links at least one Frizzled family member (Fz4) to clathrin-mediated endocytosis by interacting with the {mu}2 subunit of the AP-2 clathrin adaptor, through both a classical endocytic tyrosine motif and a so-called DEP domain. We report here the crystal structure of a chimeric protein that mimics the Dvl2-{mu}2 complex. The DEP domain binds at one end of the elongated, C-terminal domain of {mu}2. This domain:domain interface shows that parts of the {mu}2 surface distinct from the tyrosine-motif site can help recruit specific receptors or adaptors into a clathrin coated pit. Mutation of residues at the DEP-{mu}2 contact or in the tyrosine motif reduce affinity of Dvl2 for {mu}2 and block efficient internalization of Fz4 in response to ligation by Wnt5a. The crystal structure has thus allowed us to identify the specific interaction that leads to Frizzled uptake and to downstream, noncanonical signaling events.

  10. Clathrin Functions in the Absence of the Terminal Domain Binding Site for Adaptor-associated Clathrin-Box Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Collette, John R.; Chi, Richard J.; Boettner, Douglas R.; Fernandez-Golbano, Isabel M.; Plemel, Rachael; Merz, Alex J.; Geli, Maria Isabel; Traub, Linton M.

    2009-01-01

    Clathrin is involved in vesicle formation in the trans-Golgi network (TGN)/endosomal system and during endocytosis. Clathrin recruitment to membranes is mediated by the clathrin heavy chain (HC) N-terminal domain (TD), which forms a seven-bladed β-propeller. TD binds membrane-associated adaptors, which have short peptide motifs, either the clathrin-box (CBM) and/or the W-box; however, the importance of the TD binding sites for these motifs has not been tested in vivo. We investigated the importance of the TD in clathrin function by generating 1) mutations in the yeast HC gene (CHC1) to disrupt the binding sites for the CBM and W-box (chc1-box), and 2) four TD-specific temperature-sensitive alleles of CHC1. We found that TD is important for the retention of resident TGN enzymes and endocytosis of α-factor; however, the known adaptor binding sites are not necessary, because chc1-box caused little to no effect on trafficking pathways involving clathrin. The Chc1-box TD was able to interact with the endocytic adaptor Ent2 in a CBM-dependent manner, and HCs encoded by chc1-box formed clathrin-coated vesicles. These data suggest that additional or alternative binding sites exist on the TD propeller to help facilitate the recruitment of clathrin to sites of vesicle formation. PMID:19458198

  11. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based 'adaptors/connectors' with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties. PMID:25813537

  12. Different dimerisation mode for TLR4 upon endosomal acidification?

    PubMed Central

    Gangloff, Monique

    2012-01-01

    TLR4 is unique among pathogen-recognition receptors in that it initiates different pathways in different cellular locations. Binding of a bridging factor, Mal, allows recruitment of an adapter protein, MyD88, at the plasma membrane, which leads to the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Upon internalization, TLR4 uses a different bridging factor, TRAM, to activate a MyD88-independent pathway that results in type I interferon expression. Interestingly, both Mal and TRAM are localised initially at the plasma membrane. In this Opinion, I suggest a possible mechanism by which endosomal acidification triggers the differential adaptor usage of TLR4. I discuss the evidence of the pH sensitivity of TLR4 and propose a new dimerisation mode for TLR4 based on the crystal structure of the related receptor TLR3 bound to its ligand, double-stranded RNA. PMID:22196451

  13. Different dimerisation mode for TLR4 upon endosomal acidification?

    PubMed

    Gangloff, Monique

    2012-03-01

    TLR4 is unique among pathogen-recognition receptors in that it initiates different pathways in different cellular locations. Binding of a bridging factor, Mal, allows recruitment of an adapter protein, MyD88, at the plasma membrane, which leads to the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Upon internalization, TLR4 uses a different bridging factor, TRAM, to activate a MyD88-independent pathway that results in type I interferon expression. Interestingly, both Mal and TRAM are localised initially at the plasma membrane. In this Opinion, I suggest a possible mechanism by which endosomal acidification triggers the differential adaptor usage of TLR4. I discuss the evidence of the pH sensitivity of TLR4 and propose a new dimerisation mode for TLR4 based on the crystal structure of the related receptor TLR3 bound to its ligand, double-stranded RNA. PMID:22196451

  14. Regulation of natural cytotoxicity by the adaptor SAP and the Src-related kinase Fyn

    PubMed Central

    Bloch-Queyrat, Coralie; Fondanèche, Marie-Claude; Chen, Riyan; Yin, Luo; Relouzat, Francis; Veillette, André; Fischer, Alain; Latour, Sylvain

    2005-01-01

    SAP is an adaptor protein that is expressed in NK and T cells. It is mutated in humans who have X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) disease. By interacting with SLAM family receptors, SAP enables tyrosine phosphorylation signaling of these receptors by its ability to recruit the Src-related kinase, Fyn. Here, we analyzed the role of SAP in NK cell functions using the SAP-deficient mouse model. Our results showed that SAP was required for the ability of NK cells to eliminate tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. This effect strongly correlated with expression of CD48 on tumor cells, the ligand of 2B4, a SLAM-related receptor expressed in NK cells. In keeping with earlier reports that studied human NK cells, we showed that SAP was necessary for the ability of 2B4 to trigger cytotoxicity and IFN-γ secretion. In the absence of SAP, 2B4 function was shifted toward inhibition of NK cell–mediated cytotoxicity. By analyzing mice lacking Fyn, we showed that similarly to SAP, Fyn was strictly required for 2B4 function. Taken together, these results provide evidence that the 2B4-SAP-Fyn cascade defines a potent activating pathway of natural cytotoxicity. They also could help to explain the high propensity of patients who have XLP disease to develop lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:15998796

  15. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  16. Role of the Ada adaptor complex in gene activation by the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, A; Almlöf, T; Ford, J; McEwan, I J; Gustafsson, J A; Wright, A P

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that the Ada adaptor complex is important for the gene activation capacity of the glucocorticoid receptor in yeast. The recently isolated human Ada2 protein also increases the potency of the receptor protein in mammalian cells. The Ada pathway is of key significance for the tau1 core transactivation domain (tau1c) of the receptor, which requires Ada for activity in vivo and in vitro. Ada2 can be precipitated from nuclear extracts by a glutathione S-transferase-tau1 fusion protein coupled to agarose beads, and a direct interaction between Ada2 and tau1c can be shown by using purified proteins. This interaction is strongly reduced by a mutation in tau1c that reduces transactivation activity. Mutations affecting the Ada complex do not reverse transcriptional squelching by the tau1 domain, as they do for the VP16 transactivation domain, and thus these powerful acidic activators differ in at least some important aspects of gene activation. Mutations that reduce the activity of the tau1c domain in wild-type yeast strains cause similar reductions in ada mutants that contain little or no Ada activity. Thus, gene activation mechanisms, in addition to the Ada pathway, are involved in the activity of the tau1c domain. PMID:9154805

  17. Cysteine-based regulation of the CUL3 adaptor protein Keap1

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, Konjeti R.; Rachakonda, Girish; Freeman, Michael L.

    2010-04-01

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master transcription factor containing a powerful acidic transcriptional activation domain. Nrf2-dependent gene expression impacts cancer chemoprevention strategies, inflammatory responses, and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Under basal conditions, association of Nrf2 with the CUL3 adaptor protein Keap1 results in the rapid Nrf2 ubiquitylation and proteasome-dependent degradation. Inhibition of Keap1 function blocks ubiquitylation of Nrf2, allowing newly synthesized Nrf2 to translocate into the nucleus, bind to ARE sites and direct target gene expression. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments coupled with proteomic analysis support a model in which Keap1 contains at least 2 distinct cysteine motifs. The first is located at Cys 151 in the BTB domain. The second is located in the intervening domain and centers around Cys 273 and 288. Adduction or oxidation at Cys151 has been shown to produce a conformational change in Keap1 that results in dissociation of Keap1 from CUL3, thereby inhibiting Nrf2 ubiquitylation. Thus, adduction captures specific chemical information and translates it into biochemical information via changes in structural conformation.

  18. The role of palmitoylation and transmembrane domain in sorting of transmembrane adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Chum, Tomáš; Glatzová, Daniela; Kvíčalová, Zuzana; Malínský, Jan; Brdička, Tomáš; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins synthesised at the endoplasmic reticulum are delivered to the cell surface via sorting pathways. Hydrophobic mismatch theory based on the length of the transmembrane domain (TMD) dominates discussion about determinants required for protein sorting to the plasma membrane. Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAP) are involved in signalling events which take place at the plasma membrane. Members of this protein family have TMDs of varying length. We were interested in whether palmitoylation or other motifs contribute to the effective sorting of TRAP proteins. We found that palmitoylation is essential for some, but not all, TRAP proteins independent of their TMD length. We also provide evidence that palmitoylation and proximal sequences can modulate sorting of artificial proteins with TMDs of suboptimal length. Our observations point to a unique character of each TMD defined by its primary amino acid sequence and its impact on membrane protein localisation. We conclude that, in addition to the TMD length, secondary sorting determinants such as palmitoylation or flanking sequences have evolved for the localisation of membrane proteins. PMID:26585312

  19. Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen targets the NEMO adaptor protein to disrupt inflammatory signaling.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, David A; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Knight, Laura M; Jackson, Brian R; Richards, Kathryn; Prescott, Emma L; Peach, A Howard S; Blair, G Eric; Macdonald, Andrew; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2013-12-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive nonmelanoma skin cancer arising from epidermal mechanoreceptor Merkel cells. In 2008, a novel human polyomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), was identified and is strongly implicated in MCC pathogenesis. Currently, little is known regarding the virus-host cell interactions which support virus replication and virus-induced mechanisms in cellular transformation and metastasis. Here we identify a new function of MCPyV small T antigen (ST) as an inhibitor of NF-κB-mediated transcription. This effect is due to an interaction between MCPyV ST and the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) adaptor protein. MCPyV ST expression inhibits IκB kinase α (IKKα)/IKKβ-mediated IκB phosphorylation, which limits translocation of the NF-κB heterodimer to the nucleus. Regulation of this process involves a previously undescribed interaction between MCPyV ST and the cellular phosphatase subunits, protein phosphatase 4C (PP4C) and/or protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) Aβ, but not PP2A Aα. Together, these results highlight a novel function of MCPyV ST to subvert the innate immune response, allowing establishment of early or persistent infection within the host cell. PMID:24109239

  20. The polarity protein Par3 regulates APP trafficking and processing through the endocytic adaptor protein Numb.

    PubMed

    Sun, Miao; Asghar, Suwaiba Z; Zhang, Huaye

    2016-09-01

    The processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) into β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is a key step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and trafficking dysregulations of APP and its secretases contribute significantly to altered APP processing. Here we show that the cell polarity protein Par3 plays an important role in APP processing and trafficking. We found that the expression of full length Par3 is significantly decreased in AD patients. Overexpression of Par3 promotes non-amyloidogenic APP processing, while depletion of Par3 induces intracellular accumulation of Aβ. We further show that Par3 functions by regulating APP trafficking. Loss of Par3 decreases surface expression of APP by targeting APP to the late endosome/lysosome pathway. Finally, we show that the effects of Par3 are mediated through the endocytic adaptor protein Numb, and Par3 functions by interfering with the interaction between Numb and APP. Together, our studies show a novel role for Par3 in regulating APP processing and trafficking. PMID:27072891

  1. Architecture and roles of periplasmic adaptor proteins in tripartite efflux assemblies.

    PubMed

    Symmons, Martyn F; Marshall, Robert L; Bavro, Vassiliy N

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen major advances in the structural understanding of the different components of tripartite efflux assemblies, which encompass the multidrug efflux (MDR) pumps and type I secretion systems. The majority of these investigations have focused on the role played by the inner membrane transporters and the outer membrane factor (OMF), leaving the third component of the system - the Periplasmic Adaptor Proteins (PAPs) - relatively understudied. Here we review the current state of knowledge of these versatile proteins which, far from being passive linkers between the OMF and the transporter, emerge as active architects of tripartite assemblies, and play diverse roles in the transport process. Recognition between the PAPs and OMFs is essential for pump assembly and function, and targeting this interaction may provide a novel avenue for combating multidrug resistance. With the recent advances elucidating the drug efflux and energetics of the tripartite assemblies, the understanding of the interaction between the OMFs and PAPs is the last piece remaining in the complete structure of the tripartite pump assembly puzzle. PMID:26074901

  2. Losses, Expansions, and Novel Subunit Discovery of Adaptor Protein Complexes in Haptophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Laura J Y; Klute, Mary J; Herman, Emily K; Read, Betsy; Dacks, Joel B

    2015-11-01

    The phylum Haptophyta (Diaphoratickes) contains marine algae that perform biomineralization, extruding large, distinctive calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths) that completely cover the cell. Coccolith production is an important part of global carbon cycling; however, the membrane trafficking pathway by which they are secreted has not yet been elucidated. In most eukaryotes, post-Golgi membrane trafficking involves five heterotetrameric adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which impart cargo selection specificity. To better understand coccolith secretion, we performed comparative genomic, phylogenetic, and transcriptomic analyses of the AP complexes in Emiliania huxleyi strains 92A, Van556, EH2, and CCMP1516, and related haptophytes Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Isochrysis galbana; the latter has lost the ability to biomineralize. We show that haptophytes have a modified membrane trafficking system (MTS), as we found both AP subunit losses and duplications. Additionally, we identified a single conserved subunit of the AP-related TSET complex, whose expression suggests a functional role in membrane trafficking. Finally, we detected novel alpha adaptin ear and gamma adaptin ear proteins, the first of their kind to be described outside of opisthokonts. These novel ear proteins and the sculpting of the MTS may support the capacity for biomineralization in haptophytes, enhancing their ability to perform this highly specialized form of secretion. PMID:26519625

  3. ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of All Three Members of the MRN Complex: From Sensor to Adaptor

    PubMed Central

    Lavin, Martin F.; Kozlov, Sergei; Gatei, Magtouf; Kijas, Amanda W.

    2015-01-01

    The recognition, signalling and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) involves the participation of a multitude of proteins and post-translational events that ensure maintenance of genome integrity. Amongst the proteins involved are several which when mutated give rise to genetic disorders characterised by chromosomal abnormalities, cancer predisposition, neurodegeneration and other pathologies. ATM (mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and members of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN complex) play key roles in this process. The MRN complex rapidly recognises and locates to DNA DSB where it acts to recruit and assist in ATM activation. ATM, in the company of several other DNA damage response proteins, in turn phosphorylates all three members of the MRN complex to initiate downstream signalling. While ATM has hundreds of substrates, members of the MRN complex play a pivotal role in mediating the downstream signalling events that give rise to cell cycle control, DNA repair and ultimately cell survival or apoptosis. Here we focus on the interplay between ATM and the MRN complex in initiating signaling of breaks and more specifically on the adaptor role of the MRN complex in mediating ATM signalling to downstream substrates to control different cellular processes. PMID:26512707

  4. PHF6 Degrees of Separation: The Multifaceted Roles of a Chromatin Adaptor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Matthew A.M.; Ivanochko, Danton; Picketts, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of chromatin regulation to human disease is highlighted by the growing number of mutations identified in genes encoding chromatin remodeling proteins. While such mutations were first identified in severe developmental disorders, or in specific cancers, several genes have been implicated in both, including the plant homeodomain finger protein 6 (PHF6) gene. Indeed, germline mutations in PHF6 are the cause of the Börjeson–Forssman–Lehmann X-linked intellectual disability syndrome (BFLS), while somatic PHF6 mutations have been identified in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Studies from different groups over the last few years have made a significant impact towards a functional understanding of PHF6 protein function. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of PHF6 with particular emphasis on how it interfaces with a distinct set of interacting partners and its functional roles in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus. Overall, PHF6 is emerging as a key chromatin adaptor protein critical to the regulation of neurogenesis and hematopoiesis. PMID:26103525

  5. Lymphocyte adaptor protein LNK deficiency exacerbates hypertension and end-organ inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohamed A; McMaster, William G; Wu, Jing; Norlander, Allison E; Funt, Samuel A; Thabet, Salim R; Kirabo, Annet; Xiao, Liang; Chen, Wei; Itani, Hana A; Michell, Danielle; Huan, Tianxiao; Zhang, Yahua; Takaki, Satoshi; Titze, Jens; Levy, Daniel; Harrison, David G; Madhur, Meena S

    2015-03-01

    The lymphocyte adaptor protein LNK (also known as SH2B3) is primarily expressed in hematopoietic and endothelial cells, where it functions as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling and cell proliferation. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding LNK are associated with autoimmune and cardiovascular disorders; however, it is not known how LNK contributes to hypertension. Here, we determined that loss of LNK exacerbates angiotensin II-induced (Ang II-induced) hypertension and the associated renal and vascular dysfunction. At baseline, kidneys from Lnk-/- mice exhibited greater levels of inflammation, oxidative stress, and glomerular injury compared with WT animals, and these parameters were further exacerbated by Ang II infusion. Aortas from Lnk-/- mice exhibited enhanced inflammation, reduced nitric oxide levels, and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. Bone marrow transplantation studies demonstrated that loss of LNK in hematopoietic cells is primarily responsible for the observed renal and vascular inflammation and predisposition to hypertension. Ang II infusion increased IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells in the spleen and kidneys of Lnk-/- mice compared with WT mice. Moreover, IFN-γ deficiency resulted in blunted hypertension in response to Ang II infusion. Together, these results suggest that LNK is a potential therapeutic target for hypertension and its associated renal and vascular sequela. PMID:25664851

  6. The clathrin adaptor Numb regulates intestinal cholesterol absorption through dynamic interaction with NPC1L1.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-Shan; Fu, Zhen-Yan; Zhang, Ying-Yu; Zhang, Jin-Hui; Xu, Chen-Qi; Ma, Yi-Tong; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia, typically due to excessive cholesterol uptake, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which is responsible for ∼50% of all deaths in developed societies. Although it has been shown that intestinal cholesterol absorption is mediated by vesicular endocytosis of the Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) protein, the mechanism of sterol-stimulated NPC1L1 internalization is still mysterious. Here, we identified an endocytic peptide signal, YVNXXF (where X stands for any amino acid), in the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of NPC1L1. Cholesterol binding on the N-terminal domain of NPC1L1 released the YVNXXF-containing region of NPC1L1 from association with the plasma membrane and enabled Numb binding. We also found that Numb, a clathrin adaptor, specifically recognized this motif and recruited clathrin for internalization. Disrupting the NPC1L1-Numb interaction decreased cholesterol uptake. Ablation of Numb in mouse intestine significantly reduced dietary cholesterol absorption and plasma cholesterol level. Together, these data show that Numb is a pivotal protein for intestinal cholesterol absorption and may provide a therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24336247

  7. A Common Variant in the Adaptor Mal Regulates Interferon Gamma Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Sheedy, Frederick J; Harris, James; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Lee, Jinhee; West, Kim; McDermott, Eva Palsson; Smyth, Alicia; Gleeson, Laura E; Coleman, Michelle; Martinez, Nuria; Hearnden, Claire H A; Tynan, Graham A; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jones, Sarah A; Corr, Sinéad C; Bernard, Nicholas J; Hughes, Mark M; Corcoran, Sarah E; O'Sullivan, Mary; Fallon, Ciara M; Kornfeld, Hardy; Golenbock, Douglas; Gordon, Stephen V; O'Neill, Luke A J; Lavelle, Ed C; Keane, Joseph

    2016-02-16

    Humans that are heterozygous for the common S180L polymorphism in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor Mal (encoded by TIRAP) are protected from a number of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), whereas those homozygous for the allele are at increased risk. The reason for this difference in susceptibility is not clear. We report that Mal has a TLR-independent role in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) receptor signaling. Mal-dependent IFN-γ receptor (IFNGR) signaling led to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 phosphorylation and autophagy. IFN-γ signaling via Mal was required for phagosome maturation and killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The S180L polymorphism, and its murine equivalent S200L, reduced the affinity of Mal for the IFNGR, thereby compromising IFNGR signaling in macrophages and impairing responses to TB. Our findings highlight a role for Mal outside the TLR system and imply that genetic variation in TIRAP may be linked to other IFN-γ-related diseases including autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26885859

  8. Functional similarity and physical association between GCN5 and ADA2: putative transcriptional adaptors.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, G A; Silverman, N; Berger, S L; Horiuchi, J; Guarente, L

    1994-01-01

    A selection for yeast mutants resistant to GAL4-VP16-induced toxicity previously identified two genes, ADA2 and ADA3, which may function as adaptors for some transcriptional activation domains and thereby facilitate activation. Here we identify two new genes by the same selection, one of which is identical to GCN5. We show that gcn5 mutants share properties with ada mutants, including slow growth, temperature sensitivity and reduced activation by the VP16 and GCN4 activation domains. Double mutant studies suggest that ADA2 and GCN5 function together in a complex or pathway. Moreover, we demonstrate that GCN5 binds to ADA2 both by the two-hybrid assay in vivo and by co-immunoprecipitation in vitro. This suggests that ADA2 and GCN5 are part of a heteromeric complex that mediates transcriptional activation. Finally, we demonstrate the functional importance of the bromodomain of GCN5, a sequence found in other global transcription factors such as the SWI/SNF complex and the TATA binding protein-associated factors. This domain is not required for the interaction between GCN5 and ADA2 and thus may mediate a more general activity of transcription factors. Images PMID:7957049

  9. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein.

    PubMed

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  10. Preventing farnesylation of the dynein adaptor Spindly contributes to the mitotic defects caused by farnesyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Andrew J.; Reis, Rita M.; Niessen, Sherry; Pereira, Cláudia; Andres, Douglas A.; Spielmann, H. Peter; Cleveland, Don W.; Desai, Arshad; Gassmann, Reto

    2015-01-01

    The clinical interest in farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) makes it important to understand how these compounds affect cellular processes involving farnesylated proteins. Mitotic abnormalities observed after treatment with FTIs have so far been attributed to defects in the farnesylation of the outer kinetochore proteins CENP-E and CENP-F, which are involved in chromosome congression and spindle assembly checkpoint signaling. Here we identify the cytoplasmic dynein adaptor Spindly as an additional component of the outer kinetochore that is modified by farnesyltransferase (FTase). We show that farnesylation of Spindly is essential for its localization, and thus for the proper localization of dynein and its cofactor dynactin, to prometaphase kinetochores and that Spindly kinetochore recruitment is more severely affected by FTase inhibition than kinetochore recruitment of CENP-E and CENP-F. Molecular replacement experiments show that both Spindly and CENP-E farnesylation are required for efficient chromosome congression. The identification of Spindly as a new mitotic substrate of FTase provides insight into the causes of the mitotic phenotypes observed with FTase inhibitors. PMID:25808490

  11. Endocytosis of the Anthrax Toxin Is Mediated by Clathrin, Actin and Unconventional Adaptors

    PubMed Central

    Abrami, Laurence; Bischofberger, Mirko; Kunz, Béatrice; Groux, Romain; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2010-01-01

    The anthrax toxin is a tripartite toxin, where the two enzymatic subunits require the third subunit, the protective antigen (PA), to interact with cells and be escorted to their cytoplasmic targets. PA binds to cells via one of two receptors, TEM8 and CMG2. Interestingly, the toxin times and triggers its own endocytosis, in particular through the heptamerization of PA. Here we show that PA triggers the ubiquitination of its receptors in a β-arrestin-dependent manner and that this step is required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In addition, we find that endocytosis is dependent on the heterotetrameric adaptor AP-1 but not the more conventional AP-2. Finally, we show that endocytosis of PA is strongly dependent on actin. Unexpectedly, actin was also found to be essential for efficient heptamerization of PA, but only when bound to one of its 2 receptors, TEM8, due to the active organization of TEM8 into actin-dependent domains. Endocytic pathways are highly modular systems. Here we identify some of the key players that allow efficient heptamerization of PA and subsequent ubiquitin-dependent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the anthrax toxin. PMID:20221438

  12. The AP-3 adaptor complex is required for vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zwiewka, Marta; Feraru, Elena; Möller, Barbara; Hwang, Inhwan; Feraru, Mugurel I; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Weijers, Dolf; Friml, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular trafficking is required for a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells. It involves regulation of cargo sorting, vesicle formation, trafficking and fusion processes at multiple levels. Adaptor protein (AP) complexes are key regulators of cargo sorting into vesicles in yeast and mammals but their existence and function in plants have not been demonstrated. Here we report the identification of the protein-affected trafficking 4 (pat4) mutant defective in the putative δ subunit of the AP-3 complex. pat4 and pat2, a mutant isolated from the same GFP imaging-based forward genetic screen that lacks a functional putative AP-3 β, as well as dominant negative AP-3 μ transgenic lines display undistinguishable phenotypes characterized by largely normal morphology and development, but strong intracellular accumulation of membrane proteins in aberrant vacuolar structures. All mutants are defective in morphology and function of lytic and protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) but show normal sorting of reserve proteins to PSVs. Immunoprecipitation experiments and genetic studies revealed tight functional and physical associations of putative AP-3 β and AP-3 δ subunits. Furthermore, both proteins are closely linked with putative AP-3 μ and σ subunits and several components of the clathrin and dynamin machineries. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AP complexes, similar to those in other eukaryotes, exist in plants, and that AP-3 plays a specific role in the regulation of biogenesis and function of vacuoles in plant cells. PMID:21670741

  13. Stargazin regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through adaptor protein complexes during long-term depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Shinji; Kakegawa, Wataru; Budisantoso, Timotheus; Nomura, Toshihiro; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2013-11-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) underlies learning and memory in various brain regions. Although postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking mediates LTD, its underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here we show that stargazin, a transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein, forms a ternary complex with adaptor proteins AP-2 and AP-3A in hippocampal neurons, depending on its phosphorylation state. Inhibiting the stargazin-AP-2 interaction disrupts NMDA-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis, and inhibiting that of stargazin-AP-3A abrogates the late endosomal/lysosomal trafficking of AMPA receptors, thereby upregulating receptor recycling to the cell surface. Similarly, stargazin’s interaction with AP-2 or AP-3A is necessary for low-frequency stimulus-evoked LTD in CA1 hippocampal neurons. Thus, stargazin has a crucial role in NMDA-dependent LTD by regulating two trafficking pathways of AMPA receptors—transport from the cell surface to early endosomes and from early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes—through its sequential binding to AP-2 and AP-3A.

  14. PLEKHA7: Cytoskeletal adaptor protein at center stage in junctional organization and signaling.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jimit; Guerrera, Diego; Vasileva, Ekaterina; Sluysmans, Sophie; Bertels, Eva; Citi, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    PLEKHA7 is a recently characterized component of the cytoplasmic region of epithelial adherens junctions (AJ). It comprises two WW domains, a pleckstrin-homology domain, and proline-rich and coiled-coil domains. PLEKHA7 interacts with cytoplasmic components of the AJ (p120-catenin, paracingulin, afadin), stabilizes the E-cadherin complex by linking it to the minus ends of noncentrosomal microtubules, and stabilizes junctional nectins through the newly identified interactor PDZD11. Similarly to afadin, and unlike E-cadherin and p120-catenin, the localization of PLEKHA7 at AJ is strictly zonular (in the zonula adhaerens subdomain of AJ), and does not extend along the basolateral contacts. Genome-wide association studies and experiments on animal and cellular models show that although PLEKHA7 is not required for organism viability, it is implicated in cardiovascular physiology, hypertension, primary angle closure glaucoma, susceptibility to staphylococcal α-toxin, and epithelial morphogenesis and growth. Thus, PLEKHA7 is a cytoskeletal adaptor protein important for AJ organization, and at the center of junction-associated signaling pathways which fine-tune important pathophysiological processes. PMID:27072621

  15. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites within the Signaling Adaptor APPL1 by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gant-Branum, Randi L.; Broussard, Joshua A.; Mahsut, Ablatt; Webb, Donna J.; McLean, John A.

    2010-01-01

    APPL1 is a membrane-associated adaptor protein implicated in various cellular processes, including apoptosis, proliferation, and survival. Although there is increasing interest in the biological roles as well as the protein and membrane interactions of APPL1, a comprehensive phosphorylation profile has not been generated. In this study, we use mass spectrometry (MS) to identify 13 phosphorylated residues within APPL1. By using multiple proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Glu C) and replicate experiments of linear ion trap (LTQ) MS and LTQ-Orbitrap-MS, a combined sequence coverage of 99.6% is achieved. Four of the identified sites are located in important functional domains, suggesting a potential role in regulating APPL1. One of these sites is within the BAR domain, two cluster near the edge of the PH domain, and one is located within the PTB domain. These phosphorylation sites may control APPL1 function by regulating the ability of APPL1 domains to interact with other proteins and membranes. PMID:20095645

  16. Endostatin-induced tyrosine kinase signaling through the Shb adaptor protein regulates endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dixelius, J; Larsson, H; Sasaki, T; Holmqvist, K; Lu, L; Engström, A; Timpl, R; Welsh, M; Claesson-Welsh, L

    2000-06-01

    Endostatin, which corresponds to the C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII, is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-induced angiogenesis in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane was inhibited by endostatin, but not by an endostatin mutant R158/270A, lacking heparin-binding ability. Endostatin was internalized by endothelial cells, but not by mouse fibroblasts. Treatment of murine brain endothelial (IBE) cells with endostatin reduced the proportion of cells in S phase, whereas growth-arrested IBE cells in collagen gels treated with endostatin displayed enhanced tubular morphogenesis. IBE cells overexpressing Shb, an adaptor protein implicated in angiostatin-induced apoptosis, displayed elevated apoptosis and decreased tubular morphogenesis in collagen gels in response to endostatin when added together with FGF-2. Induction of apoptosis was dependent on the heparin-binding ability of endostatin and the expression of Shb with a functional Src homology 2 (SH2)-domain. Endostatin treatment for 10 minutes or 24 hours induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Shb and formation of multiprotein complexes. An Shb SH2 domain fusion protein precipitated a 125-kd phosphotyrosyl protein in endostatin-treated cells. The 125-kd component either contained intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity or occurred in complex with a tyrosine kinase. In conclusion, our data show that endostatin induces tyrosine kinase activity and enhanced apoptosis in FGF-treated endothelial cells. PMID:10828022

  17. Adaptor protein LNK is a negative regulator of brain neural stem cell proliferation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Ahlenius, Henrik; Devaraju, Karthikeyan; Monni, Emanuela; Oki, Koichi; Wattananit, Somsak; Darsalia, Vladimer; Iosif, Robert E; Torper, Olof; Wood, James C; Braun, Sebastian; Jagemann, Lucas; Nuber, Ulrike A; Englund, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Sten-Eirik W; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2012-04-11

    Ischemic stroke causes transient increase of neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), and migration of newly formed neuroblasts toward the damaged area where they mature to striatal neurons. The molecular mechanisms regulating this plastic response, probably involved in structural reorganization and functional recovery, are poorly understood. The adaptor protein LNK suppresses hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, but its presence and role in the brain are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that LNK is expressed in NSPCs in the adult mouse and human SVZ. Lnk(-/-) mice exhibited increased NSPC proliferation after stroke, but not in intact brain or following status epilepticus. Deletion of Lnk caused increased NSPC proliferation while overexpression decreased mitotic activity of these cells in vitro. We found that Lnk expression after stroke increased in SVZ through the transcription factors STAT1/3. LNK attenuated insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling by inhibition of AKT phosphorylation, resulting in reduced NSPC proliferation. Our findings identify LNK as a stroke-specific, endogenous negative regulator of NSPC proliferation, and suggest that LNK signaling is a novel mechanism influencing plastic responses in postischemic brain. PMID:22496561

  18. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Targets the NEMO Adaptor Protein To Disrupt Inflammatory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, David A.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Knight, Laura M.; Jackson, Brian R.; Richards, Kathryn; Prescott, Emma L.; Peach, A. Howard S.; Blair, G. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive nonmelanoma skin cancer arising from epidermal mechanoreceptor Merkel cells. In 2008, a novel human polyomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), was identified and is strongly implicated in MCC pathogenesis. Currently, little is known regarding the virus-host cell interactions which support virus replication and virus-induced mechanisms in cellular transformation and metastasis. Here we identify a new function of MCPyV small T antigen (ST) as an inhibitor of NF-κB-mediated transcription. This effect is due to an interaction between MCPyV ST and the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) adaptor protein. MCPyV ST expression inhibits IκB kinase α (IKKα)/IKKβ-mediated IκB phosphorylation, which limits translocation of the NF-κB heterodimer to the nucleus. Regulation of this process involves a previously undescribed interaction between MCPyV ST and the cellular phosphatase subunits, protein phosphatase 4C (PP4C) and/or protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) Aβ, but not PP2A Aα. Together, these results highlight a novel function of MCPyV ST to subvert the innate immune response, allowing establishment of early or persistent infection within the host cell. PMID:24109239

  19. A Common Variant in the Adaptor Mal Regulates Interferon Gamma Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Sheedy, Frederick J.; Harris, James; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Lee, Jinhee; West, Kim; McDermott, Eva Palsson; Smyth, Alicia; Gleeson, Laura E.; Coleman, Michelle; Martinez, Nuria; Hearnden, Claire H.A.; Tynan, Graham A.; Carroll, Elizabeth C.; Jones, Sarah A.; Corr, Sinéad C.; Bernard, Nicholas J.; Hughes, Mark M.; Corcoran, Sarah E.; O’Sullivan, Mary; Fallon, Ciara M.; Kornfeld, Hardy; Golenbock, Douglas; Gordon, Stephen V.; O’Neill, Luke A.J.; Lavelle, Ed C.; Keane, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Summary Humans that are heterozygous for the common S180L polymorphism in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor Mal (encoded by TIRAP) are protected from a number of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), whereas those homozygous for the allele are at increased risk. The reason for this difference in susceptibility is not clear. We report that Mal has a TLR-independent role in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) receptor signaling. Mal-dependent IFN-γ receptor (IFNGR) signaling led to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 phosphorylation and autophagy. IFN-γ signaling via Mal was required for phagosome maturation and killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The S180L polymorphism, and its murine equivalent S200L, reduced the affinity of Mal for the IFNGR, thereby compromising IFNGR signaling in macrophages and impairing responses to TB. Our findings highlight a role for Mal outside the TLR system and imply that genetic variation in TIRAP may be linked to other IFN-γ-related diseases including autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26885859

  20. Impairment of dendritic cell functions in patients with adaptor protein-3 complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prandini, Alberto; Salvi, Valentina; Colombo, Francesca; Moratto, Daniele; Lorenzi, Luisa; Vermi, William; De Francesco, Maria Antonia; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Porta, Fulvio; Plebani, Alessandro; Facchetti, Fabio; Sozzani, Silvano; Badolato, Raffaele

    2016-06-30

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 2 (HPS2) is a primary immunodeficiency due to adaptor protein-3 (AP-3) complex deficiency. HPS2 patients present neutropenia, partial albinism, and impaired lysosomal vesicles formation in hematopoietic cells. Given the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in the immune response, we studied monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in two HPS2 siblings. Mature HPS2 moDCs showed impaired expression of CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP), low levels of MIP1-β/CCL4, MIG/CXCL9, and severe defect of interleukin-12 (IL-12) secretion. DCs in lymph-node biopsies from the same patients showed a diffuse cytoplasm reactivity in a large fraction of DC-LAMP(+) cells, instead of the classical dot-like stain. In addition, analysis of pDC-related functions of blood-circulating mononuclear cells revealed reduced interferon-α secretion in response to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), whereas granzyme-B induction upon IL-3/IL-10 stimulation was normal. Finally, T-cell costimulatory activity, as measured by mixed lymphocyte reaction assay, was lower in patients, suggesting that function and maturation of DCs is abnormal in patients with HPS2. PMID:27207797

  1. Lymphocyte adaptor protein LNK deficiency exacerbates hypertension and end-organ inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mohamed A.; McMaster, William G.; Wu, Jing; Norlander, Allison E.; Funt, Samuel A.; Thabet, Salim R.; Kirabo, Annet; Xiao, Liang; Chen, Wei; Itani, Hana A.; Michell, Danielle; Huan, Tianxiao; Zhang, Yahua; Takaki, Satoshi; Titze, Jens; Levy, Daniel; Harrison, David G.; Madhur, Meena S.

    2015-01-01

    The lymphocyte adaptor protein LNK (also known as SH2B3) is primarily expressed in hematopoietic and endothelial cells, where it functions as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling and cell proliferation. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding LNK are associated with autoimmune and cardiovascular disorders; however, it is not known how LNK contributes to hypertension. Here, we determined that loss of LNK exacerbates angiotensin II–induced (Ang II–induced) hypertension and the associated renal and vascular dysfunction. At baseline, kidneys from Lnk–/– mice exhibited greater levels of inflammation, oxidative stress, and glomerular injury compared with WT animals, and these parameters were further exacerbated by Ang II infusion. Aortas from Lnk–/– mice exhibited enhanced inflammation, reduced nitric oxide levels, and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. Bone marrow transplantation studies demonstrated that loss of LNK in hematopoietic cells is primarily responsible for the observed renal and vascular inflammation and predisposition to hypertension. Ang II infusion increased IFN-γ–producing CD8+ T cells in the spleen and kidneys of Lnk–/– mice compared with WT mice. Moreover, IFN-γ deficiency resulted in blunted hypertension in response to Ang II infusion. Together, these results suggest that LNK is a potential therapeutic target for hypertension and its associated renal and vascular sequela. PMID:25664851

  2. The clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex and Arf1 regulate planar cell polarity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Meg; Dussert, Aurore; Collu, Giovanna; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Weber, Ursula; Ciruna, Brian; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    A key step in generating planar cell polarity (PCP) is the formation of restricted junctional domains containing Frizzled/Dishevelled/Diego (Fz/Dsh/Dgo) or Van Gogh/Prickle (Vang/Pk) complexes within the same cell, stabilized via Flamingo (Fmi) across cell membranes. Although models have been proposed for how these complexes acquire and maintain their polarized localization, the machinery involved in moving core PCP proteins around cells remains unknown. We describe the AP-1 adaptor complex and Arf1 as major regulators of PCP protein trafficking in vivo. AP-1 and Arf1 disruption affects the accumulation of Fz/Fmi and Vang/Fmi complexes in the proximo–distal axis, producing severe PCP phenotypes. Using novel tools, we demonstrate a direct and specific Arf1 involvement in Fz trafficking in vivo. Moreover, we uncover a conserved Arf1 PCP function in vertebrates. Our data support a model whereby the trafficking machinery plays an important part during PCP establishment, promoting formation of polarized PCP-core complexes in vivo. PMID:25849195

  3. Molecular basis of synaptic vesicle cargo recognition by the endocytic sorting adaptor stonin 2.

    PubMed

    Jung, Nadja; Wienisch, Martin; Gu, Mingyu; Rand, James B; Müller, Sebastian L; Krause, Gerd; Jorgensen, Erik M; Klingauf, Jürgen; Haucke, Volker

    2007-12-31

    Synaptic transmission depends on clathrin-mediated recycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs). How select SV proteins are targeted for internalization has remained elusive. Stonins are evolutionarily conserved adaptors dedicated to endocytic sorting of the SV protein synaptotagmin. Our data identify the molecular determinants for recognition of synaptotagmin by stonin 2 or its Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue UNC-41B. The interaction involves the direct association of clusters of basic residues on the surface of the cytoplasmic domain of synaptotagmin 1 and a beta strand within the mu-homology domain of stonin 2. Mutation of K783, Y784, and E785 to alanine within this stonin 2 beta strand results in failure of the mutant stonin protein to associate with synaptotagmin, to accumulate at synapses, and to facilitate synaptotagmin internalization. Synaptotagmin-binding-defective UNC-41B is unable to rescue paralysis in C. elegans stonin mutant animals, suggesting that the mechanism of stonin-mediated SV cargo recognition is conserved from worms to mammals. PMID:18166656

  4. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  5. Involvement of the AP-1 Adaptor Complex in Early Steps of Phagocytosis and Macropinocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lefkir, Yaya; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Gotthardt, Daniel; Ozinsky, Adrian; Cornillon, Sophie; Bruckert, Franz; Aderem, Alan A.; Soldati, Thierry; Cosson, Pierre; Letourneur, François

    2004-01-01

    The best described function of the adaptor complex-1 (AP-1) is to participate in the budding of clathrin-coated vesicles from the trans-Golgi network and endosomes. Here, we show that AP-1 is also localized to phagocytic cups in murine macrophages as well as in Dictyostelium amoebae. AP-1 is recruited to phagosomal membranes at this early stage of phagosome formation and rapidly dissociates from maturing phagosomes. To establish the role of AP-1 in phagocytosis, we made used of Dictyostelium mutant cells (apm1- cells) disrupted for AP-1 medium chain. In this mutant, phagocytosis drops by 60%, indicating that AP-1 is necessary for efficient phagocytosis. Furthermore, phagocytosis in apm1- cells is more affected for large rather than small particles, and cells exhibiting incomplete engulfment are then often observed. This suggests that AP-1 could participate in the extension of the phagocytic cup. Interestingly, macropinocytosis, a process dedicated to fluid-phase endocytosis and related to phagocytosis, is also impaired in apm1- cells. In summary, our data suggest a new role of AP-1 at an early stage of phagosome and macropinosome formation. PMID:14617812

  6. Architecture and roles of periplasmic adaptor proteins in tripartite efflux assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Symmons, Martyn F.; Marshall, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen major advances in the structural understanding of the different components of tripartite efflux assemblies, which encompass the multidrug efflux (MDR) pumps and type I secretion systems. The majority of these investigations have focused on the role played by the inner membrane transporters and the outer membrane factor (OMF), leaving the third component of the system – the Periplasmic Adaptor Proteins (PAPs) – relatively understudied. Here we review the current state of knowledge of these versatile proteins which, far from being passive linkers between the OMF and the transporter, emerge as active architects of tripartite assemblies, and play diverse roles in the transport process. Recognition between the PAPs and OMFs is essential for pump assembly and function, and targeting this interaction may provide a novel avenue for combating multidrug resistance. With the recent advances elucidating the drug efflux and energetics of the tripartite assemblies, the understanding of the interaction between the OMFs and PAPs is the last piece remaining in the complete structure of the tripartite pump assembly puzzle. PMID:26074901

  7. The methyltransferase adaptor protein Trm112 is involved in biogenesis of both ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Richa; Johnson, Arlen W.

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified Bud23 as the methyltransferase that methylates G1575 of rRNA in the P-site of the small (40S) ribosomal subunit. In this paper, we show that Bud23 requires the methyltransferase adaptor protein Trm112 for stability in vivo. Deletion of Trm112 results in a bud23Δ-like mutant phenotype. Thus Trm112 is required for efficient small-subunit biogenesis. Genetic analysis suggests the slow growth of a trm112Δ mutant is due primarily to the loss of Bud23. Surprisingly, suppression of the bud23Δ-dependent 40S defect revealed a large (60S) biogenesis defect in a trm112Δ mutant. Using sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis and coimmunoprecipitation, we show that Trm112 is also involved in 60S subunit biogenesis. The 60S defect may be dependent on Nop2 and Rcm1, two additional Trm112 interactors that we identify. Our work extends the known range of Trm112 function from modification of tRNAs and translation factors to both ribosomal subunits, showing that its effects span all aspects of the translation machinery. Although Trm112 is required for Bud23 stability, our results suggest that Trm112 is not maintained in a stable complex with Bud23. We suggest that Trm112 stabilizes its free methyltransferase partners not engaged with substrate and/or helps to deliver its methyltransferase partners to their substrates. PMID:22956767

  8. The adaptor protein insulin receptor substrate 2 inhibits alternative macrophage activation and allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Preeta; Dorsey, Nicolas J; Li, Jiaqi; Qi, Xiulan; Smith, Elizabeth P; Yamaji-Kegan, Kazuyo; Keegan, Achsah D

    2016-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) is an adaptor protein that becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to the cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13, which results in activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway. IL-4 and IL-13 contribute to allergic lung inflammation. To examine the role of IRS2 in allergic disease, we evaluated the responses of IRS2-deficient (IRS2(-/-)) mice. Unexpectedly, loss of IRS2 resulted in a substantial increase in the expression of a subset of genes associated with the generation of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) in response to IL-4 or IL-13 in vitro. AAMs secrete factors that enhance allergic responses and promote airway remodeling. Moreover, compared to IRS2(+/+) mice, IRS2(+/-) and IRS2(-/-) mice developed enhanced pulmonary inflammation, accumulated eosinophils and AAMs, and exhibited airway and vascular remodeling upon allergen stimulation, responses that partially depended on macrophage-intrinsic IRS2 signaling. Both in unstimulated and IL-4-stimulated macrophages, lack of IRS2 enhanced phosphorylation of Akt and ribosomal S6 protein. Thus, we identified a critical inhibitory loop downstream of IRS2, demonstrating an unanticipated and previously unrecognized role for IRS2 in suppressing allergic lung inflammation and remodeling. PMID:27330190

  9. Live Staphylococcus aureus Induces Expression and Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Terminally Differentiated Mouse Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnzon, Carl-Fredrik; Rönnberg, Elin; Guss, Bengt; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells have been shown to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thereby implicating mast cells in pro-angiogenic processes. However, the mechanism of VEGF induction in mast cells and the possible expression of VEGF in fully mature mast cells have not been extensively studied. Here, we report that terminally differentiated peritoneal cell-derived mast cells can be induced to express VEGF in response to challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, thus identifying a mast cell–bacteria axis as a novel mechanism leading to VEGF release. Whereas live bacteria produced a robust upregulation of VEGF in mast cells, heat-inactivated bacteria failed to do so, and bacteria-conditioned media did not induce VEGF expression. The induction of VEGF was not critically dependent on direct cell–cell contact between bacteria and mast cells. Hence, these findings suggest that VEGF can be induced by soluble factors released during the co-culture conditions. Neither of a panel of bacterial cell-wall products known to activate toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling promoted VEGF expression in mast cells. In agreement with the latter, VEGF induction occurred independently of Myd88, an adaptor molecule that mediates the downstream events following TLR engagement. The VEGF induction was insensitive to nuclear factor of activated T-cells inhibition but was partly dependent on the nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells signaling pathway. Together, these findings identify bacterial challenge as a novel mechanism by which VEGF is induced in mast cells. PMID:27446077

  10. DAMP production by human islets under low oxygen and nutrients in the presence or absence of an immunoisolating-capsule and necrostatin-1

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Juarez, Genaro A.; Sahasrabudhe, Neha M.; Tjoelker, Reina S.; de Haan, Bart J.; Engelse, Marten A.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In between the period of transplantation and revascularization, pancreatic islets are exposed to low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions. In the present study we mimicked those conditions in vitro to study the involvement of different cell death processes, release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMP), and associated in vitro immune activation. Under low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions, apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis occur in human islets. Necroptosis is responsible for DAMP-release such as dsDNA, uric acid, and HMGB1. The sensors of the innate immune system able to recognize these DAMPs are mainly TLR, NOD receptors, and C-type lectins. By using cell-lines with a non-functional adaptor molecule MyD88, we were able to show that the islet-derived DAMPs signal mainly via TLR. Immunoisolation in immunoprotective membranes reduced DAMP release and immune activation via retention of the relative large DAMPs in the capsules. Another effective strategy was suppressing necroptosis using the inhibitor nec-1. Although the effect on cell-survival was minor, nec-1 was able to reduce the release of HMGB1 and its associated immune activation. Our data demonstrate that in the immediate post-transplant period islets release DAMPs that in vitro enhance responses of innate immune cells. DAMP release can be reduced in vitro by immunoisolation or intervention with nec-1. PMID:26419792

  11. Internalization-dependent recognition of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis by intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pott, Johanna; Basler, Tina; Duerr, Claudia U; Rohde, Manfred; Goethe, Ralph; Hornef, Mathias W

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, a highly prevalent chronic intestinal infection in domestic and wildlife ruminants. The microbial pathogenesis of MAP infection has attracted additional attention due to an association with the human enteric inflammatory Crohn's disease. MAP is acquired by the faecal-oral route prompting us to study the interaction with differentiated intestinal epithelial cells. MAP was rapidly internalized and accumulated in a late endosomal compartment. In contrast to other opportunistic mycobacteria or M. bovis, MAP induced significant epithelial activation as indicated by a NF-kappaB-independent but Erk-dependent chemokine secretion. Surprisingly, MAP-induced chemokine production was completely internalization-dependent as inhibition of Rac-dependent bacterial uptake abolished epithelial activation. In accordance, innate immune recognition of MAP by differentiated intestinal epithelial cells occurred through the intracellularly localized pattern recognition receptors toll-like receptor 9 and NOD1 with signal transduction via the adaptor molecules MyD88 and RIP2. The internalization-dependent innate immune activation of intestinal epithelial cells is in contrast to the stimulation of professional phagocytes by extracellular bacterial constituents and might significantly contribute to the histopathological changes observed during enteric MAP infection. PMID:19681906

  12. The role of innate immune signals in immunity to Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Marco Túlio R.; Campos, Priscila C.; de Almeida, Leonardo A.; Oliveira, Fernanda S.; Costa, Miriam Maria S.; Marim, Fernanda M.; Pereira, Guilherme S. M.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2012-01-01

    Innate immunity serves as the first line of defense against infectious agents such as intracellular bacteria. The innate immune platform includes Toll-like receptors (TLRs), retinoid acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors and other cytosolic nucleic acid sensors, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptors, adaptors, kinases and other signaling molecules that are required to elicit effective responses against different pathogens. Our research group has been using the Gram-negative bacteria Brucella abortus as a model of pathogen. We have demonstrated that B. abortus triggers MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in macrophages in a MyD88 and IRAK-4-dependent manner. Furthermore, we claimed that so far TLR9 is the most important single TLR during Brucella infection. The identification of host receptors that recognize pathogen-derived nucleic acids has revealed an essential role for nucleic acid sensing in the triggering of immunity to intracellular pathogens. Besides TLRs, herein we describe recent advances in NOD1, NOD2, and type I IFN receptors in innate immune pathways during B. abortus infection. PMID:23112959

  13. Purified IgG from Patients with Obstetric but not IgG from Non-obstetric Antiphospholipid Syndrome Inhibit Trophoblast Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, Katie; Ripoll, Vera M; Pericleous, Charis; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Gerosa, Maria; Ioannou, Yiannis; Rahman, Anisur; Giles, Ian P

    2015-01-01

    Problem Some patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) suffer pregnancy morbidity (PM) but not vascular thrombosis (VT), whilst others suffer VT only. Therefore, we compared the effects of IgG from VT+/PM− and VT−/PM+ subjects on human first-trimester trophoblast (HTR8) cells. Method of study HTR-8 cells were incubated with APS VT+/PM−, APS VT−/PM+ or healthy control (HC) IgG. We measured trophoblast invasion by cell invasion assay; mRNA expression of TLR4 and adaptor proteins; phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, NFκB and ERK; and expression of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6. Results VT−/PM+ IgG, but not VT+/PM− IgG significantly reduced HTR-8 invasion. The effects on invasion were blocked by TLR-4 inhibition. Neither VT+/PM− nor VT−/PM+ IgG altered MyD88 mRNA expression, phosphorylation of signalling molecules or cytokine expression. Conclusions VT−/PM+ IgG exert functionally relevant effects on human trophoblast cells but VT+/PM− IgG do not. PMID:25469631

  14. Interferon-β Mediates Signaling Pathways Uniquely Regulated in Hepatic Stellate Cells and Attenuates the Progression of Hepatic Fibrosis in a Dietary Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Kazumi; Akiyama, Hideo; Funamoto, Saeko; Izawa, Akiko; Sai, Takafumi; Kunita, Kana; Kainoh, Mie; Suzuki, Tomohiko; Kawada, Norifumi

    2015-01-01

    The results of clinical and experimental studies suggest that type I interferons (IFNs) may have direct antifibrotic activity in addition to their antiviral properties. However, the mechanisms are still unclear; in particular, little is known about the antifibrotic activity of IFN-β and how its activity is distinct from that of IFN-α. Using DNA microarrays, we demonstrated that gene expression in TWNT-4 cells, an activated human hepatic stellate cell line, was remarkably altered by IFN-β more than by IFN-α. Integrated pathway enrichment analyses revealed that a variety of IFN-β–mediated signaling pathways are uniquely regulated in TWNT-4 cells, including those related to cell cycle and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. To investigate the antifibrotic activity of IFN-β and the involvement of TLR4 signaling in vivo, we used mice fed a choline-deficient l-amino acid-defined diet as a model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-related hepatic fibrosis. In this model, the administration of IFN-β significantly attenuated augmentation of the area of liver fibrosis, with accompanying transcriptional downregulation of the TLR4 adaptor molecule MyD88. Our results provide important clues for understanding the mechanisms of the preferential antifibrotic activity of IFN-β and suggest that IFN-β itself, as well as being a modulator of its unique signaling pathway, may be a potential treatment for patients with hepatic fibrosis in a pathogenesis-independent manner. PMID:25715168

  15. Genetic Deletion of the Clathrin Adaptor GGA3 Reduces Anxiety and Alters GABAergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, David; Lomoio, Selene; Haydon, Philip G.; Moss, Stephen J.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF binding protein 3 (GGA3) is a monomeric clathrin adaptor that has been shown to regulate the trafficking of the Beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1), which is required for production of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-associated amyloid βpeptide. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that depletion of GGA3 results in increased BACE1 levels and activity owing to impaired lysosomal trafficking and degradation. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3 null mice. We report here that GGA3 deletion results in novelty-induced hyperactivity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors. Given the pivotal role of GABAergic transmission in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviors, we performed electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices and found increased phasic and decreased tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGC). Moreover, we found that the number of inhibitory synapses is increased in the dentate gyrus of GGA3 null mice in further support of the electrophysiological data. Thus, the increased GABAergic transmission is a leading candidate mechanism underlying the reduced anxiety-like behaviors observed in GGA3 null mice. All together these findings suggest that GGA3 plays a key role in GABAergic transmission. Since BACE1 levels are elevated in the brain of GGA3 null mice, it is possible that at least some of these phenotypes are a consequence of increased processing of BACE1 substrates. PMID:27192432

  16. The Adaptor Protein p62 Is Involved in RANKL-induced Autophagy and Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui-Fang; Chen, Gang; Ren, Jian-Gang; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Zhong-Xing; Liu, Bing; Zhao, Yi-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have implicated autophagy in osteoclast differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of p62, a characterized adaptor protein for autophagy, in RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot analyses were used to evaluate the expression levels of autophagy-related markers during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Meanwhile, the potential relationship between p62/LC3 localization and F-actin ring formation was tested using double-labeling immunofluorescence. Then, the expression of p62 in RAW264.7 cells was knocked down using small-interfering RNA (siRNA), followed by detecting its influence on RANKL-induced autophagy activation, osteoclast differentiation, and F-actin ring formation. The data showed that several key autophagy-related markers including p62 were significantly altered during RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. In addition, the expression and localization of p62 showed negative correlation with LC3 accumulation and F-actin ring formation, as demonstrated by western blot and immunofluorescence analyses, respectively. Importantly, the knockdown of p62 obviously attenuated RANKL-induced expression of autophagy- and osteoclastogenesis-related genes, formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells, accumulation of LC3, as well as formation of F-actin ring. Our study indicates that p62 may play essential roles in RANKL-induced autophagy and osteoclastogenesis, which may help to develop a novel therapeutic strategy against osteoclastogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25163928

  17. Biophysical Basis of the Binding of WWOX Tumor Suppressor to WBP1 and WBP2 Adaptors

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Caleb B.; Buffa, Laura; Bar-Mag, Tomer; Salah, Zaidoun; Bhat, Vikas; Mikles, David C.; Deegan, Brian J.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; Malhotra, Arun; Sudol, Marius; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Nawaz, Zafar; Farooq, Amjad

    2012-01-01

    The WWOX tumor suppressor participates in a diverse array of cellular activities by virtue of its ability to recognize WBP1 and WBP2 signaling adaptors among a wide variety of other ligands. Herein, using a multitude of biophysical techniques, we provide evidence that while the WW1 domain of WWOX binds to PPXY motifs within WBP1 and WBP2 in a physiologically-relevant manner, the WW2 domain exhibits no affinity toward any of these PPXY motifs. Importantly, our data suggest that while R25/W44 residues located within the binding pocket of triple-stranded β-fold of WW1 domain are critical for the recognition of PPXY ligands, they are replaced by the chemically-distinct E66/Y85 duo at structurally-equivalent positions within the WW2 domain, thereby accounting for its failure to bind PPXY ligands. Predictably, introduction of E66R/Y85W double-substitution within the WW2 domain not only results in gain-of-function but the resulting engineered domain, hereinafter referred to as WW2_RW, also appears to be a much stronger binding partner of WBP1 and WBP2 than the wild type WW1 domain. We also show that while the WW1 domain is structurally disordered and folds upon ligand binding, the WW2 domain not only adopts a fully structured conformation but also aids stabilization and ligand binding to WW1 domain. This salient observation implies that the WW2 domain likely serves as a chaperone to augment the physiological function of WW1 domain within WWOX. Collectively, our study lays the groundwork for understanding the molecular basis of a key protein-protein interaction pertinent to human health and disease. PMID:22634283

  18. Activation of the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) adaptor attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Henrique; Huang, Lei; Chandler, Phillip R.; Mohamed, Eslam; Souza, Guilherme R.; Li, Lingqian; Pacholczyk, Gabriela; Barber, Glen N.; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Munn, David H.; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic DNA sensing activates the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) adaptor to induce interferon type I (IFNαβ) production. Constitutive DNA sensing to induce sustained STING activation incites tolerance breakdown leading to autoimmunity. Here we show that systemic treatments with DNA nanoparticles (DNPs) induced potent immune regulatory responses via STING signaling that suppressed experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) when administered to mice after immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), at EAE onset, or at peak disease severity. DNP treatments attenuated infiltration of effector T cells into the central nervous system (CNS) and suppressed innate and adaptive immune responses to MOG immunization in spleen. Therapeutic responses were not observed in mice treated with cargo DNA or cationic polymers alone, indicating that DNP uptake and cargo DNA sensing by cells with regulatory functions was essential for therapeutic responses to manifest. Intact STING and IFNαβ receptor genes, but not IFNγ receptor genes, were essential for therapeutic responses to DNPs to manifest. Treatments with cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-diGMP) to activate STING also delayed EAE onset and reduced disease severity. Therapeutic responses to DNPs were critically dependent on indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme activity in hematopoietic cells. Thus DNPs and c-diGMP attenuate EAE by inducing dominant T cell regulatory responses via the STING-IFNαβ-IDO pathway that suppress CNS-specific autoimmunity. These findings reveal dichotomous roles for the STING-IFNαβ pathway in either stimulating or suppressing autoimmunity and identify STING activating reagents as a novel class of immune modulatory drugs. PMID:24799564

  19. Role of the clathrin adaptor PICALM in normal hematopoiesis and polycythemia vera pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yuichi; Maeda, Manami; Pasham, Mithun; Aguet, Francois; Tacheva-Grigorova, Silvia K.; Masuda, Takeshi; Yi, Hai; Lee, Sung-Uk; Xu, Jian; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Ericsson, Maria; Mullally, Ann; Heuser, John; Kirchhausen, Tom; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Clathrin-dependent endocytosis is an essential cellular process shared by all cell types. Despite this, precisely how endocytosis is regulated in a cell-type-specific manner and how this key pathway functions physiologically or pathophysiologically remain largely unknown. PICALM, which encodes the clathrin adaptor protein PICALM, was originally identified as a component of the CALM/AF10 leukemia oncogene. Here we show, by employing a series of conditional Picalm knockout mice, that PICALM critically regulates transferrin uptake in erythroid cells by functioning as a cell-type-specific regulator of transferrin receptor endocytosis. While transferrin receptor is essential for the development of all hematopoietic lineages, Picalm was dispensable for myeloid and B-lymphoid development. Furthermore, global Picalm inactivation in adult mice did not cause gross defects in mouse fitness, except for anemia and a coat color change. Freeze-etch electron microscopy of primary erythroblasts and live-cell imaging of murine embryonic fibroblasts revealed that Picalm function is required for efficient clathrin coat maturation. We showed that the PICALM PIP2 binding domain is necessary for transferrin receptor endocytosis in erythroblasts and absolutely essential for erythroid development from mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in an erythroid culture system. We further showed that Picalm deletion entirely abrogated the disease phenotype in a Jak2V617F knock-in murine model of polycythemia vera. Our findings provide new insights into the regulation of cell-type-specific transferrin receptor endocytosis in vivo. They also suggest a new strategy to block cellular uptake of transferrin-bound iron, with therapeutic potential for disorders characterized by inappropriate red blood cell production, such as polycythemia vera. PMID:25552701

  20. Surfactant Protein A Enhances Constitutive Immune Functions of Clathrin Heavy Chain and Clathrin Adaptor Protein 2.

    PubMed

    Moulakakis, Christina; Steinhäuser, Christine; Biedziak, Dominika; Freundt, Katja; Reiling, Norbert; Stamme, Cordula

    2016-07-01

    NF-κB transcription factors are key regulators of pulmonary inflammatory disorders and repair. Constitutive lung cell type- and microenvironment-specific NF-κB/inhibitor κBα (IκB-α) regulation, however, is poorly understood. Surfactant protein (SP)-A provides both a critical homeostatic and lung defense control, in part by immune instruction of alveolar macrophages (AMs) via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The central endocytic proteins, clathrin heavy chain (CHC) and the clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complex AP2, have pivotal alternative roles in cellular homeostasis that are endocytosis independent. Here, we dissect endocytic from alternative functions of CHC, the α-subunit of AP2, and dynamin in basal and SP-A-modified LPS signaling of macrophages. As revealed by pharmacological inhibition and RNA interference in primary AMs and RAW264.7 macrophages, respectively, CHC and α-adaptin, but not dynamin, prevent IκB-α degradation and TNF-α release, independent of their canonical role in membrane trafficking. Kinetics studies employing confocal microscopy, Western analysis, and immunomagnetic sorting revealed that SP-A transiently enhances the basal protein expression of CHC and α-adaptin, depending on early activation of protein kinase CK2 (former casein kinase II) and Akt1 in primary AMs from rats, SP-A(+/+), and SP-A(-/-) mice, as well as in vivo when intratracheally administered to SP-A(+/+) mice. Constitutive immunomodulation by SP-A, but not SP-A-mediated inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α release, requires CHC, α-adaptin, and dynamin. Our data demonstrate that endocytic proteins constitutively restrict NF-κB activity in macrophages and provide evidence that SP-A enhances the immune regulatory capacity of these proteins, revealing a previously unknown pathway of microenvironment-specific NF-κB regulation in the lung. PMID:26771574

  1. Biophysical basis of the binding of WWOX tumor suppressor to WBP1 and WBP2 adaptors.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Caleb B; Buffa, Laura; Bar-Mag, Tomer; Salah, Zaidoun; Bhat, Vikas; Mikles, David C; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Malhotra, Arun; Sudol, Marius; Aqeilan, Rami I; Nawaz, Zafar; Farooq, Amjad

    2012-09-01

    The WW-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) tumor suppressor participates in a diverse array of cellular activities by virtue of its ability to recognize WW-binding protein 1 (WBP1) and WW-binding protein 2 (WBP2) signaling adaptors among a wide variety of other ligands. Herein, using a multitude of biophysical techniques, we provide evidence that while the WW1 domain of WWOX binds to PPXY motifs within WBP1 and WBP2 in a physiologically relevant manner, the WW2 domain exhibits no affinity toward any of these PPXY motifs. Importantly, our data suggest that while R25/W44 residues located within the binding pocket of a triple-stranded β-fold of WW1 domain are critical for the recognition of PPXY ligands, they are replaced by the chemically distinct E66/Y85 duo at structurally equivalent positions within the WW2 domain, thereby accounting for its failure to bind PPXY ligands. Predictably, not only does the introduction of E66R/Y85W double substitution within the WW2 domain result in gain of function but the resulting engineered domain, hereinafter referred to as WW2_RW, also appears to be a much stronger binding partner of WBP1 and WBP2 than the wild-type WW1 domain. We also show that while the WW1 domain is structurally disordered and folds upon ligand binding, the WW2 domain not only adopts a fully structured conformation but also aids stabilization and ligand binding to WW1 domain. This salient observation implies that the WW2 domain likely serves as a chaperone to augment the physiological function of WW1 domain within WWOX. Collectively, our study lays the groundwork for understanding the molecular basis of a key protein-protein interaction pertinent to human health and disease. PMID:22634283

  2. The SH2B1 Adaptor Protein Associates with a Proximal Region of the Erythropoietin Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Mojib; Hofstätter, Edda; Stickle, Natalie; Beattie, Bryan K.; Jaster, Robert; Carter-Su, Christin; Barber, Dwayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Gene targeting experiments have shown that the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO), its cognate erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R), and associated Janus tyrosine kinase, JAK2, are all essential for erythropoiesis. Structural-functional and murine knock-in experiments have suggested that EPO-R Tyr-343 is important in EPO-mediated mitogenesis. Although Stat5 binds to EPO-R phosphotyrosine 343, the initial Stat5-deficient mice did not have profound erythroid abnormalities suggesting that additional Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing effectors may bind to EPO-R Tyr-343 and couple to downstream signaling pathways. We have utilized cloning of ligand target (COLT) screening to demonstrate that EPO-R Tyr(P)-343 and Tyr(P)-401 bind to the SH2 domain-containing adaptor protein SH2B1β. Immunoprecipitation and in vitro mixing experiments reveal that EPO-R binds to SH2B1 in an SH2 domain-dependent manner and that the sequence that confers SH2B1 binding to the EPO-R is pYXXL. Previous studies have shown that SH2B1 binds directly to JAK2, but we show that in hematopoietic cells, SH2B1β preferentially associates with the EPO-R. SH2B1 is capable of constitutive association with EPO-R, which is necessary for its optimal SH2-dependent recruitment to EPO-R-Tyr(P)-343/Tyr(P)-401. We also demonstrate that SH2B1 is responsive to EPO stimulation and becomes phosphorylated, most likely on serines/threonines, in an EPO dose- and time-dependent manner. In the absence of SH2B1, we observe enhanced activation of signaling pathways downstream of the EPO-R, indicating that SH2B1 is a negative regulator of EPO signaling. PMID:22669948

  3. The SH2B1 adaptor protein associates with a proximal region of the erythropoietin receptor.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Mojib; Hofstätter, Edda; Stickle, Natalie; Beattie, Bryan K; Jaster, Robert; Carter-Su, Christin; Barber, Dwayne L

    2012-07-27

    Gene targeting experiments have shown that the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO), its cognate erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R), and associated Janus tyrosine kinase, JAK2, are all essential for erythropoiesis. Structural-functional and murine knock-in experiments have suggested that EPO-R Tyr-343 is important in EPO-mediated mitogenesis. Although Stat5 binds to EPO-R phosphotyrosine 343, the initial Stat5-deficient mice did not have profound erythroid abnormalities suggesting that additional Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing effectors may bind to EPO-R Tyr-343 and couple to downstream signaling pathways. We have utilized cloning of ligand target (COLT) screening to demonstrate that EPO-R Tyr(P)-343 and Tyr(P)-401 bind to the SH2 domain-containing adaptor protein SH2B1β. Immunoprecipitation and in vitro mixing experiments reveal that EPO-R binds to SH2B1 in an SH2 domain-dependent manner and that the sequence that confers SH2B1 binding to the EPO-R is pYXXL. Previous studies have shown that SH2B1 binds directly to JAK2, but we show that in hematopoietic cells, SH2B1β preferentially associates with the EPO-R. SH2B1 is capable of constitutive association with EPO-R, which is necessary for its optimal SH2-dependent recruitment to EPO-R-Tyr(P)-343/Tyr(P)-401. We also demonstrate that SH2B1 is responsive to EPO stimulation and becomes phosphorylated, most likely on serines/threonines, in an EPO dose- and time-dependent manner. In the absence of SH2B1, we observe enhanced activation of signaling pathways downstream of the EPO-R, indicating that SH2B1 is a negative regulator of EPO signaling. PMID:22669948

  4. Hydrological Modeling Reproducibility Through Data Management and Adaptors for Model Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Because of a lack of centralized planning and no widely-adopted standards among hydrological modeling research groups, research communities, and the data management teams meant to support research, there is chaos when it comes to data formats, spatio-temporal resolutions, ontologies, and data availability. All this makes true scientific reproducibility and collaborative integrated modeling impossible without some glue to piece it all together. Our Virtual Watershed Integrated Modeling System provides the tools and modeling framework hydrologists need to accelerate and fortify new scientific investigations by tracking provenance and providing adaptors for integrated, collaborative hydrologic modeling and data management. Under global warming trends where water resources are under increasing stress, reproducible hydrological modeling will be increasingly important to improve transparency and understanding of the scientific facts revealed through modeling. The Virtual Watershed Data Engine is capable of ingesting a wide variety of heterogeneous model inputs, outputs, model configurations, and metadata. We will demonstrate one example, starting from real-time raw weather station data packaged with station metadata. Our integrated modeling system will then create gridded input data via geostatistical methods along with error and uncertainty estimates. These gridded data are then used as input to hydrological models, all of which are available as web services wherever feasible. Models may be integrated in a data-centric way where the outputs too are tracked and used as inputs to "downstream" models. This work is part of an ongoing collaborative Tri-state (New Mexico, Nevada, Idaho) NSF EPSCoR Project, WC-WAVE, comprised of researchers from multiple universities in each of the three states. The tools produced and presented here have been developed collaboratively alongside watershed scientists to address specific modeling problems with an eye on the bigger picture of

  5. Mind Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific styles vary tremendously. For me, research is largely about the unfettered pursuit of novel ideas and experiments that can test multiple ideas in a day, not a year, an approach that I learned from my mentor Julius “Julie” Axelrod. This focus on creative conceptualizations has been my métier since working in the summers during medical school at the National Institutes of Health, during my two years in the Axelrod laboratory, and throughout my forty-five years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Equally important has been the “high” that emerges from brainstorming with my students. Nothing can compare with the eureka moments when, together, we sense new insights and, better yet, when high-risk, high-payoff experiments succeed. Although I have studied many different questions over the years, a common theme emerges: simple biochemical approaches to understanding molecular messengers, usually small molecules. Equally important has been identifying, purifying, and cloning the messengers' relevant biosynthetic, degradative, or target proteins, at all times seeking potential therapeutic relevance in the form of drugs. In the interests of brevity, this Reflections article is highly selective, and, with a few exceptions, literature citations are only of findings of our laboratory that illustrate notable themes. PMID:21543333

  6. Direct interactions of adaptor protein complexes 1 and 2 with the copper transporter ATP7A mediate its anterograde and retrograde trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ling; Kaler, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    ATP7A is a P-type ATPase in which diverse mutations lead to X-linked recessive Menkes disease or occipital horn syndrome. Recently, two previously unknown ATP7A missense mutations, T994I and P1386S, were shown to cause an isolated distal motor neuropathy without clinical or biochemical features of other ATP7A disorders. These mutant alleles cause subtle defects in ATP7A intracellular trafficking, resulting in preferential plasma membrane localization compared with wild-type ATP7A. We reported previously that ATP7AP1386S causes unstable insertion of the eighth and final transmembrane segment, preventing proper position of the carboxyl-terminal tail in a proportion of mutant molecules. Here, we utilize this and other naturally occurring and engineered mutant ATP7A alleles to identify mechanisms of normal ATP7A trafficking. We show that adaptor protein (AP) complexes 1 and 2 physically interact with ATP7A and that binding is mediated in part by a carboxyl-terminal di-leucine motif. In contrast to other ATP7A missense mutations, ATP7AP1386S partially disturbs interactions with both APs, leading to abnormal axonal localization in transfected NSC-34 motor neurons and altered calcium-signaling following glutamate stimulation. Our results imply that AP-1 normally tethers ATP7A at the trans-Golgi network in the somatodendritic segments of motor neurons and that alterations affecting the ATP7A carboxyl-terminal tail induce release of the copper transporter to the axons or axonal membranes. The latter effects are intensified by diminished interaction with AP-2, impeding ATP7A retrograde trafficking. Taken together, these findings further illuminate the normal molecular mechanisms of ATP7A trafficking and suggest a pathophysiological basis for ATP7A-related distal motor neuropathy. PMID:25574028

  7. Adaptor protein CRK induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition and metastasis of bladder cancer cells through HGF/c-Met feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ryuji; Tsuda, Masumi; Wang, Lei; Maishi, Nako; Abe, Takashige; Kimura, Taichi; Tanino, Mishie; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Hida, Kyoko; Ohba, Yusuke; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nonomura, Katsuya; Tanaka, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that an adaptor protein CRK, including CRK-I and CRK-II, plays essential roles in the malignant potential of various aggressive human cancers, suggesting the validity of targeting CRK in molecular targeted therapy of a wide range of cancers. Nevertheless, the role of CRK in human bladder cancer with marked invasion, characterized by distant metastasis and poor prognosis, remains obscure. In the present study, immunohistochemistry indicated a striking enhancement of CRK-I/-II, but not CRK-like, in human bladder cancer tissues compared to normal urothelium. We established CRK-knockdown bladder cancer cells using 5637 and UM-UC-3, which showed a significant decline in cell migration, invasion, and proliferation. It is noteworthy that an elimination of CRK conferred suppressed phosphorylation of c-Met and the downstream scaffold protein Gab1 in a hepatocyte growth factor-dependent and -independent manner. In epithelial–mesenchymal transition-related molecules, E-cadherin was upregulated by CRK elimination, whereas N-cadherin, vimentin, and Zeb1 were downregulated. A similar effect was observed following treatment with c-Met inhibitor SU11274. Depletion of CRK significantly decreased cell proliferation of 5637 and UM-UC-3, consistent with reduced activity of ERK. An orthotopic xenograft model with bioluminescent imaging revealed that CRK knockdown significantly attenuated not only tumor volume but also the number of circulating tumor cells, resulted in a complete abrogation of metastasis. Taken together, this evidence uncovered essential roles of CRK in invasive bladder cancer through the hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met/CRK feedback loop for epithelial–mesenchymal transition induction. Thus, CRK might be a potent molecular target in bladder cancer, particularly for preventing metastasis, leading to the resolution of clinically longstanding critical issues. PMID:25816892

  8. TRAF molecules in cell signaling and in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R)-associated factor (TRAF) family of intracellular proteins were originally identified as signaling adaptors that bind directly to the cytoplasmic regions of receptors of the TNF-R superfamily. The past decade has witnessed rapid expansion of receptor families identified to employ TRAFs for signaling. These include Toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), T cell receptor, IL-1 receptor family, IL-17 receptors, IFN receptors and TGFβ receptors. In addition to their role as adaptor proteins, most TRAFs also act as E3 ubiquitin ligases to activate downstream signaling events. TRAF-dependent signaling pathways typically lead to the activation of nuclear factor-κBs (NF-κBs), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), or interferon-regulatory factors (IRFs). Compelling evidence obtained from germ-line and cell-specific TRAF-deficient mice demonstrates that each TRAF plays indispensable and non-redundant physiological roles, regulating innate and adaptive immunity, embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, stress response, and bone metabolism. Notably, mounting evidence implicates TRAFs in the pathogenesis of human diseases such as cancers and autoimmune diseases, which has sparked new appreciation and interest in TRAF research. This review presents an overview of the current knowledge of TRAFs, with an emphasis on recent findings concerning TRAF molecules in signaling and in human diseases. PMID:23758787

  9. Cell Free DNA of Tumor Origin Induces a ‘Metastatic’ Expression Profile in HT-29 Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Fűri, István; Kalmár, Alexandra; Wichmann, Barnabás; Spisák, Sándor; Schöller, Andrea; Barták, Barbara; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Background Epithelial cells in malignant conditions release DNA into the extracellular compartment. Cell free DNA of tumor origin may act as a ligand of DNA sensing mechanisms and mediate changes in epithelial-stromal interactions. Aims To evaluate and compare the potential autocrine and paracrine regulatory effect of normal and malignant epithelial cell-related DNA on TLR9 and STING mediated pathways in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and normal fibroblasts. Materials and Methods DNA isolated from normal and tumorous colonic epithelia of fresh frozen surgically removed tissue samples was used for 24 and 6 hour treatment of HT-29 colon carcinoma and HDF-α fibroblast cells. Whole genome mRNA expression analysis and qRT-PCR was performed for the elements/members of TLR9 signaling pathway. Immunocytochemistry was performed for epithelial markers (i.e. CK20 and E-cadherin), DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3a) and NFκB (for treated HDFα cells). Results Administration of tumor derived DNA on HT29 cells resulted in significant (p<0.05) mRNA level alteration in 118 genes (logFc≥1, p≤0.05), including overexpression of metallothionein genes (i.e. MT1H, MT1X, MT1P2, MT2A), metastasis-associated genes (i.e. TACSTD2, MACC1, MALAT1), tumor biomarker (CEACAM5), metabolic genes (i.e. INSIG1, LIPG), messenger molecule genes (i.e. DAPP, CREB3L2). Increased protein levels of CK20, E-cadherin, and DNMT3a was observed after tumor DNA treatment in HT-29 cells. Healthy DNA treatment affected mRNA expression of 613 genes (logFc≥1, p≤0.05), including increased expression of key adaptor molecules of TLR9 pathway (e.g. MYD88, IRAK2, NFκB, IL8, IL-1β), STING pathway (ADAR, IRF7, CXCL10, CASP1) and the FGF2 gene. Conclusions DNA from tumorous colon epithelium, but not from the normal epithelial cells acts as a pro-metastatic factor to HT-29 cells through the overexpression of pro-metastatic genes through TLR9/MYD88 independent pathway. In contrast, DNA derived from

  10. Cooperative and independent roles of the Drp1 adaptors Mff, MiD49 and MiD51 in mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Osellame, Laura D; Singh, Abeer P; Stroud, David A; Palmer, Catherine S; Stojanovski, Diana; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-06-01

    Cytosolic dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, also known as DNM1L) is required for both mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission. Drp1-dependent division of these organelles is facilitated by a number of adaptor proteins at mitochondrial and peroxisomal surfaces. To investigate the interplay of these adaptor proteins, we used gene-editing technology to create a suite of cell lines lacking the adaptors MiD49 (also known as MIEF2), MiD51 (also known as MIEF1), Mff and Fis1. Increased mitochondrial connectivity was observed following loss of individual adaptors, and this was further enhanced following the combined loss of MiD51 and Mff. Moreover, loss of adaptors also conferred increased resistance of cells to intrinsic apoptotic stimuli, with MiD49 and MiD51 showing the more prominent role. Using a proximity-based biotin labeling approach, we found close associations between MiD51, Mff and Drp1, but not Fis1. Furthermore, we found that MiD51 can suppress Mff-dependent enhancement of Drp1 GTPase activity. Our data indicates that Mff and MiD51 regulate Drp1 in specific ways to promote mitochondrial fission. PMID:27076521

  11. Multiple interactions drive adaptor-m