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Sample records for adar family adar1

  1. ADAR1 restricts LINE-1 retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Orecchini, Elisa; Doria, Margherita; Antonioni, Ambra; Galardi, Silvia; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Frassinelli, Loredana; Mancone, Carmine; Montaldo, Claudia; Tripodi, Marco; Michienzi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are involved in RNA editing that converts adenosines to inosines in double-stranded RNAs. ADAR1 was demonstrated to be functional on different viruses exerting either antiviral or proviral effects. Concerning HIV-1, several studies showed that ADAR1 favors viral replication. The aim of this study was to investigate the composition of the ADAR1 ribonucleoprotein complex during HIV-1 expression. By using a dual-tag affinity purification procedure in cells expressing HIV-1 followed by mass spectrometry analysis, we identified 14 non-ribosomal ADAR1-interacting proteins, most of which are novel. A significant fraction of these proteins were previously demonstrated to be associated to the Long INterspersed Element 1 (LINE1 or L1) ribonucleoparticles and to regulate the life cycle of L1 retrotransposons that continuously re-enter host-genome. Hence, we investigated the function of ADAR1 in the regulation of L1 activity. By using different cell-culture based retrotransposition assays in HeLa cells, we demonstrated a novel function of ADAR1 as suppressor of L1 retrotransposition. Apparently, this inhibitory mechanism does not occur through ADAR1 editing activity. Furthermore, we showed that ADAR1 binds the basal L1 RNP complex. Overall, these data support the role of ADAR1 as regulator of L1 life cycle. PMID:27658966

  2. RNA Editing, ADAR1, and the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingde; Li, Xiaoni; Qi, Ruofan; Billiar, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    RNA editing, particularly A-to-I RNA editing, has been shown to play an essential role in mammalian embryonic development and tissue homeostasis, and is implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including skin pigmentation disorder, autoimmune and inflammatory tissue injury, neuron degeneration, and various malignancies. A-to-I RNA editing is carried out by a small group of enzymes, the adenosine deaminase acting on RNAs (ADARs). Only three members of this protein family, ADAR1–3, exist in mammalian cells. ADAR3 is a catalytically null enzyme and the most significant function of ADAR2 was found to be in editing on the neuron receptor GluR-B mRNA. ADAR1, however, has been shown to play more significant roles in biological and pathological conditions. Although there remains much that is not known about how ADAR1 regulates cellular function, recent findings point to regulation of the innate immune response as an important function of ADAR1. Without appropriate RNA editing by ADAR1, endogenous RNA transcripts stimulate cytosolic RNA sensing receptors and therefore activate the IFN-inducing signaling pathways. Overactivation of innate immune pathways can lead to tissue injury and dysfunction. However, obvious gaps in our knowledge persist as to how ADAR1 regulates innate immune responses through RNA editing. Here, we review critical findings from ADAR1 mechanistic studies focusing on its regulatory function in innate immune responses and identify some of the important unanswered questions in the field. PMID:28106799

  3. Substrate recognition by ADAR1 and ADAR2.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S K; Sato, S; Lazinski, D W

    2001-01-01

    RNA editing catalyzed by ADAR1 and ADAR2 involves the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine within imperfectly duplexed RNA. ADAR1- and ADAR2-mediated editing occurs within transcripts of glutamate receptors (GluR) in the brain and in hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA in the liver. Although the Q/R site within the GluR-B premessage is edited more efficiently by ADAR2 than it is by ADAR1, the converse is true for the +60 site within this same transcript. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are homologs having two common functional regions, an N-terminal double-stranded RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal deaminase domain. It is neither understood why only certain adenosines within a substrate molecule serve as targets for ADARs, nor is it known which domain of an ADAR confers its specificity for particular editing sites. To assess the importance of several aspects of RNA sequence and structure on editing, we evaluated 20 different mutated substrates, derived from four editing sites, for their ability to be edited by either ADAR1 or ADAR2. We found that when these derivatives contained an A:C mismatch at the editing site, editing by both ADARs was enhanced compared to when A:A or A:G mismatches or A:U base pairs occurred at the same site. Hence substrate recognition and/or catalysis by ADARs could involve the base that opposes the edited adenosine. In addition, by using protein chimeras in which the deaminase domains were exchanged between ADAR1 and ADAR2, we found that this domain played a dominant role in defining the substrate specificity of the resulting enzyme. PMID:11421361

  4. Hepatitis Delta Virus Minimal Substrates Competent for Editing by ADAR1 and ADAR2

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shuji; Wong, Swee Kee; Lazinski, David W.

    2001-01-01

    A host-mediated RNA-editing event allows hepatitis delta virus (HDV) to express two essential proteins, the small delta antigen (HDAg-S) and the large delta antigen (HDAg-L), from a single open reading frame. One or several members of the ADAR (adenosine deaminases that act on RNA) family are thought to convert the adenosine to an inosine (I) within the HDAg-S amber codon in antigenomic RNA. As a consequence of replication, the UIG codon is converted to a UGG (tryptophan [W]) codon in the resulting HDAg-L message. Here, we used a novel reporter system to monitor the editing of the HDV amber/W site in the absence of replication. In cultured cells, we observed that both human ADAR1 (hADAR1) and hADAR2 were capable of editing the amber/W site with comparable efficiencies. We also defined the minimal HDV substrate required for hADAR1- and hADAR2-mediated editing. Only 24 nucleotides from the amber/W site were sufficient to enable efficient editing by hADAR1. Hence, the HDV amber/W site represents the smallest ADAR substrate yet identified. In contrast, the minimal substrate competent for hADAR2-mediated editing contained 66 nucleotides. PMID:11507200

  5. ADAR1 promotes malignant progenitor reprogramming in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qingfei; Crews, Leslie A.; Barrett, Christian L.; Chun, Hye-Jung; Court, Angela C.; Isquith, Jane M.; Zipeto, Maria A.; Goff, Daniel J.; Minden, Mark; Sadarangani, Anil; Rusert, Jessica M.; Dao, Kim-Hien T.; Morris, Sheldon R.; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.; Marra, Marco A.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular etiology of human progenitor reprogramming into self-renewing leukemia stem cells (LSC) has remained elusive. Although DNA sequencing has uncovered spliceosome gene mutations that promote alternative splicing and portend leukemic transformation, isoform diversity also may be generated by RNA editing mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes that regulate stem cell maintenance. In this study, whole-transcriptome sequencing of normal, chronic phase, and serially transplantable blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitors revealed increased IFN-γ pathway gene expression in concert with BCR-ABL amplification, enhanced expression of the IFN-responsive ADAR1 p150 isoform, and a propensity for increased adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing during CML progression. Lentiviral overexpression experiments demonstrate that ADAR1 p150 promotes expression of the myeloid transcription factor PU.1 and induces malignant reprogramming of myeloid progenitors. Moreover, enforced ADAR1 p150 expression was associated with production of a misspliced form of GSK3β implicated in LSC self-renewal. Finally, functional serial transplantation and shRNA studies demonstrate that ADAR1 knockdown impaired in vivo self-renewal capacity of blast crisis CML progenitors. Together these data provide a compelling rationale for developing ADAR1-based LSC detection and eradication strategies. PMID:23275297

  6. ADAR1 promotes malignant progenitor reprogramming in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qingfei; Crews, Leslie A; Barrett, Christian L; Chun, Hye-Jung; Court, Angela C; Isquith, Jane M; Zipeto, Maria A; Goff, Daniel J; Minden, Mark; Sadarangani, Anil; Rusert, Jessica M; Dao, Kim-Hien T; Morris, Sheldon R; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Marra, Marco A; Frazer, Kelly A; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2013-01-15

    The molecular etiology of human progenitor reprogramming into self-renewing leukemia stem cells (LSC) has remained elusive. Although DNA sequencing has uncovered spliceosome gene mutations that promote alternative splicing and portend leukemic transformation, isoform diversity also may be generated by RNA editing mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes that regulate stem cell maintenance. In this study, whole-transcriptome sequencing of normal, chronic phase, and serially transplantable blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitors revealed increased IFN-γ pathway gene expression in concert with BCR-ABL amplification, enhanced expression of the IFN-responsive ADAR1 p150 isoform, and a propensity for increased adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing during CML progression. Lentiviral overexpression experiments demonstrate that ADAR1 p150 promotes expression of the myeloid transcription factor PU.1 and induces malignant reprogramming of myeloid progenitors. Moreover, enforced ADAR1 p150 expression was associated with production of a misspliced form of GSK3β implicated in LSC self-renewal. Finally, functional serial transplantation and shRNA studies demonstrate that ADAR1 knockdown impaired in vivo self-renewal capacity of blast crisis CML progenitors. Together these data provide a compelling rationale for developing ADAR1-based LSC detection and eradication strategies.

  7. Genome organization and transcriptional regulation of Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA gene 1 (ADAR1) in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhicheng; Wang, Binhua; Liu, Yong; Liu, Xiancheng; Mi, Yichuan; Gu, Meihui; Wang, Fang; Wu, Chuxin; Hu, Chengyu

    2015-06-01

    ADAR1, involved in A-to-I RNA editing, belongs to adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family. A-to-I RNA editing is the most widespread editing phenomenon in higher eukaryotes. In the present study, we cloned and identified the full-length cDNA, complete genomic sequence and the promoter sequence of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) ADAR1 (CiADAR1) by homology cloning strategy and genome walking. CiADAR1 full-length cDNA is comprised of a 5'UTR (43  bp), a 3'UTR (229 bp) and a 4179 bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 1392 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of CiADAR1 contains two Z-DNA binding domains, three dsRNA binding motifs and a conserved catalytic domain. The complete genomic CiADAR1 has 16 exons and 15 introns. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that CiADAR1 shared high homology with Danio rerio ADAR1 (DrADAR1). RT-PCR showed that CiADAR1 were ubiquitously expressed and significantly up-regulated after stimulation with poly I:C. In spleen and liver, CiADAR1 mRNA reached the peak at 12 h and maintained the highest level during 12-24 h post-injection. CiADAR1 promoter was found to be 1102 bp in length and divided into two distinct regions, the proximal region containing three putative interferon regulatory factor binding elements (IRF-E) and the distal region containing only one IRF-E. To further study the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of CiADAR1, grass carp IRF1 (CiIRF1) and IRF3 (CiIRF3) were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified by affinity chromatography with the Ni-NTA His-Bind resin. Then, gel mobility shift assay was employed to analyze the affinity of CiADAR1 promoter sequence with CiIRF1 and CiIRF3 in vitro. The result revealed that CiIRF1 and CiIRF3 bound to CiADAR1 promoter with high affinity, indicating that IRF1 and IRF3 could be the potential transcriptional regulatory factor for CiADAR1. Co-transfection of pcDNA3.1-IRF1 (or pcDNA3.1-IRF3) with pGL3-CiADAR1 into C. idella kidney (CIK) cells showed that both

  8. ADAR1 ablation decreases bone mass by impairing osteoblast function in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shibing; Sharma, Rohit; Nie, Daibang; Jiao, Hongli; Im, Hee-Jeong; Lai, Yumei; Zhao, Zhongfang; Zhu, Ke; Fan, Jie; Chen, Di; Wang, Qingde; Xiao, Guozhi

    2013-01-15

    Bone mass is controlled through a delicate balance between osteoblast-mediated bone formation and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. We show here that RNA editing enzyme adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) is critical for proper control of bone mass. Postnatal conditional knockout of Adar1 (the gene encoding ADAR1) resulted in a severe osteopenic phenotype. Ablation of the Adar1 gene significantly suppressed osteoblast differentiation without affecting osteoclast differentiation in bone. In vitro deletion of the Adar1 gene decreased expression of osteoblast-specific osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein genes, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization, suggesting a direct intrinsic role of ADAR1 in osteoblasts. ADAR1 regulates osteoblast differentiation by, at least in part, modulation of osterix expression, which is essential for bone formation. Further, ablation of the Adar1 gene decreased the proliferation and survival of bone marrow stromal cells and inhibited the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards osteoblast lineage. Finally, shRNA knockdown of the Adar1 gene in MC-4 pre-osteoblasts reduced cyclin D1 and cyclin A1 expression and cell growth. Our results identify ADAR1 as a new key regulator of bone mass and suggest that ADAR1 functions in this process mainly through modulation of the intrinsic properties of osteoblasts (i.e., proliferation, survival and differentiation).

  9. Host response to polyomavirus infection is modulated by RNA adenosine deaminase ADAR1 but not by ADAR2.

    PubMed

    George, Cyril X; Samuel, Charles E

    2011-08-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the C-6 deamination of adenosine (A) to produce inosine (I), which behaves as guanine (G), thereby altering base pairing in RNAs with double-stranded character. Two genes, adar1 and adar2, are known to encode enzymatically active ADARs in mammalian cells. Furthermore, two size forms of ADAR1 are expressed by alternative promoter usage, a short (p110) nuclear form that is constitutively made and a long (p150) form that is interferon inducible and present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. ADAR2 is also a constitutively expressed nuclear protein. Extensive A-to-G substitution has been described in mouse polyomavirus (PyV) RNA isolated late times after infection, suggesting modification by ADAR. To test the role of ADAR in PyV infection, we used genetically null mouse embryo fibroblast cells deficient in either ADAR1 or ADAR2. The single-cycle yields and growth kinetics of PyV were comparable between adar1(-/-) and adar2(-/-) genetic null fibroblast cells. While large T antigen was expressed to higher levels in adar1(-/-) cells than adar2(-/-) cells, less difference was seen in VP1 protein expression levels between the two knockout MEFs. However, virus-induced cell killing was greatly enhanced in PyV-infected adar1(-/-) cells compared to that of adar2(-/-) cells. Complementation with p110 protected cells from PyV-induced cytotoxicity. UV-irradiated PyV did not display any enhanced cytopathic effect in adar1(-/-) cells. Reovirus and vesicular stomatitis virus single-cycle yields were comparable between adar1(-/-) and adar2(-/-) cells, and neither reovirus nor VSV showed enhanced cytotoxicity in adar1(-/-)-infected cells. These results suggest that ADAR1 plays a virus-selective role in the host response to infection.

  10. Functions of the RNA Editing Enzyme ADAR1 and Their Relevance to Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chunzi; Sakurai, Masayuki; Shiromoto, Yusuke; Nishikura, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) convert adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Among the three types of mammalian ADARs, ADAR1 has long been recognized as an essential enzyme for normal development. The interferon-inducible ADAR1p150 is involved in immune responses to both exogenous and endogenous triggers, whereas the functions of the constitutively expressed ADAR1p110 are variable. Recent findings that ADAR1 is involved in the recognition of self versus non-self dsRNA provide potential explanations for its links to hematopoiesis, type I interferonopathies, and viral infections. Editing in both coding and noncoding sequences results in diseases ranging from cancers to neurological abnormalities. Furthermore, editing of noncoding sequences, like microRNAs, can regulate protein expression, while editing of Alu sequences can affect translational efficiency and editing of proximal sequences. Novel identifications of long noncoding RNA and retrotransposons as editing targets further expand the effects of A-to-I editing. Besides editing, ADAR1 also interacts with other dsRNA-binding proteins in editing-independent manners. Elucidating the disease-specific patterns of editing and/or ADAR1 expression may be useful in making diagnoses and prognoses. In this review, we relate the mechanisms of ADAR1′s actions to its pathological implications, and suggest possible mechanisms for the unexplained associations between ADAR1 and human diseases. PMID:27999332

  11. ADAR1 regulates ARHGAP26 gene expression through RNA editing by disrupting miR-30b-3p and miR-573 binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Hui, Haipeng; Guo, Zhendong; Zhang, Weina; Hu, Yaou; He, Tao; Tai, Yanhong; Peng, Peng; Wang, Li

    2013-11-01

    Rho GTPase activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26) is a negative regulator of the Rho family that converts the small G proteins RhoA and Cdc42 to their inactive GDP-bound forms. It is essential for the CLIC/GEEC endocytic pathway, cell spreading, and muscle development. The present study shows that ARHGAP26 mRNA undergoes extensive A-to-I RNA editing in the 3' UTR that is specifically catalyzed by ADAR1. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of ARHGAP26 were decreased in cells in which ADAR1 was knocked down. Conversely, ADAR1 overexpression increased the abundance of ARHGAP26 mRNA and protein. In addition, we found that both miR-30b-3p and miR-573 target the ARHGAP26 gene and that RNA editing of ARHGAP26 mediated by ADAR1 abolished the repression of its expression by miR-30b-3p or miR-573. When ADAR1 was overexpressed, the reduced abundance of ARHGAP26 protein mediated by miR-30b-3p or miR-573 was rescued. Importantly, we also found that knocking down ADAR1 elevated RhoA activity, which was consistent with the reduced level of ARHGAP26. Conversely, when ADAR1 was overexpressed, the amount of RhoA-GTP decreased. The similar expression patterns of ARHGAP26 and ADAR1 in human tissue samples further confirmed our findings. Taken together, our results suggest that ADAR1 regulates the expression of ARHGAP26 through A-to-I RNA editing by disrupting the binding of miR-30b-3p and miR-573 within the 3' UTR of ARHGAP26. This study provides a novel insight into the mechanism by which ADAR1 and its RNA editing function regulate microRNA-mediated modulation of target genes.

  12. Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David N.; Li, Yonghua; Kumar, Rajnish; Burke, Sean A.; Dawson, Rodney; Hioe, Catarina E.; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N.; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    While exploring the effects of aerosol IFN-γ treatment in HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected patients, we observed A to G mutations in HIV-1 envelope sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of aerosol IFN-γ-treated patients and induction of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) in the BAL cells. IFN-γ induced ADAR1 expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) but not T cells. ADAR1 siRNA knockdown induced HIV-1 expression in BAL cells of four HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Similar results were obtained in MDM that were HIV-1 infected in vitro. Over-expression of ADAR1 in transformed macrophages inhibited HIV-1 viral replication but not viral transcription measured by nuclear run-on, suggesting that ADAR1 acts post-transcriptionally. The A to G hyper-mutation pattern observed in ADAR1 over-expressing cells in vitro was similar to that found in the lungs of HIV-1 infected patients treated with aerosol IFN-γ suggesting the model accurately represented alveolar macrophages. Together, these results indicate that ADAR1 restricts HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally in macrophages harboring HIV-1 provirus. ADAR1 may therefore contribute to viral latency in macrophages. PMID:25272020

  13. ADAR1 is vital for B cell lineage development in the mouse bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Marcu-Malina, Victoria; Goldberg, Sanja; Vax, Einav; Amariglio, Ninette

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) 1 is the master editor of the transcriptome, catalyzing the conversion of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I). RNA transcripts fold into a variety of secondary structures including long intramolecular RNA duplexes that are the major substrate of ADAR1. Most A-to-I editing sites occur within RNA duplexes formed by complementary pairing of inverted retrotransposable elements interspersed within noncoding regions of transcripts. This catalytic activity of ADAR1 most likely prevents the abnormal activation of cytosolic nucleic acid sensors by self-dsRNAs. Homozygous disruption of mouse Adar is embryonic lethal due to a toxic type-I interferons response and correspondingly biallelic missense mutations in human ADAR1 cause a severe congenital interferonopathy. Here, we report that Cd19-Cre-mediated Adar gene ablation in the mouse causes a significant defect in the final stages of B cell development with an almost complete absence of newly formed immature and CD23+ mature recirculating B cells in the BM. Adar ablation in pre-B cells induced upregulation of typical interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and apoptosis upon further maturation. ADAR1 deficiency also inhibited the in vitro, IL-7-mediated, differentiation of BM-derived B cell precursors. In summary, ADAR1 is required, non-redundantly, for normal B lymphopoiesis in the BM and peripheral maintenance. PMID:27494846

  14. ADAR1 is essential for intestinal homeostasis and stem cell maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, W; Wang, X; Buchanan, M; He, K; Sharma, R; Zhang, L; Wang, Q; Yu, J

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) is a double-stranded RNA-editing enzyme that converts adenosine (A) to inosine (I), and essential for normal development. In this study, we reported an essential role of ADAR1 in the survival and maintenance of intestinal stem cells and intestinal homoeostasis by suppressing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and interferon (IFN) signaling. ADAR1 was highly expressed in the Lgr5+ cells, and its deletion in adult mice led to a rapid apoptosis and loss of these actively cycling stem cells in the small intestine and colon. ADAR1 deletion resulted in a drastic expansion of progenitors and Paneth cells but a reduction of three other major epithelial lineages. Moreover, loss of ADAR1 induced ER stress and activation of IFN signaling, and altered expression in WNT targets, followed by intestinal inflammation. An ER stress inhibitor partially suppressed crypt apoptosis. Finally, data from cultured intestinal crypts demonstrated that loss of ADAR1 in the epithelial cells is the primary cause of these effects. These results support an essential role of ADAR1 and RNA editing in tissue homeostasis and stem cells. PMID:23598411

  15. ADAR1 deletion induces NFκB and interferon signaling dependent liver inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shoshan, Shirley Oren; Kagan, Polina; Sultan, Maya; Barabash, Zohar; Dor, Chen; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Harmelin, Alon; Pappo, Orit; Marcu-Malina, Victoria; Ben-Ari, Ziv; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Goldstein, Itamar; Safran, Michal

    2016-06-30

    Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) 1 binds and edits double-stranded (ds) RNA secondary structures found mainly within untranslated regions of many transcripts. In the current research, our aim was to study the role of ADAR1 in liver homeostasis. As previous studies show a conserved immunoregulatory function for ADAR1 in mammalians, we focused on its role in preventing chronic hepatic inflammation and the associated activation of hepatic stellate cells to produce extracellular matrix and promote fibrosis. We show that hepatocytes specific ADAR1 knock out (KO) mice display massive liver damage with multifocal inflammation and fibrogenesis. The bioinformatics analysis of the microarray gene-expression datasets of ADAR1 KO livers reveled a type-I interferons signature and an enrichment for immune response genes compared to control littermate livers. Furthermore, we found that in vitro silencing of ADAR1 expression in HepG2 cells leads to enhanced transcription of NFκB target genes, foremost of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL6 and IL8. We also discovered immune cell-independent paracrine signaling among ADAR1-depleted HepG2 cells and hepatic stellate cells, leading to the activation of the latter cell type to adopt a profibrogenic phenotype. This paracrine communication dependent mainly on the production and secretion of the cytokine IL6 induced by ADAR1 silencing in hepatocytes. Thus, our findings shed a new light on the vital regulatory role of ADAR1 in hepatic immune homeostasis, chiefly its inhibitory function on the crosstalk between the NFκB and type-I interferons signaling cascades, restraining the development of liver inflammation and fibrosis.

  16. Aberrant overexpression of ADAR1 promotes gastric cancer progression by activating mTOR/p70S6K signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Ning; Yu, Shijun; Ye, Xiaojuan; Yang, Dong; Li, Yandong; Gao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    ADAR1, one of adenosine deaminases acting on RNA, modulates RNA transcripts through converting adenosine (A) to inosine (I) by deamination. Emerging evidence has implicated that ADAR1 plays an important role in a few of human cancers, however, its expression and physiological significance in gastric cancer remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that ADAR1 was frequently overexpressed in gastric cancer samples by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. In a gastric cancer tissue microarray, ADAR1 staining was closely correlated with tumor stage (P < 0.001) and N classification (P < 0.001). Functional analysis indicated that ADAR1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation and migration in vitro, whereas ADAR1 knockdown resulted in an opposite phenotypes. Furthermore, ADAR1 knockdown also inhibited tumorigenicity and lung metastasis potential of gastric cancer cells in nude mice models. Mechanistically, ADAR1 expression had a significant effect on phosphorylation level of mTOR, p70S kinase, and S6 ribosomal protein, implying its involvement in the regulation of mTOR signaling pathway. We conclude that ADAR1 contributes to gastric cancer development and progression via activating mTOR/p70S6K/S6 ribosomal protein signaling axis. Our findings suggest that ADAR1 may be a valuable biomarker for GC diagnosis and prognosis and may represent a new novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:27863387

  17. Applying Human ADAR1p110 and ADAR1p150 for Site-Directed RNA Editing—G/C Substitution Stabilizes GuideRNAs against Editing

    PubMed Central

    Heep, Madeleine; Mach, Pia; Reautschnig, Philipp; Wettengel, Jacqueline; Stafforst, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Site-directed RNA editing is an approach to reprogram genetic information at the RNA level. We recently introduced a novel guideRNA that allows for the recruitment of human ADAR2 to manipulate genetic information. Here, we show that the current guideRNA design is already able to recruit another human deaminase, ADAR1, in both isoforms, p110 and p150. However, further optimization seems necessary as the current design is less efficient for ADAR1 isoforms. Furthermore, we describe hotspots at which the guideRNA itself is edited and show a way to circumvent this auto-editing without losing editing efficiency at the target. Both findings are important for the advancement of site-directed RNA editing as a tool in basic biology or as a platform for therapeutic editing. PMID:28098820

  18. A novel immune resistance mechanism of melanoma cells controlled by the ADAR1 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Galore-Haskel, Gilli; Nemlich, Yael; Greenberg, Eyal; Ashkenazi, Shira; Hakim, Motti; Itzhaki, Orit; Shoshani, Noa; Shapira-Fromer, Ronnie; Ben-Ami, Eytan; Ofek, Efrat; Anafi, Liat; Besser, Michal J; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2015-10-06

    The blossom of immunotherapy in melanoma highlights the need to delineate mechanisms of immune resistance. Recently, we have demonstrated that the RNA editing protein, adenosine deaminase acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) is down-regulated during metastatic transition of melanoma, which enhances melanoma cell proliferation and tumorigenicity. Here we investigate the role of ADAR1 in melanoma immune resistance.Importantly, knockdown of ADAR1 in human melanoma cells induces resistance to tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in a cell contact-dependent mechanism. We show that ADAR1, in an editing-independent manner, regulates the biogenesis of miR-222 at the transcription level and thereby Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM1) expression, which consequently affects melanoma immune resistance. ADAR1 thus has a novel, pivotal, role in cancer immune resistance. Corroborating with these results, the expression of miR-222 in melanoma tissue specimens was significantly higher in patients who had no clinical benefit from treatment with ipilimumab as compared to patients that responded clinically, suggesting that miR-222 could function as a biomarker for the prediction of response to ipilimumab.These results provide not only novel insights on melanoma immune resistance, but also pave the way to the development of innovative personalized tools to enable optimal drug selection and treatment.

  19. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  20. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-08-18

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis.

  1. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; Laet, Corinne De; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O’Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements. PMID:23001123

  2. Effects of social isolation and re-socialization on cognition and ADAR1 (p110) expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoxin; Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Weizhi; Yu, Deqin; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Yiping; Deng, Wuguo; Tang, Yiyuan

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that social isolation stress could be a key factor that leads to cognitive deficit for both humans and rodent models. However, detailed mechanisms are not yet clear. ADAR1 (Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) is an enzyme involved in RNA editing that has a close relation to cognitive function. We have hypothesized that social isolation stress may impact the expression of ADAR1 in the brain of mice with cognitive deficit. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated the cognition ability of mice isolated for different durations (2, 4, and 8 weeks) using object recognition and object location tests; we also measured ADAR1 expression in hippocampus and cortex using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our study showed that social isolation stress induced spatial and non-spatial cognition deficits of the tested mice. In addition, social isolation significantly increased both the immunoreactivity and protein expression of ADAR1 (p110) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, re-socialization could not only recover the cognition deficits, but also bring ADAR1 (p110) immunoreactivity of hippocampus and frontal cortex, as well as ADAR1 (p110) protein expression of hippocampus back to the normal level for the isolated mice in adolescence. In conclusion, social isolation stress significantly increases ADAR1 (p110) expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the mice with cognitive deficit. This finding may open a window to better understand the reasons (e.g., epigenetic change) that are responsible for social isolation-induced cognitive deficit and help the development of novel therapies for the resulted diseases. PMID:27602277

  3. Effects of social isolation and re-socialization on cognition and ADAR1 (p110) expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; An, Dong; Xu, Hong; Cheng, Xiaoxin; Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Weizhi; Yu, Deqin; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Yiping; Deng, Wuguo; Tang, Yiyuan; Yin, Shengming

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that social isolation stress could be a key factor that leads to cognitive deficit for both humans and rodent models. However, detailed mechanisms are not yet clear. ADAR1 (Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) is an enzyme involved in RNA editing that has a close relation to cognitive function. We have hypothesized that social isolation stress may impact the expression of ADAR1 in the brain of mice with cognitive deficit. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated the cognition ability of mice isolated for different durations (2, 4, and 8 weeks) using object recognition and object location tests; we also measured ADAR1 expression in hippocampus and cortex using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our study showed that social isolation stress induced spatial and non-spatial cognition deficits of the tested mice. In addition, social isolation significantly increased both the immunoreactivity and protein expression of ADAR1 (p110) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, re-socialization could not only recover the cognition deficits, but also bring ADAR1 (p110) immunoreactivity of hippocampus and frontal cortex, as well as ADAR1 (p110) protein expression of hippocampus back to the normal level for the isolated mice in adolescence. In conclusion, social isolation stress significantly increases ADAR1 (p110) expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the mice with cognitive deficit. This finding may open a window to better understand the reasons (e.g., epigenetic change) that are responsible for social isolation-induced cognitive deficit and help the development of novel therapies for the resulted diseases.

  4. Proteolytic dissection of Zab, the Z-DNA-binding domain of human ADAR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, T.; Lowenhaupt, K.; Kim, Y. G.; Li, L.; Brown, B. A. 2nd; Herbert, A.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Zalpha is a peptide motif that binds to Z-DNA with high affinity. This motif binds to alternating dC-dG sequences stabilized in the Z-conformation by means of bromination or supercoiling, but not to B-DNA. Zalpha is part of the N-terminal region of double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase (ADAR1), a candidate enzyme for nuclear pre-mRNA editing in mammals. Zalpha is conserved in ADAR1 from many species; in each case, there is a second similar motif, Zbeta, separated from Zalpha by a more divergent linker. To investigate the structure-function relationship of Zalpha, its domain structure was studied by limited proteolysis. Proteolytic profiles indicated that Zalpha is part of a domain, Zab, of 229 amino acids (residues 133-361 in human ADAR1). This domain contains both Zalpha and Zbeta as well as a tandem repeat of a 49-amino acid linker module. Prolonged proteolysis revealed a minimal core domain of 77 amino acids (positions 133-209), containing only Zalpha, which is sufficient to bind left-handed Z-DNA; however, the substrate binding is strikingly different from that of Zab. The second motif, Zbeta, retains its structural integrity only in the context of Zab and does not bind Z-DNA as a separate entity. These results suggest that Zalpha and Zbeta act as a single bipartite domain. In the presence of substrate DNA, Zab becomes more resistant to proteases, suggesting that it adopts a more rigid structure when bound to its substrate, possibly with conformational changes in parts of the protein.

  5. The role of binding domains for dsRNA and Z-DNA in the in vivo editing of minimal substrates by ADAR1

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Alan; Rich, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    RNA editing changes the read-out of genetic information, increasing the number of different protein products that can be made from a single gene. One form involves the deamination of adenosine to form inosine, which is subsequently translated as guanosine. The reaction requires a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrate and is catalyzed by the adenosine deaminase that act on dsRNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. These enzymes possess dsRNA-binding domains (DRBM) and a catalytic domain. ADAR1 so far has been found only in vertebrates and is characterized by two Z-DNA-binding motifs, the biological function of which remains unknown. Here the role of the various functional domains of ADAR1 in determining the editing efficiency and specificity of ADAR1 is examined in cell-based assays. A variety of dsRNA substrates was tested. It was found that a 15-bp dsRNA stem with a single base mismatch was sufficient for editing. The particular adenosine modified could be varied by changing the position of the mismatch. Editing efficiency could be increased by placing multiple pyrimidines 5′ to the edited adenosine. With longer substrates, editing efficiency also increased and was partly due to the use of DRBMs. Additional editing sites were also observed that clustered on the complementary strand 11–15 bp from the first. An unexpected finding was that the DRBMs are not necessary for the editing of the shorter 15-bp substrates. However, mutation of the Z-DNA-binding domains of ADAR1 decreased the efficiency with which such a substrate was edited. PMID:11593027

  6. Reovirus-mediated induction of ADAR1 (p150) minimally alters RNA editing patterns in discrete brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Jennifer L.; Morabito, Michael V.; Martinez, Charles R.; Gilbert, James A.; Ferrick, Elizabeth A.; Ayers, Gregory D.; Chappell, James D.; Dermody, Terence S.; Emeson, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Transcripts encoding ADAR1, a double-stranded, RNA-specific adenosine deaminase involved in the adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing of mammalian RNAs, can be alternatively spliced to produce an interferon-inducible protein isoform (p150) that is up-regulated in both cell culture and in vivo model systems in response to pathogen or interferon stimulation. In contrast to other tissues, p150 is expressed at extremely low levels in the brain and it is unclear what role, if any, this isoform may play in the innate immune response of the central nervous system (CNS) or whether the extent of editing for RNA substrates critical for CNS function is affected by its induction. To investigate the expression of ADAR1 isoforms in response to viral infection and subsequent alterations in A-to-I editing profiles for endogenous ADAR targets, we used a neuro-tropic strain of reovirus to infect neonatal mice and quantify A-to-I editing in discrete brain regions using a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing strategy. While intracranial injection of reovirus resulted in a widespread increase in the expression of ADAR1 (p150) in multiple brain regions and peripheral organs, significant changes in site-specific A-to-I conversion were quite limited, suggesting that steady-state levels of p150 expression are not a primary determinant for modulating the extent of editing for numerous ADAR targets in vivo. PMID:24906008

  7. The roles of phospholipase C activation and alternative ADAR1 and ADAR2 pre-mRNA splicing in modulating serotonin 2C-receptor editing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schmauss, Claudia; Zimnisky, Ross; Mehta, Mukti; Shapiro, Lauren P.

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR), a Gq-protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptor, exists in multiple isoforms that result from RNA editing of five exonic adenosines that are converted to inosines. In the adult brain, editing of 5-HT2C pre-mRNA exhibits remarkable plasticity in response to environmental and neurochemical stimuli. Here, we investigated two potential mechanisms underlying these plastic changes in adult 5-HT2CR editing phenotypes in vivo: activation of phospholipase C (PLC) and alternative splicing of pre-mRNA encoding the editing enzymes ADAR1 and ADAR2. Studies on two inbred strains of mice (C57Bl/6 and Balb/c) revealed that sustained stimulation of PLC—a downstream effector of activated Gαq protein—increased editing of forebrain neocortical 5-HT2C pre-mRNA at two sites known to be targeted by ADAR2. Moreover, changes in relative expression of the alternatively spliced “a” and “b” mRNA isoforms of ADAR1 and ADAR2 also correlate with changes in 5-HT2CR editing. The site-specific changes in 5-HT2CR editing detected in mice with different “a” over “b” ADAR mRNA isoform ratios only partially overlap with those evoked by sustained PLC activation and are best explained by the increased editing efficiency of ADAR1. Thus, activation of PLC and alternative splicing of ADAR pre-mRNA have both overlapping and specific roles in modulating 5-HT2CR editing phenotypes. PMID:20651031

  8. Ribonuclease L mediates the cell-lethal phenotype of the double-stranded RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 in a human cell line.

    PubMed

    Li, Yize; Banerjee, Shuvojit; Goldstein, Stephen A; Dong, Beihua; Gaughan, Christina; Rath, Sneha; Donovan, Jesse; Korennykh, Alexei V; Silverman, Robert H; Weiss, Susan R

    2017-03-31

    ADAR1 isoforms are adenosine deaminases that edit and destabilize double-stranded RNA reducing its immunostimulatory activities. Mutation of ADAR1 leads to a severe neurodevelopmental and inflammatory disease of children, Aicardi-Goutiéres syndrome. In mice, Adar1 mutations are embryonic lethal but are rescued by mutation of the Mda5 or Mavs genes, which function in IFN induction. However, the specific IFN regulated proteins responsible for the pathogenic effects of ADAR1 mutation are unknown. We show that the cell-lethal phenotype of ADAR1 deletion in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells is rescued by CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis of the RNASEL gene or by expression of the RNase L antagonist, murine coronavirus NS2 accessory protein. Our result demonstrate that ablation of RNase L activity promotes survival of ADAR1 deficient cells even in the presence of MDA5 and MAVS, suggesting that the RNase L system is the primary sensor pathway for endogenous dsRNA that leads to cell death.

  9. Double-stranded-RNA-specific adenosine deaminase 1 (ADAR1) is proposed to contribute to the adaptation of equine infectious anemia virus from horses to donkeys.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Zhang, Xiang; Na, Lei; Wang, Xue-Feng; Fu, Li-Hua; Zhu, Chun-Hui; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a member of the genus Lentivirus of the family Retroviridae. Horses are the most susceptible equids to EIAV infection and are therefore the primary hosts of this virus. In contrast, infected donkeys do not develop clinically active equine infectious anemia (EIA). This phenomenon is similar to what has been observed with HIV-1, which fails to induce AIDS in non-human primates. Interestingly, Shen et al. developed a donkey-tropic pathogenic virus strain (EIAVDV117, DV117) by serially passaging a horse-tropic pathogenic strain, EIAVLN40 (LN40), in donkeys. LN40, which was generated by passaging a field isolate in horses, displayed enhanced virulence in horses but caused no clinical symptoms in donkeys. Infection with DV117 induced acute EIA in nearly 100 % of donkeys. Genomic analysis of DV117 revealed a significantly higher frequency of A-to-G substitutions when compared to LN40. Furthermore, detailed analysis of dinucleotide editing showed that A-to-G mutations had a preference for 5'TpA and 5'ApA. These results strongly implicated the activity of the adenosine deaminase, ADAR1, in this type of mutation. Further investigation demonstrated that overexpression of donkey ADAR1 increased A-to-G mutations within the genome of EIAV. Together with our previous finding that multiple mutations in multiple genes are generated in DV117 during its adaptation from horses to donkeys, the present study suggests that ADAR1-induced A-to-G mutations occur during virus adaption to related new hosts contributing to the alteration of EIAV host tropism.

  10. ADAR1 and PACT contribute to efficient translation of transcripts containing HIV-1 trans-activating response (TAR) element

    PubMed Central

    Chukwurah, Evelyn; Handy, Indhira

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has evolved various measures to counter the host cell's innate antiviral response during the course of infection. Interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene products are produced following HIV-1 infection to limit viral replication, but viral proteins and RNAs counteract their effect. One such mechanism is specifically directed against the IFN-induced Protein Kinase PKR, which is centrally important to the cellular antiviral response. In the presence of viral RNAs, PKR is activated and phosphorylates the translation initiation factor eIF2α. This shuts down the synthesis of both host and viral proteins, allowing the cell to mount an effective antiviral response. PACT (protein activator of PKR) is a cellular protein activator of PKR, primarily functioning to activate PKR in response to cellular stress. Recent studies have indicated that during HIV-1 infection, PACT's normal cellular function is compromised and that PACT is unable to activate PKR. Using various reporter systems and in vitro kinase assays, we establish in this report that interactions between PACT, ADAR1 and HIV-1-encoded Tat protein diminish the activation of PKR in response to HIV-1 infection. Our results highlight an important pathway by which HIV-1 transcripts subvert the host cell's antiviral activities to enhance their translation. PMID:28167698

  11. Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA (ADARs) are both Antiviral and Proviral Dependent upon the Virus

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing, the deamination of adenosine (A) to inosine (I) that occurs in regions of RNA with double-stranded character, is catalyzed by a family of Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA (ADARs). In mammals there are three ADAR genes. Two encode proteins that possess demonstrated deaminase activity: ADAR1, which is interferon-inducible, and ADAR2 which is constitutively expressed. ADAR3, by contrast, has not yet been shown to bean active enzyme. The specificity of the ADAR1 and ADAR2 deaminases ranges from highly site-selective to non-selective, dependent on the duplex structure of the substrate RNA. A-to-I editing is a form of nucleotide substitution editing, because I is decoded as guanosine (G) instead of A by ribosomes during translation and by polymerases during RNA-dependent RNA replication. Additionally, A-to-I editing can alter RNA structure stability as I:U mismatches are less stable than A:U base pairs. Both viral and cellular RNAs are edited by ADARs. A-to-I editing is of broad physiologic significance. Among the outcomes of A-to-I editing are biochemical changes that affect how viruses interact with their hosts, changes that can lead to either enhanced or reduced virus growth and persistence dependent upon the specific virus. PMID:21211811

  12. Probing RNA recognition by human ADAR2 using a high-throughput mutagenesis method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuru; Beal, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deamination is one of the most prevalent post-transcriptional modifications in mRNA. In humans, ADAR1 and ADAR2 catalyze this modification and their malfunction correlates with disease. Recently our laboratory reported crystal structures of the human ADAR2 deaminase domain bound to duplex RNA revealing a protein loop that binds the RNA on the 5′ side of the modification site. This 5′ binding loop appears to be one contributor to substrate specificity differences between ADAR family members. In this study, we endeavored to reveal detailed structure–activity relationships in this loop to advance our understanding of RNA recognition by ADAR2. To achieve this goal, we established a high-throughput mutagenesis approach which allows rapid screening of ADAR variants in single yeast cells and provides quantitative evaluation for enzymatic activity. Using this approach, we determined the importance of specific amino acids at 19 different positions in the ADAR2 5′ binding loop and revealed six residues that provide essential structural elements supporting the fold of the loop and key RNA-binding functional groups. This work provided new insight into RNA recognition by ADAR2 and established a new tool for defining structure–function relationships in ADAR reactions. PMID:27614075

  13. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing mediated by ADARs in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yan-Ru; Qiao, Jun-Jing; Chan, Tim Hon Man; Zhu, Ying-Hui; Li, Fang-Fang; Liu, Haibo; Fei, Jing; Li, Yan; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Leilei

    2014-02-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the major histologic form of esophageal cancer, is a heterogeneous tumor displaying a complex variety of genetic and epigenetic changes. Aberrant RNA editing of adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I), as it is catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR), represents a common posttranscriptional modification in certain human diseases. In this study, we investigated the status and role of ADARs and altered A-to-I RNA editing in ESCC tumorigenesis. Among the three ADAR enzymes expressed in human cells, only ADAR1 was overexpressed in primary ESCC tumors. ADAR1 overexpression was due to gene amplification. Patients with ESCC with tumoral overexpression of ADAR1 displayed a poor prognosis. In vitro and in vivo functional assays established that ADAR1 functions as an oncogene during ESCC progression. Differential expression of ADAR1 resulted in altered gene-specific editing activities, as reflected by hyperediting of FLNB and AZIN1 messages in primary ESCC. Notably, the edited form of AZIN1 conferred a gain-of-function phenotype associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Our findings reveal that altered gene-specific A-to-I editing events mediated by ADAR1 drive the development of ESCC, with potential implications in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of this disease.

  14. Differential Binding of Three Major Human ADAR Isoforms to Coding and Long Non-Coding Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Galipon, Josephine; Ishii, Rintaro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Tomita, Masaru; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2017-01-01

    RNA editing by deamination of adenosine to inosine is an evolutionarily conserved process involved in many cellular pathways, from alternative splicing to miRNA targeting. In humans, it is carried out by no less than three major adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs): ADAR1-p150, ADAR1-p110, and ADAR2. However, the first two derive from alternative splicing, so that it is currently impossible to delete ADAR1-p110 without also knocking out ADAR1-p150 expression. Furthermore, the expression levels of ADARs varies wildly among cell types, and no study has systematically explored the effect of each of these isoforms on the cell transcriptome. In this study, RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP)-sequencing on overexpressed ADAR isoforms tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) shows that each ADAR is associated with a specific set of differentially expressed genes, and that they each bind to distinct set of RNA targets. Our results show a good overlap with known edited transcripts, establishing RIP-seq as a valid method for the investigation of RNA editing biology. PMID:28208661

  15. Tad1p, a yeast tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase, is related to the mammalian pre-mRNA editing enzymes ADAR1 and ADAR2.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, A; Grosjean, H; Melcher, T; Keller, W

    1998-01-01

    We have identified an RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (termed Tad1p/scADAT1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that selectively converts adenosine at position 37 of eukaryotic tRNAAla to inosine. The activity of purified recombinant Tad1p depends on the conformation of its tRNA substrate and the enzyme was found to be inactive on all other types of RNA tested. Mutant strains in which the TAD1 gene is disrupted are viable but lack Tad1p enzyme activity and their tRNAAla is not modified at position A37. Transformation of the mutant cells with the TAD1 gene restored enzyme activity. Tad1p has significant sequence similarity with the mammalian editing enzymes which act on specific precursor-mRNAs and on long double-stranded RNA. These findings suggest an evolutionary link between pre-mRNA editing and tRNA modification. PMID:9707437

  16. Effects of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome mutations predicted from ADAR-RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew J; Beal, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine (A) to inosine (I) RNA editing is important for life in metazoan organisms. Dysregulation or mutations that compromise the efficacy of A to I editing results in neurological disorders and a shorten life span. These reactions are catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs), which hydrolytically deaminate adenosines in regions of duplex RNA. Because inosine mimics guanosine in hydrogen bonding, this prolific RNA editing alters the sequence and structural information in the RNA landscape. Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a severe childhood autoimmune disease that is one of a broader set of inherited disorders characterized by constitutive upregulation of type I interferon (IFN) referred to as type I interferonopathies. AGS is caused by mutations in multiple genes whose protein products, including ADAR1, are all involved in nucleic acid metabolism or sensing. The recent crystal structures of human ADAR2 deaminase domain complexed with duplex RNA substrates enabled modeling of how AGS causing mutations may influence RNA binding and catalysis. The mutations can be broadly characterized into three groups; mutations on RNA-binding loops that directly affect RNA binding, "second-layer" mutations that can alter the disposition of RNA-binding loops, and mutations that can alter the position of an α-helix bearing an essential catalytic residue.

  17. Spatio-temporal profiling of Filamin A RNA-editing reveals ADAR preferences and high editing levels outside neuronal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Stulić, Maja; Jantsch, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    RNA editing by ADARs can change the coding potential of protein-coding mRNAs. So far, this type of RNA editing has mainly been shown to affect RNAs expressed in the nervous system with much lower editing levels being observed in other tissues. The actin crosslinking proteins filamin α and filamin β are widely expressed in most tissues. The mRNAs encoding either protein are edited at the same position leading to a conserved Q to R exchange in both proteins. Using bar-coded next generation sequencing, we show that editing of filamin α is most abundant in the gastrointestinal tract and only to a lesser extent in the nervous system. Using knockout mice, we show that ADARB1 (ADAR2) is responsible for the majority of FLNA editing, while ADAR1 can edit filamin α mRNA in some tissues quite efficiently. Interestingly, editing levels of filamin α and β do not follow the same trend across tissues, suggesting a substrate-specific regulation of editing. PMID:24025532

  18. ADAR proteins: double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We review here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the dsRNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

  19. Splicing variants of ADAR2 and ADAR2-mediated RNA editing in glioma.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Zhao, Xingli; Li, Zhaohui; Wei, Jun; Tian, Yu

    2016-08-01

    The roles of alternative splicing and RNA editing in gene regulation and transcriptome diversity are well documented. Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are responsible for adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing and exemplify the complex association between RNA editing and alternative splicing. The self-editing activity of ADAR2, which acts on its own pre-mRNA, leads to its alternative splicing. Alternative splicing occurs independently at nine splicing sites on ADAR2 pre-mRNA, generating numerous alternative splicing variants with various catalytic activities. A-to-I RNA editing is important in a range of physiological processes in humans and is associated with several diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, mood disorders, epilepsy and glioma. Reduced editing at the glutamine/arginine site of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 in glioma, without any alteration in ADAR2 expression, is a notable phenomenon. Several studies have tried to explain this alteration in the catalytic activity of ADAR2; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present review summarizes the relevant literature and shares experimental results concerning ADAR2 alternative splicing. In particular, the present review demonstrates that shifts in the relative abundance of the active and inactive splicing variants of ADAR2 may reduce the ADAR2 editing activity in glioma. Dominant expression of ADAR2 splicing variant with low enzyme activity causes reduced RNA editing of GluA2 subunit at the glutamine/arginine site in glioma.

  20. Tuning of RNA editing by ADAR is required in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Liam P; Brindle, James; Gallo, Angela; Leroy, Anne; Reenan, Robert A; O'Connell, Mary A

    2005-01-01

    RNA editing increases during development in more than 20 transcripts encoding proteins involved in rapid synaptic neurotransmission in Drosophila central nervous system and muscle. Adar (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) mutant flies expressing only genome-encoded, unedited isoforms of ion-channel subunits are viable but show severe locomotion defects. The Adar transcript itself is edited in adult wild-type flies to generate an isoform with a serine to glycine substitution close to the ADAR active site. We show that editing restricts ADAR function since the edited isoform of ADAR is less active in vitro and in vivo than the genome-encoded, unedited isoform. Ubiquitous expression in embryos and larvae of an Adar transcript that is resistant to editing is lethal. Expression of this transcript in embryonic muscle is also lethal, with above-normal, adult-like levels of editing at sites in a transcript encoding a muscle voltage-gated calcium channel. PMID:15920480

  1. Postspreading rifting in the Adare Basin, Antarctica: Regional tectonic consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, R.; Cande, S. C.; Stock, J. M.; Davey, F. J.; Clayton, R. W.

    2010-08-01

    Extension during the middle Cenozoic (43-26 Ma) in the north end of the West Antarctic rift system (WARS) is well constrained by seafloor magnetic anomalies formed at the extinct Adare spreading axis. Kinematic solutions for this time interval suggest a southward decrease in relative motion between East and West Antarctica. Here we present multichannel seismic reflection and seafloor mapping data acquired within and near the Adare Basin on a recent geophysical cruise. We have traced the ANTOSTRAT seismic stratigraphic framework from the northwest Ross Sea into the Adare Basin, verified and tied to DSDP drill sites 273 and 274. Our results reveal three distinct periods of tectonic activity. An early localized deformational event took place close to the cessation of seafloor spreading in the Adare Basin (˜24 Ma). It reactivated a few normal faults and initiated the formation of the Adare Trough. A prominent pulse of rifting in the early Miocene (˜17 Ma) resulted in normal faulting that initiated tilted blocks. The overall trend of structures was NE-SW, linking the event with the activity outside the basin. It resulted in major uplift of the Adare Trough and marks the last extensional phase of the Adare Basin. Recent volcanic vents (Pliocene to present day) tend to align with the early Miocene structures and the on-land Hallett volcanic province. This latest phase of tectonic activity also involves near-vertical normal faulting (still active in places) with negligible horizontal consequences. The early Miocene extensional event found within the Adare Basin does not require a change in the relative motion between East and West Antarctica. However, the lack of subsequent rifting within the Adare Basin coupled with the formation of the Terror Rift and an on-land and subice extension within the WARS require a pronounced change in the kinematics of the rift. These observations indicate that extension increased southward, therefore suggesting that a major change in

  2. New Insights into the Biological Role of Mammalian ADARs; the RNA Editing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, Niamh; Arieti, Fabiana; Gallo, Angela; Keegan, Liam P.; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    The ADAR proteins deaminate adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA which is one of the most abundant modifications present in mammalian RNA. Inosine can have a profound effect on the RNAs that are edited, not only changing the base-pairing properties, but can also result in recoding, as inosine behaves as if it were guanosine. In mammals there are three ADAR proteins and two ADAR-related proteins (ADAD) expressed. All have a very similar modular structure; however, both their expression and biological function differ significantly. Only two of the ADAR proteins have enzymatic activity. However, both ADAR and ADAD proteins possess the ability to bind double-strand RNA. Mutations in ADARs have been associated with many diseases ranging from cancer, innate immunity to neurological disorders. Here, we will discuss in detail the domain structure of mammalian ADARs, the effects of RNA editing, and the role of ADARs in human diseases. PMID:26437436

  3. RNA editing enzyme adenosine deaminase is a restriction factor for controlling measles virus replication that also is required for embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Simone V.; George, Cyril X.; Welch, Megan J.; Liou, Li-Ying; Hahm, Bumsuk; Lewicki, Hanna; de la Torre, Juan C.; Samuel, Charles E.; Oldstone, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Measles virus (MV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae and an exclusively human pathogen, is among the most infectious viruses. A progressive fatal neurodegenerative complication, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), occurs during persistent MV infection of the CNS and is associated with biased hypermutations of the viral genome. The observed hypermutations of A-to-G are consistent with conversions catalyzed by the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR1). To evaluate the role of ADAR1 in MV infection, we selectively disrupted expression of the IFN-inducible p150 ADAR1 isoform and found it caused embryonic lethality at embryo day (E) 11–E12. We therefore generated p150-deficient and WT mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells stably expressing the MV receptor signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM or CD150). The p150−/− but not WT MEF cells displayed extensive syncytium formation and cytopathic effect (CPE) following infection with MV, consistent with an anti-MV role of the p150 isoform of ADAR1. MV titers were 3 to 4 log higher in p150−/− cells compared with WT cells at 21 h postinfection, and restoration of ADAR1 in p150−/− cells prevented MV cytopathology. In contrast to infection with MV, p150 disruption had no effect on vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus replication but protected against CPE resulting from infection with Newcastle disease virus, Sendai virus, canine distemper virus, and influenza A virus. Thus, ADAR1 is a restriction factor in the replication of paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses. PMID:21173229

  4. How do ADARs bind RNA? New protein-RNA structures illuminate substrate recognition by the RNA editing ADARs.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Justin M; Beal, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Deamination of adenosine in RNA to form inosine has wide ranging consequences on RNA function including amino acid substitution to give proteins not encoded in the genome. What determines which adenosines in an mRNA are subject to this modification reaction? The answer lies in an understanding of the mechanism and substrate recognition properties of adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs). Our recent publication of X-ray crystal structures of the human ADAR2 deaminase domain bound to RNA editing substrates shed considerable light on how the catalytic domains of these enzymes bind RNA and promote adenosine deamination. Here we review in detail the deaminase domain-RNA contact surfaces and present models of how full length ADARs, bearing double stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) and deaminase domains, could process naturally occurring substrate RNAs.

  5. The ADAR RNA editing enzyme controls neuronal excitability in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianghua; Overton, Ian M.; Baines, Richard A.; Keegan, Liam P.; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA editing by deamination of specific adenosine bases to inosines during pre-mRNA processing generates edited isoforms of proteins. Recoding RNA editing is more widespread in Drosophila than in vertebrates. Editing levels rise strongly at metamorphosis, and Adar5G1 null mutant flies lack editing events in hundreds of CNS transcripts; mutant flies have reduced viability, severely defective locomotion and age-dependent neurodegeneration. On the other hand, overexpressing an adult dADAR isoform with high enzymatic activity ubiquitously during larval and pupal stages is lethal. Advantage was taken of this to screen for genetic modifiers; Adar overexpression lethality is rescued by reduced dosage of the Rdl (Resistant to dieldrin), gene encoding a subunit of inhibitory GABA receptors. Reduced dosage of the Gad1 gene encoding the GABA synthetase also rescues Adar overexpression lethality. Drosophila Adar5G1 mutant phenotypes are ameliorated by feeding GABA modulators. We demonstrate that neuronal excitability is linked to dADAR expression levels in individual neurons; Adar-overexpressing larval motor neurons show reduced excitability whereas Adar5G1 null mutant or targeted Adar knockdown motor neurons exhibit increased excitability. GABA inhibitory signalling is impaired in human epileptic and autistic conditions, and vertebrate ADARs may have a relevant evolutionarily conserved control over neuronal excitability. PMID:24137011

  6. ADAR2-mediated editing of miR-214 and miR-122 precursor and antisense RNA transcripts in liver cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Hsin; Chen, Chao-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Li, Chiao-Ling; Wu, Yi-Jinn; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei

    2013-01-01

    A growing list of microRNAs (miRNAs) show aberrant expression patterns in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the regulatory mechanisms largely remain unclear. RNA editing catalyzed by members of the adenosine deaminase acting on the RNA (ADAR) family could target the miRNA precursors and affect the biogenesis process. Therefore, we investigate whether RNA editing could be one mechanism contributing to the deregulation of specific miRNAs in HCC. By overexpression of individual ADARs in hepatoma cells, RNA editing on the precursors of 16 miRNAs frequently deregulated in HCC was screened by a sensitive high-resolution melting platform. The results identified RNA precursors of miR-214 and miR-122 as potential targets edited by ADAR2. A subset of HCC showing elevated ADAR2 verified the major editings identified in ARAR2 overexpressed hepatoma cells, either with A-to-I or U-to-C changes. The unusual U-to-C editing at specific residues was demonstrated as being attributed to the A-to-I editing on the RNA transcripts complementary to the pri-miRNAs. The editing event caused a decrease of the RNA transcript complementary to pri-miR-214, which led to the decrease of pri-miR-214 and miR-214 and resulted in the increased protein level of its novel target gene Rab15. In conclusion, the current study discovered ADAR2-mediated editing of the complementary antisense transcripts as a novel mechanism for regulating the biogenesis of specific miRNAs during hepatocarcinogenesis.

  7. Cape Adare - A sentinel for change in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. S.; Cary, C.; Cummings, V.; Hawes, I.; Hong, S. G.; Coleman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Cape Adare stretches some 40km beyond the Antarctic Continent across the Continental Shelf. It is flanked to the east by the northern Ross Sea and to the West by Robertson Bay. The following characteristics make it an ideal monitoring and observation point to understand the impact of warm ocean and climate propogating into Antarctica from the Southern Ocean: 1) Robertson Bay is some 500m deep and has the potential to record deep water inflow which is predicted as climate warms and is also indicated as the biggest risk for melting Antarctic ice shelves. 2) Cape Adare also lies between the Antarctic continental high pressure and the Southern Ocean low pressure 3) Ridley Beach at the tip of the Peninsula is home to Antarctica's largest Adelie Penguin Colony In November 2015 we will conduct a pilot survey of the marine and terrestrial ecology and physical setting, with a view to determining what opportunities exist for a long term monitoring system. Cape Adare and the Ridley Beach Penguin Colony also offers the advantage of being on the edge of the proposed Ross Sea marine protected area and may represent an opportunity to monitor the associated ecosystem.

  8. Fmrp Interacts with Adar and Regulates RNA Editing, Synaptic Density and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Porath, Hagit T.; Barak, Michal; Pinto, Yishay; Wachtel, Chaim; Zilberberg, Alona; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Efroni, Sol; Levanon, Erez Y.; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most frequent inherited form of mental retardation. The cause for this X-linked disorder is the silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (fmr1) gene and the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (Fmrp). The RNA-binding protein Fmrp represses protein translation, particularly in synapses. In Drosophila, Fmrp interacts with the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (Adar) enzymes. Adar enzymes convert adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) and modify the sequence of RNA transcripts. Utilizing the fmr1 zebrafish mutant (fmr1-/-), we studied Fmrp-dependent neuronal circuit formation, behavior, and Adar-mediated RNA editing. By combining behavior analyses and live imaging of single axons and synapses, we showed hyperlocomotor activity, as well as increased axonal branching and synaptic density, in fmr1-/- larvae. We identified thousands of clustered RNA editing sites in the zebrafish transcriptome and showed that Fmrp biochemically interacts with the Adar2a protein. The expression levels of the adar genes and Adar2 protein increased in fmr1-/- zebrafish. Microfluidic-based multiplex PCR coupled with deep sequencing showed a mild increase in A-to-I RNA editing levels in evolutionarily conserved neuronal and synaptic Adar-targets in fmr1-/- larvae. These findings suggest that loss of Fmrp results in increased Adar-mediated RNA editing activity on target-specific RNAs, which, in turn, might alter neuronal circuit formation and behavior in FXS. PMID:26637167

  9. Magnetic anomalies northeast of Cape Adare, northern Victoria Land (Antarctica), and their relation to onshore structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Damaske, D.; Läufer, A.L.; Goldmann, F.; Möller, H.-D.; Lisker, F.

    2007-01-01

    An aeromagnetic survey was flown over the offshore region northeast of Cape Adare and the magnetic anomalies compared to onshore structures between Pennell Coast and Tucker Glacier. The magnetic anomalies show two nearly orthogonal major trends. NNW-SSE trending anomalies northeast of Cape Adare represent seafloor spreading within the Adare Trough. A connection of these anomalies to the Northern Basin of the Ross Sea is not clear. Onshore faults are closely aligned to offshore anomalies. Main trends are NW-SE to NNW-SSE and NE-SW to NNESSW. NNW-SSE oriented dextral-transtensional to extensional faults parallel the Adare Peninsula and Adare Trough anomalies. NE-SW trending normal faults appear to segment the main Hallett volcanic bodies.

  10. Hyperactive hypothalamus, motivated and non-distractible chronic overeating in ADAR2 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Akubuiro, A; Bridget Zimmerman, M; Boles Ponto, L L; Walsh, S A; Sunderland, J; McCormick, L; Singh, M

    2013-04-01

    ADAR2 transgenic mice misexpressing the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 (Adenosine Deaminase that act on RNA) show characteristics of overeating and experience adult onset obesity. Behavioral patterns and brain changes related to a possible addictive overeating in these transgenic mice were explored as transgenic mice display chronic hyperphagia. ADAR2 transgenic mice were assessed in their food preference and motivation to overeat in a competing reward environment with ad lib access to a running wheel and food. Metabolic activity of brain and peripheral tissue were assessed with [(18) F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and RNA expression of feeding related genes, ADAR2, dopamine and opiate receptors from the hypothalamus and striatum were examined. The results indicate that ADAR2 transgenic mice exhibit, (1) a food preference for diets with higher fat content, (2) significantly increased food intake that is non-distractible in a competing reward environment, (3) significantly increased messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of ADAR2, serotonin 2C receptor (5HT2C R), D1, D2 and mu opioid receptors and no change in corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNAs and significantly reduced ADAR2 protein expression in the hypothalamus, (4) significantly increased D1 receptor and altered bioamines with no change in ADAR2, mu opioid and D2 receptor mRNA expression in the striatum and (5) significantly greater glucose metabolism in the hypothalamus, brain stem, right hippocampus, left and right mid brain regions and suprascapular peripheral tissue than controls. These results suggest that highly motivated and goal-oriented overeating behaviors of ADAR2 transgenic mice are associated with altered feeding, reward-related mRNAs and hyperactive brain mesolimbic region.

  11. Affect-related behaviors in mice misexpressing the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2.

    PubMed

    Singh, Minati; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2009-06-22

    Misediting of the serotonin (5HT) 2C receptor (5HT(2C)R) has been implicated in both depression and anxiety. The adenosine deaminases that act on double stranded RNAs (ADARs) are reported to modify the 5HT(2C)R by RNA editing. Transgenic mice misexpressing the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 show an adult onset obese phenotype due to chronic hyperphagia, but little more than this is known about the behavior of these animals. The present experiments examined whether affect-associated behaviors are also altered in ADAR2 transgenic mice. Age- and weight-matched transgenic mice misexpressing ADAR2 were tested for signs of behavioral despair with the forced swim (FST) and tail suspension (TST) tests, and for anxiety by evaluating spontaneous exploration in a novel environment and by elevated plus maze performance. Plasma corticosterone was also determined by radioimmunoassay. Transgenic mice of both sexes displayed indications of increased behavioral despair on first exposures to the TST and the FST. Behavioral despair persisted in ADAR2 mice in that it was also observed in the FST in tests administered 24 h and 1 week following the initial TST and FST. ADAR2 transgenic mice also displayed behaviors associated with anxiety as indicated by decreased entry into the open arms in an elevated plus maze test. Both sexes of ADAR2 transgenic mice displayed elevated plasma corticosterone. Taken together, the results suggest that ADAR2 transgenic mice represent a novel rodent model of endogenous behavioral despair and anxiety accompanied by elevated hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis activity.

  12. Large-scale overexpression and purification of ADARs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae for biophysical and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Mark R; Bass, Brenda L

    2007-01-01

    Many biochemical and biophysical analyses of enzymes require quantities of protein that are difficult to obtain from expression in an endogenous system. To further complicate matters, native adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) are expressed at very low levels, and overexpression of active protein has been unsuccessful in common bacterial systems. Here we describe the plasmid construction, expression, and purification procedures for ADARs overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ADAR expression is controlled by the Gal promoter, which allows for rapid induction of transcription when the yeast are grown in media containing galactose. The ADAR is translated with an N-terminal histidine tag that is cleaved by the tobacco etch virus protease, generating one nonnative glycine residue at the N-terminus of the ADAR protein. ADARs expressed using this system can be purified to homogeneity, are highly active in deaminating RNA, and are produced in quantities (from 3 to 10mg of pure protein per liter of yeast culture) that are sufficient for most biophysical studies.

  13. Altered Intracellular Milieu of ADAR2-Deficient Motor Neurons in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takenari; Akamatsu, Megumi; Kwak, Shin

    2017-02-08

    Transactive response DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) pathology, and failure of A-to-I conversion (RNA editing) at the glutamine/arginine (Q/R) site of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA2, are etiology-linked molecular abnormalities that concomitantly occur in the motor neurons of most patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2) specifically catalyzes GluA2 Q/R site-RNA editing. Furthermore, conditional ADAR2 knockout mice (AR2) exhibit a progressive ALS phenotype with TDP-43 pathology in the motor neurons, which is the most reliable pathological marker of ALS. Therefore, the evidence indicates that ADAR2 downregulation is a causative factor in ALS, and AR2 mice exhibit causative molecular changes that occur in ALS. We discuss the contributors to ADAR2 downregulation and TDP-43 pathology in AR2 mouse motor neurons. We describe mechanisms of exaggerated Ca(2+) influx amelioration via AMPA receptors, which is neuroprotective in ADAR2-deficient motor neurons with normalization of TDP-43 pathology in AR2 mice. Development of drugs to treat diseases requires appropriate animal models and a sensitive method of evaluating efficacy. Therefore, normalization of disrupted intracellular environments resulting from ADAR2 downregulation may be a therapeutic target for ALS. We discuss the development of targeted therapy for ALS using the AR2 mouse model.

  14. Modulation of dADAR-dependent RNA editing by the Drosophila fragile X mental retardation protein.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Balpreet; Jepson, James E; Savva, Yiannis A; Pepper, Anita S-R; Reenan, Robert A; Jongens, Thomas A

    2011-10-30

    Loss of FMR1 gene function results in fragile X syndrome, the most common heritable form of intellectual disability. The protein encoded by this locus (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that is thought to primarily act as a translational regulator; however, recent studies have implicated FMRP in other mechanisms of gene regulation. We found that the Drosophila fragile X homolog (dFMR1) biochemically interacted with the adenosine-to-inosine RNA-editing enzyme dADAR. Adar and Fmr1 mutant larvae exhibited distinct morphological neuromuscular junction (NMJ) defects. Epistasis experiments based on these phenotypic differences revealed that Adar acts downstream of Fmr1 and that dFMR1 modulates dADAR activity. Furthermore, sequence analyses revealed that a loss or overexpression of dFMR1 affects editing efficiency on certain dADAR targets with defined roles in synaptic transmission. These results link dFMR1 with the RNA-editing pathway and suggest that proper NMJ synaptic architecture requires modulation of dADAR activity by dFMR1.

  15. Altered Intracellular Milieu of ADAR2-Deficient Motor Neurons in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Takenari; Akamatsu, Megumi; Kwak, Shin

    2017-01-01

    Transactive response DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) pathology, and failure of A-to-I conversion (RNA editing) at the glutamine/arginine (Q/R) site of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA2, are etiology-linked molecular abnormalities that concomitantly occur in the motor neurons of most patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2) specifically catalyzes GluA2 Q/R site-RNA editing. Furthermore, conditional ADAR2 knockout mice (AR2) exhibit a progressive ALS phenotype with TDP-43 pathology in the motor neurons, which is the most reliable pathological marker of ALS. Therefore, the evidence indicates that ADAR2 downregulation is a causative factor in ALS, and AR2 mice exhibit causative molecular changes that occur in ALS. We discuss the contributors to ADAR2 downregulation and TDP-43 pathology in AR2 mouse motor neurons. We describe mechanisms of exaggerated Ca2+ influx amelioration via AMPA receptors, which is neuroprotective in ADAR2-deficient motor neurons with normalization of TDP-43 pathology in AR2 mice. Development of drugs to treat diseases requires appropriate animal models and a sensitive method of evaluating efficacy. Therefore, normalization of disrupted intracellular environments resulting from ADAR2 downregulation may be a therapeutic target for ALS. We discuss the development of targeted therapy for ALS using the AR2 mouse model. PMID:28208729

  16. Aberrant alternative splicing pattern of ADAR2 downregulates adenosine-to-inosine editing in glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Yu; Tian, Nan; Zhao, Xingli; Du, Chao; Han, Liang; Zhang, Haishan

    2015-06-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is the most common type of RNA editing in mammals, and is catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). ADAR2 is the main enzyme responsible for A-to-I editing in humans, and A-to-I underediting at the glutamine (Q)/arginine (R) site of the glutamate receptor subunit B (GluR-B) is associated with the pathogenesis and invasiveness of glioma. The level of ADAR2 mRNA expression and the alternative splicing of the ADAR2 pre-mRNA both affect the catalytic activity of ADAR2. However, reports of ADAR2 mRNA expression in glioma are inconsistent. The mechanism regulating ADAR2 pre-mRNA splicing is also unknown. In this study, we explored the deregulation of A-to-I RNA editing in glioma. We confirmed the underediting at the Q/R site of GluR-B mRNA in the glioma cell lines U87, U251 and A172 compared with that in normal human astrocytes (NHAs) HA1800. However, we demonstrated with reverse transcription (RT-PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) that the expression of ADAR2 mRNA was not significantly altered in the glioma cell lines. Three alternative splicing sites are utilized in the glioma cell lines and NHAs: the first, located between exons -1 and 1, causes the inclusion of exon 1a; the second causes the removal of exon 2, which encodes two double-stranded RNA-binding domains; and the third, located between exons 4 and 6, causes the inclusion of alternative exon 5a, introducing a 120-nucleotide coding Alu-repeat sequence in frame. However, the expression ratio of two types of transcripts (with and without exon 5a) was altered in the glioma cells. Transcripts with exon 5a, which generate an ADAR2 isoform with ~50% reduced activity, were predominantly expressed in the glioma cell lines, whereas transcripts without exon 5a were predominantly expressed in the NHAs. From these results, we conclude that this aberrant alternative splicing pattern of ADAR2 downregulates A-to-I editing in glioma.

  17. RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 is a mediator of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hitoshi; Matsumura, Shinji; Okada, Shunpei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Minami, Toshiaki; Ito, Seiji

    2017-01-26

    Transcriptional and post-translational regulations are important in peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, but little is known about the role of post-transcriptional modification. Our objective was to determine the possible effect of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, which catalyze post-transcriptional RNA editing, in tactile allodynia, a hallmark of neuropathic pain. Seven days after L5 spinal nerve transection (SNT) in adult mice, we found an increase in ADAR2 expression and a decrease in ADAR3 expression in the injured, but not in the uninjured, dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). These changes were accompanied by elevated levels of editing at the D site of the serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR), at the I/V site of coatomer protein complex subunit α (COPA), and at the R/G site of AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 in the injured DRG. Compared to Adar2(+/+)/Gria2(R/R) littermate controls, Adar2(-/-)/Gria2(R/R) mice completely lacked the increased editing of 5-HT2CR, COPA, and GluA2 transcripts in the injured DRG and showed attenuated tactile allodynia after SNT. Furthermore, the antidepressant fluoxetine inhibited neuropathic allodynia after injury and reduced the COPA I/V site editing in the injured DRG. These findings suggest that ADAR2 is a mediator of injury-induced tactile allodynia and thus a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of neuropathic pain.-Uchida, H., Matsumura, S., Okada, S., Suzuki, T., Minami, T., Ito, S. RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 is a mediator of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

  18. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing controls cathepsin S expression in atherosclerosis by enabling HuR-mediated post-transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Stellos, Konstantinos; Gatsiou, Aikaterini; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon; Perisic Matic, Ljubica; John, David; Lunella, Federica Francesca; Jaé, Nicolas; Rossbach, Oliver; Amrhein, Carolin; Sigala, Frangiska; Boon, Reinier A; Fürtig, Boris; Manavski, Yosif; You, Xintian; Uchida, Shizuka; Keller, Till; Boeckel, Jes-Niels; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Maegdefessel, Lars; Chen, Wei; Schwalbe, Harald; Bindereif, Albrecht; Eriksson, Per; Hedin, Ulf; Zeiher, Andreas M; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, which is catalyzed by a family of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, is important in the epitranscriptomic regulation of RNA metabolism. However, the role of A-to-I RNA editing in vascular disease is unknown. Here we show that cathepsin S mRNA (CTSS), which encodes a cysteine protease associated with angiogenesis and atherosclerosis, is highly edited in human endothelial cells. The 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the CTSS transcript contains two inverted repeats, the AluJo and AluSx(+) regions, which form a long stem-loop structure that is recognized by ADAR1 as a substrate for editing. RNA editing enables the recruitment of the stabilizing RNA-binding protein human antigen R (HuR; encoded by ELAVL1) to the 3' UTR of the CTSS transcript, thereby controlling CTSS mRNA stability and expression. In endothelial cells, ADAR1 overexpression or treatment of cells with hypoxia or with the inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ and tumor-necrosis-factor-α induces CTSS RNA editing and consequently increases cathepsin S expression. ADAR1 levels and the extent of CTSS RNA editing are associated with changes in cathepsin S levels in patients with atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including subclinical atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, aortic aneurysms and advanced carotid atherosclerotic disease. These results reveal a previously unrecognized role of RNA editing in gene expression in human atherosclerotic vascular diseases.

  19. Functions and Regulation of RNA Editing by ADAR Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    One type of RNA editing converts adenosines to inosines (A→I editing) in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. A→I RNA editing is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes. A→I RNA editing of protein-coding sequences of a limited number of mammalian genes results in recoding and subsequent alterations of their functions. However, A→I RNA editing most frequently targets repetitive RNA sequences located within introns and 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Although the biological significance of noncoding RNA editing remains largely unknown, several possibilities, including its role in the control of endogenous short interfering RNAs (esiRNAs), have been proposed. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the biogenesis and functions of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) are regulated by the editing of their precursors. Here, I review the recent findings that indicate new functions for A→I editing in the regulation of noncoding RNAs and for interactions between RNA editing and RNA interference mechanisms. PMID:20192758

  20. Global regulation of alternative splicing by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR).

    PubMed

    Solomon, Oz; Oren, Shirley; Safran, Michal; Deshet-Unger, Naamit; Akiva, Pinchas; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Cesarkas, Karen; Kabesa, Reut; Amariglio, Ninette; Unger, Ron; Rechavi, Gideon; Eyal, Eran

    2013-05-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a major mechanism for gene regulation and transcriptome diversity. Despite the extent of the phenomenon, the regulation and specificity of the splicing machinery are only partially understood. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing of pre-mRNA by ADAR enzymes has been linked to splicing regulation in several cases. Here we used bioinformatics approaches, RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray of ADAR knockdown cells to globally examine how ADAR and its A-to-I RNA editing activity influence alternative mRNA splicing. Although A-to-I RNA editing only rarely targets canonical splicing acceptor, donor, and branch sites, it was found to affect splicing regulatory elements (SREs) within exons. Cassette exons were found to be significantly enriched with A-to-I RNA editing sites compared with constitutive exons. RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray revealed that ADAR knockdown in hepatocarcinoma and myelogenous leukemia cell lines leads to global changes in gene expression, with hundreds of genes changing their splicing patterns in both cell lines. This global change in splicing pattern cannot be explained by putative editing sites alone. Genes showing significant changes in their splicing pattern are frequently involved in RNA processing and splicing activity. Analysis of recently published RNA-seq data from glioblastoma cell lines showed similar results. Our global analysis reveals that ADAR plays a major role in splicing regulation. Although direct editing of the splicing motifs does occur, we suggest it is not likely to be the primary mechanism for ADAR-mediated regulation of alternative splicing. Rather, this regulation is achieved by modulating trans-acting factors involved in the splicing machinery.

  1. Deep crustal structure of the Adare and Northern Basins, Ross Sea, Antarctica, from sonobuoy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.; Stock, J. M.; Clayton, R. W.; Cande, S.; Granot, R.

    2014-11-01

    Extension associated with ultraslow seafloor spreading within the Adare Basin, in oceanic crust just north of the continental shelf in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, extended south into the Northern Basin. Magnetic and gravity anomaly data suggest continuity of crustal structure across the continental shelf break that separates the Adare and Northern Basins. We use sonobuoy refraction data and multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected during research cruise NBP0701, including 71 new sonobuoy records, to provide constraints on crustal structure in the Adare and Northern Basins. Adjacent 1D sonobuoy profiles along several MCS lines reveal deep crustal structure in the vicinity of the continental shelf break, and agree with additional sonobuoy data that document fast crustal velocities (6000-8000 m/s) at shallow depths (1-6 km below sea level) from the Adare Basin to the continental shelf, a structure consistent with that of other ultraslow-spread crust. Our determination of crustal structure in the Northern Basin only extends through sedimentary rock to the basement rock, and so cannot help to distinguish between different hypotheses for formation of the basin.

  2. Positive correlation between ADAR expression and its targets suggests a complex regulation mediated by RNA editing in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Liscovitch, Noa; Bazak, Lily; Levanon, Erez Y; Chechik, Gal

    2014-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA is a post-transcriptional modification that is crucial for normal life and development in vertebrates. RNA editing has been shown to be very abundant in the human transcriptome, specifically at the primate-specific Alu elements. The functional role of this wide-spread effect is still not clear; it is believed that editing of transcripts is a mechanism for their down-regulation via processes such as nuclear retention or RNA degradation. Here we combine 2 neural gene expression datasets with genome-level editing information to examine the relation between the expression of ADAR genes with the expression of their target genes. Specifically, we computed the spatial correlation across structures of post-mortem human brains between ADAR and a large set of targets that were found to be edited in their Alu repeats. Surprisingly, we found that a large fraction of the edited genes are positively correlated with ADAR, opposing the assumption that editing would reduce expression. When considering the correlations between ADAR and its targets over development, 2 gene subsets emerge, positively correlated and negatively correlated with ADAR expression. Specifically, in embryonic time points, ADAR is positively correlated with many genes related to RNA processing and regulation of gene expression. These findings imply that the suggested mechanism of regulation of expression by editing is probably not a global one; ADAR expression does not have a genome wide effect reducing the expression of editing targets. It is possible, however, that RNA editing by ADAR in non-coding regions of the gene might be a part of a more complex expression regulation mechanism.

  3. Inositol hexakisphosphate is bound in the ADAR2 core and required for RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Mark R; Schubert, Heidi L; Vandemark, Andrew P; Lingam, Arunth T; Hill, Christopher P; Bass, Brenda L

    2005-09-02

    We report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human ADAR2, an RNA editing enzyme, at 1.7 angstrom resolution. The structure reveals a zinc ion in the active site and suggests how the substrate adenosine is recognized. Unexpectedly, inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) is buried within the enzyme core, contributing to the protein fold. Although there are no reports that adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) require a cofactor, we show that IP6 is required for activity. Amino acids that coordinate IP6 in the crystal structure are conserved in some adenosine deaminases that act on transfer RNA (tRNA) (ADATs), related enzymes that edit tRNA. Indeed, IP6 is also essential for in vivo and in vitro deamination of adenosine 37 of tRNAala by ADAT1.

  4. Basal Adare volcanics, Robertson Bay, North Victoria Land, Antarctica: Late Miocene intraplate basalts of subaqueous origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mortimer, N.; Dunlap, W.J.; Isaac, M.J.; Sutherland, R.P.; Faure, K.

    2007-01-01

    Late Cenozoic lavas and associated hyaloclastite breccias of the Adare volcanics (Hallett volcanic province) in Robertson Bay, North Victoria Land rest unconformably on Paleozoic greywackes. Abundant hyaloclastite breccias are confined to a paleovalley; their primary geological features, and the stable isotope ratios of secondary minerals, are consistent with eruption in a subaqueous environment with calcite formation probably involving seawater. In contrast, the lavas which stratigraphically overlie the hyaloclastites on Mayr Spur probably were erupted subaerially. K-Ar dating of eight samples from this basal sequence confirms the known older age limit (Late Miocene) of the Hallett volcanic province. Geochemical data reveal an ocean island basalt-like affinity, similar to other Cenozoic igneous rocks of the Hallett volcanic province. If a submarine eruptive paleoenvironment is accepted then there has been net tectonic or isostatic post-Late Miocene uplift of a few hundred metres in the Robertson Bay-Adare Peninsula area

  5. Profiling the RNA editomes of wild-type C. elegans and ADAR mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Han-Qing; Zhang, Pan; Gao, Hua; He, Xiandong; Dou, Yanmei; Huang, August Y; Liu, Xi-Ming; Ye, Adam Y; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Wei, Liping

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing increases transcriptome diversity through post-transcriptional modifications of RNA. Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) conversion, the most common type of RNA editing in higher eukaryotes. Caenorhabditis elegans has two ADARs, ADR-1 and ADR-2, but their functions remain unclear. Here, we profiled the RNA editomes of C. elegans at different developmental stages of wild-type and ADAR mutants. We developed a new computational pipeline with a "bisulfite-seq-mapping-like" step and achieved a threefold increase in identification sensitivity. A total of 99.5% of the 47,660 A-to-I editing sites were found in clusters. Of the 3080 editing clusters, 65.7% overlapped with DNA transposons in noncoding regions and 73.7% could form hairpin structures. The numbers of editing sites and clusters were highest at the L1 and embryonic stages. The editing frequency of a cluster positively correlated with the number of editing sites within it. Intriguingly, for 80% of the clusters with 10 or more editing sites, almost all expressed transcripts were edited. Deletion of adr-1 reduced the editing frequency but not the number of editing clusters, whereas deletion of adr-2 nearly abolished RNA editing, indicating a modulating role of ADR-1 and an essential role of ADR-2 in A-to-I editing. Quantitative proteomics analysis showed that adr-2 mutant worms altered the abundance of proteins involved in aging and lifespan regulation. Consistent with this finding, we observed that worms lacking RNA editing were short-lived. Taken together, our results reveal a sophisticated landscape of RNA editing and distinct modes of action of different ADARs.

  6. Functional Impact of RNA editing and ADARs on regulation of gene expression: perspectives from deep sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsuan; Ma, Chung-Pei; Chen, Yi-Tung; Schuyler, Scott C; Chang, Kai-Ping; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Cells regulate gene expression at multiple levels leading to a balance between robustness and complexity within their proteome. One core molecular step contributing to this important balance during metazoan gene expression is RNA editing, such as the co-transcriptional recoding of RNA transcripts catalyzed by the adenosine deaminse acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Understanding of the adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing process has been broadened considerably by the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, which allows for in-depth demarcation of an RNA editome at nucleotide resolution. However, critical issues remain unresolved with regard to how RNA editing cooperates with other transcript-associated events to underpin regulated gene expression. Here we review the growing body of evidence, provided by recent NGS-based studies, that links RNA editing to other mechanisms of post-transcriptional RNA processing and gene expression regulation including alternative splicing, transcript stability and localization, and the biogenesis and function of microRNAs (miRNAs). We also discuss the possibility that systematic integration of NGS data may be employed to establish the rules of an "RNA editing code", which may give us new insights into the functional consequences of RNA editing.

  7. Adenosine Deaminase That Acts on RNA 3 (ADAR3) Binding to Glutamate Receptor Subunit B Pre-mRNA Inhibits RNA Editing in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Eimile; Anderson, Ashley; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron; Hundley, Heather A

    2017-03-10

    RNA editing is a cellular process that precisely alters nucleotide sequences, thus regulating gene expression and generating protein diversity. Over 60% of human transcripts undergo adenosine to inosine RNA editing, and editing is required for normal development and proper neuronal function of animals. Editing of one adenosine in the transcript encoding the glutamate receptor subunit B, glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA 2 (GRIA2), modifies a codon, replacing the genomically encoded glutamine (Q) with arginine (R); thus this editing site is referred to as the Q/R site. Editing at the Q/R site of GRIA2 is essential, and reduced editing of GRIA2 transcripts has been observed in patients suffering from glioblastoma. In glioblastoma, incorporation of unedited GRIA2 subunits leads to a calcium-permeable glutamate receptor, which can promote cell migration and tumor invasion. In this study, we identify adenosine deaminase that acts on RNA 3 (ADAR3) as an important regulator of Q/R site editing, investigate its mode of action, and detect elevated ADAR3 expression in glioblastoma tumors compared with adjacent brain tissue. Overexpression of ADAR3 in astrocyte and astrocytoma cell lines inhibits RNA editing at the Q/R site of GRIA2 Furthermore, the double-stranded RNA binding domains of ADAR3 are required for repression of RNA editing. As the Q/R site of GRIA2 is specifically edited by ADAR2, we suggest that ADAR3 directly competes with ADAR2 for binding to GRIA2 transcript, inhibiting RNA editing, as evidenced by the direct binding of ADAR3 to the GRIA2 pre-mRNA. Finally, we provide evidence that both ADAR2 and ADAR3 expression contributes to the relative level of GRIA2 editing in tumors from patients suffering from glioblastoma.

  8. Down-Regulation of the RNA Editing Enzyme ADAR2 Contributes to RGC Death in a Mouse Model of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ai Ling; Carroll, Reed C.; Nawy, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) associated with characteristic axon degeneration in the optic nerve. Excitotoxic damage due to increased Ca2+ influx, possibly through NMDA-type glutamate receptors, has been proposed to be a cause of RGC dysfunction and death in glaucoma. Recent work has found that expression of another potentially critical receptor, the Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptor (CP-AMPAR), is elevated during various pathological conditions (including ALS and ischemia), resulting in increased neuronal death. Here we test the hypothesis that CP-AMPARs contribute to RGC death due to elevated Ca2+ influx in glaucoma. AMPA receptors are impermeable to Ca2+ if the tetrameric receptor contains a GluA2 subunit that has undergone Q/R RNA editing at a site in the pore region. The activity of ADAR2, the enzyme responsible for this RNA editing, generally ensures that the vast majority of GluA2 proteins are edited. Here, we demonstrate that ADAR2 levels decrease in a mouse model of glaucoma in which IOP is chronically elevated. Furthermore, using an in vitro model of RGCs, we find that knockdown of ADAR2 using siRNA increased the accumulation of Co2+ in response to glutamate, and decreased the rectification index of AMPA currents detected electrophysiologically, indicating an increased Ca2+ permeability through AMPARs. The RGCs in primary culture also exhibited increased excitotoxic cell death following knock down of ADAR2. Furthermore, cell death was reversed by NASPM, a specific blocker for CP-AMPARs. Together, our data suggest that chronically elevated IOP in adult mice reduces expression of the ADAR2 enzyme, and the loss of ADAR2 editing and subsequent disruption of GluA2 RNA editing might potentially play a role in promoting RGC neuronal death as observed in glaucoma. PMID:24608178

  9. Genome-wide A-to-I RNA editing in fungi independent of ADAR enzymes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Qinhu; He, Yi; Chen, Lingfeng; Hao, Chaofeng; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Dai, Yafeng; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-04-01

    Yeasts and filamentous fungi do not have adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) orthologs and are believed to lack A-to-I RNA editing, which is the most prevalent editing of mRNA in animals. However, during this study with the PUK1(FGRRES_01058) pseudokinase gene important for sexual reproduction in Fusarium graminearum, we found that two tandem stop codons, UA(1831)GUA(1834)G, in its kinase domain were changed to UG(1831)GUG(1834)G by RNA editing in perithecia. To confirm A-to-I editing of PUK1 transcripts, strand-specific RNA-seq data were generated with RNA isolated from conidia, hyphae, and perithecia. PUK1 was almost specifically expressed in perithecia, and 90% of transcripts were edited to UG(1831)GUG(1834)G. Genome-wide analysis identified 26,056 perithecium-specific A-to-I editing sites. Unlike those in animals, 70.5% of A-to-I editing sites inF. graminearum occur in coding regions, and more than two-thirds of them result in amino acid changes, including editing of 69PUK1-like pseudogenes with stop codons in ORFs.PUK1orthologs and other pseudogenes also displayed stage-specific expression and editing in Neurospora crassa and F. verticillioides Furthermore,F. graminearum differs from animals in the sequence preference and structure selectivity of A-to-I editing sites. Whereas A's embedded in RNA stems are targeted by ADARs, RNA editing inF. graminearum preferentially targets A's in hairpin loops, which is similar to the anticodon loop of tRNA targeted by adenosine deaminases acting on tRNA (ADATs). Overall, our results showed that A-to-I RNA editing occurs specifically during sexual reproduction and mainly in the coding regions in filamentous ascomycetes, involving adenosine deamination mechanisms distinct from metazoan ADARs.

  10. Genome-wide A-to-I RNA editing in fungi independent of ADAR enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Qinhu; He, Yi; Chen, Lingfeng; Hao, Chaofeng; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Dai, Yafeng; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts and filamentous fungi do not have adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) orthologs and are believed to lack A-to-I RNA editing, which is the most prevalent editing of mRNA in animals. However, during this study with the PUK1 (FGRRES_01058) pseudokinase gene important for sexual reproduction in Fusarium graminearum, we found that two tandem stop codons, UA1831GUA1834G, in its kinase domain were changed to UG1831GUG1834G by RNA editing in perithecia. To confirm A-to-I editing of PUK1 transcripts, strand-specific RNA-seq data were generated with RNA isolated from conidia, hyphae, and perithecia. PUK1 was almost specifically expressed in perithecia, and 90% of transcripts were edited to UG1831GUG1834G. Genome-wide analysis identified 26,056 perithecium-specific A-to-I editing sites. Unlike those in animals, 70.5% of A-to-I editing sites in F. graminearum occur in coding regions, and more than two-thirds of them result in amino acid changes, including editing of 69 PUK1-like pseudogenes with stop codons in ORFs. PUK1 orthologs and other pseudogenes also displayed stage-specific expression and editing in Neurospora crassa and F. verticillioides. Furthermore, F. graminearum differs from animals in the sequence preference and structure selectivity of A-to-I editing sites. Whereas A's embedded in RNA stems are targeted by ADARs, RNA editing in F. graminearum preferentially targets A's in hairpin loops, which is similar to the anticodon loop of tRNA targeted by adenosine deaminases acting on tRNA (ADATs). Overall, our results showed that A-to-I RNA editing occurs specifically during sexual reproduction and mainly in the coding regions in filamentous ascomycetes, involving adenosine deamination mechanisms distinct from metazoan ADARs. PMID:26934920

  11. Preliminary Results of Heat flow Measurements across the Eastern Flank of the Adare Trough, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J. K.; Kim, Y. G.; Jin, Y. K.

    2015-12-01

    Marine heat flow measurement on the ridge is a direct and useful approach to know the current state of thermal regime below the lithosphere. Measurements in ridges located in the Antarctica are practically challenged by harsh conditions such as extensive and moving sea ice cover and stiff seafloor composed of diatomaceous sediments. We planned heat flow measurements across the Adare Trough, north of the Ross Sea, during the recent Korean icebreaker R/V Araon's Antarctic expedition (ANA05B; Dec 12th 2014-Feb 25th 2015) to get thermal information which is a missing piece in terms of geophysical data in this region to describe its asymmetric activity in spreading rate. Finally, we collected information only at three stations across the eastern flank of the Adare Trough over 70 km along with NBP9702 seismic line because of various limitations above. It is a preliminary result that observed heat flow seems significantly higher than estimated one from known magnetic anomaly age using a global age-heat flow curve. In order to conclude some suggestion, we need further studies regarding identification of 'real' heat flow from lithosphere, and increase of the number of data. More heat flow measurements will be carried out again on the eastern flank in the next Araon's Antarctic expedition (tentatively ANA06C; March 2016) to supplement the small number of data.

  12. ADARs: allies or enemies? The importance of A-to-I RNA editing in human disease: from cancer to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Angela; Locatelli, Franco

    2012-02-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are enzymes that convert adenosine (A) to inosine (I) in nuclear-encoded RNAs and viral RNAs. The activity of ADARs has been demonstrated to be essential in mammals and serves to fine-tune different proteins and modulate many molecular pathways. Recent findings have shown that ADAR activity is altered in many pathological tissues. Moreover, it has been shown that modulation of RNA editing is important for cell proliferation and migration, and has a protective effect on ischaemic insults. This review summarises available recent knowledge on A-to-I RNA editing and ADAR enzymes, with particular attention given to the emerging role played by these enzymes in cancer, some infectious diseases and immune-mediated disorders.

  13. ADAR2-editing activity inhibits glioblastoma growth through the modulation of the CDC14B/Skp2/p21/p27 axis.

    PubMed

    Galeano, F; Rossetti, C; Tomaselli, S; Cifaldi, L; Lezzerini, M; Pezzullo, M; Boldrini, R; Massimi, L; Di Rocco, C M; Locatelli, F; Gallo, A

    2013-02-21

    Grade IV astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most aggressive and lethal tumors affecting humans. ADAR2-mediated A-to-I RNA editing, an essential post-transcriptional modification event in brain, is impaired in GBMs and astrocytoma cell lines. However, the role of ADAR2 editing in astrocytomas remains to be defined. Here, we show that ADAR2 editing rescue in astrocytomas prevents tumor growth in vivo and modulates an important cell cycle pathway involving the Skp2/p21/p27 proteins, often altered in glioblastoma. We demonstrate that ADAR2 deaminase activity is essential to inhibit tumor growth. Indeed, we identify the phosphatase CDC14B, which acts upstream of the Skp2/p21/p27 pathway, as a novel and critical ADAR2 target gene involved in glioblastoma growth. Specifically, ADAR2-mediated editing on CDC14B pre-mRNA increases its expression with a consequent reduction of the Skp2 target protein, as shown both in vitro and in vivo. We found that, compared to normal brain, both CDC14B editing and expression are progressively impaired in astrocytomas from grade I to IV, being very low in GBMs. These findings (1) demonstrate that post-transcriptional A-to-I RNA editing might be crucial for glioblastoma pathogenesis, (2) identify ADAR2-editing enzyme as a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene and (3) provide proof of principle that ADAR2 or its substrates may represent a suitable target(s) for possible novel, more effective and less toxic approaches to the treatment of GBMs.

  14. Evidence for auto-inhibition by the N terminus of hADAR2 and activation by dsRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Mark R; Lingam, Arunth T; Bass, Brenda L

    2004-10-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine conversion in RNA that is largely double stranded. Human ADAR2 (hADAR2) contains two double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs), separated by a 90-amino acid linker, and these are followed by the C-terminal catalytic domain. We assayed enzymatic activity of N-terminal deletion constructs of hADAR2 to determine the role of the dsRBMs and the intervening linker peptide. We found that a truncated protein consisting of one dsRBM and the deaminase domain was capable of deaminating a short 15-bp substrate. In contrast, full-length hADAR2 was inactive on this short substrate. In addition, we observed that the N terminus, which was deleted from the truncated protein, inhibits editing activity when added in trans. We propose that the N-terminal domain of hADAR2 contains sequences that cause auto-inhibition of the enzyme. Our results suggest activation requires binding to an RNA substrate long enough to accommodate interactions with both dsRBMs.

  15. Co-occurrence of TDP-43 mislocalization with reduced activity of an RNA editing enzyme, ADAR2, in aged mouse motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Hideyama, Takuto; Teramoto, Sayaka; Hachiga, Kosuke; Yamashita, Takenari; Kwak, Shin

    2012-01-01

    TDP-43 pathology in spinal motor neurons is a neuropathological hallmark of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and has recently been shown to be closely associated with the downregulation of an RNA editing enzyme called adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2) in the motor neurons of sporadic ALS patients. Because TDP-43 pathology is found more frequently in the brains of elderly patients, we investigated the age-related changes in the TDP-43 localization and ADAR2 activity in mouse motor neurons. We found that ADAR2 was developmentally upregulated, and its mRNA expression level was progressively decreased in the spinal cords of aged mice. Motor neurons normally exhibit nuclear ADAR2 and TDP-43 immunoreactivity, whereas fast fatigable motor neurons in aged mice demonstrated a loss of ADAR2 and abnormal TDP-43 localization. Importantly, these motor neurons expressed significant amounts of the Q/R site-unedited AMPA receptor subunit 2 (GluA2) mRNA. Because expression of unedited GluA2 has been demonstrated as a lethality-causing molecular abnormality observed in the motor neurons, these results suggest that age-related decreases in ADAR2 activity play a mechanistic role in aging and serve as one of risk factors for ALS.

  16. Mutational Pressure in Zika Virus: Local ADAR-Editing Areas Associated with Pauses in Translation and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Khrustalev, Vladislav V.; Khrustaleva, Tatyana A.; Sharma, Nitin; Giri, Rajanish

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) spread led to the recent medical health emergency of international concern. Understanding the variations in virus system is of utmost need. Using available complete sequences of ZIKV we estimated directions of mutational pressure along the length of consensus sequences of three lineages of the virus. Results showed that guanine usage is growing in ZIKV RNA plus strand due to adenine to guanine transitions, while adenine usage is growing due to cytosine to adenine transversions. Especially high levels of guanine have been found in two-fold degenerated sites of certain areas of RNA plus strand with high amount of secondary structure. The usage of cytosine in two-fold degenerated sites shows direct dependence on the amount of secondary structure in 52% (consensus sequence of East African ZIKV lineage)—32% (consensus sequence of epidemic strains) of the length of RNA minus strand. These facts are the evidences of ADAR-editing of both strands of ZIKV genome during pauses in replication. RNA plus strand can also be edited by ADAR during pauses in translation caused by the appearance of groups of rare codons. According to our results, RNA minus strand of epidemic ZIKV strain has lower number of points in which polymerase can be stalled (allowing ADAR-editing) compared to other strains. The data on preferable directions of mutational pressure in epidemic ZIKV strain is useful for future vaccine development and understanding the evolution of new strains. PMID:28275585

  17. Mutational Pressure in Zika Virus: Local ADAR-Editing Areas Associated with Pauses in Translation and Replication.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Vladislav V; Khrustaleva, Tatyana A; Sharma, Nitin; Giri, Rajanish

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) spread led to the recent medical health emergency of international concern. Understanding the variations in virus system is of utmost need. Using available complete sequences of ZIKV we estimated directions of mutational pressure along the length of consensus sequences of three lineages of the virus. Results showed that guanine usage is growing in ZIKV RNA plus strand due to adenine to guanine transitions, while adenine usage is growing due to cytosine to adenine transversions. Especially high levels of guanine have been found in two-fold degenerated sites of certain areas of RNA plus strand with high amount of secondary structure. The usage of cytosine in two-fold degenerated sites shows direct dependence on the amount of secondary structure in 52% (consensus sequence of East African ZIKV lineage)-32% (consensus sequence of epidemic strains) of the length of RNA minus strand. These facts are the evidences of ADAR-editing of both strands of ZIKV genome during pauses in replication. RNA plus strand can also be edited by ADAR during pauses in translation caused by the appearance of groups of rare codons. According to our results, RNA minus strand of epidemic ZIKV strain has lower number of points in which polymerase can be stalled (allowing ADAR-editing) compared to other strains. The data on preferable directions of mutational pressure in epidemic ZIKV strain is useful for future vaccine development and understanding the evolution of new strains.

  18. Altered A-to-I RNA Editing in Human Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Rachel; Ziskind, Anna; Nahor, Irit; Safran, Michal; Osenberg, Sivan; Sherf, Ofra; Rechavi, Gideon; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Post-transcriptional events play an important role in human development. The question arises as to whether Adenosine to Inosine RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, differs in human embryogenesis and in adulthood. We tested the editing of various target genes in coding (FLNA, BLCAP, CYFIP2) and non-coding sequences at their Alu elements (BRCA1, CARD11, RBBP9, MDM4, FNACC), as well as the transcriptional levels of the ADAR1 enzymes. This analysis was performed on five fetal and adult human tissues: brain, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen, as well as on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which represent the blastocyst stage in early human development. Our results show substantially greater editing activity for most adult tissue samples relative to fetal ones, in six of the eight genes tested. To test the effect of reduced A-to-I RNA editing activity in early human development we used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a model and tried to generate hESC clones that overexpress the ADAR1–p110 isoform. We were unable to achieve overexpression of ADAR1–p110 by either transfection or lentiviral infection, though we easily generated hESC clones that expressed the GFP transgene and overexpressed ADAR1-p110 in 293T cells and in primary human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Moreover, in contrast to the expected overexpression of ADAR1-p110 protein following its introduction into hESCs, the expression levels of this protein decreased dramatically 24–48 hr post infection. Similar results were obtained when we tried to overexpress ADAR1-p110 in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. This suggests that ADAR1 protein is substantially regulated in undifferentiated pluripotent hESCs. Overall, our data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing plays a critical role during early human development. PMID:22859999

  19. Altered A-to-I RNA editing in human embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shtrichman, Ronit; Germanguz, Igal; Mandel, Rachel; Ziskind, Anna; Nahor, Irit; Safran, Michal; Osenberg, Sivan; Sherf, Ofra; Rechavi, Gideon; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Post-transcriptional events play an important role in human development. The question arises as to whether Adenosine to Inosine RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, differs in human embryogenesis and in adulthood. We tested the editing of various target genes in coding (FLNA, BLCAP, CYFIP2) and non-coding sequences at their Alu elements (BRCA1, CARD11, RBBP9, MDM4, FNACC), as well as the transcriptional levels of the ADAR1 enzymes. This analysis was performed on five fetal and adult human tissues: brain, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen, as well as on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which represent the blastocyst stage in early human development. Our results show substantially greater editing activity for most adult tissue samples relative to fetal ones, in six of the eight genes tested. To test the effect of reduced A-to-I RNA editing activity in early human development we used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a model and tried to generate hESC clones that overexpress the ADAR1-p110 isoform. We were unable to achieve overexpression of ADAR1-p110 by either transfection or lentiviral infection, though we easily generated hESC clones that expressed the GFP transgene and overexpressed ADAR1-p110 in 293T cells and in primary human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Moreover, in contrast to the expected overexpression of ADAR1-p110 protein following its introduction into hESCs, the expression levels of this protein decreased dramatically 24-48 hr post infection. Similar results were obtained when we tried to overexpress ADAR1-p110 in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. This suggests that ADAR1 protein is substantially regulated in undifferentiated pluripotent hESCs. Overall, our data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing plays a critical role during early human development.

  20. Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA, RNA Editing, and Interferon Action

    PubMed Central

    George, Cyril X.; Gan, Zhenji; Liu, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine (A) to inosine (I) editing of RNA that possesses double-stranded (ds) structure. A-to-I RNA editing results in nucleotide substitution, because I is recognized as G instead of A both by ribosomes and by RNA polymerases. A-to-I substitution can also cause dsRNA destabilization, as I:U mismatch base pairs are less stable than A:U base pairs. Three mammalian ADAR genes are known, of which two encode active deaminases (ADAR1 and ADAR2). Alternative promoters together with alternative splicing give rise to two protein size forms of ADAR1: an interferon-inducible ADAR1-p150 deaminase that binds dsRNA and Z-DNA, and a constitutively expressed ADAR1-p110 deaminase. ADAR2, like ADAR1-p110, is constitutively expressed and binds dsRNA. A-to-I editing occurs with both viral and cellular RNAs, and affects a broad range of biological processes. These include virus growth and persistence, apoptosis and embryogenesis, neurotransmitter receptor and ion channel function, pancreatic cell function, and post-transcriptional gene regulation by microRNAs. Biochemical processes that provide a framework for understanding the physiologic changes following ADAR-catalyzed A-to-I ( = G) editing events include mRNA translation by changing codons and hence the amino acid sequence of proteins; pre-mRNA splicing by altering splice site recognition sequences; RNA stability by changing sequences involved in nuclease recognition; genetic stability in the case of RNA virus genomes by changing sequences during viral RNA replication; and RNA-structure-dependent activities such as microRNA production or targeting or protein–RNA interactions. PMID:21182352

  1. Inhibition of PKR protects against H2O2-induced injury on neonatal cardiac myocytes by attenuating apoptosis and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongyi; Men, Min; Xie, Bo; Shan, Jianggui; Wang, Chengxi; Liu, Jidong; Zheng, Hui; Yang, Wengang; Xue, Song; Guo, Changfa

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygenation species (ROS) generated from reperfusion results in cardiac injury through apoptosis and inflammation, while PKR has the ability to promote apoptosis and inflammation. The aim of the study was to investigate whether PKR is involved in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced neonatal cardiac myocytes (NCM) injury. In our study, NCM, when exposed to H2O2, resulted in persistent activation of PKR due to NCM endogenous RNA. Inhibition of PKR by 2-aminopurine (2-AP) or siRNA protected against H2O2 induced apoptosis and injury. To elucidate the mechanism, we revealed that inhibition of PKR alleviated H2O2 induced apoptosis companied by decreased caspase3/7 activity, BAX and caspase-3 expression. We also revealed that inhibition of PKR suppressed H2O2 induced NFκB pathway and NLRP3 activation. Finally, we found ADAR1 mRNA and protein expression were both induced after H2O2 treatment through STAT-2 dependent pathway. By gain and loss of ADAR1 expression, we confirmed ADAR1 modulated PKR activity. Therefore, we concluded inhibition of PKR protected against H2O2-induced injury by attenuating apoptosis and inflammation. A self-preservation mechanism existed in NCM that ADAR1 expression is induced by H2O2 to limit PKR activation simultaneously. These findings identify a novel role for PKR/ADAR1 in myocardial reperfusion injury. PMID:27929137

  2. A-to-I RNA Editing Up-regulates Human Dihydrofolate Reductase in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masataka; Fukami, Tatsuki; Gotoh, Saki; Nakajima, Miki

    2017-03-24

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a key role in folate metabolism and is a target molecule of methotrexate. An increase in the cellular expression level of DHFR is one of the mechanisms of tumor resistance to methotrexate. The present study investigated the possibility that adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing, which causes nucleotide conversion by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, might modulate DHFR expression. In human breast adenocarcinoma-derived MCF-7 cells, 26 RNA editing sites were identified in the 3'-UTR of DHFR. Knockdown of ADAR1 decreased the RNA editing levels of DHFR and resulted in a decrease in the DHFR mRNA and protein levels, indicating that ADAR1 up-regulates DHFR expression. Using a computational analysis, miR-25-3p and miR-125a-3p were predicted to bind to the non-edited 3'-UTR of DHFR but not to the edited sequence. The decrease in DHFR expression by the knockdown of ADAR1 was restored by transfection of antisense oligonucleotides for these miRNAs, suggesting that RNA editing mediated up-regulation of DHFR requires the function of these miRNAs. Interestingly, we observed that the knockdown of ADAR1 decreased cell viability and increased the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to methotrexate. ADAR1 expression levels and the RNA editing levels in the 3'-UTR of DHFR in breast cancer tissues were higher than those in adjacent normal tissues. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that ADAR1 positively regulates the expression of DHFR by editing the miR-25-3p and miR-125a-3p binding sites in the 3'-UTR of DHFR, enhancing cellular proliferation and resistance to methotrexate.

  3. Characterization of Human Disease Phenotypes Associated with Mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR, and IFIH1

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Yanick J.; Chase, Diana S.; Schmidt, Johanna Lowenstein; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Forte, Gabriella M.A.; Gornall, Hannah L.; Oojageer, Anthony; Anderson, Beverley; Pizzino, Amy; Helman, Guy; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M.; Ackroyd, Sam; Aeby, Alec; Agosta, Guillermo; Albin, Catherine; Allon-Shalev, Stavit; Arellano, Montse; Ariaudo, Giada; Aswani, Vijay; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Baildam, Eileen M.; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bailey, Kathryn M.; Barnerias, Christine; Barth, Magalie; Battini, Roberta; Beresford, Michael W.; Bernard, Geneviève; Bianchi, Marika; de Villemeur, Thierry Billette; Blair, Edward M.; Bloom, Miriam; Burlina, Alberto B.; Carpanelli, Maria Luisa; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Cavallini, Anna; Cereda, Cristina; Chandler, Kate E.; Chitayat, David A.; Collins, Abigail E.; Corcoles, Concepcion Sierra; Cordeiro, Nuno J.V.; Crichiutti, Giovanni; Dabydeen, Lyvia; Dale, Russell C.; D’Arrigo, Stefano; De Goede, Christian G.E.L.; De Laet, Corinne; De Waele, Liesbeth M.H.; Denzler, Ines; Desguerre, Isabelle; Devriendt, Koenraad; Di Rocco, Maja; Fahey, Michael C.; Fazzi, Elisa; Ferrie, Colin D.; Figueiredo, António; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Gowrinathan, Nirmala R.; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Hanrahan, Donncha; Isidor, Bertrand; Kara, Bülent; Khan, Nasaim; King, Mary D.; Kirk, Edwin P.; Kumar, Ram; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre; Lauffer, Heinz; Laugel, Vincent; La Piana, Roberta; Lim, Ming J.; Lin, Jean-Pierre S.-M.; Linnankivi, Tarja; Mackay, Mark T.; Marom, Daphna R.; Lourenço, Charles Marques; McKee, Shane A.; Moroni, Isabella; Morton, Jenny E.V.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Murray, Kevin; Nabbout, Rima; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Nunez-Enamorado, Noemi; Oades, Patrick J.; Olivieri, Ivana; Ostergaard, John R.; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén; Prendiville, Julie S.; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Régal, Luc; Ricci, Federica; Rio, Marlène; Rodriguez, Diana; Roubertie, Agathe; Salvatici, Elisabetta; Segers, Karin A.; Sinha, Gyanranjan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stödberg, Tommy I.; Straussberg, Rachel; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Suri, Mohnish; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Y.; Naude, Johann te Water; Teik, Keng Wee; Thomas, Maya Mary; Till, Marianne; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy Noel; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Vassallo, Grace; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Vogt, Julie; Wallace, Geoffrey B.; Wassmer, Evangeline; Webb, Hannah J.; Whitehouse, William P.; Whitney, Robyn N.; Zaki, Maha S.; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Livingston, John H.; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Vanderver, Adeline; Orcesi, Simona; Rice, Gillian I.

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi–Goutières syndrome is an inflammatory disease occurring due to mutations in any of TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR or IFIH1. We report on 374 patients from 299 families with mutations in these seven genes. Most patients conformed to one of two fairly stereotyped clinical profiles; either exhibiting an in utero disease-onset (74 patients; 22.8% of all patients where data were available), or a post-natal presentation, usually within the first year of life (223 patients; 68.6%), characterized by a sub-acute encephalopathy and a loss of previously acquired skills. Other clinically distinct phenotypes were also observed; particularly, bilateral striatal necrosis (13 patients; 3.6%) and non-syndromic spastic paraparesis (12 patients; 3.4%). We recorded 69 deaths (19.3% of patients with follow-up data). Of 285 patients for whom data were available, 210 (73.7%) were profoundly disabled, with no useful motor, speech and intellectual function. Chilblains, glaucoma, hypothyroidism, cardiomyopathy, intracerebral vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, bowel inflammation and systemic lupus erythematosus were seen frequently enough to be confirmed as real associations with the Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome phenotype. We observed a robust relationship between mutations in all seven genes with increased type I interferon activity in cerebrospinal fluid and serum, and the increased expression of interferon-stimulated gene transcripts in peripheral blood. We recorded a positive correlation between the level of cerebrospinal fluid interferon activity assayed within one year of disease presentation and the degree of subsequent disability. Interferon-stimulated gene transcripts remained high in most patients, indicating an ongoing disease process. On the basis of substantial morbidity and mortality, our data highlight the urgent need to define coherent treatment strategies for the phenotypes associated with mutations in the Aicardi–Goutières syndrome

  4. Characterization of human disease phenotypes associated with mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR, and IFIH1.

    PubMed

    Crow, Yanick J; Chase, Diana S; Lowenstein Schmidt, Johanna; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Forte, Gabriella M A; Gornall, Hannah L; Oojageer, Anthony; Anderson, Beverley; Pizzino, Amy; Helman, Guy; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M; Ackroyd, Sam; Aeby, Alec; Agosta, Guillermo; Albin, Catherine; Allon-Shalev, Stavit; Arellano, Montse; Ariaudo, Giada; Aswani, Vijay; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Baildam, Eileen M; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bailey, Kathryn M; Barnerias, Christine; Barth, Magalie; Battini, Roberta; Beresford, Michael W; Bernard, Geneviève; Bianchi, Marika; Billette de Villemeur, Thierry; Blair, Edward M; Bloom, Miriam; Burlina, Alberto B; Carpanelli, Maria Luisa; Carvalho, Daniel R; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Cavallini, Anna; Cereda, Cristina; Chandler, Kate E; Chitayat, David A; Collins, Abigail E; Sierra Corcoles, Concepcion; Cordeiro, Nuno J V; Crichiutti, Giovanni; Dabydeen, Lyvia; Dale, Russell C; D'Arrigo, Stefano; De Goede, Christian G E L; De Laet, Corinne; De Waele, Liesbeth M H; Denzler, Ines; Desguerre, Isabelle; Devriendt, Koenraad; Di Rocco, Maja; Fahey, Michael C; Fazzi, Elisa; Ferrie, Colin D; Figueiredo, António; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Gowrinathan, Nirmala R; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Hanrahan, Donncha; Isidor, Bertrand; Kara, Bülent; Khan, Nasaim; King, Mary D; Kirk, Edwin P; Kumar, Ram; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre; Lauffer, Heinz; Laugel, Vincent; La Piana, Roberta; Lim, Ming J; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Linnankivi, Tarja; Mackay, Mark T; Marom, Daphna R; Marques Lourenço, Charles; McKee, Shane A; Moroni, Isabella; Morton, Jenny E V; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Murray, Kevin; Nabbout, Rima; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Nunez-Enamorado, Noemi; Oades, Patrick J; Olivieri, Ivana; Ostergaard, John R; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén; Prendiville, Julie S; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Régal, Luc; Ricci, Federica; Rio, Marlène; Rodriguez, Diana; Roubertie, Agathe; Salvatici, Elisabetta; Segers, Karin A; Sinha, Gyanranjan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stödberg, Tommy I; Straussberg, Rachel; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Suri, Mohnish; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Y; te Water Naude, Johann; Wee Teik, Keng; Thomas, Maya Mary; Till, Marianne; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy Noel; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Vassallo, Grace; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Vogt, Julie; Wallace, Geoffrey B; Wassmer, Evangeline; Webb, Hannah J; Whitehouse, William P; Whitney, Robyn N; Zaki, Maha S; Zuberi, Sameer M; Livingston, John H; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Vanderver, Adeline; Orcesi, Simona; Rice, Gillian I

    2015-02-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome is an inflammatory disease occurring due to mutations in any of TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR or IFIH1. We report on 374 patients from 299 families with mutations in these seven genes. Most patients conformed to one of two fairly stereotyped clinical profiles; either exhibiting an in utero disease-onset (74 patients; 22.8% of all patients where data were available), or a post-natal presentation, usually within the first year of life (223 patients; 68.6%), characterized by a sub-acute encephalopathy and a loss of previously acquired skills. Other clinically distinct phenotypes were also observed; particularly, bilateral striatal necrosis (13 patients; 3.6%) and non-syndromic spastic paraparesis (12 patients; 3.4%). We recorded 69 deaths (19.3% of patients with follow-up data). Of 285 patients for whom data were available, 210 (73.7%) were profoundly disabled, with no useful motor, speech and intellectual function. Chilblains, glaucoma, hypothyroidism, cardiomyopathy, intracerebral vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, bowel inflammation and systemic lupus erythematosus were seen frequently enough to be confirmed as real associations with the Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome phenotype. We observed a robust relationship between mutations in all seven genes with increased type I interferon activity in cerebrospinal fluid and serum, and the increased expression of interferon-stimulated gene transcripts in peripheral blood. We recorded a positive correlation between the level of cerebrospinal fluid interferon activity assayed within one year of disease presentation and the degree of subsequent disability. Interferon-stimulated gene transcripts remained high in most patients, indicating an ongoing disease process. On the basis of substantial morbidity and mortality, our data highlight the urgent need to define coherent treatment strategies for the phenotypes associated with mutations in the Aicardi-Goutières syndrome-related genes

  5. Decrease of mRNA Editing after Spinal Cord Injury is Caused by Down-regulation of ADAR2 that is Triggered by Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Narzo, Antonio Fabio Di; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Ge, Yongchao; Zhang, Bin; Sanelli, Leo; May, Zacnicte; Li, Yanqing; Fouad, Karim; Cardozo, Christopher; Koonin, Eugene V; Bennett, David J; Dracheva, Stella

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a decrease in mRNA editing of serotonin receptor 2C (5-HT2CR) contributing to post-SCI spasticity. Here we study post-SCI mRNA editing and global gene expression using massively parallel sequencing. Evidence is presented that the decrease in 5-HT2CR editing is caused by down-regulation of adenosine deaminase ADAR2 and that editing of at least one other ADAR2 target, potassium channel Kv1.1, is decreased after SCI. Bayesian network analysis of genome-wide transcriptome data indicates that down-regulation of ADAR2 (1) is triggered by persistent inflammatory response to SCI that is associated with activation of microglia and (2) results in changes in neuronal gene expression that are likely to contribute both to post-SCI restoration of neuronal excitability and muscle spasms. These findings have broad implications for other diseases of the Central Nervous System and could open new avenues for developing efficacious antispastic treatments. PMID:26223940

  6. Alu sequences in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells display high levels of A-to-I RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Osenberg, Sivan; Paz Yaacov, Nurit; Safran, Michal; Moshkovitz, Sharon; Shtrichman, Ronit; Sherf, Ofra; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Keshet, Gilmor; Amariglio, Ninette; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Rechavi, Gideon

    2010-06-21

    Adenosine to Inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a site-specific modification of RNA transcripts, catalyzed by members of the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA) protein family. RNA editing occurs in human RNA in thousands of different sites. Some of the sites are located in protein-coding regions but the majority is found in non-coding regions, such as 3'UTRs, 5'UTRs and introns - mainly in Alu elements. While editing is found in all tissues, the highest levels of editing are found in the brain. It was shown that editing levels within protein-coding regions are increased during embryogenesis and after birth and that RNA editing is crucial for organism viability as well as for normal development. In this study we characterized the A-to-I RNA editing phenomenon during neuronal and spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We identified high editing levels of Alu repetitive elements in hESCs and demonstrated a global decrease in editing levels of non-coding Alu sites when hESCs are differentiating, particularly into the neural lineage. Using RNA interference, we showed that the elevated editing levels of Alu elements in undifferentiated hESCs are highly dependent on ADAR1. DNA microarray analysis showed that ADAR1 knockdown has a global effect on gene expression in hESCs and leads to a significant increase in RNA expression levels of genes involved in differentiation and development processes, including neurogenesis. Taken together, we speculate that A-to-I editing of Alu sequences plays a role in the regulation of hESC early differentiation decisions.

  7. Prevalence of unrecognized depression and associated factors among patients attending medical outpatient department in Adare Hospital, Hawassa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tilahune, Asres Bedaso; Bekele, Gezahegn; Mekonnen, Nibretie; Tamiru, Eyerusalem

    2016-01-01

    Depression is an illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts and that affects the way a person eats, sleeps, feels about him or herself and thinks about things. Depression is one of the most common mental disorders affecting 121 million people in the world, and it frequently goes unrecognized among patients. It is estimated that 5%–10% of the population at any given time is suffering from identifiable depression needing psychiatric or psychosocial intervention. An institution-based cross-sectional study design was implemented to determine the magnitude and associated factors of unrecognized depression among patients attending the adult medical outpatient department in Adare Hospital, Hawassa, Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Region, Ethiopia, among 326 patients selected using systematic random sampling technique. Data were collected using the interviewer-administered technique. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics and other independent variables. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire 9. Data were entered and ana-lyzed using SPSS 20. The level of significance was determined at P<0.05. About 326 patients were interviewed, of whom 186 (57.1%) were males. The mean age of participant was 34 with standard deviation of ±13.1 years. Current substance users accounted for 106 (32.5%) of the total participants. Of 326 respondents, 80 (24.5%) had significant depressive symptoms, while the detection rate of depression by the clinician was 0%. Depression was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =1.63 [1.14–2.34]), age >60 years (AOR =4.14 [1.87–9.14]), being divorced (AOR =3.13 [1.70–5.76]), and having an average monthly income <750 ETB (AOR =1.92 [1.119–3.195]). The findings of this study revealed that the prevalence of depression among patients attending general medical outpatient department was highly underrecognized and unmanaged. On the basis of

  8. Alternative Splicing of STAT3 Is Affected by RNA Editing.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Lior; Abutbul-Amitai, Mor; Paret, Gideon; Nevo-Caspi, Yael

    2017-03-09

    A-to-I RNA editing, carried out by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, is an epigenetic phenomenon of posttranscriptional modifications on pre-mRNA. RNA editing in intronic sequences may influence alternative splicing of flanking exons. We have previously shown that conditions that induce editing result in elevated expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), preferentially the alternatively-spliced STAT3β isoform. Mechanisms regulating alternative splicing of STAT3 have not been elucidated. STAT3 undergoes A-to-I RNA editing in an intron residing in proximity to the alternatively spliced exon. We hypothesized that RNA editing plays a role in regulating alternative splicing toward STAT3β. In this study we extend our observation connecting RNA editing to the preferential induction of STAT3β expression. We study the involvement of ADAR1 in STAT3 editing and reveal the connection between editing and alternative splicing of STAT3. Deferoaxamine treatment caused the induction in STAT3 RNA editing and STAT3β expression. Silencing ADAR1 caused a decrease in STAT3 editing and expression with a preferential decrease in STAT3β. Cells transfected with a mutated minigene showed preferential splicing toward the STAT3β transcript. Editing in the STAT3 intron is performed by ADAR1 and affects STAT3 alternative splicing. These results suggest that RNA editing is one of the molecular mechanisms regulating the expression of STAT3β.

  9. Left-handed Z-DNA: structure and function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, A.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Z-DNA is a high energy conformer of B-DNA that forms in vivo during transcription as a result of torsional strain generated by a moving polymerase. An understanding of the biological role of Z-DNA has advanced with the discovery that the RNA editing enzyme double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase type I (ADAR1) has motifs specific for the Z-DNA conformation. Editing by ADAR1 requires a double-stranded RNA substrate. In the cases known, the substrate is formed by folding an intron back onto the exon that is targeted for modification. The use of introns to direct processing of exons requires that editing occurs before splicing. Recognition of Z-DNA by ADAR1 may allow editing of nascent transcripts to be initiated immediately after transcription, ensuring that editing and splicing are performed in the correct sequence. Structural characterization of the Z-DNA binding domain indicates that it belongs to the winged helix-turn-helix class of proteins and is similar to the globular domain of histone-H5.

  10. Association between targeted somatic mutation (TSM) signatures and HGS-OvCa progression.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Robyn A; Humbert, Patrick; Larner, Cliff; Akmeemana, Eric H; Pendlebury, Christopher R R

    2016-09-01

    Evidence already exists that the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID/APOBEC) and the adenosine deaminase (ADAR) families of enzymes are implicated as powerful mutagens in oncogenic processes in many somatic tissues. Each deaminase is identified by the DNA or RNA nucleotide sequence ("motif") surrounding the nucleotide targeted for deamination. The primary objective of this study is to develop an in silico approach to identify nucleotide sequence changes of the target motifs of key deaminases during oncogenesis. If successful, a secondary objective is to investigate if such changes are associated with disease progression indicators that include disease stage and progression-free survival time. Using a discovery cohort of 194 high-grade serous ovarian adenocarcinoma (HGS-OvCa) exomes, the results confirm the ability of the novel in silico approach used to identify changes in the preferred target motifs for AID, APOBEC3G, APOBEC3B, and ADAR1 during oncogenesis. Using this approach, a set of new cancer-progression associated signatures (C-PASs) were identified. Furthermore, it was found that the C-PAS identified can be used to differentiate between the cohort of patients that remained progression-free for longer than 60 months, from those in which disease progressed within 60 months (sensitivity 95%, specificity 90%). The spectrum of outcomes observed here could provide a foundation for future clinical assessment of susceptibility variants in ovarian, and several other cancers as disease progresses. The ability of the in silico methodology used to identify changes in deaminase motifs during oncogenesis also suggests new links between immune system function and tumorigenesis.

  11. Family Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Family therapy By Mayo Clinic Staff Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that helps family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided ...

  12. Family Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... your outlook on the future. Friends and adult family members The effects of cancer on your relationships ...

  13. Measles Virus Defective Interfering RNAs Are Generated Frequently and Early in the Absence of C Protein and Can Be Destabilized by Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1-Like Hypermutations

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Christian K.; Mastorakos, George M.; Matchett, William E.; Ma, Xiao; Samuel, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defective interfering RNAs (DI-RNAs) of the viral genome can form during infections of negative-strand RNA viruses and outgrow full-length viral genomes, thereby modulating the severity and duration of infection. Here we document the frequent de novo generation of copy-back DI-RNAs from independent rescue events both for a vaccine measles virus (vac2) and for a wild-type measles virus (IC323) as early as passage 1 after virus rescue. Moreover, vaccine and wild-type C-protein-deficient (C-protein-knockout [CKO]) measles viruses generated about 10 times more DI-RNAs than parental virus, suggesting that C enhances the processivity of the viral polymerase. We obtained the nucleotide sequences of 65 individual DI-RNAs, identified breakpoints and reinitiation sites, and predicted their structural features. Several DI-RNAs possessed clusters of A-to-G or U-to-C transitions. Sequences flanking these mutation sites were characteristic of those favored by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1), which catalyzes in double-stranded RNA the C-6 deamination of adenosine to produce inosine, which is recognized as guanosine, a process known as A-to-I RNA editing. In individual DI-RNAs the transitions were of the same type and occurred on both sides of the breakpoint. These patterns of mutations suggest that ADAR1 edits unencapsidated DI-RNAs that form double-strand RNA structures. Encapsidated DI-RNAs were incorporated into virus particles, which reduced the infectivity of virus stocks. The CKO phenotype was dominant: DI-RNAs derived from vac2 with a CKO suppressed the replication of vac2, as shown by coinfections of interferon-incompetent lymphatic cells with viruses expressing different fluorescent reporter proteins. In contrast, coinfection with a C-protein-expressing virus did not counteract the suppressive phenotype of DI-RNAs. IMPORTANCE Recombinant measles viruses (MVs) are in clinical trials as cancer therapeutics and as vectored vaccines for HIV-AIDS and

  14. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  15. Familial hypertriglyceridemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000397.htm Familial hypertriglyceridemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial hypertriglyceridemia is a common disorder passed down through families. ...

  16. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  17. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  18. Family Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Research indicates that family literacy programs can provide opportunities for educational success for parents and children. The benefits reaped by the children in family literacy workshops are presented.

  19. Dynamic profiling of double-stranded RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinlei; Vukovic, Lela; Koh, Hye Ran; Schulten, Klaus; Myong, Sua

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA is a key player in numerous biological activities in cells, including RNA interference, anti-viral immunity and mRNA transport. The class of proteins responsible for recognizing dsRNA is termed double-stranded RNA binding proteins (dsRBP). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dsRBPs and dsRNA. Here we examined four human dsRBPs, ADAD2, TRBP, Staufen 1 and ADAR1 on six dsRNA substrates that vary in length and secondary structure. We combined single molecule pull-down (SiMPull), single molecule protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (smPIFE) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the dsRNA-dsRBP interactions. Our results demonstrate that despite the highly conserved dsRNA binding domains, the dsRBPs exhibit diverse substrate specificities and dynamic properties when in contact with different RNA substrates. While TRBP and ADAR1 have a preference for binding simple duplex RNA, ADAD2 and Staufen1 display higher affinity to highly structured RNA substrates. Upon interaction with RNA substrates, TRBP and Staufen1 exhibit dynamic sliding whereas two deaminases ADAR1 and ADAD2 mostly remain immobile when bound. MD simulations provide a detailed atomic interaction map that is largely consistent with the affinity differences observed experimentally. Collectively, our study highlights the diverse nature of substrate specificity and mobility exhibited by dsRBPs that may be critical for their cellular function. PMID:26184879

  20. Muslim families and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Daneshpour, M

    1998-07-01

    Muslim immigrant families living in the United States may well come to the attention of mental health professionals. This article examines the applicability of the Anglo-American models of family therapy to Muslim immigrant families. The most significant differences in value systems between the Muslim and Anglo-American cultures is Muslim families' preference for greater connectedness, a less flexible and more hierarchical family structure, and an implicit communication style. Systemic thinking, which deals with the pattern of relationships, is valid for all families regardless of cultural differences. However, the preferred directions of change for Muslim families need to be integrated into the assessment and goals for family therapy.

  1. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  2. Muslim Families and Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshpour, Manijeh

    1998-01-01

    Examines the applicability of the Anglo-American models of family therapy to Muslim immigrant families. The differences in value systems are the Muslim families' preferences for greater connectedness, a less flexible and more hierarchical family structure, and an implicit communication style. Suggests that directions for change for Muslims need to…

  3. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  4. Family Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Deployment & Transition Home » Health & Wellness » Family Violence Family Violence Recognize the warning signs . Know how to report. ... Love Every Day Making Relationships Work National Domestic Violence Hotline Signs of Child Abuse INSTALLATION PROGRAM DIRECTORY ...

  5. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liontos, Lynn Balster

    1992-01-01

    Family involvement in schools will work only when perceived as an enlarged concept focusing on all children, including those from at-risk families. Each publication reviewed here is specifically concerned with family involvement strategies concerned with all children or targeted at primarily high risk students. Susan McAllister Swap looks at three…

  6. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the…

  7. Italian families and family interventions.

    PubMed

    Casacchia, Massimo; Roncone, Rita

    2014-06-01

    In Italy, as in many countries, relatives are closely involved in caring for persons with physical and mental disorders. The Italian scenario lends itself to routine involvement of family members in psychiatric treatment because, despite becoming smaller and smaller, Italian families keep close ties, and men and women do not leave the parental home until relatively late. The authors describe the impact of international family psychosocial research on the Italian mental health services (MHSs) and the main psychosocial interventions currently in use, including family psychoeducational interventions and the "Milan family therapy approach." They also highlight the contribution Italian researchers have given to the study of important variables in integrated mental disorder care, such as family burden of care, relatives' attitudes, family functioning, and satisfaction with the MHSs. Finally, they discuss the difficulties of implementing and disseminating family interventions within the Italian MHS, despite the growing evidence of their effectiveness.

  8. Roles within the Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  9. Improving Family Communications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  10. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  11. Family Reunification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulczyn, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Reunifying children placed in foster care with their birth parents is a primary goal of the child welfare system. Yet, relatively little is known about the reunification process. This article analyzes new data on trends in family reunification and discovers: (1) Although most children still exit foster care through family reunification, exit…

  12. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of…

  13. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  14. Family, Extended

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Jessica Rae

    2006-01-01

    Parents are a child's first and most influential teacher. People hear this truism often, yet nowhere has the author seen it more taken to heart than at Tower Street Elementary School. The school's efforts to form a true partnership with students' families--from involving families in the first day of school, to the principal making home visits, to…

  15. Family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  16. Family Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document is made up of a selection of some of the papers distributed to participants in courses on "Family Health and Family Planning" which have been organized each year since 1973 by the International Children's Center and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Six courses, held between 1973 and 1978, brought together a…

  17. Reduced adenosine-to-inosine miR-455-5p editing promotes melanoma growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Einav; Mobley, Aaron K; Braeuer, Russell R; Kamiya, Takafumi; Huang, Li; Vasquez, Mayra E; Salameh, Ahmad; Lee, Ho Jeong; Kim, Sun Jin; Ivan, Cristina; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Nip, Ka Ming; Zhu, Kelsey; Brooks, Denise; Jones, Steven J M; Birol, Inanc; Mosqueda, Maribel; Wen, Yu-ye; Eterovic, Agda Karina; Sood, Anil K; Hwu, Patrick; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Robertson, A Gordon; Calin, George A; Markel, Gal; Fidler, Isaiah J; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2015-03-01

    Although recent studies have shown that adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing occurs in microRNAs (miRNAs), its effects on tumour growth and metastasis are not well understood. We present evidence of CREB-mediated low expression of ADAR1 in metastatic melanoma cell lines and tumour specimens. Re-expression of ADAR1 resulted in the suppression of melanoma growth and metastasis in vivo. Consequently, we identified three miRNAs undergoing A-to-I editing in the weakly metastatic melanoma but not in strongly metastatic cell lines. One of these miRNAs, miR-455-5p, has two A-to-I RNA-editing sites. The biological function of edited miR-455-5p is different from that of the unedited form, as it recognizes a different set of genes. Indeed, wild-type miR-455-5p promotes melanoma metastasis through inhibition of the tumour suppressor gene CPEB1. Moreover, wild-type miR-455 enhances melanoma growth and metastasis in vivo, whereas the edited form inhibits these features. These results demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for RNA editing in melanoma progression.

  18. Asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Bottke, William F.; Vokrouhlický, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Jedicke, Robert

    An asteroid family is a group of asteroids with similar orbits and spectra that was produced by a collisional breakup of a large parent body. To identify asteroid families, researchers look for clusters of asteroid positions in the space of proper orbital elements. These elements, being more constant over time than osculating orbital elements, provide a dynamical criterion of whether a group of bodies has a common ancestor. More than fifty asteroid families have been identified to date. Their analysis produced several important insights into the physics of large scale collisions, dynamical processes affecting small bodies in the Solar System, and surface and interior properties of asteroids.

  19. Familial dysautonomia

    MedlinePlus

    Riley-Day syndrome; FD; Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy - type III (HSAN III); Autonomic crises - familial dysautonomia ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 107. Sarnat HB. Autonomic neuropathies. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  20. Unusual families.

    PubMed

    Golombok, Susan

    2005-03-01

    The introduction of assisted reproduction has led to unusual forms of procreation. This article describes the social consequences of lesbian motherhood and of families headed by single heterosexual mothers.

  1. Family dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hayaki, Chie; Anno, Kozo; Shibata, Mao; Iwaki, Rie; Kawata, Hiroshi; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Hosoi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have shown differences in the psychosocial factors related to chronic localized pain (CLP) and chronic widespread pain (CWP). However, no studies have done an evaluation of differences between CLP and CWP from the viewpoint of family functioning. We did a cross-sectional study in a tertiary care setting to investigate possible differences in the relation of CWP and CLP to family functioning. Patients with CLP (N = 126) or CWP (N = 75) were assessed for family functioning by the Family Assessment Device (FAD) and a comparison was done. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate associations of family functioning subscales with pain status (CWP vs CLP), controlling for demographic variables, pain variables; pain duration, pain ratings, pain disability, and psychological factors; depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing. The odds ratios (ORs) for the presence of CWP were calculated. Compared to patients with CLP, patients with CWP showed a lower functional status for Roles and Affective Involvement. The ORs for CWP were significantly higher in lower functioning Roles (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.21–4.65) and Affective Involvement (OR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.56–5.24) after adjusting for demographic variables. The significant association of CWP to Roles and Affective Involvement remained after controlling for the pain variables and psychological factors. This study shows that the families of patients with CWP have poorer family functioning than those with CLP. Our findings suggest that early identification and interventions for the family dysfunction of chronic pain patients are important to the treatment and prevention of CWP. PMID:27930535

  2. Family welfare.

    PubMed

    Sinha, N K

    1992-01-01

    Between 1901-1921, India gained 12.9 million people because mortality remained high. The death rate fell between 1921-1951, but birth rates remained the same. Therefore 110 million people were added--2 times the population increase between 1891-1921. Between 1951-1981, the population increased to 324 million. Socioeconomic development was responsible for most of the downward trend in the birth rate during the 20th century. Even though large families were the norm in early India, religious leaders encouraged small family size. The 1st government family planning clinics in the world opened in Mysore and Bangalore in 1930. Right before Independence, the Bhore Committee made recommendations to reduce population growth such as increasing the age of marriage for girls. Since 1951 there has been a change in measures and policies geared towards population growth with each of the 7 5-Year Plans because policy makers applied what they learned from each previous plan. The 1st 5-Year Plan emphasized the need to understand what factors contribute to population growth. It also integrated family planning services into health services of hospitals and health centers. The government was over zealous in its implementation of the sterilization program (2nd 5-Year Plan, 1956-1961), however, which hurt family planning programs for many years. As of early 1992, sterilization, especially tubectomy, remained the most popular family planning method, however. The 7th 5-Year Plan changed its target of reaching a Net Reproductive Rate of 1 by 2001 to 2006-2011. It set a goal of 100% immunization coverage by 1990 but it did not occur. In 1986, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare planned to make free contraceptives available in urban and rural areas and to involve voluntary organizations. The government needs to instill measures to increase women's status, women's literacy, and age of marriage as well as to eliminate poverty, ensure old age security, and ensure child survival and

  3. Family Hypnotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  4. Small Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... more emphasis on careers for women, more effective methods of contraception, and the rising cost of rearing and educating children. There are some very clear benefits to having a small family; Each child receives more parental attention and educational advantages, which generally raise her self- ...

  5. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific…

  6. Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgen, Carol, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This quarterly publication, issued by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), contains articles dealing with family violence and alcohol abuse, children of alcoholic parents, training programs for counselors, and confidentiality of client records. The three articles on alcohol abuse suggest that: (1) there is a clear…

  7. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  8. FAMILY TYMOVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article provides a brief review of the taxonomic structure, virion properties, genome organization and replication strategy, antigenic properties, and biological properties of viruses in the family Tymoviridae. Criteria for demarcation of genus and species are provided. A brief review of each...

  9. FAMILY LAUXANIIDAE.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vera Cristina

    2016-06-14

    An updated Catalogue of the Lauxaniidae of Colombia is presented. This acalyptratae family is poorly known in Colombia, with only 36 described species in 33 genera. This paper expands the distribution of 24 species to Colombia. At total, 63 species are reported here for Colombia.

  10. Family Structure and Family Processes in Mexican American Families

    PubMed Central

    Zeiders, Katharine H.; Roosa, Mark W.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    Despite increases in single-parent families among Mexican Americans (MA), few studies have examined the association of family structure and family adjustment. Utilizing a diverse sample of 738 Mexican American families (21.7% single parent), the current study examined differences across family structure on early adolescent outcomes, family functioning, and parent-child relationship variables. Results revealed that early adolescents in single parent families reported greater school misconduct, CD/ODD and MDD symptoms, and greater parent-child conflict than their counterparts in two parent families. Single parent mothers reported greater economic hardship, depression and family stress. Family stress and parent-child conflict emerged as significant mediators of the association between family structure and early adolescent outcomes, suggesting important processes linking MA single parent families and adolescent adjustment. PMID:21361925

  11. Family Therapy and Disturbed Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H., Ed.; Boszormenyi-Nagy, Ivan, Ed.

    Presented at a conference at which authors represented major theoretical positions in the field, most of the papers use family therapy as an important source of observations or ideas, or as a means to pinpoint methodological problems. Papers are grouped in sections as follows: four which introduce the reader to the field of specialization, provide…

  12. Family Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-30

    quality service delivery to meet the needs of the DoD personnel and their families, in accordance with DoD Directive 1342.17 (reference (a)). 4...facility, and program standards. f. Develop and forward to ASD(FM&P), for review and approval, a comprehensive evaluation system to measure the...of future services and the continuation, expansion, or termination of others. (3) Service-wide measurement criteria for monitoring and evaluating the

  13. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen and LDL apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with FH. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients in order to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:25939291

  14. Integrating Family Resilience and Family Stress Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Joan M.

    2002-01-01

    The construct, family resilience, is defined differently by practitioners and researchers. This study tries to clarify the concept of family resilience. The foundation is family stress and coping theory, particularly the stress models that emphasize adaptation processes in families exposed to major adversities. (JDM)

  15. The Family Hero in Black Alcoholism Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisbane, Francis L.

    1989-01-01

    Uses data from 20 case studies of Black adult female children of alcoholic parents to discuss Family Hero role often assumed by oldest or only female child in Black alcoholism families. Explains how female-dominated survival role of Family Hero in Black families is significantly more related to racial and cultural factors than numbers alone may…

  16. Positive Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Marvin B.

    The persistence of the nuclear family as the primary social unit in the United States and most all other societies, especially complex ones, is a fact. Values shape the definition of family, especially the "good family," and the "great debate" of this period on family failure, family corruption and the family's near demise originates in…

  17. Family Orientation in Family Medicine Training

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Yves R.; Tannenbaum, David

    1990-01-01

    Teaching about the family has become an important part of the family medicine curriculum. The family orientation index, a 39-item questionnaire, was designed to evaluate the family orientation of services and care provided as well as the teaching and research. The questionnaire was distributed to 55 program directors at 16 Canadian universities. The response rate was 84%. The results indicate that the family orientation of services is less than optimal. PMID:21233938

  18. Family ties: constructing family time in low-income families.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, Carolyn Y; Roy, Kevin M; Burton, Linda M

    2005-03-01

    "Family time" is reflected in the process of building and fortifying family relationships. Whereas such time, free of obligatory work, school, and family maintenance activities, is purchased by many families using discretionary income, we explore how low-income mothers make time for and give meaning to focused engagement and relationship development with their children within time constraints idiosyncratic to being poor and relying on welfare. Longitudinal ethnographic data from 61 low-income African American, European American, and Latina American mothers were analyzed to understand how mothers construct family time during daily activities such as talking, play, and meals. We also identify unique cultural factors that shape family time for low-income families, such as changing temporal orientations, centrality of television time, and emotional burdens due to poverty. Implications for family therapy are also discussed.

  19. Familial hyperargininaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Terheggen, H G; Lowenthal, A; Lavinha, F; Colombo, J P

    1975-01-01

    A third case of hyperargininaemia occurring in one family was studied from birth. In cord blood serum arginine concentration was only slightly raised, but arginase activity in red blood cell haemolysates was very low. In the urine on day 2 a typical cystinuria pattern was present. Arginine concentration in serum increased to 158 mumol/100 ml on the 41st day of life. Later determinations of the arginase activity in peripheral blood showed values below the sensitivity of the method. Blood ammonia was consistently high, and cystinuria was present. The enzymatic defect was further displayed by intravenous loading tests with arginine. Serum urea values were predominantly normal or near the lower limit of normal, suggesting the presence of other metabolic pathways of urea synthesis. In urine there was no excretion of guanidinosuccinic acid, while the excretion of other monosubstituted guanidine derivatives was increased, pointing to a connexion with hyperargininaemia. Owing to parental attitude, a low protein diet (1-5 g/kg) was introduced only late. The infant developed severe mental retardation, athetosis, and spasticity. PMID:1124944

  20. Family and family therapy in Russia.

    PubMed

    Bebtschuk, Marina; Smirnova, Daria; Khayretdinov, Oleg

    2012-04-01

    This article represents the information about family and family therapy in the context of culture, traditions and contemporary changes of social situations in Russia. The legislation of family rights are mentioned within items about marriage and family in the Constitution, Civil Code and Family Code of the Russian Federation which has changed during recent years. The definition of family and description of family structure are given through the prism of the current demographic situation, dynamics of statistics of marriage and divorce rates, mental disorders, disabilities and such phenomena as social abandonment. The actual curriculum, teaching of family therapy and its disadvantages, system of continuous education, supervision and initiatives of the Institute of Integrative Family Therapy in improvement of preparing of specialists who can provide qualified psychosocial assistance for the family according to the actual needs of society are noted. The directions of state and private practice of family counselling and therapy both for psychiatric patients and medical patients, for adults and children in a family systemic approach are highlighted with an indication of the spectrum of techniques and methods used by Russian professionals. The main obstacles and perspectives of development of family therapy in Russia are summarized.

  1. Family Therapy and Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Guillermo; Ysern, Eduardo

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the family and the enterprise of family therapy are social systems and under the influence of the ideology particular to a given society. The strategic family therapy treatment of a family with a drug-addicted member serves as an example to clarify the ideological themes of contemporary family therapy. (Author/BL)

  2. Effects of family connection and family individuation.

    PubMed

    Bell, Linda G; Bell, David C

    2009-09-01

    This prospective longitudinal study explores the differential effects of family connection and family individuation measured during adolescence on later midlife well-being. Home interviews were held in the 1970s with 99 families of 245 adolescents. Connection and individuation in the family system were measured by self-report, a projective exercise, and coding of taped family interactions. Twenty-five years later, telephone interviews were conducted with 54 men and 120 women (representing 82 families) who had been adolescents in the 1970s interviews. Family connection (measured during adolescence) was associated with self-acceptance and positive relationships at midlife partially mediated by marriage. Family individuation (measured during adolescence) was associated with personal autonomy at midlife.

  3. Revamping Family Preservation Services for Native Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Heather; Unrau, Yvonne A.; Manyfingers, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Examines the philosophy and program structures of family preservation services (FPS) in the context of providing services to Native American families with child welfare issues. Explores Native cultural concepts of family, child rearing, time, and spirituality. Outlines cross-cultural training needs for FPS workers related to cultural awareness,…

  4. Family Capital: Implications for Interventions with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, John R.; Peckuonis, Edward V.; Deforge, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been extensively discussed in the literature as building blocks that individuals and communities utilize to leverage system resources. Similarly, some families also create capital, which can enable members of the family, such as children, to successfully negotiate the outside world. Families in poverty confront serious…

  5. Choosing a Family Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the whole family. Family doctors create caring relationships with patients and their families. They really get ... questions.Remember, it takes time to build a relationship with your doctor. Last Updated: May 2014 This ...

  6. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  7. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... members within the same family have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) or any other form of Idiopathic Interstitial ...

  8. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... have good news and bad news for military families. MORE Military Families Brace for What’s Next In Syria President Trump ordered an airstrike in Syria leaving military families wondering what's next. More April is the Month ...

  9. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  10. Familial mesothelioma: a report of two families

    SciTech Connect

    Hammar, S.P.; Bockus, D.; Remington, F.; Freidman, S.; LaZerte, G.

    1989-02-01

    Five reports of familial mesothelioma in which mesotheliomas occurred in two or more family members have been recorded in the medical literature. In this report, we describe two examples of familial mesothelioma. In one family, three brothers who worked in the asbestos insulation industry developed mesothelioma. In the second family, the father, who was occupationally exposed to asbestos, died from a tubulopapillary peritoneal mesothelioma 11 years before his son died from an identical histologic type of peritoneal mesothelioma. Our report, as with those previously recorded, suggests that genetic factors may be important in the genesis of some mesotheliomas.

  11. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Familial Mediterranean fever By Mayo Clinic Staff Familial Mediterranean fever is an inflammatory disorder that causes recurrent fevers and painful inflammation of your abdomen, ...

  12. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a culturally-adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9–12 year old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted with each family. Parental stress, parent-child dysfunctional relations, and child behavior problems were reduced in the families receiving the intervention; family hardiness and family attachment were improved. Findings contribute to the validation of the SFP with Latinos, and can be used to inform social work practice with Puerto Rican families. PMID:20871785

  13. The Changing Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue contains feature articles and short reports on how and why family structures are undergoing substantial change in many parts of the world. These articles include: (1) "The Changing Family Structure," a review of how families are changing and why; (2) "Peru: Families in the Andes"; (3) "Thailand:…

  14. The Family in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlop, Jean D.

    This paper describes Laurelhurst Manor's family treatment program to help families affected by chemical dependency, a 7-month program which treats family members from the perspective of developmental stages and family roles. The center, located in Portland, Oregon, is a 40-bed, free-standing facility having a 20-bed adolescent unit and a 20-bed…

  15. Black Families. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes, Ed.

    The chapters of this collection explore the experiences of black families in the United States and Africa, today and in the past. They are: (1) "African American Families: A Historical Note" (John Hope Franklin); (2) "African American Families and Family Values" (Niara Sudarkasa); (3) "Old-Time Religion: Benches Can't Say…

  16. Family Participation in Policymaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Elizabeth, Ed.; Blankenship, Kelly, Ed.; McManus, Marilyn, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This bulletin focuses on family participation in mental health policymaking and highlights state efforts to increase family involvement. Articles include: (1) "Promoting Family Member Involvement in Children's Mental Health Policy Making Bodies," which describes how different states are promoting family member involvement in various statutory and…

  17. Families in Transition .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  18. Nontraditional family romance.

    PubMed

    Corbett, K

    2001-07-01

    Family stories lie at the heart of psychoanalytic developmental theory and psychoanalytic clinical technique, but whose family? Increasingly, lesbian and gay families, multiparent families, and single-parent families are relying on modern reproductive technologies to form families. The contemplation of these nontraditional families and the vicissitudes of contemporary reproduction lead to an unknowing of what families are, including the ways in which psychoanalysts configure the family within developmental theory. This article focuses on the stories that families tell in order to account for their formation--stories that include narratives about parental union, parental sexuality, and conception. The author addresses three constructs that inform family stories and that require rethinking in light of the category crises posed by and for the nontraditional family: (1) normative logic, (2) family reverie and the construction of a family romance, and (3) the primal scene. These constructs are examined in tandem with detailed clinical material taken from the psychotherapy of a seven-year-old boy and his two mothers.

  19. The Family Relationships Grid: Measuring Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Anne P.; And Others

    This study examined the Family Relationships Grid (FRG), a new measure of family structure that evaluates alliances, identification, isolation, and the relative strength of sibling and marital relationships. Subjects were 52 female and 35 male adolescents who were recruited through a university course and who each had at least one sibling.…

  20. Putting the "family" back into family therapy.

    PubMed

    Breunlin, Douglas C; Jacobsen, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we examine the field of family therapy by drawing a distinction between two forms of practice: Whole Family Therapy (WFT), defined as treating the whole family, and Relational Family Therapy (RFT), defined as working with a subsystem of the family or an individual while retaining a systemic lens. Our thesis is that the practice of WFT has been in decline for some time and steps must be taken to keep it from becoming a defunct practice. We consider the trajectory of WFT and RFT throughout the development of family therapy through reference to the people, the literature, training, and practice patterns associated with family therapy. We remind the reader of the many benefits of WFT and suggest that today WFT is likely to be practiced in conjunction with RFT and individual therapy. Since training of family therapists today is largely located in degree-granting programs, we identify constraints to including WFT in such programs. We conclude by offering suggestions that can enhance a program's ability to train students in WFT.

  1. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9- to 12-year-old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted…

  2. Family Therapy for the "Truncated" Nuclear Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1980-01-01

    The truncated nuclear family consists of a two-generation group in which conflict has produced a polarization of values. The single-parent family is at special risk. Go-between process enables the therapist to depolarize sharply conflicted values and reduce pathogenic relating. (Author)

  3. Creating a Family Health History

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Creating a Family Health History Why Create a Family Health History? Click for more information A Family Tree for ... Click for more information What a Family Health History May Reveal You can use a family health ...

  4. Invest in Family*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilesh; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The family is an integral part of one's life. It is very essential that every individual employed or unemployed invests time therein. The family is a source of support and growth for an individual, and the lack of family support or loneliness may be a causative factor in the genesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In India, family plays a paramount role when it comes to mental health of the individual. Tips on how one should invest time in one's family along with the role of a family in one's personal and social structure are discussed. PMID:25838732

  5. Assessing Postpartum Family Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Midmer, Deana; Talbot, Yves

    1988-01-01

    The birth of a child requires adaptation and reorganization within the family system in order to accommodate the new family member and to allow the family to continue in its psychosocial development. Knowledge of the normative and transitional changes required at this stage of family life will enhance family practitioners' understanding of some of the common concerns and complaints related to them by various family members during the postpartum period. The Family FIRO model represents a helpful conceptual framework to increase the family physician's understanding of the issues of inclusion, control, and intimacy that are highlighted during the transition to parenthood. The authors briefly present this model and discuss its application to postpartum adjustment and its implications for health-care professionals. PMID:21253238

  6. Unique Family Living Situations

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the family home changes for reasons of divorce, death, or economics? Factors, such as shifting between ... blending families when a parent remarries after a divorce or death of a spouse, or moving in ...

  7. Government and the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondale, Walter F.

    1975-01-01

    In order to deal successfully with the changes and pressures placed upon families, article considered the extent government policies are helping or hurting families, and what kind of support services are available. (Author/RK)

  8. Family Caregiver Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... on your schedule. Look for our launch soon! FAMILY CARE NAVIGATOR ─ Click on Your State AL AK ... Group) Smart Patients Caregivers Community In partnership with Family Caregiver Alliance Learn more Caregiver Research Caregivers exhibit ...

  9. Family Violence: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (DHHS/OHDS), Washington, DC.

    Family violence is a widespread problem; research has shown multiple factors are associated with family violence. Types of family violence include spouse abuse; elder abuse and neglect; child abuse and neglect; parent abuse; and sibling abuse. There are three types of spouse abuse: physical abuse, sexual violence, and psychological/emotional…

  10. Fatherhood and Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    On the assumption that fathers have been relatively absent from family support programs, this publication of the Family Resource Coalition addresses the role of fathers in family support programs, examines the impact of fathers on their children, and describes programs involving fathers successfully. Articles include: (1) "What's Behind the…

  11. Changing Family Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibert, M. Therese; Willetts, Marion C.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the definition of family. Considers three facets of the contemporary family measured by U.S. Census statistics: (1) marriage and divorce trends; (2) declining fertility; and (3) the rise in single-headed families. Addresses the societal changes (economic, cultural, legal, and technological) that have influenced the changes in family…

  12. Launching Family Message Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollman-Bonilla, Julie

    This lesson introduces Family Message Journals, a tool for encouraging family involvement and supporting writing to reflect and learn. First and second graders are led into composing through demonstration, guided writing, and finally independent writing of messages that they will bring home for family to read and write a reply. During the three…

  13. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  14. Families in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Patti O., Ed.; McGee, Michael, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This issue of "Emphasis" deals with families in transition, providing some model programs for the new family and some historical perspectives on how families have developed over time. Articles include: (1) "Nostalgia on the Right" (Nancy Theriot); (2) "Heart to Heart" (Nancy Harrington-MacLennan); (3) "The Media Get the Message" (Janet Alyn); (4)…

  15. Family Planning & Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This publication is an International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) annotated bibliography of books and articles concerned with family planning and literacy. The subject is divided into four major listings: (1) Literacy; (2) Education; (3) Literacy and Family Planning; and (4) Functional Literacy/Family Planning Projects and Programs.…

  16. Books in the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinger, Alice K.

    1989-01-01

    Opportunities for parents to encourage reading in the family are noted and ways to enhance the reading experience are discussed, including writing letters to book characters, singing combined with reading aloud, supplementing school subjects with enjoyable reading, sharing books at family gatherings, and using family experiences for book…

  17. Family Customs and Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Cynthia

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining open communication with immediate and extended family members, this book provides a compilation of ideas for family traditions and customs that are grounded in compassion and human kindness. The traditions were gathered from families in the United States and Canada who responded to advertisements in…

  18. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... for anyone with a family history of this disease. Prevention There is no known prevention for this rare, inherited disorder. Awareness of risks may allow early detection. Following a very low-fat diet can improve the ... Type I hyperlipoproteinemia; Familial chylomicronemia; Familial ...

  19. Year of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Agriculture, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This special issue focuses on problems and challenges confronting the California family and on research and extension efforts to provide at least partial answers. Research briefs by staff include "Challenges Confront the California Family" (state trends in poverty, divorce, single-parent families, child abuse, delinquency, teen births,…

  20. Individual and Family Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Jean; Simpson, Elizabeth

    This curriculum guide, in working paper form, for a semester-long three-credit course in individual and family development is one of nine technical core courses in an associate degree consumer/family manager program. The course studies individual and family development through the life cycle. Emphasis is on the relationship of basic needs to the…

  1. Treatment of violent families.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C. C.; Chance-Hill, G.

    1991-01-01

    Family violence is responsible for a significant proportion of homicides, a major cause of premature deaths in African-Americans. This article reviews the prevalence of family violence and explores associated risk factors. Principles and tips of treatment, along with a cognitive framework to guide the actual therapy, are outlined. Finally, issues of preventing family violence are discussed. PMID:2038079

  2. Strengthening America's Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Rose; Kumpfer, Karol

    2000-01-01

    Improving parenting practices and the family environment is the most effective, enduring strategy for combating juvenile delinquency. Describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Strengthening America's Families Initiative. Highlights several family-focused prevention programs identified as exemplary, explaining how they…

  3. A story of family.

    PubMed

    Condon, Barbara Backer

    2010-07-01

    The author of this column gives a vivid description of Parse's humanbecoming family model as lived in community. The story of M'Barek (Mark), who was imprisoned for 18 years, draws readers to a new understanding of family and community. Through the process of storytelling, Parse's essences of family are discussed.

  4. Family practice in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozsahin, Akatli Kursad

    2014-03-01

    The national project 'Transformation in Health' was started in 2005 to provide expert primary care by family physicians, and decrease expenses in Turkey. The number of family physicians was far below the need, so public physicians were promoted to family physician status after a 10-day intensive course. The government declared some satisfactory results, but privately paid family physicians were not accepted into the system. Furthermore, the government stopped paying for their services from private settings. Some family physicians became unemployed as the major payer for all forms of medical care in Turkey denied their services. The process showed it's value in time. Nevertheless, family physicians should be the core of this transformation as family medicine is an academic and a scientific discipline and a primary care-oriented specialty with its own specific educational content, research and base of evidence, which cannot be achieved through standard medical education.

  5. Multiplex families with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Afawi, Zaid; Oliver, Karen L.; Kivity, Sara; Mazarib, Aziz; Blatt, Ilan; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Misk, Adel J.; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kahana, Esther; Masalha, Rafik; Kramer, Uri; Ekstein, Dana; Shorer, Zamir; Wallace, Robyn H.; Mangelsdorf, Marie; MacPherson, James N.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Heron, Sarah E.; Corbett, Mark; Mulley, John C.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Korczyn, Amos D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical syndromes and inheritance patterns of multiplex families with epilepsy toward the ultimate aim of uncovering the underlying molecular genetic basis. Methods: Following the referral of families with 2 or more relatives with epilepsy, individuals were classified into epilepsy syndromes. Families were classified into syndromes where at least 2 family members had a specific diagnosis. Pedigrees were analyzed and molecular genetic studies were performed as appropriate. Results: A total of 211 families were ascertained over an 11-year period in Israel. A total of 169 were classified into broad familial epilepsy syndrome groups: 61 generalized, 22 focal, 24 febrile seizure syndromes, 33 special syndromes, and 29 mixed. A total of 42 families remained unclassified. Pathogenic variants were identified in 49/211 families (23%). The majority were found in established epilepsy genes (e.g., SCN1A, KCNQ2, CSTB), but in 11 families, this cohort contributed to the initial discovery (e.g., KCNT1, PCDH19, TBC1D24). We expand the phenotypic spectrum of established epilepsy genes by reporting a familial LAMC3 homozygous variant, where the predominant phenotype was epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, and a pathogenic SCN1A variant in a family where in 5 siblings the phenotype was broadly consistent with Dravet syndrome, a disorder that usually occurs sporadically. Conclusion: A total of 80% of families were successfully classified, with pathogenic variants identified in 23%. The successful characterization of familial electroclinical and inheritance patterns has highlighted the value of studying multiplex families and their contribution towards uncovering the genetic basis of the epilepsies. PMID:26802095

  6. Opening Doors: Understanding School and Family Influences on Family Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Erin; Stanley, Lindsey; Kemple, Kristen Mary

    2005-01-01

    Family involvement in schooling can benefit young children, teachers, and families. Family involvement in schools can be influenced by both school-related and family-related factors. School-related factors include teachers' attitudes toward families, and school and teacher expectations. Family-related factors include ethnicity, prior school…

  7. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  8. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  9. Extended family medicine training

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  10. Family dynamics and family psychotherapy of psychosomatic.

    PubMed

    Wirsching, M; Stierlin, H

    1979-01-01

    Family therapy of psychosomatic disorders is oftern difficult and comparable to the therapy of psychotic patients. Nonetheless, the results published today by authors such as Minuchin and Selvini and our own experiences are promising indeed. We have found that what seemed to be a deep-rooted psychic structure changed rapidly and enduringly if the relationship field changed. Amelioration of symptoms is in many cases easily attained if they are understood in their function within a relational system. Also, we regard the system or family approach as a chance for medical practice. The general practioner who usually deals with family systems has, in our view, an ideal position to bring about change if he uses his authority and trust properly. He has to obtain a positive, not pathology-oriented view and should use family and social resources in spite of engaging in an often fruitless and endless contact with the designated patient, which only serves to maintain and even to increase the homeostatic lock of the family system.

  11. Creating a family health history

    MedlinePlus

    Family health history; Create a family health history; Family medical history ... Many factors affect your health. These include your: Genes Diet and exercise habits Environment Family members tend to share certain behaviors, genetic traits, and habits. ...

  12. Advancing family psychology.

    PubMed

    Fiese, Barbara H

    2016-02-01

    To realize the broad and complex nature of the field of family psychology, I have slightly revised the mission statement of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP) to capture contemporary scholarship in family psychology and to advance systems perspectives in this top-tier scientific journal. Over the next 6 years, I hope that authors will consider JFP as an outlet for their best work in the following areas: (1) JFP addresses societal challenges faced by families today; (2) JFP publishes important studies on what makes couple and family relationships work; (3) JFP is a leader in publishing reports that use cutting-edge sophisticated approaches to research design and data analysis; and (4) JFP imparts knowledge about effective therapy and prevention programs relevant to couples and families. The journal is also expanding its publication rate to eight issues per year.

  13. State of family planning.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Courtney A; Traxler, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Family planning and reproductive health services are uniquely impacted by policy and politics in the United States. Recent years have witnessed an unprecedented number of abortion restrictions, and research funding has decreased in related areas. Despite this, both the science and the implementation of improved family planning and abortion methods have progressed in the past decade. This article reviews the current state of family planning, as well as technologies and patient care opportunities for the future.

  14. The Growth of a Family

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Biringer, Anne

    1991-01-01

    Caring for a family during pregnancy and birth is an ideal opportunity for family physicians to assess family functioning and help the family adjust to the birth of a new child. Stress and support systems can influence the course of pregnancy, including obstetric and perinatal outcomes. A family-centered approach can help patients during this critical stage of family development. PMID:21229107

  15. The Hoffmeister asteroid family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, V.; Novaković, B.; Aljbaae, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Hoffmeister family is a C-type group located in the central main belt. Dynamically, it is important because of its interaction with the ν1C nodal secular resonance with Ceres, which significantly increases the dispersion in inclination of family members at a lower semimajor axis. As an effect, the distribution of inclination values of the Hoffmeister family at a semimajor axis lower than its centre is significantly leptokurtic, and this can be used to set constraints on the terminal ejection velocity field of the family at the time it was produced. By performing an analysis of the time behaviour of the kurtosis of the vW component of the ejection velocity field [γ2(vW)], as obtained from Gauss' equations, for different fictitious Hoffmeister families with different values of the ejection velocity field, we were able to exclude that the Hoffmeister family should be older than 335 Myr. Constraints from the currently observed inclination distribution of the Hoffmeister family suggest that its terminal ejection velocity parameter VEJ should be lower than 25 m s-1. Results of a Yarko-YORP Monte Carlo method to family dating, combined with other constraints from inclinations and γ2(vW), indicate that the Hoffmeister family should be 220^{+60}_{-40} Myr old, with an ejection parameter VEJ = 20 ± 5 m s-1.

  16. [Nuclear families in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unalan, T

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the household or family types in Turkey in 1983, especially nuclear families. Nuclear families constitute 61.6% of all households in Turkey, and the majority of them are in the West and the Central regions. The highest % of nuclear families was found in the Mediterranean regions, and the lowest in the Black Sea region. Among all nuclear families, 87% of them consist of husband, wife and children, whereas 13% of them have only husband and wife. Nuclear families without children are common in urban areas and in the West while nuclear families with children are mostly found in rural areas and in the East and the Black Sea regions. Nuclear families with 3 or more children constitute 32% of all nuclear households in the West. On the other hand, the corresponding % is 73 for the Eastern region. As a result, it is concluded that nuclear families have significant regional and residential differentiations and households with the same formation in a developed and a less developed region should have different social, economic, and cultural characteristics.

  17. Inherited variants affecting RNA editing may contribute to ovarian cancer susceptibility: results from a large-scale collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Permuth, Jennifer B.; Reid, Brett; Earp, Madalene; Chen, Y. Ann; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Chen, Zhihua; Group, AOCS Study; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Lambrechts, Diether; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Niewenhuyse, Els Van; Vergote, Ignace; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten; Odunsi, Kunle; Goodman, Marc T.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa; Leminen, Arto; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.; Ness, Roberta B.; Kelley, Joseph; Heitz, Florian; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham; Hildebrandt, Michelle; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H.; Wu, Xifeng; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Winham, Stacey J.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bjorge, Line; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon; Pejovic, Tanja; Moffitt, Melissa; Le, Nhu; Cook, Linda S.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Kelemen, Linda E.; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hanna; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian; Eccles, Diana; McNeish, Iain; Whittemore, Alice; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph; Phelan, Catherine M.; Risch, Harvey; Narod, Steven; McLaughlin, John; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Wu, Anna H.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Cheng, Jin Q.; Goode, Ellen L.; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing in mammals is a form of post-transcriptional modification in which adenosine is converted to inosine by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Based on evidence of altered ADAR expression in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC), we hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ADAR genes modify EOC susceptibility, potentially by altering ovarian tissue gene expression. Using directly genotyped and imputed data from 10,891 invasive EOC cases and 21,693 controls, we evaluated the associations of 5,303 SNPs in ADAD1, ADAR, ADAR2, ADAR3, and SND1. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), with adjustment for European ancestry. We conducted gene-level analyses using the Admixture Maximum Likelihood (AML) test and the Sequence-Kernel Association test for common and rare variants (SKAT-CR). Association analysis revealed top risk-associated SNP rs77027562 (OR (95% CI)= 1.39 (1.17-1.64), P=1.0×10−4) in ADAR3 and rs185455523 in SND1 (OR (95% CI)= 0.68 (0.56-0.83), P=2.0×10−4). When restricting to serous histology (n=6,500), the magnitude of association strengthened for rs185455523 (OR=0.60, P=1.0×10−4). Gene-level analyses revealed that variation in ADAR was associated (P<0.05) with EOC susceptibility, with PAML=0.022 and PSKAT-CR=0.020. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis in EOC tissue revealed significant associations (P<0.05) with ADAR expression for several SNPs in ADAR, including rs1127313 (G/A), a SNP in the 3′ untranslated region. In summary, germline variation involving RNA editing genes may influence EOC susceptibility, warranting further investigation of inherited and acquired alterations affecting RNA editing. PMID:27911851

  18. Inherited variants affecting RNA editing may contribute to ovarian cancer susceptibility: results from a large-scale collaboration.

    PubMed

    Permuth, Jennifer B; Reid, Brett; Earp, Madalene; Chen, Y Ann; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Chen, Zhihua; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lambrechts, Diether; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Van Niewenhuyse, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten; Odunsi, Kunle; Goodman, Marc T; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Wilkens, Lynne R; Thompson, Pamela J; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa; Leminen, Arto; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; Kelley, Joseph; Heitz, Florian; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham; Hildebrandt, Michelle; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H; Wu, Xifeng; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Poole, Elizabeth M; Bandera, Elisa V; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Winham, Stacey J; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Bjorge, Line; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon; Pejovic, Tanja; Moffitt, Melissa; Le, Nhu; Cook, Linda S; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Kelemen, Linda E; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hanna; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Pharoah, Paul D P; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian; Eccles, Diana; McNeish, Iain; Whittemore, Alice; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph; Phelan, Catherine M; Risch, Harvey; Narod, Steven; McLaughlin, John; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Wu, Anna H; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Cheng, Jin Q; Goode, Ellen L; Sellers, Thomas A

    2016-11-08

    RNA editing in mammals is a form of post-transcriptional modification in which adenosine is converted to inosine by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Based on evidence of altered ADAR expression in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC), we hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ADAR genes modify EOC susceptibility, potentially by altering ovarian tissue gene expression. Using directly genotyped and imputed data from 10,891 invasive EOC cases and 21,693 controls, we evaluated the associations of 5,303 SNPs in ADAD1, ADAR, ADAR2, ADAR3, and SND1. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), with adjustment for European ancestry. We conducted gene-level analyses using the Admixture Maximum Likelihood (AML) test and the Sequence-Kernel Association test for common and rare variants (SKAT-CR). Association analysis revealed top risk-associated SNP rs77027562 (OR (95% CI)= 1.39 (1.17-1.64), P=1.0x10-4) in ADAR3 and rs185455523 in SND1 (OR (95% CI)= 0.68 (0.56-0.83), P=2.0x10-4). When restricting to serous histology (n=6,500), the magnitude of association strengthened for rs185455523 (OR=0.60, P=1.0x10-4). Gene-level analyses revealed that variation in ADAR was associated (P<0.05) with EOC susceptibility, with PAML=0.022 and PSKAT-CR=0.020. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis in EOC tissue revealed significant associations (P<0.05) with ADAR expression for several SNPs in ADAR, including rs1127313 (G/A), a SNP in the 3' untranslated region. In summary, germline variation involving RNA editing genes may influence EOC susceptibility, warranting further investigation of inherited and acquired alterations affecting RNA editing.

  19. Family Sense of Coherence and Family Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonovsky, Aaron; Sourani, Talma

    1988-01-01

    Administered family Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale to 60 married Israeli males who were disabled by injury or illness and to their spouses. Data provide strong support for hypothesis that strength of SOC would be associated with adaptation, and showed considerable degree of consensus among spouses. (Author/NB)

  20. The Rafita asteroid family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljbaae, S.; Carruba, V.; Masiero, J. R.; Domingos, R. C.; Huaman, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Rafita asteroid family is an S-type group located in the middle main belt, on the right side of the 3J:-1A mean-motion resonance. The proximity of this resonance to the family left side in semi-major axis caused many former family members to be lost. As a consequence, the family shape in the (a, 1/D) domain is quite asymmetrical, with a preponderance of objects on the right side of the distribution. The Rafita family is also characterized by a leptokurtic distribution in inclination, which allows the use of methods of family age estimation recently introduced for other leptokurtic families such as Astrid, Hansa, Gallia, and Barcelona. In this work we propose a new method based on the behavior of an asymmetry coefficient function of the distribution in the (a, 1/D) plane to date incomplete asteroid families such as Rafita. By monitoring the time behavior of this coefficient for asteroids simulating the initial conditions at the time of the family formation, we were able to estimate that the Rafita family should have an age of 490 ± 200 Myr, in good agreement with results from independent methods such as Monte Carlo simulations of Yarkovsky and Yorp dynamical induced evolution and the time behaviour of the kurtosis of the sin (i) distribution. Asteroids from the Rafita family can reach orbits similar to 8% of the currently known near Earth objects. ≃1% of the simulated objects are present in NEO-space during the final 10 Myr of the simulation, and thus would be comparable to objects in the present-day NEO population.

  1. Strengthening Families: Exploring the Impacts of Family Camp Experiences on Family Functioning and Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garst, Barry A.; Baughman, Sarah; Franz, Nancy K.; Seidel, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that family camp experiences can enhance family relationships. Families often participate in family camp experiences for a vacation, as part of a therapeutic and/or intervention strategy, or to gain general enrichment or engagement. To better understand the impacts of family camp experiences on family functioning, a mixed-methods…

  2. Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  3. Narrative Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, William M.; Keenan, Robert

    1997-01-01

    States that narrative family therapy is informed by social constructionism and postmodern worldviews, and is a relatively significant departure from mainstream psychotherapy. Discusses the use of narrative family therapy. Uses the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden as an example. (MKA)

  4. Families, Risk, and Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael, Ed.; Feiring, Candice, Ed.

    The problems of studying families arise from the difficulty in studying systems in which there are multiple elements interacting with each other and with the child. This book attests to the growing sophistication of the conceptualization and measurement techniques for understanding family processes. Chapters in the first part of the book,…

  5. Workshops on Family Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Kathleen M.

    Intended to help speech communication professionals become involved in developing, implementing, and evaluating marital or family enrichment programs, this booklet discusses the theory and practice of using marital enrichment programs to increase family harmony. The first section contains an overview of selected enrichment programs, as well as…

  6. Changing Families, Changing Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income…

  7. Education and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Leonard, Ed.

    This book is the report of the Family Ties Commission, which was established by the Association of Teacher Educators to study the relationship between home and school. Following the preface and two introductory essays, "Education and My Family" (K.B. O'Rourke as told to E. Johnson) and "Preparing for Successful Children" (B. Clawson), the book is…

  8. The Working Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boethius, Monica

    1984-01-01

    The working family is today by far the most common family type in Sweden. However, just over 50 percent of the children of working parents have access to day care. Because Swedish income tax policy is based on the concept that all adults will support themselves and does not take into account the number of persons supported on an income, one parent…

  9. Employers, Families and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Family Involvement in Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    Family involvement in education is good for business, critical to children's school achievement, and important in creating strong and vibrant communities. This report discusses the role of businesses and employers in helping partners and family members be more involved in children's learning. Throughout the report, programs at specific companies…

  10. America's Family Time Famine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, Jr., William R.

    1990-01-01

    Parents spend increasingly less time with their children because of the pressures of dual careers and single parenthood. Economic pressures and social values have affected sharing of family time. Studies show both parents and children consider spending time together the most important element in improving family life. (BC)

  11. Family Science Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Holly; Alderman, Helen Christine

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Family Science Night (FSN) described in this article was to involve culturally and linguistically diverse families in school life so that students would be more vocal, successful, and interactive in science class. The project would also demonstrate to the students that their teacher valued their input in the classroom. The setting…

  12. Therapy for Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmann, Michael R.

    A family therapy model, based on a conceptualization of the family as a behavioral system whose members interact adaptively so that an optimal level of functioning is maintained within the system, is described. The divergent roots of this conceptualization are discussed briefly, as are the treatment approaches based on it. The author's model,…

  13. Patent Family Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Edlyn S.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on retrieval of patent information online and includes definition of patent family, basic and equivalent patents, "parents and children" applications, designated states, patent family databases--International Patent Documentation Center, World Patents Index, APIPAT (American Petroleum Institute), CLAIMS (IFI/Plenum). A table…

  14. Democratization of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Ulrich

    1997-01-01

    Discusses several issues related to a modern approach in the interpretation of civil freedom and its relationship to the notion of family. First, presents some definitions and distinctions regarding the sociology of political freedom, which it suggests should become the sociology of citizenship. Then, applies those ideas to families, particularly…

  15. Marriage or Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Jay

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the differences between family therapy and marriage counseling in terms of professional organization, theory, and practice. Suggests that training in marriage therapy does not appear adequate for family therapy. The goal of the therapy field should be more consensus in theory and a single profession of therapists. (JAC)

  16. Measuring Family Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunce, Joseph T.; Priesmeyer, Marydeth L.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated dimensions of family dynamics via test construction and cross validation, with a developmental sample (N=93) and a validity generalization sample (N=65). Developed two scales that correlated significantly with perceptions of family stability and quality in the developmental and validity generalization samples. (BH)

  17. Family Support and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Lou Ann

    2013-01-01

    Family involvement is essential to the developmental outcome of infants born into Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In this article, evidence has been presented on the parent's perspective of having an infant in the NICU and the context of family. Key points to an educational assessment are also reviewed. Throughout, the parent's concerns and…

  18. Black Families. Interdisciplinary Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Harold E., Ed.; Stewart, James B., Ed.

    Since the early 1960s, the black family has been characterized as pathological. This six-part collection of 18 research studies presents alternative approaches to understanding the special characteristics of black families. Part I, "Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives," comprises a comparison of the pioneering work of W. E. B. Du…

  19. Family-Friendly Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Patterson; Garcia, Maria

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1980s, the Denver Art Museum initiated efforts to make the museum a destination for families. From 1997 to 2001, with a generous grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, these efforts came to fruition. From the moment they walk through the doors, families' needs are anticipated. For example, they can pick up a welcoming brochure, Free…

  20. The Family Constellation Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemire, David

    The Family Constellation Scale (FC Scale) is an instrument that assesses perceived birth order in families. It can be used in counseling to help initiate conversations about various traits and assumptions that tend to characterize first-born, middle-born children, youngest-born, and only children. It provides both counselors and clients insights…

  1. Balancing Family and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahnke, Sally; And Others

    The purpose of this monograph is to present a series of activities designed to teach strategies needed for effectively managing the multiple responsibilities of family and work. The guide contains 11 lesson plans dealing with balancing family and work that can be used in any home economics class, from middle school through college. The lesson…

  2. Marinating the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, Karen A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the New York Aquarium's program specifically designed for family learning and teaching. The program's goal is to create an environment where child-parent roles are dropped and where the philosophy that no one of us is as smart as all of us prevails. Strategies for family involvement are outlined. (MH)

  3. Reaching Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter issue focuses on programming undertaken to address the health and educational needs of rural families in developing and developed nations. After examining the nature of rural families and rural poverty, the newsletter discusses: (1) the Mon Women's Organization in Thailand; (2) The "Contact With Kids" parent education…

  4. Latino Families Learning Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterling, Jorge P.; Violand-Sanchez, Emma; von Vacano, Marcela

    1999-01-01

    The push for the English-only literacy approach sends the wrong message to language-minority families. The Arlington (Virginia) Public Schools have established first-language pilot programs to accelerate Latino students' academic achievement and have welcomed community-based educational initiatives. A family-literacy program motivates parents to…

  5. Family Perspectives on Prematurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero to Three (J), 2003

    2003-01-01

    In this article, seven families describe their experiences giving birth to and raising a premature baby. Their perspectives vary, one from another, and shift over time, depending on each family's circumstances and the baby's developmental course. Experiences discussed include premature labor, medical interventions and the NICU, bringing the baby…

  6. Explaining Family Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Mary Anne, Ed.; Vangelisti, Anita L., Ed.

    A detailed review of current research and state-of-the-art ideas concerning both communication processes and family functioning is presented in this collection of articles. The volume is organized around three sections. Part 1, "The Development of Family Communication Patterns," contains: (1) "Communication in Infancy"…

  7. Transient familial hyperbilirubinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Transient familial hyperbilirubinemia is a metabolic disorder that is passed down through families. Babies with ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Jaundice Metabolic Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  8. Intervention in Disintegrating Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wootton, Ray W.

    A special demonstration project attempted to find means of assisting hard-core multi-problem families in a predominantly rural Idaho county. A single agency was formed to coordinate community activities and provide a variety of services for the needs of the total family. Project personnel included a director, social worker, home economist, public…

  9. Families on the Grow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Irene K.; Phillips, Marjorie M.

    This correspondence course was designed to help parents better understand their growing children and themselves as parents. The introduction briefly sketches the importance of the family in child development. Each of the five illustrated lessons contains 7 to 12 pages on one aspect of family life. Each lesson contains a set of objectives, a…

  10. Golden Matrix Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontaine, Anne; Hurley, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This student research project explores the properties of a family of matrices of zeros and ones that arises from the study of the diagonal lengths in a regular polygon. There is one family for each n greater than 2. A series of exercises guides the student to discover the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrices, which leads in turn to…

  11. Helping Friends and Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... chapter Join our online community Helping Friends and Family Part of living well with Alzheimer’s is adjusting to your “new normal” and helping family and friends do the same. Knowing what to ...

  12. [Focus: Family Communication].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Richard E., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the "Journal of the Wisconsin Communication Association" focuses on family communication and contains the following articles: "Marital Typologies: An Alternative Approach to the Study of Communication in Enduring Relations" by Mary Anne Fitzpatrick, "Intimate Communication and the Family" by Marilyn D. LaCourt, and "A Study in…

  13. Family Reconstruction: The Family within-a Group Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satir, Virginia; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents Virginia Satir's Family Reconstruction, a group therapy experience that blends and extends her 1982 process therapy and 1983 conjoint family therapy approaches. Describes the family reconstruction process, the review of family reconstruction data in the pregroup interview, the family reconstruction process in the counseling group, and the…

  14. 75 FR 17946 - Family Report, MTW Family Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Family Report, MTW Family Report AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... understand demographic, family profile, income, and housing information for participants in the Public... Following Information Title of Proposal: Family Report, MTW Family Report. OMB Approval Number:...

  15. Family intervention for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Fiona; Mari, Jair; Rathbone, John; Wong, Winson

    2014-01-01

    Background People with schizophrenia from families that express high levels of criticism, hostility, or over involvement, have more frequent relapses than people with similar problems from families that tend to be less expressive of emotions. Forms of psychosocial intervention, designed to reduce these levels of expressed emotions within families, are now widely used. Objectives To estimate the effects of family psychosocial interventions in community settings for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like conditions compared with standard care. Search strategy We updated previous searches by searching the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (September 2008). Selection criteria We selected randomised or quasi-randomised studies focusing primarily on families of people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder that compared community-orientated family-based psychosocial intervention with standard care. Data collection and analysis We independently extracted data and calculated fixed-effect relative risk (RR), the 95% confidence intervals (CI) for binary data, and, where appropriate, the number needed to treat (NNT) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD). Main results This 2009-10 update adds 21 additional studies, with a total of 53 randomised controlled trials included. Family intervention may decrease the frequency of relapse (n = 2981, 32 RCTs, RR 0.55 CI 0.5 to 0.6, NNT 7 CI 6 to 8), although some small but negative studies might not have been identified by the search. Family intervention may also reduce hospital admission (n = 481, 8 RCTs, RR 0.78 CI 0.6 to 1.0, NNT 8 CI 6 to 13) and encourage compliance with medication (n = 695, 10 RCTs, RR 0.60 CI 0.5 to 0.7, NNT 6 CI 5 to 9) but it does not obviously affect the tendency of individuals/families to leave care (n = 733, 10 RCTs, RR 0.74 CI 0.5 to 1.0). Family intervention also seems to improve general social impairment and the levels of

  16. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the Trp/amber editing site of hepatitis delta virus (+)RNA: a case of rational design

    SciTech Connect

    MacElrevey, Celeste; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2005-12-01

    Well diffracting decamer crystals of the hepatitis delta virus RNA-editing site were prepared, but exhibited merohedral twinning and base averaging owing to duplex symmetry. A longer asymmetric construct that includes additional flanking RNA sequences has been crystallized that does not appear to exhibit these defects. RNA editing by mammalian ADAR1 (Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA) is required for the life cycle of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV). Editing extends the single viral open reading frame to yield two protein products of alternate length. ADARs are believed to recognize double-stranded RNA substrates via a ‘structure-based’ readout mechanism. Crystals of 10-mer duplexes representing the HDV RNA-editing site diffracted to 1.35 Å resolution, but suffered from merohedral twinning and averaging of the base registry. Expansion of the construct to include two flanking 3 × 1 internal loops yielded crystals in the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution, revealing a unit cell with parameters a = 62.5, c = 63.5 Å. The crystallization and X-ray analysis of multiple forms of the HDV RNA-editing substrate, encounters with common RNA crystal-growth defects and a strategy to overcome these problems are reported.

  17. Human BLCAP transcript: new editing events in normal and cancerous tissues.

    PubMed

    Galeano, Federica; Leroy, Anne; Rossetti, Claudia; Gromova, Irina; Gautier, Philippe; Keegan, Liam P; Massimi, Luca; Di Rocco, Concezio; O'Connell, Mary A; Gallo, Angela

    2010-07-01

    Bladder cancer-associated protein (BLCAP) is a highly conserved protein among species, and it is considered a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene originally identified from human bladder carcinoma. However, little is known about the regulation or the function of this protein. Here, we show that the human BLCAP transcript undergoes multiple A-to-I editing events. Some of the new editing events alter the highly conserved amino terminus of the protein creating alternative protein isoforms by changing the genetically coded amino acids. We found that both ADAR1 and ADAR2-editing enzymes cooperate to edit this transcript and that different tissues displayed distinctive ratios of edited and unedited BLCAP transcripts. Moreover, we observed a general decrease in BLCAP-editing level in astrocytomas, bladder cancer and colorectal cancer when compared with the related normal tissues. The newly identified editing events, found to be downregulated in cancers, could be useful for future studies as a diagnostic tool to distinguish malignancies or epigenetic changes in different tumors.

  18. A family quarrel? "Developmentalism" or family planning.

    PubMed

    Carder, M

    1974-01-01

    The switch in emphasis in population policies from family planning to the development of socioeconomic policies that would encourage smaller families--summed up in the word "developmentalism"--is charted from a 1967 paper by Kinsley Davis to its culmination at the 1974 World Population Conference, when even as staunch a supporter of family planning as John D. Rockefeller came out in support of placing population policy in the context of economic and social development. The real question is, however: To what extent does developmentalism represent a true shift in policy and how much is simply a more sophisticated rhetoric designed to deflect the growing opposition to population control? On the one hand, the endorsement by a man of Rockefeller's stature indicates a significant change. On the other, the changes which the implementation of developmentalism would entail seem irreconcilable with the present political and economic structures of underdeveloped nations and of relations between them and the more developed countries. Further, developmentalism is neither as progressive as its advocates suggest, nor as threatening as its opponents cry. It is, in fact, a prescription for enhancing the effectiveness of family planning through a form of social engineering from the top; its details--more aid, investment, and trade--would involve an expanded Western role in the Third World. It is even suggested that developmentalism might be a cover for the creation of a more stratified society, where marginal members are restricted to their own quarters in an effort to secure political stability and economic growth. In the end, developmentalism might be shortlived, as pressure to step up birth control programs is felt from many quarters.

  19. [Family oriented nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquin Salvador; Lima-Serrano, Marta; Sáez-Bueno, Africa

    2009-01-01

    Nursing has experienced an important methodological development, in which it gives priority to the individual, although at a socioeconomic level a marked interest is seen in the health care of the family unit and the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) and NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) nursing guidelines, using diagnoses, criteria of results and interventions orientated towards this aim. We consider to the family as an opened system consisted of human elements, with a common history, which they form a functional unit been ruled by own procedure. In this paper we look at those aspects that must be taken into account in nursing assessment of families from a systemic perspective, including some tools for data collection and analysis of information. In addition, we identify specific areas of intervention. We believe that the family must be studied from a nursing care point of view with its own characteristics as opposed to those possessed individually by each of its members. We also believe that, when assessment is centred on the Henderson unaided activities study or the Gordon functional health patterns, they are not useful in assessing the family unit. This work offers an assessment method centred on the family unit, which helps to identify the nursing diagnoses applicable to it. Our proposal, which has been successfully used by nursing students over the last few years, hopes to contribute to quality clinical practice with a tool orientated towards the family.

  20. Families Get Involved! Learning Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Media and Information Services.

    Noting that families who are involved in their children's education make a difference in their child's performance, this two-page information sheet encourages families to get involved by listing the benefits of family involvement on one side and the ways adult family members can help in the school on the other. As a result of family participation:…

  1. Family Centered Maternity Care

    PubMed Central

    Enkin, Murray W.

    1973-01-01

    Current practices of obstetrical care tend to hinder rather than facilitate family development and maturation. A program of family centred maternity care is described. Husbands are invited to prenatal visits, and are involved in intensive preparation for labor and delivery. Their presence and active participation in labor, delivery, and postpartum course are encouraged. This, along with a rooming-in policy for the baby, and the utilization of the postpartum period for an intensive training in parenthood, appears to produce a safe and satisfying obstetrical experience for the family. PMID:20468914

  2. Family Treatment for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    FALLOON, IAN R. H.; MCGILL, CHARISTINE W.; MATTHEWS, SUSAN M.; KEITH, SAMUEL J.; SCHOOLER, NINA R.

    1996-01-01

    The NIMH Treatment Strategies in Schizophrenia (TSS) collaborative study group investigated the efficacy of antisychotic drug maintenance strategies involving reduced medication exposure in interaction with applied and supportive family management for the long-term treatment of schizophrenia. Therapy was provided at five centers by 25 clinicians who did not participate in the development of the therapies. They were trained by two of the authors, I.R.H.F and C.W.M, in applied family management, a homebased treatment derived from the behavioral family therapy developed by them. Clinicians’ characteristics, selection, and training methods, as well as patient rehospitalization rates, are reported for the two family management conditions. The TSS study represents a bridge between the development of a novel therapy and its dissemination in general clinical practice. PMID:22700264

  3. The Family Training Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Gwendolyn H.

    1974-01-01

    The author describes a program in which the families of migrant workers were educated, trained, and placed in permanent jobs. This program also provided health, counseling, and child care services. (RWP)

  4. General Dynamics Atlas family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, James

    Developments concerning the Atlas family of launch vehicles over the last three or four years are summarized. Attention is given to the center of gravity, load factors, acoustics, pyroshock, low-frequency sinusoidal vibration, and high-frequency random vibration.

  5. Balancing Work & Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chris

    1991-01-01

    Describes the responses of some companies to increasing demands for family-work balance in terms of flexibility in working hours and leave policies, child care, and fringe benefits. Identifies some of the effects on the "bottom line." (SK)

  6. Familial calcific periarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hajiroussou, V J; Webley, M

    1983-01-01

    A family of 4 is described in which both children had calcific periarthritis affecting the shoulders, and the mother had radiological evidence of periarticular calcification near the left greater trochanter. PMID:6882045

  7. Children and Families: 1984?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    1981-01-01

    In order to develop normally, children need emotional involvement and shared activities with one or more adult(s). Public policy in the United States, unlike that of most industrialized societies, is not supportive of family life. (Author/GC)

  8. Family troubles - resources

    MedlinePlus

    The following organizations are good resources for information on child abuse , incest, domestic violence, and family troubles: National Domestic Violence Hotline -- www.thehotline.org Prevent Child Abuse America -- ...

  9. Asbestos: Protect Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Protect Your Family How to Identify Materials That May Contain Asbestos ... Improper removal may actually increase your and your family’s exposure to asbestos fibers. Top of Page Asbestos ...

  10. The changing American family.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A; Freedman, D

    1983-10-01

    This Bulletin documents recent changes in American family patterns resulting both from longterm trends in urbanization, industrialization, and economic growth and the disruption of the Great Depression and World War 2, as well as changed attitudes toward marriage, parenthood, divorce, and the roles of women. Following a postwar boom in the 1950s and 1960s, marriage rates have now fallen to levels observed in the early 20th century. Since 1970, the number of unmarried couples living together has more than tripled to 1.9 million in 1983. The divorce rate has now stabilized after more than doubling since 1960, but at the current level, 1/2 of all recent marriages will end in divorce. Most divorced persons remarry fairly quickly, often creating complex families of "step-relatives." With 19% of households with minor children now headed by a women with no husband present, up to 1/2 of all children will live for sometime in a fatherless family before age 18. Over 1/2 of all married women, including 49% of married mothers of preschool children, now hold a paid job outside the home. Working wives boost a family's income by an average 40% but still are expected to shoulder most responsiblility for home and childcare. White women now in their 20s say they expect to have an average of 2 children, but are delaying childbearing to such an extent that 29% could end up childless. Most of the elderly live on their own but usually near children whom they see frequently. Despite changes in traditional family patterns, Americans consistently report that a happy marriage and good family are the most important aspects of life. And though most Americans now live with few or no family members, they maintain active contact with a large network of family.

  11. Familiality in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Familiality in brain tumors is not definitively substantiated. Methods: We used the Utah Population Data Base (UPDB), a genealogy representing the Utah pioneers and their descendants, record-linked to statewide cancer records, to describe the familial nature of primary brain cancer. We examined the familial clustering of primary brain tumors, including subgroups defined by histologic type and age at diagnosis. The UPDB includes 1,401 primary brain tumor cases defined as astrocytoma or glioblastoma, all with at least three generations of genealogy data. We tested the hypothesis of excess relatedness of brain tumor cases using the Genealogical Index of Familiality method. We estimated relative risks for brain tumors in relatives using rates of brain tumors estimated internally. Results: Significant excess relatedness was observed for astrocytomas and glioblastomas considered as a group (n = 1,401), for astrocytomas considered separately (n = 744), but not for glioblastomas considered separately (n = 658). Significantly increased risks to first- and second-degree relatives for astrocytomas were identified for relatives of astrocytomas considered separately. Significantly increased risks to first-degree relatives, but not second degree, were observed for astrocytoma and glioblastoma cases considered together, and for glioblastoma cases considered separately. Conclusions: This study provides strong evidence for a familial contribution to primary brain cancer risk. There is evidence that this familial aspect includes not only shared environment, but also a heritable component. Extended high-risk brain tumor pedigrees identified in the UPDB may provide the opportunity to identify predisposition genes responsible for familial brain tumors. GLOSSARY GBM = glioblastoma; GIF = Genealogical Index of Familiality; HGG = high-grade gliomas; ICD-O = International Classification of Disease–Oncology; LGG = low-grade gliomas; RR = relative risks; SEER = Surveillance

  12. Swedish Family Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrstrom, Staffan

    1986-01-01

    Family policy remains one of the leading issues of Swedish domestic politics. All parties are agreed that families with children must be given a better deal in the wake of the economic crisis. But how is this to be done and how quickly can it be achieved? Is the expansion of day nursery facilities to be speeded up, or are parents to be given a…

  13. Family Demands, Social Support and Family Functioning in Taiwanese Families Rearing Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, C-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) affects not only children but also their families. Much remains to be learned about factors that influence how families of children with DS function, especially families in non-Western populations. The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine how family demographics, family demands and…

  14. Welfare Policies and Black Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trader, Harriet Peat

    1979-01-01

    The family is an important resource for minority persons, and many minority families depend on public welfare for their survival. This article offers a compact analysis of how welfare policies often work to the disadvantage of poor Black families. (Author)

  15. Administration for Children and Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Speeches Videos What is the Administration for Children & Families? The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is ... Visit the Office of Community Services Website The Family Room Blog RSS Feed Building Community, Building Hope: ...

  16. Mandolin Family Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, David J.; Rossing, Thomas D.

    The mandolin family of instruments consists of plucked chordophones, each having eight strings in four double courses. With the exception of the mandobass, the courses are tuned in intervals of fifths, as are the strings in violin family instruments. The soprano member of the family is the mandolin, tuned G3-D4-A4-E5. The alto member of the family is the mandola, tuned C3-G3-D4-A4. The mandola is usually referred to simply as the mandola in the USA, but is called the tenor mandola in Europe. The tenor member of the family is the octave mandolin, tuned G2-D3-A3-E4. It is referred to as the octave mandolin in the USA, and as the octave mandola in Europe. The baritone member of the family is the mandocello, or mandoloncello, tuned C2-G2-D3-A3. A variant of the mandocello not common in the USA is the five-course liuto moderno, or simply liuto, designed for solo repertoire. Its courses are tuned C2-G2-D3-A3-E4. A mandobass was also made by more than one manufacturer during the early twentieth century, though none are manufactured today. They were fretted instruments with single string courses tuned E1-A1-D2-G2. There are currently a few luthiers making piccolo mandolins, tuned C4-G4-D5-A5.

  17. Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  18. Family planning Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Singarimbun, M

    1968-06-01

    The growth of family planning activities in Indonesia in the Postwar period is traced; and future prospects for family planning are assessed. Transmigration projects initiated by the Dutch and supported by President Sukarno after Indonesian independence as a means of decreasing population pressure on the island of Java, are identified as the only official response to the population problem until 1965. In the face of the government's opposition to the idea of birth control as a population control measure, the activities of the Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA) after its founding in 1957 were limited to advising mothers on spacing of their children for health reasons. Statements made in support of a national family planning program by government officials at a 1967 IPPA Congress and on other occasions are noted. The major components of an approved national family planning program to start in 1969 are described. However, the government's policy as of late 1967 and early 1968 is characterized as one of mainly benevolent encouragement and help to voluntary organizations. The chief impediment to family planning in Indonesia is said to be a lack of motivation and the force of traditional values that favor large families. On the positive side are: 1) Studies showing considerable interest in birth control by the rural population; 2) A long history of traditional birth control practices; 3) The absence of outright opposition by religious groups to the principle of family planning. However, financial costs, the need for the training of personnel, and a general unawareness of the magnitude of the task lying ahead constitute other formidable obstacles.

  19. We Are Family: Using Diverse Family Structure Literature with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Deanna Peterschick; Bell, Kari

    2006-01-01

    The structure of the American family has changed over the years. Although the traditional father, mother, child structure still dominates, other family patterns are emerging. In this article the authors present: (1) current statistics relating to diverse family structures; (2) reasons for using diverse family structure literature with children;…

  20. Use of family management styles in family intervention research.

    PubMed

    Alderfer, Melissa A

    2006-01-01

    Family management styles (FMSs) explain some of the complexities embedded in a family with a child who has chronic illness. The FMS typologies provide descriptions of family adjustment and management of care. These 5 distinct patterns may be valuable in tailoring and evaluating family interventions in research.

  1. 75 FR 9247 - Single Family Mortgage Insurance Premium, Single Family

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Single Family Mortgage Insurance Premium, Single Family AGENCY: Office of the Chief... the Single Family Premium Collection Subsystem-Upfront (SFPCS-U) to remit the upfront premium to... manage and process upfront single family mortgage insurance premium collections and corrections to...

  2. Engaging Families in In-Home Family Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ronald W.; Koley, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Boys Town has created a program called In-Home Family Services to deliver help to families in stress. In-home family intervention programs have become widely used to help more families who are at risk and experiencing difficulties with a wide range of problems including domestic violence, child behavior problems, parent-child and family…

  3. Family Development and the Family Life Cycle: An Empirical Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanier, Graham; And Others

    The concept of family life cycle has become increasingly prominent in the study of family development--the formation, maintenance, change, and dissolution of marriage and family relations. An evaluation of this concept is accomplished by examining the relationships between three possible stratification schemes: stage of the family life cycle,…

  4. Attitudes toward family planning.

    PubMed

    Gille, H

    1984-06-01

    Many of the 135 countries participating in the 1974 UN World Population Conference were far from accepting the basic human right to decide freely and responsibly the number and spacing of their children and to have the information, education, and means to do so. Considerable progress has been made since then, and the number of developing countries that provide direct government support for family planning has increased to over 60%. Many have liberalized laws and regulations which restricted access to modern contraceptive methods, and a growing number provide family planning services within their health care programs. A few have recognized the practice of family planning as a constitutional right. In late 1983 at the Second African Population Conference, recognition of family as a human right was strongly contested by several governments, particularly those of West Africa. in developed countries most of the women at risk of unwanted pregnancy are using contraceptives. Of the major developing regions the highest use level is in Latin America, wherein most countries 1/3 to 1/2 of married women are users. Levels in Asian countries range from up to 10% in Afghanistan, Nepal, and Pakistan to up to 40% in the southeastern countries. China, a special case, now probably exceeds an overall use level of 2/3 of married women. Contraceptive use is lowest in Africa. There is room for improvement even among many of the successful family planning programs, as access to contraceptives usually is not sufficient to overcome limiting factors. To ensure the individual's free choice and strengthen the acceptability and practice of family planning, all available methods should be provided in service programs and inluded in information and education activities. Family planning programs should engage local community groups, including voluntary organizations, in all aspects of planning, management, and allocation of resources. At the government level a clear political commitment to family

  5. Effective family planning programs.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, A G

    1973-01-01

    Organizational and content features of various national family planning programs are reviewed. The Thai program is cited as an example of a family planning program organized on a massive unipurpose compaign basis. The Korean and Taiwan programs have utilized special field workers while upgrading the general health care network. 3 major problems with family planning programs are: 1) the lack of experience with such programs; 2) lack of commitment at the highest political levels; and 3) medical conservatism. Utilization of all available contraceptive methods instead of reliance on 1 method would improve most programs. Nursing and auxiliary personnel could be trained to take over the work of physicians in family planning programs. This is already being done with IUD insertion and pill prescription in several programs. The postpartum tubal ligation approach has proven effective and should be extended. There is a place in all national programs for both the private and the commercial sectors. Incentives for clinics, personnel, and acceptors might spread family planning more rapidly.

  6. [The LDL receptor family].

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Melinda

    2002-12-29

    The members of the LDL receptor family are structurally related endocytic receptors. Our view on these receptors has considerably changed in recent years. Not only have new members of the family been identified, but also several interesting observations have been published concerning the biological function of these molecules. The LDL receptor family members are able to bind and internalize a plethora of ligands; as a consequence, they play important roles in diverse physiological processes. These receptors are key players in the lipoprotein metabolism, vitamin homeostasis, Ca2+ homeostasis, cell migration, and embryonic development. Until recently, LDL receptor family members were thought to be classic endocytic receptors that provide cells with metabolites on one hand, while regulating the concentration of their ligands in the extracellular fluids on the other hand. However, recent findings indicate that in addition to their cargo transport function, LDL receptor family members can act as signal transducers, playing important roles in the development of the central nervous system or the skeleton. Better understanding of physiological and pathophysiological functions of these molecules may open new avenues for the treatment or prevention of many disorders.

  7. Understanding family member suicide narratives by investigating family history.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Dorothy; Maple, Myfanwy; Minichiello, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The complex family environments in which a suicide death had previously occurred were explored in a qualitative study of narratives of suicide-bereaved participants. The participants searched for reasons why the suicide occurred in their family. Family patterning stories and the context of the environment in which the suicide death occurred provided an additional depth of meaning into the relational aspects of the family. Fractured families emerged as an important theme. Shared in the narratives were stories of conditions within the family that may have contributed to vulnerability towards persistent negative feelings about their lives, their family, and their future. The study also identifies the strengths of family culture that led to resilience in the suicide bereaved. These stories highlight the importance of support for those bereaved by the suicide of a close family member and the issues that places people in vulnerable situations that perhaps may explain the increased risk of suicide for those bereaved family members.

  8. Does Aid to Families with Dependent Children Displace Familial Assistance?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    RAND Does Aid to Families with Dependent Children Displace Familial Assistance? Robert F. Schoeni July 1996 ■ved id ßuclie releasaj DRU-1453-RC...cite this Working paper without permission of the author. OTIC QUALITY JQSSEEGiaa 1 DOES AID TO FAMILIES WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN DISPLACE FAMILIAL...Public Affairs at Syracuse University for valuable comments. DOES AID TO FAMTTJES WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN DISPLACE FAMILIAL ASSISTANCE? Abstract

  9. [Familial hypercholesterolemia in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Jelassi, A; Jguirim, I; Najah, M; Maatouk, F; Ben Hamda, K; Slimane, M N

    2009-07-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia or autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia is characterized by raised serum LDL (low density lipoproteins)-cholesterol levels, which result in excess deposition of cholesterol in tissues, leading to accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of premature coronary heart disease. Familial hypercholesterolemia results from defects in the hepatic uptake and degradation of LDL via the LDL receptor pathway. Familial hypercholesterolemia is commonly caused by a loss of function in the LDL receptor gene, or by a mutation in the gene encoding apolipoprotein B (APOB) or PCSK9 gene. In Tunisia, the frequency of this disease is about one of 165 for heterozygote. It is a higher frequency compared to most European countries, which is about one of 500 for heterozygote. Only five mutations in the LDLR gene were reported in this population. No mutations in the APOB or PCSK9 gene were reported.

  10. Characterizing gene family evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene families are widely used in comparative genomics, molecular evolution, and in systematics. However, they are constructed in different manners, their data analyzed and interpreted differently, with different underlying assumptions, leading to sometimes divergent conclusions. In systematics, concepts like monophyly and the dichotomy between homoplasy and homology have been central to the analysis of phylogenies. We critique the traditional use of such concepts as applied to gene families and give examples of incorrect inferences they may lead to. Operational definitions that have emerged within functional genomics are contrasted with the common formal definitions derived from systematics. Lastly, we question the utility of layers of homology and the meaning of homology at the character state level in the context of sequence evolution. From this, we move forward to present an idealized strategy for characterizing gene family evolution for both systematic and functional purposes, including recent methodological improvements. PMID:19461954

  11. The sulfatase gene family.

    PubMed

    Parenti, G; Meroni, G; Ballabio, A

    1997-06-01

    During the past few years, molecular analyses have provided important insights into the biochemistry and genetics of the sulfatase family of enzymes, identifying the molecular bases of inherited diseases caused by sulfatase deficiencies. New members of the sulfatase gene family have been identified in man and other species using a genomic approach. These include the gene encoding arylsulfatase E, which is involved in X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata, a disorder of cartilage and bone development. Another important breakthrough has been the discovery of the biochemical basis of multiple sulfatase deficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a severe of all sulfatase activities. These discoveries, together with the resolution of the crystallographic structure of sulfatases, have improved our understanding of the function and evolution of this fascinating family of enzymes.

  12. AIDS and family planning.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In 1991, an HIV prevention program advisor and a research/evaluation specialist for family planning programs discussed problems that affected HIV prevention and family planning services in Haiti before and after the coup of the Aristide government. Population activities began aimlessly in 1974 and HIV prevention efforts only began in 1988. After the coup, Haitians lost their newly found hope for meaningful development. All foreign assistance ended and they did not trust the army. In fact, other than essential child survival activities, no health and family planning services operated for several weeks. The situation grew worse after the economic embargo. 3 months after the coup, the US considered adding family planning assistance. Still little movement of condom, family planning, and health supplies left Port-au-Prince for the provinces which adversely affected all health related efforts. Condoms could no longer be distributed easily either in the socially marketed or US supplied condom distribution programs. Before the coup, HIV prevention and family planning programs depended on peer educators to educate the public (this approach made these programs quite successful), but the 2 experts feared that they would not return to those roles and that these programs would need to completely rebuild. Another concern was the large scale urban-rural migration making it difficult for them to continue care. Early in the AIDS epidemic, the Haitian government was on the defensive because the US considered Haitians as a high risk group so it did little to prevent HIV transmission. After 1988, HIV prevention activities in Haiti centered on raising awareness and personalizing the epidemic. The AIDS specialist noted, however, that a major obstacle to increasing knowledge is that AIDS is just 1 of many fatal diseases in Haiti. Moreover few health professionals in Haiti have ever had public health training.

  13. Gendered Discourse about Family Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danes, Sharon M.; Haberman, Heather R.; McTavish, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Language patterns of family business owners were explored by identifying discourse styles and emphasized ideas in four presenting contexts: business, family, intersection of family and business, and business success. The content analysis supports the existence of a general discourse style within family businesses and of similarities and…

  14. Family Day Care Training Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses for family day care, state licensing requirements for family…

  15. Family Resilience: Israeli Mothers' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Orna; Slonim, Iris; Finzi, Ricky; Leichtentritt, Ronit D.

    2002-01-01

    Study reveals components underlying the concept of family resilience based on the perceptions of Israeli women. Five components of family resilience were identified (1) interpersonal relations; (2) ability to share painful feelings; (3) flexibility among family members; (4) connectedness; and (5) family values. Components have practical…

  16. The Power of Family Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Family Literacy, Louisville, KY.

    This report presents the early findings from the analysis of a family literacy demonstration project under the direction of the National Center for Family Literacy. The data in this report are based upon the experiences of over 300 families who participated in the Toyota Families for Learning Program during the 1992-1993 school year. The first…

  17. Trends in Family Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The author presents insights from various readers of "ExchangeEveryDay" regarding trends in the world of family child care. Kathleen Reticker of Acre Family Child Care in Lowell, Massachusetts thinks an increasing trend in Family Child Care is the pressure to emulate a Center, instead of seeing family child care as a different model. Over the…

  18. Family Development's First Forty Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Evelyn Millis

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the history of human development, and of family development and its interdisciplinary nature. Explores variations as well as the universality of the family life cycle and developmental tasks. Presents examples of the applications of family developmental concepts by a variety of practitioners in the family field, offering ideas on research…

  19. The Economy, Families and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The recession has impacted American families and the schools their children attend like nothing in recent memory. Many families continue to struggle with the impact of joblessness. The number of homeless children and youth is staggering. Families struggle with access to health care, growing hunger and greater instability in the family unit.…

  20. 75 FR 63753 - Family Offices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 275 RIN 3235-AK66 Family Offices AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION... define ``family offices'' that would be excluded from the definition of an investment adviser under the... Text of Proposed Rule I. Background ``Family offices'' are entities established by wealthy families...

  1. Family Diversity and School Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Barbara

    This paper focuses on the mismatch between the diversity of American families and the structure of the schools. An examination of the history of the family reveals that the family of the past was very different from the idealized versions popularized in the media. Data concerning divorce, single-parent families, intergenerational interaction,…

  2. SAP family proteins.

    PubMed

    Fujita, A; Kurachi, Y

    2000-03-05

    Thus far, five members including Dlg, SAP97/hDlg, SAP90/PSD-95, SAP102, and PSD-93/chapsyn110 which belong to SAP family have been identified. Recent studies have revealed that these proteins play important roles in the localization and function of glutamate receptors and K(+) channels. Although most of them have been reported to be localized to the synapse, only one member, SAP97, is expressed also in the epithelial cells. In this review, we have summarized structural characters of SAP family proteins and discuss their functions in neurons and epithelial cells.

  3. Incarceration in fragile families.

    PubMed

    Wildeman, Christopher; Western, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s the U.S. imprisonment rate has increased roughly fivefold. As Christopher Wildeman and Bruce Western explain, the effects of this sea change in the imprisonment rate--commonly called mass imprisonment or the prison boom--have been concentrated among those most likely to form fragile families: poor and minority men with little schooling. Imprisonment diminishes the earnings of adult men, compromises their health, reduces familial resources, and contributes to family breakup. It also adds to the deficits of poor children, thus ensuring that the effects of imprisonment on inequality are transferred intergenerationally. Perversely, incarceration has its most corrosive effects on families whose fathers were involved in neither domestic violence nor violent crime before being imprisoned. Because having a parent go to prison is now so common for poor, minority children and so negatively affects them, the authors argue that mass imprisonment may increase future racial and class inequality--and may even lead to more crime in the long-term, thereby undoing any benefits of the prison boom. U.S. crime policy has thus, in the name of public safety, produced more vulnerable families and reduced the life chances of their children. Wildeman and Western advocate several policy reforms, such as limiting prison time for drug offenders and for parolees who violate the technical conditions of their parole, reconsidering sentence enhancements for repeat offenders, and expanding supports for prisoners and ex-prisoners. But Wildeman and Western argue that criminal justice reform alone will not solve the problems of school failure, joblessness, untreated addiction, and mental illness that pave the way to prison. In fact, focusing solely on criminal justice reforms would repeat the mistakes the nation made during the prison boom: trying to solve deep social problems with criminal justice policies. Addressing those broad problems, they say, requires a greater social

  4. Preventive Medicine and the Family

    PubMed Central

    Christie-Seely, Janet

    1981-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated the links between the family system and illness, emphasizing the importance of prevention on a family level for physical as well as psychological illness. Brief preventive counselling on routine visits is possible if the physician knows the family well and understands the principles of the family as a system. Periods of high risk when illness and family dysfunction increase in incidence are the normal “crises” of the family life cycle, medical crises of illness, hospitalization and death, and non-medical crises. High-risk families should be identified; secondary prevention is an important role for the family physician who sees family problems at a much earlier stage than the psychiatrist or marital or family therapist. PMID:21289689

  5. Family Resilience in the Military

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Sarah O.; Beckett, Megan K.; Bowling, Kirby; Golinelli, Daniela; Fisher, Michael P.; Martin, Laurie T.; Meredith, Lisa S.; Osilla, Karen Chan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Military life presents a variety of challenges to military families, including frequent separations and relocations as well as the risks that service members face during deployment; however, many families successfully navigate these challenges. Despite a recent emphasis on family resilience, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) does not have a standard and universally accepted definition of family resilience. A standard definition is a necessary for DoD to more effectively assess its efforts to sustain and improve family resilience. RAND authors reviewed the literature on family resilience and, in this study, recommend a definition that could be used DoD-wide. The authors also reviewed DoD policies related to family resilience, reviewed models that describe family resilience and identified key family resilience factors, and developed several recommendations for how family-resilience programs and policies could be managed across DoD. PMID:28083409

  6. Family Interactions in Adoptive Compared to Nonadoptive Families

    PubMed Central

    Rueter, Martha A.; Keyes, Margaret A.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Despite the large and growing numbers of adoptive families, little research describes interactions in families with adopted adolescents. Yet, adopted adolescents’ increased risk for adjustment problems, combined with the association between family interactions and adolescent adjustment in nonadoptive families, raises questions about differences in adoptive and nonadoptive family interactions. We compared observed and self-reported family interactions between 284 adoptive and 208 nonadoptive families and within 123 families with 1 adopted and 1 nonadopted adolescent. Adolescents averaged 14.9 years of age. Comparisons were made using analysis of variance incorporating hierarchical linear methods in SAS PROC MIXED to control family-related correlations in the data. Parents and children reported more conflict in adoptive families when compared with nonadoptive families. Families with 1 adopted and 1 nonadopted adolescent reported more conflict between parents and adopted adolescents. Observed parental behavior was similar across adoptive and nonadoptive children although adopted adolescents were less warm and, in families with 2 adopted children, more conflictual than nonadopted adolescents. These findings suggest a need for further investigation of the association between family interactions and adopted adolescent problem behavior. PMID:19203160

  7. All in the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2010-01-01

    Even as a little girl, Dr. Nitasha Sharma aspired to become a college professor like her parents, whose careers let the family spend entire summers or longer in either her mother's native Brooklyn, New York, or her father's native India. She dreamed of long vacations as a grown-up and going home for lunch on weekdays. But during a stay in India…

  8. Endangered Language Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, D. H.; Simons, Gary F.

    2012-01-01

    Linguists have increased their documentation efforts in response to the sharp decline in the number of languages. Greater awareness and new sources of funding have led to an upsurge in language documentation. While individual languages make unique contributions to the world's linguistic heritage, language families, by virtue of their shared…

  9. Helping Families Cope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Carol R.

    The paper presents observations of families having adult members with learning disabilities and describes a residential program to facilitate the transition to independent living of lower functioning learning disabled young adults. The program, called Independence Center, involves placing participants in apartments with roommates and helping them…

  10. A Migrant Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimner, Larry Dane

    This book incorporates many photographs portraying the life of a migrant family in a camp near San Diego, California. Houses in the camp are built of salvaged plywood with plastic sheets as roofs. Twelve-year-old Juan and his two younger brothers sleep on an old mattress atop a plywood platform. Juan's mother, stepfather, and younger sister sleep…

  11. Incarceration in Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildeman, Christopher; Western, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s the U.S. imprisonment rate has increased roughly fivefold. As Christopher Wildeman and Bruce Western explain, the effects of this sea change in the imprisonment rate--commonly called mass imprisonment or the prison boom--have been concentrated among those most likely to form fragile families: poor and minority men with little…

  12. Benign familial hyperphosphatasemia

    SciTech Connect

    Siraganian, P.A.; Mulvihill, J.J.; Mulivor, R.A.; Miller, R.W. )

    1989-03-03

    Elevated alkaline phosphatase activity in serum suggests bone or liver disease or a neoplasm but can also indicate pregnancy or another benign condition. A family with benign hyperphosphatasemia was studied to elucidate the genetics and enzyme defect. Serum total alkaline phosphatase activity was greater than the population mean in all six family members, and more than 7 SDs above the mean in two of four offspring. Monoclonal antibodies to three alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes, intestinal, placental, and tissue nonspecific demonstrated markedly increased intestinal alkaline phosphatase levels in all family members and significantly elevated liver/bone/kidney activity in the two offspring. Guanidine hydrochloride denaturation of the liver/bone/kidney component showed high alkaline phosphatase activity from liver in both siblings and from bone in one. The mode of inheritance in this family is obscure, but a complex regulation of the products of two different alkaline phosphatase genes seems likely. Steps toward diagnosis are suggested. Early recognition of this benign biochemical abnormality should help to avoid unnecessary diagnostic tests.

  13. Alcohol and Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, Stephanie S.

    There is growing acknowledgement of the association between family violence and alcohol use. A study was conducted to examine the role that abuse plays in the lives of women and to investigate the relationship between alcohol and violence. Data were collected from 35 recovering female alcoholics and 35 nonalcoholic women on their sexual experience…

  14. Family medicine curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Douglas; Schipper, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    PROBLEM ADDRESSED The Family Medicine Residency Program at the University of Alberta has used academic sessions and clinical-based teaching to prepare residents for private practice. Before the new curriculum, academic sessions were large group lectures given by specialists. These sessions lacked consistent quality, structured topics, and organization. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM The program was designed to improve the quality and consistency of academic sessions by creating a new curriculum. The goals for the new curriculum included improved organizational structure, improved satisfaction from the participants, improved resident knowledge and confidence in key areas of family medicine, and improved performance on licensing examinations. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The new curriculum is faculty guided but resident organized. Twenty-three core topics in family medicine are covered during a 2-year rotating curriculum. Several small group activities, including problem-based learning modules, journal club, and examination preparation sessions, complement larger didactic sessions. A multiple-source evaluation process is an essential component of this new program. CONCLUSION The new academic curriculum for family medicine residents is based on a variety of learning styles and is consistent with the principles of adult learning theory. This structured curriculum provides a good basis for further development. Other programs across the country might want to incorporate these ideas into their current programming. PMID:18272637

  15. Families and Communities (Bookalogues).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Miriam; Nash, Marcia F.

    1993-01-01

    Presents brief reviews of 26 picture books, chapter books, and informational books that deal with families and/or communities. Notes that the picture books and chapter books cover a wide variety of genres including poetry, realistic fiction, and fantasy and that the informational books have a variety of formats, with the "photo essay" dominating.…

  16. The Family of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavao, Joyce Maguire

    This book aims to provide a broad framework within which to think about adoption as a whole system, so that everyone involved will learn to feel some empathy for the other members of the adoption process. The book, written by a family and adoption therapist who was adopted as an infant, describes predictable developmental stages and challenges for…

  17. Kindergarten: Home and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegany County Board of Education, Cumberland, MD.

    The curriculum guide presents a working draft of the kindergarten component of a K-6 social studies program developed by the Allegany County Board of Education in Maryland. Goals and activities relating to ethnic heritage studies; family life; and career, consumer, citizenship, and environmental education are included in each of the seven guides.…

  18. [The Iowa Family Farm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This issue of the "Goldfinch" focuses on the family farm of the past. All aspects of farm life are covered: what was grown on farms, how the chores were done and who was responsible for them, what the houses were like, and what tools and equipment were used. Comparisons are made between modern farms and farms of 50 or 150 years ago, and…

  19. Family Reunion Health Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... longer. That’s why testing is so important. The health care provider tests your blood and urine to check how well ... a family history of kidney failure— ask your health care provider to test your kidneys. NATIONAL KIDNEY DISEASE EDUCATION PROGRAM l ...

  20. Serving Migrant Families, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Barbara, Ed.

    The directory describes services provided to migratory agricultural workers and their families, through the governmental and nongovernmental agencies interested in and responsible for their well-being. Agencies are grouped into: (1) United States government agencies, (2) North Carolina State government agencies, and (3) private organizations.…

  1. It's a Family Affair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashburn, Elyse

    2007-01-01

    On paper, Mariella Castillo's family makes her likelier than other students to drop out of college. Her mother left school after the fifth grade, and her father has only a middle-school education. Her parents speak little English, and Castillo, who was born in the Mexican state of San Luis Potosi, spoke her first words in Spanish. Numerous studies…

  2. Not Your Family Farm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol; Baker, Gayle; Grogg, Jill E.

    2007-01-01

    The information industry continues to consolidate, just as agribusiness has consolidated and now dominates farming. Both the family farm and the small information company still exist but are becoming rarer in an age of mergers, acquisitions, and increased economies of scale. Small companies distinguish themselves by high quality, special themes,…

  3. Family First Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The typical superintendent these days is male (though the percentage of female superintendents is steadily rising, now accounting for one in four, according to AASA's 2010 decennial study of the superintendency), in his 40s and almost always married with children. When educators become superintendents, the issues of family dynamics and related…

  4. Family Science Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbins, Sara; Thomas, Bethany; Vetere, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a family-friendly science day event that encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities, while also providing an opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators, thereby raising awareness of the importance of STEM in our society. The one-day event bought…

  5. Aging and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, C. Roberta

    1984-01-01

    Discusses emotional, social, medical, and nutritional needs of older people, and stresses the need for education of the families of the elderly and the need for a coordinated approach to service delivery to this population. In this way, maximum independence of the aged can be achieved. (NRJ)

  6. Family Literacy: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Amanda S., Comp.

    Based on the concept that literacy is a family affair, this book presents an annotated list of materials published in the 1980s appropriate for use by organizations and individuals involved in literacy training and for learners seeking materials for their personal needs and enrichment. Each of the over 750 entries includes a bibliographic…

  7. Family acholeplasmataceae (including phytoplasmas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Acholeplasmataceae was originally established to accommodate the genus Acholeplasma, comprising the mollicutes that could be cultivated without the supplement of cholesterol and that use UGA as a stop codon instead of coding for tryptophan. It was later shown that the phytoplasmas, a larg...

  8. [Family planning in Bangladesh].

    PubMed

    Saito, S

    1981-03-01

    The author participated in the family planning project in Bangladesh from August 1, 1977 to December 31, 1979. The population of Bangladesh was 81 million in 1977 with annual increase of 3%, and the government was aiming at zero population growth. The government guidelines emphasized family planning as an effort integrated with other community programs. The use of adult education classes, mass media, and agricultural field workers and the training of paramedical personnel were proposed. The project members' activities involved motivating the public to delay marriages, to space births and to limit the family size to two children (average family size 6.5 children) as well as distributing contraceptives, promoting IUD and sterilization. Sterilization campaign for women in DNN district, 30 km south of Dacca, was carried out as follows. The women who had signed up in advance arrived at the elementary school classroom, where 2 medical teams performed operations using the teachers' desks and the equipment rented from a hospital in Dacca. The general procedure involved a physical examination by a female doctor, checking blood pressure, changing into a brand new native gown, premedication by injection, total anesthesia and operation itself. The equipment was sterilized by boiling. The patients were carried on the stretchers to the other classroom where they recuperated, staying overnight on the straw mats on the mud floor. They went home on foot the next day. The shortage of food and resources, high unemployment rate and low standard of living are some of the social problems Bangladesh faces along with overpopulation.

  9. Family Feathers. [Videotape Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    Family Feathers is a set of 18 videotapes for parents of preschool children, created by the Alaska Native Home Base Video Project of the Tlingit and Haida Head Start Program. This series offers culturally relevant solutions to the challenges of parenting, drawing on practical advice from Tlingit and Haida parents, wisdom from elders, and some of…

  10. Schizophrenia and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Barbara J.

    This document addresses the problems faced by families with a schizophrenic member, based on a survey of the literature from a variety of sources including: (1) the Alden Library of Ohio University; (2) the ERIC database; (3) the American Association of Counseling and Development (AACD); and (4) the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI).…

  11. [Families Involved in Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Nicole, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Community Update" focuses on families involved in learning. The first article briefly discusses the "Ready to Read, Ready to Learn" White House summit that highlighted new research on early childhood learning. The center spread of this issue offers "Priming the Primary Educator: A Look at L. A. County's Parent Involvement Programs"…

  12. Family Living Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truitt, Debbie

    This family living supplement contains 125 supplemental ideas and strategies designed to help vocational home economics teachers increase student motivation and enrich the teaching process. Ideas and strategies are organized into seven sections. These are career planning, securing a job, and career success; managing financial resources, buying…

  13. The Family Fluency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Lesley Mandel; Kuhn, Melanie R.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a larger study on developing children's reading fluency in the classroom, a program was introduced to help parents understand the importance of fluency and participate in fluency-related activities with children at home. The Family Fluency Program included activities similar to those that the children were doing in school, with some…

  14. Profiling Canada's Families II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanier Inst. of the Family, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Noting that Canadians have witnessed profound demographic, economic, social, cultural, and technological changes over the last century and the need for sound demographic information for future planning, this report is the second to identify significant trends affecting Canada's families. Following an introductory section providing relevant…

  15. Familial Gigantiform Cementoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunyue; Wang, Hongwei; He, Guang; Qin, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Familial gigantiform cementoma is an exceedingly rare but distinct subtype of cemento-osseous-fibrous lesion. Undocumented radiographic changes and related bone metabolism disorder are herein hypothesized and discussed. We present an adolescent case with recurrent familial gigantiform cementoma who received surgical intervention in our hospital. Apart from typical multiquadrant and expansile abnormalies involving both jaws, he also suffered from several times of fractures in lower extremity. Furthermore, radiographic examinations of calvaria, pelvis, femoris, tibia, and fibula all revealed radiolucent areas signifying diffuse osteopenic bone losses. Some of his consanguineous relatives bore the same burden of fractures during pubertal period. Considering these polyostotic conditions, a correlation of congenital bone metabolism disorder in cases with familial gigantiform cementoma, named “calcium steal disorder,” was thus proposed. Familial gigantiform cementoma is closely associated with “calcium steal disorder.” Whole-body dual-energy absorptiometry should be considered as a routine examination for fracture-related risk prediction. PMID:26945411

  16. Perspectives on Family Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Assistance Center, New York, NY.

    This joint publication of the journals of the Literacy Assistance Center (LAC) and the National Even Start Association (NESA) focuses on innovative practices and theory in family literacy education, offers an array of perspectives to members of the literacy community, and critically examines some assumptions about literacy in general, as well as…

  17. Getting a High-Speed Family Connection: Associations between Family Media Use and Family Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Walker, Laura M.; Coyne, Sarah M.; Fraser, Ashley M.

    2012-01-01

    The way families have used the media has substantially changed over the past decade. Within the framework of family systems theory, this paper examines the relations between family media use and family connection in a sample of 453 adolescents (mean age of child = 14.32 years, SD = 0.98, 52% female) and their parents. Results revealed that cell…

  18. Family Literacy as a Welfare Reform Strategy. Family Independence Initiative Audioconference. Family Independence Initiative Publication #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Family Literacy, Louisville, KY.

    In 1997, the National Center for Family Literacy convened four state policymakers for an audioconference to discuss five issues related to family literacy and its role as a welfare reform strategy. First, with regard to the value of family literacy, policymakers saw literacy as the key to employment and job retention. Second, family literacy was a…

  19. Perceived Family Functioning and Family Resources of Hong Kong Families: Implications for Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Wong, Timothy K. Y.; Lau, Luk King; Pun, Shuk Han

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a telephone survey (n = 1,015 respondents) that aims to identify the perceived general family functioning and family resources of Hong Kong Chinese families and their linkage to each other in a rapidly transforming society. The perceived general family functioning of the respondents was average, and the five…

  20. Family Support Builds Stronger Families: The Roots of Family-Supportive Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiderman, Ethel

    2009-01-01

    Parent Services Project (PSP) is one model of family support that emerged from the heightened awareness of families' needs. Founded in 1980 to integrate family support into four San Francisco Bay Area early childhood programs, PSP since has spread to more than 800 organizations serving 30,000 families in Alaska, California, Delaware, Florida,…

  1. [Family relationships and family therapy of eating disorders].

    PubMed

    Reich, Günter

    2005-04-01

    A multitude of empirical studies clearly demonstrates that the origin and course of eating disorders is closely linked to family factors. The influence is exerted in a direct way by conveying attitudes towards food, eating, weight, shape and appearance within the family and in a more indirect way by the family relationships. Families of bulimics differ from those of anorexics by a higher degree of conflict, impulsivity, expressiveness and by lower affective resonance and cohesion. Family therapy has proven to be effective in the treatment of eating disorders. A sketch of a family therapy describes the conflict oriented approach which includes behavioral elements in oder to stabilize the eating behavior and the weight.

  2. The impact of family functioning on family racial socialization processes.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Michael S; Szapocznik, José; Mayorga, Carla C; Dillon, Frank R; Burns, Myron; Feaster, Daniel J

    2007-10-01

    This longitudinal study evaluated the relationship between family functioning and family racial socialization processes in a clinical sample of African American youth referred for drug abuse treatment. Participants were 77 African American adolescents and their parents. Results showed that participants assigned to structural ecosystems therapy experienced a greater increase in family racial socialization processes during treatment than participants assigned to the treatment as usual in community settings condition. Participants in structural ecosystems therapy also demonstrated a greater increase in family functioning than participants in community settings condition, and this improvement in family functioning mediated the relationship between treatment condition and family racial socialization processes. Research and clinical implications are discussed.

  3. Family Patterns Associated with Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigg, Darryl N.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Used family systems perspective to explore familial transactional patterns related to anorexia nervosa among 22 families with an anorexic child and 22 matched control families. Identified 7 family groups with unique family dynamics differentiating one from another. With no single family pattern characterizing families of anorexics, results…

  4. At the Table with Family and Making Family Meals Manageable

    MedlinePlus

    ... healthful food choices. Over 1,700 high school students were surveyed and reported strong associations between family ... the nearly 100,000 6th to 12th grade students who were surveyed, with consideration for differing family ...

  5. Balancing Family and Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andam, Aba Bentil; Dawson, Silvina Ponce; Horton, K. Renee; Sandow, Barbara

    2005-10-01

    In essentially all countries, responsibilities for child care, cooking, cleaning, and other homemaking tasks fall predominantly on the wife and mother. In addition, the childbearing years come during the period when a physicist must study hard, work long hours on research, and take temporary positions, often abroad. Thus, balancing family and career has long been one of the major barriers to women's participation in science and engineering fields, including physics. While many young women believe that they must choose between having children and having a science career, the fact is that the majority of women physicists in both developing and developed countries have successfully done both. This paper summarizes some ideas and recommendations raised in discussions, especially focused on easing the challenges of having children while in temporary jobs, returning to physics after a career break, the need for "family-friendly" working conditions, and the dual-career problem facing couples where both are scientists.

  6. Family functioning in lesbian families created by donor insemination.

    PubMed

    Vanfraussen, Katrien; Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, Ingrid; Brewaeys, Anne

    2003-01-01

    The quantitative and qualitative data of this study on family functioning in lesbian donor insemination families reveal that according to both parents and children, the quality of children's relationship with the social mother is comparable to that with the biological mother. Unlike fathers in heterosexual families, the lesbian social mother is as much involved in child activities as is the biological mother. Furthermore, the lesbian social mother has as much authority as does the father in heterosexual families.

  7. Enhancing family resilience through family narrative co-construction.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, William R; Pynoos, Robert S; Lester, Patricia; Layne, Christopher M; Beardslee, William R

    2013-09-01

    We draw upon family resilience and narrative theory to describe an evidence-based method for intervening with military families who are impacted by multiple wartime deployments and psychological, stress-related, or physical parental injuries. Conceptual models of familial resilience provide a guide for understanding the mechanics of how families respond and recover from exposure to extreme events, and underscore the role of specific family processes and interaction patterns in promoting resilient capabilities. Leading family theorists propose that the family's ability to make meaning of stressful and traumatic events and nurture protective beliefs are critical aspects of resilient adaptation. We first review general theoretical and empirical research contributions to understanding family resilience, giving special attention to the circumstances, challenges, needs, and strengths of American military families. Therapeutic narrative studies illustrate the processes through which family members acquire meaning-making capacities, and point to the essential role of parents' in facilitating discussions of stressful experiences and co-constructing coherent and meaningful narratives. This helps children to make sense of these experiences and develop capacities for emotion regulation and coping. Family-based narrative approaches provide a structured opportunity to elicit parents' and children's individual narratives, assemble divergent storylines into a shared family narrative, and thereby enhance members' capacity to make meaning of stressful experiences and adopt beliefs that support adaptation and growth. We discuss how family narratives can help to bridge intra-familial estrangements and re-engage communication and support processes that have been undermined by stress, trauma, or loss. We conclude by describing a family-based narrative intervention currently in use with thousands of military children and families across the USA.

  8. Galileo - Ganymede Family Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This videotape is a continuation of tape number NONP-NASA-VT-2000036029. When the Galileo spacecraft flew by Ganymede, Jupiter's and the solar system's largest satellite, the project scientist and engineers gather together with their friends and family to view the photos as they are received. This videotape presents the last part of that meeting, which culminates in the announcement of the confirmation of the fly-by, and a review of the current trajectory status.

  9. Natural family planning.

    PubMed

    Davis, M S

    1992-01-01

    Natural family planning includes the calendar (rhythm), basal body temperature, ovulation (mucus), and sympto-thermal methods. Reliability of such methods often is underestimated, but effectiveness of various methods has been reported. Correct understanding and use of proper techniques, primarily abstinence during fertile periods, is imperative for effectiveness. New methods being studied may heighten awareness of fertile times and shorten required periods of abstinence or use of back-up methods.

  10. [Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aurélie

    2012-04-01

    Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy is a rare autosomal dominant disease. It is characterized by abnormal handling of urate responsible for hyperuricaemia often complicated of gouty arthritis. Renal failure is due to tubulointerstitial nephritis. Ultrasonography sometimes finds renal cysts of variable size and number. Renal histology, although not specific, shows interstitial fibrosis, atrophic tubules, sometimes enlarged and with irregular membrane thickening. Renal failure progresses to end stage between 30 and 60 years of age. Allopurinol treatment is recommended at the early stages of the disease, its efficacy on slowing down the progression of the disease is however not proven. There is genetic heterogeneity in familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy. Uromodulin encoding Tamm-Horsfall protein is the only gene to date identified, responsible in less than half of the families. The described mutations most often concern a cystein and are clustering in exon 4. These mutations result in abnormal retention of the protein in endoplasmic reticulum of Henle loop cells and in reduction of its urinary excretion. The pathophysiology of the disease is however still dubious. Indeed, Tamm-Horsfall protein functions are not well known (anti-infectious role, cristallisation inhibition, immunomodulating role). Knock-out mice do not develop renal phenotype but are more prone to E. coli urinary infections. Uromodulin gene mutations have also been described in medullary cystic kidney disease, an autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial nephropathy, considered at first as a distinct disorder. Genetic progress allowed us to consider familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy and medullary cystic kidney disease as the two facets of a same disease, we should call uromodulin associated kidney diseases. At least two other genes have been implicated in similar clinical presentation: TCF2 and the gene encoding renin.

  11. Lipidomics of familial longevity.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Covarrubias, Vanessa; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won; Dane, Adrie; Troost, Jorne; Paliukhovich, Iryna; van der Kloet, Frans M; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine; Vreeken, Rob J; Hankemeier, Thomas; Slagboom, Eline P

    2013-06-01

    Middle-aged offspring of nonagenarians, as compared to their spouses (controls), show a favorable lipid metabolism marked by larger LDL particle size in men and lower total triglyceride levels in women. To investigate which specific lipids associate with familial longevity, we explore the plasma lipidome by measuring 128 lipid species using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in 1526 offspring of nonagenarians (59 years ± 6.6) and 675 (59 years ± 7.4) controls from the Leiden Longevity Study. In men, no significant differences were observed between offspring and controls. In women, however, 19 lipid species associated with familial longevity. Female offspring showed higher levels of ether phosphocholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SM) species (3.5-8.7%) and lower levels of phosphoethanolamine PE (38:6) and long-chain triglycerides (TG) (9.4-12.4%). The association with familial longevity of two ether PC and four SM species was independent of total triglyceride levels. In addition, the longevity-associated lipid profile was characterized by a higher ratio of monounsaturated (MUFA) over polyunsaturated (PUFA) lipid species, suggesting that female offspring have a plasma lipidome less prone to oxidative stress. Ether PC and SM species were identified as novel longevity markers in females, independent of total triglycerides levels. Several longevity-associated lipids correlated with a lower risk of hypertension and diabetes in the Leiden Longevity Study cohort. This sex-specific lipid signature marks familial longevity and may suggest a plasma lipidome with a better antioxidant capacity, lower lipid peroxidation and inflammatory precursors, and an efficient beta-oxidation function.

  12. Family planning: where now?

    PubMed

    Saunders, L

    1977-01-01

    The focus is in terms of family planning as an exercise in induced social change; the objective is to alter the reproductive patterns of societies sufficiently to bring about a significant reduction in fertility. The year 1974 emerges as the year in which family planning as a social movement achieved maturity and was confirmed as a legitimate area for national policy and programming, a year of determined and varied efforts to reduce population growth. In affirming the rights and responsibilities of people and the obligations of governments in population concerns, the Bucharest Conference conferred its seal of approval on a movement that had made considerable progress since it began early in the 19th century. The evolution of birth control as a social movement which began with Francis Place's printing and distributing contraceptive bills in 1820 was encouraged by other writings in England and the U.S. over the next 50 years. Several overlapping phases can be distinguished in the global response to a new sense of urgence regarding population concerns following World War 2. Moving from a global perspective to consideration of family planning as it exists in the programs of individual countries, the achievement is not so great and the prospects are less hopeful. Although it has had success as a social movement and is now accepted as a government responsibility, family planning programs still have a long way to go before they develop the scope, vigor, and versatility that is required for there to be widespread demographic change. 1 change that is needed is for a stronger and more visible political commitment and commitment on the basis of demographic rather than health or welfare reasons.

  13. Psychoanalysis: a dysfunctional family?

    PubMed

    Grosskurth, P

    1998-01-01

    The discussion opens with an account of the author's mother's bizarre family in which a strong, charismatic grandmother maintained absolute control over her large family by encouraging a neurotic dependence in them through daily reports of their complaints. Getting interested in psychoanalysis in an effort to understand the dynamics of this dysfunctional family, the author, a biographer, turned to the study of Melanie Klein, becoming entranced by her ideas. Her research also revealed how Klein had discouraged her followers from developing ideas that diverged in any way from her own. Her portrait of the pioneer analyst provoked intense indignation. A similar pattern of absolute loyalty to his person and theories was to be found in Freud's Secret Committee, formed primarily as a means of getting rid of Jung who had been showing disturbing signs of independence. When Ferenczi and Rank began to pursue independent lines of enquiry in their work, they too were though to be undermining the foundations of classical psychoanalysis. Finally, the author concludes that though there have been sorry incidents in psychoanalysis, we should be mature enough to accept both the contributions of the early pioneers and the realizations that new ideas must be permitted to evolve.

  14. Family planning: Muslim style.

    PubMed

    Virina, I

    1979-01-01

    Early birth control methods practiced by Muslims included a version of rhythm called takwim. Instead of using a thermometer to determine the safe period, the woman pressed her navel hard. If she felt magnetic sensations she was not in the safe period. Withdrawal, called piil, was also used. Old folks prepared juices extracted from roots like safran, pitawali, and when drunk they contracted the uterus and prevented pregnancy. New methods and programs have not gained popularity because of traditional medicines. Some early methods are still used today. To some Muslims sex is sacred and should not be talked about in polite conversation. If a Muslim discusses sex in front of others he has no delicadeza. Muslims must voluntarily accept family planning. If they are forced they reject the idea entirely. Extensive radio drama series have been broadcast since the establishment of the Provincial Population Office in Jolo in 1977. Muslims still believe in having many children as security in cases of tribal or interfamily feuds. Family planning workers in Stanvac, Zamboanga use the economic approach for motivating people. The financial burden of raising a big family is emphasized.

  15. Family Counseling Interventions: Understanding Family Systems and the Referral Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Ellen Hawley; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This article describes concepts underlying the idea of the "family as a system"; compares and contrasts four approaches to family therapy (those of Virginia Satir, Jay Haley, Murray Bowen, and Salvador Minuchin); and offers suggestions to teachers referring parents for family counseling. (DB)

  16. Fostering Families' and Children's Rights to Family Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsman, Miriam J.; Boel-Studt, Shamra

    2011-01-01

    Recent federal legislation strengthens children's and families' rights to family-centered practice by increasing the responsibility of child welfare agencies to identify and engage extended family members in providing care and support to children placed out of the home. Preliminary results from an experimental study of a federally funded family…

  17. Family and Family Change in Ireland: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canavan, John

    2012-01-01

    In Ireland, historically and in the current era, family has been a central concern for society and the State. This article provides a descriptive overview of family life in Ireland and of major family-related changes over the past 40 years. It presents a general framework of analysis within which these changes can be understood, considers the…

  18. Street Men, Family Men: Race and Men's Extended Family Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarkisian, Natalia

    2007-01-01

    Disorganization theories postulate that black men have largely abandoned their familial roles. Using the NSFH data, this article refutes the hypothesis of black men's familial disengagement by focusing on extended family integration. Black men are more likely than white men to live with or near extended kin, as well as to frequently see kin in…

  19. Indicators of Familial Alcoholism in Children's Kinetic Family Drawings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Elizabeth S.; Kaiser, Donna H.

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to delineate indicators in children's depictions of family that suggest the presence of parental alcoholism. Kinetic Family Drawings from two groups of children were collected. Statistical analysis revealed two of six items of the evaluation - depiction of isolation of self and isolation of other family members - were significantly higher…

  20. Family Structure, Family Processes, and Adolescent Smoking and Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan L.; Rinelli, Lauren N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether family structure was associated with adolescent risk behaviors, including smoking and drinking. Family living arrangements have become increasingly diverse, yet research on adolescent risk behaviors has typically relied on measures of family structure that do not adequately capture this diversity. Data from the…

  1. Measuring Family Problem Solving: The Family Problem Solving Diary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieren, Dianne K.

    The development and use of the family problem-solving diary are described. The diary is one of several indicators and measures of family problem-solving behavior. It provides a record of each person's perception of day-to-day family problems (what the problem concerns, what happened, who got involved, what those involved did, how the problem…

  2. Functional Family Therapy. Family Strengthening Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Thomas L.; Alexander, James F.

    Increases in delinquency and violence over the past decade are often rooted in a number of interrelated social problems that may originate within the family structure. The focus of this publication is the effectiveness of family intervention programs and chronicles one type of intervention, the Functional Family Therapy (FFT). FFT draws on a…

  3. Strengthening Family Resilience. The Guilford Family Therapy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Froma

    Offering an alternative to clinician's prevalent focus on family dysfunction, this book draws upon extensive clinical and research experience to present a framework for therapeutic and preventive work with couples and families who are distressed, vulnerable, or at risk. The book identifies key interactional processes that enable family members to…

  4. Family Theory versus the Theories Families Live By.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Kerry

    2003-01-01

    Argues that there is significant disjunction between the way that families live their lives and the way that professionals theorize about families. Using the metaphor of positive and negative spaces, argues that there are many negative spaces in our theorizing--everyday family activities that take up considerable time, energy, and attention but…

  5. Multiple Perspectives Within the Family: Family Relationship Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekovic, Maja; Buist, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    The first aim of the present study was to examine the extent to which the larger network of family relationships (parent-adolescent, marital, and sibling relations) affect adolescent adjustment. The second aim was to identify distinct patterns of family relationships and to examine whether these different family relationship patterns are…

  6. Resource Guide for Family-Centered Child Care. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyre, Saren

    For child care to become more supportive of families, programs and providers need to learn about the guiding principles of working with families and the concrete steps they can take in that direction. This resource guide offers ideas and resources for implementing family support principles in child care. The guide offers practitioners ideas and…

  7. Family Structure and Dynamics in Neglectful Families: Implications for Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudin, James M., Jr.

    To identify remedial and preventive interventions that target dysfunctional processes in the family, this study compared the structure and processes of neglectful and non-neglectful families. A sample of 102 neglectful families was identified and recruited from the caseloads of protective service workers in Georgia. A comparison group of 103…

  8. Families Around the World. The Japanese Family. Teacher's Resource Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    The resource unit prepared for grade one is the fourth in a series on the theme of Families Around the World. For this study of the Japanese family, background material is presented for the teacher describing the site of Suye Mura, family structure, basic physical needs, a typical day, socialization, communication, village life today, and the…

  9. Changing Families, Changing Responsibilities: Family Obligations Following Divorce and Remarriage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    The high incidence of divorce and remarriage means that the structure of American families is changing. Drawing on 13 studies that explore intergenerational obligations, this book discusses the responsibilities of family members to one another after divorce and remarriage. Chapter 1, "Who Is Responsible for Dependent Family Members?," presents an…

  10. Family practice clinics. Survey of family practice residents' attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, H.; Levitt, C.

    1993-01-01

    All residents of McGill University's Department of Family Medicine were surveyed by mail about their family practice clinic experience. Residents were generally satisfied with their training site and their supervision, but noted problems with volume and diversity of patients, learning certain procedures, and knowledge of community resources. They did not want more family medicine clinic time. PMID:8219838

  11. Correlates of Family Routines in Head Start Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Susan L.; Stoneman, Zolinda

    2004-01-01

    The popular parenting literature places great importance on the role of routines in children's lives. Empirical research on family routines, however, is limited. This study examined correlates of family routines in a Head Start population in order to better understand their significance in the lives of families. Weak correlations were found…

  12. Genetics Home Reference: familial cylindromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with the skin (skin appendages), such as hair follicles and sweat glands . People with familial cylindromatosis typically ... cylindromas are now generally believed to begin in hair follicles. Individuals with familial cylindromatosis occasionally develop other types ...

  13. Cybernetics of Brief Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Bradford P.; Ross, Jeffrey M.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a cybernetic view of brief family therapy. Includes a historical discussion of the key ideas underlying brief family therapy, a cybernetic model of therapeutic change, and a clinical case for exemplification. (Author/JAC)

  14. Veterans and Military Family Health

    MedlinePlus

    Service members and veterans face some different health issues from civilians. Their families also face some unique challenges. Families may have to cope with Separation from their loved ones Anxiety over ...

  15. Myth of the Perfect Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... divorce rate, and with the growing number of single-parent households, other family structures have become more common. ... percent of American families are now headed by single parents, either divorced, widowed, or never married. Some children ...

  16. Protect Your Family from Rabies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Protect Your Family from Rabies Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... or camp official right away. Talk With Your Family About the Seriousness of Rabies While very few ...

  17. National Center on Family Homelessness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events You are here Home National Center on Family Homelessness Center A staggering 2.5 million children ... the impact of homelessness on children, youth, and families. Through research, programs, trainings, and partnerships with the ...

  18. Strategies for Working with Families

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Edward; Maimets, Talvi

    1991-01-01

    Family physicians are in contact with families as they pass through various stages and become aware of marital and family problems. By offering guidance and patient education before problems arise, physicians can avoid trouble and encourage healthy marital and parenting patterns. This article presents the Family Life Cycle framework and discusses the stresses that occur at marriage and at the birth of the first child. Helpful tools can be shared with patients. PMID:21228986

  19. Military Families: A Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    ProQuest Burrell, Lolita , Doris Briley Durand, and Jennifer Fortado. "Military Community Integration and Its Effect on Well-Being and Retention...Information and Support for Iraq & Afghanistan Veterans and Their Families. 2nd ed. Oklahoma City : Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, Family Mental...Michelle. SAFE [Support and Family Education] Program: Mental Health Facts for Families. 3rd ed. Oklahoma City : Oklahoma City Veterans Affairs Medical

  20. Theme Section: Focus on Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Manya; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A collection of 14 brief articles considers the effects of family environment and lifestyle on children and provides suggestions for healthier family relations. The articles cover such topics as: family stress; preschool academic programs; stepfamilies; corporate child care; fathers; divorce; only children; single and working parents; and death.…

  1. Family Therapy and Psychosomatic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waring, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the use of family therapy in dealing with illnesses such as childhood diabetes, asthma, pain, and anorexia nervosa. Marital and family therapy may be effective in treating some psychosomatic problems. Family assessment is helpful in the management of all psychosomatic problems. (Author/JAC)

  2. Family Textbooks Twelve Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Norval D.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996 the author conducted an intensive study of twenty current family textbooks published in the United States, the results of which appeared in an academic journal article and a nonacademic report in 1997. The study included practical "functionalist" marriage and family textbooks and more academic sociology of the family books; these…

  3. Changes in American Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saluter, Arlene F.

    1989-01-01

    This report provides a graphic overview of recent trends in the lifestyles of Americans which suggest a movement away from "traditional" family living. The charts in this report with their limited commentary, summarize major trends and focus on families with children present. Data are also presented on other types of families, households, and…

  4. Understanding and Fostering Family Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Joan B.; Murphy, John J.; Smith, Shelia M.

    2005-01-01

    Family resilience can be defined as the ability of a family to respond positively to an adverse situation and emerge from the situation feeling strengthened, more resourceful, and more confident than its prior state. This article presents a succinct literature review on family resilience, including its dimensions, working models, and the…

  5. Family Literacy Programs: Who Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padak, Nancy; Rasinski, Tim

    Designing and delivering literacy programs that benefit both parents (or other family members) and children makes sense. But do family literacy programs really work? And if so, who benefits? The concept of family literacy is firmly rooted in a substantial research base from several disciplines, including adult literacy, emergent literacy, child…

  6. Family Histories: Collecting, Connecting, Celebrating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damkoehler, Dee; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an integrated curriculum for grade two at Metcalf Laboratory School, Normal, Illinois, that celebrates family histories and American immigration. Reports that the journey begins with the teachers sharing their own family backgrounds, followed by story reading, sharing the family history project with parents, collecting oral histories,…

  7. Family Values in American Drama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Joanne

    When an educator was invited by a Chinese university to teach a seminar in American drama, she used "family drama" as the organizing theme of her course because she was (and is) convinced that from Eugene O'Neill on, American playwrights have been obsessed with family disintegration and the failure of family harmony. This paper is an…

  8. Families with Special Health Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for a five-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on families with special health needs. The units cover: (1) family health needs (including the impact of special needs on financial well-being, the impact on the psychological health of the family, and the relationship of society to…

  9. Neighborhood-Based Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Susan Whitelaw

    This report provides an overview of neighborhood-based family-support programs and describes the development of the family-support movement. It includes sections on the definition of neighborhood-based family-support programs, the principles and theories on which they are based, a discussion of the problems they are designed to address, a…

  10. A Feminist Family Therapy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Leora; Piercy, Fred P.

    1991-01-01

    Reports on development and psychometric properties of Feminist Family Therapy Scale (FFTS), a 17-item instrument intended to reflect degree to which family therapists conceptualize process of family therapy from feminist-informed perspective. Found that the instrument discriminated between self-identified feminists and nonfeminists, women and men,…

  11. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care…

  12. Family Day Care in Denmark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Mary; Wagner, Marsden G.

    The present report describes a system for the care of children during the day in Denmark: care in private family homes. Begun in 1966, this program organized a formal system of family day care homes initiated and supervised by the government; this is an extension of the former system of licensing privately initiated family day care homes. From the…

  13. [Family dynamics of autistic children].

    PubMed

    Sprovieri, M H; Assumpção, F B

    2001-06-01

    We studied 15 families with autistics, 15 with Down's syndrome and 15 asymptomatic children. Patients' age ranged from 5 to 15 years-old. The parents of these three families' groups were appraised in regard to their family dynamics, to relate those symptoms to the functioning of an autistic family, in a comparative study. Details were provided of the families, the overall autistic features, the autistic's family, the family and the mental health, their limitations and difficulties throughout the vital cycle. An attempt was made to locate the factors that aid the family in hindering the healthy emotional development of its members. The field research was achieved by use of the instruments of the Family Dynamics Evaluation, (Carneiro, 1983). The data gathered were statistically compared. Considering the family population studied (n = 45), we found that the autistics' families and victims of Down's syndrome made it difficult to sustain the emotional health of group members. We conclude that the autistic's family dynamics caused difficulties to the emotional health of the group's members.

  14. Family Literacy Programs: Who Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padak, Nancy; Rasinski, Tim

    The concept of family literacy is firmly rooted in a substantial research base from several disciplines, including adult literacy, emergent literacy, child development, and systems analysis. Results from a review of research from each discipline found answers to questions about benefits of family literacy. Results show family literacy programs do…

  15. Family Interventions in Physical Health

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Thomas L.

    1991-01-01

    As we begin to understand the relationships between family interaction and physical health, we can develop interventions that focus on education, support, and problem solving. The author reviews existing research on family interventions in physical health and proposes guidelines for developing, implementing, and studying family interventions. PMID:21229055

  16. Rural Family Functioning. Bulletin 562.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Helen M.; Kuipers, Judith L.

    In a 1972 interview survey of 250 rural families in 2 East Tennessee counties, patterns of family functioning were shown to be directly related to economic level, husband's age, and husband's educational level. Within the sample population consisting of family households of 2 or more members, the mean age of husbands was 49, and of wives, 46. The…

  17. Family Research: An Ethnographic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Howard F.

    1991-01-01

    An ethnographic approach based on in-depth interviewing, naturalistic and participant observation, narrative description, and contextual interpretation is proposed as a tool for family health care research. The multiple meanings of family, both for research clinicians and for society, are considered. The problem of how a family orientation is incorporated into biomedical' health care is discussed. PMID:21229058

  18. Farm and Family Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This teacher's guide contains four units for the farm and family management program, a three-year educational program through which farm families have the opportunity to participate in group and individualized instruction. The program is intended to help provide basic farm and home management information to farm families to meet the changes of the…

  19. Does Addiction Run in Families?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addiction Run in Families? Does Addiction Run in Families? Listen PDF: EasyToRead_WhatIsAddiction_Final_012017.pdf Addiction ... Español English Español "Heart disease runs in some families. Addiction runs in ours." ©istock.com/ Antonio_Diaz ...

  20. Getting to Know ELLs' Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breiseth, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Most English language learners are from families that have recently immigrated to the United States-and many of those families traveled here at tremendous risk to seek better education for their children. It's important for classroom teachers to make building relationships with the families of ELLs a priority. Breiseth asserts that the most…

  1. Measurement of Family Affective Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Joseph

    1980-01-01

    Three studies demonstrate that the Inventory of Family Feelings, a measure of family affective structure, has high reliability and construct and concurrent validity. It is appropriate for affective comparisons by age, sex, and ordinal position of children and for measuring change after family or marital therapy, or after predictable stress…

  2. Family Literacy Programs: Who Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padak, Nancy; Rasinski, Tim

    The concept of family literacy is firmly rooted in a substantial research base from several disciplines: adult literacy, emergent literacy, child development, and systems analysis. Research from these disciplines was reviewed to determine the benefits of family literacy. The results show that family literacy programs do work and that at least four…

  3. Critical care family needs: nurse-family member confederate pairs.

    PubMed

    Forrester, D A; Murphy, P A; Price, D M; Monaghan, J F

    1990-11-01

    In this study we explored the relationship between critical care family members' perceived needs and the assessment of these needs by a confederate sample of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses. Family needs were measured by using Molter's revised Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Data consisted of 92 confederate pairs of Critical Care Family Needs Inventory responses obtained from 92 family members of adult patients hospitalized in a variety of ICUs and 49 ICU nurses providing direct care for these patients. Paired t tests (two tailed) were calculated to detect significant differences between confederate pairs of family members' perceptions and ICU nurses' assessments of the importance of the needs studied. Family members' perceptions and ICU nurses' assessments of the most and least important critical care family needs were identified. Significant (p less than 0.001 to p less than 0.05) differences were detected between confederate pairs of family members' perceptions and ICU nurses' assessments of the importance of 15 (50%) of the critical care family needs studied. Therefore, it appears that these nurses were only moderately accurate in their assessments of critical care family needs. Implications for nursing practice, education, and research were identified and discussed.

  4. Family identity: black-white interracial family health experience.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Marcia Marie; Garwick, Ann Williams

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this interpretive descriptive study was to describe how eight Black-White couples with school-aged children constructed their interracial family identity through developmental transitions and interpreted race to their children. Within and across-case data analytic strategies were used to identify commonalities and variations in how Black men and White women in couple relationships formed their family identities over time. Coming together was the core theme described by the Black-White couples as they negotiated the process of forming a family identity. Four major tasks in the construction of interracial family identity emerged: (a) understanding and resolving family of origin chaos and turmoil, (b) transcending Black-White racial history, (c) articulating the interracial family's racial standpoint, and (d) explaining race to biracial children across the developmental stages. The findings guide family nurses in promoting family identity formation as a component of family health within the nurse-family partnership with Black-White mixed-race families.

  5. Explaining Family Change and Variation: Challenges for Family Demographers

    PubMed Central

    Seltzer, Judith A.; Bachrach, Christine A.; Bianchi, Suzanne M.; Bledsoe, Caroline H.; Casper, Lynne M.; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; DiPrete, Thomas A.; Hotz, V. Joseph; Morgan, S. Philip; Sanders, Seth G.; Thomas, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Twenty years ago, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) issued a request for proposals that resulted in the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH), a unique survey valuable to a wide range of family scholars. This paper describes the efforts of an interdisciplinary group of family demographers to build on the progress enabled by the NSFH and many other theoretical and methodological innovations. Our work, also supported by NICHD, will develop plans for research and data collection to address the central question of what causes family change and variation. We outline the group's initial assessments of orienting frameworks, key aspects of family life to study, and theoretical and methodological challenges for research on family change. Finally, we invite family scholars to follow our progress and to help develop this shared public good. PMID:20376277

  6. Anticipation in familial leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.; Jarvik, G.P.; Goode, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Living My Family's Story

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Lally, Robin M.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Murekeyisoni, Christine; Dickerson, Suzanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on known or suggested genetic risk factors, a growing number of women now live with knowledge of a potential cancer diagnosis that may never occur. Given this, it is important to understand the meaning of living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer. Objective The objective of the study was to explore how women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer (1) form self-identity, (2) apply self-care strategies toward risk, and (3) describe the meaning of care through a high-risk breast program. Methods Interpretive hermeneutic phenomenology guided the qualitative research method. Women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer were recruited from a high-risk breast program. Open-ended interview questions focused on experiences living as women managing high risk for breast cancer. Consistent with hermeneutic methodology, the principal investigator led a team to analyze the interview transcripts. Results Twenty women participated in in-depth interviews. Analysis revealed that women describe their own identity based on their family story and grieve over actual and potential familial loss. This experience influences self-care strategies, including seeking care from hereditary breast cancer risk experts for early detection and prevention, as well as maintaining a connection for early treatment “when” diagnosis occurs. Conclusions Healthy women living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer are living within the context of their family cancer story, which influences how they define themselves and engage in self-care. Implications for Practice Findings present important practical, research, and policy information regarding health promotion, psychosocial assessment, and support for women living with this risk. PMID:22544165

  8. Fertility and the family.

    PubMed

    Kono, S

    1991-09-01

    The developed countries of Asia include Japan and the newly industrialized economies of Hong Kong, Taiwan, Republic of Korea, and Singapore. These 5 societies share various similarities that have helped in their socioeconomic development. The 1st includes a significant and quite rapid socioeconomic development (per capita gross national product, urbanization, demographic transition, educational attainment, and industrialization). The 2nd similarity is the extremely high levels of education. Indeed those 5 societies boast the most highly educated populations in Asia. 3rd, they have achieved below replacement fertility. In fact, they never really had very high birth rates anyhow. 4th, extended families are the norm despite rapid transformation of their societies. Confucianism, the 5th similarity, advocates multigenerational families. Children understand that it is their duty to always take care of their parents. Parents know that they have a right to ask for their children's help at any time. In 1981, a demographer hypothesized that 1 of the leading signs of fertility decline is the nucleation of the family. yet in these 5 societies nucleation did not appear before fertility decline. In fact, in Japan, fertility is higher in those homes where the grandmother watches her grandchildren while the daughter or daughter-in-law is at work. Some have compared the role of Confucianism in socioeconomic development with that of Protestantism in the industrialization of Europe. Both stress hard work, simplicity, frugality, discipline, and regularity in daily life. Yet Confucianism sees women as bearers of children and servants to men. Women in these societies protest this mindset by postponing marriage and having few children. If these societies wish to increase fertility, they need to restructure their male oriented societies.

  9. [Population and family planning].

    PubMed

    Romero, H

    1977-12-01

    This work consists of a speech read before the Adacemy of Medicine of the Institute of Chile and a brief debate by members of the audience. Misinformed opponents of birth control who argue among other things that family planning is a US plot ignore the fact that the desire to avoid pregnancy dates from the remote past, as attested by evidence from early Egyptian papyruses. Recent sharp declines in human mortality have led to unprecedented population growth. Around the beginning of the modern era the world contained about 250 million people, a population which did not double until the mid 1600s. Today world population doubles in 30 to 35 years, and by the end of the century it may reach 7 billion. The impact of such growth on the food supply, housing, the economy, education, and the environment have been the object of many studies, predominant among them those presented at the World Population Conferences in Rome, Belgrade, and Bucharest. The family planning program in Chile was initiated around 1962 although some activities had been carried out earlier. The Chilean Association for the Protection of the Family, a private organization, grew out of these early efforts and enjoyed considerable success from its earliest days. The natality rate declined from 38/1000 in 1962 to 23.5/1000 in 1977, and infant and maternal mortality also declined. The decline has been concentrated in births after age 30 and in high parity births. The young age structure means that the population will continue to increase for the foreseeable future.

  10. Research Methodology of Family-Oriented Care

    PubMed Central

    Ransom, Donald C.

    1991-01-01

    Family practice and family-centered primary care have a special role in studying the family. A framework for conceptualizing research on families and health, illness, and care is presented. The author discusses ways in which families can influence the health of their members, current controversies about what family means, the logic of family research measurements, whether family research is warranted, and the question of variable-versus case- (person- versus family-) centered research design and analysis. PMID:21229057

  11. Galileo - Ganymede Family Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    When the Galileo spacecraft flew by Ganymede, Jupiter's and the solar system's largest satellite, on June 26, 1996, the project scientists and engineers gather with their friends and family to view the photos as they are received and to celebrate the mission. This videotape presents that meeting. Representatives from the various instrument science teams discuss many of the instruments aboard Galileo and show videos and pictures of what they have seen so far. This video is continued on Videotape number NONP-NASA-VT-2000036028.

  12. [Family planning in Europe].

    PubMed

    Wynnyczuk, V

    1984-01-01

    The results of a comparative study of demographic problems in 24 European countries are presented. The focus is on reproductive behavior, including the treatment of infertility, family planning, induced abortion, education for marriage and parenthood, and consultative services. The author notes that changes in the age of sexual maturity, age at marriage, the educational status of women, the impact of mass media, the stability of marriages, the acceptance of sexual intercourse prior to marriage, and the general availability of birth control impose changes on the provision of educational and consultative services. English and Russian abstracts of this article are available separately.

  13. The SEQUEST Family Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabb, David L.

    2015-11-01

    Since its introduction in 1994, SEQUEST has gained many important new capabilities, and a host of successor algorithms have built upon its successes. This Account and Perspective maps the evolution of this important tool and charts the relationships among contributions to the SEQUEST legacy. Many of the changes represented improvements in computing speed by clusters and graphics cards. Mass spectrometry innovations in mass accuracy and activation methods led to shifts in fragment modeling and scoring strategies. These changes, as well as the movement of laboratories and lab members, have led to great diversity among the members of the SEQUEST family.

  14. The laminin family.

    PubMed

    Aumailley, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Laminins are large molecular weight glycoproteins constituted by the assembly of three disulfide-linked polypeptides, the α, β and γ chains. The human genome encodes 11 genetically distinct laminin chains. Structurally, laminin chains differ by the number, size and organization of a few constitutive domains, endowing the various members of the laminin family with common and unique important functions. In particular, laminins are indispensable building blocks for cellular networks physically bridging the intracellular and extracellular compartments and relaying signals critical for cellular behavior, and for extracellular polymers determining the architecture and the physiology of basement membranes.

  15. Balancing family and work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-08-01

    More than 45% of women scientists at top universities in the United States have indicated that their careers have kept them from having as many children as they want, according to an 8 August study, “Scientists want more children,” which appears in the journal PLoS ONE. The study, by sociologists Elaine Howard Ecklund of Rice University and Anne Lincoln of Southern Methodist University, indicates that 24.5% of male scientists surveyed indicated the same concerns. The study also found that among junior scientists, 29% of women indicated concern that a science career would prevent them from having a family; 7% of men indicated the same concern.

  16. [Family and chronic paediatric illness].

    PubMed

    Grau Rubio, Claudia; Fernández Hawrylak, M

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric illnesses are always a family problem. Hospitalization, treatments and their long term consequences constitute a challenge for the family. In this paper, we describe the structural, procedural and emotional alterations that affect the family dynamic. We argue that the child should be treated within the family context and propose a multi-dimensional intervention model centered on the family's singularities and specific needs, the support available in their environment, the development of capacities and resilience, and also the organization of user-centered services that are coordinated with all the services provided by the community.

  17. The Family Map: Structured Family Interview to Identify Risks and Strengths in Head Start Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Bradley, Robert; Conners, Nicola; Bokony, Patti

    2007-01-01

    The Family Map is a semistructured interview developed to assess important aspects of the family and home environment associated with well-being in 3- to 5-year old children. The measure is designed so that it can be used during home visits with Head Start families. Accordingly, it was developed in collaboration with Head Start providers and…

  18. Familial risk for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Madiha; Ding, Xiao-Ji; Cao, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer, which has a low survival rate, is a leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Smoking and air pollution are the major causes of lung cancer; however, numerous studies have demonstrated that genetic factors also contribute to the development of lung cancer. A family history of lung cancer increases the risk for the disease in both smokers and never-smokers. This review focuses on familial lung cancer, in particular on the familial aggregation of lung cancer. The development of familial lung cancer involves shared environmental and genetic factors among family members. Familial lung cancer represents a good model for investigating the association between environmental and genetic factors, as well as for identifying susceptibility genes for lung cancer. In addition, studies on familial lung cancer may help to elucidate the etiology and mechanism of lung cancer, and may identify novel biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis, targeted therapy and improved prevention strategies. This review presents the aetiology and molecular biology of lung cancer and then systematically introduces and discusses several aspects of familial lung cancer, including the characteristics of familial lung cancer, population-based studies on familial lung cancer and the genetics of familial lung cancer. PMID:28356926

  19. Communication Among Melanoma Family Members.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Deborah J; Albrecht, Terrance; Hay, Jennifer; Eggly, Susan; Harris-Wei, Julie; Meischke, Hendrika; Burke, Wylie

    2017-03-01

    Interventions to improve communication among family members may facilitate information flow about familial risk and preventive health behaviors. This is a secondary analysis of the effects of an interactive website intervention aimed at increasing communication frequency and agreement about health risk among melanoma families. Participants were family units, consisting of one family member with melanoma identified from a previous research study (the Case) and an additional first degree relative and a parent of a child 0-17. Family triads were randomized to receive access to the website intervention or to serve as control families. Family communication frequency and agreement about melanoma prevention behaviors and beliefs were measured at baseline and again at 1 year post randomization. Intervention participants of all three types significantly increased the frequency of communication to their first degree relatives (Parents, siblings, children; range = 14-18 percentage points; all p < .05). At baseline, approximately two-thirds of all three family members talked with at least some member of the family about cancer risk. Agreement between Cases and First Degree Relatives and between Cases and Parents increased from pre to post intervention in the intervention participants compared to the control participants (p < .05). These findings provide support for interventions to improve family communication about cancer risk.

  20. Familial Gastric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Namrata; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Duda, Dan G.; Hong, Theodore S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Mullen, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Although the majority of gastric carcinomas are sporadic, approximately 10% show familial aggregation, and a hereditary cause is determined in 1%–3% cases. Of these, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is the most recognized predisposition syndrome. Although rare, the less commonly known syndromes also confer a markedly increased risk for development of gastric cancer. Identification and characterization of these syndromes require a multidisciplinary effort involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, biologists, and pathologists. This article reviews the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Implications for Practice: Although the majority of gastric adenocarcinomas are sporadic with many of those related to chronic Helicobacter pylori infection, approximately 10% of the cases show familial aggregation, and a specific hereditary cause is determined in 1%–3% cases. This review describes the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Ultimately, a better understanding of the biology of these conditions should allow early identification and intervention as part of a multidisciplinary approach involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, and pathologists. PMID:26424758

  1. Prevention, family, and community

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Lung; Rohrbach, Louise Ann; Daley, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The “Prevention, Family, and Community” session was chaired by Dr. Joseph Jror-Serk Cheng, who is an expert in community psychiatry and mental health policy and is superintendent of the Bali Psychiatric Center in Taipei. Dr. Shu-Lung Yang, dean of Student Affairs and Professor/Director of the Crime Research Center, National Chung Cheng University in Taiwan, served as the discussant. The two presenters were Dr. Louise Ann Rohrbach, who presented on “Prevention of Alcohol and other Drug Abuse: Science, Practice, Critical Issues, and Future Direction,” and Dr. Dennis Daley, who spoke on “Family and Social Aspects of Drug Abuse: Implications for Treatment and Recovery.” Dr. Rohrbach is associate professor of Preventive Medicine and director of the Master of Public Health (MPH) program at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine. Dr. Daley is professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Pennsylvania. PMID:25264416

  2. Familial hypercholesterolaemia in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Bourbon, M; Alves, A C; Medeiros, A M; Silva, S; Soutar, A K

    2008-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is characterised clinically by an increased level of circulating LDL cholesterol that leads to lipid accumulation in tendons and arteries, premature atherosclerosis and increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Although Portugal should have about 20,000 cases, this disease is severely under-diagnosed in our country, this being the first presentation of Portuguese data on FH. A total of 602 blood samples were collected from 184 index patients and 418 relatives from several centres throughout Portugal. Fifty-three different mutations were found in 83 index patients, 79 heterozygous and 4 with two defective LDLR alleles. Additionally, 4 putative alterations were found in 8 patients but were not considered mutations causing disease, mainly because they did not co-segregate with hypercholesterolaemia in the families. Three unrelated patients were found to be heterozygous for the APOB(3500) mutation and two unrelated patients were found to be heterozygous for a novel mutation in PCSK9, predicted to cause a single amino acid substitution, D374H. Cascade screening increased the number of FH patients identified genetically to 204. The newly identified FH patients are now receiving counselling and treatment based on the genetic diagnosis. The early identification of FH patients can increase their life expectancy and quality of life by preventing the development of premature CHD if patients receive appropriate pharmacological treatment.

  3. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, E

    1999-06-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC), also known as Byler disease, is an inherited disorder of childhood in which cholestasis of hepatocellular origin often presents in the neonatal period and leads to death from liver failure before adolescence. The pattern of appearance of affected children within families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. Several studies have provided support for the heterogeneity of this clinical entity suggesting the existence of different types due to different disorders affecting the hepatocyte and related to defects of bile acid secretion or bile acid metabolism. Recent molecular and genetic studies have identified genes responsible for three types of PFIC and have shown that PFIC was related to mutations in hepatocellular transport system genes involved in bile formation. These findings now provide specific diagnostic tools for the investigation of children with PFIC and should allow prenatal diagnosis in the future. Genotype-phenotype correlations performed in patients treated with ursodeoxycholic acid or biliary diversion should allow those PFIC patients who could benefit from these therapies to be precisely identified. In the future, other therapies, such as cell and gene therapies, might be considered and could also represent an alternative to liver transplantation.

  4. Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sızmaz, Selçuk; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; T. Trese, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a hereditary disease associated with visual loss, particularly in the pediatric group. Mutations in the NDP, FZD4, LRP5, and TSPAN12 genes have been shown to contribute to FEVR. FEVR has been reported to have X-linked recessive, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive inheritances. However, both the genotypic and phenotypic features are variable. Novel mutations contributing to the disease have been reported. The earliest and the most prominent finding of the disease is avascularity in the peripheral retina. As the disease progresses, retinal neovascularization, subretinal exudation, partial and total retinal detachment may occur, which may be associated with certain mutations. With early diagnosis and prompt management visual loss can be prevented with laser photocoagulation and anti-VEGF injections. In case of retinal detachment, pars plana vitrectomy alone or combined with scleral buckling should be considered. Identifying asymptomatic family members with various degrees of insidious findings is of certain importance. Wide-field imaging with fluorescein angiography is crucial in the management of this disease. The differential diagnosis includes other pediatric vitreoretinopathies such as Norrie disease, retinopathy of prematurity, and Coats’ disease. PMID:27800225

  5. Familial apolipoprotein E deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, E J; Gregg, R E; Ghiselli, G; Forte, T M; Ordovas, J M; Zech, L A; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    A unique kindred with premature cardiovascular disease, tubo-eruptive xanthomas, and type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) associated with familial apolipoprotein (apo) E deficiency was examined. Homozygotes (n = 4) had marked increases in cholesterol-rich very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL), which could be effectively lowered with diet and medication (niacin, clofibrate). Homozygotes had only trace amounts of plasma apoE, and accumulations of apoB-48 and apoA-IV in VLDL, IDL, and low density lipoproteins. Radioiodinated VLDL apoB and apoE kinetic studies revealed that the homozygous proband had markedly retarded fractional catabolism of VLDL apoB-100, apoB-48 and plasma apoE, as well as an extremely low apoE synthesis rate as compared to normals. Obligate heterozygotes (n = 10) generally had normal plasma lipids and mean plasma apoE concentrations that were 42% of normal. The data indicate that homozygous familial apoE deficiency is a cause of type III HLP, is associated with markedly decreased apoE production, and that apoE is essential for the normal catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein constituents. Images PMID:3771793

  6. Familial Resemblance for Loneliness

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Derom, Catherine A.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Cacioppo, John T.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2010-01-01

    Social isolation and loneliness in humans have been associated with physical and psychological morbidity, as well as mortality. This study aimed to assess the etiology of individual differences in feelings of loneliness. The genetic architecture of loneliness was explored in an extended twin-family design including 8,683 twins, siblings and parents from 3,911 families. In addition, 917 spouses of twins participated. The presence of assortative mating, genetic non-additivity, vertical cultural transmission, genotype–environment (GE) correlation and interaction was modeled. GE interaction was considered for several demographic characteristics. Results showed non-random mating for loneliness. We confirmed that loneliness is moderately heritable, with a significant contribution of non-additive genetic variation. There were no effects of vertical cultural transmission. With respect to demographic characteristics, results indicated that marriage, having offspring, more years of education, and a higher number of siblings are associated with lower levels of loneliness. Interestingly, these effects tended to be stronger for men than women. There was little evidence of changes in genetic architecture as a function of these characteristics. We conclude that the genetic architecture of loneliness points to non-additive genetic influences, suggesting it may be a trait that was not neutral to selection in our evolutionary past. Sociodemographic factors that influence the prevalence of loneliness do not affect its genetic architecture. PMID:20145989

  7. The expanding family Marseilleviridae.

    PubMed

    Aherfi, Sarah; La Scola, Bernard; Pagnier, Isabelle; Raoult, Didier; Colson, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    The family Marseilleviridae encompasses giant viruses that replicate in free-living Acanthamoeba amoebae. Since the discovery of the founding member Marseillevirus in 2007, 7 new marseilleviruses have been observed, including 3 from environmental freshwater, one from a dipteran, and two from symptom-free humans. Marseilleviruses have ≈250-nm-large icosahedral capsids and 346-386-kb-long mosaic genomes that encode 444-497 predicted proteins. They share a small set of core genes with Mimivirus and other large and giant DNA viruses that compose a monophyletic group, first described in 2001. Comparative genomics analyses indicate that the family Marseilleviridae currently includes three lineages and a pan-genome composed of ≈600 genes. Antibodies against marseilleviruses and viral DNA have been observed in a significant proportion of asymptomatic individuals and in the blood and lymph nodes of a child with adenitis; these observations suggest that these giant viruses may be blood borne and question if they may be pathogenic in humans.

  8. Familial hypercholesterolemia: A review

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Mithun J

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder of lipoprotein metabolism resulting in elevated serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels leading to increased risk for premature cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The diagnosis of this condition is based on clinical features, family history, and elevated LDL-cholesterol levels aided more recently by genetic testing. As the atherosclerotic burden is dependent on the degree and duration of exposure to raised LDL-cholesterol levels, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment is paramount. Statins are presently the mainstay in the management of these patients, although newer drugs, LDL apheresis, and other investigational therapies may play a role in certain subsets of FH, which are challenging to treat. Together these novel treatments have notably improved the prognosis of FH, especially that of the heterozygous patients. Despite these achievements, a majority of children fail to attain targeted lipid goals owing to persistent shortcomings in diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment. This review aims to highlight the screening, diagnosis, goals of therapy, and management options in patients with FH. PMID:24987256

  9. Family dynamics and postnatal depression.

    PubMed

    Tammentie, T; Tarkka, M-T; Astedt-Kurki, P; Paavilainen, E; Laippala, P

    2004-04-01

    Research has shown that postnatal depression (PND) affects 10-15% of mothers in Western societies. PND is not easily identified and therefore it often remains undetected. Untreated depression has a detrimental effect on the mother and child and the entire family. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the state of family dynamics after delivery and whether the mother's PND was associated with family dynamics. The study used a survey covering the catchment area of one Finnish university hospital. Both primi- and multiparas took part and data were collected using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for mothers and the Family Dynamics Measure II (FDM II) for both mothers and fathers. The data were analysed using SPSS statistical programme and frequency and percentage distributions, means and standard deviations were examined. Correlations were analysed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The significance of any differences between mothers' and fathers' scores was determined with a paired t-test. Of the families participating in the study (373 mothers and 314 partners), 13% of the mothers suffered from PND symptoms (EPDS score of 13 or more). As a whole, family dynamics in the families participating in the study were reported to be rather good. However, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics compared with other families. With the exception of individuation, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics than their partners. With the exception of role reciprocity, non-depressed mothers reported more positive family dynamics than their partners. Knowledge of the association of mothers' PND with family dynamics could help to develop nursing care at maternity and child welfare clinics and maternity hospitals. Depressed mothers and their families need support to be able to make family dynamics as good as possible.

  10. NASA's Astronant Family Support Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beven, Gary; Curtis, Kelly D.; Holland, Al W.; Sipes, Walter; VanderArk, Steve

    2014-01-01

    During the NASA-Mir program of the 1990s and due to the challenges inherent in the International Space Station training schedule and operations tempo, it was clear that a special focus on supporting families was a key to overall mission success for the ISS crewmembers pre-, in- and post-flight. To that end, in January 2001 the first Family Services Coordinator was hired by the Behavioral Health and Performance group at NASA JSC and matrixed from Medical Operations into the Astronaut Office's organization. The initial roles and responsibilities were driven by critical needs, including facilitating family communication during training deployments, providing mission-specific and other relevant trainings for spouses, serving as liaison for families with NASA organizations such as Medical Operations, NASA management and the Astronaut Office, and providing assistance to ensure success of an Astronaut Spouses Group. The role of the Family Support Office (FSO) has modified as the ISS Program matured and the needs of families changed. The FSO is currently an integral part of the Astronaut Office's ISS Operations Branch. It still serves the critical function of providing information to families, as well as being the primary contact for US and international partner families with resources at JSC. Since crews launch and return on Russian vehicles, the FSO has the added responsibility for coordinating with Flight Crew Operations, the families, and their guests for Soyuz launches, landings, and Direct Return to Houston post-flight. This presentation will provide a summary of the family support services provided for astronauts, and how they have changed with the Program and families the FSO serves. Considerations for future FSO services will be discussed briefly as NASA proposes one year missions and beyond ISS missions. Learning Objective: 1) Obtain an understanding of the reasons a Family Support Office was important for NASA. 2) Become familiar with the services provided for

  11. Law and family planning.

    PubMed

    Kirby, M D

    1984-03-17

    This discussion of law and family planning reviews some recent reports of the Australain Law Reform Commission (ALRC), the law as it affects family planning and the sexuality of young people with reference to the Irish dilemma, the law's approach in Ingland, Canada, and the US. The ALRC works only on references recived by it from the Federal Attorney General. No reference so far received has been specific to the issues of family planning, but some past and present projects are partly relevant. The most recent report of the ALRC, tabled in Federal Parliament in December 1983 related to privacy protection. An issue that arose in this inquiry related to the subject of the rights to privacy of young people. In a discussion paper the ALRC had suggestd that young persons between the ages of 12-16 should have certain defined legal protection of privacy, even against their parents. Specifically, the ALRC was thinking of medical advice and school counseling. Obviously the issue of contraceptive advice was raised in this context, and never has a tenative proposal of the ALRC engendered so much bitter criticism. The Commission modified its proposal on this topic and the details of the revised proposals are disclosed in its report. Clearly, the rights of young people in regard to sexual advice, education, and treatment are matters of great controversy and strongly divided community opinion. In Australia there are some who are totally opposed to family planning for themselves, their children, and even for others. Such opposition exists in the medical profession. Presumably, such people base their views on strongly held moral principles. They generally believe that contraception interferes in the ways of nature. Far from being promoted by open discussion and instruction in the schools, such matters are intimate concerns of a small circle, principally the family. In dealing with those aspects that concern the rights of parents in thes matters, attention turns to England's Gillick

  12. Family pediatrics: report of the Task Force on the Family.

    PubMed

    Schor, Edward L

    2003-06-01

    WHY A TASK FORCE ON THE FAMILY? The practice of pediatrics is unique among medical specialties in many ways, among which is the nearly certain presence of a parent when health care services are provided for the patient. Regardless of whether parents or other family members are physically present, their influence is pervasive. Families are the most central and enduring influence in children's lives. Parents are also central in pediatric care. The health and well-being of children are inextricably linked to their parents' physical, emotional and social health, social circumstances, and child-rearing practices. The rising incidence of behavior problems among children attests to some families' inability to cope with the increasing stresses they are experiencing and their need for assistance. When a family's distress finds its voice in a child's symptoms, pediatricians are often parents' first source for help. There is enormous diversity among families-diversity in the composition of families, in their ethnic and racial heritage, in their religious and spiritual orientation, in how they communicate, in the time they spend together, in their commitment to individual family members, in their connections to their community, in their experiences, and in their ability to adapt to stress. Within families, individuals are different from one another as well. Pediatricians are especially sensitive to differences among children-in their temperaments and personalities, in their innate and learned abilities, and in how they view themselves and respond to the world around them. It is remarkable and a testament to the effort of parents and to the resilience of children that most families function well and most children succeed in life. Family life in the United States has been subjected to extensive scrutiny and frequent commentary, yet even when those activities have been informed by research, they tend to be influenced by personal experience within families and by individual and

  13. Acculturation gaps in Vietnamese immigrant families: Impact on family relationships

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Joyce; Birman, Dina

    2009-01-01

    Vietnamese immigrants in the United States face acculturation challenges involving the individual, family, and community. Experts suggest that immigrant family members acculturate at different rates resulting in an acculturation gap, which negatively influences family adjustment. In this study we examined the degree and patterns of acculturation differences between 104 first generation immigrant Vietnamese adolescents and their parents, and whether acculturation gap affected family relationships. Operationalizing the “gap” as both absolute value of differences in acculturation and interactions of parent and adolescent acculturation levels, we examined the impact of such gaps in Vietnamese and American language, identity, and behavioral acculturation on family relationships. Results revealed that family cohesion and satisfaction were predicted by gaps in Vietnamese identity acculturation, but not by gaps in other acculturation domains. PMID:20161537

  14. Family Science Night: Changing Perceptions One Family at a Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Drobnes, E.; Mitchell, S.; Colina-Trujillo, M.

    2007-01-01

    If students are not encouraged to succeed in science, mathematics, and technology classes at school, efforts to improve the quality of content and teaching in these subjects may be futile. Parents and families are in a unique position to encourage children to enroll and achieve in these classes. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Family Science Night program invites middle school students and their families to explore the importance of science and technology in our daily lives by providing a venue for families to comfortably engage in learning activities that change their perception and understanding of science - making it more practical and approachable for participants of all ages. Family Science Night strives to change the way that students and their families participate in science, within the program and beyond.

  15. Family Ties: The Role of Family Context in Family Health History Communication about Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Vivian M.; Corona, Rosalie; Bodurtha, Joann N.; Quillin, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Family health history about cancer is an important prevention and health promotion tool. Yet, few studies have identified family context factors that promote such discussions. We explored relations among family context (cohesion, flexibility, and openness), self-efficacy, and cancer communication (gathering family history, sharing cancer risk information, and frequency) in a diverse group of women enrolled in a randomized control trial. Baseline survey data for 472 women were analyzed. Average age was 34 years, 59% identified as Black, 31% graduated high school, and 75% reported a family history of any cancer. Results showed that greater family cohesion and flexibility were related to higher communication frequency and sharing cancer information. Women who reported greater self-efficacy were more likely to have gathered family history, shared cancer risk information, and communicated more frequently with relatives. Openness was not associated with communication but was related to greater family cohesion and flexibility. Adjusting for demographic variables, self-efficacy and family cohesion significantly predicted communication frequency. Women with higher self-efficacy were also more likely to have gathered family health history about cancer and shared cancer risk information. Future research may benefit from considering family organization and self-efficacy when developing psychosocial theories that, in turn, inform cancer prevention interventions. PMID:26735646

  16. Academic family health teams

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Talbot, Yves; Permaul, Joanne; Tobin, Anastasia; Moineddin, Rahim; Blaine, Sean; Bloom, Jeff; Butt, Debra; Kay, Kelly; Telner, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore patients’ perceptions of primary care (PC) in the early development of academic family health teams (aFHTs)—interprofessional PC teams delivering care where family medicine and other health professional learners are trained—focusing on patients’ perceptions of access and patients’ satisfaction with services. Design Self-administered survey. Setting Six aFHTs in Ontario. Participants Adult patients attending appointments and administrators at each of the aFHTs. Main outcome measures Answers to questions about access from the Primary Care Assessment Tool Adult Expanded Version, the Primary Care Assessment Survey, and research team questions. Results The response rate was 47.3% (1026 of 2167). The mean (SD) Primary Care Assessment Tool first-contact accessibility score was 2.28 (0.36) out of 4, with 96.5% of patients rating access less than 3, which was the minimum expected level of care. Two-thirds (66.6%) indicated someone from their aFHTs would definitely or probably see them the same day if they were sick, 56.8% could definitely or probably get advice quickly by telephone, and 14.5% indicated it was definitely or probably difficult to be seen by their primary health care provider (HCP). Additionally, 46.9% indicated they would like to get medical advice by e-mail. For a routine or follow-up visit, 73.4% would be willing to see another aFHT physician if their regular provider were unavailable, while only 48.3% would see a nonphysician HCP. If sick, 88.2% would see another aFHT physician and 55.2% would see a nonphysician HCP. Most (75.3%) were satisfied with access to their regular HCP. Conclusion Although patients are generally satisfied with care, there is room for improvement in access. Strategies are needed to enhance access to care, including addressing appropriate roles and scopes of practice for nonphysician HCPs. The accessibility challenges for aFHTs will likely affect new family physicians and other HCPs training in

  17. Cancer: a family at risk

    PubMed Central

    Iżycki, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of cancer is a family experience that changes the lives of all its members, bringing an immense amount of stress and many challenging situations. The daily routine, common activities and distribution of duties all have to change. Family members follow the phases of the disease, very often suffering comparable or greater distress than the patient. They use various coping methods which aim at helping both the sick relative and themselves. These methods, together with emotional responses, change over time according to the phase of the disease. Cancer puts the family at risk since it imposes an alternation in the relations among family members. It affects the couple's relationship, their sex life, and it can also be a cause of major trauma among their children and adolescents. The diagnosis of cancer brings also individual risks for the family members in terms of psychological and physical health impairment. Family caregivers often feel overloaded with the additional obligations and roles they have to pick up. They find it increasingly burdening to care full-time for the household and provide emotional support for the patient. The family's problems and the way family members regard the disease may be also a result of the family system they are in. This article describes the nature of caregiving to a patient with cancer and the biggest concerns for the family. PMID:26327863

  18. Familial infantile cortical hyperostosis in a large Canadian family.

    PubMed Central

    Maclachlan, A. K.; Gerrard, J. W.; Houston, C. S.; Ives, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Infantile cortical hyperostosis is a rare proliferative bone disease affecting infants under the age of 6 months. In 1961 a large family of French-Canadian origin in which 14 children in three generations were affected was described. Since then 20 new cases have been found in this family. This is the largest familial aggregation of this disease reported in the literature to date. On the basis of the findings in this pedigree, the familial form of the disease appears to be transmitted by a single autosomal dominant gene with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6370402

  19. Supervised Protein Family Classification and New Family Construction

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Gangman; Thon, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The goal of protein family classification is to group proteins into families so that proteins within the same family have common function or are related by ancestry. While supervised classification algorithms are available for this purpose, most of these approaches focus on assigning unclassified proteins to known families but do not allow for progressive construction of new families from proteins that cannot be assigned. Although unsupervised clustering algorithms are also available, they do not make use of information from known families. By computing similarities between proteins based on pairwise sequence comparisons, we develop supervised classification algorithms that achieve improved accuracy over previous approaches while allowing for construction of new families. We show that our algorithm has higher accuracy rate and lower mis-classification rate when compared to algorithms that are based on the use of multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models, and our algorithm performs well even on families with very few proteins and on families with low sequence similarity. A software program implementing the algorithm (SClassify) is available online (http://faculty.cse.tamu.edu/shsze/sclassify). PMID:22876787

  20. Surgeon General's Family Health History Initiative

    MedlinePlus

    ... Start Your Family Health History My Family Health Portrait Tool English Web Tool Printable Versions Source Code ... your family's health history. My Family Health History Portrait Tool Find out about this web-based tool ...

  1. Medical History: Compiling Your Medical Family Tree

    MedlinePlus

    ... family medical history, sometimes called a medical family tree, is a record of illnesses and medical conditions ... to consult family documents, such as existing family trees, baby books, old letters, obituaries or records from ...

  2. Religion and family planning.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Bojana; Hakim, Marwan; Seidman, Daniel S; Kubba, Ali; Kishen, Meera; Di Carlo, Costantino

    2016-12-01

    Religion is embedded in the culture of all societies. It influences matters of morality, ideology and decision making, which concern every human being at some point in their life. Although the different religions often lack a united view on matters such contraception and abortion, there is sometimes some dogmatic overlap when general religious principles are subject to the influence of local customs. Immigration and population flow add further complexities to societal views on reproductive issues. For example, present day Europe has recently faced a dramatic increase in refugee influx, which raises questions about the health care of immigrants and the effects of cultural and religious differences on reproductive health. Religious beliefs on family planning in, for example, Christianity, Judaism, Islam and Hinduism have grown from different backgrounds and perspectives. Understanding these differences may result in more culturally competent delivery of care by health care providers. This paper presents the teachings of the most widespread religions in Europe with regard to contraception and reproduction.

  3. Evolutionary lunar transportation family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capps, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    The development of an evolutionary lunar transportation family (LTF) that can accommodate evolving human exploration goals is discussed. An evolutionary system is aimed at minimizing program costs while preserving programmatic versatility. Technical requirements that affect the design strategy for LTF include aerobraking technology and packaging constraints; mixed, unsymmetrical payload manifests; crew and payload exchange operations; crew and cargo off-loading on the lunar surface; and cryogenic lunar transfer and storage. It is concluded that the LTF is capable of meeting exploration goals, which include the provision for a significant early manned lunar surface science and exploration capability, the avoidance or reduction of some major operational and infrastructure requirements, and the incorporation of common vehicle designs and existing/near-term technology.

  4. PAK family kinases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo-shen; Manser, Ed

    2012-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of Ser/Thr protein kinases that are represented by six genes in humans (PAK 1–6), and are found in all eukaryotes sequenced to date. Genetic and knockdown experiments in frogs, fish and mice indicate group I PAKs are widely expressed, required for multiple tissue development, and particularly important for immune and nervous system function in the adult. The group II PAKs (human PAKs 4–6) are more enigmatic, but their restriction to metazoans and presence at cell-cell junctions suggests these kinases emerged to regulate junctional signaling. Studies of protozoa and fungal PAKs show that they regulate cell shape and polarity through phosphorylation of multiple cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule binding proteins, myosins and septins. This chapter discusses what we know about the regulation of PAKs and their physiological role in different model organisms, based primarily on gene knockout studies. PMID:23162738

  5. The Adams family.

    PubMed

    Douven, Igor; Verbrugge, Sara

    2010-12-01

    According to Adams's Thesis, the acceptability of an indicative conditional sentence goes by the conditional probability of its consequent given its antecedent. We test, for the first time, whether this thesis is descriptively correct and show that it is not; in particular, we show that it yields the wrong predictions for people's judgments of the acceptability of important subclasses of the class of inferential conditionals. Experimental results are presented that reveal an interaction effect between, on the one hand, the type of inferential connection between a conditional's antecedent and its consequent and, on the other, the judged acceptability of the conditional in relation to the conditional probability of its consequent given its antecedent. Specifically, these results suggest a family of theses, each pertaining to a different type of conditional, about how conditionals relate to the relevant conditional probabilities.

  6. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Migita, Kiyoshi; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Yazaki, Masahide; Nonaka, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Akinori; Toma, Tomoko; Kishida, Dai; Uehara, Ritei; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Jiuchi, Yuka; Masumoto, Junya; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Ida, Hiroaki; Terai, Chihiro; Nakashima, Yoshikazu; Kawakami, Atsushi; Nakamura, Tadashi; Eguchi, Katsumi; Yasunami, Michio; Yachie, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disease caused by MEditerranean FeVer gene (MEFV) mutations. In Japan, patients with FMF have been previously reported, including a mild or incomplete form. Several factors are presumed to contribute to the variable penetrance and to the phenotypic variability of FMF. We conducted the current study to investigate the correlation of variable clinical presentations and MEFV genotypic distributions in Japanese FMF patients. We analyzed demographic, clinical, and genetic data for 311 FMF patients enrolled in the study. Clinically, we classified FMF into 2 phenotypes: 1) the “typical” form of FMF, and 2) the “atypical” form of FMF according to the Tel Hashomer criteria. Patients with the typical FMF phenotype had a higher frequency of febrile episodes, a shorter duration of febrile attacks, more frequent thoracic pain, abdominal pain, a family history of FMF, and MEFV exon 10 mutations. Conversely, patients with the atypical FMF phenotype had a lower frequency of fever episodes and more frequent arthritis in atypical distribution, myalgia, and MEFV exon 3 mutations. Multivariate analysis showed that the variable associated with typical FMF presentation was the presence of MEFV exon 10 mutations. Typical FMF phenotype frequencies were decreased in patients carrying 2 or a single low-penetrance mutations compared with those carrying 2 or a single high-penetrance mutations (M694I), with an opposite trend for the atypical FMF phenotype. In addition, patients having more than 2 MEFV mutations had a younger disease onset and a higher prevalence of thoracic pain than those carrying a single or no mutations. Thus, MEFV exon 10 mutations are associated with the more typical FMF phenotype. In contrast, more than half of the Japanese FMF patients without MEFV exon 10 mutations presented with an atypical FMF phenotype, indicating that Japanese FMF patients tend to be divided into 2 phenotypes by a variation

  7. Abuse and violence in families.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Denise; Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa Maria; Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2017-03-31

    Abuse and violence within families is both a global and gendered health issue (World Health Organization, 2013, 2014). In fact, one in every three women have experienced violence from an intimate partner in their lifetime, presenting equity, social justice and human rights concerns across the globe (García-Moreno, Jansen, Ellsberg, Heise, & Watts, 2005). Abuse and violence in families occurs in varying forms: intimate partner violence or maltreatment of children (often referred to as domestic violence), child to mother violence, or abuse of elder family members. These cut across ethnic groups, socioeconomic levels, and family configurations, including nuclear families comprised of two parents and children as well as extended family networks. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Familial resemblance for body composition measures: the HERITAGE Family Study.

    PubMed

    Rice, T; Daw, E W; Gagnon, J; Bouchard, C; Leon, A S; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Rao, D C

    1997-11-01

    A sex-specific familial correlation model was used to assess the heritable contributions to several measures of body composition in 86 sedentary white families participating in the HERITAGE Family Study. For this study, sedentary families were recruited, tested for a battery of measures, endurance exercise trained for 20 weeks, and remeasured. This sample is unique in that activity level was controlled for in these families at baseline measurement. In this report, three body composition variables measured at baseline were analyzed, two indexing adiposity (total subcutaneous fat based on eight skinfold measurements [SF8] and percent body fat measured by underwater weighing techniques [%BF]) and one assessing fat free mass ([FFM] derived from underwater weighing). The maximal heritabilities for SF8 (34%) and %BF (62%) were consistent with those reported in previous studies. There were no sex nor generation differences in the familial correlations, and the spouse correlation was significant, consistent with the hypothesis that the familial aggregation reflects genetic and familial environmental factors. However, the results for FFM were very different. The most parsimonious pattern of familial resemblance was consistent with mitochondrial inheritance (i.e., mother-offspring and sibling correlations were equal and were larger than those for spouse and father-offspring pairs). Under the mitochondrial hypothesis, 39% of the variance was accounted for by familial/genetic effects. However, under a nonmitochondrial hypothesis, which could not be ruled out, 65% of the FFM phenotypic variance was accounted for by familial/genetic factors. This high heritability level, as compared with results from previous studies, is consistent with the hypothesis that activity may constitute an important environmental determinant of FFM. These alternative hypotheses for FFM warrant further investigation using complex multilocus-multitrait segregation models, which allow for major genetic

  9. Selected Internet Resources on Family History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Provides a list of Internet resources on family history that cover topics such as colonial families, shifting family ideals, families in the Early Republic, families in bondage, westward migration, families during the Great Depression, journals, reference sources, and lesson plans. (CMK)

  10. The Parent Services Project. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lisa; Seiderman, Ethel

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  11. Family Medicine Specialty in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Santosh Lional

    2013-01-01

    Family Medicine in Singapore has its roots in a generalist ethos and found its origin as a counter culture movement to the increasing sub-specialisation of medicine which resulted in a complex healthcare system where that patients are often cared for by multiple specialists potentially resulting in fragmentation of care. The aim of the discipline of Family Medicine was to train and develop more generalist physicians so as to promote holistic care. Family physicians are the largest pool of generalists who are trained to provide general medical care to patients in the context of the person, the family and the community that they live in. PMID:24479066

  12. An SEU immune logic family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canaris, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new logic family, which is immune to single event upsets, is described. Members of the logic family are capable of recovery, regardless of the shape of the upsetting event. Glitch propagation from an upset node is also blocked. Logic diagrams for an Inverter, Nor, Nand, and Complex Gates are provided. The logic family can be implemented in a standard, commercial CMOS process with no additional masks. DC, transient, static power, upset recovery and layout characteristics of the new family, based on a commercial 1 micron CMOS N-Well process, are described.

  13. Schizophrenia: Impact on Family Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Caqueo-Urízar, Alejandra; Rus-Calafell, Mar; Craig, Thomas K J; Irarrazaval, Matias; Urzúa, Alfonso; Boyer, Laurent; Williams, David R

    2017-01-01

    In many societies, family members are now the primary caregivers of mental health patients, taking on responsibilities traditionally under the purview of hospitals and medical professionals. The impact of this shift on the family is high, having both an emotional and economic toll. The aim of this paper is to review the main changes that occur in family dynamics for patients with schizophrenia. The article addresses three central themes: (i) changes in the family at the onset of the disorder, (ii) consequences for family members because of their caregiver role, and (iii) family interventions aimed at improving the complex dynamics within the family. After analyzing and discussing these themes, it is observed that despite advances in the field, the viability of taking care of a patient with schizophrenia by the family remains a challenge. Improving care will require commitments from the family, the mental health service system, and local and national governments for greater investments to improve the quality of life of society in general and individuals with schizophrenia in particular.

  14. [Dependent seniors: families and caregivers].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Ursula M

    2003-01-01

    This article focuses on health care for dependent seniors in relation to chronic illnesses. Expectations about family support for the dependent elderly are related to the role of family caregivers, but care requires support from the public and private sectors. Governments throughout the developed countries are examining their role in the provision of social welfare programs, especially in the public health sector. To recommend home care and family assistance, the context of changing family structures, the type of care needed, and professional follow-up must be taken into account.

  15. Policy implications for familial searching.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joyce; Mammo, Danny; Siegel, Marni B; Katsanis, Sara H

    2011-11-01

    In the United States, several states have made policy decisions regarding whether and how to use familial searching of the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database in criminal investigations. Familial searching pushes DNA typing beyond merely identifying individuals to detecting genetic relatedness, an application previously reserved for missing persons identifications and custody battles. The intentional search of CODIS for partial matches to an item of evidence offers law enforcement agencies a powerful tool for developing investigative leads, apprehending criminals, revitalizing cold cases and exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals. As familial searching involves a range of logistical, social, ethical and legal considerations, states are now grappling with policy options for implementing familial searching to balance crime fighting with its potential impact on society. When developing policies for familial searching, legislators should take into account the impact of familial searching on select populations and the need to minimize personal intrusion on relatives of individuals in the DNA database. This review describes the approaches used to narrow a suspect pool from a partial match search of CODIS and summarizes the economic, ethical, logistical and political challenges of implementing familial searching. We examine particular US state policies and the policy options adopted to address these issues. The aim of this review is to provide objective background information on the controversial approach of familial searching to inform policy decisions in this area. Herein we highlight key policy options and recommendations regarding effective utilization of familial searching that minimize harm to and afford maximum protection of US citizens.

  16. Policy implications for familial searching

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, several states have made policy decisions regarding whether and how to use familial searching of the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database in criminal investigations. Familial searching pushes DNA typing beyond merely identifying individuals to detecting genetic relatedness, an application previously reserved for missing persons identifications and custody battles. The intentional search of CODIS for partial matches to an item of evidence offers law enforcement agencies a powerful tool for developing investigative leads, apprehending criminals, revitalizing cold cases and exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals. As familial searching involves a range of logistical, social, ethical and legal considerations, states are now grappling with policy options for implementing familial searching to balance crime fighting with its potential impact on society. When developing policies for familial searching, legislators should take into account the impact of familial searching on select populations and the need to minimize personal intrusion on relatives of individuals in the DNA database. This review describes the approaches used to narrow a suspect pool from a partial match search of CODIS and summarizes the economic, ethical, logistical and political challenges of implementing familial searching. We examine particular US state policies and the policy options adopted to address these issues. The aim of this review is to provide objective background information on the controversial approach of familial searching to inform policy decisions in this area. Herein we highlight key policy options and recommendations regarding effective utilization of familial searching that minimize harm to and afford maximum protection of US citizens. PMID:22040348

  17. Using Family Reconstruction Techniques with Families in Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheras, Peter L.

    An examination of the technique of Family Reconstruction employed by Satir and others attempting to establish an appreciation of the client's personhood through the understanding of their parents' personhood is presented. In addition, the feeling of continuity with the family and the facilitation of integration is explored to further reveal the…

  18. Counseling Families with Chronic Illness. Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Susan H., Ed.

    Regardless of whether a patient's health-care provider works from a traditional biomedical or a new biopsychosocial model, therapists and counselors need to work with patients and their families challenged by the onset of a serious illness. This book addresses this need and outlines the five goals of medical family therapy: (1) help the family…

  19. Family Structure in Norwegian Families of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundeby, Hege; Tossebro, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Background: The idea that raising a child with disabilities has a negative impact on the parents' relationship is still widely accepted despite contradictory research findings. This article addresses the impact of raising a child with disabilities on family structure in the present Norwegian context. Method: Family demographics were collected at…

  20. Families Hardest Hit: Effects of Welfare Reform on Homeless Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Julie

    This report presents data from 1999 surveys of people living in Chicago shelters and warming centers for families with children. The surveys asked about the impacts of welfare reform on respondents' lives. Researchers also surveyed housing and food assistance agencies, shelters, and other social service agencies. Of 481 families surveyed, 44…

  1. Military Families under Stress: Implications for Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummet, Amy Reinkober; Coleman, Marilyn; Cable, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Provides a summary of the limited research on three uniquely stressful experiences of military families: relocation, separation, and reunion. Using the insights derived from this literature, identifies and discusses interventions to assist and guide military families through these unique events. (Contains 64 references.) (GCP)

  2. The Role of Family Functioning in Bipolar Disorder in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du Rocher Schudlich, Tina D.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Findling, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Investigated the association between family functioning and conflict and their links with mood disorder in parents and with children's risk for bipolar disorder. Participants were 272 families with a child between the ages of 5-17 years. Parents' history of psychiatric diagnoses and children's current diagnoses were obtained via semi-structured…

  3. Caution: Families at Work = Attention: Families au Travail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theilheimer, Ish, Ed.; Eisner, Kathy, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This publication, in English and French, reports on the work-family conflict in Canada, gauges progress over the past decade, and examines how views have changed. The following articles are featured: (1) "Caution: Families at Work" (Ish Theilheimer), an examination of current workplace innovations, viewpoints of employers and employees,…

  4. Family Therapy with Latino Families: An Interview with Patricia Arredondo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardona, Betty; Softas-Nall, Lia

    2010-01-01

    In this interview, Patricia Arredondo shares with us her scholarship and expertise working with Latino families. Patricia talks about multicultural competencies, multicultural development as well as diversity assessment when working with Latino families. Dr. Arredondo has published widely on these topics and is the coauthor of "Counseling Latinos…

  5. Effective Family Strengthening Interventions. Juvenile Justice Bulletin. Family Strengthening Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Rose; Kumpfer, Karol L.

    This bulletin summarizes the results of a training and technology transfer program focussing on strengthening families for the prevention of delinquency. A national search was conducted for representative family strengthening programs, and through a process that involved national conferences, regional training sessions, and technical assistance,…

  6. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2012-09-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) refers to a heterogeneous group of autosomal-recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. The exact prevalence remains unknown, but the estimated incidence varies between 1/50,000 and 1/100,000 births. Three types of PFIC have been identified and associated with mutations in hepatocellular transport-system genes involved in bile formation. PFIC1 and PFIC2 usually appear in the first months of life, whereas onset of PFIC3 may arise later in infancy, in childhood or even during young adulthood. The main clinical manifestations include cholestasis, pruritus and jaundice. PFIC patients usually develop fibrosis and end-stage liver disease before adulthood. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity is normal in PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, but is elevated in PFIC3 patients. Both PFIC1 and PFIC2 are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein and in ABCB11 encoding bile salt export pump (BSEP) protein, respectively. Defects in ABCB4, encoding multidrug resistance 3 protein (MDR3), impair biliary phospholipid secretion, resulting in PFIC3. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations, liver ultrasonography, cholangiography and liver histology, as well as on specific tests to exclude other causes of childhood cholestasis. MDR3 and BSEP liver immunostaining, and analysis of biliary lipid composition should help to select PFIC candidates for whom genotyping could be proposed to confirm the diagnosis. Antenatal diagnosis may be proposed for affected families in which a mutation has been identified. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) therapy should be initiated in all patients to prevent liver damage. In some PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, biliary diversion may also relieve pruritus and slow disease progression. However, most PFIC patients are ultimately candidates for liver transplantation. Monitoring of liver tumors

  7. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Davit-Spraul, Anne; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Baussan, Christiane; Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2009-01-08

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) refers to heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. The exact prevalence remains unknown, but the estimated incidence varies between 1/50,000 and 1/100,000 births. Three types of PFIC have been identified and related to mutations in hepatocellular transport system genes involved in bile formation. PFIC1 and PFIC2 usually appear in the first months of life, whereas onset of PFIC3 may also occur later in infancy, in childhood or even during young adulthood. Main clinical manifestations include cholestasis, pruritus and jaundice. PFIC patients usually develop fibrosis and end-stage liver disease before adulthood. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity is normal in PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, but is elevated in PFIC3 patients. Both PFIC1 and PFIC2 are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due respectively to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein, and in ABCB11 encoding the bile salt export pump protein (BSEP). Defects in ABCB4, encoding the multi-drug resistant 3 protein (MDR3), impair biliary phospholipid secretion resulting in PFIC3. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations, liver ultrasonography, cholangiography and liver histology, as well as on specific tests for excluding other causes of childhood cholestasis. MDR3 and BSEP liver immunostaining, and analysis of biliary lipid composition should help to select PFIC candidates in whom genotyping could be proposed to confirm the diagnosis. Antenatal diagnosis can be proposed for affected families in which a mutation has been identified. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) therapy should be initiated in all patients to prevent liver damage. In some PFIC1 or PFIC2 patients, biliary diversion can also relieve pruritus and slow disease progression. However, most PFIC patients are ultimately candidates for liver transplantation. Monitoring of

  8. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 505.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J M; Yañez, R J; Pan, R; Rodriguez, J F; Salas, M L; Viñuela, E

    1994-01-01

    Sequencing of restriction fragment EcoRI A-SalI C of African swine fever virus has revealed the existence of a multigene family, designated family 505 because of the average number of amino acids in the proteins, composed of seven homologous and tandemly arranged genes. All the genes of family 505 are expressed during infection. Primer extension analysis showed that transcription is initiated a short distance (3 to 62 nucleotides) from the start codon of the corresponding open reading frame. The proteins of family 505 showed similarity to those of family 360 from African swine fever virus. In particular, a striking conservation of three regions at the amino terminus of the polypeptides was observed. Images PMID:8139051

  9. Family planning: what women say.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, J

    1992-04-30

    Some interviews with educated women about their thoughts on family planning, birth spacing, and desired family size are provided. There were rumors that Nigerian women wanted birth spacing because the economy was so bad. There was a question about whether women desired family planning for both birth spacing and family limitation without jeopardizing conjugal felicity, or whether the government campaigns for smaller family size were being effective, or whether the economic realities were forcing rethinking. The responses came from a legal assistant in her early 30s; a health consultant, a 27-years old baby wear dealer, a 27-year old nurse, a 54-years old academician, a 44-year old librarian, a 35-year old pharmacist, and a fashion designer. Mrs. Ige, the legal assistant, married at 28 years believed that family planning was essential and the desired family size was around 4, but more importantly family size was based on the parents ability to provide "adequate" care. The health consultant with 4 children considered that a mother had a life after children and living standards were not improving. The baby war dealer with 2 children believed that family planning provided the opportunity to plan for the education of your children; the number of educated children depended on the ability of society to provide adequate jobs. The nurse was not married and planned to seek counseling in family planning after her first child. The academician with 4 children believed individuals had the right to decide the desired number of children, but should be guided by the principle of having no more than they could adequately care for. The librarian with 4 children thought family planning was nice for helping ladies plan their families according to their means; wealthy families could afford 4-5 children, and middle income earners could only afford 2-3 children. The fashion designer with 2 children said that family planning was necessary for spacing the number of children and giving the

  10. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Frulloni, Luca; Cerati, Elena; Ribeiro, Luciana Andrea; Corrente, Vincenzo; Sianesi, Mario; Franzè, Angelo; Di Mario, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive childhood cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. PFIC 1, also known as Byler disease, was first described in Amish kindred. It is characterized by cholestasis often arising in the neonatal period and it leads to death due to liver failure. PFIC 1, like Benign Recurrent Intrahepatic Cholestasis (BRIC) which is the benign form of the same disease, recognizes mutations in the ATP8B1 gene. PFIC 2 disease is clinically similar to PFIC 1 but it has a different gene mutation causing a defect in the Bile Salt Export Pump (BSEP), exclusively expressed in the liver and involved in the canalicular secretion of bile acids. PFIC 3 usually appears later in life and it has a higher risk of portal hypertension, gastrointestinal bleeding and liver failure. This particular form of disease (the only one with high serum values of g-glutamil transpeptidase), is associated to a genetic defect in the class III multidrug resistance protein (MDR). External biliary diversion and ursodeoxycholic acid therapy, should be considered as the initial therapy in these patients, even if liver transplantation still seems to be the only solution for most patients.

  11. Uranus - family portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This 'family portrait' of Uranus' five largest moons was compiled from images sent back Jan. 20, 1986, by the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The pictures were taken through a clear filter from distances of 5.0 million to 6.1 million kilometers (3.1 million to 3.8 million miles). In this comparison, we see the relative sizes and relativities of the satellites. From left, in order of increasing distance from the planet, they are Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania and Oberon. The two largest, Oberon and Titania, are about half the size of Earth's Moon, or roughly, 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) in diameter. Miranda, smallest of the five, has about one-quarter to one-third the diameter. Even in these distant views, the satellites exhibit distinct differences in appearance. On average, Oberon and Titania reflect about 20 percent of the sunlight, Umbriel about 12 percent, Ariel and Miranda about 30 percent. Ariel shows the largest contrast on its surface, with the brightest areas about 25 percent. All five satellites show only slight color variations on their surfaces, with their average color being very nearly gray. The best views of the satellites will be obtained Jan. 24, the day of closest approach. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  12. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Said, Gerard

    2011-12-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathies (FAPs) are a group of life-threatening multisystem disorders transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Nerve lesions are induced by deposits of amyloid fibrils, most commonly due to mutated transthyretin (TTR). Less often the precursor of amyloidosis is mutant apolipoprotein A-1 or gelsolin. The first identified cause of FAP-the TTR Val30Met mutation-is still the most common of more than 100 amyloidogenic point mutations identified worldwide. The penetrance and age at onset of FAP among people carrying the same mutation vary between countries. The symptomatology and clinical course of FAP can be highly variable. TTR FAP typically causes a nerve length-dependent polyneuropathy that starts in the feet with loss of temperature and pain sensations, along with life-threatening autonomic dysfunction leading to cachexia and death within 10 years on average. TTR is synthesised mainly in the liver, and liver transplantation seems to have a favourable effect on the course of neuropathy, but not on cardiac or eye lesions. Oral administration of tafamidis meglumine, which prevents misfolding and deposition of mutated TTR, is under evaluation in patients with TTR FAP. In future, patients with FAP might benefit from gene therapy; however, genetic counselling is recommended for the prevention of all types of FAP.

  13. Childhood disablement and family incomes.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, S; Godfrey, C; Staden, F

    1983-01-01

    Data on the incomes of families with a severely disabled child were obtained by replicating the Family Expenditure Survey. These data were compared with income data from a control group of families with children, drawn from the FES for the same period. The participation rates, hours, and earnings of the women with a disabled child were all found to be substantially lower than those of women in the control group, differences between the samples increasing with the age of the youngest child. The earnings of men with a disabled child were also lower than those of men in the control group, though differences were more pronounced among non-manual workers. Loss of parental earnings was not made good by social security benefits paid on account of disablement. In general the incomes of the families with a disabled child were lower than those of the control families, the magnitude of the differences increasing with family income and the age of the youngest child. Nevertheless, one group of families with a disabled child--manual workers whose youngest child was under 5--had slightly higher incomes than similar families in the control group. PMID:6225819

  14. Maine's Families: Poverty Despite Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazere, Edward B.

    Children are among the poorest of Maine's residents. Nearly 1 in 5 children under the age of 18, 19.3%, lived in families below the federal poverty line in the early 1990s. Most of these poor children lived in working families. The working poor are often missing from policy debates, but their numbers are likely to increase with welfare reform…

  15. The Future of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitze, Hazel Taylor

    1980-01-01

    Describes two panels of a 1979 conference on the future of the family. Marriage as an Economic Partnership was a panel that included speakers addressing family law, child abuse, marital property reform, and women's rights. After 50--The New Third of Life discussed needs and problems of the aging. (JOW)

  16. Family Influences on Early Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, Sharon

    1989-01-01

    The article reviews the literature concerning family influences on early childhood development. Implications of this literature for intervention planning with high risk children and families are suggested. Topics covered include the early parent-child relationship, disciplinary strategies, stimulation, parental instruction and expectations, the…

  17. Family and Child Homelessness. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homelessness Exchange, Washington, DC.

    This packet contains documents that provide information about family and child homelessness and the need to address homelessness within the context of community development. The following sections are included: (1) "Family Homelessness" (Homelessness Information Exchange); (2) "A Report on the 1988 National Survey on Shelters for the Homeless"…

  18. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  19. Family Functioning in Pediatric Trichotillomania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Phoebe S.; Franklin, Martin E.; Keuthen, Nancy J.; Flessner, Christopher A.; Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John A.; Stein, Dan J.; Loew, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about how pediatric trichotillomania (TTM), a clinically significant and functionally impairing disorder, is impacted by, and impacts, family functioning. We explored dimensions of family functioning and parental attitudes in a sample of children and adolescents who participated in an Internet-based survey and satisfied…

  20. Family Literacy in Bridge Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwill Industries of Pittsburgh, PA.

    A project proposed to demonstrate an effective delivery system for providing family literacy services to homeless parents of young children by taking the "Read Me a Story" program directly into bridge housing sites where the families resided. The approach offered was the direct parent/indirect child model. The curriculum came from…

  1. The Ritualization of Family Ties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheal, David

    1988-01-01

    Examines three theories of family ritual derived from Emile Durkheim's sociology of social order: the structural-functional theory, constructionist theory, and mobilization theory. Concludes that rituals maintain traditional family structures, yet are creative in that they may define new forms of relationships and support emerging possibilities…

  2. Family Assessment and Genetic Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Pat; And Others

    Presented are two papers from a panel discussion on prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling with families. D. Blackston (director of the Developmental Evaluation Clinic, Decatur, Georgia) points out that a concise family history, pregnancy and birth data, developmental history, careful physical examination, and appropriate laboratory studies are…

  3. Protecting Children and Supporting Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kathy Goetz, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This serial "double issue" focuses on protecting children and supporting families through greater collaboration between child welfare services and family resource programs. The issue includes the featured articles: (1) "Making the Media a Constructive Force in Child Welfare" (Kathy Bonk), which discusses how the media and child welfare agencies…

  4. Familial Risk and Child Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sameroff, Arnold J.; Seifer, Ronald

    1983-01-01

    Examines components of familial risk in the context of a four-year longitudinal study of children with mentally ill mothers. Risk factors examined were parental mental health, social status, parental perspectives, and family stress. Interactions among risk factors were found to be complex and different for cognitive and social-emotional…

  5. Familial influences on adolescent smoking.

    PubMed

    Avenevoli, Shelli; Merikangas, Kathleen Ries

    2003-05-01

    The family unit is the primary source of transmission of basic social, cultural, genetic, and biological factors that may underlie individual differences in smoking. Existing information on the role of familial factors in tobacco use is characterized by two separate, but somewhat overlapping, lines of research: genetic epidemiological studies and risk-factor research. The present paper summarizes and evaluates studies assessing the association between adolescent smoking and parent and sibling smoking behaviors. A review of 87 studies reveals that methods are limited by a lack of standardized instruments, failure to measure important confounding and mediating factors, reliance on cross-sectional designs and the use of inconsistent definitions of tobacco-related behavior and assessment procedures. Moreover, there are no systematic family studies of the acquisition and continuation of smoking that have employed contemporary methodological standards for examining familial aggregation of tobacco behaviors among adolescents. Findings across studies show weak and inconsistent associations between parent and adolescent smoking; inconsistent findings may be attributed to methodological issues or associated factors that may complicate the relation between parent and adolescent smoking. Sibling and peer smoking show greater associations with adolescent smoking. Suggestions for future research include contemporary family studies that delineate meaningful phenotypes of tobacco use and prospective work on the later stages of tobacco use and the timing of the influence and valence of parent and family factors. Integration of the risk factor approach within the family study design may enrich both approaches to elucidate familial influences on smoking.

  6. Family Friends in Homeless Shelters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Aging, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Family Friends is a nationwide outreach program that enlists the support of senior volunteers in providing nurturing help to children and their parents. Homeless Children is a branch of the program in which volunteers are matched to homeless families with young children, and, during biweekly visits to homeless shelters, become surrogate…

  7. Family Structure and Voter Turnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfinger, Nicholas H.; Wolfinger, Raymond E.

    2008-01-01

    We use data from the Voting and Registration Supplement of the Current Population Survey to explore the effects of family structure on turnout in the 2000 presidential election. Our results indicate that family structure, defined as marital status and the presence of children, has substantial consequences for turnout. Married adults are more…

  8. Parental Relationships in Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLanahan, Sara; Beck, Audrey N.

    2010-01-01

    As nonmarital childbearing escalated in the United States over the past half century, fragile families--defined as unmarried couples with children--drew increased interest from researchers and policy makers. Sara McLanahan and Audrey Beck discuss four aspects of parental relationships in these families: the quality of parents' intimate…

  9. Counselling Intervention for Family Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fareo, Dorcas Oluremi

    2015-01-01

    All couples look forward to having normal healthy babies. The issues of disabilities in their children shake the families and serve as sources of severe psychological disruption to family adjustment. The parents of such children live with many difficult issues and frequently experience trauma, grief and stress. This article deals with counselling…

  10. Comprehensive Treatment of Addictive Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlesinger, Stephen E.; Horberg, Lawrence K.

    This article describes a practical approach to treating addictive families, designed to help them repair the damage, create more satisfying lives, and prevent long-lasting deleterious effects, commonly associated with "co-dependency" and "children of addicts." This approach is grounded in a developmental model of family recovery which was devised…

  11. The American Family: Myth & Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, A. Eugene

    Change in family forms and functions is not necessarily evil or frightening unless one chooses to deify and cling to the past and to insist upon the rightness of by-gone ways. The crisis of American families today is not a crisis of form, or size or function, of governmental interference, economics or energy; it is a crisis of emotions, of…

  12. Family Poverty--Childhood Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanier Inst. of the Family, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Children comprise the largest group of poor Canadians. While childhood poverty is closely related to a number of factors pertaining to the structure and functioning of families, such as parental marital status and wage-earning patterns, the poverty of children is a consequence of the poverty of families. As such, childhood poverty can be reduced…

  13. Families Discover the Outdoors Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Polly

    1980-01-01

    An idea for hands-on activities for families to use in discovering the outdoors together when visiting parks is described. Family packs contain discovery and natural history cards, thermometers, magnifiers, insect boxes, photographs of animals and plants, a pencil, and a feedback form. (SA)

  14. Power Politics of Family Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Carl A.

    It is postulated that the standard framework for psychotherapy, a cooperative transference neurosis, does not validly carry over to the successful psychotherapy of a two-generation family group. In many disturbed families, the necessary and sufficient dynamics for change must be initiated, controlled, and augmented by a group dynamic power-play,…

  15. Population Growth: Family Planning Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doberenz, Alexander R., Ed.; Taylor, N. Burwell G., Ed.

    These proceedings of the second annual symposium on population growth bring together speeches and panel discussions on family planning programs. Titles of speeches delivered are: Communicating Family Planning (Mrs. Jean Hutchinson); Effects of New York's Abortion Law Change (Dr. Walter Rogers); The Law and Birth Control, Sterilization and Abortion…

  16. New Thoughts on Old Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troll, Lillian E.

    1988-01-01

    Contends that one's generational position and gender influence one's perspective on family structure and function. Suggests integration of child developmental research with gerontological research. Advocates recognition of reciprocities of interaction and influence among family members of all ages, correcting the child focus. Discusses kinkeeping,…

  17. Family transitions and juvenile delinquency.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Ryan D; Osgood, Aurea K; Oghia, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    There is a large body of research that shows children from non-intact homes show higher rates of juvenile delinquency than children from intact homes, partially due to weaker parental control and supervision in non-intact homes. What has not been adequately addressed in the research is the influence of changes in family structure among individual adolescents over time on delinquent offending. Using the first and third waves of the National Youth Study, we assess the effect of family structure changes on changes in delinquent offending between waves through the intermediate process of changes in family time and parental attachment. Although prior research has documented adolescents in broken homes are more delinquent than youth in intact homes, the process of family dissolution is not associated with concurrent increases in offending. In contrast, family formation through marriage or cohabitation is associated with simultaneous increases in offending. Changes in family time and parental attachment account for a portion of the family formation effect on delinquency, and prior parental attachment and juvenile offending significantly condition the effect of family formation on offending.

  18. Family myths in romantic fiction.

    PubMed

    Kramer, D; Moore, M

    2001-02-01

    Three types of myths frequently appearing in contemporary romantic fiction deal with traditional family values, spousal relationships, and love. Several myths belonging to each type are illustrated and analyzed. It is argued that by naturalizing some behaviors and idealizing others, romantic novels not only may indoctrinate their readers with a patriarchal ideology but also may inculcate upon them pathogenic family processes.

  19. Learning from Bilingual Family Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murillo, Luz A.

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic study explores the literacies of bilingual families living in the Rio Grande Valley on the U.S.-Mexico border. Murillo argues that immigrant families living on the border play an important role in their children's literacy development, but that their voices are seldom heard in schools due to powerful and persistent deficit views…

  20. Evaluating Infant-Family Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    "Zero to Three" is a single-focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Compiling articles from participants of the Leadership Development Initiative Class of 2001-2002, this issue focuses on evaluation…

  1. Lifeworld-Oriented Family Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razpotnik, Špela; Turnšek, Nada; Rapuš-Pavel, Jana; Poljšak-Škraban, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Since the spring of 2014, the authors of this article, joined by a wider group of students, have been dedicated to researching vulnerable families and their involvement with education systems. In the initial phase, we explored the experiences and challenges that these families face and how they understand and address these challenges. Next, we…

  2. Family Planning Handbook for Doctors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Ronald L., Ed.

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) believes that all people have the right to family planning information, including premarital and marital counseling, contraception information, and sex education. This physician's handbook is designed to provide all doctors with the necessary instructions on the latest family planning methods…

  3. Family Life Education: Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuccaro, Mary; And Others

    Designed to serve as a model and resource for teachers setting up family life education programs at the secondary level, this family life education curriculum guide presents a specific ten-session model for programs at both the high school and junior high school levels. While both programs attempt to provide a broad overview of the areas commonly…

  4. Migration, Acculturation and Family Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colleran, Kevin J.; Gurak, Douglas; Kritz, Mary

    1984-01-01

    Two articles are presented in this research bulletin. The first, entitled "Acculturation in Puerto Rican Families," assesses the degree of acculturation of 100 sets of married children of 100 Puerto Rican families living in New York City. Attitudes toward language, identity, and values are used as criteria. The specific values the study…

  5. Attempted Non-Family Abductions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelhor, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examined cases of attempted nonfamily abductions, to determine child and family characteristics that may serve as risk factors for such incidents. The prevalence and risk-marker findings from this study reinforce the need to continue teaching "stranger danger" and suggest that children living in stressful or unstable family environments…

  6. The Family in Value Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lezhnina, Iu. P.

    2011-01-01

    Russia's declining birth rate is linked to a delay in a family's decision to have children and to uncertainty about the place of children in a couple's relationship. Despite the rise of individualism and the importance of career and self-realization, however, the family retains a very important place in Russian society. (Contains 1 table, 1…

  7. Together We Learn: Family Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molek, Carol

    A project provided family literacy services in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. The "Together We Learn" project had four objectives: (1) promoting family literacy by using the Project PACT (Parents and Children Together) model in two 10-week sessions; (2) improving parents' basic skills so they can work better with their children; (3) assisting…

  8. Economic Pressures and Family Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haccoun, Dorothy Markiewicz; Ledingham, Jane E.

    The relationships between economic stress on the family and child and parental adjustment were examined for a sample of 199 girls and boys in grades one, four, and seven. These associations were examined separately for families in which both parents were present and in which mothers only were at home. Economic stress was associated with boys'…

  9. Diabetic Youths and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melva

    1974-01-01

    In response to a need for a comprehensive program to fill the gap in services for children with diabetes and their families, the Diabetic Youth and Family Program of Wichita, Kansas is directing efforts to deal effectively and creatively with children's diabetic problems. (CS)

  10. Familial Patterns of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Pedigree analysis of 12 young adults (9 of whom had learning disabilities) indicated that learning disability (LD) was strongly familial but that the type of disability (reading or math) was not directly inherited. Autoimmune disorders were significantly correlated with LD. In seven of the LD families, adults failed to overcome earlier reading and…

  11. Coping within the Alcoholic Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Joseph F.

    This book considers the dynamics and characteristics of the alcoholic family. The first part examines the alcoholic family. Needs such as security, love, and self-esteem, and defenses such as denial, rationalization, projection, regression, fantasy, displacement, and avoidance are discussed. Common denominators in the personalities of enablers…

  12. Predicting Deviancy in Family Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpowitz, Dennis H.

    Should a stimulus be defined as the single event immediately preceding a response (simple stimulus) or as a constellation of antecedents representing several preceding events (complex stimulus)? Sixty-eight families with a child between four and eight years of age were observed, and family interactions coded in the naturalistic setting of the…

  13. Child Advocacy and Family Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Seymour; Feshbach, Norma Deitch

    This paper discusses the issues involved in achieving a balance between a child's rights to protection and adequate care and a family's rights to privacy and autonomy. The paper advocates a shift from the current norm of privacy concerning parents' child rearing practices towards increased openness and freer community-family communication. In view…

  14. Family Kindergarten = Kinder para familias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Jolinda

    The Family Kindergarten program designed and pilot tested by a bilingual kindergarten teacher at Garretson Elementary School in Corona, California, is described. Based on the premise that parents are the most important and influential educators of children, Family Kindergarten was conceived as an evening class that includes parents and children…

  15. Family Learning: The Missing Exemplar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    As a supporter of informal and alternative learning environments for science learning I am pleased to add to the discussion generated by Adriana Briseno-Garzon's article, "More than science: family learning in a Mexican science museum". I am keenly aware of the value of active family involvement in education in general, and science education in…

  16. Autism and Potential Family Stressors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Pamela; Drew, Clifford

    1994-01-01

    Examines some effects that diagnosis of autism may bring to family and some of potential family stressors that presence of autistic child may present. Discusses problem areas, including communication, bonding, early sleep patterns, unpredictable behavior, difficulties created by changes in routine, splinter effects, respite, and financial matters.…

  17. Issues in Training Family Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Issues related to graduate education in family science, especially at the doctoral level, are explored. Discusses competencies family scientists should have, as well as experiences necessary to help students acquire them. Proposes ideas for a core curriculum, identifies controversies and unresolved issues, and examines training for the future.…

  18. Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldfogel, Jane; Craigie, Terry-Ann; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    Jane Waldfogel, Terry-Ann Craigie, and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn review recent studies that use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS) to examine why children who grow up in single-mother and cohabiting families fare worse than children born into married-couple households. They also present findings from their own new research.…

  19. Phrase versus Phase: Family Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Margaret M.

    2011-01-01

    Parents and their roles in schools, public or private, often become the bed of heated discussions. "Parent involvement" is yesterday's buzz word; today, it is "family involvement." The phrase "parent involvement" connotes an image of parents being involved in their children's education. Family involvement is a more encompassing concept, embracing…

  20. Growing Up in Interracial Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Philip; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Provides excerpts from personal accounts presented at a 1984 conference on the needs of children of interracial families: "Communicating is the Key" (Philip Spivey); "Growing Up with an Asian American Heritage" (Clarence L. Chen); "An Hispanic Perspective on Biracial, Bicultural Families" (Irma Garcia Rose); and…