Science.gov

Sample records for adatom diffusion length

  1. Surface diffusion of a carbon adatom on charged SWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Longtao; Krstic, Predrag; Kaganovich, Igor

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion of a carbon adatom on SWCNT could be a mechanism for a CNT growth in a volume plasma, supplementing its growth from a transition metal catalyst nanoparticle. However, being embedded in plasma, the nanotube can charge by the plasma particles irradiation, in particular by electrons. Using Density Functional Theory, Nudged Elastic Band and Kinetic Monte Carlo methods we find (1) equilibrium sites, (2) adsorption energies, (3) potential barriers, (4) vibrational frequencies and (5) most probable pathways for diffusion of the adatom on external surfaces of SWCNTs of (5,5), (10,0) and (10,5) chirality, as function of its charge. The metal (5,5) SWCNT can support a fast diffusion of the carbon adatom, which is accelerated by the presence of the SWCNT negative charge. Reduced model of SWCNT growth is proposed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  2. Surface diffusion and substrate-nanowire adatom exchange in InAs nanowire growth.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2009-05-01

    We report new fundamental insights into InAs nanowire (NW) nucleation and evolution on InAs (111)B surfaces using organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and present the first experimental demonstration of two distinct NW growth regimes, defined by the direction of substrate-NW adatom exchange, that lead to nonlinear growth rates. We show that the NW elongation rate and morphology in these two growth regimes are governed by the relative difference between the In adatom diffusion lengths on the growth substrate surface and on the NW sidewalls, resulting in strong growth rate dependence on the NW length. These results indicate that surface solid-phase diffusion of In adatoms is a key process in InAs NW growth, which is also supported by diameter-dependent growth rates. These developments enable rational growth of axial and radial NW heterostructures.

  3. Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (dh) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with dh and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

  4. Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Calarco, R.; Stoica, T.

    2011-03-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (d{sub h}) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with d{sub h} and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

  5. Control of the crystal structure of InAs nanowires by tuning contributions of adatom diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui; Ren, Xiaomin; Ye, Xian; Guo, Jingwei; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xia; Cai, Shiwei; Huang, Yongqing

    2010-11-01

    The dependence of crystal structure on contributions of adatom diffusion (ADD) and precursor direct impingement (DIM) was investigated for vapor-liquid-solid growth of InAs nanowires (NWs). The ADD contributions from the sidewalls and substrate surface can be changed by using GaAs NWs of different length as the basis for growing InAs NWs. We found that pure zinc-blende structure is favored when DIM contributions dominate. Moreover, without changing the NW diameter or growth parameters (such as temperature or V/III ratio), a transition from zinc-blende to wurtzite structure can be realized by increasing the ADD contributions. A nucleation model is proposed in which ADD and DIM contributions play different roles in determining the location and phase of the nucleus.

  6. A calculation of the diffusion energies for adatoms on surfaces of F.C.C. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, T.; Pound, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The activation energies for diffusion were determined for gold, platinum and iridium adatoms on plane and plane PT surfaces and were found to be in good agreement with the measurements reported by Bassett and Webber. The Lennard-Jones pair potentials were used to model the interatomic forces, and relaxation of the substrate atoms in near proximity to the adatom was considered in detail. The present calculations clarify the mechanism of the observed two-dimensional diffusion of platinum and iridium atoms on a plane PT surface. The results are compared with those obtained using Morse potential functions and different relaxation techniques.

  7. Electric-field noise from carbon-adatom diffusion on a Au(110) surface: First-principles calculations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Safavi-Naini, A.; Hite, D. A.; McKay, K. S.; Pappas, D. P.; Weck, P. F.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2017-03-01

    The decoherence of trapped-ion quantum gates due to heating of their motional modes is a fundamental science and engineering problem. This heating is attributed to electric-field noise arising from the trap-electrode surfaces. In this work, we investigate the source of this noise by focusing on the diffusion of carbon-containing adsorbates on the surface of Au(110). We show by density functional theory, based on detailed scanning probe microscopy, how the carbon adatom diffusion on the gold surface changes the energy landscape and how the adatom dipole moment varies with the diffusive motion. A simple model for the diffusion noise, which varies quadratically with the variation of the dipole moment, predicts a noise spectrum, in accordance with the measured values.

  8. Electric-field noise from carbon-adatom diffusion on a Au(110) surface: First-principles calculations and experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, E.; Safavi-Naini, A.; Hite, D. A.; ...

    2017-03-01

    The decoherence of trapped-ion quantum bits due to heating of their motional modes is a fundamental science and engineering problem. This heating is attributed to electric-field noise arising from processes on the trap-electrode surfaces. In this work, we address the source of this noise by focusing on the diffusion of carbon-containing adsorbates on the surface of Au(110). We show by detailed scanned probe microscopy and density functional theory how the carbon adatom diffusion on the gold surface changes the energy landscape, and how the adatom dipole moment varies with the diffusive motion. Lastly, a simple model for the diffusion noise,more » which varies quadratically with the variation of the dipole moment, qualitatively reproduces the measured noise spectrum, and the estimate of the noise spectral density is in accord with measured values.« less

  9. Diffusion of Cd and Te adatoms on CdTe(111) surfaces: A computational study using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Naderi, Ebadollah; Nanavati, Sachin; Majumder, Chiranjib; Ghaisas, S. V.

    2015-01-15

    CdTe is one of the most promising semiconductor for thin-film based solar cells. Here we report a computational study of Cd and Te adatom diffusion on the CdTe (111) A-type (Cd terminated) and B-type (Te terminated) surfaces and their migration paths. The atomic and electronic structure calculations are performed under the DFT formalism and climbing Nudge Elastic Band (cNEB) method has been applied to evaluate the potential barrier of the Te and Cd diffusion. In general the minimum energy site on the surface is labeled as A{sub a} site. In case of Te and Cd on B-type surface, the sub-surface site (a site just below the top surface) is very close in energy to the A site. This is responsible for the subsurface accumulation of adatoms and therefore, expected to influence the defect formation during growth. The diffusion process of adatoms is considered from A{sub a} (occupied) to A{sub a} (empty) site at the nearest distance. We have explored three possible migration paths for the adatom diffusion. The adatom surface interaction is highly dependent on the type of the surface. Typically, Te interaction with both type (5.2 eV for A-type and 3.8 eV for B-type) is stronger than Cd interactions(2.4 eV for B-type and 0.39 eV for A-type). Cd interaction with the A-type surface is very weak. The distinct behavior of the A-type and B-type surfaces perceived in our study explain the need of maintaining the A-type surface during growth for smooth and stoichiometric growth.

  10. Diffusion of Cd and Te adatoms on CdTe(111) surfaces: A computational study using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ebadollah; Nanavati, Sachin; Majumder, Chiranjib; Ghaisas, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    CdTe is one of the most promising semiconductor for thin-film based solar cells. Here we report a computational study of Cd and Te adatom diffusion on the CdTe (111) A-type (Cd terminated) and B-type (Te terminated) surfaces and their migration paths. The atomic and electronic structure calculations are performed under the DFT formalism and climbing Nudge Elastic Band (cNEB) method has been applied to evaluate the potential barrier of the Te and Cd diffusion. In general the minimum energy site on the surface is labeled as Aa site. In case of Te and Cd on B-type surface, the sub-surface site (a site just below the top surface) is very close in energy to the A site. This is responsible for the subsurface accumulation of adatoms and therefore, expected to influence the defect formation during growth. The diffusion process of adatoms is considered from Aa (occupied) to Aa (empty) site at the nearest distance. We have explored three possible migration paths for the adatom diffusion. The adatom surface interaction is highly dependent on the type of the surface. Typically, Te interaction with both type (5.2 eV for A-type and 3.8 eV for B-type) is stronger than Cd interactions(2.4 eV for B-type and 0.39 eV for A-type). Cd interaction with the A-type surface is very weak. The distinct behavior of the A-type and B-type surfaces perceived in our study explain the need of maintaining the A-type surface during growth for smooth and stoichiometric growth.

  11. Modelisation de la diffusion sur les surfaces metalliques: De l'adatome aux processus de croissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Ghyslain

    Cette these est consacree a l'etude des processus de diffusion en surface dans le but ultime de comprendre, et de modeliser, la croissance d'une couche mince. L'importance de bien mai triser la croissance est primordiale compte tenu de son role dans la miniaturisation des circuits electroniques. Nous etudions ici les surface des metaux nobles et de ceux de la fin de la serie de transition. Dans un premier temps, nous nous interessons a la diffusion d'un simple adatome sur une surface metallique. Nous avons, entre autres, mis en evidence l'apparition d'une correlation entre evenements successifs lorsque la temperature est comparable a la barriere de diffusion, i.e., la diffusion ne peut pas etre associee a une marche aleatoire. Nous proposons un modele phenomenologique simple qui reproduit bien les resultats des simulations. Ces calculs nous ont aussi permis de montrer que la diffusion obeit a la loi de Meyer-Neldel. Cette loi stipule que, pour un processus active, le prefacteur augmente exponentiellement avec la barriere. En plus, ce travail permet de clarifier l'origine physique de cette loi. En comparant les resultats dynamiques aux resultats statiques, on se rend compte que la barriere extraite des calculs dynamiques est essentiellement la meme que celle obtenue par une approche statique, beaucoup plus simple. On peut donc obtenir cette barriere a l'aide de methodes plus precises, i.e., ab initio, comme la theorie de la fonctionnelle de la densite, qui sont aussi malheureusement beaucoup plus lourdes. C'est ce que nous avons fait pour plusieurs systemes metalliques. Nos resultats avec cette derniere approche se comparent tres bien aux resultats experimentaux. Nous nous sommes attardes plus longuement a la surface (111) du platine. Cette surface regorge de particularites interessantes, comme la forme d'equilibre non-hexagonale des i lots et deux sites d'adsorption differents pour l'adatome. De plus, des calculs ab initio precedents n'ont pas reussi a confirmer la

  12. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-28

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C{sub 6}-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ∼0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. This in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001)

  13. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom inmore » the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).« less

  14. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).

  15. The crossover from collective motion to periphery diffusion for two-dimensional adatom-islands on Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Karim, Altaf; Kara, Abdelkader; Trushin, Oleg; Rahman, Talat S

    2011-11-23

    The diffusion of two-dimensional adatom-islands (up to 100 atoms) on Cu(111) has been studied, using the self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo method (Trushin et al 2005 Phys. Rev. B 72 115401). A variety of multiple- and single-atom processes are revealed in the simulations, and the size dependences of the diffusion coefficients and effective diffusion barriers are calculated for each. From the tabulated frequencies of events found in the simulation, we show a crossover from diffusion due to the collective motion of the island to a regime in which the island diffuses through periphery-dominated mass transport. This crossover occurs for island sizes between 13 and 19 atoms. For islands containing 19-100 atoms the scaling exponent is 1.5, which is in good agreement with previous work. The diffusion of islands containing 2-13 atoms can be explained primarily on the basis of a linear increase of the barrier for the collective motion with the size of the island.

  16. First principle simulations of the surface diffusion of Si and Me adatoms on the Si(111)3×3-Me surface, Me= Al, Ga, In, Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luniakov, Y. V.

    2011-10-01

    The intriguing but yet still unexplained experimental results of Hibino and Ogino [Phys. Rev. B 54, 5763 (1996); Surf. Sci. 328, L547 (1995)], who have observed single defect movement on an Me induced Si(111)3×3 surface, have been revived and theoretically analysed. Using Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) optimization, the minimal energy path for an Si adatom moving on the ideal and vacancy defected surfaces has been obtained and the most probable mechanism of the vacancy mediated single defect diffusion has been established. This mechanism is shown to be responsible for the experimentally observed Si adatom movement and predicts a far easier movement of the Me adatom on vacancy defected Me induced Si(111)3×3 surfaces.

  17. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Surface diffusion of Si, Ge and C adatoms on Si (001) substrate studied by the molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Yu, Zhong-Yuan; Lu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Yu-Min

    2009-10-01

    Depositions of Si, Ge and C atoms onto a preliminary Si (001) substrate at different temperatures are investigated by using the molecular dynamics method. The mechanism of atomic self-assembling occurring locally on the flat terraces between steps is suggested. Diffusion and arrangement patterns of adatoms at different temperatures are observed. At 900 K, the deposited atoms are more likely to form dimers in the perpendicular [110] direction due to the more favourable movement along the perpendicular [110] direction. C adatoms are more likely to break or reconstruct the dimers on the substrate surface and have larger diffusion distances than Ge and Si adatoms. Exchange between C adatoms and substrate atoms are obvious and the epitaxial thickness is small. Total potential energies of adatoms and substrate atoms involved in the simulation cell are computed. When a newly arrived adatom reaches the stable position, the potential energy of the system will decrease and the curves turns into a ladder-like shape. It is found that C adatoms can lead to more reduction of the system energy and the potential energy of the system will increase as temperature increases.

  18. Hot Adatom Diffusion Following Oxygen Dissociation on Pd(100) and Pd(111): A First-Principles Study of the Equilibration Dynamics of Exothermic Surface Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukas, Vanessa J.; Reuter, Karsten

    2016-09-01

    We augment ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with a quantitative account of phononic dissipation to study the hyperthermal adsorbate dynamics resulting from a noninstantaneous energy dissipation during exothermic surface chemical reactions. Comparing the hot adatom diffusion ensuing O2 dissociation over Pd(100) and Pd(111) we find experimentally accessible product end distances to form a rather misleading measure for the lifetime of this hyperthermal state. The lifetime is particularly long at Pd(111) where a random-walk-type diffusion leads only to small net displacements. A detailed phonon analysis rationalizes the slow equilibration through long-lived Rayleigh mode excitations that spatially confine the released energy within a nanoscopic "hot spot" around the impingement region.

  19. Connecting molecular structure and exciton diffusion length in rubrene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mullenbach, Tyler K; McGarry, Kathryn A; Luhman, Wade A; Douglas, Christopher J; Holmes, Russell J

    2013-07-19

    Connecting molecular structure and exciton diffusion length in rubrene derivatives demonstrates how the diffusion length of rubrene can be enhanced through targeted functionalization aiming to enhance self-Förster energy transfer. Functionalization adds steric bulk, forcing the molecules farther apart on average, and leading to increased photoluminescence efficiency. A diffusion length enhancement greater than 50% is realized over unsubstituted rubrene.

  20. Diffusion lengths in amphoteric GaAs heteroface solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, K. L.; Beal, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    Minority-carrier diffusion lengths in amphoteric GaAs:Si were investigated. Electron and hole diffusion lengths in p- and n-type, respectively, were determined to be 13 microns and 7 microns. Preliminary efficiency measurements on heteroface structures based on amphoteric GaAs:Si p-n junctions indicated that these devices should make excellent solar cells.

  1. Thirty years since diffuse sound reflection by maximum length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Trevor J.; D'Antonio, Peter

    2005-09-01

    This year celebrates the 30th anniversary of Schroeder's seminal paper on sound scattering from maximum length sequences. This paper, along with Schroeder's subsequent publication on quadratic residue diffusers, broke new ground, because they contained simple recipes for designing diffusers with known acoustic performance. So, what has happened in the intervening years? As with most areas of engineering, the room acoustic diffuser has been greatly influenced by the rise of digital computing technologies. Numerical methods have become much more powerful, and this has enabled predictions of surface scattering to greater accuracy and for larger scale surfaces than previously possible. Architecture has also gone through a revolution where the forms of buildings have become more extreme and sculptural. Acoustic diffuser designs have had to keep pace with this to produce shapes and forms that are desirable to architects. To achieve this, design methodologies have moved away from Schroeder's simple equations to brute force optimization algorithms. This paper will look back at the past development of the modern diffuser, explaining how the principles of diffuser design have been devised and revised over the decades. The paper will also look at the present state-of-the art, and dreams for the future.

  2. Long Spin Diffusion Length in Few-Layer Graphene Flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, W.; Phillips, L. C.; Barbone, M.; Hämäläinen, S. J.; Lombardo, A.; Ghidini, M.; Moya, X.; Maccherozzi, F.; van Dijken, S.; Dhesi, S. S.; Ferrari, A. C.; Mathur, N. D.

    2016-09-01

    We report a spin valve with a few-layer graphene flake bridging highly spin-polarized La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 electrodes, whose surfaces are kept clean during lithographic definition. Sharp magnetic switching is verified using photoemission electron microscopy with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism contrast. A naturally occurring high interfacial resistance ˜12 M Ω facilitates spin injection, and a large resistive switching (0.8 M Ω at 10 K) implies a 70 - 130 μ m spin diffusion length that exceeds previous values obtained with sharp-switching electrodes.

  3. Beyond the mixing-length theory - A turbulent diffusivity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unno, W.

    The use of single mode theory and Xiong's (1979, 1981) theory is considered for approximating the dynamics of convection. In the largest eddy limit, the simulation of turbulent convection is reduced to Xiong's nonlocal mixing-length theory, with application to the construction of stellar convection zones. The spectral theory is valid for large wave numbers and provides correct estimates for the eddy diffusivities. Using nonlinear convection theory, the single mode simulation with an effective Reynolds number of about 10 is shown to correctly simulate the dynamics of large scale flow. It is noted that the single mode simulation also has application to the study of the hydrodynamical properties of steller convection zones.

  4. Diffusion of isolated DNA molecules: dependence on length and topology.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Rae M; Laib, Stephan; Smith, Douglas E

    2006-05-09

    The conformation and dynamics of circular polymers is a subject of considerable theoretical and experimental interest. DNA is an important example because it occurs naturally in different topological states, including linear, relaxed circular, and supercoiled circular forms. A fundamental question is how the diffusion coefficients of isolated polymers scale with molecular length and how they vary for different topologies. Here, diffusion coefficients D for relaxed circular, supercoiled, and linear DNA molecules of length L ranging from approximately 6 to 290 kbp were measured by tracking the Brownian motion of single molecules. A topology-independent scaling law D approximately L(-nu) was observed with nu(L) = 0.571 +/- 0.014, nu(C) = 0.589 +/- 0.018, and nu(S) = 0.571 +/- 0.057 for linear, relaxed circular, and supercoiled DNA, respectively, in good agreement with the scaling exponent of nu congruent with 0.588 predicted by renormalization group theory for polymers with significant excluded volume interactions. Our findings thus provide evidence in support of several theories that predict an effective diameter of DNA much greater than the Debye screening length. In addition, the measured ratio D(Circular)/D(Linear) = 1.32 +/- 0.014 was closer to the value of 1.45 predicted by using renormalization group theory than the value of 1.18 predicted by classical Kirkwood hydrodynamic theory and agreed well with a value of 1.31 predicted when incorporating a recently proposed expression for the radius of gyration of circular polymers into the Zimm model.

  5. Exciton diffusion lengths of organic semiconductor thin films measured by spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Richard R.; Giebink, Noel C.; Belak, Anna A.; Benziger, Jay B.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching as a means to determine the exciton diffusion length of several archetype organic semiconductors used in thin film devices. We show that aggregation and crystal orientation influence the anisotropy of the diffusion length for vacuum-deposited polycrystalline films. The measurement of the singlet diffusion lengths is found to be in agreement with diffusion by Förster transfer, whereas triplet diffusion occurs primarily via Dexter transfer.

  6. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; ...

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  7. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective mass transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.

  8. Diffusion length in nanoporous TiO{sub 2} films under above-band-gap illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. D.; Son, B. H.; Park, J. K.; Kim, Sang Yong; Park, Ji-Yong; Lee, Soonil; Ahn, Y. H.

    2014-06-15

    We determined the carrier diffusion lengths in TiO{sub 2} nanoporous layers of dye-sensitized solar cells by using scanning photocurrent microscopy using an ultraviolet laser. Here, we excited the carrier directly in the nanoporous layers where the diffusion lengths were found to 140 μm as compared to that of visible illumination measured at 90 μm. The diffusion length decreased with increasing laser modulation frequency, in which we determined the electron lifetimes and the diffusion coefficients for both visible and UV illuminations. The diffusion lengths have been studied in terms of the sintering temperatures for both cells with and without binding molecules. We found a strong correlation between the diffusion length and the overall light-to-current conversion efficiency, proving that improving the diffusion length and hence the interparticle connections, is key to improving cell efficiency.

  9. Studies of minority carrier diffusion length increase in p-type ZnO:Sb

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O.; Chernyak, L.; Xiu, F. X.; Liu, J. L.; Jang, S.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Gartsman, K.; Feldman, Y.; Osinsky, A.; Chow, P.

    2006-10-15

    Minority electron diffusion length was measured in p-type, Sb-doped ZnO as a function of temperature using the electron beam induced current technique. A thermally induced increase of electron diffusion length was determined to have an activation energy of 184{+-}10 meV. Irradiation with a low energy (5 kV) electron beam also resulted in an increase of diffusion length with a similar activation energy (219{+-}8 meV). Both phenomena are suggested to involve a Sb{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} acceptor complex. Saturation and relaxation dynamics of minority carrier diffusion length are explored. Details of a possible mechanism for diffusion length increase are presented.

  10. Decoupled length scales for diffusivity and viscosity in glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. L.; Voigtmann, Th.

    2016-10-01

    The growth of the characteristic length scales both for diffusion and viscosity is investigated by molecular dynamics utilizing the finite-size effect in a binary Lennard-Jones mixture. For those quantities relevant to the diffusion process (e.g., the hydrodynamic value and the spatial correlation function), a strong system-size dependence is found. In contrast, it is weak or absent for the shear relaxation process. Correlation lengths are estimated from the decay of the spatial correlation functions. We find the length scale for viscosity decouples from the one of diffusivity, featured by a saturated length even in high supercooling. This temperature-independent behavior of the length scale is reminiscent of the unapparent structure change upon supercooling, implying the manifestation of configuration entropy. Whereas for the diffusion process, it is manifested by relaxation dynamics and dynamic heterogeneity. The Stokes-Einstein relation is found to break down at the temperature where the decoupling of these lengths happens.

  11. Two mechanisms forming a comblike step pattern induced by a moving linear adatom source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masahide; Miura, Hitoshi; Uwaha, Makio

    2017-03-01

    We carry out phase field simulations to study properties of the comblike step patterns induced by an adatom source. When an adatom source advances right in front of a step, step wandering is caused by the asymmetry of the surface diffusion field and small protrusions are formed. If the velocity of the source Vp is smaller than a critical value Vpc, the protrusions follow the adatom source with coarsening of the step pattern, and a regular comblike pattern with finger-like protrusions is formed. With a sufficiently small Vp, the gap of the supersaturation is large at the adatom source. Since the period of protrusions, Λ , decreases with increasing Vp, the coarsening of step pattern is irrelevant for the protrusions to catch up with the adatom source. Near Vpc, the gap of the supersaturation at the adatom source is small. Taking account of the increase in Λ with increasing Vp, the coarsening of the step pattern is essential for the protrusions to follow the adatom source.

  12. First working group meeting on the minority carrier diffusion length/lifetime measurement: Results of the round robin lifetime/diffusion length tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cudzinovic, M; Sopori, B

    1995-11-01

    As was noted in the cover letter that accompanied the samples, the eleven bare silicon samples were from various manufacturers. Table I lists the codes for the samples and the manufacturer of each sample. It also notes if the sample was single or poly-crystalline. The samples had been polished on one side before being sent out for measurements, but no further processing was done. The participants of the study were asked to measure either the lifetime or diffusion length of each of the samples using their standard procedure. Table II shows the experimental conditions used by the groups who measured diffusion length. All the diffusion length measurements were performed using the Surface Photovoltage method (SPV). Table M shows the experimental conditions for the lifetime measurements. All the lifetime measurements were made using the Photoconductance Decay method (PCD) under low level injection. These tables show the diameter of the spot size used during the measurement (the effective sampling area), the locations where measurements were taken, and the number of measurements taken at each location. Table N shows the results of the measurements. The table is divided into diffusion length and lifetime measurements for each sample. The values listed are the average values reported by each group. One of the immediate artifacts seen in the data is the large variation in the lifetime measurements. The values from MIT and Mobil are generally close. However, the measurements from NCSU are typically an order of magnitude lower.

  13. Investigation of diffusion length distribution on polycrystalline silicon wafers via photoluminescence methods.

    PubMed

    Lou, Shishu; Zhu, Huishi; Hu, Shaoxu; Zhao, Chunhua; Han, Peide

    2015-09-14

    Characterization of the diffusion length of solar cells in space has been widely studied using various methods, but few studies have focused on a fast, simple way to obtain the quantified diffusion length distribution on a silicon wafer. In this work, we present two different facile methods of doing this by fitting photoluminescence images taken in two different wavelength ranges or from different sides. These methods, which are based on measuring the ratio of two photoluminescence images, yield absolute values of the diffusion length and are less sensitive to the inhomogeneity of the incident laser beam. A theoretical simulation and experimental demonstration of this method are presented. The diffusion length distributions on a polycrystalline silicon wafer obtained by the two methods show good agreement.

  14. Adatom-dimer interaction on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, C. P.; Ong, C. K.

    1994-02-01

    We use a modified form of the Stillinger-Weber potential to obtain the binding sites and diffusion barriers of a Si adatom in the vicinity of single F and B type dimers on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface. We find that both kinds of dimer provide good sinks for adatoms and are therefore ideal nucleation sites, provided the temperature is not too high as to induce dimer breaking. Our results also show that adatoms can be trapped in non-lattice sites surrounding the F type dimer, leading to a disordering of the growing epitaxial film. Monte Carlo simulated annealing indicates that adatoms at these "defect" sites are vertically displaced with respect to those adsorbed on the epitaxial sites, giving rise to step structures that closely resemble those proposed by Falta and Henzler [Surf. Sci 269/270 (1992) 14] to account for their SPA-LEED results.

  15. Tracer diffusion through F-actin: effect of filament length and cross-linking.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J D; Luby-Phelps, K

    1996-01-01

    We have determined diffusion coefficients for small (50- to 70-nm diameter) fluorescein-thiocarbamoyl-labeled Ficoll tracers through F-actin as a function of filament length and cross-linking. fx45 was used to regulate filament length and avidin/biotinylated actin or ABP-280 was used to prepare cross-linked actin gels. We found that tracer diffusion was generally independent of filament length in agreement with theoretical predictions for diffusion through solutions of rods. However, in some experiments diffusion was slower through short (< or = 1.0 micron) filaments, although this result was not consistently reproducible. Measured diffusion coefficients through unregulated F-actin and filaments of lengths > 1.0 micron were more rapid than predicted by theory for tracer diffusion through rigid, random networks, which was consistent with some degree of actin bundling. Avidin-induced cross-linking of biotinylated F-actin did not affect diffusion through unregulated F-actin, but in cases where diffusion was slower through short filaments this cross-linking method resulted in enhanced tracer diffusion rates indistinguishable from unregulated F-actin. This finding, in conjunction with increased turbidity of 1.0-micron filaments upon avidin cross-linking, indicated that this cross-linking method induces F-actin bundling. By contrast, ABP-280 cross-linking retarded diffusion through unregulated F-actin and decreased turbidity. Tracer diffusion under these conditions was well approximated by the diffusion theory. Both cross-linking procedures resulted in gel formation as determined by falling ball viscometry. These results demonstrate that network microscopic geometry is dependent on the cross-linking method, although both methods markedly increase F-actin macroscopic viscosity. PMID:8913611

  16. Estimation of minority carrier diffusion lengths in InP/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier diffusion length is one of the most important parameters affecting the solar cell performance. An attempt is made to estimate the minority carrier diffusion lengths is the emitter and base of InP/GaAs heteroepitaxial solar cells. The PC-1D computer model was used to simulate the experimental cell results measured at NASA Lewis under AMO (air mass zero) spectrum at 25 C. A 16 nm hole diffusion length in the emitter and a 0.42 micron electron diffusion length in the base gave very good agreement with the I-V curve. The effect of varying minority carrier diffusion lengths on cell short current, open circuit voltage, and efficiency was studied. It is also observed that the front surface recombination velocity has very little influence on the cell performance. The poor output of heteroepitaxial cells is caused primarily by the large number of dislocations generated at the interfaces that propagate through the bulk indium phosphide layers. Cell efficiency as a function of dislocation density was calculated and the effect of improved emitter bulk properties on cell efficiency is presented. It is found that cells with over 16 percent efficiencies should be possible, provided the dislocation density is below 10(exp 6)/sq cm.

  17. Excitation and temperature dependent exciton-carrier transport in CVD diamond: Diffusion coefficient, recombination lifetime and diffusion length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ščajev, Patrik

    2017-04-01

    Time-resolved induced absorption (IA) and light induced transient grating (LITG) techniques were applied for the investigation of nonequilibrium exciton-carrier diffusion and recombination processes in a high-purity CVD diamond. Injection range from 1015 to 1020 cm-3 carrier density was achieved by combining one photon and two photon excitations. The measurements were performed in the 10-750 K temperature range. The LITG diffusion coefficient peaked at 44 cm2/s value at room temperature under low injection conditions. At lower temperatures it transferred to much lower exciton diffusion coefficient. A strong decrease of diffusion coefficient under higher injection conditions was explained by exciton formation with a low diffusion coefficient and many body effects, as polyexciton and electron-hole droplet formation. High temperature phonon-limited diffusion coefficient was weakly injection dependent. Low excitation carrier lifetime was about 700 ns above 200 K. At lower temperatures, the decay time reduced by two orders of magnitude, which was explained by the formation of biexcitons. At lowest temperatures, an increase of the carrier recombination rate at high injection was attributed to Auger recombinations of polyexcitons and electron-hole droplets. While at high temperatures, the increase of the recombination rate with 490 meV activation energy was observed. The combination of IA and LITG measurements provided effective diffusion lengths in a 0.3-50 μm range, being strongly dependent on the excess carrier density and temperature.

  18. Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othmer, S.; Chen, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plate arrays. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results are compared with those obtained using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

  19. Laser interferometric method for determining the carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Manukhov, V. V.; Fedortsov, A. B.; Ivanov, A. S.

    2015-09-15

    A new laser interferometric method for measuring the carrier diffusion length in semiconductors is proposed. The method is based on the interference–absorption interaction of two laser radiations in a semiconductor. Injected radiation generates additional carriers in a semiconductor, which causes a change in the material’s optical constants and modulation of the probing radiation passed through the sample. When changing the distance between carrier generation and probing points, a decrease in the carrier concentration, which depends on the diffusion length, is recorded. The diffusion length is determined by comparing the experimental and theoretical dependences of the probe signal on the divergence of the injector and probe beams. The method is successfully tested on semiconductor samples with different thicknesses and surface states and can be used in scientific research and the electronics industry.

  20. Determination of the Pt spin diffusion length by spin-pumping and spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Vlaminck, Vincent; Divan, Ralu; Bader, Samuel D.

    2013-12-09

    The spin diffusion length of Pt at room temperature and at 8 K is experimentally determined via spin pumping and spin Hall effect in permalloy/Pt bilayers. Voltages generated during excitation of ferromagnetic resonance from the inverse spin Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance effect were investigated with a broadband approach. Varying the Pt layer thickness gives rise to an evolution of the voltage line shape due to the superposition of the above two effects. By studying the ratio of the two voltage components with the Pt layer thickness, the spin diffusion length of Pt can be directly extracted. We obtain a spin diffusion length of ∼1.2 nm at room temperature and ∼1.6 nm at 8 K.

  1. Probing sub-alveolar length scales with hyperpolarized-gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Wilson; Carl, Michael; Mooney, Karen; Mugler, John; Cates, Gordon

    2009-05-01

    Diffusion MRI of the lung is a promising technique for detecting alterations of normal lung microstructure in diseases such as emphysema. The length scale being probed using this technique is related to the time scale over which the helium-3 or xenon-129 diffusion is observed. We have developed new MR pulse sequence methods for making diffusivity measurements at sub-millisecond diffusion times, allowing one to probe smaller length scales than previously possible in-vivo, and opening the possibility of making quantitative measurements of the ratio of surface area to volume (S/V) in the lung airspaces. The quantitative accuracy of simulated and experimental measurements in microstructure phantoms will be discussed, and preliminary in-vivo results will be presented.

  2. Determination of the spin diffusion length in germanium by spin optical orientation and electrical spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, C.; Bertoli, S.; Asa, M.; Baldrati, L.; Manzoni, C.; Marangoni, M.; Cerullo, G.; Bianchi, M.; Sordan, R.; Bertacco, R.; Cantoni, M.

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of the spin diffusion length and/or lifetime in semiconductors is a key issue for the realisation of spintronic devices, exploiting the spin degree of freedom of carriers for storing and manipulating information. In this paper, we address such parameters in germanium (0 0 1) at room temperature (RT) by three different measurement methods. Exploiting optical spin orientation in the semiconductor and spin filtering across an insulating MgO barrier, the dependence of the resistivity on the spin of photo-excited carriers in Fe/MgO/Ge spin photodiodes (spin-PDs) was electrically detected. A spin diffusion length of 0.9  ±  0.2 µm was obtained by fitting the photon energy dependence of the spin signal by a mathematical model. Electrical techniques, comprising non-local four-terminal and Hanle measurements performed on CoFeB/MgO/Ge lateral devices, led to spin diffusion lengths of 1.3  ±  0.2 µm and 1.3  ±  0.08 µm, respectively. Despite minor differences due to experimental details, the order of magnitude of the spin diffusion length is the same for the three techniques. Although standard electrical methods are the most employed in semiconductor spintronics for spin diffusion length measurements, here we demonstrate optical spin orientation as a viable alternative for the determination of the spin diffusion length in semiconductors allowing for optical spin orientation.

  3. Scaling of submonolayer island growth with reversible adatom exchange in surfactant-mediated epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daimu; Wang, Zhuping; Zhu, Hui

    2007-08-01

    Surfactant-mediated epitaxial growth is studied with a realistic model, which includes three main kinetic processes: diffusion of adatoms on the surfactant terrace, exchange of adatoms with their underneath surfactant atoms, and reexchange in which an exchanged adatom resurfaces to the top of the surfactant layer. The scaling behavior of nucleus density and island size distributions in the initial stage of growth is investigated by using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the temperature dependence of nucleus density and island size distributions governed by the reexchanging-controlled nucleation at high temperatures exhibits similar scaling behavior to that obtained by the standard diffusion-mediated nucleation at low temperatures. However, at intermediate temperatures, the exchanging-controlled nucleation leads to an increase of nucleus density with temperature, while the island size distribution scales to a monotonically decreasing function, showing nonstandard scaling behavior.

  4. Two Birds with One Stone: Tailoring Singlet Fission for Both Triplet Yield and Exciton Diffusion Length.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tong; Wan, Yan; Guo, Zhi; Johnson, Justin; Huang, Libai

    2016-09-01

    By direct imaging of singlet and triplet populations with ultrafast microscopy, it is shown that the triplet diffusion length and singlet fission yield can be simultaneously optimized for tetracene and its derivatives, making them ideal structures for application in bilayer solar cells.

  5. Two Birds with One Stone: Tailoring Singlet Fission for Both Triplet Yield and Exciton Diffusion Length

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Tong; Wan, Yan; Guo, Zhi; Johnson, Justin; Huang, Libai

    2016-06-27

    By direct imaging of singlet and triplet populations with ultrafast microscopy, it is shown that the triplet diffusion length and singlet fission yield can be simultaneously optimized for tetracene and its derivatives, making them ideal structures for application in bilayer solar cells.

  6. Diffusion length measurements in solar cells: An analysis and comparison of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Khan, A. A.; Soukup, R. J.; Hermann, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief review of the major techniques for measuring minority carrier diffusion lengths in solar cells is given. Emphasis is placed on comparing limits of applicability for each method, especially as applied to silicon cells or to gallium arsenide cells, including the effects of radiation damage.

  7. Effective defect diffusion lengths in Ar-ion bombarded 3C-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Bayu Aji, L. B.; Wallace, J. B.; Shao, L.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2016-04-14

    Above room temperature, SiC exhibits pronounced processes of diffusion and interaction of radiation-generated point defects. Here, we use the recently developed pulsed ion beam method to measure effective defect diffusion lengths in 3C-SiC bombarded in the temperature range of 25–200 °C with 500 keV Ar ions. Results reveal a diffusion length of ~10 nm, which exhibits a weak temperature dependence, changing from 9 to 13 nm with increasing temperature. Lastly, these results have important implications for understanding and predicting radiation damage in SiC and for the development of radiation-resistant materials via interface-mediated defect reactions.

  8. Determination of the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity: Two simple methods

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, J.C.; Venier, G.L.; Tamasi, M.J.L.; Bolzi, C.G.; Pla, J.C.; Godfrin, E.M.

    1997-12-31

    The present paper analyzes two new methods for the estimation of the diffusion length (L{sub d}) and surface recombination velocity (S) through simple and inexpensive equipment. The first one is based on the behavior of the short circuit current (J{sub sc}) under rear illumination, as a function of the cell width (d). In a general case, this model allows one to determine L{sub d} and the effective rear S by a numerical fitting. The second method uses crystalline silicon cells with localized diffusions. A geometry with linear diffusions is considered and the dependence of J{sub sc} with the distance between those diffusions is analyzed by means of a one dimensional model. The second method is applied to n{sup +}pp{sup +} solar cells fabricated in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA).

  9. Atom-by-Atom and Concerted Hopping of Adatom Pairs on an Open Metal Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bogicevic, A.; Ovesson, S.; Lundqvist, B.I.; Jennison, D.R.

    1999-08-25

    Atom-by-atom and concerted hopping of ad-dimers on the open (100) surface of fcc metals are studied by means of density-functional calculations. The adatom interaction is relatively short-ranged, and beyond next-nearest neighbors ad-dimers are effectively dissociated. Diffusion takes place by a simple shearing process, favored because it maximizes adatom coordination at the transition state This holds for Al, Au, and Rh, and is likely a general result because geometrical arguments dominate over details of the electronic structure.

  10. Metals on graphene: correlation between adatom adsorption behavior and growth morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lu, Wencai; Tringides, Michael C.; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-05-19

    We present a systematic study of metal adatom adsorption on graphene by ab initio calculations. The calculations cover alkali metals, sp-simple metals, 3d and group 10 transition metals, noble metals, as well as rare earth metals. The correlation between the adatom adsorption properties and the growth morphology of the metals on graphene is also investigated. We show that the growth morphology is related to the ratio of the metal adsorption energy to its bulk cohesive energy (E(a)/E(c)) and the diffusion barrier (ΔE) of the metal adatom on graphene. Charge transfer, electric dipole and magnetic moments, and graphene lattice distortion induced by metal adsorption would also affect the growth morphologies of the metal islands. We also show that most of the metal nanostructures on graphene would be thermally stable against coarsening.

  11. Diffusion length measurements of thin GaAs solar cells by means of energetic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonross, O.

    1980-01-01

    A calculation of the short circuit current density (j sub sc) of a thin GaAs solar cell induced by fast electrons is presented. It is shown that in spite of the disparity in thickness between the N-type portion of the junction and the P-type portion of the junction, the measurement of the bulk diffusion length L sub p of the N-type part of the junction is seriously hampered due to the presence of a sizable contribution to the j sub sc from the P-type region of the junction. Corrections of up to 50% had to be made in order to interpret the data correctly. Since these corrections were not amenable to direct measurements it is concluded that the electron beam method for the determination of the bulk minority carrier diffusion length, which works so well for Si solar cells, is a poor method when applied to thin GaAs cells.

  12. Length distributions of nanowires: Effects of surface diffusion versus nucleation delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.

    2017-04-01

    It is often thought that the ensembles of semiconductor nanowires are uniform in length due to the initial organization of the growth seeds such as lithographically defined droplets or holes in the substrate. However, several recent works have already demonstrated that most nanowire length distributions are broader than Poissonian. Herein, we consider theoretically the length distributions of non-interacting nanowires that grow by the material collection from the entire length of their sidewalls and with a delay of nucleation of the very first nanowire monolayer. The obtained analytic length distribution is controlled by two parameters that describe the strength of surface diffusion and the nanowire nucleation rate. We show how the distribution changes from the symmetrical Polya shape without the nucleation delay to a much broader and asymmetrical one for longer delays. In the continuum limit (for tall enough nanowires), the length distribution is given by a power law times an incomplete gamma-function. We discuss interesting scaling properties of this solution and give a recipe for analyzing and tailoring the experimental length histograms of nanowires which should work for a wide range of material systems and growth conditions.

  13. Minority carrier diffusion length measurements - A review and comparison of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, A. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Hermann, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the major techniques for measuring minority carrier diffusion lengths in solar cells is given. Limits of applicability are indicated for each method, as relevant to indirect bandgap materials such as silicon, and direct bandgap materials like gallium arsenide. A discussion and bibliography is presented for the following techniques: uniform generation, electron beam induced current, Schottky barrier (and other steady-state) photocurrent, surface photovoltage, transient decay, and luminescence.

  14. Minority carrier diffusion length and edge surface-recombination velocity in InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1993-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used to obtain the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) profiles in InP specimens containing a Schottky barrier perpendicular to the scanned (edge) surface. An independent technique was used to measure the edge surface-recombination velocity. These values were used in a fit of the experimental EBIC data with a theoretical expression for normalized EBIC (Donolato, 1982) to obtain the electron (minority carrier) diffusion length.

  15. Near Field Imaging for the Characterization of Diffusion Length and Waveguiding in Zinc Oxide Nanowires

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments...raster scan of the nanowire featured . Some diffusion length data are lost by starting the probe tip far away from the cathodoluminescence... featured . By placing the probe tip close to the electron beam, the chances of incidental contact increase. The risk increases that photons would

  16. Characterizing acid diffusion lengths in chemically amplified resists from measurements of deprotection kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Abhijit A.; Pandey, Yogendra Narayan; Doxastakis, Manolis; Stein, Gila E.

    2014-10-01

    The acid-catalyzed deprotection of glassy poly(4-hydroxystyrene-co-tertbutyl acrylate) films was studied with infrared absorbance spectroscopy and stochastic simulations. Experimental data were interpreted with a simple description of subdiffusive acid transport coupled to second-order acid loss. This model predicts key attributes of observed deprotection rates, such as fast reaction at short times, slow reaction at long times, and a nonlinear dependence on acid loading. Fickian diffusion is approached by increasing the postexposure bake temperature or adding plasticizing agents to the polymer resin. These findings demonstrate that acid mobility and overall deprotection kinetics are coupled to glassy matrix dynamics. To complement the analysis of bulk kinetics, acid diffusion lengths were calculated from the anomalous transport model and compared with nanopattern line widths. The consistent scaling between experiments and simulations suggests that the anomalous diffusion model could be further developed into a predictive lithography tool.

  17. Acid Diffusion Length Corresponding to Post Exposure Bake Time and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Back; Kim, Sung-Hyuck; Kim, Sung-Jin; Cho, Jung-Hyuk; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2007-01-01

    The post exposure bake (PEB) step in lithography is important for fabricating good patterns when a chemically amplified resist is used. Hydrogen ions or acid is generated by a photoacid generator through light exposure. The generated acid diffuses and acts as a catalyst for chemical amplification during the PEB step. Acid diffusion length (ADL) affects the deprotection of a resist polymer, such that linewidth is affected by ADL. The common parameter that determines ADL is the acid diffusion coefficient D; thus, we must determine D accurately in order to obtain the actual linewidth. However, D cannot be unambiguously determined for the actual PEB temperature and time. ADL has become a critical factor for 100 nm patterns and below. Thus, the accurate ADL determination becomes an important issue for better linewidth prediction by simulation. To match ADL and PEB time and temperature, we attempted to determine the relationship between the PEB parameters and ADL. As a result, we obtained a reasonable ADL.

  18. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  19. Diffusion of Nanoparticles in Semidilute Polymer Solutions: The Effect of Different Length Scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, Indermeet; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2012-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were used to investigate the length-scale dependent dynamics in semidilute poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-water solutions. Fluctuation correlation spectroscopy was used to measure the diffusion coefficients (D) of the NPs as a function of their radius, Ro (2.5-10 nm), PEG volume fraction, φ (0-0.37) and molecular weight, Mw (5 kg/mol and 35 kg/mol). Our results indicate that the radius of gyration, Rg of the polymer chain is the crossover length scale for the NPs experiencing nanoviscosity or macroviscosity. The reduced diffusivity can be plotted on a single master curve as Do/D= exp (α(Ro/ξ)^δ) for Rg > Ro and as Do/D= exp (α(Rg/ξ)^δ) for Rg <= Ro, where Do is diffusion coefficient in the neat solvent, ξ is the correlation length, α = 1.63 and δ = 0.89. In the intermediate size regime, ξ < Ro < a(φ), where `a(φ)' is the tube diameter for entangled polymer liquid, we found that D ˜ φ-1.45 and independent of Mw. For Ro > a(φ), D˜φ-4 was obtained. The results were compared with currently available theories.

  20. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Bernard; Dresner, Joseph; Szostak, Daniel J.

    1983-07-12

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant-magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. An unmodulated illumination provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV. A vibrating Kelvin method-type probe electrode couples the SPV to a measurement system. The operating optical wavelength of an adjustable monochromator to compensate for the wavelength dependent sensitivity of a photodetector is selected to measure the illumination intensity (photon flux) on the silicon. Measurements of the relative photon flux for a plurality of wavelengths are plotted against the reciprocal of the optical absorption coefficient of the material. A linear plot of the data points is extrapolated to zero intensity. The negative intercept value on the reciprocal optical coefficient axis of the extrapolated linear plot is the diffusion length of the minority carriers.

  1. Improvement of carrier diffusion length in silicon nanowire arrays using atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinya; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Yuya; Yamada, Akira; Ohta, Yoshimi; Niwa, Yusuke; Hirota, Masaki

    2013-08-23

    To achieve a high-efficiency silicon nanowire (SiNW) solar cell, surface passivation technique is very important because a SiNW array has a large surface area. We successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) high-quality aluminum oxide (Al2O3) film for passivation on the whole surface of the SiNW arrays. The minority carrier lifetime of the Al2O3-depositedSiNW arrays with bulk silicon substrate was improved to 27 μs at the optimum annealing condition. To remove the effect of bulk silicon, the effective diffusion length of minority carriers in the SiNW array was estimated by simple equations and a device simulator. As a result, it was revealed that the effective diffusion length in the SiNW arrays increased from 3.25 to 13.5 μm by depositing Al2O3 and post-annealing at 400°C. This improvement of the diffusion length is very important for application to solar cells, and Al2O3 deposited by ALD is a promising passivation material for a structure with high aspect ratio such as SiNW arrays.

  2. Taylor-Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry of Varying Lengths Simulated by Reaction-Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Halmstad, Andrew; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Previously, we have observed chaotic formation of Taylor-Vortex pairs in Modified Taylor- Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry. In the experiment, the chaotic formation in a shorter system has been restricted to a narrow band about the waist of the hourglass. Such behavior has been modeled by The Reaction-Diffusion equation, which has been previously studied, by Riecke and Paap. Their calculation suggested that quadrupling length of the system would lead to spatial chaos in the vortex formation. We present a careful recreation of this result and consider an intermediate length. We demonstrate that doubling the length should be sufficient to observe spatially chaotic behavior. Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997). H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991).

  3. Charge Transfer Fluorescence and 34 nm Exciton Diffusion Length in Polymers with Electron Acceptor End Traps.

    PubMed

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R; Miller, John R

    2015-06-18

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17-127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence, and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps, the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF), and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization, and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ∼50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length is LD = 34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. The efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length but not on trap depth, solvent polarity, or which trap group is present.

  4. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    SciTech Connect

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.

  5. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    DOE PAGES

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; ...

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are asmore » large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.« less

  6. A novel diffusion-tensor MRI approach for skeletal muscle fascicle length measurements.

    PubMed

    Oudeman, Jos; Mazzoli, Valentina; Marra, Marco A; Nicolay, Klaas; Maas, Mario; Verdonschot, Nico; Sprengers, Andre M; Nederveen, Aart J; Strijkers, Gustav J; Froeling, Martijn

    2016-12-01

    Musculoskeletal (dys-)function relies for a large part on muscle architecture which can be obtained using Diffusion-Tensor MRI (DT-MRI) and fiber tractography. However, reconstructed tracts often continue along the tendon or aponeurosis when using conventional methods, thus overestimating fascicle lengths. In this study, we propose a new method for semiautomatic segmentation of tendinous tissue using tract density (TD). We investigated the feasibility and repeatability of this method to quantify the mean fascicle length per muscle. Additionally, we examined whether the method facilitates measuring changes in fascicle length of lower leg muscles with different foot positions. Five healthy subjects underwent two DT-MRI scans of the right lower leg, with the foot in 15° dorsiflexion, neutral, and 30° plantarflexion positions. Repeatability of fascicle length measurements was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis. Changes in fascicle lengths between the foot positions were tested using a repeated multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between repeated measurements. The coefficients of variation in neutral position were 8.3, 16.7, 11.2, and 10.4% for soleus (SOL), fibularis longus (FL), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and tibialis anterior (TA), respectively. The plantarflexors (SOL and FL) showed significant increase in fascicle length from plantarflexion to dorsiflexion, whereas the dorsiflexors (EDL and TA) exhibited a significant decrease. The use of a tract density for semiautomatic segmentation of tendinous structures provides more accurate estimates of the mean fascicle length than traditional fiber tractography methods. The method shows moderate to good repeatability and allows for quantification of changes in fascicle lengths due to passive stretch.

  7. Experiments on individual alumina-supported adatoms and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilius, N.; Cörper, A.; Bozdech, G.; Ernst, N.; Freund, H.-J.

    2001-08-01

    To contribute to an understanding of growth conditions and electronic properties of metal clusters on technologically relevant oxides we have examined the mobility of individual, alumina-supported Pt-adatoms and the optical properties of single supported Ag-clusters. Using field-ion microscopy (FIM) we have prepared and imaged an individual Pt-adatom at approximately 40 K, both on the apex plane of a [1 1 0]-oriented NiAl tip and on a thin alumina film, grown on the same NiAl specimen by oxidation. On the alumina film, the onset temperature for Pt surface diffusion approaches 100 K being distinctively lower than the value 165 K measured on NiAl(1 1 0). Employing the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) as a local electron source, photon emission from individual, alumina-supported Ag-clusters was spectroscopically analyzed. The occurrence of a distinct emission line is explained by the decay of a collective electron oscillation (Mie-plasmon resonance). For decreasing Ag-cluster diameter, the emission lines (i) shift to higher energies and (ii) their widths increase. To explain these observations, we discuss (i) the reduced screening of the plasmon oscillation due to the Ag 4d electrons and (ii) an enhanced electron surface scattering rate in small clusters.

  8. Surface recombination velocity and diffusion length of minority carriers in heavily doped silicon layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam-induced current and the dependence of the effective diffusion length of the minority carriers on the penetration depth of the electron beam were employed for the analysis of the carrier recombination characteristics in heavily doped silicon layers. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of P-diffused Si layers will be presented together with a three dimensional mapping of minority carrier lifetime in ion implanted Si. Layers heavily doped with As exhibit improved recombination characteristics as compared to those of the layers doped with P.

  9. Diffusion length variation in 0.5- and 3-MeV-proton-irradiated, heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide (GaAs) and silicon (Si) solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of light weight, mechanically strong, and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5- and 3-MeV proton irradiations have been explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence was calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient, K(sub L), was also plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  10. Lab on a chip Canada--rapid diffusion over large length scales.

    PubMed

    Juncker, David; Wheeler, Aaron R; Sinton, David

    2013-07-07

    The roots of lab on a chip in Canada are deep, comprising of some of the earliest contributions and first demonstrations of the potential of microfluidic chips. In an editorial leading off this special issue, Jed Harrison of University of Alberta reflects on these early days and Canada's role in the field's development (DOI: 10.1039/c3lc50522g). Over the last decade, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip research efforts grew exponentially - rapidly diffusing across the vast Canadian length scales.

  11. Diffusion lengths in irradiated N/P InP-on-Si solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Colerico, Claudia; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Walters, Robert J.; Burke, Edward A.

    1996-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells were made on silicon (Si) wafers (InP/Si) by to take advantage of both the radiation-hardness properties of the InP solar cell and the light weight and low cost of Si wafers. The InP/Si cell application is for long duration and/or high radiation orbit space missions. Spire has made N/P InP/Si cells of sizes up to 2 cm by 4 cm with beginning-of-life (BOL) AM0 efficiencies over 13% (one-sun, 28C). These InP/Si cells have higher absolute efficiency and power density after a high radiation dose than gallium arsenide (GaAs) or silicon (Si) solar cells after a fluence of about 2e15 1 MeV electrons/sq. cm. In this work, we investigate the minority carrier (electron) base diffusion lengths in the N/P InP/Si cells. A quantum efficiency model was constructed for a 12% BOL AM0 N/P InP/Si cell which agreed well with the absolutely measured quantum efficiency and the sun-simulator measured AM0 photocurrent (30.1 mA/sq. cm). This model was then used to generate a table of AM0 photocurrents for a range of base diffusion lengths. AM0 photocurrents were then measured for irradiations up to 7.7e16 1 MeV electrons/sq. cm (the 12% BOL cell was 8% after the final irradiation). By comparing the measured photocurrents with the predicted photocurrents, base diffusion lengths were assigned at each fluence level. A damage coefficient K of 4e-8 and a starting (unirradiated) base electron diffusion length of 0.8 microns fits the data well. The quantum efficiency was measured again at the end of the experiment to verify that the photocurrent predicted by the model (25.5 mA/sq. cm) agreed with the simulator-measured photocurrent after irradiation (25.7 mA/sq. cm).

  12. Diffusion length and grain boundary recombination activity determination by means of induced current methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabelnikova, Yana; Yakimov, Eugene

    2016-11-01

    The application of induced current methods for a quantitative description of multicrystalline silicon solar cell properties is demonstrated. For the minority carriers' diffusion length (L) and grain boundary recombination velocity (Vs) determination three types of measurements were used. They included the measurement of EBIC signal dependence on electron beam energy and of EBIC and XBIC grain boundary contrast profiles. The L and Vs values obtained by means of minimization the residual function between measured and model induced current curves are presented. The inaccuracy of obtained parameters is discussed for each of three types of measurements.

  13. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Arnold R.

    1984-02-21

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon, which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. Steady or modulated illumination at several wavelengths provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV for each wavelength. A probe electrode immersed in an electrolyte solution containing redox couples (preferably quinhydrone) having an oxidation-reduction potential (E) in the order of +0.6 to -1.65 volts couples the SPV to a measurement system. The redox couple solution functions to create a liquid Schottky barrier at the surface of the material. The Schottky barrier is contacted by merely placing the probe in the solution. The redox solution is placed over and in contact with the material to be tested and light is passed through the solution to generate the SPV. To compensate for colored redox solutions a portion of the redox solution not over the material is also illuminated for determining the color compensated light intensity. Steady red light is also used as an optical bias to reduce deleterious space-charge effects that occur in amorphous silicon.

  14. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Arnold R.

    1984-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. Steady or modulated illumination at several wavelengths provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV for each wavelength. A drop of a transparent electrolyte solution containing redox couples (preferably quinhydrone) having an oxidation-reduction potential (E) in the order of +0.6 to -1.65 volts couples the SPV to a measurement system. The drop of redox couple solution functions to create a liquid Schottky barrier at the surface of the material. Illumination light is passed through a transparent rod supported over the surface and through the drop of transparent electrolyte. The drop is held in the gap between the rod and the surface. Steady red light is also used as an optical bias to reduce deleterious space-charge effects that occur in amorphous silicon.

  15. Diffusion lengths in irradiated N/P InP-on-Si solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Colerico, Claudia; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Walters, Robert J.; Burke, Edward A.

    1995-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are being made on silicon (Si) wafers (InP/Si) to take advantage of both the radiation-hardness properties of the InP solar cell and the light weight and low cost of Si wafers compared to InP or germanium (Ge) wafers. The InP/Si cell application is for long duration and/or high radiation orbit space missions. InP/Si cells have higher absolute efficiency after a high radiation dose than gallium arsenide (GaAs) or silicon (Si) solar cells. In this work, base electron diffusion lengths in the N/P cell are extracted from measured AM0 short-circuit photocurrent at various irradiation levels out to an equivalent 1 MeV fluence of 1017 1 MeV electrons/sq cm for a 1 sq cm 12% BOL InP/Si cell. These values are then checked for consistency by comparing measured Voc data with a theoretical Voc model that includes a dark current term that depends on the extracted diffusion lengths.

  16. Transition to Spatio-Temporal Chaos with Increasing Length in the Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trail, Collin; Tomlin, Brett; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard J.

    2003-11-01

    Calculations based up the Reaction-Diffusion model (H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14), 1235 (1991).have proven to be suggestive for a wide variety of pattern forming systems, including Taylor-Couette flow with hourglass geometry(Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997).. Seeking insight to guide experimental investigations, we extend these calculations. Previous calculations indicated that in smaller systems, only temporal chaos, located in a small region, would be observed, while in longer systems instabilities would form over a wide region. Our simulations explore this transition from purely temporal chaos to spatio-temporal chaos as the length of the system is increased.

  17. Minority carrier diffusion lengths and absorption coefficients in silicon sheet material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, K. A.; Swimm, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the methods which have been developed for the measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length of silicon wafers require that the material have either a Schottky or an ohmic contact. The surface photovoltage (SPV) technique is an exception. The SPV technique could, therefore, become a valuable diagnostic tool in connection with current efforts to develop low-cost processes for the production of solar cells. The technique depends on a knowledge of the optical absorption coefficient. The considered investigation is concerned with a reevaluation of the absorption coefficient as a function of silicon processing. A comparison of absorption coefficient values showed these values to be relatively consistent from sample to sample, and independent of the sample growth method.

  18. Heterodiffusion of Ag adatoms on imperfect Au(1 1 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El koraychy, E.; Sbiaai, K.; Mazroui, M.; Ferrando, R.; Boughaleb, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The hetero-diffusion of Ag adatoms on imperfect Au(1 1 0) surfaces is studied using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The atomic interactions are described by an Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential. Static activation energies governing various diffusion processes (jumps and exchanges) are calculated by quenched MD, finding that activation energies for interlayer mobility at straight step edges are somewhat larger than those on the flat surface in the cross-channel [1 0 0]-direction, while interlayer barriers at kinks are considerably lower. Dynamic activation energies are calculated at high temperature from the Arrhenius plots of different diffusion mechanisms and compared to static barriers.

  19. Diffusion length damage coefficient and annealing studies in proton-irradiated InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Bailey, Sheila G.; Williams, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the diffusion length damage coefficient (K(sub L)) and the annealing characteristics of the minority carrier diffusion length (L(sub n)) in Czochralski-grown zinc-doped indium phosphide (InP), with a carrier concentration of 1 x 10(exp l8) cm(exp -3). In measuring K(sub L) irradiations were made with 0.5 MeV protons with fluences ranging from 1 x 10(exp 11) to 3 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Pre- and post-irradiation electron-beam induced current (EBIC) measurements allowed for the extraction of L(sub n) from which K(sub L) was determined. In studying the annealing characteristics of L(sub n) irradiations were made with 2 MeV protons with fluence of 5 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Post-irradiation studies of L(sub n) with time at room temperature, and with minority carrier photoinjection and forward-bias injection were carried out. The results showed that recovery under Air Mass Zero (AMO) photoinjection was complete. L(sub n) was also found to recover under forward-bias injection, where recovery was found to depend on the value of the injection current. However, no recovery of L(sub n) after proton irradiation was observed with time at room temperature, in contrast to the behavior of 1 MeV electron-irradiated InP solar cells reported previously.

  20. Role of impurities in determining the exciton diffusion length in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, Ian J.; Blaylock, D. Wayne; Holmes, Russell J.

    2016-04-01

    The design and performance of organic photovoltaic cells is dictated, in part, by the magnitude of the exciton diffusion length (LD). Despite the importance of this parameter, there have been few investigations connecting LD and materials purity. Here, we investigate LD for the organic small molecule N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine as native impurities are systematically removed from the material. Thin films deposited from the as-synthesized material yield a value for LD, as measured by photoluminescence quenching, of (3.9 ± 0.5) nm with a corresponding photoluminescence efficiency (ηPL) of (25 ± 1)% and thin film purity of (97.1 ± 1.2)%, measured by high performance liquid chromatography. After purification by thermal gradient sublimation, the value of LD is increased to (4.7 ± 0.5) nm with a corresponding ηPL of (33 ± 1)% and purity of (98.3 ± 0.8)%. Interestingly, a similar behavior is also observed as a function of the deposition boat temperature. Films deposited from the purified material at a high temperature give LD = (5.3 ± 0.8) nm with ηPL = (37 ± 1)% for films with a purity of (99.0 ± 0.3)% purity. Using a model of diffusion by Förster energy transfer, the variation of LD with purity is predicted as a function of ηPL and is in good agreement with measurements. The removal of impurities acts to decrease the non-radiative exciton decay rate and increase the radiative decay rate, leading to increases in both the diffusivity and exciton lifetime. The results of this work highlight the role of impurities in determining LD, while also providing insight into the degree of materials purification necessary to achieve optimized exciton transport.

  1. Adsorption and diffusion of Mg, O, and O2 on the MgO(001) flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geneste, Grégory; Morillo, Joseph; Finocchi, Fabio

    2005-05-01

    A thorough investigation of the adsorption and diffusion of Mg, O, and O2 on MgO(001) terraces is performed by first-principles calculations. The single Mg adatom weakly binds to surface oxygens, diffuses, and evaporates easily at room temperatures. Atomic O strongly binds to surface oxygens, forming peroxide groups. The diffusion of the O adatom is strongly influenced by the spin polarization, since energy barriers are significantly different for the singlet and triplet states. The crossing of the two Born-Oppenheimer surfaces corresponding to the distinct spin states is also analyzed. Although the O2 molecule does not stick to the perfect surface, it chemisorbs on surface nonstoichiometric point defects such as O vacancies or Mg adatoms, forming in the latter case new chemical species on the surface. We show that the oxidation rate limiting factor in an O2 atmosphere is the concentration of point defects (O vacancies and Mg adatoms) in the growing surface. The simulated O core-level shifts for the various adsorption configurations enable a meaningful comparison with the measured values, suggesting the presence of peroxide ions on growing surfaces. Finally, the computed energy barriers are used to estimate the Mg and O surface lifetimes and diffusion lengths, and some implications for the homoepitaxial growth of MgO are discussed.

  2. Studies of deep level centers determining the diffusion length in epitaxial layers and crystals of undoped n-GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Hwan; Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Yakimov, E. B.; Tarelkin, S. A.; Turutin, A. V.; Shemerov, I. V.; Pearton, S. J.

    2016-05-01

    A wide variety of parameters were measured for undoped n-GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy and compared to n-GaN films grown by conventional and lateral overgrowth metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The parameters included deep level electron and hole trap spectra, microcathodoluminescence, electron beam induced current, diffusion length, and electron capture cross section from the dependence of the low temperature persistent photocapacitance on forward bias injection pulse duration. The results show a prominent role of electron traps with levels near Ec-0.56 eV in limiting the lifetime and diffusion length values in all these materials.

  3. Enhancing electron collection efficiency and effective diffusion length in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Daniel Kwan-Pang; Ku, Chen-Hao; Chen, Yen-Ru; Chen, Guan-Ren; Wu, Jih-Jen

    2009-10-19

    Intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy and intensity-modulated photovoltage spectroscopy are employed to measure the dynamics of electron transport and recombination in the ZnO nanowire (NW) array-ZnO/layered basic zinc acetate (LBZA) nanoparticle (NP) composite dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The roles of the vertical ZnO NWs and insulating LBZA in the electron collection and transport in DSSCs are investigated by comparing the results to those in the TiO(2)-NP, horizontal TiO(2)-NW and vertical ZnO-NW-array DSSCs. The electron transport rate and electron lifetime in the ZnO NW/NP composite DSSC are superior to those in the conventional TiO(2)-NP cell due to the existence of the vertical ZnO NWs and insulating LBZA. It indicates that the ZnO NW/NP composite anode is able to sustain efficient electron collection over much greater thickness than the TiO(2)-NP cell does. Consequently, a larger effective electron diffusion length is available in the ZnO composite DSSC.

  4. Spin-Diffusion Lengths in Ag(4%Sn) and Cu(2%Ge) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amit; Richard, Brandon; Fowler, Quinton; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, William, Jr.; Bass, Jack

    2008-03-01

    Alloying Ag with a little Sn, or Cu with a little Ge, greatly increases elastic scattering of electrons---i.e., greatly decreases the electron mean-free-path (mfp), but does not produce much spin-flipping---i.e., leaves the electron spin-diffusion length, l, relatively long. Thus, dilute AgSn and CuGe alloys were used to study effects of changing the mfp on current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) magnetoresistance [1] and current-induced magnetization switching (CIMS) [2], while leaving spin-flipping weak. Published transport data in dilute AgSn and CuGe alloys give only lower bounds for l [3-5]. We find l = 34 ± 4 nm for Ag(4%Sn) and l = 125 ± 10 nm for Cu(2%Ge). [1] K. Eid et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mat. 224, L205 (2001). [2] N. Theodoropoulou et al., Phys. Rev. B (rapid comm.) in press. [3] S.-F.Lee et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mat. 118, L1 (993). [4] J. Bass et al, Mat. Sci. and Eng. B31, 77 (1995). [5] J. Bass and W.P. Pratt Jr., J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 19, 183201 (2007).

  5. Roughness distribution of multiple hit and long surface diffusion length noise reduced discrete growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disrattakit, P.; Chanphana, R.; Chatraphorn, P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventionally, the universality class of a discrete growth model is identified via the scaling of interface width. This method requires large-scale simulations to minimize finite-size effects on the results. The multiple hit noise reduction techniques (m > 1 NRT) and the long surface diffusion length noise reduction techniques (ℓ > 1 NRT) have been used to promote the asymptotic behaviors of the growth models. Lately, an alternative method involving comparison of roughness distribution in the steady state has been proposed. In this work, the roughness distribution of the (2 +1)-dimensional Das Sarma-Tamborenea (DT), Wolf-Villain (WV), and Larger Curvature (LC) models, with and without NRTs, are calculated in order to investigate effects of the NRTs on the roughness distribution. Additionally, effective growth exponents of the noise reduced (2 +1)-dimensional DT, WV and LC models are also calculated. Our results indicate that the NRTs affect the interface width both in the growth and the saturation regimes. In the steady state, the NRTs do not seem to have any impact on the roughness distribution of the DT model, but it significantly changes the roughness distribution of the WV and LC models to the normal distribution curves.

  6. Levitation effect: role of symmetry and dependence of diffusivity on the bond length of homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic species.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manju; Yashonath, S

    2011-04-07

    Molecular dynamics investigation of model diatomic species confined to the α-cages of zeolite NaY is reported. The dependence of self-diffusivity on the bond length of the diatomic species has been investigated. Three different sets of runs have been carried out. In the first set, the two atoms of the diatomic molecule interact with the zeolite atoms with equal strength (example, O(2), the symmetric case). In the second and third sets which correspond to asymmetric cases, the two atoms of the diatomic molecule interact with unequal strengths (example, CO). The result for the symmetric case exhibits a well-defined maximum in self-diffusivity for an intermediate bond length. In contrast to this, the intermediate asymmetry leads to a less pronounced maximum. For the large asymmetric case, the maximum is completely absent. These findings are analyzed by computing a number of related properties. These results provide a direct confirmation at the microscopic level of the suggestion by Derouane that the supermobility observed experimentally by Kemball has its origin in the mutual cancellation of forces. The maximum in diffusivity from molecular dynamics is seen at the value predicted by the levitation effect. Further, these findings suggest a role for symmetry in the existence of a diffusivity maximum as a function of diameter of the diffusant often referred to as the levitation effect. The nature of the required symmetry for the existence of anomalous diffusivity is interaction symmetry which is different from that normally encountered in crystallography.

  7. Method to extract diffusion length from solar cell parameters—Application to polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taretto, K.; Rau, U.; Werner, J. H.

    2003-05-01

    A closed form, analytical expression for the interdependence of the effective diffusion length Leff and the open-circuit voltage of solar cells is derived for the parallel connection of recombination in the space-charge region and in the neutral base region. This expression allows for the calculation of Leff from the open-circuit voltage, the short-circuit current, and the base doping of the solar cell as the only quantities that need to be determined experimentally. Values of Leff calculated with our method match with an accuracy of 35% values that are determined experimentally by quantum-efficiency measurements of silicon solar cells. The agreement holds in a range 0.3 μm

  8. Tracer counterpermeation analysis of diffusivity in finite-length nanopores with and without single-file dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, David M.; Evans, James W.

    2017-01-01

    We perform a tracer counterpermeation (TCP) analysis for a stochastic model of diffusive transport through a narrow linear pore where passing of species within the pore is inhibited or even excluded (single-file diffusion). TCP involves differently labeled but otherwise identical particles from two decoupled infinite reservoirs adsorbing into opposite ends of the pore, and desorbing from either end. In addition to transient behavior, we assess steady-state concentration profiles, spatial correlations, particle number fluctuations, and diffusion fluxes through the pore. From the profiles and fluxes, we determine a generalized tracer diffusion coefficient Dtr(x ) , at various positions x within the pore. Dtr(x ) has a plateau value in the pore center scaling inversely with the pore length, but it is enhanced near the pore openings. The latter feature reflects the effect of fluctuations in adsorption and desorption, and it is also associated with a nontrivial scaling of the concentration profiles near the pore openings.

  9. Native gallium adatoms discovered on atomically-smooth gallium nitride surfaces at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Alam, Khan; Foley, Andrew; Smith, Arthur R

    2015-03-11

    In advanced compound semiconductor devices, such as in quantum dot and quantum well systems, detailed atomic configurations at the growth surfaces are vital in determining the structural and electronic properties. Therefore, it is important to investigate the surface reconstructions in order to make further technological advancements. Usually, conventional semiconductor surfaces (e.g., arsenides, phosphides, and antimonides) are highly reactive due to the existence of a high density of group V (anion) surface dangling bonds. However, in the case of nitrides, group III rich growth conditions in molecular beam epitaxy are usually preferred leading to group III (Ga)-rich surfaces. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to reveal a uniform distribution of native gallium adatoms with a density of 0.3%-0.5% of a monolayer on the clean, as-grown surface of nitrogen polar GaN(0001̅) having the centered 6 × 12 reconstruction. Unseen at room temperature, these Ga adatoms are strongly bound to the surface but move with an extremely low surface diffusion barrier and a high density saturation coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium with Ga droplets. Furthermore, the Ga adatoms reveal an intrinsic surface chirality and an asymmetric site occupation. These observations can have important impacts in the understanding of gallium nitride surfaces.

  10. Measurement of minority carrier lifetime, mobility and diffusion length in heavily doped silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swirhun, S. E.; Swanson, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Carrier transport and recombination parameters in heavily doped silicon were examined. Data were presented for carrier diffusivity in both p- and n-type heavily doped silicon covering a broad range of doping concentrations from 10 to the 15th power to 10 to the 20th power atoms/cu cm. One of the highlights of the results showed that minority carrier diffusivities are higher by a factor of 2 in silicon compared to majority carrier diffusivities.

  11. Exciton diffusion length in complex quantum systems: the effects of disorder and environmental fluctuations on symmetry-enhanced supertransfer.

    PubMed

    Abasto, D F; Mohseni, M; Lloyd, S; Zanardi, P

    2012-08-13

    Symmetric couplings among aggregates of n chromophores increase the transfer rate of excitons by a factor n(2), a quantum-mechanical phenomenon called 'supertransfer'. In this work, we demonstrate how supertransfer effects induced by geometrical symmetries can enhance the exciton diffusion length by a factor n along cylindrically symmetric structures, consisting of arrays of rings of chromophores, and along spiral arrays. We analyse both closed-system dynamics and open quantum dynamics, modelled by combining a random bosonic bath with static disorder. In the closed-system case, we use the symmetries of the system within a short-time approximation to obtain a closed analytical expression for the diffusion length that explicitly reveals the supertransfer contribution. When subject to disorder, we show that supertransfer can enhance excitonic diffusion lengths for small disorders and characterize the crossover from coherent to incoherent motion. Owing to the quasi-one-dimensional nature of the model, disorder ultimately localizes the excitons, diminishing but not destroying the effects of supertransfer. When dephasing effects are included, we study the scaling of diffusion with both time and number of chromophores and observe that the transition from a coherent, ballistic regime to an incoherent, random-walk regime occurs at the same point as the change from supertransfer to classical scaling.

  12. Metal Adatoms and Clusters on Ultrathin Zirconia Films

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of transition metals on zirconia has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Since STM requires electrical conductivity, ultrathin ZrO2 films grown by oxidation of Pt3Zr(0001) and Pd3Zr(0001) were used as model systems. DFT studies were performed for single metal adatoms on supported ZrO2 films as well as the (1̅11) surface of monoclinic ZrO2. STM shows decreasing cluster size, indicative of increasing metal–oxide interaction, in the sequence Ag < Pd ≈ Au < Ni ≈ Fe. Ag and Pd nucleate mostly at steps and domain boundaries of ZrO2/Pt3Zr(0001) and form three-dimensional clusters. Deposition of low coverages of Ni and Fe at room temperature leads to a high density of few-atom clusters on the oxide terraces. Weak bonding of Ag to the oxide is demonstrated by removing Ag clusters with the STM tip. DFT calculations for single adatoms show that the metal–oxide interaction strength increases in the sequence Ag < Au < Pd < Ni on monoclinic ZrO2, and Ag ≈ Au < Pd < Ni on the supported ultrathin ZrO2 film. With the exception of Au, metal nucleation and growth on ultrathin zirconia films follow the usual rules: More reactive (more electropositive) metals result in a higher cluster density and wet the surface more strongly than more noble metals. These bind mainly to the oxygen anions of the oxide. Au is an exception because it can bind strongly to the Zr cations. Au diffusion may be impeded by changing its charge state between −1 and +1. We discuss differences between the supported ultrathin zirconia films and the surfaces of bulk ZrO2, such as the possibility of charge transfer to the substrate of the films. Due to their large in-plane lattice constant and the variety of adsorption sites, ZrO2{111} surfaces are more reactive than many other oxygen-terminated oxide surfaces. PMID:27213024

  13. Fano fingerprints of Majoranas in Kitaev dimers of superconducting adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessotti, F. A.; Ricco, L. S.; Marques, Y.; Machado, R. S.; Guessi, L. H.; Figueira, M. S.; de Souza, M.; Seridonio, A. C.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate theoretically a Fano interferometer composed by STM and AFM tips close to a Kitaev dimer of superconducting adatoms, in which the adatom placed under the AFM tip, encloses a pair of Majorana fermions (MFs). For the binding energy Δ of the Cooper pair delocalized into the adatoms under the tips coincident with the tunneling amplitude t between them, namely Δ=t, we find that only one MF beneath the AFM tip hybridizes with the adatom coupled to the STM tips. As a result, a gate invariance feature emerges: the Fano profile of the transmittance rises as an invariant quantity depending upon the STM tips Fermi energy, due to the symmetric swap in the gate potential of the AFM tip.

  14. Measurement of diffusion length and surface recombination velocity in Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) and Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinden, Pierre; Van de Wiele, Fernand

    1985-03-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cells by means of a simple linear regression on experimental quantum efficiency values versus the inverse of the absorption coefficient. This method is extended to the case of Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells. Under certain conditions, the real or the effective surface recombination velocity may be measured.

  15. Direct determination of minority carrier diffusion lengths at axial GaAs nanowire p-n junctions.

    PubMed

    Gutsche, Christoph; Niepelt, Raphael; Gnauck, Martin; Lysov, Andrey; Prost, Werner; Ronning, Carsten; Tegude, Franz-Josef

    2012-03-14

    Axial GaAs nanowire p-n diodes, possibly one of the core elements of future nanowire solar cells and light emitters, were grown via the Au-assisted vapor-liquid-solid mode, contacted by electron beam lithography, and investigated using electron beam induced current measurements. The minority carrier diffusion lengths and dynamics of both, electrons and holes, were determined directly at the vicinity of the p-n junction. The generated photocurrent shows an exponential decay on both sides of the junction and the extracted diffusion lengths are about 1 order of magnitude lower compared to bulk material due to surface recombination. Moreover, the observed strong diameter-dependence is well in line with the surface-to-volume ratio of semiconductor nanowires. Estimating the surface recombination velocities clearly indicates a nonabrupt p-n junction, which is in essential agreement with the model of delayed dopant incorporation in the Au-assisted vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Surface passivation using ammonium sulfide effectively reduces the surface recombination and thus leads to higher minority carrier diffusion lengths.

  16. Study on flow instability in a diffuser with swirling flow under several conditions of pipe length and swirl intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaka, R.; Nakashima, T.; Miyagawa, K.

    2016-11-01

    A swirling flow in a diffuser such as a draft tube of a hydro turbine may induce the flow instabilities accompanied by pressure fluctuations known as vortex rope behaviour and cavitation surge. Cavitation surge is the self-excited oscillation, which induces the large flow rate fluctuation that results from the change of the cavity volume. In this research, the investigation of the effect of the pipe length and the swirl intensity on the flow instabilities in a diffuser was performed by experiments and numerical analyses using the draft tube component experimental facility. The length of the pipe was modified by up to about 25 times as long as the diameter of the throat in order to validate the one-dimensional analyses. In addition, the swirl intensity was changed by replacing another swirl generator. The frequency of cavitation surge was changed with regard to the swirl intensity as the one-dimensional analyses in the previous study has predicted it. Unsteady numerical simulations of the swirling flow with cavitation in the diffuser was performed. The results of experiments and numerical analyses correspond qualitatively with the result of the one-dimensional analyses, which suggested that the coupling with the experiments, CFD analyses and the one-dimensional analyses is the more effective way in order to predict the flow instabilities in the diffuser.

  17. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Measurements of the Membrane Protein TetA in Escherichia coli Suggest Rapid Diffusion at Short Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Chow, David; Guo, Lin; Gai, Feng; Goulian, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Structural inhomogeneities in biomembranes can lead to complex diffusive behavior of membrane proteins that depend on the length or time scales that are probed. This effect is well studied in eukaryotic cells, but has been explored only recently in bacteria. Here we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study diffusion of the membrane protein TetA-YFP in E. coli. We find that the diffusion constant determined from FRAP is comparable to other reports of inner membrane protein diffusion constants in E. coli. However, FCS, which probes diffusion on shorter length scales, gives a value that is almost two orders of magnitude higher and is comparable to lipid diffusion constants. These results suggest there is a population of TetA-YFP molecules in the membrane that move rapidly over short length scales (∼ 400 nm) but move significantly more slowly over the longer length scales probed by FRAP. PMID:23119068

  18. Amide Proton Transfer Imaging of Diffuse Gliomas: Effect of Saturation Pulse Length in Parallel Transmission-Based Technique

    PubMed Central

    Hiwatashi, Akio; Keupp, Jochen; Yamashita, Koji; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yoneyama, Masami; Kruiskamp, Marijn J.; Sagiyama, Koji; Takahashi, Masaya; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the dependence of saturation pulse length on APT imaging of diffuse gliomas using a parallel transmission-based technique. Twenty-two patients with diffuse gliomas (9 low-grade gliomas, LGGs, and 13 high-grade gliomas, HGGs) were included in the study. APT imaging was conducted at 3T with a 2-channel parallel transmission scheme using three different saturation pulse lengths (0.5 s, 1.0 s, 2.0 s). The 2D fast spin-echo sequence was used for imaging. Z-spectrum was obtained at 25 frequency offsets from -6 to +6 ppm (step 0.5 ppm). A point-by-point B0 correction was performed with a B0 map. Magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) and ΔMTRasym (contrast between tumor and normal white matter) at 3.5 ppm were compared among different saturation lengths. A significant increase in MTRasym (3.5 ppm) of HGG was found when the length of saturation pulse became longer (3.09 ± 0.54% at 0.5 s, 3.83 ± 0.67% at 1 s, 4.12 ± 0.97% at 2 s), but MTRasym (3.5 ppm) was not different among the saturation lengths in LGG. ΔMTRasym (3.5 ppm) increased with the length of saturation pulse in both LGG (0.48 ± 0.56% at 0.5 s, 1.28 ± 0.56% at 1 s, 1.88 ± 0.56% at 2 s and HGG (1.72 ± 0.54% at 0.5 s, 2.90 ± 0.49% at 1 s, 3.83 ± 0.88% at 2 s). In both LGG and HGG, APT-weighted contrast was enhanced with the use of longer saturation pulses. PMID:27227746

  19. Derivation of effective fission gas diffusivities in UO2 from lower length scale simulations and implementation of fission gas diffusion models in BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar; Pastore, Giovanni; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Perriot, Romain Thibault; Tonks, Michael; Stanek, Christopher Richard

    2014-11-07

    This report summarizes the development of new fission gas diffusion models from lower length scale simulations and assessment of these models in terms of annealing experiments and fission gas release simulations using the BISON fuel performance code. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe) in UO2 were derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. The importance of the large XeU3O cluster (a Xe atom in a uranium + oxygen vacancy trap site with two bound uranium vacancies) is emphasized, which is a consequence of its high mobility and stability. These models were implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe diffusivities for various irradiation conditions. The effective diffusivities were used in BISON to calculate fission gas release for a number of test cases. The results are assessed against experimental data and future directions for research are outlined based on the conclusions.

  20. Migration of Carbon Adatoms on the Surface of Charged SWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Longtao; Krstic, Predrag; Kaganovich, Igor

    2016-10-01

    In volume plasma, the growth of SWCNT from a transition metal catalyst could be enhanced by incoming carbon flux on SWCNT surface, which is generated by the adsorption and migration of carbon adatoms on SWCNT surface. In addition, the nanotube can be charged by the irradiation of plasma particles. How this charging effect will influence the adsorption and migration behavior of carbon atom has not been revealed. Using Density Functional Theory, Nudged Elastic Band and Kinetic Monte Carlo method, we found equilibrium sites, vibrational frequency, adsorption energy, most probable pathways for migration of adatoms, and the barrier sizes along these pathways. The metallic (5,5) SWCNT can support a fast migration of the carbon adatom along a straight path with low barriers, which is further enhanced by the presence of negative charge on SWCNT. The enhancement is contributed by the higher adsorption energy and thence longer lifetime of adatom on the charged SWCNT surface. The lifetime and migration distance of adatom increase by three and two orders of magnitude, respectively, as shown by Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. These results support the surface migration mechanism of SWCNT growth in plasma environment. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Material Sciences and Engineering Division.

  1. Binding of an adatom to a simple metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, H. B.; Turk, L. A.; White, W. W., III

    1975-01-01

    The density functional formalism of Hohenberg and Kohn is used to investigate the energies, charge densities and forces which hold an adatom on the surface of a simple metal. The valence wavefunction of the adatom is fitted to the Herman-Skillman solutions at large distance and is simplified somewhat in the core region. The field of the ion is represented by the Ashcroft pseudopotential. For the metal the jellium model is used. Detailed calculations are carried out for a sodium adatom on a sodium surface. Simply juxtaposing adatom and surface gives a binding energy of about 1/3 eV. This value is approximately twice the surface energy per atom in the close-packed plane. Charge redistributions as determined variationally increase the binding energy by about 10%. The equilibrium distance for the adatom turns out to be 1.66 A from the surface, as compared with 1.52 A, the observed value for one-half the distance between the close-packed planes.

  2. Effect of Crystal Defects on Minority Carrier Diffusion Length in 6H SiC Measured Using the Electron Beam Induced Current Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1997-01-01

    We report values of minority carrier diffusion length in n-type 6H SiC measured using a planar Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) method. Values of hole diffusion length in defect free regions of n-type 6H SiC, with a doping concentration of 1.7El7 1/cu cm, ranged from 1.46 microns to 0.68 microns. We next introduce a novel variation of the planar method used above. This 'planar mapping' technique measured diffusion length along a linescan creating a map of diffusion length versus position. This map is then overlaid onto the EBIC image of the corresponding linescan, allowing direct visualization of the effect of defects on minority carrier diffusion length. Measurements of the above n-type 6H SiC resulted in values of hole diffusion length ranging from 1.2 micron in defect free regions to below 0.1 gm at the center of large defects. In addition, measurements on p-type 6H SiC resulted in electron diffusion lengths ranging from 1.42 micron to 0.8 micron.

  3. Diffusion length of photo-generated charge carriers in layers and powders of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Th.; Lang, F.; Shargaieva, O.; Rappich, J.; Nickel, N. H.; Unger, E.; Rech, B.

    2016-08-01

    The diffusion or transport lengths of photo-generated charge carriers in CH3NH3PbI3 layers (thickness up to 1 μm) and powders have been directly measured with high accuracy by modulated surface photovoltage after Goodman. The values of the diffusion lengths of photo-generated charge carriers ranged from 200 nm to tenths of μm. In thin CH3NH3PbI3 layers, the transport lengths corresponded to the layer thickness whereas in thicker layers and in crystallites of CH3NH3PbI3 powders the grain size limited the diffusion length. For grains, the diffusion length of photo-generated charge carriers depended on the measurement conditions.

  4. Diffusion-coupled molecular assembly: structuring of coordination polymers across multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Kenji; Reboul, Julien; Morone, Nobuhiro; Heuser, John E; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2014-10-22

    Porous coordination polymers (PCPs) are an intriguing class of molecular-based materials because of the designability of framework scaffolds, pore sizes and pore surface functionalities. Besides the structural designability at the molecular scale, the structuring of PCPs into mesoscopic/macroscopic morphologies has attracted much attention due to the significance for the practical applications. The structuring of PCPs at the mesoscopic/macroscopic scale has been so far demonstrated by the spatial localization of coordination reactions on the surface of templates or at the phase boundaries. However, these methodologies have never been applied to the fabrication of solid-solution or multivariate metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), in which multiple components are homogeneously mixed. Herein, we demonstrate the structuring of a box-type superstructure comprising of a solid-solution PCP by integrating a bidirectional diffusion of multiple organic ligands into molecular assembly. The parent crystals of [Zn2(ndc)2(bpy)]n were placed in the DMF solution of additional organic component of H2bdc, and the temperature was rapidly elevated up to 80 °C (ndc = 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate, bpy = 4,4'-bipyridyl, bdc = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate). The dissolution of the parent crystals induced the outward diffusion of components; contrariwise, the accumulation of the other organic ligand of H2bdc induced the inward diffusion toward the surface of the parent crystals. This bidirectional diffusion of multiple components spatially localized the recrystallization at the surface of cuboid parent crystals; therefore, the nanocrystals of a solid-solution PCP ([Zn2(bdc)1.5(ndc)0.5(bpy)]n) were organized into a mesoscopic box superstructure. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the box superstructures enhanced the mass transfer kinetics for the separation of hydrocarbons.

  5. Migration characterization of Ga and In adatoms on dielectric surface in selective MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Jie; Han, Xiao-Biao; Lin, Jia-Li; Hu, Guo-Heng; Liu, Ming-Gang; Yang, Yi-Bin; Chen, Jie; Wu, Zhi-Sheng; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Bai-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Migration characterizations of Ga and In adatoms on the dielectric surface in selective metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) were investigated. In the typical MOVPE environment, the selectivity of growth is preserved for GaN, and the growth rate of GaN micro-pyramids is sensitive to the period of the patterned SiO2 mask. A surface migration induced model was adopted to figure out the effective migration length of Ga adatoms on the dielectric surface. Different from the growth of GaN, the selective area growth of InGaN on the patterned template would induce the deposition of InGaN polycrystalline particles on the patterned SiO2 mask with a long period. It was demonstrated with a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy that the In adatoms exhibit a shorter migration length on the dielectric surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274039 and 51177175), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB301903), the Ph.D. Programs Foundation of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20110171110021), the International Sci. & Tech. Collaboration Program of China (Grant No. 2012DFG52260), the International Sci. & Tech. Collaboration Program of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B051000041), the Science and Technology Plan of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B010401013), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA032606), and the Opened Fund of the State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, China (Grant No. IOSKL2014KF17).

  6. Electrochemical measurement of lateral diffusion coefficients of ubiquinones and plastoquinones of various isoprenoid chain lengths incorporated in model bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Marchal, D; Boireau, W; Laval, J M; Moiroux, J; Bourdillon, C

    1998-01-01

    The long-range diffusion coefficients of isoprenoid quinones in a model of lipid bilayer were determined by a method avoiding fluorescent probe labeling of the molecules. The quinone electron carriers were incorporated in supported dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine layers at physiological molar fractions (<3 mol%). The elaborate bilayer template contained a built-in gold electrode at which the redox molecules solubilized in the bilayer were reduced or oxidized. The lateral diffusion coefficient of a natural quinone like UQ10 or PQ9 was 2.0 +/- 0.4 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) at 30 degrees C, two to three times smaller than the diffusion coefficient of a lipid analog in the same artificial bilayer. The lateral mobilities of the oxidized or reduced forms could be determined separately and were found to be identical in the 4-13 pH range. For a series of isoprenoid quinones, UQ2 or PQ2 to UQ10, the diffusion coefficient exhibited a marked dependence on the length of the isoprenoid chain. The data fit very well the quantitative behavior predicted by a continuum fluid model in which the isoprenoid chains are taken as rigid particles moving in the less viscous part of the bilayer and rubbing against the more viscous layers of lipid heads. The present study supports the concept of a homogeneous pool of quinone located in the less viscous region of the bilayer. PMID:9545054

  7. Tracer counterpermeation analysis of diffusivity in finite-length nanopores with and without single-file dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Ackerman, David M.; Evans, James W.

    2017-01-19

    Here, we perform a tracer counterpermeation (TCP) analysis for a stochastic model of diffusive transport through a narrow linear pore where passing of species within the pore is inhibited or even excluded (single-file diffusion). TCP involves differently labeled but otherwise identical particles from two decoupled infinite reservoirs adsorbing into opposite ends of the pore, and desorbing from either end. In addition to transient behavior, we assess steady-state concentration profiles, spatial correlations, particle number fluctuations, and diffusion fluxes through the pore. From the profiles and fluxes, we determine a generalized tracer diffusion coefficient Dtr(x), at various positions x within the pore.more » Dtr(x) has a plateau value in the pore center scaling inversely with the pore length, but it is enhanced near the pore openings. The latter feature reflects the effect of fluctuations in adsorption and desorption, and it is also associated with a nontrivial scaling of the concentration profiles near the pore openings.« less

  8. Diffusion length variation and proton damage coefficients for InP/In(x)Ga(1-x)As/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of lighter, mechanically strong and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5 and 3 MeV proton irradiations are explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence is calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient K(L) is plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  9. Measurement of N-Type 6H SiC Minority-Carrier Diffusion Lengths by Electron Bombardment of Schottky Barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, S. M.; Tabib-Azar, M.; Balley, S.; Rybickid, G.; Neudeck, P.; Raffaelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    Minority-Carrier diffusion lengths of n-type 6H-SiC were measured using the electron-beam induced current (EBIC) technique. Experimental values of primary beam current, EBIC, and beam voltage were obtained for a variety of SIC samples. This data was used to calculate experimental diode efficiency vs. beam voltage curves. These curves were fit to theoretically calculated efficiency curves, and the diffusion length and metal layer thickness were extracted. The hole diffusion length in n-6H SiC ranged from 0.93 +/- 0.15 microns.

  10. Electron beam induced current study of minority carrier diffusion length in homoepitaxial GaN (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talin, A. Alec; Collins, Kimberlee C.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Léonard, François

    2016-09-01

    GaN is a promising material for a range of high power, high frequency, and high temperature device applications. The wide bandgap of GaN leads to high breakdown voltages and low switching losses. Recently, large HVPE grown GaN substrates have become available for homoepitaxial growth leading to 103 reduction in dislocation density compared to similarly grown heteroepitaxial films. Device performance, however, is ultimately limited by the transport properties of minority carriers. Measured values for minority carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes in GaN vary widely1-3, and a recent report suggests flaws in the commonly adopted electron beam induced current (EBIC) method in the planar-collection geometry.1 Here we report on EBIC measurements performed on 8 micrometer thick GaN grown by MOCVD on 2 inch GaN substrates with a n-type dopant density of 5×1016 cm-3. We determine the carrier diffusion length using both the conventional EBIC method by varying the electron beam-to-contact lateral distance as well as by varying the electron beam penetration depth and find the extracted values differ by 10×, with the latter technique yielding the lower diffusion length. We rationalize these results in light of other materials characteristics including Raman and photoluminescence. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length and edge surface-recombination velocity in InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Hakimzadeh, Roshanak

    1993-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to measure the electron (minority carrier) diffusion length (L(sub n)) and the edge surface-recombination velocity (V(sub s)) in zinc-doped Czochralski-grown InP wafers. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) profiles were obtained in specimens containing a Schottky barrier perpendicular to the scanned (edge) surface. An independent technique was used to measure V(sub s), and these values were used in a theoretical expression for normalized EBIC. A fit of the experimental data with this expression enabled us to determine L(sub n).

  12. Reaction-Diffusion Model Simulations relevant to Modified Taylor-Couette Flow in Systems of Varying Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halmstad, Andrew; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Previously, we have observed a period-doubling cascade to chaos in Modified Taylor-Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry. Such behavior had been predicted by The Reaction-Diffusion model simulations. The chaotic formation of Taylor-Vortex pair formation was restricted to a very narrow band about the waist of the hourglass. It was suggested that with increasing lengths of systems, the chaotic region would expand. We present a battery of simulations to determine the variation of the size of the chaotic region with length, seeking the transition to spatio- temporal chaos. Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997). H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991).

  13. Identifying ergodicity breaking for fractional anomalous diffusion: Criteria for minimal trajectory length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch-Olszewska, Hanna; Sikora, Grzegorz; Janczura, Joanna; Weron, Aleksander

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study ergodic properties of α -stable autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average (ARFIMA) processes which form a large class of anomalous diffusions. A crucial practical question is how long trajectories one needs to observe in an experiment in order to claim that the analyzed data are ergodic or not. This will be solved by checking the asymptotic convergence to 0 of the empirical estimator F (n ) for the dynamical functional D (n ) defined as a Fourier transform of the n -lag increments of the ARFIMA process. Moreover, we introduce more flexible concept of the ɛ -ergodicity.

  14. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabishchenkova, A. G. Otrokov, M. M.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2015-09-15

    Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) step surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has been performed for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of diffusion of adatoms on the surface and in van der Waals gaps near steps, as well as the estimate of diffusion lengths, have shown that efficient intercalation through steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can occur before intercalation. The results have been discussed in the context of existing experimental data.

  15. Zero energy modes in a superconductor with ferromagnetic adatom chains and quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čadež, Tilen; Sacramento, Pedro D.

    2016-12-01

    We study Majorana zero energy modes (MZEM) that occur in an s-wave superconducting surface, at the ends of a ferromagnetic (FM) chain of adatoms, in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) considering both non self-consistent and self-consistent superconducting order. We find that in the self-consistent solution, the average superconducting gap function over the adatom sites has a discontinuous drop with increasing exchange interaction at the same critical value where the topological phase transition occurs. We also study the MZEM for both treatments of superconducting order and find that the decay length is a linear function of the exchange coupling strength, chemical potential and superconducting order. For wider FM chains the MZEM occur at smaller exchange couplings and the slope of the decay length as a function of exchange coupling grows with chain width. Thus we suggest experimental detection of different delocalization of MZEM in chains of varying widths. We discuss similarities and differences between the MZEM for the two treatments of the superconducting order.

  16. Terahertz Conductivity within Colloidal CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals: Remarkably High Carrier Mobilities and Large Diffusion Lengths.

    PubMed

    Yettapu, Gurivi Reddy; Talukdar, Debnath; Sarkar, Sohini; Swarnkar, Abhishek; Nag, Angshuman; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Mandal, Pankaj

    2016-08-10

    Colloidal CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as an excellent light emitting material in last one year. Using time domain and time-resolved THz spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we establish 3-fold free carrier recombination mechanism, namely, nonradiative Auger, bimolecular electron-hole recombination, and inefficient trap-assisted recombination in 11 nm sized colloidal CsPbBr3 NCs. Our results confirm a negligible influence of surface defects in trapping charge carriers, which in turn results into desirable intrinsic transport properties, from the perspective of device applications, such as remarkably high carrier mobility (∼4500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), large diffusion length (>9.2 μm), and high luminescence quantum yield (80%). Despite being solution processed and possessing a large surface to volume ratio, this combination of high carrier mobility and diffusion length, along with nearly ideal photoluminescence quantum yield, is unique compared to any other colloidal quantum dot system.

  17. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, E. Arciprete, F.; Latini, V.; Latini, S.; Patella, F.; Magri, R.

    2014-09-15

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surface occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.

  18. Measuring the Minority-Carrier Diffusion Length of n-Type In0.53Ga0.47As Epilayers Using Surface Photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Tao; Li, Xue; Shao, Xiumei; Pavelka, Tibor; Huang, Li; Gong, Haimei

    2017-04-01

    We report measurements of the minority-carrier diffusion length of n-type In0.53Ga0.47As epilayer samples using the surface photovoltage (SPV) method, and the minority-carrier lifetime of the same samples obtained by the microwave photoconductivity decay ( μ-PCD) method. The minority-carrier diffusion length was determined from the surface photovoltage and the optical absorption coefficient of the material. By scanning the SPV probe over the sample, the difference in surface photovoltage could be measured, as well as enabling surface photovoltage mapping. Samples having two different doping concentrations were used: sample A with 3 × 1016 cm-3 and sample B with 1 × 1016 cm-3, having minority-carrier diffusion length at room temperature of 5.59 μm and 6.3 μm, respectively. Meanwhile, sample uniformity was investigated using SPV for the first time. Lifetime measurements were performed on the n-type In0.53Ga0.47As epilayer samples using the μ-PCD technique, obtaining the minority-carrier diffusion length indirectly. Comparison of the minority-carrier diffusion length values obtained from SPV versus μ-PCD showed good consistency. Therefore, the presented method could be useful for characterization of the minority-carrier diffusion length of wafers.

  19. Reduced work function of graphene by metal adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legesse, Merid; Mellouhi, Fedwa El; Bentria, El Tayeb; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the work function of graphene doped by different metal adatoms and at different concentrations is investigated. Density functional theory is used to maximize the reduction of the work function. In general, the work function drops significantly before reaching saturation. For example in the case of Cs doping, the work function saturates at 2.05 eV with a modest 8% doping. The adsorption of different concentrations on metal adatoms on graphene is also studied. Our calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. The transfer of electron from metallic dopants to the graphene for all the studied systems shifts the Fermi energy levels above the Dirac-point and the doped graphenes become metallic. The value of Fermi energy shifts depends on the type of metallic dopants and its concentrations. A detail analysis of the electronic structure in terms of band structure and density of states, absorption energy, and charge transfer for each adatom-graphene system is presented.

  20. Illustrative view on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of adatoms and monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šipr, O.; Mankovsky, S.; Polesya, S.; Bornemann, S.; Minár, J.; Ebert, H.

    2016-05-01

    Although it has been known for decades that magnetocrystalline anisotropy is linked to spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the mechanism of how it arises for specific systems is still a subject of debate. We focused on finding markers of SOC in the density of states (DOS) and on using them to understand the source of magnetocrystalline anisotropy for the case of adatoms and monolayers. Fully relativistic ab initio Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green's-function calculations were performed for Fe, Co, and Ni adatoms and monolayers on Au(111) to investigate changes in the orbital-resolved DOS due to a rotation of magnetization. In this way, one can see that a significant contribution to magnetocrystalline anisotropy for adatoms comes from pushing the SOC-split states above or below the Fermi level. As a result of this, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy depends crucially on the position of the energy bands of the adatom with respect to the Fermi level of the substrate. This view is supported by model crystal-field Hamiltonian calculations.

  1. Average Path-Length Parameter of Diffuse Light in Scattering Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arancibia-Bulnes, Camilo A.; Ruiz-Suárez, Jesús C.

    1999-03-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to study in detail the propagation of light in a plane-parallel medium containing scattering particles. In particular, we compute the forward and backward average path-length parameters (FAPP and BAPP, respectively) of four-flux radiative transfer models as functions of the optical depth. Strong dependence on the single scattering albedo and phase function asymmetry is found for both quantities. In general the values of the FAPP decrease with increasing absorption, whereas the opposite occurs for the BAPP. A similar effect is produced when changing from isotropic phase functions to phase functions with a large asymmetry in the forward direction. We present analytical results for the asymptotic values of the FAPP and BAPP as functions of albedo for the particular case of isotropic scattering. Our results differ markedly from the predictions obtained recently with two multiple-scattering models by Vargas and Niklasson J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 14, 2243 (1997); Appl. Opt. 36, 3735 (1997) . The differences found point out the intrinsic limitations of these models.

  2. Single Silver Adatoms on Nanostructured Manganese Oxide Surfaces: Boosting Oxygen Activation for Benzene Abatement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Huang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Meijuan; Ma, Zhen; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2017-02-21

    The involvement of a great amount of active oxygen species is a crucial requirement for catalytic oxidation of benzene, because complete mineralization of one benzene molecule needs 15 oxygen atoms. Here, we disperse single silver adatoms on nanostructured hollandite manganese oxide (HMO) surfaces by using a thermal diffusion method. The single-atom silver catalyst (Ag1/HMO) shows high catalytic activity in benzene oxidation, and 100% conversion is achieved at 220 °C at a high space velocity of 23 000 h(-1). The Mars-van Krevelen mechanism is valid in our case as the reaction orders for both benzene and O2 approach one, according to reaction kinetics data. Data from H2 temperature-programmed reduction and O core-level X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) reveal that Ag1/HMO possesses a great amount of active surface lattice oxygen available for benzene oxidation. Valence-band XPS and density functional theoretical calculations demonstrate that the single Ag adatoms have the upshifted 4d orbitals, thus facilitating the activation of gaseous oxygen. Therefore, the excellent activation abilities of Ag1/HMO toward both surface lattice oxygen and gaseous oxygen account for its high catalytic activity in benzene oxidation. This work may assist with the rational design of efficient metal-oxide catalysts for the abatement of volatile organic compounds such as benzene.

  3. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadi, V. Nihtianov, S.

    2016-02-15

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, L{sub B}, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is reported. The value of L{sub B} is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and confirmed analytically in the boron deposition temperature range from 700 °C down to 400 °C. For this temperature range the local loading effect of the boron deposition is investigated on the micro scale. A L{sub B} = 2.2 mm was determined for boron deposition at 700 °C, while a L{sub B} of less than 1 mm was observed at temperatures lower than 500 °C.

  4. Spin Torque Study of the Spin Hall Conductivity and Spin Diffusion Length in Platinum Thin Films with Varying Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh-Hai; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    We report measurements of the spin torque efficiencies in perpendicularly magnetized Pt /Co bilayers where the Pt resistivity ρPt is strongly dependent on thickness tPt . The dampinglike spin Hall torque efficiency per unit current density ξDLj varies significantly with tPt , exhibiting a peak value ξDLj=0.12 at tPt=2.8 - 3.9 nm . In contrast, ξDLj/ρPt increases monotonically with tPt and saturates for tPt>5 nm , consistent with an intrinsic spin Hall effect mechanism, in which ξDLj is enhanced by an increase in ρPt . Assuming the Elliott-Yafet spin scattering mechanism dominates, we estimate that the spin diffusion length λs=(0.77 ±0.08 )×10-15 Ω .m2/ρPt .

  5. Determination of minority carrier diffusion length of sprayed-Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courel, Maykel; Valencia-Resendiz, E.; Pulgarín-Agudelo, F. A.; Vigil-Galán, O.

    2016-04-01

    Despite Cu2ZnSnS4(CZTS) is a potential candidate for solar cell applications, so far, low efficiency values have been reported. In particular, for spray-deposited CZTS, efficiencies lower than 2% are commonly achieved. It is well known that one of the most important parameters governing solar cell performance is minority carrier diffusion length (Ln). In this work, CZTS thin film solar cells with different compositional ratios are fabricated in order to study its impact on Ln values. The Ln parameter is calculated for sprayed-CZTS layers using external quantum efficiency measurements in conjunction with optical absorption coefficient versus wavelength measurements - for the first time. Values in the range of 0.11-0.17 μm are obtained emphasizing the need for improving sprayed-CZTS crystalline quality.

  6. Temperature dependence of the magnon spin diffusion length and magnon spin conductivity in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, L. J.; Shan, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-11-01

    We present a systematic study of the temperature dependence of diffusive magnon spin transport using nonlocal devices fabricated on a 210-nm yttrium iron garnet film on a gadolinium gallium garnet substrate. In our measurements, we detect spin signals arising from electrical and thermal magnon generation, and we directly extract the magnon spin diffusion length λm for temperatures from 2 to 293 K. Values of λm obtained from electrical and thermal generation agree within the experimental error with λm=9.6 ±0.9 μ m at room temperature to a minimum of λm=5.5 ±0.7 μ m at 30 K. Using a two-dimensional finite element model to fit the data obtained for electrical magnon generation we extract the magnon spin conductivity σm as a function of temperature, which is reduced from σm=3.7 ±0.3 ×105S /m at room temperature to σm=0.9 ±0.6 ×104S /m at 5 K. Finally, we observe an enhancement of the signal originating from thermally generated magnons for low temperatures where a maximum is observed around T =7 K . An explanation for this low-temperature enhancement is however still missing and requires additional investigation.

  7. Investigation of adatom adsorption on single layer buckled germanium selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkın, H.; Aktürk, E.

    2016-12-01

    A recent study of Hu et al. [1] predicted that 2D single layer of asymmetric washboard germanium selenide is found to be stable and display semiconducting properties. Motivating from this study, we have shown that another phase, which is 2D buckled honeycomb germanium selenide, is also stable. This phase exhibits semiconducting behavior with a band gap of 2.29 eV. Furthermore, on the basis of the first principles, spin-polarized density functional calculations, we investigate the effect of selected adatoms adsorption on the b-GeSe single layer. The adatoms Se, Ge, S, Si, C, Br and P are chemisorbed with significant binding energy where this effects modify the electronic structure of the single layer buckled GeSe locally by tuning the band gap. Net integer magnetic moment can be achieved and b-GeSe attains half metallicity through the adsorption of Si, Ge, P and Br.

  8. Sputtering at grazing ion incidence: Influence of adatom islands

    SciTech Connect

    Rosandi, Yudi; Redinger, Alex; Michely, Thomas; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2010-09-15

    When energetic ions impinge at grazing incidence onto an atomically flat terrace, they will not sputter. However, when adatom islands (containing N atoms) are deposited on the surface, they induce sputtering. We investigate this effect for the specific case of 83 deg. -incident 5 keV Ar ions on a Pt (111) surface by means of molecular-dynamics simulation and experiment. We find that - for constant coverage {Theta} - the sputter yield has a maximum at island sizes of N congruent with 10-20. A detailed picture explaining the decline of the sputter yield toward larger and smaller island sizes is worked out. Our simulation results are compared with dedicated sputtering experiments, in which a coverage of {Theta}=0.09 of Pt adatoms are deposited onto the Pt (111) surface and form islands with a broad distribution around a most probable size of N congruent with 20.

  9. Electron Doping of Ultrathin Black Phosphorus with Cu Adatoms.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Steven P; Doganov, Rostislav A; Seixas, Leandro; Carvalho, Alexandra; Tan, Jun You; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yakovlev, Nikolai; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2016-04-13

    Few-layer black phosphorus is a monatomic two-dimensional crystal with a direct band gap that has high carrier mobility for both holes and electrons. Similarly to other layered atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is sensitive to surface impurities, adsorbates, and adatoms. Here we study the effect of Cu adatoms onto few-layer black phosphorus by characterizing few-layer black phosphorus field effect devices and by performing first-principles calculations. We find that the addition of Cu adatoms can be used to controllably n-dope few layer black phosphorus, thereby lowering the threshold voltage for n-type conduction without degrading the transport properties. We demonstrate a scalable 2D material-based complementary inverter which utilizes a boron nitride gate dielectric, a graphite gate, and a single bP crystal for both the p- and n-channels. The inverter operates at matched input and output voltages, exhibits a gain of 46, and does not require different contact metals or local electrostatic gating.

  10. Density functional calculation of transition metal adatom adsorption on graphene.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuliang; Yuan, Jianmei; Zhong, Jianxin

    2008-03-19

    The functionalization of graphene (a single graphite layer) by the addition of transition metal atoms of Mn, Fe and Co to its surface has been investigated computationally using density functional theory. In the calculation, the graphene surface supercell was constructed from a single layer of graphite (0001) surface separated by vertical vacuum layers 2 nm thick. We found that the center of the hexagonal ring formed by carbon from graphene is the most stable site for Mn, Fe, Co to stay after optimization. The calculated spin-polarized band structures of the graphene encapsulating the Mn adatom indicate that the conduction bands are modified and move down due to the coupling between the Mn atom and graphene. For Fe adsorbed on the graphene surface, it is semi-half-metallic, and the spin polarization P is found to be 100%. The system of Co adatom on graphene exhibits metallic electronic structure due to the density of states (DOS) peak at the band center with both majority and minority spins. Local density of states analyses indicate a larger promotion of 4s electrons into the 3d state in Fe and Co, resulting in lower local moments compared to an Mn adatom on the graphite surface.

  11. Zero-Point Spin-Fluctuations of Single Adatoms.

    PubMed

    Ibañez-Azpiroz, Julen; Dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Blügel, Stefan; Lounis, Samir

    2016-07-13

    Stabilizing the magnetic signal of single adatoms is a crucial step toward their successful usage in widespread technological applications such as high-density magnetic data storage devices. The quantum mechanical nature of these tiny objects, however, introduces intrinsic zero-point spin-fluctuations that tend to destabilize the local magnetic moment of interest by dwindling the magnetic anisotropy potential barrier even at absolute zero temperature. Here, we elucidate the origins and quantify the effect of the fundamental ingredients determining the magnitude of the fluctuations, namely, the (i) local magnetic moment, (ii) spin-orbit coupling, and (iii) electron-hole Stoner excitations. Based on a systematic first-principles study of 3d and 4d adatoms, we demonstrate that the transverse contribution of the fluctuations is comparable in size to the magnetic moment itself, leading to a remarkable ≳50% reduction of the magnetic anisotropy energy. Our analysis gives rise to a comprehensible diagram relating the fluctuation magnitude to characteristic features of adatoms, providing practical guidelines for designing magnetically stable nanomagnets with minimal quantum fluctuations.

  12. Determination of charge-carrier diffusion length in the photosensing layer of HgCdTe n-on-p photovoltaic infrared focal plane array detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnyakov, A. V.; Stuchinsky, V. A. Brunev, D. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2014-03-03

    In the present paper, we propose a method for evaluating the bulk diffusion length of minority charge carriers in the photosensing layer of photovoltaic focal plane array (FPA) photodetectors. The method is based on scanning a strip-shaped illumination spot with one of the detector diodes at a low level of photocurrents j{sub ph} being registered; such scanning provides data for subsequent analysis of measured spot-scan profiles within a simple diffusion model. The asymptotic behavior of the effective (at j{sub ph} ≠ 0) charge-carrier diffusion length l{sub d} {sub eff} as a function of j{sub ph} for j{sub ph} → 0 inferred from our experimental data proved to be consistent with the behavior of l{sub d} {sub eff} vs j{sub ph} as predicted by the model, while the obtained values of the bulk diffusion length of minority carriers (electrons) in the p-HgCdTe film of investigated HgCdTe n-on-p FPA photodetectors were found to be in a good agreement with the previously reported carrier diffusion-length values for HgCdTe.

  13. Determination of charge-carrier diffusion length in the photosensing layer of HgCdTe n-on-p photovoltaic infrared focal plane array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, A. V.; Stuchinsky, V. A.; Brunev, D. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2014-03-01

    In the present paper, we propose a method for evaluating the bulk diffusion length of minority charge carriers in the photosensing layer of photovoltaic focal plane array (FPA) photodetectors. The method is based on scanning a strip-shaped illumination spot with one of the detector diodes at a low level of photocurrents jph being registered; such scanning provides data for subsequent analysis of measured spot-scan profiles within a simple diffusion model. The asymptotic behavior of the effective (at jph ≠ 0) charge-carrier diffusion length ld eff as a function of jph for jph → 0 inferred from our experimental data proved to be consistent with the behavior of ld eff vs jph as predicted by the model, while the obtained values of the bulk diffusion length of minority carriers (electrons) in the p-HgCdTe film of investigated HgCdTe n-on-p FPA photodetectors were found to be in a good agreement with the previously reported carrier diffusion-length values for HgCdTe.

  14. Ferromagnetism, adatom effect, and edge reconstruction induced by Klein boundary in graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Zhi-qiang; Shi, Jun-jie; Zhang, Min

    2013-05-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic characteristics of Klein graphene nanoribbons (KGNRs), as observed by Suenaga and Koshino [K. Suenaga and M. Koshino, Nature 468, 1088 (2010)], are investigated using first-principles calculations. We find three new characteristics induced by the Klein boundary. First, the localized edge states in the KGNRs have a ferromagnetic coupling rather than the antiferromagnetic coupling of the zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs). Lieb's theorem is no longer applicable in the KGNRs. Second, the marginal single carbon adatom of the ZGNRs can destroy the edge states nearby. The edge states can recover if the length of the zigzag chains is equal to or greater than five times that of the lattice constant. Finally, we show that the pentagon-heptagon edge can be induced from the Klein boundary.

  15. Electronic Nature of Step-edge Barriers Against Adatom Descent on Transition-metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yina; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    The activation barriers against adatom migration on terraces and across steps play an essential role in determining the growth morphology of surfaces, interfaces, and thin lms. By studying a series of adatoms on representative transition metal surfaces through extensive rst-principles calculations, we establish a clear correlation between the preferred mechanism and activation energy for adatom descent at a step and the relative degree of electronic shell lling between the adatom and the substrate. We also nd an approximate linear relation between the adatom hopping barriers at step edges and the adatom-surface bonding strength. These results may serve as simple guiding rules for predicting the precise atomic nature of surface morphologies in heteroepitaxial growth such as nanowires.

  16. Silicon adatom switching and manipulation on Si(111)-7 x 7.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, Keisuke; Luce, Alexander; Fujita, Daisuke

    2010-01-29

    We report on a multiple-state switching behavior in the tip height or tunneling current of scanning tunneling microscopy on the Si(111)-7 x 7 surface. This switching is caused by displacement of silicon adatoms under the influence of energetic tunneling electrons. When the tip is fixed over a center adatom, five well-defined levels appear in the measured tip height and tunneling current. These levels are attributed to different electronic structures, depending on the configuration of the center adatoms in the unit cell. We also demonstrate manipulations of the center adatoms by controlling the sample bias.

  17. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; ...

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals thanmore » in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.« less

  18. Diffusion-induced growth of nanowires: Generalized boundary conditions and self-consistent kinetic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Hervieu, Yu. Yu.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical analysis of the diffusion-induced growth of "vapor-liquid-solid" nanowires, based on the stationary equations with generalized boundary conditions. We discuss why and how the earlier results are modified when the adatom chemical potential is discontinuous at the nanowire base. Several simplified models for the adatom diffusion flux are discussed, yielding the 1 /Rp radius dependence of the length, with p ranging from 0.5 to 2. The self-consistent approach is used to couple the diffusion transport with the kinetics of 2D nucleation under the droplet. This leads to a new growth equation that contains only two dimensional parameters and the power exponents p and q, where q=1 or 2 depends on the nucleus position. We show that this equation describes the size-dependent depression of the growth rate of narrow nanowires much better than the Gibbs-Thomson correction in several important cases. Overall, our equation fits very well the experimental data on the length-radius correlations of III-V and group IV nanowires obtained by different epitaxy techniques.

  19. Tunneling spectroscopy of a magnetic adatoms on topological insulator surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiorny, M.; Bjerngaard, M.; Paaske, J.

    In this communication, we address the question of how the presence of a magnetic impurity on a topological insulator (TI) surface manifests in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) when such a system is probed by a STM. For this purpose, we consider a single magnetic adatom with arbitrary spin, whose dynamics is governed by the local magnetic anisotropy. The spin is exchange-coupled to two-dimensional helical surface electrons, corresponding to the surface of a three-dimensional TI like Bi2Se3, with its characteristic hexagonally warped Dirac cone band structure. Employing an effective exchange-tunneling model, we calculate the non-linear differential conductance from a spin-polarized STM tip to the helical substrate, valid in the perturbative regime of weak exchange-tunneling and including the nonequilibrium pumping of the adatom spin states. The interplay between the magnetic anisotropy and the spin-momentum locked surface electrons is shown to give a number of specific imprints in the IETS, which could be investigated by spin-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy. M. Misiorny, M. Bjerngaard and J. Paaske, manuscript in preparation Work supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Education as `Iuventus Plus' project (IP2014 030973) in years 2015-2016.

  20. Subkelvin spin polarized STM: measuring magnetization curves of individual adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Jens

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic nanostructures consisting of a few atoms on non-magnetic substrates are explored as model systems for miniaturized data storage devices and for the implementation of novel spin-based computation techniques. Since these nanostructures are well defined and controllable on the atomic scale, they are ideally suited to study the fundamentals of magnetic interactions. We used spin polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy at subkelvin temperatures to image the magnetization of individual adatoms as a function of an external magnetic field. This allows to directly measure their magnetic interactions at very low energy scale. We will present the design of the 300mK STM [1] and then focus on the results. Interestingly, Co atoms on Pt(111) behave paramagnetic even at very low temperatures, 300 times smaller than the previously reported giant barrier between up and down spin [2]. A peculiar variation in the saturation flux density, which is measured for each atom, is found. This is attributed to their mutual indirect exchange via the substrate electrons. Indeed, we observe an interaction between the adatom and a Co monolayer stripe oscillating with distance between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling on the scale of the Fermi wavelength. [1] J. Wiebe et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4871 (2004). [2] P. Gambardella et al., Science 300, 1130 (2003).

  1. Chiral magnetism of magnetic adatoms generated by Rashba electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Juba; dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Ziane, Abdelhamid; Benakki, Mouloud; Blügel, Stefan; Lounis, Samir

    2017-02-01

    We investigate long-range chiral magnetic interactions among adatoms mediated by surface states spin-splitted by spin–orbit coupling. Using the Rashba model, the tensor of exchange interactions is extracted wherein a thepseudo-dipolar interaction is found, in addition to the usual isotropic exchange interaction and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction. We find that, despite the latter interaction, collinear magnetic states can still be stabilized by the pseudo-dipolar interaction. The interadatom distance controls the strength of these terms, which we exploit to design chiral magnetism in Fe nanostructures deposited on a Au(111) surface. We demonstrate that these magnetic interactions are related to superpositions of the out-of-plane and in-plane components of the skyrmionic magnetic waves induced by the adatoms in the surrounding electron gas. We show that, even if the interatomic distance is large, the size and shape of the nanostructures dramatically impacts on the strength of the magnetic interactions, thereby affecting the magnetic ground state. We also derive an appealing connection between the isotropic exchange interaction and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction, which relates the latter to the first-order change of the former with respect to spin–orbit coupling. This implies that the chirality defined by the direction of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya vector is driven by the variation of the isotropic exchange interaction due to the spin–orbit interaction.

  2. Atomistic simulation of the electronic states of adatoms in monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jiwon; Larentis, Stefano; Tutuc, Emanuel; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2014-04-07

    Using an ab initio density functional theory based electronic structure method, we study the effects of adatoms on the electronic properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide Molybdenum-disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). We consider the 1st (Li, Na, K) and 7th (F, Cl, Br) column atoms and metals (Sc, Ti, Ta, Mo, Pd, Pt, Ag, Au). Three high symmetry sites for the adatom on the surface of monolayer MoS{sub 2} are examined as starting points to search for the most energetically stable configuration for each adatom-monolayer MoS{sub 2} system, as well as the type of associated bonding. For the most stable adatom positions, we characterize the emergence of adatom-induced electronic states including any dopant states.

  3. The realization of half-metal and spin-semiconductor for metal adatoms on arsenene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Geng; Zhao, Yinchang; Zeng, Shuming; Ni, Jun

    2016-12-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to study the adsorption of 15 different metal adatoms on silicenelike arsenene. The adsorption energies, geometries, density of states, dipole moments, work functions, net magnetic moments and Bader charges transferred from adatoms to arsenene sheet are calculated. All of the 15 metal adatoms on arsenene have binding energies larger than cohesive energies of the bulk metal, implying that stable adsorbates can be formed. As a result of the localized states originating from adatoms, the adsorption systems show a rich variety of electronic properties, such as metal, half-metal, semiconducting, and spin-semiconducting behaviors. The Co doped arsenene displays a half-metal property. The adsorption of Cu, Ag, and Au turns semiconducting arsenene into a narrow gap spin-semiconductor. These results indicate potential applications of functionalizations of silicenelike arsenene with metal adatoms, in particular for spintronics and dilute magnetic semiconductor materials.

  4. Two Pathways for Water Interaction with Oxygen Adatoms on TiO2(110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubinetsky, Igor; Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel

    2010-08-04

    Atomic-level investigation of the interaction of H2O with a partially re-oxidized TiO2(110) has been performed at 300 K by combining scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. In particular, we demonstrate that oxygen adatoms (Oa), produced during O2 exposure of reduced TiO2(110) surfaces, alter water dissociation/ recombination chemistry through two different pathways. When H2O diffuses to Oa on the same Ti row, it becomes trapped near the Oa, exchanges a proton easily to dissociate and form a pair of terminal hydroxyls (OHt) along the row, which can then readily recombine and re-dissociate many times or overcome the barrier to move away. When H2O passes along the Oa on an adjacent row, an across-row proton transfer facilitated by the bridging O atom results in spontaneous dissociation of H2O on a Ti trough leading to the formation of a stable across-row OHt pair, which after awhile can recombine and H2O diffuses away. The across-row process has not been reported previously, and it starts from a ‘‘pseudo-dissociated’’ state of water. We also show how the H2O dissociation and OHt pair statistical reformation induce an apparent along- or across-row shift of Oa as a result of the oxygen scrambling process between H2O and Oa.

  5. Determination of critical diameters for intrinsic carrier diffusion-length of GaN nanorods with cryo-scanning near-field optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y. T.; Karlsson, K. F.; Birch, J.; Holtz, P. O.

    2016-01-01

    Direct measurements of carrier diffusion in GaN nanorods with a designed InGaN/GaN layer-in-a-wire structure by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) were performed at liquid-helium temperatures of 10 K. Without an applied voltage, intrinsic diffusion lengths of photo-excited carriers were measured as the diameters of the nanorods differ from 50 to 800 nm. The critical diameter of nanorods for carrier diffusion is concluded as 170 nm with a statistical approach. Photoluminescence spectra were acquired for different positions of the SNOM tip on the nanorod, corresponding to the origins of the well-defined luminescence peaks, each being related to recombination-centers. The phenomenon originated from surface oxide by direct comparison of two nanorods with similar diameters in a single map has been observed and investigated. PMID:26876009

  6. Surface Modifications by Field Induced Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Martin; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    By applying a voltage pulse to a scanning tunneling microscope tip the surface under the tip will be modified. We have in this paper taken a closer look at the model of electric field induced surface diffusion of adatoms including the van der Waals force as a contribution in formations of a mound on a surface. The dipole moment of an adatom is the sum of the surface induced dipole moment (which is constant) and the dipole moment due to electric field polarisation which depends on the strength and polarity of the electric field. The electric field is analytically modelled by a point charge over an infinite conducting flat surface. From this we calculate the force that cause adatoms to migrate. The calculated force is small for voltage used, typical 1 pN, but due to thermal vibration adatoms are hopping on the surface and even a small net force can be significant in the drift of adatoms. In this way we obtain a novel formula for a polarity dependent threshold voltage for mound formation on the surface for positive tip. Knowing the voltage of the pulse we then can calculate the radius of the formed mound. A threshold electric field for mound formation of about 2 V/nm is calculated. In addition, we found that van der Waals force is of importance for shorter distances and its contribution to the radial force on the adatoms has to be considered for distances smaller than 1.5 nm for commonly used voltages. PMID:22253894

  7. Magnetism of an adatom on bilayer graphene and its control: A first-principles perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafday, Dhani; Saha-Dasgupta, T.

    2013-11-01

    We present a first-principles investigation of the electronic and magnetic properties of an adatom on bilayer graphene within the framework of density functional theory. In particular, we study the influence of an applied gate voltage which modifies the electronic states of the bilayer graphene as well as shifts the adatom energy states relative to that of the graphene energy states. Our study carried out for a choice of three different adatoms, Na, Cu, and Fe, shows that the nature of adatom-graphene bonding evolves from ionic to covalent, in moving from an alkali metal, Na, to a transition metal, Cu or Fe. This leads to the formation of magnetic moments in the latter cases (Cu, Fe) and the absence of a magnetic moment in the former (Na). Application of an external electric field to bilayer graphene completely changes the scenario, switching on a magnetic moment for the Na adatom, and switching off the magnetic moments for Cu and Fe adatoms. Our results have important implications for fundamental studies of controlled adatom magnetism and spintronics applications in nanotechnology.

  8. Magnetism of Adatom on Bilayer Graphene and its Control: A First-principles Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri; Nafday, Dhani

    2014-03-01

    We present first-principles investigation of the electronic and magnetic properties of adatom on bilayer graphene within the framework of density functional theory. In particular, we study the influence of an applied gate-voltage which modifies the electronic states of the bilayer graphene as well as shifts the adatom energy states relative to that of the graphene energy states. Our study carried out for a choice of three different adatoms, Na, Cu and Fe, shows that the nature of adatom-graphene bonding evolves from ionic to covalent, in moving from alkali metal, Na to transition metal, Cu or Fe. This leads to the formation of magnetic moments in the latter cases (Cu, Fe) and its absence in the former (Na). Application of an external electric field to bilayer graphene, completely changes the scenario, switching on a magnetic moment for Na adatom, and switching off the magnetic moments for Cu, and Fe adatoms. Our results have important implications for fundamental studies of controlled adatom magnetism and spintronics application in nanotechnology. The authors thank Ministry of Earth Science and Department of Science and Technology, India for financial support.

  9. Effects of adatoms and physisorbed molecules on the physical properties of antimonene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Üzengi Aktürk, O.; Aktürk, E.; Ciraci, S.

    2016-01-01

    A recent study predicted that a 2D single layer of antimony in buckled honeycomb as well as asymmetric washboard structures, named antimonene, is stable at high temperature and displays semiconducting properties. Based on first-principles, spin-polarized density functional calculations, we investigated chemisorption of selected adatoms and physisorption of molecules on two antimonene phases. Since adspecies-adspecies interaction is minimized by using large supercells, our results mimic the effects of isolated, single adatoms or molecules. We found that molecules such as H2,O2, and H2O neither form strong chemical bonds nor dissociate; they are physisorbed with a weak binding energy without affecting the properties of antimonene. The adatoms, such as H, Li, B, C, N, O, Al, In, Si, P, Cl, Ti, As, and Sb, are chemisorbed with significant binding energy, whereby the atomic and electronic structures are modified locally. Boron and carbon adatoms are implemented into buckled antimonene crystal leading to a local reconstruction of the crystal. Nitrogen gives rise to Stone-Wales type defects. The localized states originating from adatoms give rise to diversity of electronic structure. The lowest conduction and highest valence bands of antimonene in asymmetric washboard structures have very high curvature. Once combined with adatom states, these bands offer a variety of features. Specific adatoms lead to spin polarization, attain magnetic moments, and can attribute a half-metallic character to antimonene.

  10. Evaluation of a multimode fiber optic low coherence interferometer for path length resolved Doppler measurements of diffuse light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Babu; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; Van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2007-12-01

    The performance of a graded index multimode fiber optic low coherence Mach-Zehnder interferometer with phase modulation is analyzed. Investigated aspects were its ability to measure path length distributions and to perform path length resolved Doppler measurements of multiple scattered photons in a turbid suspension of particles undergoing Brownian and translational motion. The path length resolution of this instrument is compared with a system using single mode fibers for illumination and detection. The optical path lengths are determined from the zero order moment of the phase modulation peak in the power spectrum. The weighted first moment, which is equal to the average Doppler shift, shows a linear response for different mean flow velocities within the physiological range.

  11. Magnetic properties of iron adatoms and small iron clusters on Ag(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarovits, B.; Szunyogh, L.; Weinberger, P.

    2002-02-01

    A Green's function embedding technique based on the fully relativistic spin-polarized Screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method is used to calculate the electronic and magnetic properties of magnetic nanostructures. Strongly enhanced spin and orbital moments are obtained for an Fe adatom and for small clusters of Fe on a Ag(1 0 0) surface. As a consequence, for an Fe adatom a magnetic anisotropy energy is found that is about 10 times larger than for an Fe monolayer. Furthermore, the exchange coupling energy between two Fe adatoms is calculated in terms of the force theorem, showing a very rapid decay with increasing distance.

  12. A Study of the Correlation Between Dislocations and Diffusion Length in In(49)Ga(51)P Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Length in In49Ga51P 6. AUTHOR(S) Scott Edward Williams 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate...1 B. PURPOSE OF THESIS................................................................................... 5 C. MILITARY...RELEVANCE............................................................................. 5 D. THESIS OVERVIEW

  13. Observational Estimates of the Horizontal Eddy Diffusivity and Mixing Length in the Low-Level Region of Intense Hurricanes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    372 statistical analysis (t- test ) shows that the difference between the mean mixing length and 373 energy/flux containing scale is significantly...and R. W. Burpee , 2008: Structure of the eye and 521 eyewall of Hurricane Hugo (1989). Mon. Wea. Rev., 136, 1237-1259. 522 Montgomery, T. M., and R

  14. Disorder-induced bound states within an adatom-quantum wire system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnetta, Bradley; Ordonez, Gonzalo

    2014-03-01

    Bound states induced by disorder are theoretically observed within a quantum wire and adatom system. The quantum wire is modeled as an array of quantum wells with random energies and exhibits Anderson Localization. By varying the energy of our adatom and adjusting the tunneling strength between the adatom and the quantum wire we observe disorder-induced bound states between the the adatom and its attached point. The characteristics of these disorder-induced bound states are greatly influenced by the site of interest on the quantum wire. Utilizing random quantum wires and disordered superlattices to produce bound states may offer flexibility in fabrication as well as provide grounds for energy transmission in photovoltaics.

  15. Evaluation of the minority carrier diffusion length and surface-recombination velocity in GaAs p/n solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Moeller, Hans J.; Bailey, Sheila

    1991-01-01

    The minority carrier diffusion length (Lp) and the surface recombination velocity (Vs) were measured as a function of distance (x) from the p-n junction in GaAs p/n concentrator solar cells. The measured Vs values were used in a theoretical expression for the normalized electron-beam-induced current. A fitting procedure was then used to fit this expression with experimental values to obtain Lp. The results show that both Vs and Lp vary with x. Lp measured in irradiated cells showed a marked reduction. These values were compared to those measured previously which did not account for Vs.

  16. Correlated adatom trimer on a metal surface: a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Savkin, V V; Rubtsov, A N; Katsnelson, M I; Lichtenstein, A I

    2005-01-21

    The problem of three interacting Kondo impurities is solved within a numerically exact continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo scheme. A suppression of the Kondo resonance by interatomic exchange interactions for different cluster geometries is investigated. It is shown that a drastic difference between the Heisenberg and Ising cases appears for antiferromagnetically coupled adatoms. The effects of magnetic frustrations in the adatom trimer are investigated, and possible connections with available experimental data are discussed.

  17. Adatom Ascending at Step Edges and Faceting on fcc Metal (110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; de Mongeot, F. B.; Valbusa, U.; Wang, E. G.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2004-01-01

    Using first-principles total-energy calculations, we show that an adatom can easily climb up at monatomic-layer-high steps on several representative fcc metal (110) surfaces via a place exchange mechanism. Inclusion of such novel adatom ascending processes in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of Al(110) homoepitaxy as a prototypical model system can lead to the existence of an intriguing faceting instability, whose dynamical evolution and kinetic nature are explored in comparison with experimental observations.

  18. A local view of bonding and diffusion at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.

    1996-09-01

    First-principles density functional calculations and corresponding experimental results underline the importance of basic chemical concepts, such as coordination, valence saturation and promotion-hybridization energetics, in understanding bonding and diffusion of atoms at and on metal surfaces. Several examples are reviewed, including outer-layer relaxations of clean hcp(0001) surfaces, liquid-metal-embrittlement energetics, separation energies of metal-adatom dimers, concerted substitutional self-diffusion on fcc(001) surfaces, and adsorption and diffusion barrier sites for adatoms near steps.

  19. Comparison of the electron work function, hole concentration and exciton diffusion length for P3HT and PT prepared by thermal or acid cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toušek, J.; Toušková, J.; Ludvík, J.; Liška, A.; Remeš, Z.; Kylián, O.; Kousal, J.; Chomutová, R.; Heckler, I. M.; Bundgaard, E.; Krebs, F. C.

    2016-02-01

    The electron work function, hole concentration and diffusion length were compared for poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymer (P3HT) that is commonly used for construction of solar cells, and two types of native polythiophene (PT) samples which are prospective candidates for this purpose. The polythiophene samples were prepared from 2 different precursors by thermal or chemical treatment at room temperature. Cyclic voltammetry and work function measurements were used for estimating the concentration of holes. The measured data were evaluated assuming the validity of band theory based on the tight-binding model. Published data on the valence bandwidth were used for calculating the value of the overlap integral which is related to the hole effective mass. Energy band diagrams were constructed for all 3 materials. Finally, the exciton diffusion length, which is a critical parameter for the application of conjugated polymer materials in solar cells, was measured by a modified surface photovoltage method. The approach allowed us to identify the differences in the material properties related to the processing method. Morphology of the samples determined by AFM was another tool showing these differences. It is stated that a native polythiophene prepared by treatment with acids is a prospective material for solar cells and shows a similar quality as that produced by a thermal process.

  20. Well-Ordered In Adatoms at the In2O3(111 ) Surface Created by Fe Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Margareta; Lackner, Peter; Seiler, Steffen; Gerhold, Stefan; Osiecki, Jacek; Schulte, Karina; Boatner, Lynn A.; Schmid, Michael; Meyer, Bernd; Diebold, Ulrike

    2016-11-01

    Metal deposition on oxide surfaces usually results in adatoms, clusters, or islands of the deposited material, where defects in the surface often act as nucleation centers. Here an alternate configuration is reported. After the vapor deposition of Fe on the In2O3(111 ) surface at room temperature, ordered adatoms are observed with scanning tunneling microscopy. These are identical to the In adatoms that form when the sample is reduced by heating in ultrahigh vacuum. Density functional theory calculations confirm that Fe interchanges with In in the topmost layer, pushing the excess In atoms to the surface where they arrange as a well-ordered adatom array.

  1. Applicability of the Fokker-Planck equation to the description of diffusion effects on nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, M. V.; Dubinko, V. I.; Borodin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    The nucleation of islands in a supersaturated solution of surface adatoms is considered taking into account the possibility of diffusion profile formation in the island vicinity. It is shown that the treatment of diffusion-controlled cluster growth in terms of the Fokker-Planck equation is justified only provided certain restrictions are satisfied. First of all, the standard requirement that diffusion profiles of adatoms quickly adjust themselves to the actual island sizes (adiabatic principle) can be realized only for sufficiently high island concentration. The adiabatic principle is essential for the probabilities of adatom attachment to and detachment from island edges to be independent of the adatom diffusion profile establishment kinetics, justifying the island nucleation treatment as the Markovian stochastic process. Second, it is shown that the commonly used definition of the "diffusion" coefficient in the Fokker-Planck equation in terms of adatom attachment and detachment rates is justified only provided the attachment and detachment are statistically independent, which is generally not the case for the diffusion-limited growth of islands. We suggest a particular way to define the attachment and detachment rates that allows us to satisfy this requirement as well. When applied to the problem of surface island nucleation, our treatment predicts the steady-state nucleation barrier, which coincides with the conventional thermodynamic expression, even though no thermodynamic equilibrium is assumed and the adatom diffusion is treated explicitly. The effect of adatom diffusional profiles on the nucleation rate preexponential factor is also discussed. Monte Carlo simulation is employed to analyze the applicability domain of the Fokker-Planck equation and the diffusion effect beyond it. It is demonstrated that a diffusional cloud is slowing down the nucleation process for a given monomer interaction with the nucleus edge.

  2. Interaction of CO2 with Oxygen Adatoms on Rutile TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xiao; Wang, Zhitao; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2013-01-10

    The interactions of CO2 with oxygen adatoms (Oa’s) on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. At 50 K CO2 is found to adsorb preferentially on five-coordinated Ti sites (Ti5c’s) next to Oa’s rather than on oxygen vacancies (VO’s) (the most stable adsorption sites on reduced TiO2(110)). Temperature dependent studies show that after annealing to 100 - 150 K, VO’s become preferentially populated indicating the presence of a kinetic barrier for CO2 adsorption into the VO’s. The difference between the CO2 binding energy on VO’s and Ti5c sites next to the Oa’s are found to be only 0.009 - 0.025 eV. The barrier for CO2 diffusion away from Oa’s is estimated to be ~0.17 eV. Crescent-like feature of the images of CO2 adsorbed on Ti5c’s next to Oa’s are interpreted as a time average of terminally bound CO2 molecules switching between the configurations that are tilted towards Oa and/or towards one of the two neighboring bridging oxygen (Ob) rows. In the presence of VO defects, CO2 is found to tilt preferentially away from the VO containing Ob row. If another CO2 is present on the neighboring Ti5c row, both CO2 molecules tilt towards the common Ob row that separates them.

  3. Relating adatom emission to improved durability of Pt-Pd diesel oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Tyne Richele; Goeke, Ronald S.; Ashbacher, Valerie; Thune, Peter C.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.; Kiefer, Boris; Kim, Chang H.; Balogh, Michael P.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2015-06-05

    Sintering of nanoparticles is an important contributor to loss of activity in heterogeneous catalysts, such as those used for controlling harmful emissions from automobiles. But mechanistic details, such as the rates of atom emission or the nature of the mobile species, remain poorly understood. Herein we report a novel approach that allows direct measurement of atom emission from nanoparticles. We use model catalyst samples and a novel reactor that allows the same region of the sample to be observed after short-term heat treatments (seconds) under conditions relevant to diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs). Monometallic Pd is very stable and does not sinter when heated in air (T ≤ 800 °C). Pt sinters readily in air, and at high temperatures (≥800 °C) mobile Pt species emitted to the vapor phase cause the formation of large, faceted particles. In Pt–Pd nanoparticles, Pd slows the rate of emission of atoms to the vapor phase due to the formation of an alloy. However, the role of Pd in Pt DOCs in air is quite complex: at low temperatures, Pt enhances the rate of Pd sintering (which otherwise would be stable as an oxide), while at higher temperature Pd helps to slow the rate of Pt sintering. DFT calculations show that the barrier for atom emission to the vapor phase is much greater than the barrier for emitting atoms to the support. Thus, vapor-phase transport becomes significant only at high temperatures while diffusion of adatoms on the support dominates at lower temperatures.

  4. Relating adatom emission to improved durability of Pt-Pd diesel oxidation catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Johns, Tyne Richele; Goeke, Ronald S.; Ashbacher, Valerie; ...

    2015-06-05

    Sintering of nanoparticles is an important contributor to loss of activity in heterogeneous catalysts, such as those used for controlling harmful emissions from automobiles. But mechanistic details, such as the rates of atom emission or the nature of the mobile species, remain poorly understood. Herein we report a novel approach that allows direct measurement of atom emission from nanoparticles. We use model catalyst samples and a novel reactor that allows the same region of the sample to be observed after short-term heat treatments (seconds) under conditions relevant to diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs). Monometallic Pd is very stable and does notmore » sinter when heated in air (T ≤ 800 °C). Pt sinters readily in air, and at high temperatures (≥800 °C) mobile Pt species emitted to the vapor phase cause the formation of large, faceted particles. In Pt–Pd nanoparticles, Pd slows the rate of emission of atoms to the vapor phase due to the formation of an alloy. However, the role of Pd in Pt DOCs in air is quite complex: at low temperatures, Pt enhances the rate of Pd sintering (which otherwise would be stable as an oxide), while at higher temperature Pd helps to slow the rate of Pt sintering. DFT calculations show that the barrier for atom emission to the vapor phase is much greater than the barrier for emitting atoms to the support. Thus, vapor-phase transport becomes significant only at high temperatures while diffusion of adatoms on the support dominates at lower temperatures.« less

  5. Low-energy ion irradiation during film growth: Kinetic pathways leading to enhanced adatom migration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovic, D.; Münger, E. P.; Chirita, V.; Hultman, L.; Greene, J. E.

    2005-05-01

    Embedded-atom molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the effects of low-energy self-ion irradiation of Pt adatoms on Pt(111). Here, we concentrate on self-bombardment dynamics, i.e., isolating and monitoring the atomic processes, induced by normally incident Pt atoms with energies E ranging from 5 to 50 eV, that can affect intra- and interlayer mass transport.. We find that adatom scattering, surface channeling, and dimer formation occur at all energies. Atomic intermixing events involving incident and terrace atoms are observed at energies ⩾15eV, while the collateral formation of residual surface vacancies is observed only with E >40eV. The overall effect of low-energy self-ion irradiation is to enhance lateral adatom and terrace atom migration.

  6. Spin Hall Effect and Origins of Nonlocal Resistance in Adatom-Decorated Graphene.

    PubMed

    Van Tuan, D; Marmolejo-Tejada, J M; Waintal, X; Nikolić, B K; Valenzuela, S O; Roche, S

    2016-10-21

    Recent experiments reporting an unexpectedly large spin Hall effect (SHE) in graphene decorated with adatoms have raised a fierce controversy. We apply numerically exact Kubo and Landauer-Büttiker formulas to realistic models of gold-decorated disordered graphene (including adatom clustering) to obtain the spin Hall conductivity and spin Hall angle, as well as the nonlocal resistance as a quantity accessible to experiments. Large spin Hall angles of ∼0.1 are obtained at zero temperature, but their dependence on adatom clustering differs from the predictions of semiclassical transport theories. Furthermore, we find multiple background contributions to the nonlocal resistance, some of which are unrelated to the SHE or any other spin-dependent origin, as well as a strong suppression of the SHE at room temperature. This motivates us to design a multiterminal graphene geometry which suppresses these background contributions and could, therefore, quantify the upper limit for spin-current generation in two-dimensional materials.

  7. Reducing the In2O3(111) Surface Results in Ordered Indium Adatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Margareta; Seiler, Steffen; Meyer, Bernd; Boatner, Lynn A; Schmid, M.; Diebold, U.

    2014-01-01

    The In2O3(111) surface can be transformed from an oxidized bulk termination to one that is covered by single In adatoms. As each adatom sits at one specific site within the surface unit cell they form a well-ordered (1 1) superstructure. Annealing at 500 C in O2 or in ultrahigh vacuum results in a fully reversible conversion between these two surface terminations; this transformation and intermediate stages were followed with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). Formation of this novel surface structure under reducing conditions is corroborated by Density Functional Theory (DFT). The reduced adatom-covered and the oxidized In2O3(111) surfaces are expected to exhibit different chemical and electronic properties, which can easily be exploited by the facile and reversible switching between the two terminations.

  8. Quantifying the effect of metal-rich precipitates on minority carrier diffusion length in multicrystalline silicon using synchrotron-based spectrally resolved x-ray beam-induced current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonassisi, T.; Istratov, A. A.; Pickett, M. D.; Marcus, M. A.; Hahn, G.; Riepe, S.; Isenberg, J.; Warta, W.; Willeke, G.; Ciszek, T. F.; Weber, E. R.

    2005-07-01

    Synchrotron-based, spectrally resolved x-ray beam-induced current (SR-XBIC) is introduced as a technique to locally measure the minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductor devices. Equivalence with well-established diffusion length measurement techniques is demonstrated. The strength of SR-XBIC is that it can be combined in situ with other synchrotron-based analytical techniques, such as x-ray fluorescence microscopy (μ-XRF) and x-ray absorption microspectroscopy (μ-XAS), yielding information about the distribution, elemental composition, chemical nature, and effect on minority carrier diffusion length of individual transition metal species in multicrystalline silicon. SR-XBIC, μ-XRF, and μ-XAS measurements were performed on intentionally contaminated multicrystalline silicon, revealing a strong correlation between local concentrations of copper and nickel silicide precipitates and a decrease of minority carrier diffusion length. In addition, the reduction of minority carrier diffusion length due to submicron-sized Cu3Si and NiSi2 precipitates could be decoupled from the influence of homogeneously distributed nanoprecipitates and point defects.

  9. Increase in the diffusion length of minority carriers in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}N alloys ({sub x} = 0–0.1) fabricated by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, T. V. Gilinsky, A. M.; Mansurov, V. G.; Protasov, D. Yu.; Kozhuhov, A. S.; Yakimov, E. B.; Zhuravlev, K. S.

    2015-10-15

    The room-temperature diffusion length of minority carriers in n-Al{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N layers grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire (0001) substrates used in structures for ultraviolet photodetectors is studied. Measurements were performed using the spectral dependence of the photocurrent recorded in a built-in p–n junction for thin samples and using the induced electron-current procedure for films up to 2 µm thick. The results show that the hole diffusion length in n-AlGaN films is 120–150 nm, which is larger than in GaN films grown under similar growth conditions by a factor of 3–4. This result can be associated with the larger lateral sizes characteristic of hexagonal columns in AlGaN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. No increase in the hole diffusion length is observed for thicker films.

  10. Effect of alkyl chain length on the rotational diffusion of nonpolar and ionic solutes in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imides.

    PubMed

    Gangamallaiah, V; Dutt, G B

    2013-10-10

    Rotational diffusion of a nonpolar solute 9-phenylanthracene (9-PA) and a cationic solute rhodamine 110 (R110) has been examined in a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium (alkyl = octyl, decyl, dodecyl, tetradecyl, hexadecyl, and octadecyl) bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imides to understand the influence of alkyl chain length on solute rotation. In this study, reorientation times (τr) have been measured as a function of viscosity (η) by varying the temperature (T) of the solvents. These results have been analyzed using the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) hydrodynamic theory along with the ones obtained for the same solutes in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium (alkyl = methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, and hexyl) bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imides (Gangamallaiah and Dutt, J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 12819-12825). It has been noticed that the data for 9-PA and R110 follows the relation τr = A(η/T)(n) with A being the ratio of hydrodynamic volume of the solute to the Boltzmann constant and n = 1 as envisaged by the SED theory. However, upon increasing the alkyl chain length from methyl to octadecyl significant deviations from the SED theory have been observed especially from the octyl derivative onward. From methyl to octadecyl derivatives, the value of A decreases by a factor of 3 for both the solutes and n by a factor of 1.4 and 1.6 for 9-PA and R110, respectively. These observations have been rationalized by taking into consideration the organized structure of the ionic liquids, whose influence appears to be pronounced when the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain attached to the imidazolium cation exceeds eight.

  11. RKKY-like contributions to the magnetic anisotropy energy: 3 d adatoms on Pt(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhassoune, Mohammmed; Dias, Manuel dos Santos; Zimmermann, Bernd; Dederichs, Peter H.; Lounis, Samir

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic anisotropy energy defines the energy barrier that stabilizes a magnetic moment. Utilizing density-functional-theory-based simulations and analytical formulations, we establish that this barrier is strongly modified by long-range contributions very similar to Friedel oscillations and Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions. Thus, oscillations are expected and observed, with different decaying factors and highly anisotropic in realistic materials, which can switch nontrivially the sign of the magnetic anisotropy energy. This behavior is general, and for illustration we address the transition-metal adatoms, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co deposited on a Pt(111) surface. We explain, in particular, the mechanisms leading to the strong site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy observed for Fe adatoms on a Pt(111) surface as revealed previously via first-principles-based simulations and inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy [A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157204 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.157204]. The same mechanisms are probably active for the site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy obtained for Fe adatoms on Pd or Rh(111) surfaces and for Co adatoms on a Rh(111) surface [P. Blonski et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 104426 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.104426].

  12. Effects of extrinsic point defects in phosphorene: B, C, N, O, and F adatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gaoxue E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu Pandey, Ravindra E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu; Karna, Shashi P. E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu

    2015-04-27

    Phosphorene is emerging as a promising 2D semiconducting material with a direct band gap and high carrier mobility. In this paper, we examine the role of the extrinsic point defects including surface adatoms in modifying the electronic properties of phosphorene using density functional theory. The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O, and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. Our calculations show that B and C, with electronegativity close to P, prefer to break the sp{sup 3} bonds of phosphorene and reside at the interstitial sites in the 2D lattice by forming sp{sup 2} like bonds with the native atoms. On the other hand, N, O, and F, which are more electronegative than P, prefer the surface sites by attracting the lone pairs of phosphorene. B, N, and F adsorption will also introduce local magnetic moment to the lattice. Moreover, B, C, N, and F adatoms will modify the band gap of phosphorene, yielding metallic transverse tunneling characters. Oxygen does not modify the band gap of phosphorene, and a diode like tunneling behavior is observed. Our results therefore offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of phosphorene by the adatom functionalization and provide the physical insights of the environmental sensitivity of phosphorene, which will be helpful to experimentalists in evaluating the performance and aging effects of phosphorene-based electronic devices.

  13. Solid-State Mesostructured Perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 Solar Cells: Charge Transport, Recombination, and Diffusion Length.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Nardes, Alexandre M; Zhu, Kai

    2014-02-06

    We report on the effect of TiO2 film thickness on charge transport and recombination in solid-state mesostructured perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (via one-step coating) solar cells using spiro-MeOTAD as the hole conductor. Intensity-modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopies show that the transport and recombination properties of solid-state mesostructured perovskite solar cells are similar to those of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Charge transport in perovskite cells is dominated by electron conduction within the mesoporous TiO2 network rather than from the perovskite layer. Although no significant film-thickness dependence is found for transport and recombination, the efficiency of perovskite cells increases with TiO2 film thickness from 240 nm to about 650-850 nm owing primarily to the enhanced light harvesting. Further increasing film thickness reduces cell efficiency associated with decreased fill factor or photocurrent density. The electron diffusion length in mesostructured perovskite cells is longer than 1 μm for over four orders of magnitude of light intensity.

  14. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Mulligan, Padhraic; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals than in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.

  15. Gold-Adatom-Mediated Bonding in Self-Assembled Short-Chain Alkanethiolate Species on the Au(111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymovych, P.; Sorescu, D.C.; Yates, J.T., Jr.

    2006-10-06

    Microscopic evidence for Au-adatom-induced self-assembly of alkanethiolate species on the Au(111) surface is presented. Based on STM measurements and density-functional theory calculations, a new model for the low-coverage self-assembled monolayer of alkanethiolate on the Au(111) surface is developed, which involves the adsorbate complexes incorporating Au adatoms. It is also concluded that the Au(111) herringbone reconstruction is lifted by the alkanethiolate self-assembly because the reconstructed surface layer provides reactive Au adatoms that drive self-assembly.

  16. Well-Ordered In Adatoms at the In2O3(111) Surface Created by Fe Deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Margareta; Lackner, Peter; Seiler, Steffen; ...

    2016-11-11

    Metal deposition on oxide surfaces usually results in adatoms, clusters, or islands of the deposited material, where defects in the surface often act as nucleation centers. An alternate configuration is reported. Afterwards the vapor deposition of Fe on the In2O3(111) surface at room temperature, ordered adatoms are observed with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These are identical to the In adatoms that form when the sample is reduced by heating in ultrahigh vacuum. Our density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirm that Fe interchanges with In in the topmost layer, pushing the excess In atoms to the surface where they arrange asmore » a well-ordered adatom array.« less

  17. Electronic structure and magnetism of samarium and neodymium adatoms on free-standing graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, Agnieszka L.; Shick, Alexander B.; Máca, František; Kolorenč, Jindřich; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure of selected rare-earth atoms adsorbed on a free-standing graphene was investigated using methods beyond the conventional density functional theory (DFT+U , DFT+HIA, and DFT+ED). The influence of the electron correlations and the spin-orbit coupling on the magnetic properties has been examined. The DFT+U method predicts both atoms to carry local magnetic moments (spin and orbital) contrary to a nonmagnetic f6 (J =0 ) ground-state configuration of Sm in the gas phase. Application of DFT +Hubbard-I (HIA) and DFT +exact diagonalization (ED) methods cures this problem, and yields a nonmagnetic ground state with six f electrons and J =0 for the Sm adatom. Our calculations show that Nd adatom remains magnetic, with four localized f electrons and J =4.0 . These conclusions could be verified by STM and XAS experiments.

  18. Theoretical probing of inelastic spin-excitations in adatoms on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Samir; Schweflinghaus, Benedikt; Dias, Manuel dos Santos; Bouhassoune, Mohammed; Muniz, Roberto B.; Costa, Antonio T.

    2014-12-01

    We review our recent work on the simulation, description and prediction of spin-excitations in adatoms and dimers deposited on metallic surfaces. This work done together with Douglas L. Mills, is an extension of his seminal contribution (with Pascal Lederer) published 50 years ago on the spin-dynamics of transition metal impurities embedded in transition metal hosts [Lederer et al. (1967)]. The main predictions of his model were verified experimentally with state of the art inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy on adatoms. Our formalism, presented in this review, is based on time-dependent density functional theory, combined with the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method. Comparison to experiments is shown and discussed in detail. Our scheme enables the description and prediction of the main characteristics of these excitations, i.e. their resonance frequency, their lifetime and their behavior upon application of external perturbations such as a magnetic field.

  19. Theoretical investigation of structures and energetics of sodium adatom and its dimer on graphene: DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-11-01

    Extensive ab initio calculations have been performed to study the energetics of a sodium (Na) atom and its dimer adsorbed on graphene using the SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS), partial density states (PDOS) of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated. After considering various sites for adsorption of Na on graphene, the center of a hexagonal ring of carbon atoms is found to be the preferred site of adsorption while the Na2 dimer prefers to rest parallel to the graphene sheet. We find insignificant energy differences among adsorption configurations involving different possible sites in parallel orientation, which implies high mobility of the dimer on the graphene sheet. We also notice only a slight distortion of the graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane upon adatom adsorption. However, some lateral displacements seen are more perceptible. Summary The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS) and PDOS of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated using SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. Preferred site for adsorption of a sodium atom on graphene is the hollow site. For the Na dimer adsorption, we found that horizontal orientation is favored over the vertical one. From DOS plots, it is clear that graphene's states are nearly unaffected by the adsorption of Na adatom and Interaction between sodium and graphene is predominantly ionic

  20. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance effect of single adatoms on a noncollinear magnetic surface.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Nuala M; Schröder, Silke; Ferriani, Paolo; Heinze, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    The tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) effect demonstrates the sensitivity of spin-polarized electron transport to the orientation of the magnetization with respect to the crystallographic axes. As the TAMR effect requires only a single magnetic electrode, in contrast to the tunneling magnetoresistance effect, it offers an attractive route to alternative spintronic applications. In this work we consider the TAMR effect at the single-atom limit by investigating the anisotropy of the local density of states (LDOS) in the vacuum above transition-metal adatoms adsorbed on a noncollinear magnetic surface, the monolayer of Mn on W(1 1 0). This surface presents a cycloidal spin spiral ground state with an angle of 173° between neighboring spins and thus allows a quasi-continuous exploration of the angular dependence of the TAMR of adsorbed adatoms using scanning tunneling microscopy. Using first-principle calculations, we investigate the TAMR of Co, Rh and Ir adatoms on Mn/W(1 1 0) and relate our results to the magnetization-direction-dependent changes in the LDOS. The anisotropic effect is found to be enhanced dramatically on the adsorption of heavy transition-metal atoms, with values of up to 50% predicted from our calculations. This effect will be measurable even with a non-magnetic STM tip.

  1. Characteristics of Li diffusion on silicene and zigzag nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Hua, Guo; Jue-Xian, Cao; Bo, Xu

    2016-01-01

    We perform a density functional study on the adsorption and diffusion of Li atoms on silicene sheet and zigzag nanoribbons. Our results show that the diffusion energy barrier of Li adatoms on silicene sheet is 0.25 eV, which is much lower than on graphene and Si bulk. The diffusion barriers along the axis of zigzag silicene nanoribbon range from 0.1 to 0.25 eV due to an edge effect, while the diffusion energy barrier is about 0.5 eV for a Li adatom to enter into a silicene nanoribbon. Our calculations indicate that using silicene nanoribbons as anodes is favorable for a Li-ion battery. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11074212 and 11204123) and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu province, China (Grant No. BK20130945).

  2. Edge effects on the characteristics of uranium diffusion on graphene and graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Han, Han; Ren, Cui-Lan; Wang, Chang-Ying; Shao, Kuan; Huai, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The first principles density-functional theoretical calculations of U adatom adsorption and diffusion on a planar graphene and quasi-one-dimensional graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are performed. An energetic preference is found for U adatom diffusing to the hollow sites of both graphene and GNRs surface. A number of U distinctive diffusion paths either perpendicular or parallel to the ribbon growth direction are examined. The edge effects are evidenced by the calculated energy barriers of U adatom diffusion on armchair and zigzag nanoribbons surfaces. The calculation results indicate that the diffusion of U adatom from the inner site toward the edge site is a feasible process, particularly in zigzag GNR. It is viable to control the initial morphology of nuclear carbon material to retard the diffusion and concentration of nuclides. Project supported by the International S & T Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2014DFG60230), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91326105, 21306220, and 21501189), and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA02040104).

  3. Permeability and kinetic coefficients for mesoscale BCF surface step dynamics: Discrete two-dimensional deposition-diffusion equation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Renjie; Evans, James W.; Oliveira, Tiago J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, a discrete version of deposition-diffusion equations appropriate for description of step flow on a vicinal surface is analyzed for a two-dimensional grid of adsorption sites representing the stepped surface and explicitly incorporating kinks along the step edges. Model energetics and kinetics appropriately account for binding of adatoms at steps and kinks, distinct terrace and edge diffusion rates, and possible additional barriers for attachment to steps. Analysis of adatom attachment fluxes as well as limiting values of adatom densities at step edges for nonuniform deposition scenarios allows determination of both permeability and kinetic coefficients. Behavior of these quantities is assessed as a function of key system parameters including kink density, step attachment barriers, and the step edge diffusion rate.

  4. Permeability and kinetic coefficients for mesoscale BCF surface step dynamics: Discrete two-dimensional deposition-diffusion equation analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Renjie; Evans, James W.; Oliveira, Tiago J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, a discrete version of deposition-diffusion equations appropriate for description of step flow on a vicinal surface is analyzed for a two-dimensional grid of adsorption sites representing the stepped surface and explicitly incorporating kinks along the step edges. Model energetics and kinetics appropriately account for binding of adatoms at steps and kinks, distinct terrace and edge diffusion rates, and possible additional barriers for attachment to steps. Analysis of adatom attachment fluxes as well as limiting values of adatom densities at step edges for nonuniform deposition scenarios allows determination of both permeability and kinetic coefficients. Behavior of these quantities is assessedmore » as a function of key system parameters including kink density, step attachment barriers, and the step edge diffusion rate.« less

  5. The nature of bonding and electronic properties of graphene and benzene with iridium adatoms.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Petr; Granatier, Jaroslav; Klimeš, Jiří; Hobza, Pavel; Otyepka, Michal

    2014-10-14

    Recent theoretical simulations predicted that graphene decorated with Ir adatoms could realize a two-dimensional topological insulator with a substantial band gap. Our understanding of how the electronic properties of graphene change in the presence of metal adatoms is however still limited, as the binding is quite complex involving static and dynamic correlation effects together with relativistic contributions, which makes the theoretical description of such systems quite challenging. We applied the quantum chemical complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) method and density functional theory beyond the standard local density functional approach including relativistic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects on Ir-benzene and Ir-graphene complexes. The CASPT2-SOC method revealed a strong binding affinity of Ir for benzene (33.1 kcal mol(-1)) at a 1.81 Å distance, which was of a single reference character, and a weaker binding affinity (6.3 kcal mol(-1)) at 3.00 Å of a multireference character. In the Ir-graphene complex, the quartet ground-state of the Ir atom changed to the doublet state upon adsorption, and the binding energy predicted by optB86b-vdW-SOC functional remained high (33.8 kcal mol(-1)). In all cases the dynamic correlation effects significantly contributed to the binding. The density of states calculated with the hybrid functional HSE06 showed that the gap of 0.3 eV was induced in graphene by the adsorbed Ir atom even in scalar relativistic calculation, in contrast to metallic behaviour predicted by local density approximation. The results suggest that the strong correlation effects contribute to the opening of the band gap in graphene covered with the Ir adatoms. The value of the magnetic anisotropy energy of 0.1 kcal mol(-1) predicted by HSE06 is lower than those calculated using local functionals.

  6. Oxidation mechanism of formic acid on the bismuth adatom-modified Pt(111) surface.

    PubMed

    Perales-Rondón, Juan Victor; Ferre-Vilaplana, Adolfo; Feliu, Juan M; Herrero, Enrique

    2014-09-24

    In order to improve catalytic processes, elucidation of reaction mechanisms is essential. Here, supported by a combination of experimental and computational results, the oxidation mechanism of formic acid on Pt(111) electrodes modified by the incorporation of bismuth adatoms is revealed. In the proposed model, formic acid is first physisorbed on bismuth and then deprotonated and chemisorbed in formate form, also on bismuth, from which configuration the C-H bond is cleaved, on a neighbor Pt site, yielding CO2. It was found computationally that the activation energy for the C-H bond cleavage step is negligible, which was also verified experimentally.

  7. Realization of anomalous multiferroicity in free-standing graphene with magnetic adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Y.; Ricco, L. S.; Dessotti, F. A.; Machado, R. S.; Shelykh, I. A.; de Souza, M.; Seridonio, A. C.

    2016-11-01

    It is generally believed that free-standing graphene does not demonstrate any ferroic properties. In the present work we revise this statement and show that a single graphene sheet with a pair of magnetic adatoms can be driven into ferroelectric (FE) and multiferroic (MF) phases by tuning the Dirac cones slope. The transition into the FE phase occurs gradually, but an anomalous MF phase appears abruptly by means of a quantum phase transition. Our findings suggest that such features should exist in graphene recently investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy [H. González-Herrero et al., Science 352, 437 (2016), 10.1126/science.aad8038].

  8. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  9. Spin-dependent beating patterns in thermoelectric properties: Filtering the carriers of the heat flux in a Kondo adatom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seridonio, A. C.; Siqueira, E. C.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.; Shelykh, I. A.; Figueira, M. S.

    2014-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the thermoelectric properties of a spin-polarized two-dimensional electron gas hosting a Kondo adatom hybridized with a STM tip. Such a setup is treated within the single-impurity Anderson model in combination with the atomic approach for the Green's functions. Due to the spin dependence of the Fermi wave numbers, the electrical and thermal conductances together with thermopower and Lorenz number reveal beating patterns as a function of the STM tip position in the Kondo regime. In particular, by tuning the lateral displacement of the tip with respect to the adatom vicinity, the temperature, and the position of the adatom level, one can change the sign of the Seebeck coefficient through charge and spin. This opens a possibility of the microscopic control of the heat flux analogously to that established for the electrical current.

  10. Tailoring the electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer SnO by B, C, N, O and F adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Junguang; Guan, Lixiu

    2017-03-01

    Recently, SnO has attracted more and more attention, because it is a bipolar electronic material holding great potential in the design of p-n junction. In this paper, we examine the effect of extrinsic point defects on modifying the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO using density functionals theory (DFT). The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. All adatoms are found energetically stable. B, C, N and F adatoms will modify the band gap and introduce band gap states. In addition, our calculations show that N, B and F can introduce stable local magnetic moment to the lattice. Our results, therefore, offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO by surface functionalization, which will be helpful to experimentalists in improving the performance of SnO-based electronic devices and opening new avenue for its spintronics applications.

  11. Tailoring the electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer SnO by B, C, N, O and F adatoms.

    PubMed

    Tao, Junguang; Guan, Lixiu

    2017-03-14

    Recently, SnO has attracted more and more attention, because it is a bipolar electronic material holding great potential in the design of p-n junction. In this paper, we examine the effect of extrinsic point defects on modifying the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO using density functionals theory (DFT). The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. All adatoms are found energetically stable. B, C, N and F adatoms will modify the band gap and introduce band gap states. In addition, our calculations show that N, B and F can introduce stable local magnetic moment to the lattice. Our results, therefore, offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO by surface functionalization, which will be helpful to experimentalists in improving the performance of SnO-based electronic devices and opening new avenue for its spintronics applications.

  12. Tailoring the electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer SnO by B, C, N, O and F adatoms

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Junguang; Guan, Lixiu

    2017-01-01

    Recently, SnO has attracted more and more attention, because it is a bipolar electronic material holding great potential in the design of p-n junction. In this paper, we examine the effect of extrinsic point defects on modifying the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO using density functionals theory (DFT). The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. All adatoms are found energetically stable. B, C, N and F adatoms will modify the band gap and introduce band gap states. In addition, our calculations show that N, B and F can introduce stable local magnetic moment to the lattice. Our results, therefore, offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO by surface functionalization, which will be helpful to experimentalists in improving the performance of SnO-based electronic devices and opening new avenue for its spintronics applications. PMID:28291244

  13. Effect of adatom deposition on surface magnetism and exchange coupling parameter in (0001) SmCo{sub 5} slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Chandrasekaran, S.; Murugan, P.; Saravanan, P.; Kamat, S. V.

    2015-04-07

    First principles calculations are performed on 3d-transition metal atom deposited (0001) surface of SmCo{sub 5} to understand the magnetic properties and the improvement of Curie temperature (T{sub c}). Various atomic sites are examined to identify the energetically feasible adsorption of adatom and it is found that the void site of Co-rich (0001) SmCo{sub 5} surface is the most favourable one to deposit. The surface magnetic moments of various adatom deposited SmCo{sub 5} surfaces are larger than the clean surface except for Cu and Zn. Eventually, the surface exchange coupling of clean and adatom deposited surface is found to increase for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu deposited surfaces and this improvement results in the increase in T{sub c} of SmCo{sub 5} slab.

  14. The relative diffusive transport rate of SrI2 in water changes over the nanometer length scale as measured by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Faraone, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to provide insight into the structures of ionic solutions for over a century, but the probes have covered distances shorter than 8 Å. For the non-hydrolyzing salt SrI2 in aqueous solution, a locally ordered lattice of ions exists that scatters slow neutrons coherently down to at least 0.1 mol L(-1) concentration, where the measured average distance between scatterers is over 18 Å. To investigate the motions of these scatterers, coherent quasielastic neutron scattering (CQENS) data on D2O solutions with SrI2 at 1, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mol L(-1) concentrations was obtained to provide an experimental measure of the diffusive transport rate for the motion between pairs of ions relative to each other. Because CQENS measures the motion of one ion relative to another, the frame of reference is centered on an ion, which is unique among all diffusion measurement methods. We call the measured quantity the pairwise diffusive transport rate Dp. In addition to this ion centered frame of reference, the diffusive transport rate can be measured as a function of the momentum transfer q, where q = (4π/λ)sin θ with a scattering angle of 2θ. Since q is related to the interion distance (d = 2π/q), for the experimental range 0.2 Å(-1)≤q≤ 1.0 Å(-1), Dp is, then, measured over interion distances from 40 Å to ≈6 Å. We find the measured diffusional transport rates increase with increasing distance between scatterers over the entire range covered and interpret this behavior to be caused by dynamic coupling among the ions. Within the model of Fickian diffusion, at the longer interionic distances Dp is greater than the Nernst-Hartley value for an infinitely dilute solution. For these nm-distance diffusional transport rates to conform with the lower, macroscopically measured diffusion coefficients, we propose that local, coordinated counter motion of at least pairs of ions is part of the transport process.

  15. Chern insulators without band inversion in Mo S2 monolayers with 3 d adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xinyuan; Zhao, Bao; Zhang, Jiayong; Xue, Yang; Li, Yun; Yang, Zhongqin

    2017-02-01

    Electronic and topological properties of Mo S2 monolayers endowed with 3 d transition metal (TM) adatoms (V-Fe) are explored by using ab initio methods and k .p models. Without the consideration of the Hubbard U interaction, the V, Cr, and Fe adatoms tend to locate on the top of the Mo atoms, while the most stable site for the Mn atom is at the hollow position of the Mo-S hexagon. After the Hubbard U is applied, the most stable sites of all the systems become the top of the Mo atoms. Chern insulators without band inversion are achieved in these systems. The V and Fe adsorption systems are the best candidates to produce the topological states. The k .p model calculations indicate that these topological states are determined by the TM magnetism, the C3 v crystal field from the Mo S2 substrate, and the TM atomic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The special two-meron pseudospin texture is found to contribute to the topology. The apparent difference between the Berry curvatures for the V and Fe adsorption systems is also explored. Our results widen the understanding of the Chern insulators and are helpful for the applications of the Mo S2 monolayers in the future electronics and spintronics.

  16. Symmetry-protected coherent transport for diluted vacancies and adatoms in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Tijerina, David A.; da Silva, Luis G. G. V. Dias

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of a low concentration of adatoms or single vacancies in the linear-response transport properties of otherwise clean graphene. These impurities were treated as localized orbitals, and for each type two cases with distinct coupling symmetries were studied. For adatoms, we considered top- and hollow-site adsorbates (TOP and HS). For vacancies, we studied impurity formation by soft bond reconstruction (REC), as well as the more symmetric case of charge accumulation in unreconstructed vacancies (VAC). Our results indicate that the transport is determined by usual impurity scattering when the graphene-impurity coupling does not possess C3 v symmetry (TOP and REC). In contrast, VAC impurities decouple from the electronic states at the Dirac points, and yield no contribution to the resistivity for a sample in charge neutrality. Furthermore, the inversion-symmetry-conserving HS impurities also decouple from entire sets of momenta throughout the Brillouin zone, and do not contribute to the resistivity within a broad range of parameters. These behaviors are protected by C3 v and inversion symmetry, respectively, and persist for more general impurity models.

  17. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; Fuente, César de la; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  18. Copper adatoms on graphene: Theory of orbital and spin-orbital effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Tobias; Irmer, Susanne; Gmitra, Martin; Kochan, Denis; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    We present a combined DFT and model Hamiltonian analysis of spin-orbit coupling in graphene induced by copper adatoms in the bridge and top positions, representing isolated atoms in the dilute limit. The orbital physics in both systems is found to be surprisingly similar, given the fundamental difference in the local symmetry. In both systems the Cu p and d contributions at the Fermi level are very similar. Based on the knowledge of orbital effects we identify that the main cause of the locally induced spin-orbit couplings are Cu p and d orbitals. By employing the DFT+U formalism as an analysis tool we find that both the p and d orbital contributions are equally important to spin-orbit coupling, although p contributions to the density of states are much higher. We fit the DFT data with phenomenological tight-binding models developed separately for the top and bridge positions. Our model Hamiltonians describe the low-energy electronic band structure in the whole Brillouin zone and allow us to extract the size of the spin-orbit interaction induced by the local Cu adatom to be in the tens of meV. By application of the phenomenological models to Green's function techniques, we find that copper atoms act as resonant impurities in graphene with large lifetimes of 50 and 100 fs for top and bridge, respectively.

  19. Nitrogen-tuned bonding mechanism of Li and Ti adatom embedded graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangho; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2013-09-15

    The effects of nitrogen defects on the bonding mechanism and resultant binding energy between the metal and graphene layer were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the graphitic N-doped graphene, Li adatom exhibited ionic bonding character, while Ti adatom showed features of covalent bonding similar to that of pristine graphene. However, in the cases of pyridinic and pyrrolic structures, partially covalent bonding characteristic occurred around N atoms in the process of binding with metals, and this particular bond formation enhanced the bond strength of metal on the graphene layer as much as it exceeded the cohesive energy of the metal bulk. Thus, Li and Ti metals are expected to be dispersed with atomic accuracy on the pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene layers. These results demonstrate that the bonding mechanism of metal–graphene complex can change according to the type of N defect, and this also affects the binding results. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nitrogen defects changed the bonding mechanism between metal and graphene. • Bonding character and binding results were investigated using DFT calculations. • Covalent bonding character occurred around pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene. • Pyridinic and pyrrolic N atoms are effective for metal dispersion on the graphene.

  20. Defects in Silicene: Vacancy Clusters, Extended Line Defects, and Di-adatoms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Wu, Yifeng; Tu, Yi; Wang, Yonghui; Jiang, Tong; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Yonghao

    2015-01-01

    Defects are almost inevitable during the fabrication process, and their existence strongly affects thermodynamic and (opto)electronic properties of two-dimensional materials. Very recent experiments have provided clear evidence for the presence of larger multi-vacancies in silicene, but their structure, stability, and formation mechanism remain largely unexplored. Here, we present a detailed theoretical study of silicene monolayer containing three types of defects: vacancy clusters, extended line defects (ELDs), and di-adatoms. First-principles calculations, along with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, revealed the coalescence tendency of small defects and formation of highly stable vacancy clusters. The 5|8|5 ELD – the most favorable extended defect in both graphene and silicene sheets – is found to be easier to form in the latter case due to the mixed sp2/sp3 hybridization of silicon. In addition, hybrid functional calculations that contain part of the Hatree-Fock exchange energy demonstrated that the introduction of single and double silicon adatoms significantly enhances the stability of the system, and provides an effective approach on tuning the magnetic moment and band gap of silicene. PMID:25619941

  1. New adatom model for Si(11) 7X7 and Si(111)Ge 5X5 reconstructed surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadi, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A new adatom model differing from the conventional model by a reconstruction of the substrate is proposed. The new adatom structure provides an explanation for the 7x7 and 5x5 size of the unit cells seen on annealed Si(111) and Si(111)-Ge surfaces, respectively. The model is consistent with structural information from vacuum-tunneling microscopy. It also provides simple explanations for stacking-fault-type features expected from Rutherford backscattering experiments and for similarities in the LEED and photoemission spectra of 2x1 and 7x7 surfaces.

  2. Effect of a surface Al adatom on the resonant charge transfer between an H - ion and an Al( 1 1 1 ) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. A. M. C.; Wolfgang, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Gauyacq, J. P.; Nordlander, P.; Teillet-Billy, D.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents an investigation of how the charge transfer between an H - ion and an Al surface is influenced by the presence of a point defect on the surface. We consider the case of a single Al adatom on an Al(1 1 1) metal surface, and we study the resonant charge transfer process when the projectile is in the vicinity of the adatom. The adatom-induced electron potential is calculated using a density functional method. The coupled angular mode method is used to determine the shift and broadening of the H - level. The results show that the Al adatom introduces an attractive potential which, at large H --metal distances, causes a downward shift of the H - level and an increase of its width. At close distances, the calculation also shows a strong coupling between the H - ion level and the Al(3p) and Al(3s) resonances located on the adatom. A diabatic modeling including the effect of the mixing of the projectile and adatom levels is developed which allows the discussion of the non-adiabatic transitions between projectile and adatom-localised levels when the H - passes through the region near the adatom.

  3. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  4. Stabilizing Single Ni Adatoms on a Two-Dimensional Porous Titania Overlayer at the SrTiO3(110) Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nickel vapor-deposited on the SrTiO3(110) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy, photoemission spectroscopy (PES), and density functional theory calculations. This surface forms a (4 × 1) reconstruction, composed of a 2-D titania structure with periodic six- and ten-membered nanopores. Anchored at these nanopores, Ni single adatoms are stabilized at room temperature. PES measurements show that the Ni adatoms create an in-gap state located at 1.9 eV below the conduction band minimum and induce an upward band bending. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that Ni adatoms are positively charged. Our study produces well-dispersed single-adatom arrays on a well-characterized oxide support, providing a model system to investigate single-adatom catalytic and magnetic properties. PMID:25177410

  5. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with enhanced orbital moments of Fe adatoms on a topological surface of Bi2Se3.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mao; Kuroda, Kenta; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Okamoto, Kazuaki; Zhu, Si-Yuan; Shirai, Kaito; Miyamoto, Koji; Arita, Masashi; Nakatake, Masashi; Okuda, Taichi; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Kimura, Akio

    2013-06-12

    We have found a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of iron adatoms on a surface of the prototypical three-dimensional topological insulator Bi2Se3 by using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements. The orbital magnetic moment of Fe is strongly enhanced at lower coverage, where angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy shows coexistence of non-trivial topological states at the surface.

  6. Oxidation-induced spin reorientation in Co adatoms and CoPd dimers on Ni/Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Beeck, T.; Fiedler, S.; Baev, I.; Wurth, W.; Martins, M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasmall magnetic clusters and adatoms are of strong current interest because of their possible use in future technological applications. Here, we demonstrate that the magnetic coupling between the adsorbates and the substrate can be significantly changed through oxidation. The magnetic properties of Co adatoms and CoPd dimers deposited on a remanently magnetized Ni/Cu(100) substrate have been investigated by x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy at the Co L2 ,3 edges. Using spectral differences, pure and oxidized components are distinguished, and their respective magnetic moments are determined. The Co adatoms and the CoPd dimers are coupled ferromagnetically to the substrate, while their oxides, Co-O and CoPd-O, are coupled antiferromagnetically to the substrate. Along with the spin reorientation from the pure to the oxidized state, the magnetic moment of the adatom is highly reduced from Co to Co-O. In contrast, the magnetic moment of the dimer is of similar order for CoPd and CoPd-O.

  7. Strong out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy of Fe adatoms on Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eelbo, T.; Waśniowska, M.; Sikora, M.; Dobrzański, M.; Kozłowski, A.; Pulkin, A.; Autès, G.; Miotkowski, I.; Yazyev, O. V.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2014-03-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms adsorbed on the surface of the topological insulator Bi2Te3(111) are investigated. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy prove the existence of two distinct types of Fe species, while our first-principles calculations assign them to Fe adatoms in the hcp and fcc hollow sites. The combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements and angular dependent magnetization curves reveals out-of-plane anisotropies for both species with anisotropy constants of Kfcc=(10±4) meV/atom and Khcp=(8±4) meV/atom. These values are well in line with the results of calculations.

  8. Pattern formation in the instability of a vicinal surface by the drift of adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masahide; Uwaha, Makio

    1999-12-01

    We study the behavior of steps in a vicinal face with drift of adsorbed atoms (adatoms) by an external field. When the drift is in the downhill direction and its velocity exceeds critical values, vxc and vyc, the vicinal face is linearly unstable to long-wavelength fluctuations parallel and/or perpendicular to the steps. By taking the continuum limit of the step-flow model, we derive an anisotropic Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with propagative terms, which describes the motion of an unstable vicinal face. Its numerical solution shows ripples or a zigzag pattern expected from the linear analysis. Nonlinearity becomes important in the late stage and, depending on the condition, various patterns are formed: regular step bunches, a hill and valley structure tilted from the initial step direction, mounds, and a chaotic pattern.

  9. Imaging and manipulation of adatoms on an alumina surface by noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Simon, G H; Heyde, M; Freund, H-J

    2012-02-29

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) has been performed on an aluminum oxide film grown on NiAl(110) in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) at low temperature (5 K). Results reproduce the topography of the structural model, unlike scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) images. Equipped with this extraordinary contrast the network of extended defects, which stems from domain boundaries intersecting the film surface, can be analysed in atomic detail. The knowledge of occurring surface structures opens up the opportunity to determine adsorption sites of individual adsorbates on the alumina film. The level of difficulty for such imaging depends on the imaging characteristics of the substrate and the interaction which can be maintained above the adsorbate. Positions of single adsorbed gold atoms within the unit cell have been determined despite their easy removal at slightly higher interaction strength. Preliminary manipulation experiments indicate a pick-up process for the vanishing of the gold adatoms from the film surface.

  10. Measuring the charge state of an adatom with noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gross, Leo; Mohn, Fabian; Liljeroth, Peter; Repp, Jascha; Giessibl, Franz J; Meyer, Gerhard

    2009-06-12

    Charge states of atoms can be investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy, but this method requires a conducting substrate. We investigated the charge-switching of individual adsorbed gold and silver atoms (adatoms) on ultrathin NaCl films on Cu(111) using a qPlus tuning fork atomic force microscope (AFM) operated at 5 kelvin with oscillation amplitudes in the subangstrom regime. Charging of a gold atom by one electron charge increases the force on the AFM tip by a few piconewtons. Moreover, the local contact potential difference is shifted depending on the sign of the charge and allows the discrimination of positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged atoms. The combination of single-electron charge sensitivity and atomic lateral resolution should foster investigations of molecular electronics, photonics, catalysis, and solar photoconversion.

  11. Hybridization of phenylthiolate- and methylthiolate-adatom species at low coverage on the Au(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymovych, Petro; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2013-04-02

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy we observed reaction products of two chemisorbed thiolate species, methylthiolate and phenylthiolate, on the Au(111) surface. Despite the apparent stability, organometallic complexes of methyl- and phenylthiolate with the gold-adatom (RS-Au-SR, with R as the hydrocarbon group) undergo a stoichiometric exchange reaction, forming hybridized CH{sub 3}S-Au-SPh complexes. Complementary density functional theory calculations suggest that the reaction is most likely mediated by a monothiolate RS-Au complex bonded to the gold surface, which forms a trithiolate RS-Au-(SR)-Au-SR complex as a key intermediate. This work therefore reveals the novel chemical reactivity of the low-coverage “striped” phase of alkanethiols on gold and strongly points to the involvement of monoadatom thiolate intermediates in this reaction. By extension, such intermediates may be involved in the self-assembly process itself, shedding new light on this long-standing problem.

  12. Combined ab initio and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of C diffusion on the √(3)×√(3) β-SiC (111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M. C.; Pignedoli, C. A.; di Felice, R.; Bertoni, C. M.; Catellani, A.

    2005-02-01

    We investigate the kinetic behavior of a single C adatom on the 3×3 β-SiC(111) surface by means of combined ab initio and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. After identifying the metastable binding locations, we calculate the energy barriers the adatom must overcome when jumping among them. The presence of the 3×3 reconstruction creates considerable differences among the diffusion mechanisms that can be thermally activated. This has important implications for the C mobility on the surface, and therefore for SiC growth. The kinetic simulation at realistic temperatures and time scales revealed that C diffusion occurs mostly around the Si adatoms forming the 3×3 reconstruction. A reduced adatom mobility, as observed in many studies of surfactant-mediated growth, can favor the formation of a high density of nuclei, and thus promote a layer-by-layer growth. As a further result of the kinetic simulation we obtained the adatom diffusion coefficient, a macroscopic quantity accessible in experiments.

  13. Possibility of transforming the electronic structure of one species of graphene adatoms into that of another by application of gate voltage: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kevin T.; Lee, Hoonkyung; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2011-10-01

    Graphene provides many advantages for controlling the electronic structure of adatoms and other adsorbates via gating. Using the projected density of states and charge density obtained from first-principles density-functional periodic supercell calculations, we investigate the possibility of performing “alchemy” of adatoms on graphene, i.e., transforming the electronic structure of one species of adatom into that of another species by application of a gate voltage. Gating is modeled as a change in the number of electrons in the unit cell, with the inclusion of a compensating uniform background charge. Within this model and the generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation functional, we find that such transformations are possible for K, Ca, and several transition-metal adatoms. Gate control of the occupation of the p states of In on graphene is also investigated. The validity of the supercell approximation with uniform compensating charge and the model for exchange and correlation is also discussed.

  14. Experimental test of the single adatom exchange model in surfactant-mediated growth of Ge on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailes, A. A., III; Boshart, M. A.; Seiberling, L. E.

    1998-03-01

    We have tested the single adatom exchange model for surfactant-mediated growth. Using two samples with different coverages of Ge on Sb-terminated Si(100), we generated energy distributions of scattered MeV ions from transmission ion channeling experiments. We studied the system both after room temperature deposition of Ge and after annealing at 350°C. We then compared simulated energy distributions for the single adatom exchange model to the experimental energy distributions. No combination of temperature and coverage produced a good fit between data and simulations of this model. Before annealing, however, a model having Ge in dimer-like sites on top of undisturbed Sb dimers describes the data well for both Ge coverages.

  15. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-10-01

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as {1 1 1}-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on {1 1 1} and {2 1 1} surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while {0 0 1} and {0 1 1} surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to {1 1 1} and {2 1 1} tungsten surfaces than is observed for {0 0 1} or {0 1 1} surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten "fuzz" in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  16. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-10-14

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as (1 1 1)-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) tungsten surfaces than is observed for (0 0 1) or (0 1 1) surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten “fuzz” in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  17. Black Phosphorus N-Type Field-Effect Transistor with Ultrahigh Electron Mobility via Aluminum Adatoms Doping.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Amit; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Ang, Kah-Wee

    2017-02-01

    High-performance black phosphorus n-type field-effect transistors are realized using Al adatoms as effective electron donors, which achieved a record high mobility of >1495 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 260 K. The electron mobility is corroborated to charged-impurity scattering at low temperature, whilst metallic-like conduction is observed at high gate bias with increased carrier density due to enhanced electron-phonon interactions at high temperature.

  18. Diffusion on Cu surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    1993-01-01

    Understanding surface diffusion is essential in understanding surface phenomena, such as crystal growth, thin film growth, corrosion, physisorption, and chemisorption. Because of its importance, various experimental and theoretical efforts have been directed to understand this phenomena. The Field Ion Microscope (FIM) has been the major experimental tool for studying surface diffusion. FIM have been employed by various research groups to study surface diffusion of adatoms. Because of limitations of the FIM, such studies are only limited to a few surfaces: nickel, platinum, aluminum, iridium, tungsten, and rhodium. From the theoretical standpoint, various atomistic simulations are performed to study surface diffusion. In most of these calculations the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) along with the molecular static (MS) simulation are utilized. The EAM is a semi-empirical approach for modeling the interatomic interactions. The MS simulation is a technique for minimizing the total energy of a system of particles with respect to the positions of its particles. One of the objectives of this work is to develop the EAM functions for Cu and use them in conjunction with the molecular static (MS) simulation to study diffusion of a Cu atom on a perfect as well as stepped Cu(100) surfaces. This will provide a test of the validity of the EAM functions on Cu(100) surface and near the stepped environments. In particular, we construct a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model and calculate the migration energies of an atom on a terrace, near a ledge site, near a kink site, and going over a descending step. We have also calculated formation energies of an atom on the bare surface, a vacancy in the surface, a stepped surface, and a stepped-kink surface. Our results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Control of selectivity in allylic alcohol oxidation on gold surfaces: the role of oxygen adatoms and hydroxyl species.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Gregory M; Zhang, Liang; Evans, Edward J; Yan, Ting; Henkelman, Graeme; Mullins, C Buddie

    2015-02-14

    Gold catalysts display high activity and good selectivity for partial oxidation of a number of alcohol species. In this work, we discuss the effects of oxygen adatoms and surface hydroxyls on the selectivity for oxidation of allylic alcohols (allyl alcohol and crotyl alcohol) on gold surfaces. Utilizing temperature programmed desorption (TPD), reactive molecular beam scattering (RMBS), and density functional theory (DFT) techniques, we provide evidence to suggest that the selectivity displayed towards partial oxidation versus combustion pathways is dependent on the type of oxidant species present on the gold surface. TPD and RMBS results suggest that surface hydroxyls promote partial oxidation of allylic alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes with very high selectivity, while oxygen adatoms promote both partial oxidation and combustion pathways. DFT calculations indicate that oxygen adatoms can react with acrolein to promote the formation of a bidentate surface intermediate, similar to structures that have been shown to decompose to generate combustion products over other transition metal surfaces. Surface hydroxyls do not readily promote such a process. Our results help explain phenomena observed in previous studies and may prove useful in the design of future catalysts for partial oxidation of alcohols.

  20. Rapid diffusion of magic-size islands by combined glide and vacancy mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, D; Voter, A F; Uche, O U; Hamilton, J C

    2009-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics, nudged elastic band, and embedded atom methods, we show that certain 2D Ag islands undergo extremely rapid one-dimensional diffusion on Cu(001) surfaces. Indeed, below 300K, hopping rates for 'magic-size' islands are orders of magnitude faster than hopping rates for single Ag adatoms. This rapid diffusion requires both the c(10 x 2) hexagonally-packed superstructure typical of Ag on Cu(001) and appropriate 'magic-sizes' for the islands. The novel highly-cooperative diffusion mechanism presented here couples vacancy diffusion with simultaneous core glide.

  1. Noble-metal intercalation process leading to a protected adatom in a graphene hollow site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan Nair, M.; Cranney, M.; Jiang, T.; Hajjar-Garreau, S.; Aubel, D.; Vonau, F.; Florentin, A.; Denys, E.; Bocquet, M.-L.; Simon, L.

    2016-08-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that gold deposited on a monolayer (ML) of graphene on SiC(0001) is intercalated below the ML after an annealing procedure and affects the band structure of graphene. Here we prove experimentally and theoretically that some of the gold forms a dispersed phase composed of single adatoms, being intercalated between the ML and the buffer layer and in a hollow position with respect to C atoms of the ML on top. They are freestanding and negatively charged, due to the partial screening of the electron transfer between SiC and the ML, without changing the intrinsic n-type doping of the ML. As these single atoms decouple the ML from the buffer layer, the quasiparticles of graphene are less perturbed, thus increasing their Fermi velocity. Moreover, the hollow position of the intercalated single Au atoms might lead to spin-orbit coupling in the graphene layer covering IC domains. This effect of spin-orbit coupling has been recently observed experimentally in Au-intercalated graphene on SiC(0001) [D. Marchenko, A. Varykhalov, J. Sánchez-Barriga, Th. Seyller, and O. Rader, Appl. Phys. Lett. 108, 172405 (2016), 10.1063/1.4947286] and has been theoretically predicted for heavy atoms, like thallium, in a hollow position on graphene [C. Weeks, J. Hu, J. Alicea, M. Franz, and R. Wu, Phys. Rev. X 1, 021001 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevX.1.021001; A. Cresti, D. V. Tuan, D. Soriano, A. W. Cummings, and S. Roche, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 246603 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.246603].

  2. Adsorption of Te atoms on Au(1 1 1) and the emergence of an adatom-induced bound state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouteden, Koen; Debehets, Jolien; Muzychenko, Dmitry; Li, Zhe; Seo, Jin Won; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2017-03-01

    We report on the adsorption of Te adatoms on Au(1 1 1), which are identified and investigated relying on scanning tunnelling microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and density functional theory. The Te adatoms lift the 23  ×  √3 surface reconstruction of the Au(1 1 1) support and their organization is similar to that of previously reported chalcogen adatoms on Au(1 1 1), which are also known to lift the herringbone reconstruction and can adopt a (√3  ×  √3)R30° structure. The adatoms show strong interaction with the Au(1 1 1) surface, resulting in scattering and confinement of the Au surface state (SS) electrons near the Fermi level. More remarkably, scanning tunnelling spectroscopy reveals the existence of an electronic resonance at high voltages well above the Fermi level. This resonance can be interpreted as a bound state that is split off from the bottom of the Au(1 1 1) bulk conduction band. A similar split-off state may exist for other types of adatoms on metallic surfaces that exhibit a surface band gap.

  3. Tracking the Effect of Adatom Electronegativity on Systematically Modified AlGaN/GaN Schottky Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Maria; Pietschnig, Rudolf; Ostermaier, Clemens

    2015-10-21

    The influence of surface modifications on the Schottky barrier height for gallium nitride semiconductor devices is frequently underestimated or neglected in investigations thereof. We show that a strong dependency of Schottky barrier heights for nickel/aluminum-gallium nitride (0001) contacts on the surface terminations exists: a linear correlation of increasing barrier height with increasing electronegativity of superficial adatoms is observed. The negatively charged adatoms compete with the present nitrogen over the available gallium (or aluminum) orbital to form an electrically improved surface termination. The resulting modification of the surface dipoles and hence polarization of the surface termination causes observed band bending. Our findings suggest that the greatest Schottky barrier heights are achieved by increasing the concentration of the most polarized fluorine-gallium (-aluminum) bonds at the surface. An increase in barrier height from 0.7 to 1.1 eV after a 15% fluorine termination is obtained with ideality factors of 1.10 ± 0.05. The presence of surface dipoles that are changing the surface energy is proven by the sessile drop method as the electronegativity difference and polarization influences the contact angle. The extracted decrease in the Lifshitz-van-der-Waals component from 48.8 to 40.4 mJ/m(2) with increasing electronegativity and concentration of surface adatoms confirms the presence of increasing surface dipoles: as the polarizability of equally charged anions decreases with increasing electronegativity, the diiodomethane contact angles increase significantly from 14° up to 39° after the 15% fluorine termination. Therefore, a linear correlation between increasing anion electronegativity of the (Al)GaN termination and total surface energy within a 95% confidence interval is obtained. Furthermore, our results reveal a generally strong Lewis basicity of (Al)GaN surfaces explaining the high chemical inertness of the surfaces.

  4. Atomic diffusion on vicinal surfaces: step roughening impact on step permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranguelov, B.; Michailov, M.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of mass transport in material science for systems with reduced dimensionality holds special academic and technological attention since the fine diffusion control of adatoms could initiate exotic nanoscale patterning at epitaxial interfaces. The present study brings out important details of the atomic diffusion mechanisms on vicinal surfaces, accounting for the subtle competition between an external field imposed on the migrating adatoms and the roughening of the steps bordering the atomic terraces. The computational model reveals a temperature gap for breakdown of step permeability in the vicinity of the step roughening transition and sheds light on recently observed experimental results for atomic step dynamics on Si surfaces. The present study also demonstrates the extended capability of atomistic models in computer simulations to unravel simultaneous effects, to distinguish between them, and finally to assess their specific contribution to experimentally observed complex physical phenomena.

  5. Spiral magnetic order and topological superconductivity in a chain of magnetic adatoms on a two-dimensional superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Morten H.; Schecter, Michael; Flensberg, Karsten; Andersen, Brian M.; Paaske, Jens

    2016-10-01

    We study the magnetic and electronic phases of a one-dimensional (1D) magnetic adatom chain on a 2D superconductor. In particular, we confirm the existence of a "self-organized" 1D topologically nontrivial superconducting phase within the set of subgap Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states formed along the magnetic chain. This phase is stabilized by incommensurate spiral correlations within the magnetic chain that arise from the competition between short-range ferromagnetic and long-range antiferromagnetic electron-induced exchange interactions, similar to a recent study for a 3D superconductor [M. Schecter et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 140503(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.140503]. The exchange interactions along diagonal directions are also considered and found to display behavior similar to a 1D substrate when close to half filling. We show that the topological phase diagram is robust against local superconducting order parameter suppression and weak substrate spin-orbit coupling. Lastly, we study the effect of a direct ferromagnetic exchange coupling between the adatoms, and find the region of spiral order in the phase diagram to be significantly enlarged in a wide range of the direct exchange coupling.

  6. Interaction of cesium adatoms with free-standing graphene and graphene-veiled SiO2 surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2015-04-21

    In this study, the interaction of Cs adatoms with mono- or bi-layered graphene (MLG and BLG), either free-standing or on a SiO2 substrate, was investigated using density functional theory. The most stable adsorption sites for Cs are found to be hollow sites on both graphene sheets and graphene-veiled SiO2(0001). In addition, larger dipole moments are created when a MLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate is used for adsorption of Cs atoms compared to the adsorption on free-standing MLG, due to charge transfer occurring between the MLG and the SiO2 substrate. For the adsorption of Cs on BLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate, these differences are smoothed out and the binding energies corresponding to different sites are nearly degenerate; smaller dipole moments created by the Cs adatoms on BLG compared to MLG are also predicted.

  7. Interaction of cesium adatoms with free-standing graphene and graphene-veiled SiO2 surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2015-04-21

    In this study, the interaction of Cs adatoms with mono- or bi-layered graphene (MLG and BLG), either free-standing or on a SiO2 substrate, was investigated using density functional theory. The most stable adsorption sites for Cs are found to be hollow sites on both graphene sheets and graphene-veiled SiO2(0001). In addition, larger dipole moments are created when a MLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate is used for adsorption of Cs atoms compared to the adsorption on free-standing MLG, due to charge transfer occurring between the MLG and the SiO2 substrate. For the adsorption of Cs on BLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate, these differences are smoothedmore » out and the binding energies corresponding to different sites are nearly degenerate; smaller dipole moments created by the Cs adatoms on BLG compared to MLG are also predicted.« less

  8. Phase singularity diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Lockerman, Yitzchak; Genack, Azriel Z

    2014-06-01

    We follow the trajectories of phase singularities at nulls of intensity in the speckle pattern of waves transmitted through random media as the frequency of the incident radiation is scanned in microwave experiments and numerical simulations. Phase singularities are observed to diffuse with a linear increase of the square displacement 〈R2〉 with frequency shift. The product of the diffusion coefficient of phase singularities in the transmitted speckle pattern and the photon diffusion coefficient through the random medium is proportional to the square of the effective sample length. This provides the photon diffusion coefficient and a method for characterizing the motion of dynamic material systems.

  9. Phonons in Potassium-doped Graphene: The Effects of Electron-phonon Interactions, Dimensionality, and Adatom Ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Dean M. P.; Howard, C.A.; Withers, F.

    2011-12-19

    Graphene phonons are measured as a function of electron doping via the addition of potassium adatoms. In the low doping regime, the in-plane carbon G peak hardens and narrows with increasing doping, analogous to the trend seen in graphene doped via the field effect. At high dopings, beyond those accessible by the field effect, the G peak strongly softens and broadens. This is interpreted as a dynamic, nonadiabatic renormalization of the phonon self-energy. At dopings between the light and heavily doped regimes, we find a robust inhomogeneous phase where the potassium coverage is segregated into regions of high and low density. The phonon energies, linewidths, and tunability are notably very similar for one- to four-layer potassium-doped graphene, but significantly different to bulk potassium-doped graphite.

  10. Formation of O Adatom Pairs and Charge Transfer upon O-2 Dissociation on Reduced TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2010-06-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory have been used to investigate the details of O2 dissociation leading to the formation of oxygen adatom (Oa) pairs at terminal Ti sites. An intermediate, metastable Oa-Oa configuration with two nearest-neighbor O atoms is observed after O2 dissociation at 300 K. The nearest-neighbor Oa pairs are destabilized by Coulomb repulsion of charged Oa’s that separate further along the Ti row into energetically more favorable second-nearest neighbor configuration. The potential energy profile calculated for O2 dissociation on Ti rows and following Oa’s separation strongly supports the experimental observations. Furthermore, our results suggest that the itinerant electrons associated with the O vacancies are being utilized in the O2 dissociation process at the Ti row, whereas at least two oxygen vacancies per O2 molecule are required in order for this process to become viable.

  11. A density functional theory study of uranium-doped thoria and uranium adatoms on the major surfaces of thorium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Ashley E.; Santos-Carballal, David; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2016-05-01

    Thorium dioxide is of significant research interest for its use as a nuclear fuel, particularly as part of mixed oxide fuels. We present the results of a density functional theory (DFT) study of uranium-substituted thorium dioxide, where we found that increasing levels of uranium substitution increases the covalent nature of the bonding in the bulk ThO2 crystal. Three low Miller index surfaces have been simulated and we propose the Wulff morphology for a ThO2 particle and STM images for the (100), (110), and (111) surfaces studied in this work. We have also calculated the adsorption of a uranium atom and the U adatom is found to absorb strongly on all three surfaces, with particular preference for the less stable (100) and (110) surfaces, thus providing a route to the incorporation of uranium into a growing thoria particle.

  12. Intermixed adatom and surface-bound adsorbates in regular self-assembled monolayers of racemic 2-butanethiol on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Runhai; Yan, Jiawei; Jensen, Palle S; Ascic, Erhad; Gan, Shiyu; Tanner, David; Mao, Bingwei; Niu, Li; Zhang, Jingdong; Tang, Chunguang; Hush, Noel S; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Ulstrup, Jens

    2015-04-07

    In situ scanning tunneling microscopy combined with density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations reveal a complex structure for the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of racemic 2-butanethiol on Au(111) in aqueous solution. Six adsorbate molecules occupy a (10×√3)R30° cell organized as two RSAuSR adatom-bound motifs plus two RS species bound directly to face-centered-cubic and hexagonally close-packed sites. This is the first time that these competing head-group arrangements have been observed in the same ordered SAM. Such unusual packing is favored as it facilitates SAMs with anomalously high coverage (30%), much larger than that for enantiomerically resolved 2-butanethiol or secondary-branched butanethiol (25%) and near that for linear-chain 1-butanethiol (33%).

  13. First principles investigation of the diffusion of interstitial Cu, Ag and Au in ZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li An; Zhu, Xing Feng; Chen, Ling Fu

    2015-07-01

    The diffusion is of great significance in many applications when the impurities are employed to tune the semiconductor's electrical or optical properties. It is necessary to understand how dopant defects diffuse in semiconductors. Using first-principles calculations, we consider interstitial diffusion mechanisms and calculate the migration barrier energies of interstitial Cu, Ag and Au atoms in II-VI compounds ZnTe. We find that the relative size of dopant and bulk atoms is an important factor which affects the diffusion behavior. The high symmetry Tc site, which is tetrahedrally coordinated by four cation atoms, is the global minimum energy location for Ag and Au interstitials. The size of Cu adatom is small, so Cu is more stable when it locates at the Ta site which is tetrahedrally coordinated by four anion atoms. But the global minimum energy location for Cu interstitials is M site which is of smaller space than Ta. Cu adatoms show an asymmetric curve of energy diffusion barrier with two energetically distinct extremum in the pathway. Ag diffuses along nearly straight line paths along [111] or equivalent directions. Diffusion for Cu or Au deviates from the straight line paths along <111> avoiding high symmetric sites.

  14. Dioxygen molecule adsorption and oxygen atom diffusion on clean and defective aluminum(111) surface using first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiltat, Mathilde; Brut, Marie; Vizzini, Sébastien; Hémeryck, Anne

    2017-03-01

    First principles calculations are conducted to investigate kinetic behavior of oxygen species at the surface of clean and defective Al(111) substrate. Oxygen island, aluminum vacancy, aluminum sub-vacancy, aluminum ad-atom and aluminum terraces defects are addressed. Adsorption of oxygen molecule is first performed on all these systems resulting in dissociated oxygen atoms in main cases. The obtained adsorbed configurations are then picked to study the behavior of atomic oxygen specie and get a detailed understanding on the effect of the local environment on the ability of the oxygen atom to diffuse on the surface. We pointed out that local environment impacts energetics of oxygen atom diffusion. Close packed oxygen island, sub-vacancy and ad-atoms favor oxygen atom stability and decrease mobility of oxygen atom on the surface, to be seen as surface area for further nucleation of oxygen island.

  15. Role of sidewall diffusion in GaAs nanowire growth: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankoke, Volker; Sakong, Sung; Kratzer, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The molecular processes during the growth of GaAs nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are studied from first principles. For the wurtzite crystal structure of GaAs, which is formed exclusively in nanowire growth, potential energy surfaces for sidewall diffusion of Ga, As, and GaAs surface species are calculated using density functional theory. We compare materials transport on type-I and -II nanowires (with {101¯0} and {112¯0} facets of wurtzite GaAs, respectively) and discuss its role for materials supply to the growth zone at the nanowire tip. On the sidewalls of type-II nanowires, the diffusion barrier for Ga along the growth direction is particularly low, only 0.30 eV compared to 0.60 eV on type-I nanowires. For As adatoms, the corresponding diffusion barriers are 0.64 eV and 1.20 eV, respectively, and hence higher than for Ga adatoms. The GaAs molecule formed by the chemical surface reaction of Ga and As finds very stable binding sites on type-II sidewalls where it inserts itself into a chemical bond between surface atoms, triggering radial growth. In contrast, on type-I nanowires the GaAs molecule adsorbed with the As end towards the surface has a low diffusion barrier of 0.50 eV. Together with our previous finding that the gold particle at the nanowire tip is efficient in promoting dissociative adsorption of As2 molecules, we conclude that the influx of Ga adatoms from sidewall diffusion is very important to maintain stoichiometric growth of GaAs nanowires, in particular when a large V-III ratio is used in MBE.

  16. Surface alloy formation of noble adatoms adsorbed on Si(111)-\\sqrt {3}\\times \\sqrt {3} -Pb surface: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chong; Wang, Fei; Sun, Q.; Jia, Yu

    2011-07-01

    The geometric structures, stability and electronic properties of initial stages of surface alloy formation for noble atoms adsorbed on Si(111)-\\sqrt {3}\\times \\sqrt {3} -Pb surfaces have been comparatively and extensively studied by using first-principles calculations within density functional theory. Our results revealed that an Au trimer rather than a tetramer adsorption induces a surface alloy by combining with Pb atoms in covalent bonds, exhibiting semiconducting characteristics due to the localization of surface states. The stability of the two-dimensional (2D) surface alloy obeys the Hume-Rothery rule. The electronic structures of the 2D surface alloy are sensitive to the number of Au adatoms and can be modulated by the quantity of Au adatoms. Unlike the Au atoms, our further calculations indicated that adsorption of Ag or Cu atoms on the surface cannot form a surface alloy with Pb atoms in the surface layer due to a weaker interaction or smaller radius.

  17. Combustor diffuser interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Ram; Thorp, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Advances in gas turbine engine performance are achieved by using compressor systems with high stage loading and low part count, which result in high exit Mach numbers. The diffuser and combustor systems in such engines should be optimized to reduce system pressure loss and to maximize the engine thrust-to-weight ratio and minimize length. The state-of-the-art combustor-diffuser systems do not meet these requirements. Detailed understanding of the combustor-diffuser flow field interaction is required for designing advanced gas turbine engines. An experimental study of the combustor-diffuser interaction (CDI) is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of analytical models applicable to a wide variety of diffuser designs. The CDI program consists of four technical phases: Literature Search; Baseline Configuration; Parametric Configurations; and Performance Configurations. Phase 2 of the program is in progress.

  18. Novel Diffusivity Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser

    2001-01-01

    A common-path interferometer (CPI) system was developed to measure the diffusivity of liquid pairs. The CPI is an optical technique that can be used to measure changes in the gradient of the refraction index of transparent materials. This system uses a shearing interferometer that shares the same optical path from a laser light source to the final imaging plane. Hence, the molecular diffusion coefficient of liquids can be determined using the physical relations between changes in the optical path length and the liquid phase properties. The data obtained with this interferometer were compared with similar results from other techniques and demonstrated that the instrument is superior in measuring the diffusivity of miscible liquids while keeping the system very compact and robust. CPI can also be used for studies in interface dynamics and other diffusion-dominated-process applications.

  19. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  20. Transition metals on the (0001) surface of graphite: Fundamental aspects of adsorption, diffusion, and morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W; Thiel, Patricia A

    2014-08-01

    In this article, we review basic information about the interaction of transition metal atoms with the (0 0 0 1) surface of graphite, especially fundamental phenomena related to growth. Those phenomena involve adatom-surface bonding, diffusion, morphology of metal clusters, interactions with steps and sputter-induced defects, condensation, and desorption. General traits emerge which have not been summarized previously. Some of these features are rather surprising when compared with metal-on-metal adsorption and growth. Opportunities for future work are pointed out.

  1. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  2. Interfacial diffusion aided deformation during nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Amit; E, Weinan

    2016-07-01

    Nanoindentation is commonly used to quantify the mechanical response of material surfaces. Despite its widespread use, a detailed understanding of the deformation mechanisms responsible for plasticity during these experiments has remained elusive. Nanoindentation measurements often show stress values close to a material's ideal strength which suggests that dislocation nucleation and subsequent dislocation activity dominates the deformation. However, low strain-rate exponents and small activation volumes have also been reported which indicates high temperature sensitivity of the deformation processes. Using an order parameter aided temperature accelerated sampling technique called adiabatic free energy dynamics [J. B. Abrams and M. E. Tuckerman, J. Phys. Chem. B, 112, 15742 (2008)], and molecular dynamics we have probed the diffusive mode of deformation during nanoindentation. Localized processes such as surface vacancy and ad-atom pair formation, vacancy diffusion are found to play an important role during indentation. Our analysis suggests a change in the dominant deformation mode from dislocation mediated plasticity to diffusional flow at high temperatures, slow indentation rates and small indenter tip radii.

  3. The electrooxidation mechanism of formic acid on platinum and on lead ad-atoms modified platinum studied with the kinetic isotope effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełtowska-Brzezinska, M.; Łuczak, T.; Stelmach, J.; Holze, R.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of formic acid (FA) oxidation on platinum and upd-lead ad-atoms modified platinum electrodes have been studied using unlabelled and deuterated compounds. Poisoning of the electrode surface by CO-like species was prevented by suppression of dissociative chemisorption of FA due to a fast competitive underpotential deposition of lead ad-atoms on the Pt surface from an acidic solution containing Pb2+ cations. Modification of the Pt electrode with upd lead induced a catalytic effect in the direct electrooxidation of physisorbed FA to CO2. With increasing degree of H/D substitution, the rate of this reaction decreased in the order: HCOOH > DCOOH ≥ HCOOD > DCOOD. HCOOH was oxidized 8.5-times faster on a Pt/Pb electrode than DCOOD. This primary kinetic isotope effect proves that the C-H- and O-H-bonds are simultaneously cleaved in the rate determining step. A secondary kinetic isotope effect was found in the dissociative chemisorption of FA in the hydrogen adsorption-desorption range on a bare Pt electrode after H/D exchange in the C-H bond, wherein the influence of deuterium substitution in the O-H group was negligibly small. Thus the C-H bond cleavage is accompanied by the C-OH and not the O-H bond split in the FA decomposition, producing CO-like species on the Pt surface sites.

  4. Computer modelling of nanoscale diffusion phenomena at epitaxial interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailov, M.; Ranguelov, B.

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines an important area in the application of computer modelling to interface phenomena. Being relevant to the fundamental physical problem of competing atomic interactions in systems with reduced dimensionality, these phenomena attract special academic attention. On the other hand, from a technological point of view, detailed knowledge of the fine atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces correlates with a large number of practical problems in materials science. Typical examples are formation of nanoscale surface patterns, two-dimensional superlattices, atomic intermixing at an epitaxial interface, atomic transport phenomena, structure and stability of quantum wires on surfaces. We discuss here a variety of diffusion mechanisms that control surface-confined atomic exchange, formation of alloyed atomic stripes and islands, relaxation of pure and alloyed atomic terraces, diffusion of clusters and their stability in an external field. The computational model refines important details of diffusion of adatoms and clusters accounting for the energy barriers at specific atomic sites: smooth domains, terraces, steps and kinks. The diffusion kinetics, integrity and decomposition of atomic islands in an external field are considered in detail and assigned to specific energy regions depending on the cluster stability in mass transport processes. The presented ensemble of diffusion scenarios opens a way for nanoscale surface design towards regular atomic interface patterns with exotic physical features.

  5. The dynamics of unsteady detonation with diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq Dennis; Romick, Christopher; Powers, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Here we consider an unsteady detonation with diffusion included. This introduces an interaction between the reaction length scales and diffusion length scales. Detailed kinetics introduce multiple length scales as shown though the spatial eigenvalue analysis of hydrogen-oxygen system; the smallest length scale is {approx} 10{sup 7} m and the largest {approx} 10{sup -2} m; away from equilibrium, the breadth can be larger. In this paper, we consider a simpler set of model equations, similar to the inviscid reactive compressible fluid equations, but include diffusion (in the form of thermal/energy, momentum, and mass diffusion). We will seek to reveal how the complex dynamics already discovered in one-step systems in the inviscid limit changes with the addition of diffusion.

  6. A computational ab initio study of surface diffusion of sulfur on the CdTe (111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ebadollah; Ghaisas, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    In order to discern the formation of epitaxial growth of CdS shell over CdTe nanocrystals, kinetics related to the initial stages of the growth of CdS on CdTe is investigated using ab-initio methods. We report diffusion of sulfur adatom on the CdTe (111) A-type (Cd-terminated) and B-type (Te-terminated) surfaces within the density functional theory (DFT). The barriers are computed by applying the climbing Nudge Elastic Band (c-NEB) method. From the results surface hopping emerges as the major mode of diffusion. In addition, there is a distinct contribution from kick-out type diffusion in which a CdTe surface atom is kicked out from its position and is replaced by the diffusing sulfur atom. Also, surface vacancy substitution contributes to the concomitant dynamics. There are sites on the B- type surface that are competitively close in terms of the binding energy to the lowest energy site of epitaxy on the surface. The kick-out process is more likely for B-type surface where a Te atom of the surface is displaced by a sulfur adatom. Further, on the B-type surface, subsurface migration of sulfur is indicated. Furthermore, the binding energies of S on CdTe reveal that on the A-type surface, epitaxial sites provide relatively higher binding energies and barriers than on B-type.

  7. Neandertal clavicle length

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik; Holliday, Trenton W.; Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene archaic humans from western Eurasia (the Neandertals) have been described for a century as exhibiting absolutely and relatively long clavicles. This aspect of their body proportions has been used to distinguish them from modern humans, invoked to account for other aspects of their anatomy and genetics, used in assessments of their phylogenetic polarities, and used as evidence for Late Pleistocene population relationships. However, it has been unclear whether the usual scaling of Neandertal clavicular lengths to their associated humeral lengths reflects long clavicles, short humeri, or both. Neandertal clavicle lengths, along with those of early modern humans and latitudinally diverse recent humans, were compared with both humeral lengths and estimated body masses (based on femoral head diameters). The Neandertal do have long clavicles relative their humeri, even though they fall within the ranges of variation of early and recent humans. However, when scaled to body masses, their humeral lengths are relatively short, and their clavicular lengths are indistinguishable from those of Late Pleistocene and recent modern humans. The few sufficiently complete Early Pleistocene Homo clavicles seem to have relative lengths also well within recent human variation. Therefore, appropriately scaled clavicular length seems to have varied little through the genus Homo, and it should not be used to account for other aspects of Neandertal biology or their phylogenetic status. PMID:24616525

  8. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  9. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  10. Diffusion Barriers Block Defect Occupation on Reduced CeO_{2}(111).

    PubMed

    Lustemberg, P G; Pan, Y; Shaw, B-J; Grinter, D; Pang, Chi; Thornton, G; Pérez, Rubén; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M V; Nilius, N

    2016-06-10

    Surface defects are believed to govern the adsorption behavior of reducible oxides. We challenge this perception on the basis of a combined scanning-tunneling-microscopy and density-functional-theory study, addressing the Au adsorption on reduced CeO_{2-x}(111). Despite a clear thermodynamic preference for oxygen vacancies, individual Au atoms were found to bind mostly to regular surface sites. Even at an elevated temperature, aggregation at step edges and not decoration of defects turned out to be the main consequence of adatom diffusion. Our findings are explained with the polaronic nature of the Au-ceria system, which imprints a strong diabatic character onto the diffusive motion of adatoms. Diabatic barriers are generally higher than those in the adiabatic regime, especially if the hopping step couples to an electron transfer into the ad-gold. As the population of O vacancies always requires a charge exchange, defect decoration by Au atoms becomes kinetically hindered. Our study demonstrates that polaronic effects determine not only electron transport in reducible oxides but also the adsorption characteristics and therewith the surface chemistry.

  11. Diffusion Barriers Block Defect Occupation on Reduced CeO2(111 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustemberg, P. G.; Pan, Y.; Shaw, B.-J.; Grinter, D.; Pang, Chi; Thornton, G.; Pérez, Rubén; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M. V.; Nilius, N.

    2016-06-01

    Surface defects are believed to govern the adsorption behavior of reducible oxides. We challenge this perception on the basis of a combined scanning-tunneling-microscopy and density-functional-theory study, addressing the Au adsorption on reduced CeO2 -x(111 ) . Despite a clear thermodynamic preference for oxygen vacancies, individual Au atoms were found to bind mostly to regular surface sites. Even at an elevated temperature, aggregation at step edges and not decoration of defects turned out to be the main consequence of adatom diffusion. Our findings are explained with the polaronic nature of the Au-ceria system, which imprints a strong diabatic character onto the diffusive motion of adatoms. Diabatic barriers are generally higher than those in the adiabatic regime, especially if the hopping step couples to an electron transfer into the ad-gold. As the population of O vacancies always requires a charge exchange, defect decoration by Au atoms becomes kinetically hindered. Our study demonstrates that polaronic effects determine not only electron transport in reducible oxides but also the adsorption characteristics and therewith the surface chemistry.

  12. Knudsen Diffusion in Silicon Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruener, Simon; Huber, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Measurements on helium and argon gas flow through an array of parallel, linear channels of 12 nm diameter and 200μm length in a single crystalline silicon membrane reveal a Knudsen diffusion type transport from 102 to 107 in Knudsen number Kn. The classic scaling prediction for the transport diffusion coefficient on temperature and mass of diffusing species, DHe∝T, is confirmed over a T range from 40 K to 300 K for He and for the ratio of DHe/DAr∝mAr/mHe. Deviations of the channels from a cylindrical form, resolved with electron microscopy down to subnanometer scales, quantitatively account for a reduced diffusivity as compared to Knudsen diffusion in ideal tubular channels. The membrane permeation experiments are described over 10 orders of magnitude in Kn, encompassing the transition flow regime, by the unified flow model of Beskok and Karniadakis.

  13. Myofilament length dependent activation.

    PubMed

    de Tombe, Pieter P; Mateja, Ryan D; Tachampa, Kittipong; Ait Mou, Younss; Farman, Gerrie P; Irving, Thomas C

    2010-05-01

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca(2+) ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the "Frank-Starling law of the heart" constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  14. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  15. Myofilament length dependent activation

    SciTech Connect

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  16. Length Paradox in Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Roberto de A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thought experiment using a general analysis approach with Lorentz transformations to show that the apparent self-contradictions of special relativity concerning the length-paradox are really non-existant. (GA)

  17. Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, David H.

    1968-01-01

    Five methodologies for predicting hospital length of stay were developed and compared. Two—a subjective Bayesian forecaster and a regression forecaster—also measured the relative importance of the symptomatic and demographic factors in predicting length of stay. The performance of the methodologies was evaluated with several criteria of effectiveness and one of cost. The results should provide encouragement for those interested in computer applications to utilization review and to scheduling inpatient admissions. PMID:5673664

  18. Observations on oesophageal length.

    PubMed Central

    Kalloor, G J; Deshpande, A H; Collis, J L

    1976-01-01

    The subject of oesophageal length is discussed. The great variations in the length of the oesophagus in individual patients is noted, and the practical use of its recognition in oesophageal surgery is stressed. An apprasial of the various methods available for this measurement is made; this includes the use of external chest measurement, endoscopic measurement, and the measurement of the level of the electrical mucosal potential change. Correlative studies of these various methods are made, and these show a very high degree of significance. These studies involved simultaneous measurement of external and internal oesophageal length in 26 patients without a hiatal hernia or gastro-oesophageal length in 26 patients without a hiatal hernia or gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms, 42 patients with sliding type hiatal hernia, and 17 patients with a peptic stricture in association with hiatal hernia. The method of measuring oesophageal length by the use of the external chest measurement, that is, the distance between the lower incisor teeth and the xiphisternum, measured with the neck fully extended and the patient lying supine, is described in detail, its practical application in oesophageal surgery is illustrated, and its validity tested by internal measurements. The findings of this study demonstrate that the external chest measurement provides a mean of assessing the true static length of the oesophagus, corrected for the size of the individual. Images PMID:941114

  19. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2011-07-15

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  20. Ion-assisted precursor dissociation and surface diffusion: Enabling rapid, low-temperature growth of carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denysenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.

    2007-06-01

    Growth kinetics of carbon nanofibers in a hydrocarbon plasma is studied. In addition to gas-phase and surface processes common to chemical vapor deposition, the model includes (unique to plasma-exposed catalyst surfaces) ion-induced dissociation of hydrocarbons, interaction of adsorbed species with incoming hydrogen atoms, and dissociation of hydrocarbon ions. It is shown that at low, nanodevice-friendly process temperatures the nanofibers grow via surface diffusion of carbon adatoms produced on the catalyst particle via ion-induced dissociation of a hydrocarbon precursor. These results explain a lower activation energy of nanofiber growth in a plasma and can be used for the synthesis of other nanoassemblies.

  1. Degradation of bulk diffusion length in CZ silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, J.H.; King, R.R.; Mitchell, K.W.

    1995-08-01

    Commercially-produced, unencapsulated, CZ silicon solar cells can lose 3 to 4% of their initial efficiency after exposure to light. After this initial, rapid ( < 30 min.) decrease, the cell power output remains stable. The cell performance recovers in a matter of hours in the dark at room temperature, and degrades again under light exposure. The different conditions under which CZ silicon cells degrade, and the reverse process, annealing, are characterized with the methods of spectral response and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Iron impurities are a possible cause of this effect.

  2. Design of Advanced Photocatalysis System by Adatom Decoration in 2D Nanosheets of Group-IV and III–V Binary Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hao; Dai, Ying; Huang, Bai-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Searching for novel photocatalysts is one of the most important topic in photocatalytic fields. In the present work, we propose a feasible approach to improve the photocatalytic activities of 2D bilayers through surface decoration, i.e. hydrogenation, halogenation, and hydroxylation. Our investigations demonstrate that after surface modification, the optical adsorption expands into the visible region, while a built-in electric field is induced due to the interlayer coupling, which can promote the charge separation for photogenerated electron-hole pairs. Our results show that the indirect-direct band gap transition of SiC, SnC, BN and GaN can be realised through adatom decoration. Furthermore, the surface-modified 2D bilayers have suitable VBM and CBM alignments with the oxidation and reduction potentials for water splitting, suggesting powerful potentials in energy and environmental applications. PMID:26983908

  3. Radiotracer study of the adsorption of organic compounds on gold. adsorption of chloroacetic and phenylacetic acid, and the effects of cadmium, copper, and silver adatoms on it

    SciTech Connect

    Horani, G.; Andreev, V.N.; Vazarinov, V.E.

    1986-04-01

    This paper studies the adsorption of monochloroacetic and phenylacetic acid (MA and PA, respectively) by the radiotracer technique on gold-plated gold electrodes in acidic solutions. The authors also study the effect of cadmium, copper, and silver adatoms on these processes. The adsorption of MA was measured as a function of potential of the electrode. Data from these measurements are presented. Data show that cadmium, copper, and silver ions present in the solution have no effect on the adsorption of PA at potentials where they are not adsorbed on the gold surface. It is confirmed that the radiotracer technique will be as effective in adsorption studies on the gold-plated gold electrode as it was in the case of the platinized platinum electrode.

  4. Tracer diffusion in silica inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Cherdhirankorn, Thipphaya; Retsch, Markus; Jonas, Ulrich; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2010-06-15

    We employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the diffusion of small fluorescence tracers in liquid filled silica inverse opals. The inverse opals consisted of a nanoporous silica scaffold spanning a hexagonal crystal of spherical voids of 360 nm diameter connected by circular pores of 70 nm diameter. The diffusion of Alexa Fluor 488 in water and of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) in toluene was studied. Three diffusion modes could be distinguished: (1) Free diffusion limited by the geometric constraints given by the inverse opal, where, as compared to the free solution, this diffusion is slowed down by a factor of 3-4, (2) slow diffusion inside the nanoporous matrix of the silica scaffold, and (3) diffusion limited by adsorption. On the length scale of the focus of a confocal microscope of roughly 400 nm diffusion was non-Fickian in all cases.

  5. Upper Extremity Length Equalization

    PubMed Central

    DeCoster, Thomas A.; Ritterbusch, John; Crawford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Significant upper extremity length inequality is uncommon but can cause major functional problems. The ability to position and use the hand may be impaired by shortness of any of the long bones of the upper extremity. In many respects upper and lower extremity length problems are similar. They most commonly occur after injury to a growing bone and the treatment modalities utilized in the lower extremity may be applied to the upper extremity. These treatment options include epiphysiodesis, shortening osteotomy, angulatory correction osteotomy and lengthening. This report reviews the literature relative to upper extremity length inequality and equalization and presents an algorithm for evaluation and planning appropriate treatment for patients with this condition. This algorithm is illustrated by two clinical cases of posttraumatic shortness of the radius which were effectively treated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  6. Relativistic Length Agony Continued

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redzic, D. V.

    2014-06-01

    We made an attempt to remedy recent confusing treatments of some basic relativistic concepts and results. Following the argument presented in an earlier paper (Redzic 2008b), we discussed the misconceptions that are recurrent points in the literature devoted to teaching relativity such as: there is no change in the object in Special Relativity, illusory character of relativistic length contraction, stresses and strains induced by Lorentz contraction, and related issues. We gave several examples of the traps of everyday language that lurk in Special Relativity. To remove a possible conceptual and terminological muddle, we made a distinction between the relativistic length reduction and relativistic FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction, corresponding to a passive and an active aspect of length contraction, respectively; we pointed out that both aspects have fundamental dynamical contents. As an illustration of our considerations, we discussed briefly the Dewan-Beran-Bell spaceship paradox and the 'pole in a barn' paradox.

  7. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  8. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  9. Surface Roughness Lengths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    m trees 110 - 170 Thom 1972 Pine forest - 20 m trees 128 DeBruin and Moore 1985 Forested plateau, rolling 120 - 130 Ming et al. 1983 Rolling terrain...H. A. R., and C. J. Moore , 1985 , "Zero-Plane Displacement and Roughness Length for Tall Vegetation, Derived from a Simple Mass Conservation

  10. Sampling by Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of sampling methods used in information science research focuses on Fussler's method for sampling catalog cards and on sampling by length. Highlights include simple random sampling, sampling with probability equal to size without replacement, sampling with replacement, and examples of estimating the number of books on shelves in certain…

  11. A New Model for Diffusion and Island Growth in Metallic Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biham, Ofer; Karimi, Majid; Vidali, Gianfranco

    1996-03-01

    We propose a simple model that describes the diffusion of Cu atoms on the Cu(001) surface and their nucleation into islands. Using a simple formula, the values of the 128 energy barriers for the motion of an adatom in the presence of nearest and next-nearest neighbours are generated. These values are close to the ones obtained using the Embedded Atom Method (M. Karimi, T. Tomkowsky, G. Vidali, and O.Biham, Phys. Rev. B. 52, 5364 (1995)). The results of Monte Carlo simulations are compared with experimental data. This model provides a better understanding of diffusion on the FCC (001) surface than it has been possible so far. It should be valid for other FCC metals such as Ni and is likely to increase the feasibility of MC studies by reducing the need to calculate large sets of hopping energy barriers.

  12. Influence of the Si(111)-7 Multiplication-Sign 7 surface reconstruction on the diffusion of strontium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhachuk, R. A.; Teys, S. A.; Olshanetsky, B. Z.

    2011-12-15

    The diffusion of strontium atoms on the Si(111) surface at room temperature has been investigated using scanning tunnel microscopy and simulation carried out in terms of the density functional theory and the Monte Carlo method. It has been found that the reconstruction of a clean silicon surface with a 7 Multiplication-Sign 7 structure has a profound effect on the diffusion process. The average velocity of motion of a strontium atom in a unit cell of the 7 Multiplication-Sign 7 structure has been calculated. The main diffusion paths of a strontium atom and the corresponding activation energies have been determined. It has been demonstrated that the formation of scanning tunnel microscope images of the Si(111)-7 Multiplication-Sign 7 surface with adsorbed strontium atoms is significantly affected by the shift of the electron density from the strontium atom to the nearest neighbor silicon adatoms in the 7 Multiplication-Sign 7 structure.

  13. CFD analysis of a rocket exhaust diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Tarit K.; Thanawala, R. H.; Annamalai, K.

    1992-11-01

    The nature of the complex shock structure responsible for the pressure recovery phenomenon in supersonic diffusers is investigated by means of a theoretical CFD analysis using a newly developed computer program for Navier-Stokes solution of an ejector system, and the Prandtl mixing length to model the turbulent boundary layer. The pressure recovery characteristics of an ejector diffuser system was studied for various geometric and flow conditions. A comparison of the results with those of pressure measurements along the diffuser length in an experimental facility showed discrepancies, which are attributed to the boundary conditions imposed.

  14. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  15. A Theoretical Study of Bulk and Surface Diffusion Processes for Semiconductor Materials Using First Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehl, Jason L.

    Diffusion of point defects on crystalline surfaces and in their bulk is an important and ubiquitous phenomenon affecting film quality, electronic properties and device functionality. A complete understanding of these diffusion processes enables one to predict and then control those processes. Such understanding includes knowledge of the structural, energetic and electronic properties of these native and non-native point defect diffusion processes. Direct experimental observation of the phenomenon is difficult and microscopic theories of diffusion mechanisms and pathways abound. Thus, knowing the nature of diffusion processes, of specific point defects in given materials, has been a challenging task for analytical theory as well as experiment. The recent advances in computing technology have been a catalyst for the rise of a third mode of investigation. The advent of tremendous computing power, breakthroughs in algorithmic development in computational applications of electronic density functional theory now enables direct computation of the diffusion process. This thesis demonstrates such a method applied to several different examples of point defect diffusion on the (001) surface of gallium arsenide (GaAs) and the bulk of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium sulfide (CdS). All results presented in this work are ab initio, total-energy pseudopotential calculations within the local density approximation to density-functional theory. Single particle wavefunctions were expanded in a plane-wave basis and reciprocal space k-point sampling was achieved by Monkhorst-Pack generated k-point grids. Both surface and bulk computations employed a supercell approach using periodic boundary conditions. Ga adatom adsorption and diffusion processes were studied on two reconstructions of the GaAs(001) surface including the c(4x4) and c(4x4)-heterodimer surface reconstructions. On the GaAs(001)- c(4x4) surface reconstruction, two distinct sets of minima and transition sites were

  16. Well-Ordered In Adatoms at the In2O3(111) Surface Created by Fe Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Margareta; Lackner, Peter; Seiler, Steffen; Gerhold, Stefan; Osiecki, Jacek; Schulte, Karina; Boatner, Lynn A.; Schmid, Michael; Meyer, Bernd; Diebold, Ulrike

    2016-11-11

    Metal deposition on oxide surfaces usually results in adatoms, clusters, or islands of the deposited material, where defects in the surface often act as nucleation centers. An alternate configuration is reported. Afterwards the vapor deposition of Fe on the In2O3(111) surface at room temperature, ordered adatoms are observed with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These are identical to the In adatoms that form when the sample is reduced by heating in ultrahigh vacuum. Our density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirm that Fe interchanges with In in the topmost layer, pushing the excess In atoms to the surface where they arrange as a well-ordered adatom array.

  17. Revealing mesoscopic structural universality with diffusion.

    PubMed

    Novikov, Dmitry S; Jensen, Jens H; Helpern, Joseph A; Fieremans, Els

    2014-04-08

    Measuring molecular diffusion is widely used for characterizing materials and living organisms noninvasively. This characterization relies on relations between macroscopic diffusion metrics and structure at the mesoscopic scale commensurate with the diffusion length. Establishing such relations remains a fundamental challenge, hindering progress in materials science, porous media, and biomedical imaging. Here we show that the dynamical exponent in the time dependence of the diffusion coefficient distinguishes between the universality classes of the mesoscopic structural complexity. Our approach enables the interpretation of diffusion measurements by objectively selecting and modeling the most relevant structural features. As an example, the specific values of the dynamical exponent allow us to identify the relevant mesoscopic structure affecting MRI-measured water diffusion in muscles and in brain, and to elucidate the structural changes behind the decrease of diffusion coefficient in ischemic stroke.

  18. The Diffusion of Charged Particles in Collisional Plasmas: Free and Ambipolar Diffusion at Low and Moderate Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, A. V.

    1990-01-01

    The interpretation of measurements of the properties of weakly ionized plasmas in terms of diffusion of electrons and ions is reviewed both critically and tutorially. A particular effort is made to tie together various aspects of charged particle diffusion phenomena in quiescent, partially ionized plasmas. The concepts of diffusion length and effective diffusion coefficient and the treatment of partially reflecting boundaries are developed in the limit of the space-charge-free motion of the electrons or ions. A simplified derivation of the screening length for space charge electric fields is followed by a review of the conventional derivation of diffusion in the ambipolar limit. A discussion of the scaling parameters of the ratio of the diffusion length to the screening length and the ratio of the diffusion length to the ion mean-free-path leads to a map used to correlate published models covering the complete range of these parameters. The models of measurements of the diffusion of electrons, several types of positive ions, and negative ions are reviewed. The role of diffusion in the decay of charged particle densities and wall currents during the afterglow of a discharge is then considered. The effects of collapse of the space charge field and of diffusion cooling are reviewed. Finally, the application of the diffusion models to a number of different discharges is discussed. PMID:28179784

  19. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  20. Length of stain dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Payload customers for the Space Shuttle have recently expressed concerns about the possibility of their payloads at an adjacent pad being contaminated by plume effluents from a shuttle at an active pad as they await launch on an inactive pad. As part of a study to satisfy such concerns a ring of inexpensive dosimeters was deployed around the active pad at the inter-pad distance. However, following a launch, dosimeters cannot be read for several hours after the exposure. As a consequence factors such as different substrates, solvent systems, and possible volatilization of HCl from the badges were studied. This observation led to the length of stain (LOS) dosimeters of this invention. Commercial passive LOS dosimeters are sensitive only to the extent of being capable of sensing 2 ppm to 20 ppm if the exposure is 8 hours. To map and quantitate the HCl generated by Shuttle launches, and in the atmosphere within a radius of 1.5 miles from the active pad, a sensitivity of 2 ppm HCl in the atmospheric gases on an exposure of 5 minutes is required. A passive length of stain dosimeter has been developed having a sensitivity rendering it capable of detecting a gas in a concentration as low as 2 ppm on an exposure of five minutes.

  1. Computer simulation of surface and adatom properties of Lennard-Jones solids: A comparison between face-centered-cubic and hexagonal-close-packed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasi, Sweta; Khomami, Bamin; Lovett, Ronald

    2001-04-01

    We introduce a new molecular dynamics simulation path to easily calculate solid-vapor surface free energies. The method is illustrated with explicit calculations of the surface free energies of a face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystal (the [110], [111], and [100] surfaces) and a hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) crystal (the [111] surface) of Lennard-Jones atoms. We verify that, because of the reduced symmetry at interfaces, simulation of the surface structure and free energy requires a large cutoff distance for the range of the pair potential. To estimate when a growing crystal resolves the fcc/hcp structural ambiguity, we observe the binding free energy and dynamics of clusters of adatoms on [111] surfaces of fcc and hcp crystals. A structural distinction only appears when clusters become large enough that their slow translational motion allows a structural relaxation of the crystal's surface. From the observed distribution over cluster structures we deduce thermodynamic parameters that can be used to model the equilibrium between fcc-like clusters and hcp-like clusters on [111] surfaces and the rate of transformation between these.

  2. Diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Iplikcioglu, A C; Bek, S; Gökduman, C A; Bikmaz, K; Cosar, M

    2006-06-01

    Diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus (DVHCP) is a rare condition which is characterized by the presence of diffuse enlargement of the entire choroid plexus throughout the length of the choroidal fissure and overproduction of CSF. The diagnosis of diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus can be established by the MR demonstration of diffusely large, contrast enhanced choroid plexus in the cases of overproduction hydrocephalus. Although some authors recommend choroid plexus excision or coagulation, ventriculo-atrial shunt insertion is a simple and effective treatment modality in cases of diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus. In this report we present a case of diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus and a short review of the literature. To our knowledge, in the CT and MRI era only 5 cases of DVHCP cases have been reported.

  3. Ambipolar diffusion in complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Losseva, T V; Popel, S I; Yu, M Y; Ma, J X

    2007-04-01

    A self-consistent model of the ambipolar diffusion of electrons and ions in complex (dusty) plasmas accounting for the local electric fields, the dust grain charging process, and the interaction of the plasma particles with the dust grains and neutrals is presented. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the interaction of the electrons and ions with the dust grains as well as with the neutrals are investigated. It is shown that increase of the dust density leads to a reduction of the diffusion scale length, and this effect is enhanced at higher electron densities. The dependence of the diffusion scale length on the neutral gas pressure is found to be given by a power law, where the absolute value of the power exponent decreases with increase of the dust density. The electric field gradient and its effects are shown to be significant and should thus be taken into account in studies of complex plasmas with not very small dust densities. The possibility of observing localized coherent dissipative nonlinear dust ion-acoustic structures in an asymmetrically discharged double plasma is discussed.

  4. Probing dark exciton diffusion using photovoltage

    PubMed Central

    Mullenbach, Tyler K.; Curtin, Ian J.; Zhang, Tao; Holmes, Russell J.

    2017-01-01

    The migration of weakly and non-luminescent (dark) excitons remains an understudied subset of exciton dynamics in molecular thin films. Inaccessible via photoluminescence, these states are often probed using photocurrent methods that require efficient charge collection. Here we probe exciton harvesting in both luminescent and dark materials using a photovoltage-based technique. Transient photovoltage permits a real-time measurement of the number of charges in an organic photovoltaic cell, while avoiding non-geminate recombination losses. The extracted exciton diffusion lengths are found to be similar to those determined using photocurrent. For the luminescent material boron subphthalocyanine chloride, the photovoltage determined diffusion length is less than that extracted from photoluminescence. This indicates that while photovoltage circumvents non-geminate losses, geminate recombination at the donor–acceptor interface remains the primary recombination pathway. Photovoltage thus offers a general approach for extracting a device-relevant diffusion length, while also providing insight in to the dominant carrier recombination pathways. PMID:28128206

  5. Probing dark exciton diffusion using photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullenbach, Tyler K.; Curtin, Ian J.; Zhang, Tao; Holmes, Russell J.

    2017-01-01

    The migration of weakly and non-luminescent (dark) excitons remains an understudied subset of exciton dynamics in molecular thin films. Inaccessible via photoluminescence, these states are often probed using photocurrent methods that require efficient charge collection. Here we probe exciton harvesting in both luminescent and dark materials using a photovoltage-based technique. Transient photovoltage permits a real-time measurement of the number of charges in an organic photovoltaic cell, while avoiding non-geminate recombination losses. The extracted exciton diffusion lengths are found to be similar to those determined using photocurrent. For the luminescent material boron subphthalocyanine chloride, the photovoltage determined diffusion length is less than that extracted from photoluminescence. This indicates that while photovoltage circumvents non-geminate losses, geminate recombination at the donor-acceptor interface remains the primary recombination pathway. Photovoltage thus offers a general approach for extracting a device-relevant diffusion length, while also providing insight in to the dominant carrier recombination pathways.

  6. Step Energetics and Diffusion Barriers on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodiyalam, S.

    1996-03-01

    Using the empirical potentials of Stillinger-Weber and Khor-Das Sarma, step energies and step-step interaction strengths have been calculated for steps on the high temperature 1×1 reconstructed phase of Si(111). (S. Kodiyalam, K.E. Khor, N.C. Bartelt, E.D. Williams and S. Das Sarma, Phys. Rev. B 51), 5200 (1995) Two distinct configurations of atoms along the step edge have been considered - one with atoms on the upper terrace that could rebond with atoms on the lower terrace and the other without these atoms. The Stillinger-weber potential allows this rebonding which results in step-step interactions an order of magnitude larger than experimental estimates thereby suggesting that such rebonded configurations do not occur. Kink energies, calculated from the orientational dependence of step energies, are however much larger that dictated by the measured step stiffness.(C. Alfonso, J.M. Bremond, J.C. Heyraud and J.J. Metois, Surf. Sci. 262), 371 (1992) Diffusion barriers over the Si(111) surface as well as the high symmetry (low energy) [\\overline211] and [\\overline1\\overline12] steps (with no rebonding between upper and lower terrace atoms) have been calculated using the Stillinger-Weber potential. (S. Kodiyalam, K.E. Khor and S. Das Sarma, Submitted to Phys. Rev. B, MS No. BG5796 (1995)) These calculations suggest that a Schwoebel barrier (of magnitude 0.61 ± 0.07 eV) on the [\\overline211] step is a robust feature i.e. a feature that is expected to survive in more satisfactory calculations. Motivated by experiments on direct current induced reversible step bunching on this surface, (E.D. Williams, E. Fu, Y.N. Yang, D.Kandel and J.D. Weeks, Surf. Sci. 336) L746 (1995) the relevance of a Schwoebel barrier to electromigration of steps has also been explored by modifying the diffusion equation for adatom concentration proposed by Soyanov. Data from this and other experiments has been used to place an upper bound on the Schwoebel barrier and a lower bound on the

  7. Coaxial atomizer liquid intact lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, Hasan; Chigier, Norman; Farago, Zoltan

    1991-01-01

    Average intact lengths of round liquid jets generated by airblast coaxial atomizer were measured from over 1500 photographs. The intact lengths were studied over a jet Reynolds number range of 18,000 and Weber number range of 260. Results are presented for two different nozzle geometries. The intact lengths were found to be strongly dependent on Re and We numbers. An empirical equation was derived as a function of these parameters. A comparison of the intact lengths for round jets and flat sheets shows that round jets generate shorter intact lengths.

  8. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  9. A submicrometer lifted diffused-layer MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokawa, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Toshio; Kiuchi, Kazuhide

    1987-03-01

    A new lifted diffused-layer (LID) MOSFET has been devised and fabricated, where the major portions of the source/drain (S/D) diffused layers are placed on top of the field insulator to reduce S/D parasitic capacitances. The primary feature of this MOSFET is that the structure and processing are especially developed for submicrometer gate lengths. The fabricated LID MOSFET with a 0.5-micron gate length and a 10-nm gate oxide thickness showed good electrical characteristics, such as a maximum transconductance of 115 mS/mm and an inverter delay time of 59 ps/stage.

  10. Effective diffusivity in active Brownian suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, Eric; Brady, John

    2016-11-01

    We study the single-particle diffusion of a Brownian probe of size R in a suspension comprised of a Newtonian solvent and a dilute dispersion of active Brownian particles (ABPs) with size a, characteristic swim velocity U0, and a reorientation time τR. These ABPs, or "swimmers," have a run length l =U0τR , and a mechanical activity ksTs =ζaU02τR / 6 , where ζa is the Stokes drag coefficient of a swimmer. When the swimmers are inactive, collisions between the probe and the swimmers sterically hinder the probe's diffusive motion. When the activity of the swimmers is greater than the Boltzmann energy, ksTs >kB T , rather than being sterically hindered, the probe diffusivity is actually greater than its Stokes-Einstein-Sutherland diffusivity due to the mechanical energy imparted to the probe upon collisions with the swimmers. The active contribution to the effective diffusivity is a non-monotonic function of the swimmers' run length compared to the contact length between the probe and a swimmer: l / (R + a) . Comparisons are made to previous theoretical and experimental investigations of the hydrodynamic diffusion of a colloidal particle in a dilute suspension of swimming bacteria. NSF Grant No. CBET 1437570.

  11. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  12. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  13. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  14. Resolving and measuring diffusion in complex interfaces: Exploring new capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.

    2015-09-01

    This exploratory LDRD targeted the use of a new high resolution spectroscopic diffusion capabilities developed at Sandia to resolve transport processes at interfaces in heterogeneous polymer materials. In particular, the combination of high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments were used to directly explore interface diffusion within heterogeneous polymer composites, including measuring diffusion for individual chemical species in multi-component mixtures. Several different types of heterogeneous polymer systems were studied using these HRMAS NMR diffusion capabilities to probe the resolution limitations, determine the spatial length scales involved, and explore the general applicability to specific heterogeneous systems. The investigations pursued included a) the direct measurement of the diffusion for poly(dimethyl siloxane) polymer (PDMS) on nano-porous materials, b) measurement of penetrant diffusion in additive manufactures (3D printed) processed PDMS composites, and c) the measurement of diffusion in swollen polymers/penetrant mixtures within nano-confined aluminum oxide membranes. The NMR diffusion results obtained were encouraging and allowed for an improved understanding of diffusion and transport processes at the molecular level, while at the same time demonstrating that the spatial heterogeneity that can be resolved using HRMAS NMR PFG diffusion experiment must be larger than ~μm length scales, expect for polymer transport within nanoporous carbons where additional chemical resolution improves the resolvable heterogeneous length scale to hundreds of nm.

  15. Fluid diffusion in porous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Lowell I.

    Fluid motion in porous media has received a great deal of theoretical and experimental attention due to its importance in systems as diverse as ground water aquifers, catalytic processes, and size separation schemes. Often, the motion of interest is the random thermal motion of molecules in a fluid undergoing no net flow. This diffusive motion is particularly important when the size of the pores is nearly the same as the size of the molecules. In this study, fluid diffusion is measured in several varieties of porous silica whose pore structure is determined by the process by which it is made. The samples in this study have porosities (φ, the ratio of the pore volume to the total sample volume) that vary from 0.3 to 0.75 and average pore radii that range from approximately 15 to 120 A. Determining the effect of the pore structure on the diffusion of a liquid in a porous material is complicated by the chemical interactions between the diffusing molecules and the pore surface. In this study, ions in a hydrophilic fluid are used to block the adsorption of the diffusing dye molecules to the hydroxyl groups covering the silica surface. This technique is unlike typical surface treatments of silica in that it does not permanently alter the pore geometry. In this work, fluid diffusion is measured with a transient holographic grating technique where interfering laser beams create a periodic refractive index modulation in the fluid. The diffraction of a third laser off this grating is monitored to determine how quickly the grating relaxes, thereby determining the diffusion coefficient of the molecules in the fluid. Varying the grating periodicity controls the length scale of the diffusion measurement from 1.2 to 100 μm which is much larger than the average pore sizes of the samples. Therefore, over these large scales, we measure 'normal' diffusion, where the mean squared displacement of a diffusing particle varies linearly with time. In one particular type of porous silica

  16. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  17. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  18. Diffusion at the boundary between the film and substrate upon the electrocrystallization of zinc on a copper substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtapenko, E. Ph.; Zabludovsky, V. A.; Dudkina, V. V.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present the results of experimental investigations of the diffusion layer formed at the film-substrate interface upon the electrodeposition of zinc films on a copper substrate. The investigations have shown that, in the transient layer, the deposited metal is diffused into the material of the substrate. The depth of the diffusion layer and, consequently, the concentrations of the incorporated zinc atoms depend strongly on the conditions of electrocrystallization, which vary from 1.5 μm when using direct current to 4 μm when using direct current in combination with laser-stimulated deposition (LSD). The X-ray diffraction investigations of the transient layer at the film-substrate interface have shown that, upon electrocrystallization using pulsed current in rigid regimes with the application of the LSD, a CuZn2 phase is formed in the diffusion layer. This indicates that the diffusion of zinc into copper occurs via two mechanisms, i.e., grainboundary and bulk. The obtained values of the coefficient of diffusion of zinc adatoms in polycrystalline copper are equal to 1.75 × 10-15 m2/s when using direct current and 1.74 × 10-13 m2/s when using LSD.

  19. Atomic-scale mechanisms for diffusion of impurities in transition-metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetseris, Leonidas; Logothetidis, S.; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2010-03-01

    We use results from first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory to evaluate the performance of ZrN, HfN, and TiN as diffusion barrier materials. We examine primarily migration of Cu impurities through the bulk or through inter-grain voids of nitride films and we elucidate the conditions that favor moderate diffusion in the former case and very rapid migration in the latter. Migration activation energies for Cu interstitials in the bulk of the materials lie in the range of 0.9-1.4 eV, while the corresponding values for surface diffusion of Cu adatoms vary between 0.1 and 0.55 eV. Based on the agreement between the calculated activation energies and available measured values we resolve previous conflicting suggestions that were used to interpret various experimental data. Overall, our findings highlight the role of native point defects, impurities, and film texture on the performance of nitride diffusion barrier materials. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Marmot-Fission-Gas-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders; Matthews, Christopher

    2016-10-22

    The MARMOT-FISSION-GAS-DIFFUSION software solves a coupled set of partial differential equations describing fission gas evolution in UO2 nuclear fuel. It is part of the MARMOT code, which builds on the MOOSE framework. Both the MARMOT code and the MOOSE framework are developed and maintained by Idaho National Laboratory. The model in MARMOT-FISSION-GAS-DIFFUSION consists of a set of continuum reaction-diffusion equations capturing formation and annihilation of defects, reactions between defects, diffusion of defects and segregation of defects to grain boundaries. Defects refer to vacancies and interstitials as well fission gas atoms (Xe) occupying various trap sites such as uranium and oxygen vacancies and interstitials sites. The code can treat a large number of defect types. The model is formulated within the phase field framework to be compatible with other MARMOT kernels. The driving forces for all reactions, diffusion and segregation events are consistently formulated as a variational derivatives of the free energy of the system. The rates of the reactions are controlled by the corresponding kinetic coefficients. The free energy and the kinetic coefficients for UO2 have been parameterized by lower length scale simulations. The code can be used to simulate defect evolution in a prescribed UO2 microstructure as well as to solve defect clustering problems that control effective diffusivities under both thermal and irradiation conditions. It I possible to extend the current UO2 model to other fuel types such as accident tolerant fuels based on the U3Si2 compound. This would obviously require a new set of material properties describing the behavior of defects in U3Si2 rather than UO2. The framework is however designed to be generic.

  1. Line Lengths and Starch Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Sandra E.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates readability of different line lengths in advertising body copy, hypothesizing a normal curve with lower scores for shorter and longer lines, and scores above the mean for lines in the middle of the distribution. Finds support for lower scores for short lines and some evidence of two optimum line lengths rather than one. (SKC)

  2. A Systematic Comparison of Mathematical Models for Inherent Measurement of Ciliary Length: How a Cell Can Measure Length and Volume

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, William B.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Serebrenik, Yevgeniy V.; Ritter, Alex; Hernandez-Lopez, Rogelio A.; Gunzenhauser, Julia; Kannegaard, Elisa; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2015-01-01

    Cells control organelle size with great precision and accuracy to maintain optimal physiology, but the mechanisms by which they do so are largely unknown. Cilia and flagella are simple organelles in which a single measurement, length, can represent size. Maintenance of flagellar length requires an active transport process known as intraflagellar transport, and previous measurements suggest that a length-dependent feedback regulates intraflagellar transport. But the question remains: how is a length-dependent signal produced to regulate intraflagellar transport appropriately? Several conceptual models have been suggested, but testing these models quantitatively requires that they be cast in mathematical form. Here, we derive a set of mathematical models that represent the main broad classes of hypothetical size-control mechanisms currently under consideration. We use these models to predict the relation between length and intraflagellar transport, and then compare the predicted relations for each model with experimental data. We find that three models—an initial bolus formation model, an ion current model, and a diffusion-based model—show particularly good agreement with available experimental data. The initial bolus and ion current models give mathematically equivalent predictions for length control, but fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments rule out the initial bolus model, suggesting that either the ion current model or a diffusion-based model is more likely correct. The general biophysical principles of the ion current and diffusion-based models presented here to measure cilia and flagellar length can be generalized to measure any membrane-bound organelle volume, such as the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:25809250

  3. Experimental Evaluation of Rocket Exhaust Diffusers for Altitude Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, Joseph N.; Meyer, Carl L.; Peters, Daniel J.

    1960-01-01

    An experimental investigation of exhaust diffusers has been conducted to evaluate various methods of minimizing the overall pressure ratio (from chamber to ambient pressure) required to establish and maintain full expansion of the nozzle flow (altitude simulation). Exhaust-diffuser configurations investigated were (1) cylindrical diffusers, (2) diffusers with contraction, and (3) diffusers including a right-angle turn. Cylindrical diffusers were evaluated with primary nozzles of various area ratios and types, as well as two clustered configurations; the other diffusers were evaluated with individual nozzles of constant area ratio and varied type. Air was the working fluid, except for two check points obtained with JP-4 fuel and liquid-oxygen rocket engines and cylindrical diffusers. The minimum length-diameter ratio of cylindrical diffusers was about 6 for minimum pressure-ratio requirements. With cylindrical diffusers of adequate length, the pressure-ratio requirements were primarily a function of the ratio of diffuser to nozzle-throat areas and were essentially independent of primary-nozzle type (including two clustered configurations) or area ratio. The two check points obtained with rocket engines indicated the pressure-ratio requirements at given ratios of diffuser to nozzle-throat areas were lowered, as compared with the requirements with air, as a result of the reduced ratio of specific heats. The minimum length-diameter ratio of the contraction throat of convergent-divergent diffusers was also about 6 for minimum pressure-ratio requirements. With adequate contraction-throat length, the pressure-ratio requirements of such diffusers were appreciably below those of comparable cylindrical diffusers when used with conical and cutoff-isentropic nozzles, but not when used with a bell nozzle. Minimum pressure-ratio requirements of a diffuser including a simple long-radius right-angle turn at maximum diffuser area, obtained with the center of radius of the turn a

  4. Gestation length in farmed reindeer.

    PubMed

    Shipka, M P; Rowell, J E

    2010-01-01

    Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarundus) are the only cervids indigenous to the arctic environment. In Alaska, reindeer are a recognized agricultural species and an economic mainstay for many native populations. Traditionally raised in extensive free-ranging systems, a recent trend toward intensive farming requires a more in-depth knowledge of reproductive management. Reported gestation length in reindeer varies, ranging from 198 to 229 d in studies performed at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. A switchback study that manipulated only breeding date demonstrated a mean increase in gestation length of 8.5 d among females bred early in the season. The negative correlation between conception date and gestation length is consistent with reindeer research at other locations and reports of variable gestation length in a growing number of domestic and non-domestic species. This paper reviews the phenomenon in reindeer and discusses some of the factors known to affect gestation length as well as possible areas for future research.

  5. Double-diffusive layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaussinger, Florian; Kupka, Friedrich; Hücker, Sebastian; Egbers, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Double-diffusive convection plays an important role in geo- and astrophysical applications. The special case, where a destabilising temperature gradient counteracts a stabilising solute gradient leads to layering phenomena under certain conditions. Convectively mixed layers sandwiched in diffusive interfaces form a so-called stack. Well-known double-diffusive systems are observed in rift lakes in Africa and even from the coffee drink Latte Macciatto. Stacks of layers are also predicted to occur inside massive stars and inside giant planets. Their dynamics depend on the thermal, the solute and the momentum diffusivities, as well on the ratio of the gradients of the opposing stratifications. Since the layering process cannot be derived from linear stability analysis, the full nonlinear set of equations has to be investigated. Numerical simulations have become feasible for this task, despite the physical processes operate on a vast range of length and time scales, which is challenging for numerical hydrodynamical modelling. The oceanographically relevant case of fresh and salty water is investigated here in further details. The heat and mass transfer is compared with theoretical results and experimental measurements. Additionally, the initial dynamic of layering, the transient behaviour of a stack and the long time evolution are presented using the example of Lake Kivu and the interior of a giant planet.

  6. Nanoparticle Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Kalathi, Jagannathan; Yamamoto, Umi; Schweizer, Kenneth; Grest, Gary S.; Kumar, Sanat

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations show that nanoparticle (NP) diffusivity in weakly interacting mixtures of NPs and polymer melts has two very different classes of behavior depending on their size. NP relaxation times and their diffusivities are completely described by the local, Rouse dynamics of the polymer chains for NPs smaller than the polymer entanglement mesh size. The motion of larger NPs, which are comparable to the entanglement mesh size, is significantly slowed by chain entanglements, and is not describable by the Stokes-Einstein relationship. Our results are in essentially quantitative agreement with a force-level generalized Langevin equation theory for all the NP sizes and chain lengths explored, and imply that for these lightly entangled systems, activated NP hopping is not important.

  7. Minimum length-maximum velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panes, Boris

    2012-03-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example, we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA on superluminal neutrinos.

  8. Definition of Magnetic Exchange Length

    SciTech Connect

    Abo, GS; Hong, YK; Park, J; Lee, J; Lee, W; Choi, BC

    2013-08-01

    The magnetostatic exchange length is an important parameter in magnetics as it measures the relative strength of exchange and self-magnetostatic energies. Its use can be found in areas of magnetics including micromagnetics, soft and hard magnetic materials, and information storage. The exchange length is of primary importance because it governs the width of the transition between magnetic domains. Unfortunately, there is some confusion in the literature between the magnetostatic exchange length and a similar distance concerning magnetization reversal mechanisms in particles known as the characteristic length. This confusion is aggravated by the common usage of two different systems of units, SI and cgs. This paper attempts to clarify the situation and recommends equations in both systems of units.

  9. Length Invisibilization of Tachyonic Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estakhr, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Faster than the speed of light particle such as tachyonic neutrino due to its superluminal nature disapper and is undetectable. L = iΩ-1Lo where, i =√{ - 1 } is imaginary Number, Ω = 1 /√{βs2 - 1 } is Estakhr's Omega factor, L is the Superluminal Length, Lo is the proper length, βs =Vs / c > 1 is superluminal speed parameter, Vs is Superluminal velocity and c is speed of light.

  10. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  11. Diffusion of oxygen in cork.

    PubMed

    Lequin, Sonia; Chassagne, David; Karbowiak, Thomas; Simon, Jean-Marc; Paulin, Christian; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2012-04-04

    This work reports measurements of effective oxygen diffusion coefficient in raw cork. Kinetics of oxygen transfer through cork is studied at 298 K thanks to a homemade manometric device composed of two gas compartments separated by a cork wafer sample. The first compartment contains oxygen, whereas the second one is kept under dynamic vacuum. The pressure decrease in the first compartment is recorded as a function of time. The effective diffusion coefficient D(eff) is obtained by applying Fick's law to transient state using a numerical method based on finite differences. An analytical model derived from Fick's law applied to steady state is also proposed. Results given by these two methods are in close agreement with each other. The harmonic average of the effective diffusion coefficients obtained from the distribution of 15 cork wafers of 3 mm thickness is 1.1 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1) with a large distribution over four decades. The statistical analysis of the Gaussian distribution obtained on a 3 mm cork wafer is extrapolated to a 48 mm cork wafer, which length corresponds to a full cork stopper. In this case, the probability density distribution gives a mean value of D(eff) equal to 1.6 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1). This result shows that it is possible to obtain the effective diffusion coefficient of oxygen through cork from short time (few days) measurements performed on a thin cork wafer, whereas months are required to obtain the diffusion coefficient for a full cork stopper. Permeability and oxygen transfer rate are also calculated for comparison with data from other studies.

  12. A study of surface diffusion with the scanning tunneling microscope from fluctuations of the tunneling current

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, Lozano

    1996-01-12

    The transport of atoms or molecules over surfaces has been an important area of study for several decades now, with its progress generally limited by the available experimental techniques to characterize the phenomena. A number of methods have been developed over the years to measure surface diffusion yet only very few systems have been characterized to this day mainly due to the physical limitations inherent in these available methods. Even the STM with its astonishing atomically-resolved images of the surface has been limited in terms of its capability to determine mass transport properties. This is because the STM is inherently a ``slow`` instrument, i.e., a finite time is needed for signal averaging in order to produce the image. A need exists for additional surface diffusion measurement techniques, ideally ones which are able to study varied systems and measure a wide range of diffusion rates. The STM (especially because of its highly local nature) presents itself as a promising tool to conduct dynamical studies if its poor time resolution during ``normal operation`` can somehow be overcome. The purpose of this dissertation is to introduce a new technique of using the STM to measure adatom mobility on surfaces -- one with a capacity to achieve excellent time resolution.

  13. Translational diffusion of proteins in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Downton, Matthew T.

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions play an important role in the transport of analytes through nanoscale devices. Of particular note is the role that no-slip boundary conditions have on the drag coefficient of confined particles and molecules. In this work, we use a coarse grained molecular dynamics model to measure the diffusion coefficients of proteins confined within cylindrical nanochannels of similar dimension. Finite-size corrected bulk diffusion coefficients are found to agree with experimental data, while in channels, a good match is found between theoretical expressions based on continuum fluid mechanics and the reduction of the translational diffusion coefficient across a range of protein to channel size ratios. These results demonstrate that it is possible to directly use molecular simulation to make quantitative predictions of the effects of hydrodynamics on diffusion at length scales of order 1 nm.

  14. Bounds on the length of magnetic field lines in a two-dimensional plasma.

    PubMed

    Núñez, M

    2001-03-01

    Magnetic field lines in ideal turbulent plasmas tend to become quite complicated and their length to grow in time. Diffusivity allows for reconnection and possible shortening, but this fact has not so far been rigorously quantified. We show that in a two-dimensional diffusive plasma the mean length of field lines stays bounded for all time. Moreover, these estimates are local, in the sense that the mean values of magnetic field and velocity in the neighborhood of a ball determine bounds for length within the ball, without recourse to external magnitudes.

  15. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  16. The Effect of Upstream Vane Wakes on Annular Diffuser Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Erica; Padilla, Angelina; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John

    2008-11-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the sensitivity to inlet conditions of the flow in two annular diffusers. One of the diffusers was a conservative design typical of a diffuser directly upstream of the combustor in a jet engine. The other had the same length and inlet shape as the first diffuser but a larger area ratio and was meant to operate on the verge of separation. Each diffuser was connected to two different inlets, one containing a fully-developed channel flow, the other containing wakes from a row of airfoils. Three-component velocity measurements were taken on the flow in each inlet/diffuser combination using Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry. Results will be presented on the 3D velocity fields in the two diffusers and the effect of the airfoil wakes on separation and secondary flows.

  17. Diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

  18. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  19. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  20. A Student Diffusion Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration toward low concentration.

  1. Handbook on atmospheric diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

  2. When Does Length Cause the Word Length Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J.; Surprenant, Aimee M.

    2011-01-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining…

  3. IMF Length Scales and Predictability: The Two Length Scale Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Szabo, Adam; Slavin, James A.; Lepping, R. P.; Kokubun, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a systematic study using simultaneous data from three spacecraft, Wind, IMP 8 (Interplanetary Monitoring Platform) and Geotail to examine interplanetary length scales and their implications on predictability for magnetic field parcels in the typical solar wind. Time periods were selected when the plane formed by the three spacecraft included the GSE (Ground Support Equipment) x-direction so that if the parcel fronts were strictly planar, the two adjacent spacecraft pairs would determine the same phase front angles. After correcting for the motion of the Earth relative to the interplanetary medium and deviations in the solar wind flow from radial, we used differences in the measured front angle between the two spacecraft pairs to determine structure radius of curvature. Results indicate that the typical radius of curvature for these IMF parcels is of the order of 100 R (Sub E). This implies that there are two important IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) scale lengths relevant to predictability: (1) the well-established scale length over which correlations observed by two spacecraft decay along a given IMF parcel, of the order of a few tens of Earth radii and (2) the scale length over which two spacecraft are unlikely to even observe the same parcel because of its curvature, of the order of a hundred Earth radii.

  4. CEBAF Upgrade Bunch Length Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Mahmoud

    2016-05-01

    Many accelerators use short electron bunches and measuring the bunch length is important for efficient operations. CEBAF needs a suitable bunch length because bunches that are too long will result in beam interruption to the halls due to excessive energy spread and beam loss. In this work, bunch length is measured by invasive and non-invasive techniques at different beam energies. Two new measurement techniques have been commissioned; a harmonic cavity showed good results compared to expectations from simulation, and a real time interferometer is commissioned and first checkouts were performed. Three other techniques were used for measurements and comparison purposes without modifying the old procedures. Two of them can be used when the beam is not compressed longitudinally while the other one, the synchrotron light monitor, can be used with compressed or uncompressed beam.

  5. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  6. Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2000-01-01

    A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

  7. Hydrodynamic length-scale selection in microswimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Dunkel, Jörn; Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Bär, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A universal characteristic of mesoscale turbulence in active suspensions is the emergence of a typical vortex length scale, distinctly different from the scale invariance of turbulent high-Reynolds number flows. Collective length-scale selection has been observed in bacterial fluids, endothelial tissue, and active colloids, yet the physical origins of this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we systematically derive an effective fourth-order field theory from a generic microscopic model that allows us to predict the typical vortex size in microswimmer suspensions. Building on a self-consistent closure condition, the derivation shows that the vortex length scale is determined by the competition between local alignment forces, rotational diffusion, and intermediate-range hydrodynamic interactions. Vortex structures found in simulations of the theory agree with recent measurements in Bacillus subtilis suspensions. Moreover, our approach yields an effective viscosity enhancement (reduction), as reported experimentally for puller (pusher) microorganisms.

  8. Critical waves and the length problem of biology

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction–diffusion with a small number substance. Min oscillations in Escherichia coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eukaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PMID:26240329

  9. Hydrodynamic length-scale selection in microswimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Dunkel, Jörn; Klapp, Sabine H L; Bär, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A universal characteristic of mesoscale turbulence in active suspensions is the emergence of a typical vortex length scale, distinctly different from the scale invariance of turbulent high-Reynolds number flows. Collective length-scale selection has been observed in bacterial fluids, endothelial tissue, and active colloids, yet the physical origins of this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we systematically derive an effective fourth-order field theory from a generic microscopic model that allows us to predict the typical vortex size in microswimmer suspensions. Building on a self-consistent closure condition, the derivation shows that the vortex length scale is determined by the competition between local alignment forces, rotational diffusion, and intermediate-range hydrodynamic interactions. Vortex structures found in simulations of the theory agree with recent measurements in Bacillus subtilis suspensions. Moreover, our approach yields an effective viscosity enhancement (reduction), as reported experimentally for puller (pusher) microorganisms.

  10. Critical waves and the length problem of biology.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Robert B

    2015-08-18

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction-diffusion with a small number substance. Min oscillations in Escherichia coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eukaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs.

  11. Generalized Drift-Diffusion Model In Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, S.; Bendib-Kalache, K.; Bendib, A.

    2008-09-23

    A new drift-diffusion model is proposed based on the computation of the stationary nonlocal current density. The semi classical Boltzmann equation is solved keeping all the anisotropies of the distribution function with the use of the continued fractions. The conductivity is calculated in the linear approximation and for arbitrary collision frequency with respect to Kv{sub t} where K{sup -1} is the characteristic length scale of the system and V{sub t} is the thermal velocity. The nonlocal conductivity can be used to close the generalized drift-diffusion equations valid for arbitrary collisionality.

  12. Radon Diffusion Measurement in Polyethylene based on Alpha Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, Wolfgang

    2011-04-27

    We present a method to measure the diffusion of Radon in solid materials based on the alpha decay of the radon daughter products. In contrast to usual diffusion measurements which detect the radon that penetrates a thin barrier, we let the radon diffuse into the material and then measure the alpha decays of the radon daughter products in the material. We applied this method to regular and ultra high molecular weight poly ethylene and find diffusion lengths of order of mm as expected. However, the preliminary analysis shows significant differences between two different approaches we have chosen. These differences may be explained by the different experimental conditions.

  13. Anomalous diffusion of poly(ethylene oxide) in agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Tom; Matsukawa, Shingo

    2016-11-01

    We report on the effect of probe size and diffusion time of poly(ethylene) oxide in agarose gels. Time-dependence of the diffusion coefficient, reflecting anomalous diffusion, was observed for poly(ethylene) oxide chains with hydrodynamic radii exceeding about 20nm at an agarose concentration of 2%. The main conclusion is that the pore distribution includes pores that are only several nm across, in agreement with scattering reports in the literature. Interpretation of the diffusion coefficient dependence on the probe size based on a model of entangled rigid rods yielded a rod length of 72nm.

  14. Simulations of singlet exciton diffusion in organic semiconductors: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorgaard, Josiah A.; Kose, Muhammet Erkan

    2014-12-22

    Our review describes the various aspects of simulation strategies for exciton diffusion in condensed phase thin films of organic semiconductors. Several methods for calculating energy transfer rate constants are discussed along with procedures for how to account for energetic disorder. Exciton diffusion can be modelled by using kinetic Monte-Carlo methods or master equations. Recent literature on simulation efforts for estimating exciton diffusion lengths of various conjugated polymers and small molecules are introduced. Moreover, these studies are discussed in the context of the effects of morphology on exciton diffusion and the necessity of accurate treatment of disorder for comparison of simulation results with those of experiment.

  15. Fibreoptic diffuse-light irradiators of biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Vladimir V; Loshchenov, V B; Konov, Vitalii I; Kononenko, Vitalii V

    2010-10-15

    We report techniques for the fabrication of laser radiation diffusers for interstitial photodynamic therapy. Using chemical etching of the distal end of silica fibre with a core diameter of 200 - 600 {mu}m, we have obtained long (up to 40 mm) diffusers with good scattering uniformity. Laser ablation has been used to produce cylindrical diffusers with high emission contrast and a scattering uniformity no worse than {approx}10 % in their middle part. The maximum length of the diffusers produced by this method is 20 - 25 mm. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Incubation length of dabbling ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells-Berlin, A. M.; Prince, H.H.; Arnold, T.W.

    2005-01-01

    We collected unincubated eggs from wild Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), Gadwall (A. strepera), Blue-winged Teal (A. discors), and Northern Shoveler (A. clypeata) nests and artificially incubated them at 37.5??C. Average incubation lengths of Mallard, Gadwall, and Northern Shoveler eggs did not differ from their wild-nesting counterparts, but artificially incubated Blue-winged Teal eggs required an additional 1.7 days to hatch, suggesting that wild-nesting teal incubated more effectively. A small sample of Mallard, Gadwall, and Northern Shoveler eggs artificially incubated at 38.3??C hatched 1 day sooner, indicating that incubation temperature affected incubation length. Mean incubation length of Blue-winged Teal declined by 1 day for each 11-day delay in nesting, but we found no such seasonal decline among Mallards, Gadwalls, or Northern Shovelers. There is no obvious explanation for the seasonal reduction in incubation length for Blue-winged Teal eggs incubated in a constant environment, and the phenomenon deserves further study. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2005.

  17. Finite length Taylor Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical solutions of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for flow between concentric rotating cylinders of finite length are obtained by a spectral collocation method. These representative results pertain to two-cell/one-cell exchange process, and are compared with recent experiments.

  18. Persistent Criminality and Career Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapanen, Rudy; Britton, Lee; Croisdale, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This study is an examination of persistent offending and its implications for the understanding and investigation of desistance and career length. Persistence, especially as it is operationalized using official measures, is characterized as fundamentally a measure of resistance to formal social control: continued crime in the face of increasingly…

  19. Characteristic length of glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donth, E.

    1996-03-01

    The characteristic length of the glass transition (ξ _α ) is based on the concept of cooperatively rearranging regions (CRR's) by Adam & Gibbs (1965): ξ _α is the diameter of one CRR. In the theoretical part of the talk a formula is derived how this length can be calculated from calorimetric data of the transformation interval. The approach is based on fluctuations in natural functional subsystems. The corresponding thermodynamics is represented e.g. in a book of the author (E. Donth, Relaxation and Thermodynamics in Polymers. Glass Transition, Akademie-Verlag, Berlin 1992). A typical value for this length is 3 nanometers. In the experimental part several examples are reported to enlarge the experimental evidence for such a length: Squeezing the glass transition in the amorphous layers of partially crystallized PET (C. Schick, Rostock), glass transition of small-molecule glass formers in a series of nanoscaled pores of porous glasses (F. Kremer, Leipzig), comparison with a concentration fluctuation model in homogeneous polymer mixtures (E.W. Fischer, Mainz), and, from our laboratory, backscaling to ξ _α across the main transition from the entanglement spacing in several amorphous polymers such as PVAC, PS, NR, and some polymer networks. Rouse backscaling was possible in the α β splitting region of several poly(n alkyl methacrylates) resulting in small characteristic lengths of order 1 nanometer near the onset of α cooperativity. In a speculative outlook a dynamic density pattern is presented, having a cellular structure with higher density and lower mobility of the cell walls. It will be explained, with the aid of different thermal expansion of wall and clusters, how the clusters within the cells maintain a certain mobility far below the glass temperature.

  20. Polymer Diffusion in the Presence of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, Karen

    2014-03-01

    The center-of-mass diffusion of polymers within a polymer melt proceeds by the mechanism of reptation wherein the polymer is confined to a tube that is defined by neighboring entanglements and moves along its contour. Polymer diffusion is perturbed when the melt contains nanoparticles that are comparable in size to the radius of gyration (Rg) of the polymers. Within this talk, we will present tracer diffusion coefficients (D) results for three types of nanocomposite: spherical nanoparticles with surface functionalization, spherical nanoparticles with brushes, and cylindrical nanoparticles (aspect ratio = 5 to 50). When functionalized spherical nanoparticles have neutral or attractive interactions with the polymer matrix, a monotonic decrease in the diffusion coefficient is observed across a wide range of polymer molecular weight, nanoparticle size, and nanoparticle concentration. These data collapse onto a master curve when plotted as D normalized by the diffusion coefficient into a neat homopolymer (D/Do) versus our confinement parameter defined as the interparticle distance divided by 2Rg (ID/2Rg). Polymer diffusion in systems with grafted spherical nanoparticles exhibit the same D/Do versus ID/2Rg, when ID accounts for the extent to which the tracer polymer penetrates the polymer brush. For various cylindrical nanoparticles D/Do versus nanoparticle concentration exhibits a minimum when 2Rg is both larger than the nanoparticle diameter and smaller than the nanoparticle length. Complimentary molecular dynamics simulations and neutron scattering results will also be presented.

  1. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  2. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  3. Robustness of compound Dirichlet priors for Bayesian inference of branch lengths.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Rannala, Bruce; Yang, Ziheng

    2012-10-01

    We modified the phylogenetic program MrBayes 3.1.2 to incorporate the compound Dirichlet priors for branch lengths proposed recently by Rannala, Zhu, and Yang (2012. Tail paradox, partial identifiability and influential priors in Bayesian branch length inference. Mol. Biol. Evol. 29:325-335.) as a solution to the problem of branch-length overestimation in Bayesian phylogenetic inference. The compound Dirichlet prior specifies a fairly diffuse prior on the tree length (the sum of branch lengths) and uses a Dirichlet distribution to partition the tree length into branch lengths. Six problematic data sets originally analyzed by Brown, Hedtke, Lemmon, and Lemmon (2010. When trees grow too long: investigating the causes of highly inaccurate Bayesian branch-length estimates. Syst. Biol. 59:145-161) are reanalyzed using the modified version of MrBayes to investigate properties of Bayesian branch-length estimation using the new priors. While the default exponential priors for branch lengths produced extremely long trees, the compound Dirichlet priors produced posterior estimates that are much closer to the maximum likelihood estimates. Furthermore, the posterior tree lengths were quite robust to changes in the parameter values in the compound Dirichlet priors, for example, when the prior mean of tree length changed over several orders of magnitude. Our results suggest that the compound Dirichlet priors may be useful for correcting branch-length overestimation in phylogenetic analyses of empirical data sets.

  4. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma.

  5. Critical Length Limiting Superlow Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  6. Critical length limiting superlow friction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-06

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  7. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  8. Length dependence of carbon nanotube thermal conductivity and the "problem of long waves"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mingo, N.; Broido, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the first calculations of finite length carbon nanotube thermal conductivity that extend from the ballistic to the diffusive regime, throughout a very wide range of lengths and temperatures. The long standing problem of vanishing scattering of the "long wavelength phonf dramatically here, making the thermal conductivity diverge as the nanotube length increases. We show that the divergence disappears if 3-phonon scattering processes are considered to second or higher order. Nevertheless, for defect free nanotubes, the thermal conductivity keeps increasing up to very large lengths (10 gm at 300 K). Defects in the nanotube are also able to remove the long wavelength divergence.

  9. Thermal Diffusivity of Quartz and its Relation to Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefer, M.; Schilling, F. R.

    2001-12-01

    Thermal transport properties of minerals are fundamental for an understanding of heat transport in rocks and they are a prerequisite to model temperature distribution within the Earth. Besides its significance for crustal rocks, quartz and its physical properties are of interest in material science. Beyond that, quartz is of elementary importance due to its unique physical behavior, especially during low to high transformation. Quartz is characterized by a high anisotropy in thermal expansion, sound velocity, and thermal diffusivity. During the phase transition from low to high quartz the physical properties vary non-linearly, whereas sound velocity shows a distingued minimum, and average Poisson's ratio becomes negative. Moreover, quartz shows the highest thermal diffusivity and strongest temperature dependence of all silicates. Thermal diffusivity a and thermal conductivity l are interrelated by {l = cP ρ a}. Thermal diffusivity can be expressed by mean phonon (sound) velocity v and mean free path length l by a = 1/3 v l. By combining measured phononic velocity and thermal diffusivity the structure dependent mean free path length can be revealed. To determine thermal diffusivity of quartz especially during the low to high transition in the a- and c-direction we used a high precision transient technique (Schilling 1999) with high temperature resolution up to 800\\deg C. For temperatures below 500 \\deg C a pronounced 1/T dependence of thermal diffusivity is observed and is highest in the c-direction. A minimum in thermal diffusivity is observed during the phase transition. Above the transition thermal diffusivity increases and the highest diffusivity is observed in the a-direction. A similar cross over is observed for the maximum phononic velocity. Between 500\\deg and 800\\deg C velocity and thermal diffusivity show similar behavior. No significant contribution of radiative heat transport is detectable over the examined temperature range. The thermal diffusivity

  10. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  11. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOEpatents

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  12. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  13. Applicability of Mixing Length Theory to a Turbulent Vortex System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, Robert G.

    1961-01-01

    The ability of mixing length theory to correlate vortex data is evaluated. Expressions are derived for eddy diffusivity by applying the techniques of von Karman and Prandtl which have been established for pipe flow. Total and static pressures were measured from the outer radius to the exhaust-nozzle radius of a vortex generator for a range of mass flows. These data are combined with Navier-Stokes solutions for this region of a compressible vortex to determine turbulent Reynolds numbers. The Reynolds number is related to Prandtl and Karman functions for various assumed boundary conditions, and the experimental data are used to determine the usefulness of these expressions. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Mixing length functions developed by applying von Karman's similarity hypothesis to vortex motion correlate the data better than do Prandtl functions obtained with the assumption that mixing length is proportional to radius. (2) Some of the expressions developed do not adequately represent the experimental data. (3) The data are correlated with acceptable scatter by evaluating the fluid radial inertia at the outer boundary and the shear stress at the inner boundary. The universal constant K was found to be 0.04 to 0.08, rather than the value of 0.4 which is accepted for rectilinear flow. (4) The data are best correlated by a modified Karman expression which includes an effect of radial inertia, as well as shear stress, on eddy diffusivity.

  14. A Simple Single Step diffusion and Emitter Etching Process for High Efficiency Gallium Antimonide Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rajagopalan; N.S. Reddy; E. Ehsani; I.B. Bhat; P.S. Dutta; R.J. Gutmann; G. Nichols; G.W. Charache; O. Sulima

    2003-08-29

    A single step diffusion followed by precise etching of the diffused layer has been developed to obtain a diffusion profile appropriate for high efficiency GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells. The junction depth was controlled through monitoring of light current-voltage (I-V) curves (photovoltaic response) during the post diffusion emitter etching process. The measured photoresponses (prior to device fabrication) have been correlated with the quantum efficiencies and the open circuit voltages in the fabricated devices. An optimum junction depth for obtaining highest quantum efficiency and open circuit voltage is presented based on diffusion lengths (or monitoring carrier lifetimes), carrier mobility and typical diffused impurity profile in GaSb.

  15. The NIST Length Scale Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Beers, John S.; Penzes, William B.

    1999-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) interferometer for measuring graduated length scales has been in use since 1965. It was developed in response to the redefinition of the meter in 1960 from the prototype platinum-iridium bar to the wavelength of light. The history of the interferometer is recalled, and its design and operation described. A continuous program of modernization by making physical modifications, measurement procedure changes and computational revisions is described, and the effects of these changes are evaluated. Results of a long-term measurement assurance program, the primary control on the measurement process, are presented, and improvements in measurement uncertainty are documented.

  16. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  17. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Matthew A.; Swope, David M.; Grimes, David

    2012-01-01

    Background It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion. Methods This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method). It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB). Results Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others. Discussion Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected. PMID:23440162

  18. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  19. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  20. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  1. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hughto, J.; Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2011-07-15

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions ''hop'' in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter {Gamma}=175 to Coulomb parameters up to {Gamma}=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  2. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  3. Testable scenario for relativity with minimum length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelino-Camelia, G.

    2001-06-01

    I propose a general class of spacetimes whose structure is governed by observer-independent scales of both velocity (/c) and length (Planck length), and I observe that these spacetimes can naturally host a modification of FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction such that lengths which in their inertial rest frame are bigger than a ``minimum length'' are also bigger than the minimum length in all other inertial frames. With an analysis in leading order in the minimum length, I show that this is the case in a specific illustrative example of postulates for relativity with velocity and length observer-independent scales.

  4. Novel light diffusing fiber for use in medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klubben, W. Spencer; Logunov, Stephan L.; Fewkes, Edward J.; Mooney, Jeff; Then, Paul M.; Wigley, Peter G.; Schreiber, Horst; Matias, Kaitlyn; Wilson, Cynthia J.; Ocampo, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    Fiber-based cylindrical light diffusers are often used in photodynamic therapy to illuminate a luminal organ, such as the esophagus. The diffusers are often made of plastic and suffer from short diffusion lengths and low transmission efficiencies over a broad spectrum. We have developed FibranceTM, a glass-based fiber optic cylindrical diffuser which can illuminate a fiber from 0.5 cm to 10 meters over a broad wavelength range. With these longer illumination lengths, a variety of other medical applications are possible beyond photodynamic therapy. We present a number of applications for Fibrance ranging from in situ controllable illumination for Photodynamic Therapy to light guided anatomy highlighting for minimally invasive surgery to mitigating hospital acquired infections and more.

  5. High-power diffusing-tip fibers for interstitial photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinofsky, Edward L.; Farr, Norman; Baxter, Lincoln; Weiler, William

    1997-05-01

    A line of optical fiber based diffusing tips has been designed, developed, and tested that are capable of distributing tens of watts of cw laser power over lengths ranging from two millimeters to over 10 cm. The result is a flexible non-stick diffuser capable of coagulating large volumes of tissue in reasonably short exposures of 3 - 5 minutes. Sub-millimeter diameter devices have a distinct effect on reducing the force needed to insert the applicator interstitially into tissue. Utilizing our design approach, we have produced diffusers based on 200 micrometer core fiber that has delivered over 35 watts of Nd:YAG energy over diffusion lengths as short as 4 mm. These applicators are being tested for applications in oncology, cardiology, electrophysiology, urology and gynecology.

  6. On the role of surface diffusion in determining the shape or morphology of noble-metal nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaohu; Xie, Shuifen; Liu, Maochang; Peng, Hsin-Chieh; Lu, Ning; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J.; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the shape or morphology of metal nanocrystals is central to the realization of their many applications in catalysis, plasmonics, and electronics. In one of the approaches, the metal nanocrystals are grown from seeds of certain crystallinity through the addition of atomic species. In this case, manipulating the rates at which the atomic species are added onto different crystallographic planes of a seed has been actively explored to control the growth pattern of a seed and thereby the shape or morphology taken by the final product. Upon deposition, however, the adsorbed atoms (adatoms) may not stay at the same sites where the depositions occur. Instead, they can migrate to other sites on the seed owing to the involvement of surface diffusion, and this could lead to unexpected deviations from a desired growth pathway. Herein, we demonstrated that the growth pathway of a seed is indeed determined by the ratio between the rates for atom deposition and surface diffusion. Our result suggests that surface diffusion needs to be taken into account when controlling the shape or morphology of metal nanocrystals. PMID:23569268

  7. Helium diffusion in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amidon, W. H.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-12-01

    The abundance and large grain size of carbonate minerals make them a potentially attractive target for 4He thermochronology and 3He cosmogenic dating, although the diffusive properties of helium in carbonates remain poorly understood. This work characterizes helium diffusion in calcite and dolomite to better understand the crystal-chemical factors controlling He transport and retentivity. Slabs of cleaved natural calcite and dolomite, and polished sections of calcite cut parallel or normal to c, were implanted with 3He at 3 MeV with a dose of 5x1015/cm2. Implanted carbonates were heated in 1-atm furnaces, and 3He distributions following diffusion anneals were profiled with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For 3He transport normal to cleavage surfaces in calcite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 78-300°C: Dcalcite = 9.0x10-9exp(-55 × 6 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. Diffusion in calcite exhibits marked anisotropy, with diffusion parallel to c about two orders of magnitude slower than diffusion normal to cleavage faces. He diffusivities for transport normal to the c-axis are similar in value to those normal to cleavage surfaces. Our findings are broadly consistent with helium diffusivities from step-heating measurements of calcite by Copeland et al. (2007); these bulk degassing data may reflect varying effects of diffusional anisotropy. Helium diffusion normal to cleavage surfaces in dolomite is significantly slower than diffusion in calcite, and has a much higher activation energy for diffusion. For dolomite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for He diffusion over the temperature range 150-400°C: Ddolomite = 9.0x10-8exp(-92 × 9 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. The role of crystallographic structure in influencing these differences among diffusivities was evaluated using the maximum aperture approach of Cherniak and Watson (2011), in which crystallographic structures are sectioned along possible diffusion

  8. Thorium Diffusion in Monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Diffusion of thorium has been characterized in synthetic monazite under dry conditions. The synthetic monazites (either pure CePO4, NdPO4, or a mixed LREE phosphate containing Ce, Nd, and Sm) were grown via a Na2CO3-MoO3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were either synthesized ThSiO4 or CaTh(PO4)2 powders. Experiments were performed by placing source and monazite in Pt capsules and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 10 days to a few hours, at temperatures from 1400 to 1550C. The Th distributions in the monazite were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for diffusion in monazite: DSm = 7.2x103 exp(-814 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1 The diffusivity of Th was similar for monazites containing a single REE and the mixed LREE phosphates. Th diffusion was also similar for experiments run using the Th silicate and Ca-Th phosphate sources, suggesting that the substitutional mechanism for Th in monazite, i.e, Th+4 + Si+4 for REE+3 + P+5 with the ThSiO4 source, and Th+4 + Ca+2 for 2REE+3 with the CaTh(PO4)2 source, does not significantly affect Th diffusivities, and that Th is likely the rate-limiting species. Th diffusion in monazite is about 4 orders of magnitude slower than Pb diffusion (Cherniak et al., 2004). This contrasts with findings of Gardes et al. (2005) who determined that Pb, Th and REE diffusivities in monazite are similar. Th diffusion in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997) is about an order of magnitude slower than in monazite, but with similar activation energy for diffusion. The smaller diffusivities in zircon may be a consequence of the larger disparity in size between Th and the Zr site in zircon as compared with Th and the REE site in monazite. Nonetheless, Th is essentially immobile in monazite with respect to exchange by volume diffusion under most geologic conditions; these findings may have implications for containment of high- level actinide

  9. Exact curvilinear diffusion coefficients in the repton model.

    PubMed

    Buhot, A

    2005-10-01

    The Rubinstein-Duke or repton model is one of the simplest lattice model of reptation for the diffusion of a polymer in a gel or a melt. Recently, a slightly modified model with hardcore interactions between the reptons has been introduced. The curvilinear diffusion coefficients of both models are exactly determined for all chain lengths. The case of periodic boundary conditions is also considered.

  10. Clustering method for estimating principal diffusion directions

    PubMed Central

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Davoodi-Bojd, Esmaeil; Jiang, Quan; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTMRI) is a non-invasive tool for the investigation of white matter structure within the brain. However, the traditional tensor model is unable to characterize anisotropies of orders higher than two in heterogeneous areas containing more than one fiber population. To resolve this issue, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) with a large number of diffusion encoding gradients is used along with reconstruction methods such as Q-ball. Using HARDI data, the fiber orientation distribution function (ODF) on the unit sphere is calculated and used to extract the principal diffusion directions (PDDs). Fast and accurate estimation of PDDs is a prerequisite for tracking algorithms that deal with fiber crossings. In this paper, the PDDs are defined as the directions around which the ODF data is concentrated. Estimates of the PDDs based on this definition are less sensitive to noise in comparison with the previous approaches. A clustering approach to estimate the PDDs is proposed which is an extension of fuzzy c-means clustering developed for orientation of points on a sphere. MDL (Minimum description length) principle is proposed to estimate the number of PDDs. Using both simulated and real diffusion data, the proposed method has been evaluated and compared with some previous protocols. Experimental results show that the proposed clustering algorithm is more accurate, more resistant to noise, and faster than some of techniques currently being utilized. PMID:21642005

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of fractal aggregate diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranami, Gaurav; Lamm, Monica H.; Vigil, R. Dennis

    2010-11-01

    The diffusion of fractal aggregates constructed with the method by Thouy and Jullien [J. Phys. A 27, 2953 (1994)10.1088/0305-4470/27/9/012] comprised of Np spherical primary particles was studied as a function of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that finite-size effects have a strong impact on the apparent value of the diffusion coefficient (D) , but these can be corrected by carrying out simulations using different simulation box sizes. Specifically, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the length of a cubic simulation box, and the constant of proportionality appears to be independent of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension. Using this result, it is possible to compute infinite dilution diffusion coefficients (Do) for aggregates of arbitrary size and fractal dimension, and it was found that Do∝Np-1/df , as is often assumed by investigators simulating Brownian aggregation of fractal aggregates. The ratio of hydrodynamic radius to radius of gyration is computed and shown to be independent of mass for aggregates of fixed fractal dimension, thus enabling an estimate of the diffusion coefficient for a fractal aggregate based on its radius of gyration.

  12. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  13. Ligand chain length conveys thermochromism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mainak; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Chandrakumar, K R S; Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-08-14

    Thermochromic properties of a series of non-ionic copper compounds have been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that Cu(II) ion with straight-chain primary amine (A) and alpha-linolenic (fatty acid, AL) co-jointly exhibit thermochromic properties. In the current case, we determined that thermochromism becomes ligand chain length-dependent and at least one of the ligands (A or AL) must be long chain. Thermochromism is attributed to a balanced competition between the fatty acids and amines for the copper(II) centre. The structure-property relationship of the non-ionic copper compounds Cu(AL)2(A)2 has been substantiated by various physical measurements along with detailed theoretical studies based on time-dependent density functional theory. It is presumed from our results that the compound would be a useful material for temperature-sensor applications.

  14. Phase-Length Optical Phase-Locked-Loop Sensor (PLOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Rogawski, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    PLOPS system designed to provide high-resolution measurement of change in optical length from optical-system source to any optical reflector, including diffuse reflector. Serves as adjustable optical ruler, providing high resolution in measurements of small and large changes in distance to target. Use is broad and includes most measurement situations requiring information on length, vibration, and their derivatives. Applications include building dynamics, remote sensing of vibrations in such systems as turbine-based machinery, monitoring of structural dynamics, noncontacting sensing of surface contours, measurement of large strains as in earthquake monitoring, measurement of atmospheric dynamics and turbulence, high-resolution sensing of humidity, detection of surface acoustic waves by optical microscopy, and related areas.

  15. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  16. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  17. Channeling and diffusion in dry-etch damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.

    1997-09-01

    At present channeling is accepted to be the primary mechanism causing defects deep within dry-etched material, with diffusion possibly modifying the final defect distribution. In this article detailed analytic expressions are presented incorporating both these mechanisms. The dominant parameter affecting damage depth is found to be the mean channeling length. We show how enhanced diffusion, e.g., by illumination, may increase the observed damage. We also study the effect of damage on depletion depths and suggest how the channeling length may be inferred from the etch-depth dependence of conductance or Raman spectroscopy measurements.

  18. Diffusion of water in cat ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The rates of diffusion of tritiated water (THO) and [14C]sucrose across cat right ventricular myocardium were studied at 23 degrees C in an Ussing-type diffusion cell, recording the time-course of increase in concentration of tracer in one chamber over 4--6 h after adding tracers to the other. Sucrose data were fitted with a model for a homogeneous sheet of uneven thickness in which the tissue is considered to be an array of parallel independent pathways (parallel pathway model) of varying length. The volume of the sucrose diffusion space, presumably a wholly extracellular pathway, was 23% of the tissue or 27.4 +/-1.7% (mean +/- SEM; n=11) of the tissue water. The effective intramyocardial sucrose diffusion coefficient, D8, was 1.51 +/- 0.19 X 10(-6)cm2.s-1 (n=11). Combining these data with earlier data, D8 was 22.6 +/- 1.1% (n=95) of the free diffusion coefficient in aqueous solution D degrees 8. The parallel pathway model and a dead-end pore model, which might have accounted for intracellular sequestration of water, gave estimates of DW/D degrees W (observed/free) of 15%. Because hindrance to water diffusion must be less than for sucrose (where D8/D degrees 8=22.6%), this showed the inadequacy of these models to account simultaneously for the diffusional resistance and the tissue water content. The third or cell-matrix model, a heterogeneous system of permeable cells arrayed in the extracellular matrix, allowed logical and geometrically reasonable interpretations of the steady-state data and implied estimates of DW in the cellular and extracellular fluid of approximately 25% of the aqueous diffusion coefficient. PMID:722277

  19. Delta-doping in diffusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénière, François; Chaplain, René; Gauneau, Marcel; Reddy, Viswanatha; Régrény, André

    1993-12-01

    The δ-doping where the dopant is confined on the length-scale of the lattice constant provides perfectly ideal conditions to study the atomic transport processes. We have studied MBE-grown GaAs samples δ-doped with Si and Al layers. Long time diffusion anneals have been performed in the temperature range 550 800 °C. The distribution profiles are examined by SIMS-profiling. We obtain Si diffusion coefficients in good agreement with the other recent studies using different techniques (rapid thermal annealing, capacitance-voltage profiling, sandwiched diffusion source). This contrasts with the earlier measurements based on diffusion of implanted dopants which were much more widely spread. We conclude that the more accurate data allowed with the δ-doping show that the diffusion coefficient is an intrinsic parameter provided that the amount of dopant and the dislocation density are kept sufficiently small. Le dopage-delta, où le dopant est confiné à l'échelle du paramètre du réseau, fournit les conditions parfaitement idéales pour étudier les processus de transport atomique. Nous avons étudié des échantillons de GaAs obtenus par épitaxie par jet moléculaire dopés par des couches-delta de Si et Al. Des traitements de diffusion de longue durée ont été réalisés dans l'intervalle de température 550 à 800°C. Les profils de distribution sont examinés par spectrométrie d'émission d'ions secondaires. Nous obtenons des coefficients de diffusion de Si en bon accord avec les autres études récentes utilisant des techniques différentes (traitement thermique ultrarapide, profil de distribution par la méthode capacité-voltage, diffusion d'une couche “ sandwich ”). Ceci diffère des mesures antérieures qui, basées sur la diffusion de dopants implantés, étaient beaucoup plus dispersées. Nous concluons que les données plus précises rendues possibles par le dopage-delta montrent que le coefficient de diffusion est un paramètre intrinsèque

  20. Mastocytosis, diffuse cutaneous (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of diffuse, cutaneous mastocytosis. Abnormal collections of cells in the skin (mast cells) produce this rash. Unlike bullous mastocytosis, rubbing will not lead to formation of blisters ( ...

  1. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation.

    PubMed

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework.

  2. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework. PMID:25309676

  3. Diffusion of eccentric microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Pulak K; Li, Yunyun; Marchesoni, Fabio; Li, Baowen

    2016-02-21

    We model the two-dimensional diffusive dynamics of an eccentric artificial microswimmer in a highly viscous medium. We assume that the swimmer's propulsion results from an effective force applied to a center distinct from its center of mass, both centers resting on a body's axis parallel to its average self-propulsion velocity. Moreover, we allow for angular fluctuations of the velocity about the body's axis. We prove, both analytically and numerically, that the ensuing active diffusion of the swimmer is suppressed to an extent that strongly depends on the model parameters. In particular, the active diffusion constant undergoes a transition from a quadratic to a linear dependence on the self-propulsion speed, with practical consequences on the interpretation of the experimental data. Finally, we extend our model to describe the diffusion of chiral eccentric swimmers.

  4. Germanium nanowire growth controlled by surface diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtbauer, Jan; Bansen, Roman; Heimburger, Robert; Teubner, Thomas; Boeck, Torsten; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-07-23

    Germanium nanowires (NWs) were grown onto Ge(111) substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid process using gold droplets. The growth was carried out in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at substrate temperatures between 370 Degree-Sign C and 510 Degree-Sign C. The resulting nanowire growth rate turns out to be highly dependent on the substrate temperature exhibiting the maximum at T = 430 Degree-Sign C. The temperature dependence of growth rate can be attributed to surface diffusion both along the substrate and nanowire sidewalls. Analyzing the diffusive material transport yields a diffusion length of 126 nm at a substrate temperature of 430 Degree-Sign C.

  5. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  6. Diffusion length improvements in GaAs associated with Zn diffusion during Ga/1-x/Al/x/As growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovel, H. J.; Woodall, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Relatively good GaAs solar cells can be made from poor quality substrates by making the junction deep (more than 1 micron) instead of shallow and by leaching both the p and n GaAs regions during the growth process. Air-mass-zero efficiencies of 14.7% (19% AM1) have been obtained from substrates with starting substrate thickness of 0.6 micron.

  7. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  8. Normal and anomalous diffusion of Brownian particles on disordered potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado-García, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we study the transition from normal to anomalous diffusion of Brownian particles on disordered potentials. The potential model consists of a series of "potential hills" (defined on a unit cell of constant length) whose heights are chosen randomly from a given distribution. We calculate the exact expression for the diffusion coefficient in the case of uncorrelated potentials for arbitrary distributions. We show that when the potential heights have a Gaussian distribution (with zero mean and a finite variance) the diffusion of the particles is always normal. In contrast, when the distribution of the potential heights is exponentially distributed the diffusion coefficient vanishes when the system is placed below a critical temperature. We calculate analytically the diffusion exponent for the anomalous (subdiffusive) phase by using the so-called "random trap model". Our predictions are tested by means of Langevin simulations obtaining good agreement within the accuracy of our numerical calculations.

  9. Diffusion in natural ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhouse, Iona; O'Neill, Hugh; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Diffusion rates in natural ilmenite of composition Fe0.842+ Fe0.163+Mn0.07Mg0.01Ti 0.92O3 from the Vishnevye Mountains (Urals, Russia) have been measured at 1000° C. Experiments were carried out in a one atmosphere furnace with oxygen fugacity controlled by flow of a CO-CO2 gas mixture, over a period of four hours. The diffusant source was a synthetic ilmenite (FeTiO3) powder doped with trace amounts of Mg, Co, Ni, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Al, Cr, Ga and Y. Since, the natural ilmenite crystal contained Mn it was also possible to study diffusion of Mn from the ilmenite crystal. The experiments were analysed using the electron microprobe and scanning laser ablation ICP-MS. Diffusion profiles were measured for Al, Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Ga, and Y. Diffusion of Cr, Hf, Zr, V, Nb and Ta was too slow to allow diffusion profiles to be accurately measured for the times and temperatures studied so far. The preliminary results show that diffusion in ilmenite is fast, with the diffusivity determined in this study on the order of 10-13 to 10-16 m2s-1. For comparison, Chakraborty (1997) found interdiffusion of Fe and Mg in olivine at 1000° C on the order of 10-17 to 10-18m2s-1 and Dieckmann (1998) found diffusivity of Fe, Mg, Co in magnetite at 1200° C to be on the order of 10-13 to 10-14 m2s-1. The order in which the diffusivity of the elements decreases is Mn > Co > Mg ≥ Ni > Al ≥ Y ≥ Ga, that is to say that Mn diffuses the fastest and Ga the slowest. Overall, this study intends to determine diffusion parameters such as frequency factor, activation energy and activation volume as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. This research is taking place in the context of a larger study focusing on the use of the garnet-ilmenite system as a geospeedometer. Examination of the consequences of simultaneous diffusion of multiple elements is a necessity if we are to develop an understanding of the crystal-chemical controls on diffusion (cf Spandler & O'Neill, in press). Chakraborty

  10. Probe diffusion in phase-separated bicontinuous biopolymer gels.

    PubMed

    Wassén, Sophia; Bordes, Romain; Gebäck, Tobias; Bernin, Diana; Schuster, Erich; Lorén, Niklas; Hermansson, Anne-Marie

    2014-11-07

    Probe diffusion was determined in phase separated bicontinuous gels prepared by acid-induced gelation of the whey protein isolate-gellan gum system. The topological characterization of the phase-separated gel systems is achieved by confocal microscopy and the diffusion measurements are performed using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR and fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP). These two techniques gave complementary information about the mass transport at different time- and length scales, PFG NMR provided global diffusion rates in the gel systems, while FRAP enabled the measurements of diffusion in different phases of the phase-separated gels. The results revealed that the phase-separated gel with the largest characteristic wavelength had the fastest diffusion coefficient, while the gel with smaller microstructures had a slower probe diffusion rate. By using the diffusion data obtained by FRAP and the structural data from confocal microscopy, modelling through the lattice-Boltzmann framework was carried out to simulate the global diffusion and verify the validity of the experimental measurements. With this approach it was found that discrepancies between the two experimental techniques can be rationalized in terms of probe distribution between the different phases of the system. The combination of different techniques allowed the determination of diffusion in a phase-separated biopolymer gel and gave a clearer picture of this complex system. We also illustrate the difficulties that can arise if precautions are not taken to understand the system-probe interactions.

  11. Surface metallization on Si(001) at elevated temperatures studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure: Effect of thermal adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, C.; Hwang, C. C.; Kang, T.-H.; Kim, K.-J.; Kim, B.; Kim, Y.; Noh, D. Y.; Park, C.-Y.

    2009-10-01

    We report the metallization of the Si(001)2×1 surface at elevated temperatures using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). A metallic state (Sm) over the EF , which corresponds to the empty (π∗) state of the 2×1 asymmetric dimer model, increases in the ARPES spectra, while the π∗ state decreases in the NEXAFS spectra with increasing temperature. Since Sm is observed even at 400 K, the structural phase transition at ˜900K [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 126103 (2003); Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3869 (1996)] is not related to the metallization. Thermal excitation seems to be too small to detect in ARPES in initial stage of the metallization and cannot account for the different behavior of Sm and the filled surface state of the up-dimer upon oxidation. We suggest, based on the existence of Sm even at 400 K and the oxidation behavior, that the metallization is attributed to thermal adatoms.

  12. Length of Hospital Stay: Some Administrative Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffelmayr, Bertram E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared, during a two-year period, lengths of stay of patients on two admission wards that served the same community mental health center. Results showed a significant difference in length of stay for voluntary and involuntary patients. (BH)

  13. Flow Control in a Transonic Diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartner, Jeremy; Amitay, Michael

    2014-11-01

    In some airplanes such as fighter jets and UAV, short inlet ducts replace the more conventional ducts due to their shorter length. However, these ducts are associated with low length-to-diameter ratio and low aspect ratio and, thus, experience massive separation and the presence of secondary flow structures. These flow phenomena are undesirable as they lead to pressure losses and distortion at the Aerodynamic Interface Plane (AIP), where the engine face is located. It causes the engine to perform with a lower efficiency as it would with a straight duct diffuser. Different flow control techniques were studied on the short inlet duct, with the goal to reattach the flow and minimize the distortions at the AIP. Due to the complex interaction between the separation and the secondary flow structures, the necessity to understand the flow mechanisms, and how to control them at a more fundamental level, a new transonic diffuser with an upper ramp and a straight floor was designed and built. The objective of this project is to explore the effectiveness of different flow control techniques in a high subsonic (up to Mach 0.8) diffuser, so that the quasi two-dimensional separation and the formation of secondary flow structure can be isolated using a canonical flow field. Supported by Northrop Grumman.

  14. Water isotope diffusion in the WAIS Divide ice core during the Holocene and last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. R.; Cuffey, K. M.; White, J. W. C.; Steig, E. J.; Buizert, C.; Markle, B. R.; McConnell, J. R.; Sigl, M.

    2017-01-01

    We use a high-resolution water isotope record from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core (WDC) to evaluate the effects of water isotope diffusion for the last 29 ka B.P. Using spectral analysis of the data, we determine diffusion lengths in depth and time domains. The diffusion length quantifies the mean cumulative diffusive displacement of water molecules relative to their original location at time of deposition. We simulate the observed signal with models and find that our understanding of processes and conditions in the ice sheet is incomplete. With the effects of ice-deformational thinning removed, portions of the Holocene record show total diffusion lengths smaller than predicted for a lower limit case of diffusion through a single ice crystal. Such reduced diffusion is probably due to structural features such as crusts and tortuous porosity that inhibit vapor transport in the firn. In the late glacial portion of the record, diffusion lengths double between 19.5 and 17 ka B.P. Known dependencies of diffusion on climatic variables do not account for this enhancement in models, and we hypothesize that it could arise from thermal gradients in the firn column, impurity-driven enhancement of solid ice diffusion, or changes in firn grain properties that alter vapor access to open pores. Despite model uncertainties, the WDC diffusion length chronology will be an essential input to future studies of high-frequency variability in the water isotope climate record, as it allows for the effects of diffusion to be removed.

  15. Viscous diffusion of vorticity in unsteady wall layers using the diffusion velocity concept

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Kempka, S.N.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1995-03-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to provide a careful evaluation of the diffusion velocity concept with regard to its ability to predict the diffusion of vorticity near a moving wall. A computer code BDIF has been written which simulates the evolution of the vorticity field near a wall of infinite length which is moving in an arbitrary fashion. The simulations generated by this code are found to give excellent results when compared to several exact solutions. We also outline a two-dimensional unsteady viscous boundary layer model which utilizes the diffusion velocity concept and is compatible with vortex methods. A primary goal of this boundary layer model is to minimize the number of vortices generated on the surface at each time step while achieving good resolution of the vorticity field near the wall. Preliminary results have been obtained for simulating a simple two-dimensional laminar boundary layer.

  16. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  17. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  18. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  19. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  20. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  1. Study on length distribution of ramie fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extra-long length of ramie fibers and the high variation in fiber length has a negative impact on the spinning processes. In order to better study the feature of ramie fiber length, in this research, the probability density function of the mixture model applied in the characterization of cotton...

  2. New Chorus Diffusion Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Kersten, Tobias; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Boscher, Daniel; Sicard, Angelica; Maget, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves play a major role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. While high time resolution satellite data show that these waves are highly structured in frequency and time, at present their effects on the electron distribution can only be assessed on a global scale by using quasi-linear diffusion theory. Here we present new quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for upper and lower band chorus waves for use in global radiation belt models. Using data from DE 1 CRRES, Cluster 1, Double Star TC1 and THEMIS, we have constructed a database of wave properties and used this to construct new diffusion coefficients for L* = 1.5 to 10 in steps of 0.5, 10 latitude bins between 0o and 60o ,8 bins in MLT and 5 levels of geomagnetic activity as measured by Kp. We find that the peak frequency of lower band chorus is close to 0.2 fce, which is lower than that used in previous models. The combined upper and lower band chorus diffusion shows structure that should result in an energy dependent pitch angle anisotropy, particularly between 1 keV and 100 keV. The diffusion rates suggest that wave-particle interactions should still be very important outside geostationary orbit, out to at least L* = 8. We find significant energy diffusion near 1 keV near the loss cone, consistent with wave growth. By including the new chorus diffusion matrix into the BAS radiation belt (BRB) model we compare the effects on the evolution of the radiation belts against previous models.

  3. Analysis of the Fluorescence Correlation Function of Quantum Rods with Different Lengths.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeran; Kim, Sok Won

    2015-11-01

    We built a polarization fluorescence correlation spectroscopy system to analyze the variation of the correlation function in rotational diffusion based on the length of rod-like fluorescent particles. Because the rotational diffusion of particles in liquid depends on the relative polarization states of the laser source and particle fluorescence, we compared the amplitudes of the rotational diffusion using the autocorrelation function in different polarization states. For experiments that depend on the length of the fluorescent particles, we prepared three kinds of quantum rod samples with a width of 6.5 ± 0.5 nm and lengths of 17 ± 3, 40 ± 3, and 46 ± 3 nm. Through the experiment, we obtained the hydrodynamic radii of each particle using the rotational diffusion coefficient: 10.7 ± 0.8, 13.4 ± 0.7, and 14.1 ± 0.4 nm with the length of the particles. All the obtained values for radii are 3 nm larger than the calculated equivalent radii of spheres with the same volume as the rod samples. Through a fraction analysis by polarization state, we confirmed that the ratio of rotational fraction for polarization increases with the aspect ratio of the actual particle.

  4. Diffusion coefficient of an inclusion in a liquid membrane supported by a solvent of arbitrary thickness.

    PubMed

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Ramachandran, Sanoop; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2011-08-01

    The diffusion coefficient of an inclusion in a liquid membrane is investigated by taking into account the interaction between membranes and bulk solvents of arbitrary thickness. As illustrative examples, the diffusion coefficients of two types of inclusions, a circular domain composed of fluid with the same viscosity as the host membrane and that of a polymer chain embedded in the membrane, are studied. The diffusion coefficients are expressed in terms of the hydrodynamic screening lengths, which vary according to the solvent thickness. When the membrane fluid is dragged by the solvent of finite thickness, via stick boundary conditions, multiple hydrodynamic screening lengths together with the weight factors to the diffusion coefficients are obtained from the characteristic equation. The conditions for which the diffusion coefficients can be approximated by the expression including only a single hydrodynamic screening length are also shown.

  5. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  6. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju Hyung; Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Eui Hyun; Kang, Seok-Gu; Chang, Jong Hee

    2015-04-01

    Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDLG) is a rare condition with a fatal outcome, characterized by diffuse infiltration of the leptomeninges by neoplastic glial cells without evidence of primary tumor in the brain or spinal cord parenchyma. In particular, PDLG histologically diagnosed as gliosarcoma is extremely rare, with only 2 cases reported to date. We report a case of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. A 68-year-old man presented with fever, chilling, headache, and a brief episode of mental deterioration. Initial T1-weighted post-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement without a definite intraparenchymal lesion. Based on clinical and imaging findings, antiviral treatment was initiated. Despite the treatment, the patient's neurologic symptoms and mental status progressively deteriorated and follow-up MRI showed rapid progression of the disease. A meningeal biopsy revealed gliosarcoma and was conclusive for the diagnosis of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. We suggest the inclusion of PDLG in the potential differential diagnosis of patients who present with nonspecific neurologic symptoms in the presence of leptomeningeal involvement on MRI.

  7. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  8. Diffuser for wellhead isolation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Surjaatmadja, J.B.

    1981-04-21

    An improved diffuser for a wellhead isolation tool which employs a combination of angles in its bore. This improvement reduces the incidence of erosion caused by the flow of fluids through the diffuser, in both the well production tubing adjacent the end of the diffuser and in the diffuser itself.

  9. Going up in time and length scales in modeling polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.

    Polymer properties depend on a wide range of coupled length and time scales, with unique macroscopic viscoelastic behavior stemming from interactions at the atomistic level. The need to probe polymers across time and length scales and particularly computational modeling is inherently challenging. Here new paths to probing long time and length scales including introducing interactions into traditional bead-spring models and coarse graining of atomistic simulations will be compared and discussed. Using linear polyethylene as a model system, the degree of coarse graining with two to six methylene groups per coarse-grained bead derived from a fully atomistic melt simulation were probed. We show that the degree of coarse graining affects the measured dynamic. Using these models we were successful in probing highly entangled melts and were able reach the long-time diffusive regime which is computationally inaccessible using atomistic simulations. We simulated the relaxation modulus and shear viscosity of well-entangled polyethylene melts for scaled times of 500 µs. Results for plateau modulus are in good agreement with experiment. The long time and length scale is coupled to the macroscopic viscoelasticity where the degree of coarse graining sets the minimum length scale instrumental in defining polymer properties and dynamics. Results will be compared to those obtained from simple bead-spring models to demonstrate the additional insight that can be gained from atomistically inspired coarse grained models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. An experimental and theoretical approach to investigate the effect of chain length on aminothiol adsorption and assembly on gold.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Erin; Humblot, Vincent; Méthivier, Christophe; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Gu, Frank; Tielens, Frederik; Boujday, Souhir

    2015-10-05

    Despite the numerous studies on the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkylthiols on gold, the mechanisms involved, especially the nature and influence of the thiol-gold interface are still under debate. In this work the adsorption of aminothiols on Au(111) surfaces has been studied by using surface IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as by density functional theory (DFT) modeling. Two aminothiols were used, cysteamine (CEA) and mercaptoundecylamine (MUAM), which contain two and eleven carbon atoms, respectively. By combining experimental and theoretical methods, it was possible to draw a molecular picture of the thiol-gold interface. The long-chain aminothiol produced better ordered SAMs, but, interestingly, the XPS data showed different sulfur binding environments depending on the alkyl chain length; an additional peak at low binding energy was observed upon CEA adsorption, which indicates the presence of sulfur in a different environment. DFT modeling showed that the positions of the sulfur atoms in the SAMs on gold with similar unit cells [(2√3×2√3)R30°] depended on the length of the alkyl chain. Short-chain alkylthiol SAMs were adsorbed more strongly than long-chain thiol SAMs and were shown to induce surface reconstruction by extracting atoms from the surface, possibly forming adatom/vacancy combinations that lead to the additional XPS peak. In the case of short alkylthiols, the thiol-gold interface governs the layer, CEA adsorbs strongly, and the mechanism is closer to single-molecule adsorption than self-assembly, whereas for long chains, interactions between alkyl chains drive the system to self-assembly, leading to a higher level of SAM organization and restricting the influence of the sulfur-gold interface.

  11. Load Diffusion in Composite and Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Ambur, D. (Technical Monitor); Nemeth, M. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for the multi-functional large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Some specific problems recently considered were those of end effects in smart materials and structures, study of the stress response of pressurized linear piezoelectric cylinders for both static and steady rotating configurations, an analysis of the effect of pre-stressing and pre-polarization on the decay of end effects in piezoelectric solids and investigation of constitutive models for hardening rubber-like materials. Our goal in the study of load diffusion is the development of readily applicable results for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses.

  12. Positron diffusion in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.; Vehanen, A.; Schultz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    Positron diffusion in Si(100) and Si(111) has been studied using a variable energy positron beam. The positron diffusion coefficient is found to be D/sub +/ = 2.7 +- 0.3 cm/sup 2//sec using a Makhov-type positron implantation profile, which is demonstrated to fit the data more reliably than the more commonly applied exponential profile. The diffusion related parameter, E/sub 0/, which results from the exponential profile, is found to be 4.2 +- 0.2 keV, significantly longer than previously reported values. A drastic reduction in E/sub 0/ is found after annealing the sample at 1300 K, showing that previously reported low values of E/sub 0/ are probably associated with the thermal history of the sample.

  13. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  14. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.; Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-08-10

    1. The method of testing the separation efficiency of porous permeable membranes which comprises causing a stream of a gaseous mixture to flow into contact with one face of a finely porous permeable membrane under such conditions that a major fraction of the mixture diffuses through the membrane, maintaining a rectangular cross section of the gaseous stream so flowing past said membrane, continuously recirculating the gas that diffuses through said membrane and continuously withdrawing the gas that does not diffuse through said membrane and maintaining the volume of said recirculating gas constant by continuously introducing into said continuously recirculating gas stream a mass of gas equivalent to that which is continuously withdrawn from said gas stream and comparing the concentrations of the light component in the entering gas, the withdrawn gas and the recirculated gas in order to determine the efficiency of said membrane.

  15. Imaging the Long Transport Lengths of Photo-generated Carriers in Oriented Perovskite Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuhao; Wang, Lili; Lin, Wei-Chun; Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Burda, Clemens; Gao, Xuan P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Organometal halide perovskite has emerged as a promising material for solar cells and optoelectronics. Although the long diffusion length of photo-generated carriers is believed to be a critical factor responsible for the material's high efficiency in solar cells, a direct study of carrier transport over long distances in organometal halide perovskites is still lacking. We fabricated highly oriented crystalline CH$_3$NH$_3$PbI$_3$ (MAPbI$_3$) thin film lateral transport devices with long channel length (~ 120 $\\mu$m). By performing spatially scanned photocurrent imaging measurements with local illumination, we directly show that the perovskite films prepared here have very long transport lengths for photo-generated carriers, with a minority carrier (electron) diffusion length on the order of 10 $\\mu$m. Our approach of applying scanning photocurrent microscopy to organometal halide perovskites may be further used to elucidate the carrier transport processes and vastly different carrier diffusion lengths (~ 100 nm to 100 $\\mu$m) in different types of organometal halide perovskites.

  16. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  17. [Microbial diffusion and antibiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vilain, R

    1982-01-01

    Cleaning leg ulcers depends on tissular and microbial enzymes, the production of which depends on good vascularization. When an aetiological treatment is started, the microbes ensure sufficient cleaning, leading to granulation and epidermization. Antibiotherapy is pointless. Sometimes it can be detrimental, replacing a natural growth with alien strains which cause diffusion. Very exceptionally, a short course of antibiotherapy may be necessary to cope with signs of diffusion, usually signifying a Group A streptococcal infection, with seasonal recrudescence. The Blue Pus Microbe has no special pathological significance. It merely indicates that the case has become chronic.

  18. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH- = U4+ + O2- + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  19. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  20. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10-100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS.

  1. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10–100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS. PMID:24089741

  2. Ergodicity breaking, ageing, and confinement in generalized diffusion processes with position and time dependent diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    We study generalized anomalous diffusion processes whose diffusion coefficient D(x, t) ∼ D0|x|αtβ depends on both the position x of the test particle and the process time t. This process thus combines the features of scaled Brownian motion and heterogeneous diffusion parent processes. We compute the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements of this generalized diffusion process. The scaling exponent of the ensemble averaged mean squared displacement is shown to be the product of the critical exponents of the parent processes, and describes both subdiffusive and superdiffusive systems. We quantify the amplitude fluctuations of the time averaged mean squared displacement as function of the length of the time series and the lag time. In particular, we observe a weak ergodicity breaking of this generalized diffusion process: even in the long time limit the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements are strictly disparate. When we start to observe this process some time after its initiation we observe distinct features of ageing. We derive a universal ageing factor for the time averaged mean squared displacement containing all information on the ageing time and the measurement time. External confinement is shown to alter the magnitudes and statistics of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements.

  3. Time and length scales within a fire and implications for numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-02

    A partial non-dimensionalization of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of the rate-controlling transport processes in the reacting portion of a fire plume as a function of length scale. Over continuum length scales, buoyant times scales vary as the square root of the length scale; advection time scales vary as the length scale, and diffusion time scales vary as the square of the length scale. Due to the variation with length scale, each process is dominant over a given range. The relationship of buoyancy and baroclinc vorticity generation is highlighted. For numerical simulation, first principles solution for fire problems is not possible with foreseeable computational hardware in the near future. Filtered transport equations with subgrid modeling will be required as two to three decades of length scale are captured by solution of discretized conservation equations. By whatever filtering process one employs, one must have humble expectations for the accuracy obtainable by numerical simulation for practical fire problems that contain important multi-physics/multi-length-scale coupling with up to 10 orders of magnitude in length scale.

  4. Experimental Mating of Trapped Vortex Diffusers with Large Area Ratio Thrust Augmentors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    the hump and greatly reduce the desired effect of the cavity. Consequently, the diffuser would not operate properly. It was also found that, due to...differences. Differences In laboratory constraints (wails, ceiling, etc.) can also have a small effect on the ejector flow. 2. TRAPPED VORTEX DIFFUSER...was farther from complete at the smaller lengths. The shift in peak locations seems to be a simple diffuser effect where the flow with the thinnest

  5. Room temperature spin diffusion in (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Transient spin grating experiments are used to investigate the electron spin diffusion in intrinsic (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well at room temperature. The measured spin diffusion length of optically excited electrons is about 4 μm at low spin density. Increasing the carrier density yields both a decrease of the spin relaxation time and the spin diffusion coefficient Ds. PMID:21711662

  6. Biased diffusion in three-dimensional comb-like structures.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Dagdug, Leonardo; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2015-04-07

    In this paper, we study biased diffusion of point Brownian particles in a three-dimensional comb-like structure formed by a main cylindrical tube with identical periodic cylindrical dead ends. It is assumed that the dead ends are thin cylinders whose radius is much smaller than both the radius of the main tube and the distance between neighboring dead ends. It is also assumed that in the main tube, the particle, in addition to its regular diffusion, moves with a uniform constant drift velocity. For such a system, we develop a formalism that allows us to derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the first two moments of the particle displacement along the main tube axis. Inverting these Laplace transforms numerically, one can find the time dependences of the two moments for arbitrary values of both the drift velocity and the dead-end length, including the limiting case of infinitely long dead ends, where the unbiased diffusion becomes anomalous at sufficiently long times. The expressions for the Laplace transforms are used to find the effective drift velocity and diffusivity of the particle as functions of its drift velocity in the main tube and the tube geometric parameters. As might be expected from common-sense arguments, the effective drift velocity monotonically decreases from the initial drift velocity to zero as the dead-end length increases from zero to infinity. The effective diffusivity is a more complex, non-monotonic function of the dead-end length. As this length increases from zero to infinity, the effective diffusivity first decreases, reaches a minimum, and then increases approaching a plateau value which is proportional to the square of the particle drift velocity in the main tube.

  7. Nanocrystal diffusion doping.

    PubMed

    Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Barrows, Charles J; Erickson, Christian S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2013-09-25

    A diffusion-based synthesis of doped colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals is demonstrated. This approach involves thermodynamically controlled addition of both impurity cations and host anions to preformed seed nanocrystals under equilibrium conditions, rather than kinetically controlled doping during growth. This chemistry allows thermodynamic crystal compositions to be prepared without sacrificing other kinetically trapped properties such as shape, size, or crystallographic phase. This doping chemistry thus shares some similarities with cation-exchange reactions, but proceeds without the loss of host cations and excels at the introduction of relatively unreactive impurity ions that have not been previously accessible using cation exchange. Specifically, we demonstrate the preparation of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se (0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.2) nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, unprecedentedly high Mn(2+) content, and very large magneto-optical effects by diffusion of Mn(2+) into seed CdSe nanocrystals grown by hot injection. Controlling the solution and lattice chemical potentials of Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) allows Mn(2+) diffusion into the internal volumes of the CdSe nanocrystals with negligible Ostwald ripening, while retaining the crystallographic phase (wurtzite or zinc blende), shape anisotropy, and ensemble size uniformity of the seed nanocrystals. Experimental results for diffusion doping of other nanocrystals with other cations are also presented that indicate this method may be generalized, providing access to a variety of new doped semiconductor nanostructures not previously attainable by kinetic routes or cation exchange.

  8. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  9. Osmosis and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    OsmoBeaker is a CD-ROM designed to enhance the learning of diffusion and osmosis by presenting interactive experimentation to the student. The software provides several computer simulations that take the student through different scenarios with cells, having different concentrations of solutes in them.

  10. Diffusion in random networks

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Padrino, Juan C.

    2017-06-01

    The ensemble averaging technique is applied to model mass transport by diffusion in random networks. The system consists of an ensemble of random networks, where each network is made of pockets connected by tortuous channels. Inside a channel, fluid transport is assumed to be governed by the one-dimensional diffusion equation. Mass balance leads to an integro-differential equation for the pocket mass density. The so-called dual-porosity model is found to be equivalent to the leading order approximation of the integration kernel when the diffusion time scale inside the channels is small compared to the macroscopic time scale. As a test problem,more » we consider the one-dimensional mass diffusion in a semi-infinite domain. Because of the required time to establish the linear concentration profile inside a channel, for early times the similarity variable is xt$-$1/4 rather than xt$-$1/2 as in the traditional theory. We found this early time similarity can be explained by random walk theory through the network.« less

  11. Enzyme localization, crowding, and buffers collectively modulate diffusion-influenced signal transduction: Insights from continuum diffusion modeling.

    PubMed

    Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J A

    2015-09-07

    Biochemical reaction networks consisting of coupled enzymes connect substrate signaling events with biological function. Substrates involved in these reactions can be strongly influenced by diffusion "barriers" arising from impenetrable cellular structures and macromolecules, as well as interactions with biomolecules, especially within crowded environments. For diffusion-influenced reactions, the spatial organization of diffusion barriers arising from intracellular structures, non-specific crowders, and specific-binders (buffers) strongly controls the temporal and spatial reaction kinetics. In this study, we use two prototypical biochemical reactions, a Goodwin oscillator, and a reaction with a periodic source/sink term to examine how a diffusion barrier that partitions substrates controls reaction behavior. Namely, we examine how conditions representative of a densely packed cytosol, including reduced accessible volume fraction, non-specific interactions, and buffers, impede diffusion over nanometer length-scales. We find that diffusion barriers can modulate the frequencies and amplitudes of coupled diffusion-influenced reaction networks, as well as give rise to "compartments" of decoupled reactant populations. These effects appear to be intensified in the presence of buffers localized to the diffusion barrier. These findings have strong implications for the role of the cellular environment in tuning the dynamics of signaling pathways.

  12. Enzyme localization, crowding, and buffers collectively modulate diffusion-influenced signal transduction: Insights from continuum diffusion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    Biochemical reaction networks consisting of coupled enzymes connect substrate signaling events with biological function. Substrates involved in these reactions can be strongly influenced by diffusion "barriers" arising from impenetrable cellular structures and macromolecules, as well as interactions with biomolecules, especially within crowded environments. For diffusion-influenced reactions, the spatial organization of diffusion barriers arising from intracellular structures, non-specific crowders, and specific-binders (buffers) strongly controls the temporal and spatial reaction kinetics. In this study, we use two prototypical biochemical reactions, a Goodwin oscillator, and a reaction with a periodic source/sink term to examine how a diffusion barrier that partitions substrates controls reaction behavior. Namely, we examine how conditions representative of a densely packed cytosol, including reduced accessible volume fraction, non-specific interactions, and buffers, impede diffusion over nanometer length-scales. We find that diffusion barriers can modulate the frequencies and amplitudes of coupled diffusion-influenced reaction networks, as well as give rise to "compartments" of decoupled reactant populations. These effects appear to be intensified in the presence of buffers localized to the diffusion barrier. These findings have strong implications for the role of the cellular environment in tuning the dynamics of signaling pathways.

  13. Nitrogen diffusion in hafnia and the impact of nitridation on oxygen and hydrogen diffusion: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh E-mail: rajesh.sathiyanarayanan@gmail.com; Pandey, R. K.; Murali, K. V. R. M.

    2015-01-21

    Using first-principles simulations, we have computed incorporation energies and diffusion barriers of ammonia, the nitrogen molecule and atomic nitrogen in monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO{sub 2}). Our calculations show that ammonia is likely to dissociate into an NH{sub 2} molecular unit, whereas the nitrogen molecule remains as a molecule either in the interstitial space or at an oxygen lattice site. The lowest energy pathway for the diffusion of atomic nitrogen interstitials consists of the hopping of the nitrogen interstitial between neighboring three-coordinated lattice oxygen atoms that share a single Hf atom, and the barrier for such hops is determined by a switching mechanism. The substitutional nitrogen atom shows a preference for diffusion through the doubly positive oxygen vacancy-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, we have investigated the impact of nitrogen atoms on the diffusion barriers of oxygen and hydrogen interstitials in m-HfO{sub 2}. Our results show that nitrogen incorporation has a significant impact on the barriers for oxygen and hydrogen diffusion: nitrogen atoms attract oxygen and hydrogen interstitials diffusing in the vicinity, thereby slowing down (reducing) their diffusion (diffusion length)

  14. Instabilities and patterns in coupled reaction-diffusion layers.

    PubMed

    Catllá, Anne J; McNamara, Amelia; Topaz, Chad M

    2012-02-01

    We study instabilities and pattern formation in reaction-diffusion layers that are diffusively coupled. For two-layer systems of identical two-component reactions, we analyze the stability of homogeneous steady states by exploiting the block symmetric structure of the linear problem. There are eight possible primary bifurcation scenarios, including a Turing-Turing bifurcation that involves two disparate length scales whose ratio may be tuned via the interlayer coupling. For systems of n-component layers and nonidentical layers, the linear problem's block form allows approximate decomposition into lower-dimensional linear problems if the coupling is sufficiently weak. As an example, we apply these results to a two-layer Brusselator system. The competing length scales engineered within the linear problem are readily apparent in numerical simulations of the full system. Selecting a sqrt[2]:1 length-scale ratio produces an unusual steady square pattern.

  15. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  16. Roughness Length Variability over Heterogeneous Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    System ( COAMPS ) model fields for selected times during Tropical Storm Fay. Figure 42. Contoured roughness length from (a) COAMPS and 16.5-m wind...passage of Tropical Storm Fay on 18–21 August 2008. Spatial and temporal variations in roughness lengths for a period of one year are compared to...the same height in the tropical storm case, for wind speeds exceeding 20 ms-1, evidence is presented that indicates roughness lengths are related to

  17. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  18. On the attached length of orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komkin, A. I.; Mironov, M. A.; Yudin, S. I.

    2012-11-01

    The attached length of orifices in reactive mufflers has been estimated based on numerical calculations by the finite-element method. The numerical results for a diaphragm in a duct are compared with the theoretical data obtained by Rayleigh, Fock, Karal, and Ingard. The dependence of the attached length on the diaphragm thickness is given. The results obtained are generalized for the case in which the orifice is a Helmholtz resonator neck. The effect of the resonator length on the attached length of the neck is analyzed.

  19. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  20. Generalizations of Brandl's theorem on Engel length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quek, S. G.; Wong, K. B.; Wong, P. C.

    2013-04-01

    Let n < m be positive integers such that [g,nh] = [g,mh] and assume that n and m are chosen minimal with respect to this property. Let gi = [g,n+ih] where i = 1,2,…,m-n. Then π(g,h) = (g1,…,gm-n) is called the Engel cycle generated by g and h. The length of the Engel cycle is m-n. A group G is said to have Engel length r, if all the length of the Engel cycles in G divides r. In this paper we discuss the Brandl's theorem on Engel length and give some of its generalizations.

  1. Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian; Jensen, R. V. Skougaard; Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2010-10-04

    Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

  2. Lateral Diffusion Length Changes in HgCdTe Detectors in a Proton Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbs, John E.; Marshall, Paul W.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Gramer, Mark E.; Maestas, Diana; Garcia, John P.; Dole, Gary A.; Anderson, Amber A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the performance degradation in a proton environment of very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) HgCdTe detectors. The energy dependence of the Non-Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) in HgCdTe provides a framework for estimating the responsivity degradation in VLWIR HgCdTe due to on orbit exposure from protons. Banded detector arrays that have different detector designs were irradiated at proton energies of 7, 12, and 63 MeV. These banded detector arrays allovedin sight into how the fundamental detector parameters degraded in a proton environment at the three different proton energies. Measured data demonstrated that the detector responsivity degradation at 7 MeV is 5 times larger than the degradation at 63 MeV. The comparison of the responsivity degradation at the different proton energies suggests that the atomic Columbic interaction of the protons with the HgCdTe detector is likely the primary mechanism responsible for the degradation in responsivity at proton energies below 30 MeV.

  3. Structures of diffusion regions in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takayuki; Togano, Kentaro; Ogino, Tatsuki

    2010-05-15

    Detailed structures of diffusion regions in two-dimensional collisionless magnetic reconnection are studied by using an electromagnetic Vlasov simulation. It has been well known that plasma number density decreases near the X-point of the reconnection. However, numerical thermal fluctuations exist in particle-in-cell simulations, and there is a possibility that detailed structures near the X-point diffuse numerically when the number of particles per cell is not enough. In the present study, a high-resolution two-dimensional Vlasov simulation is performed. It is found that electron number density in the electron diffusion region decreases to a hundredth of the initial value. Structures of electron diffusion region are determined by the local electron inertial length.

  4. Diffusion of water in bentonite clay: Neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V. K.; Prabhudesai, S. A.; Dessai, R. Raut; Erwin Desa, J. A.; Mitra, S.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2013-02-01

    Diffusion of water confined in natural bentonite clay is studied using the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. X-ray diffraction shows a well-defined crystalline structure of the clay with an interlayer spacing of 13 Å. The QENS experiment has been carried out on hydrated as well as dehydrated clay at 300 K. Significant quasi-elastic broadening was observed in case of hydrated bentonite clay whereas dehydrated clay did not show any broadening over the instrument resolution. Analysis of QENS data reveals that diffusion of water occurs through jump diffusion characterized by random distribution of jump lengths. Diffusion of water in clay is found to be hindered vis a vis bulk water.

  5. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Wan, M.; Montgomery, D.

    2013-12-01

    Study of the transport and diffusion of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider Diffusion of charged particles in fully three dimensional statistically isotropic magnetic field turbulence with no mean field which is pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We classify different regions of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius of the charged particle to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. We propose three different theoretical models to calculate the diffusion coefficient each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared with those from computer simulations, showing very good agreement.

  6. Simulations of singlet exciton diffusion in organic semiconductors: a review

    DOE PAGES

    Bjorgaard, Josiah A.; Kose, Muhammet Erkan

    2014-12-22

    Our review describes the various aspects of simulation strategies for exciton diffusion in condensed phase thin films of organic semiconductors. Several methods for calculating energy transfer rate constants are discussed along with procedures for how to account for energetic disorder. Exciton diffusion can be modelled by using kinetic Monte-Carlo methods or master equations. Recent literature on simulation efforts for estimating exciton diffusion lengths of various conjugated polymers and small molecules are introduced. Moreover, these studies are discussed in the context of the effects of morphology on exciton diffusion and the necessity of accurate treatment of disorder for comparison of simulationmore » results with those of experiment.« less

  7. Role of pressure diffusion in non-homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Lele, S. K.; Durbin, P.

    1994-01-01

    A non-local model is presented for approximating the pressure diffusion in calculations of turbulent free shear and boundary layer flows. It is based on the solution of an elliptic relaxation equation which enables local diffusion sources to be distributed over lengths of the order of the integral scale. The pressure diffusion model was implemented in a boundary layer code within the framework of turbulence models based on both the kappa-epsilon-(bar)upsilon(exp 2) system of equations and the full Reynolds stress equations. Model computations were performed for mixing layers and boundary layer flows. In each case, the pressure diffusion model enabled the well-known free-stream edge singularity problem to be eliminated. There was little effect on near-wall properties. Computed results agreed very well with experimental and DNS data for the mean flow velocity, the turbulent kinetic energy, and the skin-friction coefficient.

  8. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Blasi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.; Chuychai, P.; Dmitruk, P.; Wan, M.; Parashar, T. N.; Chhiber, R.

    2017-03-01

    The investigation of the diffusive transport of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider the diffusion of charged particles in fully three-dimensional isotropic turbulent magnetic fields with no mean field, which may be pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We identify different ranges of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. Two different theoretical models are proposed to calculate the diffusion coefficient, each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared to those from computer simulations, showing good agreement.

  9. Boundary-layer analysis for the convection/diffusion transition in dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The supercooling dependence of dendritic growth kinetics under the influence of convective heat transport is investigated theoretically and experimentally with emphasis on theoretical prediction of the supercooling level at which the transition from diffusion-controlled to convection-controlled dendritic growth occurs. It is shown that the crossover between diffusive and convective transport depends on the relative thickness of the Stefan length compared with the thermal boundary layer. These lengths become equal at a supercooling which may be calculated from diffusion theory and fluid mechanics. It is also shown that the crossover supercooling varies weakly with the gravitational acceleration, melt viscosity, and the volumetric expansion coefficient.

  10. LLNL SMP Light Diffuser Fabrication and Preliminary Data

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W

    2006-06-02

    We are developing a cylindrical light diffuser using shape memory polymer (SMP) whose diameter, length, stiffness, and diffusion profile can be tailored to suit a particular application. The cylindrical SMP diffuser is made by casting SMP around the end of a glass optical fiber using a teflon tube as the casting mold, and abrading the cured SMP surface to cause the light to leak radially outward. The inner diameter of the casting tube is slightly larger than the fiber diameter. A smaller teflon tube is positioned over the fiber (between the fiber and the casting tube) to approximately center the fiber tip in the casting tube. As the SMP cures, it bonds with the optical fiber, creating a strong joint without the need for additional adhesives or mechanical fixtures. A close-up of the SMP-fiber joint and the finished SMP diffuser are shown in Fig.1. The SMP formulation (developed in-house) was specifically designed to be optically transparent in the visible and near-infrared regions; the spectral absorption of the SMP is shown in Fig. 2. The low absorption is important because (1) it allows the light to travel the length of the diffuser without suffering excessive loss due to absorption and (2) it permits delivery of up to 7 W (300 {micro}m SMP rod on 100 {micro}m core multimode fiber) of laser power into the diffuser without damaging the diffuser. SMP is a good wave guiding material with a refractive index of approximately 1.5. Also, the SMP stiffness can be tailored from stiff (e.g. acrylic, Ea {approx} 10{sup 9} Pa) to very flexible (e.g. silicon rubber, Ea {approx} 10{sup 6} Pa). Finally, since SMP can self-actuate, the SMP diffuser could be designed to actuate into a shape other than a straight rod (e.g. 2D or 3D coil).

  11. Diffusion in Immiscible Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to measure the diffusion coefficients for molten Pb in Zn in the immiscible liquid-phase region. Diffusion couples of pure Pb and Zn were prepared using a shear cell. These have been placed in graphite crucibles and encapsulated in stainless steel cartridges and are awaiting the next Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA) flight opportunity. In flight, one couple will be soaked for 40 minutes at 440 deg C (just above the monotectic temperature) and the second couple will be soaked for 40 minutes 820 deg C (just above the consolute temperature). After the soak both samples will be rapidly quenched by flowing He to minimize redistribution of the immiscible phases. Post flight compositional analysis will be accomplished using X-ray fluorescence in the scanning electron microscopy.

  12. Amosphous diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, E.; So, F. C. T.; Nicolet, M-A.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous W-Zr and W-N alloys were investigated as diffusion barriers in silicon metallization schemes. Data were presented showing that amorphous W-Zr crystallizes at 900 C, which is 200 C higher than amorphous W-Ni films, and that both films react with metallic overlayers at temperatures far below the crystllization temperature. Also, W-N alloys (crystalline temperature of 600 C) were successfully incorporated as a diffusion barrier in contact structures with both Al and Ag overlayers. The thermal stability of the electrical characteristics of shallow n(+)p junctions significantly improved by incorporating W-N layers in the contact system. One important fact demonstated was the critical influence of the deposition parameters during formation of these carriers.

  13. Nonlocal electrical diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.; Olivares-Peregrino, V. H.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Calderón-Ramón, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0<β≤1 and for the time domain is 0<γ≤2. We present solutions for the full fractional equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

  14. Magnetic diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The diffuse scattering of neutrons from magnetic materials provides unique and important information regarding the spatial correlations of the atoms and the spins. Such measurements have been extensively applied to magnetically ordered systems, such as the ferromagnetic binary alloys, for which the observed correlations describe the magnetic moment fluctuations associated with local environment effects. With the advent of polarization analysis, these techniques are increasingly being applied to study disordered paramagnetic systems such as the spin-glasses and the diluted magnetic semiconductors. The spin-pair correlations obtained are essential in understanding the exchange interactions of such systems. In this paper, we describe recent neutron diffuse scattering results on the atom-pair and spin-pair correlations in some of these disordered magnetic systems. 56 refs.

  15. Segment lengths influence hill walking strategies.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2014-08-22

    Segment lengths are known to influence walking kinematics and muscle activity patterns. During level walking at the same speed, taller individuals take longer, slower strides than shorter individuals. Based on this, we sought to determine if segment lengths also influenced hill walking strategies. We hypothesized that individuals with longer segments would display more joint flexion going uphill and more extension going downhill as well as greater lateral gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis activity in both directions. Twenty young adults of varying heights (below 155 cm to above 188 cm) walked at 1.25 m/s on a level treadmill as well as 6° and 12° up and downhill slopes while we collected kinematic and muscle activity data. Subsequently, we ran linear regressions for each of the variables with height, leg, thigh, and shank length. Despite our population having twice the anthropometric variability, the level and hill walking patterns matched closely with previous studies. While there were significant differences between level and hill walking, there were few hill walking variables that were correlated with segment length. In support of our hypothesis, taller individuals had greater knee and ankle flexion during uphill walking. However, the majority of the correlations were between tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius activities and shank length. Contrary to our hypothesis, relative step length and muscle activity decreased with segment length, specifically shank length. In summary, it appears that individuals with shorter segments require greater propulsion and toe clearance during uphill walking as well as greater braking and stability during downhill walking.

  16. 23 CFR 658.13 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... power unit behind the cab and on an over-cab rack. No State shall impose an overall length limitation of... may carry boats on the power unit so long as the length and width restrictions of the vehicles and...) in 23 CFR 658.19. (6) Munitions carriers using dromedary equipment. A truck tractor equipped with...

  17. 7 CFR 29.6024 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Length. 29.6024 Section 29.6024 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6024 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from...

  18. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  19. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  20. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  1. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  2. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  3. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  4. Turbo fluid machinery and diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1984-01-01

    The general theory behind turbo devices and diffusers is explained. Problems and the state of research on basic equations of flow and experimental and measuring methods are discussed. Conventional centrifugation-type compressor and fan diffusers are considered in detail.

  5. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  6. [The diffusion of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Ramiro-H, Manuel; Cruz-A, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Between August 19 and 21, the Feria del Libro de las Ciencias de la Salud (Healthcare Book Fair) took place in the Palacio de Medicina in Mexico City. Archives of Medical Research, Revista Médica del IMSS, and Saber IMSS, three of the main instruments of knowledge diffusion of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, assisted to this book fair, which was organized by the Facultad de Medicina of UNAM.

  7. Peridynamic thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Oterkus, Selda; Madenci, Erdogan; Agwai, Abigail

    2014-05-15

    This study presents the derivation of ordinary state-based peridynamic heat conduction equation based on the Lagrangian formalism. The peridynamic heat conduction parameters are related to those of the classical theory. An explicit time stepping scheme is adopted for numerical solution of various benchmark problems with known solutions. It paves the way for applying the peridynamic theory to other physical fields such as neutronic diffusion and electrical potential distribution.

  8. Conditions for a split diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, J.R.

    1997-05-01

    An unusual phenomenon has been observed in a methane jet diffusion flame subjected to axial acoustic forcing. At specific excitation frequencies and amplitudes, the driven flame splits into a central jet and one or two side jets. The splitting is accompanied by a partial detachment of the flame from the nozzle exit, a shortening of the flame by a factor of 2, and a change from the common yellow color of soot radiation to a clear blue flame. Such a phenomenon may be useful for the control of soot production or product species. The splitting is intermittent in time, bifurcating between the split flame and an ordinary single jet diffusion flame. The experiment consists of an unconfined axisymmetric methane jet formed by a short length of 0.4 cm diameter pipe. The pipe is connected to a large plenum surrounding a bass reflex loudspeaker enclosure that provides the excitation. Conditions producing split and bifurcated flames are presented. The drive frequencies required to cause bifurcation correspond to the first two peaks in the system`s frequency response curve. Bifurcating behavior was observed at a wide range of flow rates, ranging from very small flames of Reynolds number 240 up to turbulent lift-off, at Re = 1,000, based on the inner pipe diameter. It was not sensitive to nozzle length, but the details of the nozzle tip, such as orifice or pipe geometry, can affect the frequency range.

  9. In vivo Protein Dynamics on the Nanometer Length Scale and Nanosecond Time Scale.

    PubMed

    Anunciado, Divina B; Nguyen, Vyncent P; Hurst, Gregory Blake; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Urban, Volker S; Langan, Paul; Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh M

    2017-04-07

    Selectively-labeled GroEL protein was produced in living deuterated bacterial cells to enhance its neutron scattering signal above that of the intra-cellular milieu. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering shows that the in-cell diffusion coefficient of GroEL was (0.047 ± 0.003)10-10 m2/s, a factor of 4 slower than its diffusion coefficient in buffer solution. Internal protein dynamics showed a relaxation time of (65 ± 6) ps, a factor of 2 slower compared to the protein in solution. Comparison to literature suggests that the effective diffusivity of proteins depends on the length scale being probed. Retardation of in-cell diffusion compared to the buffer becomes more significant with the increasing probe length scale suggesting that intra-cellular diffusion of biomolecules is non-uniform over the cellular volume. The approach outlined here enables investigation of protein dynamics within living cells to open up new lines of research using "in-cell neutron scattering" to study the dynamics of complex biomolecular systems.

  10. Screening length in dusty plasma crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, V. S.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Particles interaction and value of the screening length in dusty plasma systems are of great interest in dusty plasma area. Three inter-particle potentials (Debye potential, Gurevich potential and interaction potential in the weakly collisional regime) are used to solve equilibrium equations for two dusty particles suspended in a parabolic trap. The inter-particle distance dependence on screening length, trap parameter and particle charge is obtained. The functional form of inter-particle distance dependence on ion temperature is investigated and compared with experimental data at 200-300 K in order to test used potentials applicability to dusty plasma systems at room temperatures. The preference is given to the Yukawa-type potential including effective values of particle charge and screening length. The estimated effective value of the screening length is 5-15 times larger than the Debye length.

  11. Double Diffusive Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Lee, Brace

    2008-11-01

    Sour gas flares attempt to dispose of deadly H2S gas through combustion. What does not burn rises as a buoyant plume. But the gas is heavier than air at room temperature, so as the rising gas cools eventually it becomes negatively buoyant and descends back to the ground. Ultimately, our intent is to predict the concentrations of the gas at ground level in realistic atmospheric conditions. As a first step towards this goal we have performed laboratory experiments examining the structure of a steady state plume of hot and salty water that rises buoyantly near the source and descends as a fountain after it has cooled sufficiently. We call this a double-diffusive plume because its evolution is dictated by the different (turbulent) diffusivities of heat and salt. A temperature and conductivity probe measures both the salinity and temperature along the centreline of the plume. The supposed axisymmetric structure of the salinity concentration as it changes with height is determined by light-attenuation methods. To help interpret the results, a theory has been successfully adapted from the work of Bloomfield and Kerr (2000), who developed coupled equations describing the structure of fountains. Introducing a new empirical parameter for the relative rates of turbulent heat and salt diffusion, the predictions are found to agree favourably with experimental results.

  12. Crystal structure and growth fabric of length-fast chalcedony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miehe, G.; Graetsch, H.; Flörke, O. W.

    1984-04-01

    Chalcedony from Brazilian agates, has been investigated by using transmission-electron microscopy, X-ray-diffraction, thermogravimetry and optical techniques. The quartz fibers of length-fast chalcedony are composed of submicroscopical polysynthetic, lamellar-twinned right- and lefthanded crystals, according to the Brazil law. This very narrow twinning causes 3 systems of diffuse diffraction streaks (corresponding to the three-fold symmetry) parallel to <10.1>, very frequently possessing an intensity maximum at h±1/2, k, l±1/2. These extra reflections were detected both in electron- and X-ray-diffraction patterns. Wall-lining chalcedony is parallel fibrous consisting of smaller crystallites with a higher total water content (0.06±0.01 μm and 1.2±0.1 wt %) than spherulitic chalcedony in horizontal agate bands (ca. 0.1 μm and 0.7±0.1 wt%).

  13. Pulse length assessment of compact ignition tokamak designs

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D.P.; Pomphrey, N.

    1989-07-01

    A time-dependent zero-dimensional code has been developed to assess the pulse length and auxiliary heating requirements of Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) designs. By taking a global approach to the calculation, parametric studies can be easily performed. The accuracy of the procedure is tested by comparing with the Tokamak Simulation Code which uses theory-based thermal diffusivities. A series of runs is carried out at various levels of energy confinement for each of three possible CIT configurations. It is found that for cases of interest, ignition or an energy multiplication factor Q /approx gt/ 7 can be attained within the first half of the planned five-second flattop with 10--40 MW of auxiliary heating. These results are supported by analytic calculations. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  15. The ThermalDiffusion class

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.

    2014-10-01

    The ThermalDiffusion class was created to simulate one-dimensional thermal diffusion across one or more material layers. Each layer is assumed to have constant conductivity K and diffusivity κ . Interface conductance between layers may be specified. Internal heating as a function of position and time is also supported. The ThermalDiffusion class is included in the SMASH package [1] as part of the PDE (Partial Differential Equation) subpackage.

  16. Turbulent Diffusivity under High Winds from Acoustic Measurements of Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. W.; Wijesekera, H. W.; Jarosz, E.; Teague, W. J.; Pegau, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Breaking surface waves generate layers of bubble clouds as air parcels entrain into the upper-ocean by the action of turbulent motions. The turbulent diffusivity in the bubble cloud layer was investigated by combining measurements of surface winds, waves, bubble acoustic backscatter, currents, and hydrography. These measurements were made at water depths of 60-90 m on the shelf of the Gulf of Alaska near Kayak Island during late December 2012, a period where the ocean was experiencing winds and significant wave heights up to 22 m s-1 and 9 m, respectively. Vertical profiles of acoustic backscatter decayed exponentially from the wave surface with e-folding lengths of about 0.6 to 6 m, while the bubble penetration depths were about 3 to 30 m. Both e-folding lengths and bubble depths were highly correlated with surface wind and wave conditions. The turbulent diffusion coefficients, inferred from e-folding length and bubble depth, varied from about 0.01 m2 s-1 to 0.4 m2 s-1. Our analysis suggests that the turbulent diffusivity in the bubble layer can be parameterized as a function of the cube of the wind friction velocity with a proportionality coefficient that depends weakly on wave age. Furthermore, in the bubble layer, on average, the shear production of the turbulent kinetic energy estimated by the diffusion coefficients was a similar order magnitude as the dissipation rate predicted by the wall boundary-layer theory.

  17. Characterizing cosmic inhomogeneity with anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraljic, D.

    2015-08-01

    Dark matter (DM) clustering at the present epoch is investigated from a fractal viewpoint in order to determine the scale where the self-similar scaling property of the DM halo distribution transits to homogeneity. Methods based on well-established `counts-in-cells' as well as new methods based on anomalous diffusion and random walks are investigated. Both are applied to DM haloes of the biggest N-body simulation in the `Dark Sky Simulations' (DS) catalogue and an equivalent randomly distributed catalogue. Results based on the smaller `Millennium Run' (MR) simulation are revisited and improved. It is found that the MR simulation volume is too small and prone to bias to reliably identify the onset of homogeneity. Transition to homogeneity is defined when the fractal dimension of the clustered and random distributions cannot be distinguished within the associated uncertainties. The `counts-in-cells' method applied to the DS then yields a homogeneity scale roughly consistent with previous work (˜150 h-1 Mpc). The characteristic length-scale for anomalous diffusion to behave homogeneously is found to be at about 250 h-1 Mpc. The behaviour of the fractal dimensions for a halo catalogue with the same two-point function as the original but with shuffled Fourier phases is investigated. The methods based on anomalous diffusion are shown to be sensitive to the phase information, whereas the `counts-in-cells' methods are not.

  18. Thermal diffusivity and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidenfeller, Bernd; Anhalt, Mathias; Kirchberg, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    Polypropylene-iron-silicon (FeSi) composites with spherical particles and filler content from 0 vol. % to 70 vol. % are prepared by kneading and injection molding. Modulus, crystallinity, and thermal diffusivity of samples are characterized with dynamic mechanical analyzer, differential scanning calorimeter, and laser flash method. Modulus as well as thermal diffusivity of the composites increase with filler fraction while crystallinity is not significantly affected. Measurement values of thermal diffusivity are close to the lower bound of the theoretical Hashin-Shtrikman model. A model interconnectivity shows a poor conductive network of particles. From measurement values of thermal diffusivity, the mean free path length of phonons in the amorphous and crystalline structure of the polymer and in the FeSi particles is estimated to be 0.155 nm, 0.450 nm, and 0.120 nm, respectively. Additionally, the free mean path length of the temperature conduction connected with the electrons in the FeSi particles together with the mean free path in the particle-polymer interface was estimated. The free mean path is approximately 5.5 nm and decreases to 2.5 nm with increasing filler fraction, which is a result of the increasing area of polymer-particle interfaces. A linear dependence of thermal diffusivity with the square root of the modulus independent on the measurement temperature in the range from 300 K to 415 K was found.

  19. Performance Characteristics of Plane-Wall Two-Dimensional Diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G

    1953-01-01

    Experiments have been made at Stanford University to determine the performance characteristics of plane-wall, two-dimensional diffusers which were so proportioned as to insure reasonable approximation of two-dimensional flow. All of the diffusers had identical entrance cross sections and discharged directly into a large plenum chamber; the test program included wide variations of divergence angle and length. During all tests a dynamic pressure of 60 pounds per square foOt was maintained at the diffuser entrance and the boundary layer there was thin and fully turbulent. The most interesting flow characteristics observed were the occasional appearance of steady, unseparated, asymmetric flow - which was correlated with the boundary-layer coalescence - and the rapid deterioration of flow steadiness - which occurred as soon as the divergence angle for maximum static pressure recovery was exceeded. Pressure efficiency was found to be controlled almost exclusively by divergence angle, whereas static pressure recovery was markedly influenced by area ratio (or length) as well as divergence angle. Volumetric efficiency. diminished as area ratio increased, and at a greater rate with small lengths than with large ones. Large values of the static-pressure-recovery coefficient were attained only with long diffusers of large area ratio; under these conditions pressure efficiency was high and. volumetric efficiency low. Auxiliary tests with asymmetric diffusers demonstrated that longitudinal pressure gradient, rather than wall divergence angle, controlled flow separation. Others showed that the addition of even a short exit duct of uniform section augmented pressure recovery. Finally, it was found that the installation of a thin, central, longitudinal partition suppressed flow separation in short diffusers and thereby improved pressure recovery

  20. Penile length and circumference: an Indian study.

    PubMed

    Promodu, K; Shanmughadas, K V; Bhat, S; Nair, K R

    2007-01-01

    Apprehension about the normal size of penis is a major concern for men. Aim of the present investigation is to estimate the penile length and circumference of Indian males and to compare the results with the data from other countries. Results will help in counseling the patients worried about the penile size and seeking penis enlargement surgery. Penile length in flaccid and stretched conditions and circumference were measured in a group of 301 physically normal men. Erected length and circumference were measured for 93 subjects. Mean flaccid length was found to be 8.21 cm, mean stretched length 10.88 cm and circumference 9.14 cm. Mean erected length was found to be 13.01 cm and erected circumference was 11.46 cm. Penile dimensions are found to be correlated with anthropometric parameters. Insight into the normative data of penile size of Indian males obtained. There are significant differences in the mean penile length and circumference of Indian sample compared to the data reported from other countries. Study need to be continued with a large sample to establish a normative data applicable to the general population.

  1. Intron Length Coevolution across Mammalian Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Peter A.; Seoighe, Cathal

    2016-01-01

    Although they do not contribute directly to the proteome, introns frequently contain regulatory elements and can extend the protein coding potential of the genome through alternative splicing. For some genes, the contribution of introns to the time required for transcription can also be functionally significant. We have previously shown that intron length in genes associated with developmental patterning is often highly conserved. In general, sets of genes that require precise coordination in the timing of their expression may be sensitive to changes in transcript length. A prediction of this hypothesis is that evolutionary changes in intron length, when they occur, may be correlated between sets of coordinately expressed genes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed intron length coevolution in alignments from nine eutherian mammals. Overall, genes that belong to the same protein complex or that are coexpressed were significantly more likely to show evidence of intron length coevolution than matched, randomly sampled genes. Individually, protein complexes involved in the cell cycle showed the strongest evidence of coevolution of intron lengths and clusters of coexpressed genes enriched for cell cycle genes also showed significant evidence of intron length coevolution. Our results reveal a novel aspect of gene coevolution and provide a means to identify genes, protein complexes and biological processes that may be particularly sensitive to changes in transcriptional dynamics. PMID:27550903

  2. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the phenomenon of hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules in idealized porous media. Tasks towards this objective include: Construct a diffusion cell with ideal pore structure for determination of diffusion coefficients, prepare and characterize ideal porous membranes, perform model compound experiments to calibrate and test diffusion apparatus and methodology, prepare and characterize coal macromolecules, and analyze data to evaluate the diffusional behavior of coal macromolecules. This report describes work on the hindered diffusion of tetraphenylporphine and asphaltene. 18 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of water diffusion in the presence of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lado Touriño, Isabel; Naranjo, Arisbel Cerpa; Negri, Viviana; Cerdán, Sebastián; Ballesteros, Paloma

    2015-11-01

    Computational modeling of the translational diffusion of water molecules in anisotropic environments entails vital relevance to understand correctly the information contained in the magnetic resonance images weighted in diffusion (DWI) and of the diffusion tensor images (DTI). In the present work we investigated the validity, strengths and weaknesses of a coarse-grained (CG) model based on the MARTINI force field to simulate water diffusion in a medium containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as models of anisotropic water diffusion behavior. We show that water diffusion outside the nanotubes follows Ficḱs law, while water diffusion inside the nanotubes is not described by a Ficḱs behavior. We report on the influence on water diffusion of various parameters such as length and concentration of CNTs, comparing the CG results with those obtained from the more accurate classic force field calculation, like the all-atom approach. Calculated water diffusion coefficients decreased in the presence of nanotubes in a concentration dependent manner. We also observed smaller water diffusion coefficients for longer CNTs. Using the CG methodology we were able to demonstrate anisotropic diffusion of water inside the nanotube scaffold, but we could not prove anisotropy in the surrounding medium, suggesting that grouping several water molecules in a single diffusing unit may affect the diffusional anisotropy calculated. The methodologies investigated in this work represent a first step towards the study of more complex models, including anisotropic cohorts of CNTs or even neuronal axons, with reasonable savings in computation time.

  4. Quantification of optical Doppler broadening and optical path lengths of multiply scattered light by phase modulated low coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, B.; Rajan, V.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W.

    2007-07-01

    We show experimental validation of a novel technique to measure optical path length distributions and path length resolved Doppler broadening in turbid media for different reduced scattering coefficients and anisotropies. The technique involves a phase modulated low coherence Mach-Zehnder interferometer, with separate fibers for illumination and detection. Water suspensions of Polystyrene microspheres with high scattering and low absorption levels are used as calibrated scattering phantoms. The path length dependent diffusion broadening or Doppler broadening of scattered light is shown to agree with Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy within 5%. The optical path lengths are determined experimentally from the zero order moment of the phase modulation peak around the modulation frequency in the power spectrum and the results are validated with Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Quantification of optical Doppler broadening and optical path lengths of multiply scattered light by phase modulated low coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Varghese, B; Rajan, V; van Leeuwen, T G; Steenbergen, W

    2007-07-23

    We show experimental validation of a novel technique to measure optical path length distributions and path length resolved Doppler broadening in turbid media for different reduced scattering coefficients and anisotropies. The technique involves a phase modulated low coherence Mach-Zehnder interferometer, with separate fibers for illumination and detection. Water suspensions of Polystyrene microspheres with high scattering and low absorption levels are used as calibrated scattering phantoms. The path length dependent diffusion broadening or Doppler broadening of scattered light is shown to agree with Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy within 5%. The optical path lengths are determined experimentally from the zero order moment of the phase modulation peak around the modulation frequency in the power spectrum and the results are validated with Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  7. Bunch Length Measurements in SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, W.J.; Fisher, A.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; Sebek, J.; Lumpkin, A.; Sannibale, F.; Mok, W.; /Unlisted

    2007-11-28

    A series of bunch length measurements were made in SPEAR3 for two different machine optics. In the achromatic optics the bunch length increases from the low-current value of 16.6ps rms to about 30ps at 25ma/bunch yielding an inductive impedance of -0.17{Omega}. Reducing the momentum compaction factor by a factor of {approx}60 [1] yields a low-current bunch length of {approx}4ps rms. In this paper we review the experimental setup and results.

  8. Average length of stay in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Egawa, H

    1984-03-01

    The average length of stay is essentially an important and appropriate index for hospital bed administration. However, from the position that it is not necessarily an appropriate index in Japan, an analysis is made of the difference in the health care facility system between the United States and Japan. Concerning the length of stay in Japanese hospitals, the median appeared to better represent the situation. It is emphasized that in order for the average length of stay to become an appropriate index, there is need to promote regional health, especially facility planning.

  9. Anomalous diffusion of energetic particles: implications for diffusive particle acceleration at a quasi-perpendicular shock

    SciTech Connect

    Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Le Roux, Jakobus A.

    2005-08-01

    We study energetic particle transport in turbulent magnetic fields. The composite turbulence is modeled by a nonlinear structure (vortex) and a randomly fluctuating background magnetic field. Results of our numerical simulations show that an anomalous diffusion regime (subdiffusion and superdiffusion) occurs when the correlation length of the magnetic field disturbances is about the same or larger than the average particle gyroradius. Subdiffusion of cosmic rays in the vicinity of a quasi-perpendicular shock can lower the density of particles at the shock front. Particles become temporarily trapped in the turbulent magnetic fields. The particle spectrum in this case can steepen as compared to the spectrum in the classic diffusive acceleration case. We estimate a power law index for the particle spectrum for a number of cases and discuss implications for cosmic ray transport in the heliosphere.

  10. Controlling Exciton Diffusion and Fullerene Distribution in Photovoltaic Blends by Side Chain Modification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The influence of crystallinity on exciton diffusion and fullerene distribution was investigated by blending amorphous and semicrystalline copolymers. We measured exciton diffusion and fluorescence quenching in such blends by dispersing fullerene molecules into them. We find that the diffusion length is more than two times higher in the semicrystalline copolymer than in the amorphous copolymer. We also find that fullerene preferentially mixes into disordered regions of the polymer film. This shows that relatively small differences in molecular structure are important for exciton diffusion and fullerene distribution. PMID:26267202

  11. Self-diffusion in molecular liquids: Medium-chain n-alkanes and coenzyme Q10 studied by quasielastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smuda, Christoph; Busch, Sebastian; Gemmecker, Gerd; Unruh, Tobias

    2008-07-01

    A systematic time-of-flight quasielastic neutron scattering (TOF-QENS) study on diffusion of n-alkanes in a melt is presented for the first time. As another example of a medium-chain molecule, coenzyme Q10 is investigated in the same way. The data were evaluated both in the frequency and in the time domain. TOF-QENS data can be satisfactorily described by different models, and it turned out that the determined diffusion coefficients are largely independent of the applied model. The derived diffusion coefficients are compared with values measured by pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR). With increasing chain length, an increasing difference between the TOF-QENS diffusion coefficient and the PFG-NMR diffusion coefficient is observed. This discrepancy in the diffusion coefficients is most likely due to a change of the diffusion mechanism on a nanometer length scale for molecules of medium-chain length.

  12. Similarity theory based on the Dougherty-Ozmidov length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, Andrey A.; Andreas, Edgar L.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Guest, Peter S.; Persson, P. Ola G.

    2015-07-01

    Local similarity theory is suggested based on the Brunt-Vaisala frequency and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy instead the turbulent fluxes used in the traditional Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Based on dimensional analysis (Pi theorem), it is shown that any properly scaled statistics of the small-scale turbulence are universal functions of a stability parameter defined as the ratio of a reference height z and the Dougherty-Ozmidov length scale which in the limit of z-less stratification is linearly proportional to the Obukhov length scale. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence made at five levels on a 20-m tower over the Arctic pack ice during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean experiment (SHEBA) are used to examine the behaviour of different similarity functions in the stable boundary layer. It is found that in the framework of this approach the non-dimensional turbulent viscosity is equal to the gradient Richardson number whereas the non-dimensional turbulent thermal diffusivity is equal to the flux Richardson number. These results are a consequence of the approximate local balance between production of turbulence by the mean flow shear and viscous dissipation. The turbulence framework based on the Brunt-Vaisala frequency and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy may have practical advantages for estimating turbulence when the fluxes are not directly available.

  13. Accelerated stochastic diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaczewski, Piotr

    1990-07-01

    We give a purely probabilistic demonstration that all effects of non-random (external, conservative) forces on the diffusion process can be encoded in the Nelson ansatz for the second Newton law. Each random path of the process together with a probabilistic weight carries a phase accumulation (complex valued) weight. Random path summation (integration) of these weights leads to the transition probability density and transition amplitude respectively between two spatial points in a given time interval. The Bohm-Vigier, Fenyes-Nelson-Guerra and Feynman descriptions of the quantum particle behaviours are in fact equivalent.

  14. Cation diffusion in titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, R.; McCallister, R. H.; Harrison, H. R.

    1984-02-01

    Interdiffusion couple experiments were performed with titanomagnetite single crystals at 1,000°C, 1,100° C and 1,200° C in various buffered atmospheres. The dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient on oxygen fugacity, composition and temperature was interpreted in terms of point defect structure. Estimates of the cation tracer diffusivities indicate that Fe migrates via a point defect mechanism, involving mixed tetrahedral-octahedral site jumps, with an activation energy of 33 Kcal/mole; whereas Ti migration is one to two orders of magnitude slower, is restricted to octahedral sites and has an activation energy of 60 Kcal/mole.

  15. Diffusion in quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2012-08-01

    The change of the effective dimension of spacetime with the probed scale is a universal phenomenon shared by independent models of quantum gravity. Using tools of probability theory and multifractal geometry, we show how dimensional flow is controlled by a multiscale fractional diffusion equation, and physically interpreted as a composite stochastic process. The simplest example is a fractional telegraph process, describing quantum spacetimes with a spectral dimension equal to 2 in the ultraviolet and monotonically rising to 4 towards the infrared. The general profile of the spectral dimension of the recently introduced multifractional spaces is constructed for the first time.

  16. Analysis of light propagation in highly scattering media by path-length-assigned Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsuhiro; Nishidate, Izumi; Iwai, Toshiaki

    2014-05-01

    Numerical analysis of optical propagation in highly scattering media is investigated when light is normally incident to the surface and re-emerges backward from the same point. This situation corresponds to practical light scattering setups, such as in optical coherence tomography. The simulation uses the path-length-assigned Monte Carlo method based on an ellipsoidal algorithm. The spatial distribution of the scattered light is determined and the dependence of its width and penetration depth on the path-length is found. The backscattered light is classified into three types, in which ballistic, snake, and diffuse photons are dominant.

  17. Diffusion in silicon isotope heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, Hughes Howland

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous diffusion of Si and the dopants B, P, and As has been studied by the use of a multilayer structure of isotopically enriched Si. This structure, consisting of 5 pairs of 120 nm thick natural Si and 28Si enriched layers, enables the observation of 30Si self-diffusion from the natural layers into the 28Si enriched layers, as well as dopant diffusion from an implanted source in an amorphous Si cap layer, via Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The dopant diffusion created regions of the multilayer structure that were extrinsic at the diffusion temperatures. In these regions, the Fermi level shift due to the extrinsic condition altered the concentration and charge state of the native defects involved in the diffusion process, which affected the dopant and self-diffusion. The simultaneously recorded diffusion profiles enabled the modeling of the coupled dopant and self-diffusion. From the modeling of the simultaneous diffusion, the dopant diffusion mechanisms, the native defect charge states, and the self- and dopant diffusion coefficients can be determined. This information is necessary to enhance the physical modeling of dopant diffusion in Si. It is of particular interest to the modeling of future electronic Si devices, where the nanometer-scale features have created the need for precise physical models of atomic diffusion in Si. The modeling of the experimental profiles of simultaneous diffusion of B and Si under p-type extrinsic conditions revealed that both species are mediated by neutral and singly, positively charged Si self-interstitials. The diffusion of As and Si under extrinsic n-type conditions yielded a model consisting of the interstitialcy and vacancy mechanisms of diffusion via singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral vacancies. The simultaneous diffusion of P and Si has been modeled on the basis of neutral and singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral and singly

  18. Characteristic length of the knotting probability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Erica; Deguchi, Tetsuo

    2015-09-01

    We present a self-avoiding polygon (SAP) model for circular DNA in which the radius of impermeable cylindrical segments corresponds to the screening length of double-stranded DNA surrounded by counter ions. For the model we evaluate the probability for a generated SAP with N segments having a given knot K through simulation. We call it the knotting probability of a knot K with N segments for the SAP model. We show that when N is large the most significant factor in the knotting probability is given by the exponentially decaying part exp(-N/NK), where the estimates of parameter NK are consistent with the same value for all the different knots we investigated. We thus call it the characteristic length of the knotting probability. We give formulae expressing the characteristic length as a function of the cylindrical radius rex, i.e. the screening length of double-stranded DNA.

  19. Method of continuously determining crack length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramamurthy (Inventor); Lopez, Osvaldo F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The determination of crack lengths in an accurate and straight forward manner is very useful in studying and preventing load created flaws and cracks. A crack length sensor according to the present invention is fabricated in a rectangular or other geometrical form from a conductive powder impregnated polymer material. The long edges of the sensor are silver painted on both sides and the sensor is then bonded to a test specimen via an adhesive having sufficient thickness to also serve as an insulator. A lead wire is connected to each of the two outwardly facing silver painted edges. The resistance across the sensor changes as a function of the crack length in the specimen and sensor. The novel aspect of the present invention includes the use of relatively uncomplicated sensors and instrumentation to effectively measure the length of generated cracks.

  20. Mixing lengths scaling in a gravity flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Rivera, Micheal; Chen, Jun; Ecke, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current. The turbulent transport of momentum and buoyancy can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model [1]: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and buoyancy are found to scale quadraticatly with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient is the square of the mixing length, approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show in this paper how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow {radical}({var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}{sub z}u{sup 3}).