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Sample records for adatom surface diffusion

  1. Surface diffusion of a carbon adatom on charged SWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Longtao; Krstic, Predrag; Kaganovich, Igor

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion of a carbon adatom on SWCNT could be a mechanism for a CNT growth in a volume plasma, supplementing its growth from a transition metal catalyst nanoparticle. However, being embedded in plasma, the nanotube can charge by the plasma particles irradiation, in particular by electrons. Using Density Functional Theory, Nudged Elastic Band and Kinetic Monte Carlo methods we find (1) equilibrium sites, (2) adsorption energies, (3) potential barriers, (4) vibrational frequencies and (5) most probable pathways for diffusion of the adatom on external surfaces of SWCNTs of (5,5), (10,0) and (10,5) chirality, as function of its charge. The metal (5,5) SWCNT can support a fast diffusion of the carbon adatom, which is accelerated by the presence of the SWCNT negative charge. Reduced model of SWCNT growth is proposed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  2. A calculation of the diffusion energies for adatoms on surfaces of F.C.C. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, T.; Pound, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The activation energies for diffusion were determined for gold, platinum and iridium adatoms on plane and plane PT surfaces and were found to be in good agreement with the measurements reported by Bassett and Webber. The Lennard-Jones pair potentials were used to model the interatomic forces, and relaxation of the substrate atoms in near proximity to the adatom was considered in detail. The present calculations clarify the mechanism of the observed two-dimensional diffusion of platinum and iridium atoms on a plane PT surface. The results are compared with those obtained using Morse potential functions and different relaxation techniques.

  3. Surface diffusion and substrate-nanowire adatom exchange in InAs nanowire growth.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2009-05-01

    We report new fundamental insights into InAs nanowire (NW) nucleation and evolution on InAs (111)B surfaces using organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and present the first experimental demonstration of two distinct NW growth regimes, defined by the direction of substrate-NW adatom exchange, that lead to nonlinear growth rates. We show that the NW elongation rate and morphology in these two growth regimes are governed by the relative difference between the In adatom diffusion lengths on the growth substrate surface and on the NW sidewalls, resulting in strong growth rate dependence on the NW length. These results indicate that surface solid-phase diffusion of In adatoms is a key process in InAs NW growth, which is also supported by diameter-dependent growth rates. These developments enable rational growth of axial and radial NW heterostructures.

  4. Diffusion of Cd and Te adatoms on CdTe(111) surfaces: A computational study using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Naderi, Ebadollah; Nanavati, Sachin; Majumder, Chiranjib; Ghaisas, S. V.

    2015-01-15

    CdTe is one of the most promising semiconductor for thin-film based solar cells. Here we report a computational study of Cd and Te adatom diffusion on the CdTe (111) A-type (Cd terminated) and B-type (Te terminated) surfaces and their migration paths. The atomic and electronic structure calculations are performed under the DFT formalism and climbing Nudge Elastic Band (cNEB) method has been applied to evaluate the potential barrier of the Te and Cd diffusion. In general the minimum energy site on the surface is labeled as A{sub a} site. In case of Te and Cd on B-type surface, the sub-surface site (a site just below the top surface) is very close in energy to the A site. This is responsible for the subsurface accumulation of adatoms and therefore, expected to influence the defect formation during growth. The diffusion process of adatoms is considered from A{sub a} (occupied) to A{sub a} (empty) site at the nearest distance. We have explored three possible migration paths for the adatom diffusion. The adatom surface interaction is highly dependent on the type of the surface. Typically, Te interaction with both type (5.2 eV for A-type and 3.8 eV for B-type) is stronger than Cd interactions(2.4 eV for B-type and 0.39 eV for A-type). Cd interaction with the A-type surface is very weak. The distinct behavior of the A-type and B-type surfaces perceived in our study explain the need of maintaining the A-type surface during growth for smooth and stoichiometric growth.

  5. Diffusion of Cd and Te adatoms on CdTe(111) surfaces: A computational study using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ebadollah; Nanavati, Sachin; Majumder, Chiranjib; Ghaisas, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    CdTe is one of the most promising semiconductor for thin-film based solar cells. Here we report a computational study of Cd and Te adatom diffusion on the CdTe (111) A-type (Cd terminated) and B-type (Te terminated) surfaces and their migration paths. The atomic and electronic structure calculations are performed under the DFT formalism and climbing Nudge Elastic Band (cNEB) method has been applied to evaluate the potential barrier of the Te and Cd diffusion. In general the minimum energy site on the surface is labeled as Aa site. In case of Te and Cd on B-type surface, the sub-surface site (a site just below the top surface) is very close in energy to the A site. This is responsible for the subsurface accumulation of adatoms and therefore, expected to influence the defect formation during growth. The diffusion process of adatoms is considered from Aa (occupied) to Aa (empty) site at the nearest distance. We have explored three possible migration paths for the adatom diffusion. The adatom surface interaction is highly dependent on the type of the surface. Typically, Te interaction with both type (5.2 eV for A-type and 3.8 eV for B-type) is stronger than Cd interactions(2.4 eV for B-type and 0.39 eV for A-type). Cd interaction with the A-type surface is very weak. The distinct behavior of the A-type and B-type surfaces perceived in our study explain the need of maintaining the A-type surface during growth for smooth and stoichiometric growth.

  6. Electric-field noise from carbon-adatom diffusion on a Au(110) surface: First-principles calculations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Safavi-Naini, A.; Hite, D. A.; McKay, K. S.; Pappas, D. P.; Weck, P. F.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2017-03-01

    The decoherence of trapped-ion quantum gates due to heating of their motional modes is a fundamental science and engineering problem. This heating is attributed to electric-field noise arising from the trap-electrode surfaces. In this work, we investigate the source of this noise by focusing on the diffusion of carbon-containing adsorbates on the surface of Au(110). We show by density functional theory, based on detailed scanning probe microscopy, how the carbon adatom diffusion on the gold surface changes the energy landscape and how the adatom dipole moment varies with the diffusive motion. A simple model for the diffusion noise, which varies quadratically with the variation of the dipole moment, predicts a noise spectrum, in accordance with the measured values.

  7. Electric-field noise from carbon-adatom diffusion on a Au(110) surface: First-principles calculations and experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, E.; Safavi-Naini, A.; Hite, D. A.; ...

    2017-03-01

    The decoherence of trapped-ion quantum bits due to heating of their motional modes is a fundamental science and engineering problem. This heating is attributed to electric-field noise arising from processes on the trap-electrode surfaces. In this work, we address the source of this noise by focusing on the diffusion of carbon-containing adsorbates on the surface of Au(110). We show by detailed scanned probe microscopy and density functional theory how the carbon adatom diffusion on the gold surface changes the energy landscape, and how the adatom dipole moment varies with the diffusive motion. Lastly, a simple model for the diffusion noise,more » which varies quadratically with the variation of the dipole moment, qualitatively reproduces the measured noise spectrum, and the estimate of the noise spectral density is in accord with measured values.« less

  8. Modelisation de la diffusion sur les surfaces metalliques: De l'adatome aux processus de croissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Ghyslain

    Cette these est consacree a l'etude des processus de diffusion en surface dans le but ultime de comprendre, et de modeliser, la croissance d'une couche mince. L'importance de bien mai triser la croissance est primordiale compte tenu de son role dans la miniaturisation des circuits electroniques. Nous etudions ici les surface des metaux nobles et de ceux de la fin de la serie de transition. Dans un premier temps, nous nous interessons a la diffusion d'un simple adatome sur une surface metallique. Nous avons, entre autres, mis en evidence l'apparition d'une correlation entre evenements successifs lorsque la temperature est comparable a la barriere de diffusion, i.e., la diffusion ne peut pas etre associee a une marche aleatoire. Nous proposons un modele phenomenologique simple qui reproduit bien les resultats des simulations. Ces calculs nous ont aussi permis de montrer que la diffusion obeit a la loi de Meyer-Neldel. Cette loi stipule que, pour un processus active, le prefacteur augmente exponentiellement avec la barriere. En plus, ce travail permet de clarifier l'origine physique de cette loi. En comparant les resultats dynamiques aux resultats statiques, on se rend compte que la barriere extraite des calculs dynamiques est essentiellement la meme que celle obtenue par une approche statique, beaucoup plus simple. On peut donc obtenir cette barriere a l'aide de methodes plus precises, i.e., ab initio, comme la theorie de la fonctionnelle de la densite, qui sont aussi malheureusement beaucoup plus lourdes. C'est ce que nous avons fait pour plusieurs systemes metalliques. Nos resultats avec cette derniere approche se comparent tres bien aux resultats experimentaux. Nous nous sommes attardes plus longuement a la surface (111) du platine. Cette surface regorge de particularites interessantes, comme la forme d'equilibre non-hexagonale des i lots et deux sites d'adsorption differents pour l'adatome. De plus, des calculs ab initio precedents n'ont pas reussi a confirmer la

  9. First principle simulations of the surface diffusion of Si and Me adatoms on the Si(111)3×3-Me surface, Me= Al, Ga, In, Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luniakov, Y. V.

    2011-10-01

    The intriguing but yet still unexplained experimental results of Hibino and Ogino [Phys. Rev. B 54, 5763 (1996); Surf. Sci. 328, L547 (1995)], who have observed single defect movement on an Me induced Si(111)3×3 surface, have been revived and theoretically analysed. Using Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) optimization, the minimal energy path for an Si adatom moving on the ideal and vacancy defected surfaces has been obtained and the most probable mechanism of the vacancy mediated single defect diffusion has been established. This mechanism is shown to be responsible for the experimentally observed Si adatom movement and predicts a far easier movement of the Me adatom on vacancy defected Me induced Si(111)3×3 surfaces.

  10. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Surface diffusion of Si, Ge and C adatoms on Si (001) substrate studied by the molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Yu, Zhong-Yuan; Lu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Yu-Min

    2009-10-01

    Depositions of Si, Ge and C atoms onto a preliminary Si (001) substrate at different temperatures are investigated by using the molecular dynamics method. The mechanism of atomic self-assembling occurring locally on the flat terraces between steps is suggested. Diffusion and arrangement patterns of adatoms at different temperatures are observed. At 900 K, the deposited atoms are more likely to form dimers in the perpendicular [110] direction due to the more favourable movement along the perpendicular [110] direction. C adatoms are more likely to break or reconstruct the dimers on the substrate surface and have larger diffusion distances than Ge and Si adatoms. Exchange between C adatoms and substrate atoms are obvious and the epitaxial thickness is small. Total potential energies of adatoms and substrate atoms involved in the simulation cell are computed. When a newly arrived adatom reaches the stable position, the potential energy of the system will decrease and the curves turns into a ladder-like shape. It is found that C adatoms can lead to more reduction of the system energy and the potential energy of the system will increase as temperature increases.

  11. Hot Adatom Diffusion Following Oxygen Dissociation on Pd(100) and Pd(111): A First-Principles Study of the Equilibration Dynamics of Exothermic Surface Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukas, Vanessa J.; Reuter, Karsten

    2016-09-01

    We augment ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with a quantitative account of phononic dissipation to study the hyperthermal adsorbate dynamics resulting from a noninstantaneous energy dissipation during exothermic surface chemical reactions. Comparing the hot adatom diffusion ensuing O2 dissociation over Pd(100) and Pd(111) we find experimentally accessible product end distances to form a rather misleading measure for the lifetime of this hyperthermal state. The lifetime is particularly long at Pd(111) where a random-walk-type diffusion leads only to small net displacements. A detailed phonon analysis rationalizes the slow equilibration through long-lived Rayleigh mode excitations that spatially confine the released energy within a nanoscopic "hot spot" around the impingement region.

  12. Adatom-dimer interaction on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, C. P.; Ong, C. K.

    1994-02-01

    We use a modified form of the Stillinger-Weber potential to obtain the binding sites and diffusion barriers of a Si adatom in the vicinity of single F and B type dimers on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface. We find that both kinds of dimer provide good sinks for adatoms and are therefore ideal nucleation sites, provided the temperature is not too high as to induce dimer breaking. Our results also show that adatoms can be trapped in non-lattice sites surrounding the F type dimer, leading to a disordering of the growing epitaxial film. Monte Carlo simulated annealing indicates that adatoms at these "defect" sites are vertically displaced with respect to those adsorbed on the epitaxial sites, giving rise to step structures that closely resemble those proposed by Falta and Henzler [Surf. Sci 269/270 (1992) 14] to account for their SPA-LEED results.

  13. Binding of an adatom to a simple metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, H. B.; Turk, L. A.; White, W. W., III

    1975-01-01

    The density functional formalism of Hohenberg and Kohn is used to investigate the energies, charge densities and forces which hold an adatom on the surface of a simple metal. The valence wavefunction of the adatom is fitted to the Herman-Skillman solutions at large distance and is simplified somewhat in the core region. The field of the ion is represented by the Ashcroft pseudopotential. For the metal the jellium model is used. Detailed calculations are carried out for a sodium adatom on a sodium surface. Simply juxtaposing adatom and surface gives a binding energy of about 1/3 eV. This value is approximately twice the surface energy per atom in the close-packed plane. Charge redistributions as determined variationally increase the binding energy by about 10%. The equilibrium distance for the adatom turns out to be 1.66 A from the surface, as compared with 1.52 A, the observed value for one-half the distance between the close-packed planes.

  14. Migration of Carbon Adatoms on the Surface of Charged SWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Longtao; Krstic, Predrag; Kaganovich, Igor

    2016-10-01

    In volume plasma, the growth of SWCNT from a transition metal catalyst could be enhanced by incoming carbon flux on SWCNT surface, which is generated by the adsorption and migration of carbon adatoms on SWCNT surface. In addition, the nanotube can be charged by the irradiation of plasma particles. How this charging effect will influence the adsorption and migration behavior of carbon atom has not been revealed. Using Density Functional Theory, Nudged Elastic Band and Kinetic Monte Carlo method, we found equilibrium sites, vibrational frequency, adsorption energy, most probable pathways for migration of adatoms, and the barrier sizes along these pathways. The metallic (5,5) SWCNT can support a fast migration of the carbon adatom along a straight path with low barriers, which is further enhanced by the presence of negative charge on SWCNT. The enhancement is contributed by the higher adsorption energy and thence longer lifetime of adatom on the charged SWCNT surface. The lifetime and migration distance of adatom increase by three and two orders of magnitude, respectively, as shown by Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. These results support the surface migration mechanism of SWCNT growth in plasma environment. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Material Sciences and Engineering Division.

  15. Atom-by-Atom and Concerted Hopping of Adatom Pairs on an Open Metal Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bogicevic, A.; Ovesson, S.; Lundqvist, B.I.; Jennison, D.R.

    1999-08-25

    Atom-by-atom and concerted hopping of ad-dimers on the open (100) surface of fcc metals are studied by means of density-functional calculations. The adatom interaction is relatively short-ranged, and beyond next-nearest neighbors ad-dimers are effectively dissociated. Diffusion takes place by a simple shearing process, favored because it maximizes adatom coordination at the transition state This holds for Al, Au, and Rh, and is likely a general result because geometrical arguments dominate over details of the electronic structure.

  16. Heterodiffusion of Ag adatoms on imperfect Au(1 1 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El koraychy, E.; Sbiaai, K.; Mazroui, M.; Ferrando, R.; Boughaleb, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The hetero-diffusion of Ag adatoms on imperfect Au(1 1 0) surfaces is studied using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The atomic interactions are described by an Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential. Static activation energies governing various diffusion processes (jumps and exchanges) are calculated by quenched MD, finding that activation energies for interlayer mobility at straight step edges are somewhat larger than those on the flat surface in the cross-channel [1 0 0]-direction, while interlayer barriers at kinks are considerably lower. Dynamic activation energies are calculated at high temperature from the Arrhenius plots of different diffusion mechanisms and compared to static barriers.

  17. Native gallium adatoms discovered on atomically-smooth gallium nitride surfaces at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Alam, Khan; Foley, Andrew; Smith, Arthur R

    2015-03-11

    In advanced compound semiconductor devices, such as in quantum dot and quantum well systems, detailed atomic configurations at the growth surfaces are vital in determining the structural and electronic properties. Therefore, it is important to investigate the surface reconstructions in order to make further technological advancements. Usually, conventional semiconductor surfaces (e.g., arsenides, phosphides, and antimonides) are highly reactive due to the existence of a high density of group V (anion) surface dangling bonds. However, in the case of nitrides, group III rich growth conditions in molecular beam epitaxy are usually preferred leading to group III (Ga)-rich surfaces. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to reveal a uniform distribution of native gallium adatoms with a density of 0.3%-0.5% of a monolayer on the clean, as-grown surface of nitrogen polar GaN(0001̅) having the centered 6 × 12 reconstruction. Unseen at room temperature, these Ga adatoms are strongly bound to the surface but move with an extremely low surface diffusion barrier and a high density saturation coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium with Ga droplets. Furthermore, the Ga adatoms reveal an intrinsic surface chirality and an asymmetric site occupation. These observations can have important impacts in the understanding of gallium nitride surfaces.

  18. Tunneling spectroscopy of a magnetic adatoms on topological insulator surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiorny, M.; Bjerngaard, M.; Paaske, J.

    In this communication, we address the question of how the presence of a magnetic impurity on a topological insulator (TI) surface manifests in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) when such a system is probed by a STM. For this purpose, we consider a single magnetic adatom with arbitrary spin, whose dynamics is governed by the local magnetic anisotropy. The spin is exchange-coupled to two-dimensional helical surface electrons, corresponding to the surface of a three-dimensional TI like Bi2Se3, with its characteristic hexagonally warped Dirac cone band structure. Employing an effective exchange-tunneling model, we calculate the non-linear differential conductance from a spin-polarized STM tip to the helical substrate, valid in the perturbative regime of weak exchange-tunneling and including the nonequilibrium pumping of the adatom spin states. The interplay between the magnetic anisotropy and the spin-momentum locked surface electrons is shown to give a number of specific imprints in the IETS, which could be investigated by spin-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy. M. Misiorny, M. Bjerngaard and J. Paaske, manuscript in preparation Work supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Education as `Iuventus Plus' project (IP2014 030973) in years 2015-2016.

  19. Electronic Nature of Step-edge Barriers Against Adatom Descent on Transition-metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yina; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    The activation barriers against adatom migration on terraces and across steps play an essential role in determining the growth morphology of surfaces, interfaces, and thin lms. By studying a series of adatoms on representative transition metal surfaces through extensive rst-principles calculations, we establish a clear correlation between the preferred mechanism and activation energy for adatom descent at a step and the relative degree of electronic shell lling between the adatom and the substrate. We also nd an approximate linear relation between the adatom hopping barriers at step edges and the adatom-surface bonding strength. These results may serve as simple guiding rules for predicting the precise atomic nature of surface morphologies in heteroepitaxial growth such as nanowires.

  20. Control of the crystal structure of InAs nanowires by tuning contributions of adatom diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui; Ren, Xiaomin; Ye, Xian; Guo, Jingwei; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xia; Cai, Shiwei; Huang, Yongqing

    2010-11-01

    The dependence of crystal structure on contributions of adatom diffusion (ADD) and precursor direct impingement (DIM) was investigated for vapor-liquid-solid growth of InAs nanowires (NWs). The ADD contributions from the sidewalls and substrate surface can be changed by using GaAs NWs of different length as the basis for growing InAs NWs. We found that pure zinc-blende structure is favored when DIM contributions dominate. Moreover, without changing the NW diameter or growth parameters (such as temperature or V/III ratio), a transition from zinc-blende to wurtzite structure can be realized by increasing the ADD contributions. A nucleation model is proposed in which ADD and DIM contributions play different roles in determining the location and phase of the nucleus.

  1. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-28

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C{sub 6}-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ∼0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. This in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001)

  2. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom inmore » the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).« less

  3. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).

  4. Single Silver Adatoms on Nanostructured Manganese Oxide Surfaces: Boosting Oxygen Activation for Benzene Abatement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Huang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Meijuan; Ma, Zhen; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2017-02-21

    The involvement of a great amount of active oxygen species is a crucial requirement for catalytic oxidation of benzene, because complete mineralization of one benzene molecule needs 15 oxygen atoms. Here, we disperse single silver adatoms on nanostructured hollandite manganese oxide (HMO) surfaces by using a thermal diffusion method. The single-atom silver catalyst (Ag1/HMO) shows high catalytic activity in benzene oxidation, and 100% conversion is achieved at 220 °C at a high space velocity of 23 000 h(-1). The Mars-van Krevelen mechanism is valid in our case as the reaction orders for both benzene and O2 approach one, according to reaction kinetics data. Data from H2 temperature-programmed reduction and O core-level X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) reveal that Ag1/HMO possesses a great amount of active surface lattice oxygen available for benzene oxidation. Valence-band XPS and density functional theoretical calculations demonstrate that the single Ag adatoms have the upshifted 4d orbitals, thus facilitating the activation of gaseous oxygen. Therefore, the excellent activation abilities of Ag1/HMO toward both surface lattice oxygen and gaseous oxygen account for its high catalytic activity in benzene oxidation. This work may assist with the rational design of efficient metal-oxide catalysts for the abatement of volatile organic compounds such as benzene.

  5. Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (dh) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with dh and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

  6. Adatom Ascending at Step Edges and Faceting on fcc Metal (110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; de Mongeot, F. B.; Valbusa, U.; Wang, E. G.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2004-01-01

    Using first-principles total-energy calculations, we show that an adatom can easily climb up at monatomic-layer-high steps on several representative fcc metal (110) surfaces via a place exchange mechanism. Inclusion of such novel adatom ascending processes in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of Al(110) homoepitaxy as a prototypical model system can lead to the existence of an intriguing faceting instability, whose dynamical evolution and kinetic nature are explored in comparison with experimental observations.

  7. Reducing the In2O3(111) Surface Results in Ordered Indium Adatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Margareta; Seiler, Steffen; Meyer, Bernd; Boatner, Lynn A; Schmid, M.; Diebold, U.

    2014-01-01

    The In2O3(111) surface can be transformed from an oxidized bulk termination to one that is covered by single In adatoms. As each adatom sits at one specific site within the surface unit cell they form a well-ordered (1 1) superstructure. Annealing at 500 C in O2 or in ultrahigh vacuum results in a fully reversible conversion between these two surface terminations; this transformation and intermediate stages were followed with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). Formation of this novel surface structure under reducing conditions is corroborated by Density Functional Theory (DFT). The reduced adatom-covered and the oxidized In2O3(111) surfaces are expected to exhibit different chemical and electronic properties, which can easily be exploited by the facile and reversible switching between the two terminations.

  8. Well-Ordered In Adatoms at the In2O3(111 ) Surface Created by Fe Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Margareta; Lackner, Peter; Seiler, Steffen; Gerhold, Stefan; Osiecki, Jacek; Schulte, Karina; Boatner, Lynn A.; Schmid, Michael; Meyer, Bernd; Diebold, Ulrike

    2016-11-01

    Metal deposition on oxide surfaces usually results in adatoms, clusters, or islands of the deposited material, where defects in the surface often act as nucleation centers. Here an alternate configuration is reported. After the vapor deposition of Fe on the In2O3(111 ) surface at room temperature, ordered adatoms are observed with scanning tunneling microscopy. These are identical to the In adatoms that form when the sample is reduced by heating in ultrahigh vacuum. Density functional theory calculations confirm that Fe interchanges with In in the topmost layer, pushing the excess In atoms to the surface where they arrange as a well-ordered adatom array.

  9. Surface Modifications by Field Induced Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Martin; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    By applying a voltage pulse to a scanning tunneling microscope tip the surface under the tip will be modified. We have in this paper taken a closer look at the model of electric field induced surface diffusion of adatoms including the van der Waals force as a contribution in formations of a mound on a surface. The dipole moment of an adatom is the sum of the surface induced dipole moment (which is constant) and the dipole moment due to electric field polarisation which depends on the strength and polarity of the electric field. The electric field is analytically modelled by a point charge over an infinite conducting flat surface. From this we calculate the force that cause adatoms to migrate. The calculated force is small for voltage used, typical 1 pN, but due to thermal vibration adatoms are hopping on the surface and even a small net force can be significant in the drift of adatoms. In this way we obtain a novel formula for a polarity dependent threshold voltage for mound formation on the surface for positive tip. Knowing the voltage of the pulse we then can calculate the radius of the formed mound. A threshold electric field for mound formation of about 2 V/nm is calculated. In addition, we found that van der Waals force is of importance for shorter distances and its contribution to the radial force on the adatoms has to be considered for distances smaller than 1.5 nm for commonly used voltages. PMID:22253894

  10. Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Calarco, R.; Stoica, T.

    2011-03-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (d{sub h}) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with d{sub h} and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

  11. Two Pathways for Water Interaction with Oxygen Adatoms on TiO2(110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubinetsky, Igor; Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel

    2010-08-04

    Atomic-level investigation of the interaction of H2O with a partially re-oxidized TiO2(110) has been performed at 300 K by combining scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. In particular, we demonstrate that oxygen adatoms (Oa), produced during O2 exposure of reduced TiO2(110) surfaces, alter water dissociation/ recombination chemistry through two different pathways. When H2O diffuses to Oa on the same Ti row, it becomes trapped near the Oa, exchanges a proton easily to dissociate and form a pair of terminal hydroxyls (OHt) along the row, which can then readily recombine and re-dissociate many times or overcome the barrier to move away. When H2O passes along the Oa on an adjacent row, an across-row proton transfer facilitated by the bridging O atom results in spontaneous dissociation of H2O on a Ti trough leading to the formation of a stable across-row OHt pair, which after awhile can recombine and H2O diffuses away. The across-row process has not been reported previously, and it starts from a ‘‘pseudo-dissociated’’ state of water. We also show how the H2O dissociation and OHt pair statistical reformation induce an apparent along- or across-row shift of Oa as a result of the oxygen scrambling process between H2O and Oa.

  12. RKKY-like contributions to the magnetic anisotropy energy: 3 d adatoms on Pt(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhassoune, Mohammmed; Dias, Manuel dos Santos; Zimmermann, Bernd; Dederichs, Peter H.; Lounis, Samir

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic anisotropy energy defines the energy barrier that stabilizes a magnetic moment. Utilizing density-functional-theory-based simulations and analytical formulations, we establish that this barrier is strongly modified by long-range contributions very similar to Friedel oscillations and Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions. Thus, oscillations are expected and observed, with different decaying factors and highly anisotropic in realistic materials, which can switch nontrivially the sign of the magnetic anisotropy energy. This behavior is general, and for illustration we address the transition-metal adatoms, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co deposited on a Pt(111) surface. We explain, in particular, the mechanisms leading to the strong site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy observed for Fe adatoms on a Pt(111) surface as revealed previously via first-principles-based simulations and inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy [A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157204 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.157204]. The same mechanisms are probably active for the site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy obtained for Fe adatoms on Pd or Rh(111) surfaces and for Co adatoms on a Rh(111) surface [P. Blonski et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 104426 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.104426].

  13. Diffusion on Cu surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    1993-01-01

    Understanding surface diffusion is essential in understanding surface phenomena, such as crystal growth, thin film growth, corrosion, physisorption, and chemisorption. Because of its importance, various experimental and theoretical efforts have been directed to understand this phenomena. The Field Ion Microscope (FIM) has been the major experimental tool for studying surface diffusion. FIM have been employed by various research groups to study surface diffusion of adatoms. Because of limitations of the FIM, such studies are only limited to a few surfaces: nickel, platinum, aluminum, iridium, tungsten, and rhodium. From the theoretical standpoint, various atomistic simulations are performed to study surface diffusion. In most of these calculations the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) along with the molecular static (MS) simulation are utilized. The EAM is a semi-empirical approach for modeling the interatomic interactions. The MS simulation is a technique for minimizing the total energy of a system of particles with respect to the positions of its particles. One of the objectives of this work is to develop the EAM functions for Cu and use them in conjunction with the molecular static (MS) simulation to study diffusion of a Cu atom on a perfect as well as stepped Cu(100) surfaces. This will provide a test of the validity of the EAM functions on Cu(100) surface and near the stepped environments. In particular, we construct a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model and calculate the migration energies of an atom on a terrace, near a ledge site, near a kink site, and going over a descending step. We have also calculated formation energies of an atom on the bare surface, a vacancy in the surface, a stepped surface, and a stepped-kink surface. Our results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  14. Gold-Adatom-Mediated Bonding in Self-Assembled Short-Chain Alkanethiolate Species on the Au(111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymovych, P.; Sorescu, D.C.; Yates, J.T., Jr.

    2006-10-06

    Microscopic evidence for Au-adatom-induced self-assembly of alkanethiolate species on the Au(111) surface is presented. Based on STM measurements and density-functional theory calculations, a new model for the low-coverage self-assembled monolayer of alkanethiolate on the Au(111) surface is developed, which involves the adsorbate complexes incorporating Au adatoms. It is also concluded that the Au(111) herringbone reconstruction is lifted by the alkanethiolate self-assembly because the reconstructed surface layer provides reactive Au adatoms that drive self-assembly.

  15. Well-Ordered In Adatoms at the In2O3(111) Surface Created by Fe Deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Margareta; Lackner, Peter; Seiler, Steffen; ...

    2016-11-11

    Metal deposition on oxide surfaces usually results in adatoms, clusters, or islands of the deposited material, where defects in the surface often act as nucleation centers. An alternate configuration is reported. Afterwards the vapor deposition of Fe on the In2O3(111) surface at room temperature, ordered adatoms are observed with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These are identical to the In adatoms that form when the sample is reduced by heating in ultrahigh vacuum. Our density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirm that Fe interchanges with In in the topmost layer, pushing the excess In atoms to the surface where they arrange asmore » a well-ordered adatom array.« less

  16. Theoretical probing of inelastic spin-excitations in adatoms on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Samir; Schweflinghaus, Benedikt; Dias, Manuel dos Santos; Bouhassoune, Mohammed; Muniz, Roberto B.; Costa, Antonio T.

    2014-12-01

    We review our recent work on the simulation, description and prediction of spin-excitations in adatoms and dimers deposited on metallic surfaces. This work done together with Douglas L. Mills, is an extension of his seminal contribution (with Pascal Lederer) published 50 years ago on the spin-dynamics of transition metal impurities embedded in transition metal hosts [Lederer et al. (1967)]. The main predictions of his model were verified experimentally with state of the art inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy on adatoms. Our formalism, presented in this review, is based on time-dependent density functional theory, combined with the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method. Comparison to experiments is shown and discussed in detail. Our scheme enables the description and prediction of the main characteristics of these excitations, i.e. their resonance frequency, their lifetime and their behavior upon application of external perturbations such as a magnetic field.

  17. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance effect of single adatoms on a noncollinear magnetic surface.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Nuala M; Schröder, Silke; Ferriani, Paolo; Heinze, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    The tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) effect demonstrates the sensitivity of spin-polarized electron transport to the orientation of the magnetization with respect to the crystallographic axes. As the TAMR effect requires only a single magnetic electrode, in contrast to the tunneling magnetoresistance effect, it offers an attractive route to alternative spintronic applications. In this work we consider the TAMR effect at the single-atom limit by investigating the anisotropy of the local density of states (LDOS) in the vacuum above transition-metal adatoms adsorbed on a noncollinear magnetic surface, the monolayer of Mn on W(1 1 0). This surface presents a cycloidal spin spiral ground state with an angle of 173° between neighboring spins and thus allows a quasi-continuous exploration of the angular dependence of the TAMR of adsorbed adatoms using scanning tunneling microscopy. Using first-principle calculations, we investigate the TAMR of Co, Rh and Ir adatoms on Mn/W(1 1 0) and relate our results to the magnetization-direction-dependent changes in the LDOS. The anisotropic effect is found to be enhanced dramatically on the adsorption of heavy transition-metal atoms, with values of up to 50% predicted from our calculations. This effect will be measurable even with a non-magnetic STM tip.

  18. A local view of bonding and diffusion at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.

    1996-09-01

    First-principles density functional calculations and corresponding experimental results underline the importance of basic chemical concepts, such as coordination, valence saturation and promotion-hybridization energetics, in understanding bonding and diffusion of atoms at and on metal surfaces. Several examples are reviewed, including outer-layer relaxations of clean hcp(0001) surfaces, liquid-metal-embrittlement energetics, separation energies of metal-adatom dimers, concerted substitutional self-diffusion on fcc(001) surfaces, and adsorption and diffusion barrier sites for adatoms near steps.

  19. Effect of adatom deposition on surface magnetism and exchange coupling parameter in (0001) SmCo{sub 5} slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Chandrasekaran, S.; Murugan, P.; Saravanan, P.; Kamat, S. V.

    2015-04-07

    First principles calculations are performed on 3d-transition metal atom deposited (0001) surface of SmCo{sub 5} to understand the magnetic properties and the improvement of Curie temperature (T{sub c}). Various atomic sites are examined to identify the energetically feasible adsorption of adatom and it is found that the void site of Co-rich (0001) SmCo{sub 5} surface is the most favourable one to deposit. The surface magnetic moments of various adatom deposited SmCo{sub 5} surfaces are larger than the clean surface except for Cu and Zn. Eventually, the surface exchange coupling of clean and adatom deposited surface is found to increase for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu deposited surfaces and this improvement results in the increase in T{sub c} of SmCo{sub 5} slab.

  20. Migration characterization of Ga and In adatoms on dielectric surface in selective MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Jie; Han, Xiao-Biao; Lin, Jia-Li; Hu, Guo-Heng; Liu, Ming-Gang; Yang, Yi-Bin; Chen, Jie; Wu, Zhi-Sheng; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Bai-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Migration characterizations of Ga and In adatoms on the dielectric surface in selective metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) were investigated. In the typical MOVPE environment, the selectivity of growth is preserved for GaN, and the growth rate of GaN micro-pyramids is sensitive to the period of the patterned SiO2 mask. A surface migration induced model was adopted to figure out the effective migration length of Ga adatoms on the dielectric surface. Different from the growth of GaN, the selective area growth of InGaN on the patterned template would induce the deposition of InGaN polycrystalline particles on the patterned SiO2 mask with a long period. It was demonstrated with a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy that the In adatoms exhibit a shorter migration length on the dielectric surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274039 and 51177175), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB301903), the Ph.D. Programs Foundation of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20110171110021), the International Sci. & Tech. Collaboration Program of China (Grant No. 2012DFG52260), the International Sci. & Tech. Collaboration Program of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B051000041), the Science and Technology Plan of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B010401013), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA032606), and the Opened Fund of the State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, China (Grant No. IOSKL2014KF17).

  1. Effect of a surface Al adatom on the resonant charge transfer between an H - ion and an Al( 1 1 1 ) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. A. M. C.; Wolfgang, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Gauyacq, J. P.; Nordlander, P.; Teillet-Billy, D.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents an investigation of how the charge transfer between an H - ion and an Al surface is influenced by the presence of a point defect on the surface. We consider the case of a single Al adatom on an Al(1 1 1) metal surface, and we study the resonant charge transfer process when the projectile is in the vicinity of the adatom. The adatom-induced electron potential is calculated using a density functional method. The coupled angular mode method is used to determine the shift and broadening of the H - level. The results show that the Al adatom introduces an attractive potential which, at large H --metal distances, causes a downward shift of the H - level and an increase of its width. At close distances, the calculation also shows a strong coupling between the H - ion level and the Al(3p) and Al(3s) resonances located on the adatom. A diabatic modeling including the effect of the mixing of the projectile and adatom levels is developed which allows the discussion of the non-adiabatic transitions between projectile and adatom-localised levels when the H - passes through the region near the adatom.

  2. Imaging and manipulation of adatoms on an alumina surface by noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Simon, G H; Heyde, M; Freund, H-J

    2012-02-29

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) has been performed on an aluminum oxide film grown on NiAl(110) in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) at low temperature (5 K). Results reproduce the topography of the structural model, unlike scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) images. Equipped with this extraordinary contrast the network of extended defects, which stems from domain boundaries intersecting the film surface, can be analysed in atomic detail. The knowledge of occurring surface structures opens up the opportunity to determine adsorption sites of individual adsorbates on the alumina film. The level of difficulty for such imaging depends on the imaging characteristics of the substrate and the interaction which can be maintained above the adsorbate. Positions of single adsorbed gold atoms within the unit cell have been determined despite their easy removal at slightly higher interaction strength. Preliminary manipulation experiments indicate a pick-up process for the vanishing of the gold adatoms from the film surface.

  3. New adatom model for Si(11) 7X7 and Si(111)Ge 5X5 reconstructed surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadi, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A new adatom model differing from the conventional model by a reconstruction of the substrate is proposed. The new adatom structure provides an explanation for the 7x7 and 5x5 size of the unit cells seen on annealed Si(111) and Si(111)-Ge surfaces, respectively. The model is consistent with structural information from vacuum-tunneling microscopy. It also provides simple explanations for stacking-fault-type features expected from Rutherford backscattering experiments and for similarities in the LEED and photoemission spectra of 2x1 and 7x7 surfaces.

  4. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with enhanced orbital moments of Fe adatoms on a topological surface of Bi2Se3.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mao; Kuroda, Kenta; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Okamoto, Kazuaki; Zhu, Si-Yuan; Shirai, Kaito; Miyamoto, Koji; Arita, Masashi; Nakatake, Masashi; Okuda, Taichi; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Kimura, Akio

    2013-06-12

    We have found a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of iron adatoms on a surface of the prototypical three-dimensional topological insulator Bi2Se3 by using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements. The orbital magnetic moment of Fe is strongly enhanced at lower coverage, where angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy shows coexistence of non-trivial topological states at the surface.

  5. Hybridization of phenylthiolate- and methylthiolate-adatom species at low coverage on the Au(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymovych, Petro; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2013-04-02

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy we observed reaction products of two chemisorbed thiolate species, methylthiolate and phenylthiolate, on the Au(111) surface. Despite the apparent stability, organometallic complexes of methyl- and phenylthiolate with the gold-adatom (RS-Au-SR, with R as the hydrocarbon group) undergo a stoichiometric exchange reaction, forming hybridized CH{sub 3}S-Au-SPh complexes. Complementary density functional theory calculations suggest that the reaction is most likely mediated by a monothiolate RS-Au complex bonded to the gold surface, which forms a trithiolate RS-Au-(SR)-Au-SR complex as a key intermediate. This work therefore reveals the novel chemical reactivity of the low-coverage “striped” phase of alkanethiols on gold and strongly points to the involvement of monoadatom thiolate intermediates in this reaction. By extension, such intermediates may be involved in the self-assembly process itself, shedding new light on this long-standing problem.

  6. The crossover from collective motion to periphery diffusion for two-dimensional adatom-islands on Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Karim, Altaf; Kara, Abdelkader; Trushin, Oleg; Rahman, Talat S

    2011-11-23

    The diffusion of two-dimensional adatom-islands (up to 100 atoms) on Cu(111) has been studied, using the self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo method (Trushin et al 2005 Phys. Rev. B 72 115401). A variety of multiple- and single-atom processes are revealed in the simulations, and the size dependences of the diffusion coefficients and effective diffusion barriers are calculated for each. From the tabulated frequencies of events found in the simulation, we show a crossover from diffusion due to the collective motion of the island to a regime in which the island diffuses through periphery-dominated mass transport. This crossover occurs for island sizes between 13 and 19 atoms. For islands containing 19-100 atoms the scaling exponent is 1.5, which is in good agreement with previous work. The diffusion of islands containing 2-13 atoms can be explained primarily on the basis of a linear increase of the barrier for the collective motion with the size of the island.

  7. Stabilizing Single Ni Adatoms on a Two-Dimensional Porous Titania Overlayer at the SrTiO3(110) Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nickel vapor-deposited on the SrTiO3(110) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy, photoemission spectroscopy (PES), and density functional theory calculations. This surface forms a (4 × 1) reconstruction, composed of a 2-D titania structure with periodic six- and ten-membered nanopores. Anchored at these nanopores, Ni single adatoms are stabilized at room temperature. PES measurements show that the Ni adatoms create an in-gap state located at 1.9 eV below the conduction band minimum and induce an upward band bending. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that Ni adatoms are positively charged. Our study produces well-dispersed single-adatom arrays on a well-characterized oxide support, providing a model system to investigate single-adatom catalytic and magnetic properties. PMID:25177410

  8. Control of selectivity in allylic alcohol oxidation on gold surfaces: the role of oxygen adatoms and hydroxyl species.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Gregory M; Zhang, Liang; Evans, Edward J; Yan, Ting; Henkelman, Graeme; Mullins, C Buddie

    2015-02-14

    Gold catalysts display high activity and good selectivity for partial oxidation of a number of alcohol species. In this work, we discuss the effects of oxygen adatoms and surface hydroxyls on the selectivity for oxidation of allylic alcohols (allyl alcohol and crotyl alcohol) on gold surfaces. Utilizing temperature programmed desorption (TPD), reactive molecular beam scattering (RMBS), and density functional theory (DFT) techniques, we provide evidence to suggest that the selectivity displayed towards partial oxidation versus combustion pathways is dependent on the type of oxidant species present on the gold surface. TPD and RMBS results suggest that surface hydroxyls promote partial oxidation of allylic alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes with very high selectivity, while oxygen adatoms promote both partial oxidation and combustion pathways. DFT calculations indicate that oxygen adatoms can react with acrolein to promote the formation of a bidentate surface intermediate, similar to structures that have been shown to decompose to generate combustion products over other transition metal surfaces. Surface hydroxyls do not readily promote such a process. Our results help explain phenomena observed in previous studies and may prove useful in the design of future catalysts for partial oxidation of alcohols.

  9. Correlated adatom trimer on a metal surface: a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Savkin, V V; Rubtsov, A N; Katsnelson, M I; Lichtenstein, A I

    2005-01-21

    The problem of three interacting Kondo impurities is solved within a numerically exact continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo scheme. A suppression of the Kondo resonance by interatomic exchange interactions for different cluster geometries is investigated. It is shown that a drastic difference between the Heisenberg and Ising cases appears for antiferromagnetically coupled adatoms. The effects of magnetic frustrations in the adatom trimer are investigated, and possible connections with available experimental data are discussed.

  10. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  11. Surface alloy formation of noble adatoms adsorbed on Si(111)-\\sqrt {3}\\times \\sqrt {3} -Pb surface: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chong; Wang, Fei; Sun, Q.; Jia, Yu

    2011-07-01

    The geometric structures, stability and electronic properties of initial stages of surface alloy formation for noble atoms adsorbed on Si(111)-\\sqrt {3}\\times \\sqrt {3} -Pb surfaces have been comparatively and extensively studied by using first-principles calculations within density functional theory. Our results revealed that an Au trimer rather than a tetramer adsorption induces a surface alloy by combining with Pb atoms in covalent bonds, exhibiting semiconducting characteristics due to the localization of surface states. The stability of the two-dimensional (2D) surface alloy obeys the Hume-Rothery rule. The electronic structures of the 2D surface alloy are sensitive to the number of Au adatoms and can be modulated by the quantity of Au adatoms. Unlike the Au atoms, our further calculations indicated that adsorption of Ag or Cu atoms on the surface cannot form a surface alloy with Pb atoms in the surface layer due to a weaker interaction or smaller radius.

  12. Oxidation mechanism of formic acid on the bismuth adatom-modified Pt(111) surface.

    PubMed

    Perales-Rondón, Juan Victor; Ferre-Vilaplana, Adolfo; Feliu, Juan M; Herrero, Enrique

    2014-09-24

    In order to improve catalytic processes, elucidation of reaction mechanisms is essential. Here, supported by a combination of experimental and computational results, the oxidation mechanism of formic acid on Pt(111) electrodes modified by the incorporation of bismuth adatoms is revealed. In the proposed model, formic acid is first physisorbed on bismuth and then deprotonated and chemisorbed in formate form, also on bismuth, from which configuration the C-H bond is cleaved, on a neighbor Pt site, yielding CO2. It was found computationally that the activation energy for the C-H bond cleavage step is negligible, which was also verified experimentally.

  13. A density functional theory study of uranium-doped thoria and uranium adatoms on the major surfaces of thorium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Ashley E.; Santos-Carballal, David; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2016-05-01

    Thorium dioxide is of significant research interest for its use as a nuclear fuel, particularly as part of mixed oxide fuels. We present the results of a density functional theory (DFT) study of uranium-substituted thorium dioxide, where we found that increasing levels of uranium substitution increases the covalent nature of the bonding in the bulk ThO2 crystal. Three low Miller index surfaces have been simulated and we propose the Wulff morphology for a ThO2 particle and STM images for the (100), (110), and (111) surfaces studied in this work. We have also calculated the adsorption of a uranium atom and the U adatom is found to absorb strongly on all three surfaces, with particular preference for the less stable (100) and (110) surfaces, thus providing a route to the incorporation of uranium into a growing thoria particle.

  14. Pattern formation in the instability of a vicinal surface by the drift of adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masahide; Uwaha, Makio

    1999-12-01

    We study the behavior of steps in a vicinal face with drift of adsorbed atoms (adatoms) by an external field. When the drift is in the downhill direction and its velocity exceeds critical values, vxc and vyc, the vicinal face is linearly unstable to long-wavelength fluctuations parallel and/or perpendicular to the steps. By taking the continuum limit of the step-flow model, we derive an anisotropic Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with propagative terms, which describes the motion of an unstable vicinal face. Its numerical solution shows ripples or a zigzag pattern expected from the linear analysis. Nonlinearity becomes important in the late stage and, depending on the condition, various patterns are formed: regular step bunches, a hill and valley structure tilted from the initial step direction, mounds, and a chaotic pattern.

  15. Two mechanisms forming a comblike step pattern induced by a moving linear adatom source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masahide; Miura, Hitoshi; Uwaha, Makio

    2017-03-01

    We carry out phase field simulations to study properties of the comblike step patterns induced by an adatom source. When an adatom source advances right in front of a step, step wandering is caused by the asymmetry of the surface diffusion field and small protrusions are formed. If the velocity of the source Vp is smaller than a critical value Vpc, the protrusions follow the adatom source with coarsening of the step pattern, and a regular comblike pattern with finger-like protrusions is formed. With a sufficiently small Vp, the gap of the supersaturation is large at the adatom source. Since the period of protrusions, Λ , decreases with increasing Vp, the coarsening of step pattern is irrelevant for the protrusions to catch up with the adatom source. Near Vpc, the gap of the supersaturation at the adatom source is small. Taking account of the increase in Λ with increasing Vp, the coarsening of the step pattern is essential for the protrusions to follow the adatom source.

  16. Permeability and kinetic coefficients for mesoscale BCF surface step dynamics: Discrete two-dimensional deposition-diffusion equation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Renjie; Evans, James W.; Oliveira, Tiago J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, a discrete version of deposition-diffusion equations appropriate for description of step flow on a vicinal surface is analyzed for a two-dimensional grid of adsorption sites representing the stepped surface and explicitly incorporating kinks along the step edges. Model energetics and kinetics appropriately account for binding of adatoms at steps and kinks, distinct terrace and edge diffusion rates, and possible additional barriers for attachment to steps. Analysis of adatom attachment fluxes as well as limiting values of adatom densities at step edges for nonuniform deposition scenarios allows determination of both permeability and kinetic coefficients. Behavior of these quantities is assessed as a function of key system parameters including kink density, step attachment barriers, and the step edge diffusion rate.

  17. Permeability and kinetic coefficients for mesoscale BCF surface step dynamics: Discrete two-dimensional deposition-diffusion equation analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Renjie; Evans, James W.; Oliveira, Tiago J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, a discrete version of deposition-diffusion equations appropriate for description of step flow on a vicinal surface is analyzed for a two-dimensional grid of adsorption sites representing the stepped surface and explicitly incorporating kinks along the step edges. Model energetics and kinetics appropriately account for binding of adatoms at steps and kinks, distinct terrace and edge diffusion rates, and possible additional barriers for attachment to steps. Analysis of adatom attachment fluxes as well as limiting values of adatom densities at step edges for nonuniform deposition scenarios allows determination of both permeability and kinetic coefficients. Behavior of these quantities is assessedmore » as a function of key system parameters including kink density, step attachment barriers, and the step edge diffusion rate.« less

  18. Adsorption and diffusion of Mg, O, and O2 on the MgO(001) flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geneste, Grégory; Morillo, Joseph; Finocchi, Fabio

    2005-05-01

    A thorough investigation of the adsorption and diffusion of Mg, O, and O2 on MgO(001) terraces is performed by first-principles calculations. The single Mg adatom weakly binds to surface oxygens, diffuses, and evaporates easily at room temperatures. Atomic O strongly binds to surface oxygens, forming peroxide groups. The diffusion of the O adatom is strongly influenced by the spin polarization, since energy barriers are significantly different for the singlet and triplet states. The crossing of the two Born-Oppenheimer surfaces corresponding to the distinct spin states is also analyzed. Although the O2 molecule does not stick to the perfect surface, it chemisorbs on surface nonstoichiometric point defects such as O vacancies or Mg adatoms, forming in the latter case new chemical species on the surface. We show that the oxidation rate limiting factor in an O2 atmosphere is the concentration of point defects (O vacancies and Mg adatoms) in the growing surface. The simulated O core-level shifts for the various adsorption configurations enable a meaningful comparison with the measured values, suggesting the presence of peroxide ions on growing surfaces. Finally, the computed energy barriers are used to estimate the Mg and O surface lifetimes and diffusion lengths, and some implications for the homoepitaxial growth of MgO are discussed.

  19. Atomic arrangement of alkali adatoms on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Blügel, S.; Ishida, H.; Terakura, K.

    1991-02-01

    Adsorption sites of Na and Li on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface at the saturation coverage are determined theoretically by using the simulated annealing method proposed by Williams and Soler. For Na, the most stable configuration is the combination of the hollow site along the dimer chain and the trough site on top of the third layer Si atom in contradiction to an earlier calculation. The substrate relaxation is a crucial factor for stabilizing this configuration. On the other hand Li atoms are adsorbed at low symmetry positions. For both of Na and Li, we observe a significant movement of the substrate atoms towards the ideal surface configuration.

  20. Hybridization of Phenylthiolate- and Methylthiolate-Adatom Species at Low Coverage on the Au(111) Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-07

    ACRONYM(S) ARO 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER John Yates Petro Maksymovych, Dan C... person shall be subject to any oenalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number...precursor molecules were deposited onto a clean Au(111) surface held at ∼70 K. Dissociation of the parent molecules and subsequent self-assembly of

  1. Conformational adaptation and selective adatom capturing of tetrapyridyl-porphyrin molecules on a copper (111) surface.

    PubMed

    Auwärter, Willi; Klappenberger, Florian; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Schiffrin, Agustin; Strunskus, Thomas; Wöll, Christof; Pennec, Yan; Riemann, Andreas; Barth, Johannes V

    2007-09-12

    We present a combined low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure study on the interaction of tetrapyridyl-porphyrin (TPyP) molecules with a Cu(111) surface. A novel approach using data from complementary experimental techniques and charge density calculations allows us to determine the adsorption geometry of TPyP on Cu(111). The molecules are centered on "bridge" sites of the substrate lattice and exhibit a strong deformation involving a saddle-shaped macrocycle distortion as well as considerable rotation and tilting of the meso-substituents. We propose a bonding mechanism based on the pyridyl-surface interaction, which mediates the molecular deformation upon adsorption. Accordingly, a functionalization by pyridyl groups opens up pathways to control the anchoring of large organic molecules on metal surfaces and tune their conformational state. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the affinity of the terminal groups for metal centers permits the selective capture of individual iron atoms at low temperature.

  2. Atomic diffusion on vicinal surfaces: step roughening impact on step permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranguelov, B.; Michailov, M.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of mass transport in material science for systems with reduced dimensionality holds special academic and technological attention since the fine diffusion control of adatoms could initiate exotic nanoscale patterning at epitaxial interfaces. The present study brings out important details of the atomic diffusion mechanisms on vicinal surfaces, accounting for the subtle competition between an external field imposed on the migrating adatoms and the roughening of the steps bordering the atomic terraces. The computational model reveals a temperature gap for breakdown of step permeability in the vicinity of the step roughening transition and sheds light on recently observed experimental results for atomic step dynamics on Si surfaces. The present study also demonstrates the extended capability of atomistic models in computer simulations to unravel simultaneous effects, to distinguish between them, and finally to assess their specific contribution to experimentally observed complex physical phenomena.

  3. A computational ab initio study of surface diffusion of sulfur on the CdTe (111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ebadollah; Ghaisas, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    In order to discern the formation of epitaxial growth of CdS shell over CdTe nanocrystals, kinetics related to the initial stages of the growth of CdS on CdTe is investigated using ab-initio methods. We report diffusion of sulfur adatom on the CdTe (111) A-type (Cd-terminated) and B-type (Te-terminated) surfaces within the density functional theory (DFT). The barriers are computed by applying the climbing Nudge Elastic Band (c-NEB) method. From the results surface hopping emerges as the major mode of diffusion. In addition, there is a distinct contribution from kick-out type diffusion in which a CdTe surface atom is kicked out from its position and is replaced by the diffusing sulfur atom. Also, surface vacancy substitution contributes to the concomitant dynamics. There are sites on the B- type surface that are competitively close in terms of the binding energy to the lowest energy site of epitaxy on the surface. The kick-out process is more likely for B-type surface where a Te atom of the surface is displaced by a sulfur adatom. Further, on the B-type surface, subsurface migration of sulfur is indicated. Furthermore, the binding energies of S on CdTe reveal that on the A-type surface, epitaxial sites provide relatively higher binding energies and barriers than on B-type.

  4. Interaction of cesium adatoms with free-standing graphene and graphene-veiled SiO2 surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2015-04-21

    In this study, the interaction of Cs adatoms with mono- or bi-layered graphene (MLG and BLG), either free-standing or on a SiO2 substrate, was investigated using density functional theory. The most stable adsorption sites for Cs are found to be hollow sites on both graphene sheets and graphene-veiled SiO2(0001). In addition, larger dipole moments are created when a MLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate is used for adsorption of Cs atoms compared to the adsorption on free-standing MLG, due to charge transfer occurring between the MLG and the SiO2 substrate. For the adsorption of Cs on BLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate, these differences are smoothed out and the binding energies corresponding to different sites are nearly degenerate; smaller dipole moments created by the Cs adatoms on BLG compared to MLG are also predicted.

  5. Interaction of cesium adatoms with free-standing graphene and graphene-veiled SiO2 surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2015-04-21

    In this study, the interaction of Cs adatoms with mono- or bi-layered graphene (MLG and BLG), either free-standing or on a SiO2 substrate, was investigated using density functional theory. The most stable adsorption sites for Cs are found to be hollow sites on both graphene sheets and graphene-veiled SiO2(0001). In addition, larger dipole moments are created when a MLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate is used for adsorption of Cs atoms compared to the adsorption on free-standing MLG, due to charge transfer occurring between the MLG and the SiO2 substrate. For the adsorption of Cs on BLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate, these differences are smoothedmore » out and the binding energies corresponding to different sites are nearly degenerate; smaller dipole moments created by the Cs adatoms on BLG compared to MLG are also predicted.« less

  6. Combined ab initio and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of C diffusion on the √(3)×√(3) β-SiC (111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M. C.; Pignedoli, C. A.; di Felice, R.; Bertoni, C. M.; Catellani, A.

    2005-02-01

    We investigate the kinetic behavior of a single C adatom on the 3×3 β-SiC(111) surface by means of combined ab initio and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. After identifying the metastable binding locations, we calculate the energy barriers the adatom must overcome when jumping among them. The presence of the 3×3 reconstruction creates considerable differences among the diffusion mechanisms that can be thermally activated. This has important implications for the C mobility on the surface, and therefore for SiC growth. The kinetic simulation at realistic temperatures and time scales revealed that C diffusion occurs mostly around the Si adatoms forming the 3×3 reconstruction. A reduced adatom mobility, as observed in many studies of surfactant-mediated growth, can favor the formation of a high density of nuclei, and thus promote a layer-by-layer growth. As a further result of the kinetic simulation we obtained the adatom diffusion coefficient, a macroscopic quantity accessible in experiments.

  7. Dioxygen molecule adsorption and oxygen atom diffusion on clean and defective aluminum(111) surface using first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiltat, Mathilde; Brut, Marie; Vizzini, Sébastien; Hémeryck, Anne

    2017-03-01

    First principles calculations are conducted to investigate kinetic behavior of oxygen species at the surface of clean and defective Al(111) substrate. Oxygen island, aluminum vacancy, aluminum sub-vacancy, aluminum ad-atom and aluminum terraces defects are addressed. Adsorption of oxygen molecule is first performed on all these systems resulting in dissociated oxygen atoms in main cases. The obtained adsorbed configurations are then picked to study the behavior of atomic oxygen specie and get a detailed understanding on the effect of the local environment on the ability of the oxygen atom to diffuse on the surface. We pointed out that local environment impacts energetics of oxygen atom diffusion. Close packed oxygen island, sub-vacancy and ad-atoms favor oxygen atom stability and decrease mobility of oxygen atom on the surface, to be seen as surface area for further nucleation of oxygen island.

  8. Intermixed adatom and surface-bound adsorbates in regular self-assembled monolayers of racemic 2-butanethiol on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Runhai; Yan, Jiawei; Jensen, Palle S; Ascic, Erhad; Gan, Shiyu; Tanner, David; Mao, Bingwei; Niu, Li; Zhang, Jingdong; Tang, Chunguang; Hush, Noel S; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Ulstrup, Jens

    2015-04-07

    In situ scanning tunneling microscopy combined with density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations reveal a complex structure for the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of racemic 2-butanethiol on Au(111) in aqueous solution. Six adsorbate molecules occupy a (10×√3)R30° cell organized as two RSAuSR adatom-bound motifs plus two RS species bound directly to face-centered-cubic and hexagonally close-packed sites. This is the first time that these competing head-group arrangements have been observed in the same ordered SAM. Such unusual packing is favored as it facilitates SAMs with anomalously high coverage (30%), much larger than that for enantiomerically resolved 2-butanethiol or secondary-branched butanethiol (25%) and near that for linear-chain 1-butanethiol (33%).

  9. Computer simulation of surface and adatom properties of Lennard-Jones solids: A comparison between face-centered-cubic and hexagonal-close-packed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasi, Sweta; Khomami, Bamin; Lovett, Ronald

    2001-04-01

    We introduce a new molecular dynamics simulation path to easily calculate solid-vapor surface free energies. The method is illustrated with explicit calculations of the surface free energies of a face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystal (the [110], [111], and [100] surfaces) and a hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) crystal (the [111] surface) of Lennard-Jones atoms. We verify that, because of the reduced symmetry at interfaces, simulation of the surface structure and free energy requires a large cutoff distance for the range of the pair potential. To estimate when a growing crystal resolves the fcc/hcp structural ambiguity, we observe the binding free energy and dynamics of clusters of adatoms on [111] surfaces of fcc and hcp crystals. A structural distinction only appears when clusters become large enough that their slow translational motion allows a structural relaxation of the crystal's surface. From the observed distribution over cluster structures we deduce thermodynamic parameters that can be used to model the equilibrium between fcc-like clusters and hcp-like clusters on [111] surfaces and the rate of transformation between these.

  10. Transition metals on the (0001) surface of graphite: Fundamental aspects of adsorption, diffusion, and morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W; Thiel, Patricia A

    2014-08-01

    In this article, we review basic information about the interaction of transition metal atoms with the (0 0 0 1) surface of graphite, especially fundamental phenomena related to growth. Those phenomena involve adatom-surface bonding, diffusion, morphology of metal clusters, interactions with steps and sputter-induced defects, condensation, and desorption. General traits emerge which have not been summarized previously. Some of these features are rather surprising when compared with metal-on-metal adsorption and growth. Opportunities for future work are pointed out.

  11. Surface self-diffusion of organic glasses.

    PubMed

    Brian, Caleb W; Yu, Lian

    2013-12-19

    Surface self-diffusion coefficients have been determined for the organic glass Nifedipine using the method of surface grating decay. The flattening of 1000 nm surface gratings occurs by viscous flow at 12 K or more above the glass transition temperature and by surface diffusion at lower temperatures. Surface diffusion is at least 10(7) times faster than bulk diffusion, indicating a highly mobile surface. Nifedipine glasses have faster surface diffusion than the previously studied Indomethacin glasses, despite their similar bulk relaxation times. Both glasses exhibit fast surface crystal growth, and its rate scales with surface diffusivity. The observed rate of surface diffusion implies substantial surface rearrangement during the preparation of low-energy glasses by vapor deposition. The Random First Order Transition Theory and the Coupling Model successfully predict the large surface-enhancement of mobility and its increase on cooling, but disagree with the experimental observation of the faster surface diffusion of Nifedipine.

  12. Experiments on individual alumina-supported adatoms and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilius, N.; Cörper, A.; Bozdech, G.; Ernst, N.; Freund, H.-J.

    2001-08-01

    To contribute to an understanding of growth conditions and electronic properties of metal clusters on technologically relevant oxides we have examined the mobility of individual, alumina-supported Pt-adatoms and the optical properties of single supported Ag-clusters. Using field-ion microscopy (FIM) we have prepared and imaged an individual Pt-adatom at approximately 40 K, both on the apex plane of a [1 1 0]-oriented NiAl tip and on a thin alumina film, grown on the same NiAl specimen by oxidation. On the alumina film, the onset temperature for Pt surface diffusion approaches 100 K being distinctively lower than the value 165 K measured on NiAl(1 1 0). Employing the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) as a local electron source, photon emission from individual, alumina-supported Ag-clusters was spectroscopically analyzed. The occurrence of a distinct emission line is explained by the decay of a collective electron oscillation (Mie-plasmon resonance). For decreasing Ag-cluster diameter, the emission lines (i) shift to higher energies and (ii) their widths increase. To explain these observations, we discuss (i) the reduced screening of the plasmon oscillation due to the Ag 4d electrons and (ii) an enhanced electron surface scattering rate in small clusters.

  13. Well-Ordered In Adatoms at the In2O3(111) Surface Created by Fe Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Margareta; Lackner, Peter; Seiler, Steffen; Gerhold, Stefan; Osiecki, Jacek; Schulte, Karina; Boatner, Lynn A.; Schmid, Michael; Meyer, Bernd; Diebold, Ulrike

    2016-11-11

    Metal deposition on oxide surfaces usually results in adatoms, clusters, or islands of the deposited material, where defects in the surface often act as nucleation centers. An alternate configuration is reported. Afterwards the vapor deposition of Fe on the In2O3(111) surface at room temperature, ordered adatoms are observed with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These are identical to the In adatoms that form when the sample is reduced by heating in ultrahigh vacuum. Our density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirm that Fe interchanges with In in the topmost layer, pushing the excess In atoms to the surface where they arrange as a well-ordered adatom array.

  14. Ion-assisted precursor dissociation and surface diffusion: Enabling rapid, low-temperature growth of carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denysenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.

    2007-06-01

    Growth kinetics of carbon nanofibers in a hydrocarbon plasma is studied. In addition to gas-phase and surface processes common to chemical vapor deposition, the model includes (unique to plasma-exposed catalyst surfaces) ion-induced dissociation of hydrocarbons, interaction of adsorbed species with incoming hydrogen atoms, and dissociation of hydrocarbon ions. It is shown that at low, nanodevice-friendly process temperatures the nanofibers grow via surface diffusion of carbon adatoms produced on the catalyst particle via ion-induced dissociation of a hydrocarbon precursor. These results explain a lower activation energy of nanofiber growth in a plasma and can be used for the synthesis of other nanoassemblies.

  15. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; ...

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  16. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective mass transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.

  17. A Theoretical Study of Bulk and Surface Diffusion Processes for Semiconductor Materials Using First Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehl, Jason L.

    Diffusion of point defects on crystalline surfaces and in their bulk is an important and ubiquitous phenomenon affecting film quality, electronic properties and device functionality. A complete understanding of these diffusion processes enables one to predict and then control those processes. Such understanding includes knowledge of the structural, energetic and electronic properties of these native and non-native point defect diffusion processes. Direct experimental observation of the phenomenon is difficult and microscopic theories of diffusion mechanisms and pathways abound. Thus, knowing the nature of diffusion processes, of specific point defects in given materials, has been a challenging task for analytical theory as well as experiment. The recent advances in computing technology have been a catalyst for the rise of a third mode of investigation. The advent of tremendous computing power, breakthroughs in algorithmic development in computational applications of electronic density functional theory now enables direct computation of the diffusion process. This thesis demonstrates such a method applied to several different examples of point defect diffusion on the (001) surface of gallium arsenide (GaAs) and the bulk of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium sulfide (CdS). All results presented in this work are ab initio, total-energy pseudopotential calculations within the local density approximation to density-functional theory. Single particle wavefunctions were expanded in a plane-wave basis and reciprocal space k-point sampling was achieved by Monkhorst-Pack generated k-point grids. Both surface and bulk computations employed a supercell approach using periodic boundary conditions. Ga adatom adsorption and diffusion processes were studied on two reconstructions of the GaAs(001) surface including the c(4x4) and c(4x4)-heterodimer surface reconstructions. On the GaAs(001)- c(4x4) surface reconstruction, two distinct sets of minima and transition sites were

  18. Silicon adatom switching and manipulation on Si(111)-7 x 7.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, Keisuke; Luce, Alexander; Fujita, Daisuke

    2010-01-29

    We report on a multiple-state switching behavior in the tip height or tunneling current of scanning tunneling microscopy on the Si(111)-7 x 7 surface. This switching is caused by displacement of silicon adatoms under the influence of energetic tunneling electrons. When the tip is fixed over a center adatom, five well-defined levels appear in the measured tip height and tunneling current. These levels are attributed to different electronic structures, depending on the configuration of the center adatoms in the unit cell. We also demonstrate manipulations of the center adatoms by controlling the sample bias.

  19. Influence of the Si(111)-7 Multiplication-Sign 7 surface reconstruction on the diffusion of strontium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhachuk, R. A.; Teys, S. A.; Olshanetsky, B. Z.

    2011-12-15

    The diffusion of strontium atoms on the Si(111) surface at room temperature has been investigated using scanning tunnel microscopy and simulation carried out in terms of the density functional theory and the Monte Carlo method. It has been found that the reconstruction of a clean silicon surface with a 7 Multiplication-Sign 7 structure has a profound effect on the diffusion process. The average velocity of motion of a strontium atom in a unit cell of the 7 Multiplication-Sign 7 structure has been calculated. The main diffusion paths of a strontium atom and the corresponding activation energies have been determined. It has been demonstrated that the formation of scanning tunnel microscope images of the Si(111)-7 Multiplication-Sign 7 surface with adsorbed strontium atoms is significantly affected by the shift of the electron density from the strontium atom to the nearest neighbor silicon adatoms in the 7 Multiplication-Sign 7 structure.

  20. How a Nanodroplet Diffuses on Smooth Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chu; Huang, Jizu; Li, Zhigang

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigate how nanodroplets diffuse on smooth surfaces through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and theoretical analyses. The simulations results show that the surface diffusion of nanodroplet is different from that of single molecules and solid nanoparticles. The dependence of nanodroplet diffusion coefficient on temperature is surface wettability dependent, which undergoes a transition from linear to nonlinear as the surface wettability is weakened due to the coupling of temperature and surface energy. We also develop a simple relation for the diffusion coefficient by using the contact angle and contact radius of the droplet. It works well for different surface wettabilities and sized nanodroplets, as confirmed by MD simulations. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region under Grant No. 615312.

  1. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabishchenkova, A. G. Otrokov, M. M.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2015-09-15

    Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) step surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has been performed for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of diffusion of adatoms on the surface and in van der Waals gaps near steps, as well as the estimate of diffusion lengths, have shown that efficient intercalation through steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can occur before intercalation. The results have been discussed in the context of existing experimental data.

  2. Surface conservation laws at microscopically diffuse interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kevin T; Bazant, Martin Z

    2007-11-01

    In studies of interfaces with dynamic chemical composition, bulk and interfacial quantities are often coupled via surface conservation laws of excess surface quantities. While this approach is easily justified for microscopically sharp interfaces, its applicability in the context of microscopically diffuse interfaces is less theoretically well-established. Furthermore, surface conservation laws (and interfacial models in general) are often derived phenomenologically rather than systematically. In this article, we first provide a mathematically rigorous justification for surface conservation laws at diffuse interfaces based on an asymptotic analysis of transport processes in the boundary layer and derive general formulae for the surface and normal fluxes that appear in surface conservation laws. Next, we use nonequilibrium thermodynamics to formulate surface conservation laws in terms of chemical potentials and provide a method for systematically deriving the structure of the interfacial layer. Finally, we derive surface conservation laws for a few examples from diffusive and electrochemical transport.

  3. A study of surface diffusion with the scanning tunneling microscope from fluctuations of the tunneling current

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, Lozano

    1996-01-12

    The transport of atoms or molecules over surfaces has been an important area of study for several decades now, with its progress generally limited by the available experimental techniques to characterize the phenomena. A number of methods have been developed over the years to measure surface diffusion yet only very few systems have been characterized to this day mainly due to the physical limitations inherent in these available methods. Even the STM with its astonishing atomically-resolved images of the surface has been limited in terms of its capability to determine mass transport properties. This is because the STM is inherently a ``slow`` instrument, i.e., a finite time is needed for signal averaging in order to produce the image. A need exists for additional surface diffusion measurement techniques, ideally ones which are able to study varied systems and measure a wide range of diffusion rates. The STM (especially because of its highly local nature) presents itself as a promising tool to conduct dynamical studies if its poor time resolution during ``normal operation`` can somehow be overcome. The purpose of this dissertation is to introduce a new technique of using the STM to measure adatom mobility on surfaces -- one with a capacity to achieve excellent time resolution.

  4. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  5. Diffusion mediated localization on membrane surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Using the model of a cell membrane of a spherical surface in which membrane components may diffuse, the rate of localization due to trapping under diffusion control has been estimated by computing an analytical expression for the mean trapping time including the possibilities of a trapping probability less than one and/or the establishment of an equilibrium at the trap boundary.

  6. Atomistic simulation of the electronic states of adatoms in monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jiwon; Larentis, Stefano; Tutuc, Emanuel; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2014-04-07

    Using an ab initio density functional theory based electronic structure method, we study the effects of adatoms on the electronic properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide Molybdenum-disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). We consider the 1st (Li, Na, K) and 7th (F, Cl, Br) column atoms and metals (Sc, Ti, Ta, Mo, Pd, Pt, Ag, Au). Three high symmetry sites for the adatom on the surface of monolayer MoS{sub 2} are examined as starting points to search for the most energetically stable configuration for each adatom-monolayer MoS{sub 2} system, as well as the type of associated bonding. For the most stable adatom positions, we characterize the emergence of adatom-induced electronic states including any dopant states.

  7. Metal Adatoms and Clusters on Ultrathin Zirconia Films

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of transition metals on zirconia has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Since STM requires electrical conductivity, ultrathin ZrO2 films grown by oxidation of Pt3Zr(0001) and Pd3Zr(0001) were used as model systems. DFT studies were performed for single metal adatoms on supported ZrO2 films as well as the (1̅11) surface of monoclinic ZrO2. STM shows decreasing cluster size, indicative of increasing metal–oxide interaction, in the sequence Ag < Pd ≈ Au < Ni ≈ Fe. Ag and Pd nucleate mostly at steps and domain boundaries of ZrO2/Pt3Zr(0001) and form three-dimensional clusters. Deposition of low coverages of Ni and Fe at room temperature leads to a high density of few-atom clusters on the oxide terraces. Weak bonding of Ag to the oxide is demonstrated by removing Ag clusters with the STM tip. DFT calculations for single adatoms show that the metal–oxide interaction strength increases in the sequence Ag < Au < Pd < Ni on monoclinic ZrO2, and Ag ≈ Au < Pd < Ni on the supported ultrathin ZrO2 film. With the exception of Au, metal nucleation and growth on ultrathin zirconia films follow the usual rules: More reactive (more electropositive) metals result in a higher cluster density and wet the surface more strongly than more noble metals. These bind mainly to the oxygen anions of the oxide. Au is an exception because it can bind strongly to the Zr cations. Au diffusion may be impeded by changing its charge state between −1 and +1. We discuss differences between the supported ultrathin zirconia films and the surfaces of bulk ZrO2, such as the possibility of charge transfer to the substrate of the films. Due to their large in-plane lattice constant and the variety of adsorption sites, ZrO2{111} surfaces are more reactive than many other oxygen-terminated oxide surfaces. PMID:27213024

  8. Bidentate surface structures of glycylglycine on Si(111)7×7 by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy: site-specific adsorption via N-H and O-H or double N-H dissociation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A; Zhang, L; Leung, K T

    2012-08-28

    The early adsorption stage of glycylglycine on Si(111)7×7 surface has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Filled-state imaging shows that glycylglycine adsorbs dissociatively in a bidentate fashion on two adjacent Si adatoms across a dimer wall or an adatom-restatom pair, with the dissociated H atoms on neighboring restatoms. The present STM result validates our hypothesis that both bidentate configurations involving N-H and O-H dissociation and double N-H dissociation are equally probable. Our STM results further show that the relative surface concentrations of the five bidentate configurations follow a specific ordering. This suggests that N-H dissociation at a center adatom site would likely be followed by N-H dissociation at an adjacent restatom, while N-H dissociation at a corner adatom site would be succeeded by O-H dissociation at an adatom across the dimer wall. Evidently, the strong bidentate interactions also inhibit surface diffusion of the adsorbed glycylglycine fragment, and the adsorption apparently follows random sequential adsorption statistics. The random nature of adsorption is also supported by the similar relative occupancies of the center adatom and corner adatom sites, indicating that the relative reactivities of these adatom sites do not play a significant role. Our DFT computational study shows that all three bidentate (Si-)NHCH(2)CONHCH(2)COO(-Si) adatom-adatom configurations (center-center, corner-corner, center-corner) have similar adsorption energies for a double adatom-adatom pair across the dimer wall, while the (Si-)NHCH(2)CON(-Si)CH(2)COOH bidentate adatom-restatom configuration is energetically favorable. The free -CONH- and -COOH groups remaining on the respective bidentate adstructures could facilitate adsorption of the second adlayer through the formation of hydrogen bonding.

  9. Diffuse inelastic scattering of atoms from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J.R.; Celli, V.

    1989-02-15

    We consider the large-angle diffuse scattering of thermal-energy atoms by defects or adsorbates on a surface. We obtain the Debye-Waller factor for the thermal attenuation of the incoherent elastic peak. When the Debye exponent is small, the diffuse inelastic contribution is dominated by the single-phonon exchange, and is proportional to the frequency distribution function of the defect or adsorbate. We discuss its magnitude compared to the multiphonon background.

  10. Applicability of the Fokker-Planck equation to the description of diffusion effects on nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, M. V.; Dubinko, V. I.; Borodin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    The nucleation of islands in a supersaturated solution of surface adatoms is considered taking into account the possibility of diffusion profile formation in the island vicinity. It is shown that the treatment of diffusion-controlled cluster growth in terms of the Fokker-Planck equation is justified only provided certain restrictions are satisfied. First of all, the standard requirement that diffusion profiles of adatoms quickly adjust themselves to the actual island sizes (adiabatic principle) can be realized only for sufficiently high island concentration. The adiabatic principle is essential for the probabilities of adatom attachment to and detachment from island edges to be independent of the adatom diffusion profile establishment kinetics, justifying the island nucleation treatment as the Markovian stochastic process. Second, it is shown that the commonly used definition of the "diffusion" coefficient in the Fokker-Planck equation in terms of adatom attachment and detachment rates is justified only provided the attachment and detachment are statistically independent, which is generally not the case for the diffusion-limited growth of islands. We suggest a particular way to define the attachment and detachment rates that allows us to satisfy this requirement as well. When applied to the problem of surface island nucleation, our treatment predicts the steady-state nucleation barrier, which coincides with the conventional thermodynamic expression, even though no thermodynamic equilibrium is assumed and the adatom diffusion is treated explicitly. The effect of adatom diffusional profiles on the nucleation rate preexponential factor is also discussed. Monte Carlo simulation is employed to analyze the applicability domain of the Fokker-Planck equation and the diffusion effect beyond it. It is demonstrated that a diffusional cloud is slowing down the nucleation process for a given monomer interaction with the nucleus edge.

  11. Magnetic properties of iron adatoms and small iron clusters on Ag(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarovits, B.; Szunyogh, L.; Weinberger, P.

    2002-02-01

    A Green's function embedding technique based on the fully relativistic spin-polarized Screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method is used to calculate the electronic and magnetic properties of magnetic nanostructures. Strongly enhanced spin and orbital moments are obtained for an Fe adatom and for small clusters of Fe on a Ag(1 0 0) surface. As a consequence, for an Fe adatom a magnetic anisotropy energy is found that is about 10 times larger than for an Fe monolayer. Furthermore, the exchange coupling energy between two Fe adatoms is calculated in terms of the force theorem, showing a very rapid decay with increasing distance.

  12. Diffusion and Surface Reaction in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baiker, A.; Richarz, W.

    1978-01-01

    Ethylene hydrogenation on a platinum catalyst, electrolytically applied to a tube wall, is a good system for the study of the interactions between diffusion and surface reaction in heterogeneous catalysis. Theoretical background, apparatus, procedure, and student performance of this experiment are discussed. (BB)

  13. Sputtering at grazing ion incidence: Influence of adatom islands

    SciTech Connect

    Rosandi, Yudi; Redinger, Alex; Michely, Thomas; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2010-09-15

    When energetic ions impinge at grazing incidence onto an atomically flat terrace, they will not sputter. However, when adatom islands (containing N atoms) are deposited on the surface, they induce sputtering. We investigate this effect for the specific case of 83 deg. -incident 5 keV Ar ions on a Pt (111) surface by means of molecular-dynamics simulation and experiment. We find that - for constant coverage {Theta} - the sputter yield has a maximum at island sizes of N congruent with 10-20. A detailed picture explaining the decline of the sputter yield toward larger and smaller island sizes is worked out. Our simulation results are compared with dedicated sputtering experiments, in which a coverage of {Theta}=0.09 of Pt adatoms are deposited onto the Pt (111) surface and form islands with a broad distribution around a most probable size of N congruent with 20.

  14. Density functional calculation of transition metal adatom adsorption on graphene.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuliang; Yuan, Jianmei; Zhong, Jianxin

    2008-03-19

    The functionalization of graphene (a single graphite layer) by the addition of transition metal atoms of Mn, Fe and Co to its surface has been investigated computationally using density functional theory. In the calculation, the graphene surface supercell was constructed from a single layer of graphite (0001) surface separated by vertical vacuum layers 2 nm thick. We found that the center of the hexagonal ring formed by carbon from graphene is the most stable site for Mn, Fe, Co to stay after optimization. The calculated spin-polarized band structures of the graphene encapsulating the Mn adatom indicate that the conduction bands are modified and move down due to the coupling between the Mn atom and graphene. For Fe adsorbed on the graphene surface, it is semi-half-metallic, and the spin polarization P is found to be 100%. The system of Co adatom on graphene exhibits metallic electronic structure due to the density of states (DOS) peak at the band center with both majority and minority spins. Local density of states analyses indicate a larger promotion of 4s electrons into the 3d state in Fe and Co, resulting in lower local moments compared to an Mn adatom on the graphite surface.

  15. Diffusion of silver over atomically clean silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Ol'shanetskii, B. Z.

    2013-06-15

    The diffusion of silver the (111), (100), and (110) silicon surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. The mechanisms of diffusion over the (111) and (110) surfaces are revealed, and the temperature dependences of diffusion coefficients are measured. An anisotropy of silver diffusion over the (110) surface is detected.

  16. Numerical Computation of Diffusion on a Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Peter; Adalsteinsson, David; Colella, Phillip; Arkin, Adam Paul; Onsum, Matthew

    2005-02-24

    We present a numerical method for computing diffusive transport on a surface derived from image data. Our underlying discretization method uses a Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for computing the volume transport in region consisting of all points a small distance from the surface. We obtain a representation of this region from image data using a front propagation computation based on level set methods for solving the Hamilton-Jacobi and eikonal equations. We demonstrate that the method is second-order accurate in space and time, and is capable of computing solutions on complex surface geometries obtained from image data of cells.

  17. Surface diffusion of xenon on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, D. Laurence; George, Steven M.

    1993-06-01

    The surface diffusion of xenon on the Pt(111) surface was investigated using laser induced thermal desorption (LITD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. The surface diffusion coefficient at 80 K decreased dramatically from D=8×10-7 cm2/s at θ=0.05θs to approximately D=2×10-8 cm2/s at θ=θs, where θs denotes the saturation coverage at 85 K, corresponding to a commensurate monolayer coverage of 5.0×1014 xenon atoms/cm2. This coverage dependence was consistent with attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms and the existence of two-dimensional condensed phases of xenon on Pt(111). The kinetic parameters for surface diffusion at θ=θs were Edif=1.3±0.1 kcal/mol and D0=1.1×10-4±0.2 cm2/s. The magnitude of Edif at θ=θs represented the combined effect of the intrinsic corrugation of the adsorbate-surface potential and attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms. LITD experiments at θ=0.25 θs revealed diffusion kinetic parameters of Edif=1.2±0.2 kcal/mol and D0=3.4×10-4±0.5 cm2/s. The constant Edif at low and high coverage was attributed to the ``breakaway'' of xenon atoms from the edges of condensed phase xenon islands. The coverage dependence of the surface diffusion coefficient for Xe/Pt(111) was explained by a multiple site diffusion mechanism, where collisions with xenon islands limit diffusional motion. Thermal desorption kinetics for xenon on Pt(111) were determined using TPD experiments. Using the variation of heating rates method, the desorption parameters were Edes=6.6±0.2 kcal/mol and νdes=1.3×1013±0.4 s-1, in good agreement with previous studies. The xenon TPD peak shifted to higher temperature versus initial coverage at a fixed heating rate, providing further evidence for attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms.

  18. Surface metallization on Si(001) at elevated temperatures studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure: Effect of thermal adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, C.; Hwang, C. C.; Kang, T.-H.; Kim, K.-J.; Kim, B.; Kim, Y.; Noh, D. Y.; Park, C.-Y.

    2009-10-01

    We report the metallization of the Si(001)2×1 surface at elevated temperatures using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). A metallic state (Sm) over the EF , which corresponds to the empty (π∗) state of the 2×1 asymmetric dimer model, increases in the ARPES spectra, while the π∗ state decreases in the NEXAFS spectra with increasing temperature. Since Sm is observed even at 400 K, the structural phase transition at ˜900K [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 126103 (2003); Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3869 (1996)] is not related to the metallization. Thermal excitation seems to be too small to detect in ARPES in initial stage of the metallization and cannot account for the different behavior of Sm and the filled surface state of the up-dimer upon oxidation. We suggest, based on the existence of Sm even at 400 K and the oxidation behavior, that the metallization is attributed to thermal adatoms.

  19. Silver diffusion over silicon surfaces with adsorbed tin atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Olshanetskii, B. Z.

    2015-02-15

    Silver diffusion over the (111), (100), and (110) surfaces of silicon with preliminarily adsorbed tin atoms is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Diffusion is observed only on the surface of Si(111)-2√3 × 2√3-Sn. The diffusion mechanism is established. It is found that the diffusion coefficient depends on the concentration of diffusing atoms. The diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing silver concentration, while the activation energy and the preexponential factor increase.

  20. A framework to analyze cerebral mean diffusivity using surface guided diffusion mapping in diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Hun; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Sang-Won; Na, Duk L.; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    The mean diffusivity (MD) value has been used to describe microstructural properties in Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) in cortical gray matter (GM). Recently, researchers have applied a cortical surface generated from the T1-weighted volume. When the DTI data are analyzed using the cortical surface, it is important to assign an accurate MD value from the volume space to the vertex of the cortical surface, considering the anatomical correspondence between the DTI and the T1-weighted image. Previous studies usually sampled the MD value using the nearest-neighbor (NN) method or Linear method, even though there are geometric distortions in diffusion-weighted volumes. Here we introduce a Surface Guided Diffusion Mapping (SGDM) method to compensate for such geometric distortions. We compared our SGDM method with results using NN and Linear methods by investigating differences in the sampled MD value. We also projected the tissue classification results of non-diffusion-weighted volumes to the cortical midsurface. The CSF probability values provided by the SGDM method were lower than those produced by the NN and Linear methods. The MD values provided by the NN and Linear methods were significantly greater than those of the SGDM method in regions suffering from geometric distortion. These results indicate that the NN and Linear methods assigned the MD value in the CSF region to the cortical midsurface (GM region). Our results suggest that the SGDM method is an effective way to correct such mapping errors. PMID:26236180

  1. Surface modification by subsurface pressure induced diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Claus G.

    2012-01-23

    Polycrystalline Ag, covered with a nm thin siloxane layer, was irradiated with ultraviolet light in vacuum at 500 K. Ag particles of different aspect ratios, 50-1000 nm in size, formed on the surface, including a small fraction of nanorods. Pressurized water vapor bubbles are created in the subsurface region by hydrogen radicals photo-chemically released by the siloxane layer. They provide the driving force for a diffusive material flux along grain boundaries to the surface. This mechanism was modeled and found to agree with the experimental timescale: approximately 300 h are required for a 1000 nm particle to form.

  2. Surface modification by subsurface pressure induced diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Claus G.

    2012-01-01

    Polycrystalline Ag, covered with a nm thin siloxane layer, was irradiated with ultraviolet light in vacuum at 500 K. Ag particles of different aspect ratios, 50-1000 nm in size, formed on the surface, including a small fraction of nanorods. Pressurized water vapor bubbles are created in the subsurface region by hydrogen radicals photo-chemically released by the siloxane layer. They provide the driving force for a diffusive material flux along grain boundaries to the surface. This mechanism was modeled and found to agree with the experimental timescale: approximately 300 h are required for a 1000 nm particle to form.

  3. Scaling of submonolayer island growth with reversible adatom exchange in surfactant-mediated epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daimu; Wang, Zhuping; Zhu, Hui

    2007-08-01

    Surfactant-mediated epitaxial growth is studied with a realistic model, which includes three main kinetic processes: diffusion of adatoms on the surfactant terrace, exchange of adatoms with their underneath surfactant atoms, and reexchange in which an exchanged adatom resurfaces to the top of the surfactant layer. The scaling behavior of nucleus density and island size distributions in the initial stage of growth is investigated by using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the temperature dependence of nucleus density and island size distributions governed by the reexchanging-controlled nucleation at high temperatures exhibits similar scaling behavior to that obtained by the standard diffusion-mediated nucleation at low temperatures. However, at intermediate temperatures, the exchanging-controlled nucleation leads to an increase of nucleus density with temperature, while the island size distribution scales to a monotonically decreasing function, showing nonstandard scaling behavior.

  4. Electron Doping of Ultrathin Black Phosphorus with Cu Adatoms.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Steven P; Doganov, Rostislav A; Seixas, Leandro; Carvalho, Alexandra; Tan, Jun You; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yakovlev, Nikolai; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2016-04-13

    Few-layer black phosphorus is a monatomic two-dimensional crystal with a direct band gap that has high carrier mobility for both holes and electrons. Similarly to other layered atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is sensitive to surface impurities, adsorbates, and adatoms. Here we study the effect of Cu adatoms onto few-layer black phosphorus by characterizing few-layer black phosphorus field effect devices and by performing first-principles calculations. We find that the addition of Cu adatoms can be used to controllably n-dope few layer black phosphorus, thereby lowering the threshold voltage for n-type conduction without degrading the transport properties. We demonstrate a scalable 2D material-based complementary inverter which utilizes a boron nitride gate dielectric, a graphite gate, and a single bP crystal for both the p- and n-channels. The inverter operates at matched input and output voltages, exhibits a gain of 46, and does not require different contact metals or local electrostatic gating.

  5. Dephasing and diffusion on the alveolar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschle, L. R.; Kurz, F. T.; Kampf, T.; Wagner, W. L.; Duerr, J.; Stiller, W.; Konietzke, P.; Wünnemann, F.; Mall, M. A.; Wielpütz, M. O.; Schlemmer, H. P.; Ziener, C. H.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a surface model of spin dephasing in lung tissue that includes both susceptibility and diffusion effects to provide a closed-form solution of the Bloch-Torrey equation on the alveolar surface. The nonlocal susceptibility effects of the model are validated against numerical simulations of spin dephasing in a realistic lung tissue geometry acquired from synchotron-based μ CT data sets of mouse lung tissue, and against simulations in the well-known Wigner-Seitz model geometry. The free induction decay is obtained in dependence on microscopic tissue parameters and agrees very well with in vivo lung measurements at 1.5 Tesla to allow a quantification of the local mean alveolar radius. Our results are therefore potentially relevant for the clinical diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases.

  6. On the role of surface diffusion in determining the shape or morphology of noble-metal nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaohu; Xie, Shuifen; Liu, Maochang; Peng, Hsin-Chieh; Lu, Ning; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J.; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the shape or morphology of metal nanocrystals is central to the realization of their many applications in catalysis, plasmonics, and electronics. In one of the approaches, the metal nanocrystals are grown from seeds of certain crystallinity through the addition of atomic species. In this case, manipulating the rates at which the atomic species are added onto different crystallographic planes of a seed has been actively explored to control the growth pattern of a seed and thereby the shape or morphology taken by the final product. Upon deposition, however, the adsorbed atoms (adatoms) may not stay at the same sites where the depositions occur. Instead, they can migrate to other sites on the seed owing to the involvement of surface diffusion, and this could lead to unexpected deviations from a desired growth pathway. Herein, we demonstrated that the growth pathway of a seed is indeed determined by the ratio between the rates for atom deposition and surface diffusion. Our result suggests that surface diffusion needs to be taken into account when controlling the shape or morphology of metal nanocrystals. PMID:23569268

  7. Metals on graphene: correlation between adatom adsorption behavior and growth morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lu, Wencai; Tringides, Michael C.; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-05-19

    We present a systematic study of metal adatom adsorption on graphene by ab initio calculations. The calculations cover alkali metals, sp-simple metals, 3d and group 10 transition metals, noble metals, as well as rare earth metals. The correlation between the adatom adsorption properties and the growth morphology of the metals on graphene is also investigated. We show that the growth morphology is related to the ratio of the metal adsorption energy to its bulk cohesive energy (E(a)/E(c)) and the diffusion barrier (ΔE) of the metal adatom on graphene. Charge transfer, electric dipole and magnetic moments, and graphene lattice distortion induced by metal adsorption would also affect the growth morphologies of the metal islands. We also show that most of the metal nanostructures on graphene would be thermally stable against coarsening.

  8. Diffusion and surface alloying of gradient nanostructured metals

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ke

    2017-01-01

    Gradient nanostructures (GNSs) have been optimized in recent years for desired performance. The diffusion behavior in GNS metals is crucial for understanding the diffusion mechanism and relative characteristics of different interfaces that provide fundamental understanding for advancing the traditional surface alloying processes. In this paper, atomic diffusion, reactive diffusion, and surface alloying processes are reviewed for various metals with a preformed GNS surface layer. We emphasize the promoted atomic diffusion and reactive diffusion in the GNS surface layer that are related to a higher interfacial energy state with respect to those in relaxed coarse-grained samples. Accordingly, different surface alloying processes, such as nitriding and chromizing, have been modified significantly, and some diffusion-related properties have been enhanced. Finally, the perspectives on current research in this field are discussed. PMID:28382244

  9. A Relation for Nanodroplet Diffusion on Smooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chu; Huang, Jizu; Li, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the diffusion of nanodroplets on smooth surfaces through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and theoretical analyses. Molecular dynamics simulations show that nanodroplet surface diffusion is different from that of single molecules and solid particles. The dependence of nanodroplet diffusion coefficient on temperature undergoes a transition from linear to nonlinear as the surface wettability is weakened due to the coupling of temperature and surface energy. We also develop a simple relation for the diffusion coefficient by using the contact angle and contact radius of the droplet. It works well for a wide range of surface wettabilities and different sized nanodroplets, as confirmed by MD simulations. PMID:27215471

  10. Edge effects on the characteristics of uranium diffusion on graphene and graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Han, Han; Ren, Cui-Lan; Wang, Chang-Ying; Shao, Kuan; Huai, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The first principles density-functional theoretical calculations of U adatom adsorption and diffusion on a planar graphene and quasi-one-dimensional graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are performed. An energetic preference is found for U adatom diffusing to the hollow sites of both graphene and GNRs surface. A number of U distinctive diffusion paths either perpendicular or parallel to the ribbon growth direction are examined. The edge effects are evidenced by the calculated energy barriers of U adatom diffusion on armchair and zigzag nanoribbons surfaces. The calculation results indicate that the diffusion of U adatom from the inner site toward the edge site is a feasible process, particularly in zigzag GNR. It is viable to control the initial morphology of nuclear carbon material to retard the diffusion and concentration of nuclides. Project supported by the International S & T Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2014DFG60230), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91326105, 21306220, and 21501189), and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA02040104).

  11. Directed single molecule diffusion triggered by surface energy gradients.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Pierre; Zhang, Zhenyu; Golestanian, Ramin; Leggett, Graham J; Geoghegan, Mark

    2009-10-27

    We demonstrate the diffusion of single poly(ethylene glycol) molecules on surfaces which change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic over a few micrometers. These gradients in surface energy are shown to drive the molecular diffusion in the direction of the hydrophilic component. The polymer diffusion coefficients on these surfaces are measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and are shown to be elevated by more than an order of magnitude compared to surfaces without the surface energy gradient. Along the gradient, the diffusion is asymmetric, with diffusion coefficients approximately 100 times greater in the direction of the gradient than orthogonal to it. This diffusion can be explained by a Stokes-Einstein treatment of the surface-adsorbed polymer.

  12. Low-energy ion irradiation during film growth: Kinetic pathways leading to enhanced adatom migration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovic, D.; Münger, E. P.; Chirita, V.; Hultman, L.; Greene, J. E.

    2005-05-01

    Embedded-atom molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the effects of low-energy self-ion irradiation of Pt adatoms on Pt(111). Here, we concentrate on self-bombardment dynamics, i.e., isolating and monitoring the atomic processes, induced by normally incident Pt atoms with energies E ranging from 5 to 50 eV, that can affect intra- and interlayer mass transport.. We find that adatom scattering, surface channeling, and dimer formation occur at all energies. Atomic intermixing events involving incident and terrace atoms are observed at energies ⩾15eV, while the collateral formation of residual surface vacancies is observed only with E >40eV. The overall effect of low-energy self-ion irradiation is to enhance lateral adatom and terrace atom migration.

  13. Surface diffusion in reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, Kanji; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, Giddings pointed out in 'Dynamics of Chromatography' that surface diffusion should become an important research topic in the kinetics of chromatographic phenomena. However, few studies on surface diffusion in adsorbents used in chromatography were published since then. Most scientists use ordinary rate equations to study mass transfer kinetics in chromatography. They take no account of surface diffusion and overlook the significant contributions of this mass transfer process to chromatographic behavior and to column efficiency at high mobile phase flow rate. Only recently did the significance of surface diffusion in separation processes begin to be recognized in connection with the development of new techniques of fast flow, high efficiency chromatography. In this review, we revisit the reports on experimental data on surface diffusion and introduce a surface-restricted molecular diffusion model, derived as a first approximation for the mechanism of surface diffusion, on the basis of the absolute rate theory. We also explain how this model accounts for many intrinsic characteristics of surface diffusion that cannot properly be explained by the conventional models of surface diffusion.

  14. Surface diffusion and surface crystal growth of tris-naphthyl benzene glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shigang; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Ye; Ediger, M. D.; Yu, Lian

    2016-08-01

    Surface self-diffusion coefficients of α,α,β-tris-naphthyl benzene (TNB) glasses have been measured using the method of surface grating decay. For 1000 nm wavelength gratings, the decay occurs by viscous flow at temperatures above Tg + 15 K, where Tg is the glass transition temperature (347 K), and by surface diffusion at lower temperatures. Surface diffusion of TNB is vastly faster than bulk diffusion, by a factor of 107 at Tg. Comparing TNB with other molecular glasses, each evaluated at its own Tg, we find that surface diffusion has a greater system-to-system variation than bulk diffusion, slowing down with increasing molecular size and intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Experimentally determined surface diffusion coefficients are in reasonable agreement with those from simulations and theoretical predictions. TNB and other molecular glasses show fast crystal growth on the free surface and the growth velocity is nearly proportional to the surface diffusion coefficient, indicating that the process is supported by surface mobility.

  15. Stability diagrams for the surface patterns of GaN(0001bar) as a function of Schwoebel barrier height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyżewski, Filip; Załuska-Kotur, Magdalena A.

    2017-01-01

    Height and type of Schwoebel barriers (direct or inverse) decides about the character of the surface instability. Different surface morphologies are presented. Step bunches, double steps, meanders, mounds and irregular patterns emerge at the surface as a result of step (Schwoebel) barriers at some temperature or miscut values. The study was carried out on the two-component kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model of GaN(0001bar) surface grown in nitrogen rich conditions. Diffusion of gallium adatoms over N-polar surface is slow and nitrogen adatoms are almost immobile. We show that in such conditions surfaces remain smooth when gallium adatoms diffuse in the presence of low inverse Schwoebel barrier. It is illustrated by adequate stability diagrams for surface morphologies.

  16. Anomalous surface diffusion of protons on lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Maarten G; Grubmüller, Helmut; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2014-07-01

    The cellular energy machinery depends on the presence and properties of protons at or in the vicinity of lipid membranes. To asses the energetics and mobility of a proton near a membrane, we simulated an excess proton near a solvated DMPC bilayer at 323 K, using a recently developed method to include the Grotthuss proton shuttling mechanism in classical molecular dynamics simulations. We obtained a proton surface affinity of -13.0 ± 0.5 kJ mol(-1). The proton interacted strongly with both lipid headgroup and linker carbonyl oxygens. Furthermore, the surface diffusion of the proton was anomalous, with a subdiffusive regime over the first few nanoseconds, followed by a superdiffusive regime. The time- and distance dependence of the proton surface diffusion coefficient within these regimes may also resolve discrepancies between previously reported diffusion coefficients. Our simulations show that the proton anomalous surface diffusion originates from restricted diffusion in two different surface-bound states, interrupted by the occasional bulk-mediated long-range surface diffusion. Although only a DMPC membrane was considered in this work, we speculate that the restrictive character of the on-surface diffusion is highly sensitive to the specific membrane conditions, which can alter the relative contributions of the surface and bulk pathways to the overall diffusion process. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the energy machinery.

  17. Mechanisms of Si and Ge diffusion on surfactant terminated (111) silicon and germanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhachuk, R.; Coutinho, J.

    2016-05-01

    Surfactant mediated growth of Ge layers and formation of small Ge clusters on Si(111) are promising assemblage processes with envisioned applications in areas such as nanoelectronics or photovoltaics. They critically depend on migration of Si and Ge adatoms on surfactant terminated Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces. We address Si and Ge adsorption and migration on surfactant (Bi, Sb) terminated (111) surfaces of Si and strained Ge by comprehensively mapping potential energy surfaces using density functional calculations. The main migration paths are identified and corresponding energy barriers are reported. It is shown that the energy barrier for adatom migration through Bi or Sb surfactant trimers (by actually breaking the trimers) is virtually degenerate to the mechanism involving traveling of the adatom around the same surfactant structures. We also find a low-energy anchoring site that is suggested to act as a nucleation structure and to trigger the clustering process. These results suggest a fundamentally new picture for the whole Si(111)sbnd Bi(Sb) epitaxial process.

  18. Chiral magnetism of magnetic adatoms generated by Rashba electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Juba; dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Ziane, Abdelhamid; Benakki, Mouloud; Blügel, Stefan; Lounis, Samir

    2017-02-01

    We investigate long-range chiral magnetic interactions among adatoms mediated by surface states spin-splitted by spin–orbit coupling. Using the Rashba model, the tensor of exchange interactions is extracted wherein a thepseudo-dipolar interaction is found, in addition to the usual isotropic exchange interaction and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction. We find that, despite the latter interaction, collinear magnetic states can still be stabilized by the pseudo-dipolar interaction. The interadatom distance controls the strength of these terms, which we exploit to design chiral magnetism in Fe nanostructures deposited on a Au(111) surface. We demonstrate that these magnetic interactions are related to superpositions of the out-of-plane and in-plane components of the skyrmionic magnetic waves induced by the adatoms in the surrounding electron gas. We show that, even if the interatomic distance is large, the size and shape of the nanostructures dramatically impacts on the strength of the magnetic interactions, thereby affecting the magnetic ground state. We also derive an appealing connection between the isotropic exchange interaction and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction, which relates the latter to the first-order change of the former with respect to spin–orbit coupling. This implies that the chirality defined by the direction of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya vector is driven by the variation of the isotropic exchange interaction due to the spin–orbit interaction.

  19. Eddy diffusivity in the ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Castilla, Robert; Platonov, Alexei

    2010-05-01

    In order to measure eddy diffusivity in the ocean using a scaling that includes the thickness of the surf zone as well as the depth and the wave period[1,2]. Measurements in the Mediterranean are almost two orders of magnitude smaller than in the Pacific coast. On a larger scale, and further away from the coast the relevant eddy diffusivities are much larger, because large eddies often scale on the Rossby deformation radius, LR. Direct measurements of the diffusion and the horizontal velocity field were performed at several sites in the coastal areas of Spain. The diffusion coeficients were calculated by evaluation from video images of the area of milk and fluoresceine blobs released at different positions and with different wave heights, wind speeds and tidal induced currents[1-3]. There are instances with either low hipo-diffusivity or high hyper-diffusivity and local measurements in both cases indicate that spectra deviate strongly from an equilibrium spectrum. A generalized Richardson law [3,4] deduced from Kinematic Simulation (KS) numerical models may be applied also to coastal diffusion[5]. The eddy viscosity values show a complex behaviour that depends on wind friction, wave induced Reynolds number and flow topology. The results of more than 100 experiments show that there is a dependence of the maximum diffusivity on a Reynolds number derived from the wave height[1]. The increase of diffusivity with wave height only occurs for large enough wave Reynolds numbers. Other important factors are wind speed and tidal currents. The horizontal diffusivity shows also a marked anisotropy and spectral dependence [4,6]. [1] M. Diez, M. O. Bezerra, C. Mosso, R. Castilla and J. M. Redondo,Experimental measurements and diffusion in harbor and coastal zones. Il Nuovo Cimento Vol. 31 C, N. 5-6 Settembre-Dicembre (2008), 843. [2] Carrillo A., Sanchez M. A., Platonov A. and Redondo J. M., Phys. Chem. Earth B, 26. 4 (2001) 305. [3] Redondo J. M., Sanchez M. A. and Castilla R

  20. Effects of extrinsic point defects in phosphorene: B, C, N, O, and F adatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gaoxue E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu Pandey, Ravindra E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu; Karna, Shashi P. E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu

    2015-04-27

    Phosphorene is emerging as a promising 2D semiconducting material with a direct band gap and high carrier mobility. In this paper, we examine the role of the extrinsic point defects including surface adatoms in modifying the electronic properties of phosphorene using density functional theory. The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O, and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. Our calculations show that B and C, with electronegativity close to P, prefer to break the sp{sup 3} bonds of phosphorene and reside at the interstitial sites in the 2D lattice by forming sp{sup 2} like bonds with the native atoms. On the other hand, N, O, and F, which are more electronegative than P, prefer the surface sites by attracting the lone pairs of phosphorene. B, N, and F adsorption will also introduce local magnetic moment to the lattice. Moreover, B, C, N, and F adatoms will modify the band gap of phosphorene, yielding metallic transverse tunneling characters. Oxygen does not modify the band gap of phosphorene, and a diode like tunneling behavior is observed. Our results therefore offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of phosphorene by the adatom functionalization and provide the physical insights of the environmental sensitivity of phosphorene, which will be helpful to experimentalists in evaluating the performance and aging effects of phosphorene-based electronic devices.

  1. Motion of small cross-channel clusters on W(2 1 1) surface: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurczyszyn, L.; Antczak, G.

    2014-04-01

    The adsorption and diffusion of cross-channel ad-dimers and ad-trimers was investigated using ab-initio DFT calculations. In contrast to in-channel dimers, the motion of cross-channel dimers proceeds one ad-atom at the time with an activation energy comparable to observed for quasi-isolated ad-atoms. The separation of ad-atoms by the surface channel wall lowers, but not eliminates, ad-atoms interactions. Pair interactions show long-range oscillatory behavior with an electronic origin. The short range interactions are modified by creation of straight and staggered direct bonds. Motion of ad-trimers proceeds in the same fashion as for cross-channel ad-dimers.

  2. Ion beam microtexturing and enhanced surface diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ion beam interactions with solid surfaces are discussed with particular emphasis on microtexturing induced by the deliberate deposition of controllable amounts of an impurity material onto a solid surface while simultaneously sputtering the surface with an ion beam. Experimental study of the optical properties of microtextured surfaces is described. Measurements of both absorptance as a function of wavelength and emissivity are presented. A computer code is described that models the sputtering and ion reflection processes involved in microtexture formation.

  3. Ion-beam-induced topography and surface diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Rossnagel, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the development of surface topography along with enhanced surface and bulk diffusion processes accompanying ion bombardment have generated growing interest among users of ion beams and plasmas for thin film or material processing. Interest in these processes stems both from attempts to generate topographic changes for specific studies or applications and from the need to suppress or control undesirable changes. The present investigation provides a summary of the current status of impurity-induced texturing, with emphasis on recent developments. Particular attention is given to the texturing accompanying deposition of an impurity material onto a solid surface while simultaneously etching the surface with an ion beam. A description of experimental considerations is provided, and a thermal-diffusion model is discussed along with the development of sputter cones, and aspects of impact-enhanced surface diffusion.

  4. Decoupling of surface diffusion and relaxation dynamics of molecular glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2017-04-03

    Tobacco mosaic virus is used as a probe to measure surface diffusion of ultrathin films of N,N'-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD) (12 nm [Formula: see text] 53 nm, where [Formula: see text] is the film thickness) at various temperatures below the glass transition temperature, [Formula: see text], of all films. As the film thickness is decreased, [Formula: see text] decreases rapidly and the average film dynamics are enhanced by 6-14 orders of magnitude. We show that the surface diffusion is invariant of the film thickness decrease and the resulting enhanced overall mobility. The values of the surface diffusion coefficient and its temperature dependence are invariant of film thickness and are the same as the corresponding bulk values ([Formula: see text]400 nm). For the thinnest films ([Formula: see text]20 nm), the effective activation energy for rearrangement (temperature dependence of relaxation times) becomes smaller than the activation energy for surface diffusion. These results suggest that the fast surface diffusion is decoupled from film relaxation dynamics and is a solely free surface property.

  5. A Multiscale Analysis of Diffusions on Rapidly Varying Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, A. B.; Elliott, C. M.; Pavliotis, G. A.; Stuart, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    Lateral diffusion of molecules on surfaces plays a very important role in various biological processes, including lipid transport across the cell membrane, synaptic transmission, and other phenomena such as exo- and endocytosis, signal transduction, chemotaxis, and cell growth. In many cases, the surfaces can possess spatial inhomogeneities and/or be rapidly changing shape. Using a generalization of the model for a thermally excited Helfrich elastic membrane, we consider the problem of lateral diffusion on quasi-planar surfaces, possessing both spatial and temporal fluctuations. Using results from homogenization theory, we show that, under the assumption of scale separation between the characteristic length and timescales of the membrane fluctuations and the characteristic scale of the diffusing particle, the lateral diffusion process can be well approximated by a Brownian motion on the plane with constant diffusion tensor that depends on a highly nonlinear way on the detailed properties of the surface. The effective diffusion tensor will depend on the relative scales of the spatial and temporal fluctuations, and for different scaling regimes, we prove the existence of a macroscopic limit in each case.

  6. Simulations of (An)Isotropic Diffusion on Curved Biological Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Hayer, Arnold; Helenius, Ari; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-01-01

    We present a computational particle method for the simulation of isotropic and anisotropic diffusion on curved biological surfaces that have been reconstructed from image data. The method is capable of handling surfaces of high curvature and complex shape, which are often encountered in biology. The method is validated on simple benchmark problems and is shown to be second-order accurate in space and time and of high parallel efficiency. It is applied to simulations of diffusion on the membrane of endoplasmic reticula (ER) in live cells. Diffusion simulations are conducted on geometries reconstructed from real ER samples and are compared to fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments in the same ER samples using the transmembrane protein tsO45-VSV-G, C-terminally tagged with green fluorescent protein. Such comparisons allow derivation of geometry-corrected molecular diffusion constants for membrane components from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data. The results of the simulations indicate that the diffusion behavior of molecules in the ER membrane differs significantly from the volumetric diffusion of soluble molecules in the lumen of the same ER. The apparent speed of recovery differs by a factor of ∼4, even when the molecular diffusion constants of the two molecules are identical. In addition, the specific shape of the membrane affects the recovery half-time, which is found to vary by a factor of ∼2 in different ER samples. PMID:16284262

  7. Simulations of (an)isotropic diffusion on curved biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Hayer, Arnold; Helenius, Ari; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-02-01

    We present a computational particle method for the simulation of isotropic and anisotropic diffusion on curved biological surfaces that have been reconstructed from image data. The method is capable of handling surfaces of high curvature and complex shape, which are often encountered in biology. The method is validated on simple benchmark problems and is shown to be second-order accurate in space and time and of high parallel efficiency. It is applied to simulations of diffusion on the membrane of endoplasmic reticula (ER) in live cells. Diffusion simulations are conducted on geometries reconstructed from real ER samples and are compared to fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments in the same ER samples using the transmembrane protein tsO45-VSV-G, C-terminally tagged with green fluorescent protein. Such comparisons allow derivation of geometry-corrected molecular diffusion constants for membrane components from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data. The results of the simulations indicate that the diffusion behavior of molecules in the ER membrane differs significantly from the volumetric diffusion of soluble molecules in the lumen of the same ER. The apparent speed of recovery differs by a factor of approximately 4, even when the molecular diffusion constants of the two molecules are identical. In addition, the specific shape of the membrane affects the recovery half-time, which is found to vary by a factor of approximately 2 in different ER samples.

  8. Collisional diffusion in a torus with imperfect magnetic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    A Hamiltonian forumlation of the guiding-center drift equations is used to investigate the modification of neoclassical diffusion for low collisonality in a toroidal magnetic field with partially destroyed magnetic surfaces. The magnetic field is assumed to be given by the small perturbation of an axisymmetric system. The results are applicable to particle diffusion in realistic confinement systems, midway between axisymmetric and purely stochastic ones. Significant enhancement of electron diffusion over neoclassical rates is found. This increase can be accounted for by the contributions due to the first few island chains in the Fibonacci sequence generated by the zero-order islands, and by associated stochastic domains.

  9. Germanium nanowire growth controlled by surface diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtbauer, Jan; Bansen, Roman; Heimburger, Robert; Teubner, Thomas; Boeck, Torsten; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-07-23

    Germanium nanowires (NWs) were grown onto Ge(111) substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid process using gold droplets. The growth was carried out in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at substrate temperatures between 370 Degree-Sign C and 510 Degree-Sign C. The resulting nanowire growth rate turns out to be highly dependent on the substrate temperature exhibiting the maximum at T = 430 Degree-Sign C. The temperature dependence of growth rate can be attributed to surface diffusion both along the substrate and nanowire sidewalls. Analyzing the diffusive material transport yields a diffusion length of 126 nm at a substrate temperature of 430 Degree-Sign C.

  10. Tailoring the electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer SnO by B, C, N, O and F adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Junguang; Guan, Lixiu

    2017-03-01

    Recently, SnO has attracted more and more attention, because it is a bipolar electronic material holding great potential in the design of p-n junction. In this paper, we examine the effect of extrinsic point defects on modifying the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO using density functionals theory (DFT). The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. All adatoms are found energetically stable. B, C, N and F adatoms will modify the band gap and introduce band gap states. In addition, our calculations show that N, B and F can introduce stable local magnetic moment to the lattice. Our results, therefore, offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO by surface functionalization, which will be helpful to experimentalists in improving the performance of SnO-based electronic devices and opening new avenue for its spintronics applications.

  11. Tailoring the electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer SnO by B, C, N, O and F adatoms.

    PubMed

    Tao, Junguang; Guan, Lixiu

    2017-03-14

    Recently, SnO has attracted more and more attention, because it is a bipolar electronic material holding great potential in the design of p-n junction. In this paper, we examine the effect of extrinsic point defects on modifying the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO using density functionals theory (DFT). The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. All adatoms are found energetically stable. B, C, N and F adatoms will modify the band gap and introduce band gap states. In addition, our calculations show that N, B and F can introduce stable local magnetic moment to the lattice. Our results, therefore, offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO by surface functionalization, which will be helpful to experimentalists in improving the performance of SnO-based electronic devices and opening new avenue for its spintronics applications.

  12. Tailoring the electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer SnO by B, C, N, O and F adatoms

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Junguang; Guan, Lixiu

    2017-01-01

    Recently, SnO has attracted more and more attention, because it is a bipolar electronic material holding great potential in the design of p-n junction. In this paper, we examine the effect of extrinsic point defects on modifying the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO using density functionals theory (DFT). The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. All adatoms are found energetically stable. B, C, N and F adatoms will modify the band gap and introduce band gap states. In addition, our calculations show that N, B and F can introduce stable local magnetic moment to the lattice. Our results, therefore, offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO by surface functionalization, which will be helpful to experimentalists in improving the performance of SnO-based electronic devices and opening new avenue for its spintronics applications. PMID:28291244

  13. In situ laser reflectance measurement of diffuse surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chan, W S; Khan, S U

    1978-08-01

    Report is made on an in situ method of laser reflectance measurement of diffuse surfaces by using a GaAs laser and off-the-shelf optical components not involving radiation integration over a hemisphere as with most conventional reflectometers. The design features and limitations are described. Several diffuse surfaces were evaluated by this method, and the reflectance results obtained were in good agreement with those determined by the method of integrating sphere that used MgCO(3) surface as a standard. The main advantages of this method are: the elimination of the need of a surface standard; the avoidance of having the surfaces in close contact with the measuring equipment; the accuracy better than 10%; and the relatively straightforward alignment.

  14. Atomic force microscope manipulation of Ag atom on the Si(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkhtaivan, Batnyam; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    We present first-principles total-energy electronic-structure calculations that provide the microscopic mechanism of Ag atom diffusion between the half unit cells (HUCs) on the Si(111)-(7 ×7 ) surface with and without the tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM). We find that, without the presence of the AFM tip, there are three pathways of inter-HUC diffusion. The pathway, in which the diffusing atom passes over the nanohole of the surface, has the lowest energy barrier. The diffusion along this pathway between the two HUCs is almost symmetric with the energy barrier of about 0.8 eV in both directions. In the other two pathways, the adatom diffuses along the edge of the nanohole. The diffusion along these two pathways have an energy barrier of about 1 eV. With the presence of the tip, we find that the reaction pathways are essentially the same, but the diffusion along the edge of the nanohole has a lower energy barrier than the diffusion over the nanohole. Thus the diffusion channel is changed by the presence of the tip. In the diffusion along the edge of the nanohole, the energy barrier in one direction is substantially reduced to be 0.2-0.4 eV by the tip, while that of the diffusion in the reverse direction remains larger than 1 eV. The Si tip reduces the energy barrier more than the Pt tip due to the flexibility of the tip apex structure. In addition to the reduction of the barrier, the tip traps the diffusing adatom preventing diffusion in the reverse direction. Also we find that the shape of the tip apex structure is important for the adatom's trapping ability. The bond formation between the AFM tip atom and the surface adatom is essential for atom manipulation using the AFM tip. Our results show that atom manipulation is possible with both the metallic and semiconducting AFM tips.

  15. Atomic diffusion in laser surface modified AISI H13 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a laser surface modification process of AISI H13 steel using 0.09 and 0.4 mm of laser spot sizes with an aim to increase surface hardness and investigate elements diffusion in laser modified surface. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and overlap percentage. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. Metallographic study and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were performed to observe presence of elements and their distribution in the sample surface. Maximum hardness achieved in the modified surface was 1017 HV0.1. Change of elements composition in the modified layer region was detected in the laser modified samples. Diffusion possibly occurred for C, Cr, Cu, Ni, and S elements. The potential found for increase in surface hardness represents an important method to sustain tooling life. The EDXS findings signify understanding of processing parameters effect on the modified surface composition.

  16. Surface self-diffusion of silicon during high temperature annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta-Alba, Pablo E.; Kononchuk, Oleg; Gourdel, Christophe; Claverie, Alain

    2014-04-07

    The atomic-scale mechanisms driving thermally activated self-diffusion on silicon surfaces are investigated by atomic force microscopy. The evolution of surface topography is quantified over a large spatial bandwidth by means of the Power Spectral Density functions. We propose a parametric model, based on the Mullins-Herring (M-H) diffusion equation, to describe the evolution of the surface topography of silicon during thermal annealing. Usually, a stochastic term is introduced into the M-H model in order to describe intrinsic random fluctuations of the system. In this work, we add two stochastic terms describing the surface thermal fluctuations and the oxidation-evaporation phenomenon. Using this extended model, surface evolution during thermal annealing in reducing atmosphere can be predicted for temperatures above the roughening transition. A very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data describing roughness evolution and self-diffusion phenomenon is obtained. The physical origin and time-evolution of these stochastic terms are discussed. Finally, using this model, we explore the limitations of the smoothening of the silicon surfaces by rapid thermal annealing.

  17. Infrared deflectometry for the inspection of diffusely specular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfer, Sebastian; Burke, Jan; Heizmann, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Deflectometry is a full-field gradient technique that lends itself very well to testing specular surfaces. It uses the geometry of specular reflection to determine the gradient of the surface under inspection. In consequence, a necessary precondition to apply deflectometry is the presence of at least partially specular reflection. Surfaces with larger roughness have increasingly diffuse reflection characteristics, making them inaccessible to usual deflectometry. However, many industrially relevant surfaces exist that change their reflection characteristic during production and processing. An example is metal sheets that are used as car body parts. Whereas the molded but otherwise raw metal sheets show a mostly diffuse reflection without sufficient specular reflection, the final car body panels have a high specular reflectance due to the lacquering. In consequence, it would be advantageous to apply the same inspection approach both for the raw material and for the final product. To solve this challenge, specular reflection from rough surfaces can be achieved using light with a larger wavelength, as the specular reflectivity of a surface depends on the ratio of the surface roughness and the wavelength of the light applied. Wavelengths in the thermal infrared range create enough specular reflection to apply deflectometry on many visually rough metal surfaces. This contribution presents the principles of thermal deflectometry, its special challenges, and illustrates its use with examples from the inspection of industrially produced surfaces.

  18. Fano fingerprints of Majoranas in Kitaev dimers of superconducting adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessotti, F. A.; Ricco, L. S.; Marques, Y.; Machado, R. S.; Guessi, L. H.; Figueira, M. S.; de Souza, M.; Seridonio, A. C.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate theoretically a Fano interferometer composed by STM and AFM tips close to a Kitaev dimer of superconducting adatoms, in which the adatom placed under the AFM tip, encloses a pair of Majorana fermions (MFs). For the binding energy Δ of the Cooper pair delocalized into the adatoms under the tips coincident with the tunneling amplitude t between them, namely Δ=t, we find that only one MF beneath the AFM tip hybridizes with the adatom coupled to the STM tips. As a result, a gate invariance feature emerges: the Fano profile of the transmittance rises as an invariant quantity depending upon the STM tips Fermi energy, due to the symmetric swap in the gate potential of the AFM tip.

  19. ZGB surface reaction model with high diffusion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. W.

    1993-02-01

    The diffusionless ZGB (monomer-dimer) surface reaction model exhibits a discontinuous transition to a monomer-poisoned state when the fraction of monomer adsorption attempts exceeds 0.525. It has been claimed that this transition shifts to 2/3 with introduction of rapid diffusion of the monomer species, or of both species. We show this is not the case, 2/3 representing the spinodal rather than the transition point. For equal diffusion rates of both species, we find that the transition only shifts to 0.5951±0.0002.

  20. ZGB surface reaction model with high diffusion rates

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.W. )

    1993-02-01

    The diffusionless ZGB (monomer--dimer) surface reaction model exhibits a discontinuous transition to a monomer-poisoned state when the fraction of monomer adsorption attempts exceeds 0.525. It has been claimed that this transition shifts to 2/3 with introduction of rapid diffusion of the monomer species, or of both species. We show this is not the case, 2/3 representing the spinodal rather than the transition point. For equal diffusion rates of both species, we find that the transition only shifts to 0.5951[plus minus]0.0002.

  1. Tuning metal surface diffusion on diblock copolymer films.

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, S.; Hoffmann, A.

    2007-07-01

    The authors have studied the effect of predeposition electron exposure on the diffusion behavior of silver evaporated on a diblock copolymer template. Unexposed regions display a highly selective adsorption of Ag clusters on the polystyrene domains. Exposure to the electron beam modifies the surface diffusion constants on each polymer block and produces a trend of smaller mean particle sizes with increased dose. While there is a loss of selectivity in this system upon exposure, alternative diblock chemistries or exposure procedures could enable one to engineer the selectivity of desired materials on polymer films.

  2. Surface Diffusion Effect on Gas Transport in Nanoporous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Yuta; Takagi, Shu; Kinefuchi, Ikuya

    2016-11-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells are one of the promising candidates for power sources of electric vehicles. For further improvement of their efficiency in high current density operation, a better understanding of oxygen flow inside the cells, which have micro- or nanoporous structures, is necessary. Molecular simulations such as the direct simulation of Monte Carlo (DSMC) are necessary to elucidate flow phenomena in micro- or nanostructures since the Knudsen number is close to unity. Our previous report showed that the oxygen diffusion resistance in porous structures with a characteristic pore size of 100 nm calculated by DSMC agrees well with that measured experimentally. On the other hand, when it comes to the transport in structures with much smaller pore sizes, it is expected that the surface diffusion has a significant impact on gas transport because of their higher specific surface area. Here we present the calculation of gas transport in porous structures with considering surface diffusion. The numerical porous structure models utilized in our simulations are constructed from three-dimensional imaging of materials. The effect of the distance of random walk on the total diffusion resistance in the structures is discussed. This paper is based on results obtained from a project commissioned by the New Energy and Industrial Development Organization (NEDO).

  3. Surfactant-Modified Diffusion on Transition-Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    FEIBELMAN,PETER J.; KELLOGG,GARY LEE

    1999-12-01

    Wanting to convert surface impurities from a nuisance to a systematically applicable nano-fabrication tool, we have sought to understand how such impurities affect self-diffusion on transition-metal surfaces. Our field-ion microscope experiments reveal that in the presence of surface hydrogen, self-diffusion on Rh(100) is promoted, while on Pt(100), not only is it inhibited, but its mechanism changes. First-principles calculations aimed at learning how oxygen fosters perfect layerwise growth on a growing Pt(111) crystal contradict the idea in the literature that it does so by directly promoting transport over Pt island boundaries. The discovery that its real effect is to burn off adventitious adsorbed carbon monoxide demonstrates the predictive value of state-of-the-art calculation methods.

  4. Rapid diffusion of magic-size islands by combined glide and vacancy mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, D; Voter, A F; Uche, O U; Hamilton, J C

    2009-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics, nudged elastic band, and embedded atom methods, we show that certain 2D Ag islands undergo extremely rapid one-dimensional diffusion on Cu(001) surfaces. Indeed, below 300K, hopping rates for 'magic-size' islands are orders of magnitude faster than hopping rates for single Ag adatoms. This rapid diffusion requires both the c(10 x 2) hexagonally-packed superstructure typical of Ag on Cu(001) and appropriate 'magic-sizes' for the islands. The novel highly-cooperative diffusion mechanism presented here couples vacancy diffusion with simultaneous core glide.

  5. Step density waves on growing vicinal crystal surfaces - Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranguelov, Bogdan; Müller, Pierre; Metois, Jean-Jacques; Stoyanov, Stoyan

    2017-01-01

    The Burton, Cabrera and Frank (BCF) theory plays a key conceptual role in understanding and modeling the crystal growth of vicinal surfaces. In BCF theory the adatom concentration on a vicinal surface obeys to a diffusion equation, generally solved within quasi-static approximation where the adatom concentration at a given distance x from a step has a steady state value n (x) . Recently, we show that going beyond this approximation (Ranguelov and Stoyanov, 2007) [6], for fast surface diffusion and slow attachment/detachment kinetics of adatoms at the steps, a train of fast-moving steps is unstable against the formation of steps density waves. More precisely, the step density waves are generated if the step velocity exceeds a critical value related to the strength of the step-step repulsion. This theoretical treatment corresponds to the case when the time to reach a steady state concentration of adatoms on a given terrace is comparable to the time for a non-negligible change of the step configuration leading to a terrace adatom concentration n (x , t) that depends not only on the terrace width, but also on its "past width". This formation of step density waves originates from the high velocity of step motion and has nothing to do with usual kinetic instabilities of step bunching induced by Ehrlich-Schwoebel effect, surface electromigration and/or the impact of impurities on the step rate. The so-predicted formation of step density waves is illustrated by numerical integration of the equations for step motion. In order to complete our previous theoretical treatment of the non-stationary BCF problem, we perform an in-situ reflection electron microscopy experiment at specific temperature interval and direction of the heating current, in which, for the first time, the step density waves instability is evidenced on Si(111) surface during highest possible Si adatoms deposition rates.

  6. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bietti, Sergio Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano; Fedorov, Alexey

    2014-09-21

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D₀=0.53(×2.1±1) cm² s⁻¹ that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  7. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi; Olijve, Luuk L. C.

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in

  8. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

    2014-12-01

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed 1H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5-10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in faster

  9. Geometrically nonlinear continuum thermomechanics with surface energies coupled to diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, A. T.; Javili, A.; Steinmann, P.; Bargmann, S.

    2011-10-01

    Surfaces can have a significant influence on the overall response of a continuum body but are often neglected or accounted for in an ad hoc manner. This work is concerned with a nonlinear continuum thermomechanics formulation which accounts for surface structures and includes the effects of diffusion and viscoelasticity. The formulation is presented within a thermodynamically consistent framework and elucidates the nature of the coupling between the various fields, and the surface and the bulk. Conservation principles are used to determine the form of the constitutive relations and the evolution equations. Restrictions on the jump in the temperature and the chemical potential between the surface and the bulk are not a priori assumptions, rather they arise from the reduced dissipation inequality on the surface and are shown to be satisfiable without imposing the standard assumptions of thermal and chemical slavery. The nature of the constitutive relations is made clear via an example wherein the form of the Helmholtz energy is explicitly given.

  10. Water diffusion on TiO2 anatase surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, L.; Gala, F.; Zollo, G.

    2015-06-01

    Compatibility between biological molecules and inorganic materials, such as crystalline metal oxides, is strongly dependent on the selectivity properties and the adhesion processes at the interface between the two systems. Among the many different aspects that affect the adsorption processes of peptides or proteins onto inorganic surfaces, such as the charge state of the amino acids, the peptide 3D structure, the surface roughness, the presence of vacancies or defects on and below the surface, a key role is certainly played by the water solvent whose molecules mediate the interaction. Then the surface hydration pattern may strongly affect the adsorption behavior of biological molecules. For the particular case of (101) anatase TiO2 surface that has a fundamental importance in the interaction of biocompatible nano-devices with biological environment, it was shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that various hydration patterns are close in energy and that the water molecules are mobile at as low temperature values as 190 K. Then it is important to understand the dynamical behavior of first hydration layer of the (101) anatase surface. As a first approach to this problem, density functional calculations are used to investigate water diffusion on the (101) anatase TiO2 surface by sampling the potential energy surface of water molecules of the first hydration layer thus calculating the water molecule migration energy along some relevant diffusion paths on the (101) surface. The measured activation energy of water migration seems in contrast with the observed surface mobility of the water molecules that, as a consequence could be explained invoking a strong role of the entropic term in the context of the transition state theory.

  11. Transition from distributional to ergodic behavior in an inhomogeneous diffusion process: Method revealing an unknown surface diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Takuma; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion of molecules in cells plays an important role in providing a biological reaction on the surface by finding a target on the membrane surface. The water retardation (slow diffusion) near the target assists the searching molecules to recognize the target. Here, we consider effects of the surface diffusivity on the effective diffusivity, where diffusion on the surface is slower than that in bulk. We show that the ensemble-averaged mean-square displacements increase linearly with time when the desorption rate from the surface is finite, which is valid even when the diffusion on the surface is anomalous (subdiffusion). Moreover, this slow diffusion on the surface affects the fluctuations of the time-averaged mean-square displacements (TAMSDs). We find that fluctuations of the TAMSDs remain large when the measurement time is smaller than a characteristic time, and decays according to an increase of the measurement time for a relatively large measurement time. Therefore, we find a transition from nonergodic (distributional) to ergodic diffusivity in a target search process. Moreover, this fluctuation analysis provides a method to estimate an unknown surface diffusivity.

  12. Sodium diffusion through amorphous silica surfaces: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Rarivomanantsoa, Michaël; Jund, Philippe; Jullien, Rémi

    2004-03-08

    We have studied the diffusion inside the silica network of sodium atoms initially located outside the surfaces of an amorphous silica film. We have focused our attention on structural and dynamical quantities, and we have found that the local environment of the sodium atoms is close to the local environment of the sodium atoms inside bulk sodo-silicate glasses obtained by quench. This is in agreement with recent experimental results.

  13. Surface-diffusion induced growth of ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. S.; Gösele, U.; Zacharias, M.

    2009-05-01

    The growth rate of ZnO nanowires grown epitaxially on GaN/sapphire substrates is studied. An inverse proportional relation between diameter and length of the nanowires is observed, i.e., nanowires with smaller diameters grow faster than larger ones. This unexpected result is attributed to surface diffusion of ZnO admolecules along the sidewalls of the nanowires. In addition, the unique c-axis growth of ZnO nanowires, which does not require a catalytic particle at the tip of the growing nanowires is discussed by taking into account polarity, surface free energy, and ionicity. Activation energies of the nanowire growth are determined as well.

  14. Interaction of CO2 with Oxygen Adatoms on Rutile TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xiao; Wang, Zhitao; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2013-01-10

    The interactions of CO2 with oxygen adatoms (Oa’s) on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. At 50 K CO2 is found to adsorb preferentially on five-coordinated Ti sites (Ti5c’s) next to Oa’s rather than on oxygen vacancies (VO’s) (the most stable adsorption sites on reduced TiO2(110)). Temperature dependent studies show that after annealing to 100 - 150 K, VO’s become preferentially populated indicating the presence of a kinetic barrier for CO2 adsorption into the VO’s. The difference between the CO2 binding energy on VO’s and Ti5c sites next to the Oa’s are found to be only 0.009 - 0.025 eV. The barrier for CO2 diffusion away from Oa’s is estimated to be ~0.17 eV. Crescent-like feature of the images of CO2 adsorbed on Ti5c’s next to Oa’s are interpreted as a time average of terminally bound CO2 molecules switching between the configurations that are tilted towards Oa and/or towards one of the two neighboring bridging oxygen (Ob) rows. In the presence of VO defects, CO2 is found to tilt preferentially away from the VO containing Ob row. If another CO2 is present on the neighboring Ti5c row, both CO2 molecules tilt towards the common Ob row that separates them.

  15. Cleanliness evaluation of rough surfaces with diffuse IR reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, L. H.

    1995-01-01

    Contamination on bonding surfaces has been determined to be a primary cause for degraded bond strength in certain solid rocket motor bondlines. Hydrocarbon and silicone based organic contaminants that are airborne or directly introduced to a surface are a significant source of contamination. Diffuse infrared (IR) reflectance has historically been used as an effective technique for detection of organic contaminants, however, common laboratory methods involving the use of a Fourier transform IR spectrometer (FTIR) are impractical for inspecting the large bonding surface areas found on solid rocket motors. Optical methods involving the use of acousto-optic tunable filters and fixed bandpass optical filters are recommended for increased data acquisition speed. Testing and signal analysis methods are presented which provide for simultaneous measurement of contamination concentration and roughness level on rough metal surfaces contaminated with hydrocarbons.

  16. Dynamics of surface catalyzed reactions; the roles of surface defects, surface diffusion, and hot electrons.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Gabor A; Bratlie, Kaitlin M; Montano, Max O; Park, Jeong Y

    2006-10-12

    The mechanism that controls bond breaking at transition metal surfaces has been studied with sum frequency generation (SFG), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and catalytic nanodiodes operating under the high-pressure conditions. The combination of these techniques permits us to understand the role of surface defects, surface diffusion, and hot electrons in dynamics of surface catalyzed reactions. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements were performed under 1.5 Torr of cyclohexene hydrogenation/dehydrogenation in the presence and absence of H(2) and over the temperature range 300-500 K on the Pt(100) and Pt(111) surfaces. The structure specificity of the Pt(100) and Pt(111) surfaces is exhibited by the surface species present during reaction. On Pt(100), pi-allyl c-C6H9, cyclohexyl (C6H11), and 1,4-cyclohexadiene are identified adsorbates, while on the Pt(111) surface, pi-allyl c-C6H9, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, and 1,3-cyclohexadiene are present. A scanning tunneling microscope that can be operated at high pressures and temperatures was used to study the Pt(111) surface during the catalytic hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of cyclohexene and its poisoning with CO. It was found that catalytically active surfaces were always disordered, while ordered surface were always catalytically deactivated. Only in the case of the CO poisoning at 350 K was a surface with a mobile adsorbed monolayer not catalytically active. From these results, a CO-dominated mobile overlayer that prevents reactant adsorption was proposed. By using the catalytic nanodiode, we detected the continuous flow of hot electron currents that is induced by the exothermic catalytic reaction. During the platinum-catalyzed oxidation of carbon monoxide, we monitored the flow of hot electrons over several hours using a metal-semiconductor Schottky diode composed of Pt and TiO2. The thickness of the Pt film used as the catalyst was 5 nm, less than the electron mean free path

  17. Anomalously Rapid Hydration Water Diffusion Dynamics Near DNA Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Franck, John M; Ding, Yuan; Stone, Katherine; Qin, Peter Z; Han, Songi

    2015-09-23

    The emerging Overhauser effect dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) technique measures the translational mobility of water within the vicinity (5-15 Å) of preselected sites. The work presented here expands the capabilities of the ODNP technique and illuminates an important, previously unseen, property of the translational diffusion dynamics of water at the surface of DNA duplexes. We attach nitroxide radicals (i.e., spin labels) to multiple phosphate backbone positions of DNA duplexes, allowing ODNP to measure the hydration dynamics at select positions along the DNA surface. With a novel approach to ODNP analysis, we isolate the contributions of water molecules at these sites that undergo free translational diffusion from water molecules that either loosely bind to or exchange protons with the DNA. The results reveal that a significant population of water in a localized volume adjacent to the DNA surface exhibits fast, bulk-like characteristics and moves unusually rapidly compared to water found in similar probe volumes near protein and membrane surfaces. Control studies show that the observation of these characteristics are upheld even when the DNA duplex is tethered to streptavidin or the mobility of the nitroxides is altered. This implies that, as compared to protein or lipid surfaces, it is an intrinsic feature of the DNA duplex surface that it interacts only weakly with a significant fraction of the surface hydration water network. The displacement of this translationally mobile water is energetically less costly than that of more strongly bound water by up to several kBT and thus can lower the activation barrier for interactions involving the DNA surface.

  18. Adsorption of Te atoms on Au(1 1 1) and the emergence of an adatom-induced bound state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouteden, Koen; Debehets, Jolien; Muzychenko, Dmitry; Li, Zhe; Seo, Jin Won; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2017-03-01

    We report on the adsorption of Te adatoms on Au(1 1 1), which are identified and investigated relying on scanning tunnelling microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and density functional theory. The Te adatoms lift the 23  ×  √3 surface reconstruction of the Au(1 1 1) support and their organization is similar to that of previously reported chalcogen adatoms on Au(1 1 1), which are also known to lift the herringbone reconstruction and can adopt a (√3  ×  √3)R30° structure. The adatoms show strong interaction with the Au(1 1 1) surface, resulting in scattering and confinement of the Au surface state (SS) electrons near the Fermi level. More remarkably, scanning tunnelling spectroscopy reveals the existence of an electronic resonance at high voltages well above the Fermi level. This resonance can be interpreted as a bound state that is split off from the bottom of the Au(1 1 1) bulk conduction band. A similar split-off state may exist for other types of adatoms on metallic surfaces that exhibit a surface band gap.

  19. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  20. Dielectric constant and surface morphology of the elemental diffused polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Riyadh M. A. Abdul; Datar, A.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Alegaonkar, P. S.; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2006-11-01

    Polyimide (C22H10N2O5, PMDA-ODA, Kapton-H) samples were doped with phosphorous or boron and fluorine using the radiation assisted diffusion technique, with Co-60 gamma-rays over the dose range ~64 384 kGy, at room temperature. The diffusion of phosphorus and fluorine was confirmed by the RBS technique and that of boron by the neutron depth profiling technique. The elemental concentration on the surface was studied by the XPS technique. The relative concentration of phosphorus, fluorine and boron increased with increasing dose of gamma-rays. The dielectric constant, ɛ', of the polyimide increased by ~43% after phosphorus doping but decreased by ~33% after boron and fluorine doping. The increase in ɛ' is attributed to the radiation induced chemical coupling of the phosphorus atoms across the intra-molecular polyimide chains. The down shift in ɛ' is attributed to the decrease in the degree of electronic polarization and to the increase in the free volume due to the diffused boron or fluorine atoms. For all the doped samples the dielectric constant, ɛ', decreased very slowly with increasing frequency, over the range 100 Hz 7 MHz. AFM results reveal that the surface morphology and the roughness of the doped polyimide are appreciably different than that of virgin polyimide.

  1. Diffusion-limited reactions on the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Tauber, Uwe; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly

    2003-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) stimulates proliferation of many cell types, and are crucial in such processes as eg. wound healing. Cells have specific receptor (R) protein molecules on their surface which bind FGF for this purpose. FGF is also bound by Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan (HSPG) molecules which are present on the cell surface. In isolation, both these complexes are unstable, with half-life of the order of 10-20 minutes, wheras in intact cells, the half-life of FGF-R complex is nearly 5 hours! To account for this increased stability, it has been proposed that R-FGF complex combines with HSPG via surface diffusion and forms the triad R-FGF-HSPG. We examine the feasibility of this reaction using the well-known Smoluchowski theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Our results support the triad formation theory, and are in qualitative agreement with experimental results. We also discuss the effects of slowing down of surface diffusion of these molecules by such factors as eg. the cytosekeletal network and anchored proteins.

  2. THE EFFECT OF ADSORBED SULFUR ON THE SURFACE SELF-DIFFUSION OF COPPER.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SULFUR), * DIFFUSION ), (*ADSORPTION, (*COPPER, SURFACES, HYDROGEN, SINGLE CRYSTALS, ANNEALING, HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS, SULFIDES, GRAIN BOUNDARIES, HIGH TEMPERATURE, IMPURITIES, ENTHALPY, CHEMISORPTION, MOBILITY.

  3. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-10-01

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as {1 1 1}-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on {1 1 1} and {2 1 1} surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while {0 0 1} and {0 1 1} surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to {1 1 1} and {2 1 1} tungsten surfaces than is observed for {0 0 1} or {0 1 1} surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten "fuzz" in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  4. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-10-14

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as (1 1 1)-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) tungsten surfaces than is observed for (0 0 1) or (0 1 1) surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten “fuzz” in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  5. Bulk and surface controlled diffusion of fission gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.

    2012-08-09

    {sub 2{+-}x}, which compare favorably to available experiments. This is an extension of previous work [13]. In particular, it applies improved chemistry models for the UO{sub 2{+-}x} nonstoichiometry and its impact on the fission gas activation energies. The derivation of these models follows the approach that used in our recent study of uranium vacancy diffusion in UO{sub 2} [14]. Also, based on the calculated DFT data we analyze vacancy enhanced diffusion mechanisms in the intermediate temperature regime. In addition to vacancy enhanced diffusion we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface. This is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation, for which surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting transport step. Diffusion of such bubbles constitutes an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials.

  6. Graphene surface emitting terahertz laser: Diffusion pumping concept

    SciTech Connect

    Davoyan, Arthur R.; Morozov, Mikhail Yu.; Popov, Vyacheslav V.; Satou, Akira; Otsuji, Taiichi

    2013-12-16

    We suggest a concept of a tunable graphene-based terahertz (THz) surface emitting laser with diffusion pumping. We employ significant difference in the electronic energy gap of graphene and a typical wide-gap semiconductor, and demonstrate that carriers generated in the semiconductor can be efficiently captured by graphene resulting in population inversion and corresponding THz lasing from graphene. We develop design principles for such a laser and estimate its performance. We predict up to 50 W/cm{sup 2} terahertz power output for 100 kW/cm{sup 2} pump power at frequency around 10 THz at room temperature.

  7. Tailoring Kinetics on a Topological Insulator Surface by Defect-Induced Strain: Pb Mobility on Bi2Te3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Kai; Zhang, Kai-Wen; Yang, Chao-Long; Ding, Haifeng; Wan, Xiangang; Li, Shao-Chun; Evans, James W; Han, Yong

    2016-07-13

    Heteroepitaxial structures based on Bi2Te3-type topological insulators (TIs) exhibit exotic quantum phenomena. For optimal characterization of these phenomena, it is desirable to control the interface structure during film growth on such TIs. In this process, adatom mobility is a key factor. We demonstrate that Pb mobility on the Bi2Te3(111) surface can be modified by the engineering local strain, ε, which is induced around the point-like defects intrinsically forming in the Bi2Te3(111) thin film grown on a Si(111)-7 × 7 substrate. Scanning tunneling microscopy observations of Pb adatom and cluster distributions and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) analyses of the adsorption energy and diffusion barrier Ed of Pb adatom on Bi2Te3(111) surface show a significant influence of ε. Surprisingly, Ed reveals a cusp-like dependence on ε due to a bifurcation in the position of the stable adsorption site at the critical tensile strain εc ≈ 0.8%. This constitutes a very different strain-dependence of diffusivity from all previous studies focusing on conventional metal or semiconductor surfaces. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of Pb deposition, diffusion, and irreversible aggregation incorporating the DFT results reveal adatom and cluster distributions compatible with our experimental observations.

  8. Tunneling Microscopy of Dynamical Processes on the LEAD/GERMANIUM(111) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    Knowledge about atomic scale motions is essential for understanding dynamical phenomena on surfaces, such as diffusion, phase transitions, and epitaxial growth. This report describes the results of a study of dynamical processes on the Pb/Ge(111) surface using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Individual Pb atom diffUsion and concerted atomic motions on the Ge(111) surface are observed in real time. We also study a structural surface phase transformation at elevated temperatures. At very low Pb coverage, migration of individual Pb atoms is observed in the Ge(111)-c(2 x 8) surface near room temperature. The activation energy of this migration can be measured by analyzing a large number of individual atomic motions from room temperature to 80^ circC. The Pb diffusion is found to occur mainly along the (011) adatom row direction of the c(2 x 8) reconstruction. About half of the adatom migrations are "long jumps". We also observe the formation and annihilation of metastable structural surface excitations, which occur much less often than Pb diffusion. They involve a number of adatoms in the same row moving in concert along the row direction like beads on an abacus. This "adatom row shift" may be responsible for the anisotropy of the Pb atom diffusion. It also provides a new mechanism for atomic transport on crystal surfaces and can explain several structural phenomena associated with the Ge(111) surface. At high coverage, a one monolayer Pb/Ge(111) undergoes a reversible phase transformation from sqrt{3} x sqrt{3 }R30^circ to 1 x 1 at about 180 ^circC. Atomic structures of both high and low temperature phases are resolved, which reveals an order-order transition. Spatial and temporal fluctuations are exposed just above the transition temperature. In addition, the influence of surface strain, phase boundaries, and finite size domains are found to play an important role in the phase transformation.

  9. Fast surface diffusion of amorphous o-terphenyl and its competition with viscous flow in surface evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Brian, Caleb W; Yu, Lian

    2015-04-16

    Surface self-diffusion coefficients have been measured for the model molecular glass o-terphenyl (OTP) through surface-grating decay driven by capillarity. The decay mechanism transitions from viscous flow at high temperatures to surface diffusion at low temperatures; for 1000 nm wavelength gratings, the transition occurs at Tg + 11 K. The surface diffusion of OTP is 10(8) times faster than bulk diffusion at Tg and even faster at lower temperatures because of its weaker temperature dependence. At Tg, OTP has approximately the same bulk diffusivity as the previously studied molecular liquid indomethacin, but its surface diffusion is 100 times faster. While the molecular glass-formers exhibit transitions from viscous flow to surface diffusion as the mechanism of capillarity-driven surface flattening, polystyrenes and silicates show no such transition under comparable conditions, suggesting slower surface diffusion on these materials and a general dependence of surface diffusion on intermolecular forces. The velocity of surface crystal growth on molecular glasses is proportional to surface diffusivity, indicating a common kinetic barrier for both processes for temperatures below Tg.

  10. Surface diffusion of molecular glasses: Material dependence and impact on physical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shigang; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Lian

    Surface diffusion coefficients have been measured for molecular glasses tris-naphthylbenzene (TNB) and PMMA oligomers by surface grating decay. Surface diffusion on TNB is vastly faster than bulk diffusion, by a factor of 107 at Tg, while the process is very slow on PMMA. Along with the previous results on o - terphenyl, nifedipine, indomethacin, and polystyrene oligomers, we find that surface diffusion slows down with increasing molecular size and intermolecular forces, whereas bulk diffusion has a weaker material dependence. The molecular glasses studied show fast crystal growth on the free surface. A general correlation is observed between the coefficient of surface diffusion and the velocity of surface crystal growth, indicating surface crystallization is supported by surface mobility. (Zhu, L., et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 (2011): 256103; Zhang, W., et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 119 (2015): 5071-5078) Nsf.

  11. Generating a Simulated Fluid Flow Over an Aircraft Surface Using Anisotropic Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L. (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated aircraft surface is generated using a diffusion technique. The surface is comprised of a surface mesh of polygons. A boundary-layer fluid property is obtained for a subset of the polygons of the surface mesh. A pressure-gradient vector is determined for a selected polygon, the selected polygon belonging to the surface mesh but not one of the subset of polygons. A maximum and minimum diffusion rate is determined along directions determined using a pressure gradient vector corresponding to the selected polygon. A diffusion-path vector is defined between a point in the selected polygon and a neighboring point in a neighboring polygon. An updated fluid property is determined for the selected polygon using a variable diffusion rate, the variable diffusion rate based on the minimum diffusion rate, maximum diffusion rate, and angular difference between the diffusion-path vector and the pressure-gradient vector.

  12. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Constant Behavior: IV. Diffuse Layer Charge/Potential Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most current electrostatic surface complexation models describing ionic binding at the particle/water interface rely on the use of Poisson - Boltzmann (PB) theory for relating diffuse layer charge densities to diffuse layer electrostatic potentials. PB theory is known to contain ...

  13. Reduced work function of graphene by metal adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legesse, Merid; Mellouhi, Fedwa El; Bentria, El Tayeb; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the work function of graphene doped by different metal adatoms and at different concentrations is investigated. Density functional theory is used to maximize the reduction of the work function. In general, the work function drops significantly before reaching saturation. For example in the case of Cs doping, the work function saturates at 2.05 eV with a modest 8% doping. The adsorption of different concentrations on metal adatoms on graphene is also studied. Our calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. The transfer of electron from metallic dopants to the graphene for all the studied systems shifts the Fermi energy levels above the Dirac-point and the doped graphenes become metallic. The value of Fermi energy shifts depends on the type of metallic dopants and its concentrations. A detail analysis of the electronic structure in terms of band structure and density of states, absorption energy, and charge transfer for each adatom-graphene system is presented.

  14. Illustrative view on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of adatoms and monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šipr, O.; Mankovsky, S.; Polesya, S.; Bornemann, S.; Minár, J.; Ebert, H.

    2016-05-01

    Although it has been known for decades that magnetocrystalline anisotropy is linked to spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the mechanism of how it arises for specific systems is still a subject of debate. We focused on finding markers of SOC in the density of states (DOS) and on using them to understand the source of magnetocrystalline anisotropy for the case of adatoms and monolayers. Fully relativistic ab initio Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green's-function calculations were performed for Fe, Co, and Ni adatoms and monolayers on Au(111) to investigate changes in the orbital-resolved DOS due to a rotation of magnetization. In this way, one can see that a significant contribution to magnetocrystalline anisotropy for adatoms comes from pushing the SOC-split states above or below the Fermi level. As a result of this, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy depends crucially on the position of the energy bands of the adatom with respect to the Fermi level of the substrate. This view is supported by model crystal-field Hamiltonian calculations.

  15. Normal-mode analysis of lateral diffusion on a bounded membrane surface.

    PubMed Central

    Koppel, D E

    1985-01-01

    The normal-mode analysis of fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching, introduced for the characterization of lateral diffusion on spherical membrane surfaces, has been generalized and extended to other surface geometries. Theoretical expressions are derived for the characteristic values and orthogonal characteristic functions of the diffusion equations for cylindrical surfaces, ellipsoids of revolution and dimpled discoidal surfaces. On the basis of these results, a simple analytical function is proposed as an empirical solution for the analysis of photobleaching data on a variety of discoidal surfaces. Special experimental and computational methods for determining the surface-diffusion coefficient are described, and demonstrated with data for lipid diffusion in erythrocyte membranes. PMID:3978205

  16. Competing descriptions of diffusion profiles with two features: Surface space-charge layer versus fast grain-boundary diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraknepper, H.; De Souza, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Two different physical processes, (i) fast grain-boundary diffusion (FGBD) of oxygen and (ii) hindered oxygen diffusion in a surface space-charge layer, yield oxygen isotope diffusion profiles in a similar form. Two features are observed, with the short, sharp profile close to the surface being followed by a longer, shallower profile. In this study, we develop a procedure for deciding which of the two descriptions applies to experimentally measured profiles. Specifically, we solve Fick's second law, using finite-element simulations, to obtain oxygen isotope diffusion profiles for the two cases. Each set of profiles is then analysed in terms of the competing description. In this manner, we derive falsifiable conditions that allow physical processes to be assigned unambiguously to the two features of such isotope profiles. Applying these conditions to experimental profiles for SrTiO3 single crystals published in the literature, we find that FGBD is an invalid model for describing the diffusion processes.

  17. Generating a Simulated Fluid Flow over a Surface Using Anisotropic Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L. (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated surface is generated using a diffusion technique. The surface is comprised of a surface mesh of polygons. A boundary-layer fluid property is obtained for a subset of the polygons of the surface mesh. A gradient vector is determined for a selected polygon, the selected polygon belonging to the surface mesh but not one of the subset of polygons. A maximum and minimum diffusion rate is determined along directions determined using the gradient vector corresponding to the selected polygon. A diffusion-path vector is defined between a point in the selected polygon and a neighboring point in a neighboring polygon. An updated fluid property is determined for the selected polygon using a variable diffusion rate, the variable diffusion rate based on the minimum diffusion rate, maximum diffusion rate, and the gradient vector.

  18. Role of sidewall diffusion in GaAs nanowire growth: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankoke, Volker; Sakong, Sung; Kratzer, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The molecular processes during the growth of GaAs nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are studied from first principles. For the wurtzite crystal structure of GaAs, which is formed exclusively in nanowire growth, potential energy surfaces for sidewall diffusion of Ga, As, and GaAs surface species are calculated using density functional theory. We compare materials transport on type-I and -II nanowires (with {101¯0} and {112¯0} facets of wurtzite GaAs, respectively) and discuss its role for materials supply to the growth zone at the nanowire tip. On the sidewalls of type-II nanowires, the diffusion barrier for Ga along the growth direction is particularly low, only 0.30 eV compared to 0.60 eV on type-I nanowires. For As adatoms, the corresponding diffusion barriers are 0.64 eV and 1.20 eV, respectively, and hence higher than for Ga adatoms. The GaAs molecule formed by the chemical surface reaction of Ga and As finds very stable binding sites on type-II sidewalls where it inserts itself into a chemical bond between surface atoms, triggering radial growth. In contrast, on type-I nanowires the GaAs molecule adsorbed with the As end towards the surface has a low diffusion barrier of 0.50 eV. Together with our previous finding that the gold particle at the nanowire tip is efficient in promoting dissociative adsorption of As2 molecules, we conclude that the influx of Ga adatoms from sidewall diffusion is very important to maintain stoichiometric growth of GaAs nanowires, in particular when a large V-III ratio is used in MBE.

  19. Measuring Surface Diffusion of Organic Glasses Using Tobacco Mosaic Virus as Probe Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Potter, Richard; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Recent studies have shown that diffusion on the surface of organic glasses can be many orders of magnitude faster than bulk diffusion, with lower activation barrier. Developing new probes that can readily measure the diffusion at the surface of an organic glass can help study the effect of chemical structure and molecule's size on the enhanced surface diffusion. In this study, surface diffusion coefficient of molecular glass (TPD) is measured using tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as probe particles. TMV is placed on the surface of bulk TPD films. The evolution of the meniscus formed around TMV, driven by curvature gradient, is probed at various temperatures. TMV has a well-defined cylindrical shape, with a large aspect ratio (18 nm wide, 300 nm long). As such, the shape of the meniscus around the center of TMV is semi-one dimensional. Based on the self-similarity nature of surface diffusion flow in one dimension, the surface diffusion coefficient and its temperature dependence are measured. It is found that the surface diffusion is greatly enhanced and has weak temperature dependence compared to bulk counterpart, consistent with previous studies, showing that TMV probes serve as an efficient method of measuring surface diffusion. NSF-CAREER DMR-1350044.

  20. Tracking the Effect of Adatom Electronegativity on Systematically Modified AlGaN/GaN Schottky Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Maria; Pietschnig, Rudolf; Ostermaier, Clemens

    2015-10-21

    The influence of surface modifications on the Schottky barrier height for gallium nitride semiconductor devices is frequently underestimated or neglected in investigations thereof. We show that a strong dependency of Schottky barrier heights for nickel/aluminum-gallium nitride (0001) contacts on the surface terminations exists: a linear correlation of increasing barrier height with increasing electronegativity of superficial adatoms is observed. The negatively charged adatoms compete with the present nitrogen over the available gallium (or aluminum) orbital to form an electrically improved surface termination. The resulting modification of the surface dipoles and hence polarization of the surface termination causes observed band bending. Our findings suggest that the greatest Schottky barrier heights are achieved by increasing the concentration of the most polarized fluorine-gallium (-aluminum) bonds at the surface. An increase in barrier height from 0.7 to 1.1 eV after a 15% fluorine termination is obtained with ideality factors of 1.10 ± 0.05. The presence of surface dipoles that are changing the surface energy is proven by the sessile drop method as the electronegativity difference and polarization influences the contact angle. The extracted decrease in the Lifshitz-van-der-Waals component from 48.8 to 40.4 mJ/m(2) with increasing electronegativity and concentration of surface adatoms confirms the presence of increasing surface dipoles: as the polarizability of equally charged anions decreases with increasing electronegativity, the diiodomethane contact angles increase significantly from 14° up to 39° after the 15% fluorine termination. Therefore, a linear correlation between increasing anion electronegativity of the (Al)GaN termination and total surface energy within a 95% confidence interval is obtained. Furthermore, our results reveal a generally strong Lewis basicity of (Al)GaN surfaces explaining the high chemical inertness of the surfaces.

  1. The Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on an oxide surface: a combined Monte-Carlo and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, Anthony G; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V; Vasudevan, Rama K

    2015-11-13

    The controlled growth of epitaxial films of complex oxides requires an atomistic understanding of key parameters determining final film morphology, such as termination dependence on adatom diffusion, and height of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier. Here, through an in situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of mixed-terminated La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 (LCMO) films, we image adatoms and observe pile-up at island edges. Image analysis allows determination of the population of adatoms at the edge of islands and fractions on A-site and B-site terminations. A simple Monte-Carlo model, simulating the random walk of adatoms on a sinusoidal potential landscape using Boltzmann statistics is used to reproduce the experimental data, and provides an estimate of the ES barrier as ∼0.18 ± 0.04 eV at T = 1023 K, similar to those of metal adatoms on metallic surfaces. These studies highlight the utility of in situ imaging, in combination with basic Monte-Carlo methods, in elucidating the factors which control the final film growth in complex oxides.

  2. Invariant Fast Diffusion on the Surfaces of Ultrastable and Aged Molecular Glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2017-02-10

    Surface diffusion of molecular glasses is found to be orders of magnitude faster than bulk diffusion, with a stronger dependence on the molecular size and intermolecular interactions. In this study, we investigate the effect of variations in bulk dynamics on the surface diffusion of molecular glasses. Using the tobacco mosaic virus as a probe particle, we measure the surface diffusion on glasses of the same composition but with orders of magnitude of variations in bulk relaxation dynamics, produced by physical vapor deposition, physical aging, and liquid quenching. The bulk fictive temperatures of these glasses span over 35 K, indicating 13 to 20 orders of magnitude changes in bulk relaxation times. However, the surface diffusion coefficients on these glasses are measured to be identical at two temperatures below the bulk glass transition temperature T_{g}. These results suggest that surface diffusion has no dependence on the bulk relaxation dynamics when measured below T_{g}.

  3. Invariant Fast Diffusion on the Surfaces of Ultrastable and Aged Molecular Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2017-02-01

    Surface diffusion of molecular glasses is found to be orders of magnitude faster than bulk diffusion, with a stronger dependence on the molecular size and intermolecular interactions. In this study, we investigate the effect of variations in bulk dynamics on the surface diffusion of molecular glasses. Using the tobacco mosaic virus as a probe particle, we measure the surface diffusion on glasses of the same composition but with orders of magnitude of variations in bulk relaxation dynamics, produced by physical vapor deposition, physical aging, and liquid quenching. The bulk fictive temperatures of these glasses span over 35 K, indicating 13 to 20 orders of magnitude changes in bulk relaxation times. However, the surface diffusion coefficients on these glasses are measured to be identical at two temperatures below the bulk glass transition temperature Tg . These results suggest that surface diffusion has no dependence on the bulk relaxation dynamics when measured below Tg.

  4. Investigation of adatom adsorption on single layer buckled germanium selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkın, H.; Aktürk, E.

    2016-12-01

    A recent study of Hu et al. [1] predicted that 2D single layer of asymmetric washboard germanium selenide is found to be stable and display semiconducting properties. Motivating from this study, we have shown that another phase, which is 2D buckled honeycomb germanium selenide, is also stable. This phase exhibits semiconducting behavior with a band gap of 2.29 eV. Furthermore, on the basis of the first principles, spin-polarized density functional calculations, we investigate the effect of selected adatoms adsorption on the b-GeSe single layer. The adatoms Se, Ge, S, Si, C, Br and P are chemisorbed with significant binding energy where this effects modify the electronic structure of the single layer buckled GeSe locally by tuning the band gap. Net integer magnetic moment can be achieved and b-GeSe attains half metallicity through the adsorption of Si, Ge, P and Br.

  5. A Radial Basis Function (RBF)-Finite Difference (FD) Method for Diffusion and Reaction-Diffusion Equations on Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Varun; Wright, Grady B; Kirby, Robert M; Fogelson, Aaron L

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method based on Radial Basis Function (RBF)-generated Finite Differences (FD) for numerically solving diffusion and reaction-diffusion equations (PDEs) on closed surfaces embedded in ℝ (d) . Our method uses a method-of-lines formulation, in which surface derivatives that appear in the PDEs are approximated locally using RBF interpolation. The method requires only scattered nodes representing the surface and normal vectors at those scattered nodes. All computations use only extrinsic coordinates, thereby avoiding coordinate distortions and singularities. We also present an optimization procedure that allows for the stabilization of the discrete differential operators generated by our RBF-FD method by selecting shape parameters for each stencil that correspond to a global target condition number. We show the convergence of our method on two surfaces for different stencil sizes, and present applications to nonlinear PDEs simulated both on implicit/parametric surfaces and more general surfaces represented by point clouds.

  6. Zero-Point Spin-Fluctuations of Single Adatoms.

    PubMed

    Ibañez-Azpiroz, Julen; Dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Blügel, Stefan; Lounis, Samir

    2016-07-13

    Stabilizing the magnetic signal of single adatoms is a crucial step toward their successful usage in widespread technological applications such as high-density magnetic data storage devices. The quantum mechanical nature of these tiny objects, however, introduces intrinsic zero-point spin-fluctuations that tend to destabilize the local magnetic moment of interest by dwindling the magnetic anisotropy potential barrier even at absolute zero temperature. Here, we elucidate the origins and quantify the effect of the fundamental ingredients determining the magnitude of the fluctuations, namely, the (i) local magnetic moment, (ii) spin-orbit coupling, and (iii) electron-hole Stoner excitations. Based on a systematic first-principles study of 3d and 4d adatoms, we demonstrate that the transverse contribution of the fluctuations is comparable in size to the magnetic moment itself, leading to a remarkable ≳50% reduction of the magnetic anisotropy energy. Our analysis gives rise to a comprehensible diagram relating the fluctuation magnitude to characteristic features of adatoms, providing practical guidelines for designing magnetically stable nanomagnets with minimal quantum fluctuations.

  7. Inactivation of Escherichia coli on PTFE surfaces by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tučeková, Zlata; Koval'ová, Zuzana; Zahoranová, Anna; Machala, Zdenko; Černák, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    The non-equilibrium plasma of diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge (DCSBD) was tested for decontamination of bacteria Escherichia coli on polymer surfaces. We investigated the optical parameters of DCSBD plasma generated in synthetic air with different relative humidity. Our study was provided to estimate the main plasma components active during the DCSBD plasma degradation of E. coli contamination prepared on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon) surface, in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The DCSBD plasma was characterized by means of electrical measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. The inactivation of E. coli bacteria was evaluated by standard microbiological cultivation (CFU plate counting). The experimental results of the germicidal efficiency obtained for short plasma exposure times proved the effectiveness of DCSBD plasma for the polymer surface decontamination. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  8. Stability analysis and simulations of coupled bulk-surface reaction–diffusion systems

    PubMed Central

    Madzvamuse, Anotida; Chung, Andy H. W.; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we formulate new models for coupled systems of bulk-surface reaction–diffusion equations on stationary volumes. The bulk reaction–diffusion equations are coupled to the surface reaction–diffusion equations through linear Robin-type boundary conditions. We then state and prove the necessary conditions for diffusion-driven instability for the coupled system. Owing to the nature of the coupling between bulk and surface dynamics, we are able to decouple the stability analysis of the bulk and surface dynamics. Under a suitable choice of model parameter values, the bulk reaction–diffusion system can induce patterning on the surface independent of whether the surface reaction–diffusion system produces or not, patterning. On the other hand, the surface reaction–diffusion system cannot generate patterns everywhere in the bulk in the absence of patterning from the bulk reaction–diffusion system. For this case, patterns can be induced only in regions close to the surface membrane. Various numerical experiments are presented to support our theoretical findings. Our most revealing numerical result is that, Robin-type boundary conditions seem to introduce a boundary layer coupling the bulk and surface dynamics. PMID:25792948

  9. Zero energy modes in a superconductor with ferromagnetic adatom chains and quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čadež, Tilen; Sacramento, Pedro D.

    2016-12-01

    We study Majorana zero energy modes (MZEM) that occur in an s-wave superconducting surface, at the ends of a ferromagnetic (FM) chain of adatoms, in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) considering both non self-consistent and self-consistent superconducting order. We find that in the self-consistent solution, the average superconducting gap function over the adatom sites has a discontinuous drop with increasing exchange interaction at the same critical value where the topological phase transition occurs. We also study the MZEM for both treatments of superconducting order and find that the decay length is a linear function of the exchange coupling strength, chemical potential and superconducting order. For wider FM chains the MZEM occur at smaller exchange couplings and the slope of the decay length as a function of exchange coupling grows with chain width. Thus we suggest experimental detection of different delocalization of MZEM in chains of varying widths. We discuss similarities and differences between the MZEM for the two treatments of the superconducting order.

  10. Diffusion properties of Cu(0 0 1)- c(2 × 2)-Pd surface alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremeev, S. V.; Rusina, G. G.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2007-09-01

    Structural and diffusion properties of a Cu(0 0 1)- c(2 × 2)-Pd surface and sub-surface ordered alloys are studied by using interaction potentials obtained from the embedded-atom method. The calculated diffusion energies are in agreement with observed kinetics of the surface alloy formation and confirm stability of the underlayer alloy. Activation energy of planar diffusion of palladium at the initial stage of the alloy formation as well as the activation energy of the overlayer-underlayer diffusion of the Pd atoms are in good agreement with those obtained by the scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction measurements, respectively.

  11. Dynamics of Ti, N, and TiNx (x=1-3) admolecule transport on TiN(001) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiovanni, D. G.; Edström, D.; Hultman, L.; Chirita, V.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2012-10-01

    We use classical molecular dynamics and the modified embedded atom method formalism to investigate the dynamics of atomic-scale transport on a low-index model compound surface, TiN(001). Our simulations, totaling 0.25 μs for each case study, follow the pathways and migration kinetics of Ti and N adatoms, as well as TiNx complexes with x=1-3, which are known to contribute to the growth of TiN thin films by reactive deposition from Ti, N2, and N precursors. The simulations are carried out at 1000 K, within the optimal range for TiN(001) epitaxial growth. We find Ti adatoms to be the highest-mobility species on TiN(001), with the primary migration path involving jumps of one nearest-neighbor distance dNN between adjacent fourfold hollow sites along in-plane <100> channels. Long jumps, 2dNN, are also observed, but at much lower frequency. N adatoms, which exhibit significantly lower migration rates than Ti, diffuse along in-plane <110> directions and, when they intersect other N atoms, associatively form N2 molecules, which desorb at kinetic rates. As expected, TiN and TiN3 complexes migrate at even lower rates with complex diffusion pathways involving rotations, translations, and rototranslations. TiN2 trimers, however, are shown to have surprisingly high diffusion rates, above that of N adatoms and almost half that of Ti adatoms. TiN3 motion is dominated by in-place rotation with negligible diffusion.

  12. Sub-diffusion of DNA Coated Particles Near a Complementary DNA Covered Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lang; Xu, Qin; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian; Chaikin, Paul

    2011-03-01

    We have measured the diffusive behavior of micrometer sized colloids in a DNA covered particle-surface system. Near the particle-surface melting temperature of ~45° we observe conventional diffusion but as temperature is lowered we see a crossover to sub-diffusion over a narrow temperature range. The sub-diffusive behavior is intimately related to the broad distribution of local trapping times. We present a theoretical model which explains the sub-diffusion exponent in , which ranges from at C to at 44 .1° . From the distribution of number of DNA bonds we calculate the trapping time distribution and average trapping time. When the measurement time exceeds the average trapping time the system is in equilibrium and exhibits conventional diffusion. When the measurement time is less than the average trapping time the system is not in equilibrium and is sub-diffusive. NASA NNX08AK04G.

  13. Symmetry of surface nanopatterns induced by ion-beam sputtering: Role of anisotropic surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renedo, Javier; Cuerno, Rodolfo; Castro, Mario; Muñoz-García, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Ion-beam sputtering (IBS) is a cost-effective technique able to produce ordered nanopatterns on the surfaces of different materials. To date, most theoretical studies of this process have focused on systems which become amorphous under irradiation, e.g., semiconductors at room temperature. Thus, in spite of the large amount of experimental work on metals, or more recently on semiconductors at high temperatures, such experimental contexts have received relatively little theoretical attention. These systems are characterized by transport mechanisms, e.g., surface diffusion, which are anisotropic as a reflection of the crystalline structure not being overruled by the irradiation. Here, we generalize a previous continuum theory of IBS at normal incidence, in order to account for anisotropic surface diffusion. We explore systematically our generalized model in order to understand the role of anisotropy in the space-ordering properties of the resulting patterns. In particular, we derive a height equation which predicts morphological transitions among hexagonal and rectangular patterns as a function of system parameters and employ an angular correlation function to assess these pattern symmetries. By suitably choosing experimental conditions, it is found that one might be able to experimentally control the type of order displayed by the patterns produced.

  14. Analysis of diffusion in curved surfaces and its application to tubular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Colin James Stockdale; Raghunathan, Krishnan; DiBenedetto, Emmanuele; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion of particles in curved surfaces is inherently complex compared with diffusion in a flat membrane, owing to the nonplanarity of the surface. The consequence of such nonplanar geometry on diffusion is poorly understood but is highly relevant in the case of cell membranes, which often adopt complex geometries. To address this question, we developed a new finite element approach to model diffusion on curved membrane surfaces based on solutions to Fick’s law of diffusion and used this to study the effects of geometry on the entry of surface-bound particles into tubules by diffusion. We show that variations in tubule radius and length can distinctly alter diffusion gradients in tubules over biologically relevant timescales. In addition, we show that tubular structures tend to retain concentration gradients for a longer time compared with a comparable flat surface. These findings indicate that sorting of particles along the surfaces of tubules can arise simply as a geometric consequence of the curvature without any specific contribution from the membrane environment. Our studies provide a framework for modeling diffusion in curved surfaces and suggest that biological regulation can emerge purely from membrane geometry. PMID:27733625

  15. Iterative solutions for one-dimensional diffusion with time varying surface composition and composition-dependent diffusion coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, M.; Houska, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Solutions are given for one-dimensional diffusion problems with a time varying surface composition and also a composition dependent diffusion coefficient. The most general solution does not require special mathematical functions to fit the variation in surface composition or D(C). In another solution, a series expansion may be used to fit the time dependent surface concentration. These solutions make use of iterative calculations that converge rapidly and are highly stable. Computer times are much shorter than that required for finite difference calculations and can efficiently make use of interactive graphics terminals. Existing gas carburization data were used to provide an illustration of an iterative approach with a time varying carbon composition at the free surface.

  16. Impact of diffusion on surface clustering in random hydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyatskin, V. I.; Koshel, K. V.

    2017-01-01

    Buoyant material clustering in a stochastic flow, which is homogeneous and isotropic in space and stationary in time, is addressed. The dynamics of buoyant material in three-dimensional hydrodynamic flows can be considered as the motion of passive tracers in a compressible two-dimensional velocity field. The latter is of interest in the present study. It is well known that the clustering of the density of passive tracers occurs in this case. We evaluate the impact of diffusion on the clustering process by using a numerical model. In general, the effect of diffusion is negligible in the very beginning of the evolution of initially uniformly distributed passive tracers. Therefore, the clustering of the density of passive tracers can emerge in accordance with the general theory. We analyze the long time clustering affected by diffusion and show that the emerged cluster structure persists in time in spite of the diffusion effect. However, the clusters split in time.

  17. Special report, diffuse reflectivity of the lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    The far ultraviolet diffuse reflectivity of samples of lunar dust material is determined. Equipment for measuring the diffuse reflectivity of materials (e.g. paint samples) is already in existence and requires only minor modification for the proposed experiment which will include the measurement of the polarizing properties of the lunar samples. Measurements can be made as a function of both illumination angle and angle of observation.

  18. STM tip-mediated mass transport on Cu surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. S. N.; Huang, R. Z.; Gao, T. F.; Zhang, R. J.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-02-01

    Atomic-scale simulations are performed to study atomic motion on Cu surfaces to illustrate the effect of the scanning tunneling microscopy tip on mass transport (MT) in the surfaces and on top of the Co island in heteroepitaxial Co/Cu(0 0 1) and Co/Cu(1 1 1) systems. First we investigate tip-induced atomic motion of Co atoms embedded in the Cu(0 0 1) surface at zero bias voltage. With the help of the tip, the Co atom in the surface can freely diffuse toward its nearby vacancy site. So-called vacancy mechanism is used to interpret this phenomenon. Then tip-mediated atomic motion of Co adatoms on the Co islands supported by a Cu(1 1 1) surface is studied. It is revealed that the tip has a significant effect on the diffusion of adatoms on the islands and interlayer mass transport at the island edge. Interlayer mass transport at the island edge is found to depend strongly on the tip height and the lateral distance from the tip. By calculating the diffusion barriers, it is found that the jumping diffusion barrier on the island can be zero by the tip vertical manipulation while the Ehrlich-Schwoebel diffusion barrier at the island edge can be reduced by the tip lateral manipulation. Thus, the quality of thin films can be improved by controlling MT in and/or on the surface.

  19. Surface diffusion of gold nanoclusters on Ru(0001): effects of cluster size, surface defects and adsorbed oxygen atoms.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ori; Ankri, Jonathan; Asscher, Micha

    2013-08-28

    Understanding thermal behavior of metallic clusters on their solid supports is important for avoiding sintering and aggregation of the active supported metallic particles in heterogeneous catalysis. As a model system we have studied the diffusion of gold nano-clusters on modified Ru(0001) single crystal surfaces, employing surface density grating formation via a laser induced ablation technique. Surface modifications included damage induced by varying periods of Ne(+) ion sputtering at a collision energy of 2.8 keV and the effect of pre-adsorbed oxygen on the clean, defect free ruthenium surface. High density of surface damage, obtained at long sputter times, has led to enhanced diffusivity with lower onset temperature for diffusion. It is attributed to reduced cluster-surface commensurability which gives rise to smaller effective activation energy for diffusion. The diffusion of gold nano-clusters, 2 nm in size, was found to be insensitive to the oxygen surface concentration. The adsorbed oxygen acted as an "atomic layer lubricant", reducing friction between the cluster and the underlying surface. This has led to lower diffusivity onset temperatures (150 K) of the nano-clusters, with a stronger effect on smaller clusters.

  20. Effective one-dimensional diffusion on curved surfaces: Catenoid and pseudosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Pineda, Inti; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    We present the effective diffusion coefficient for the diffusion in a narrow generally asymmetric channel embedded on a curved surface, in the case of simple diffusion of pointlike particles without interaction and under no external forces. First, we define the diffusion equation for anisotropic diffusion involving a version of the Laplace-Beltrami operator. Then, we choose symmetric surfaces whose metric components only depend on one of the local coordinates and thus, apply the Kalinay-Percus' projection method. With this method one can project two-dimensional anisotropic diffusion into the corresponding effective one-dimensional generalized Fick-Jacobs equation to the lowest order. The perturbation series to all orders converges and as a general result the effective diffusion coefficient on a curved surface depending on the longitudinal local coordinate was obtained and is presented. It contains metric terms that can be related with the Gaussian curvature of the surface. We illustrate our results by studying asymmetric conical channel configurations on two surfaces, namely, the catenoid that is a minimal surface, and the pseudosphere that is a surface with negative constant curvature.

  1. Ag Out-surface Diffusion In Crystalline SiC With An Effective SiO2 Diffusion Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, H.; Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Zhu, Zihua; Shutthanandan, V.; Snead, Lance L.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-09-01

    For applications of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles in high temperature reactors, release of radioactive Ag isotope (110mAg) through the SiC coating layer is a safety concern. To understand the diffusion mechanism, Ag ion implantations near the surface and in the bulk were performed by utilizing different ion energies and energy-degrader foils. High temperature annealing was carried out on the as-irradiated samples to study the possible out-surface diffusion. Before and after annealing, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements were employed to obtain the elemental profiles of the implanted samples. The results suggest little migration of buried Ag in the bulk, and an out-diffusion of the implanted Ag in the near-surface region of single crystal SiC. It is also found that a SiO2 layer, which was formed during annealing, may serve as an effective barrier to reduce or prevent Ag out diffusion through the SiC coating layer.

  2. Combined measurement of surface, grain boundary and lattice diffusion coefficients on olivine bi-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, Katharina; Dohmen, Ralf; Wagner, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion along interface and grain boundaries provides an efficient pathway and may control chemical transport in rocks as well as their mechanical strength. Besides the significant relevance of these diffusion processes for various geologic processes, experimental data are still very limited (e.g., Dohmen & Milke, 2010). Most of these data were measured using polycrystalline materials and the formalism of LeClaire (1951) to fit integrated concentration depth profiles. To correctly apply this formalism, certain boundary conditions of the diffusion problem need to be fulfilled, e.g., surface diffusion is ignored, and furthermore the lattice diffusion coefficient has to be known from other studies or is an additional fitting parameter, which produces some ambiguity in the derived grain boundary diffusion coefficients. We developed an experimental setup where we can measure the lattice and grain boundary diffusion coefficients simultaneously but independent and demonstrate the relevance of surface diffusion for typical grain boundary diffusion experiments. We performed Mg2SiO4 bicrystal diffusion experiments, where a single grain boundary is covered by a thin-film of pure Ni2SiO4 acting as diffusant source, produced by pulsed laser deposition. The investigated grain boundary is a 60° (011)/[100]. This specific grain boundary configuration was modeled using molecular dynamics for comparison with the experimental observations in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Both, experiment and model are in good agreement regarding the misorientation, whereas there are still some disagreements regarding the strain fields along the grain boundary that are of outmost importance for the strengths of the material. The subsequent diffusion experiments were carried out in the temperature range between 800° and 1450° C. The inter diffusion profiles were measured using the TEMs energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer standardized using the Cliff-Lorimer equation and EMPA

  3. Parallel pore and surface diffusion of levulinic acid in basic polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baojian; Yang, Yiwen; Ren, Qilong

    2006-11-03

    The equilibrium and kinetics of levulinic acid (LA) adsorption on two basic polymeric adsorbents, 335 (highly porous gel) and D315 (macroreticular), were investigated. Experimental adsorption rates in batch stirred vessels under a variety of operating conditions were described successfully by the parallel pore and surface diffusion model taking into account external mass transfer and nonlinear Toth isotherm. The film-pore diffusion model was matched with the rate data and the resulting apparent pore diffusivities were strongly concentration-dependent and approached to a constant value for 335 adsorbent. Thus, the constant value was taken as the accurate pore diffusivity, while the pore diffusivity in D315 was estimated from the particle porosity. The surface diffusivities decreased with increasing initial bulk concentration for both adsorbents. The inverse concentration dependence was correlated reasonably well to the change of isosteric heat of adsorption as amount adsorbed.

  4. Effect of high rotor pressure-surface diffusion on performance of a transonic turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miser, James W; Stewart, Warner L; Monroe, Daniel E

    1955-01-01

    The subject turbine was investigated to determine the effect of high rotor pressure-surface diffusion on turbine performance. A comparison of the subject turbine with the most efficient transonic turbine in the present series of investigations showed that the efficiency of the subject turbine was almost as high, the suction-surface diffusion parameter was about the same, and the solidity was reduced by 36 percent. Because the loss per blade increased greatly with an increase in pressure-surface diffusion, the latter is also considered to be an important design consideration.

  5. Diffusion of gold from the inner core to the surface of Ag(2)S nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Ying, Jackie Y

    2010-02-24

    The diffusion of Au in Ag(2)S from the inner core to the surface of Ag(2)S was reported, and a new nanocomposite of core-shell Pt@Ag(2)S and Au nanoparticles has been derived through this diffusion phenomenon. Ostwald ripening was observed by transmission electron microscopy during the characterization of the nanocomposite. This elucidated the mechanism of formation of semiconductor-metal heterostructures as a consequence of Au diffusion in Ag(2)S nanocrystals.

  6. Surface diffusion control of the photocatalytic oxidation in air/TiO2 heterogeneous reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, R.; Evstatieva, E.; Smirniotis, P. G.

    2002-10-01

    The diffusion of superoxide radical anions on the surface of TiO 2 catalysts is theoretically considered as an important step in the kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation of toxic pollutants. A detailed analysis is performed to discriminate the effects of rotation and adsorption bond vibrations on the diffusion coefficient. A resonant dependence of the diffusivity on the lattice parameters of the TiO 2 surface is discovered showing that the most rapid diffusion takes place when the lattice parameters are twice as large as the the bond length of the superoxide radical anions. Whereas the rotation and vibrations normal to the catalyst surface are important, the anion bond vibrations do not affect the diffusivity due to their low amplitudes as compared to the lattice parameters.

  7. Shukla-Spatschek diffusion effects on surface plasma waves in astrophysical turbulent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    The effects of Shukla-Spatschek turbulent diffusion on a temporal mode of surface waves propagating at the interface of an astrophysical turbulent plasma are investigated. The damping rates for high and low modes of surface wave are kinetically derived by employing the Vlasov-Poisson equation and the specular reflection boundary condition. We found that the diffusion caused by the fluctuating electric fields leads to damping for both high and low modes of surface waves. The high-mode damping is enhanced with an increase of the wavenumber and the diffusion coefficient, but suppressed by an increase of electron thermal energy. By contrast, the low-mode damping is suppressed as the wavenumber and the thermal energy increase although it is enhanced as the diffusion increases. The variation of the damping rate due to the Shukla-Spatschek turbulent diffusion is also discussed.

  8. Disturbance-driven Hillslope Diffusion Scales and Values Clarified by Extant Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doane, T.; Furbish, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    In low-relief landscapes, the hillslope diffusion equation approximates the rate of topographic evolution due to disturbance driven sediment transport. Whereas this expression is appealing and performs well, the physical meaning of a hillslope diffusivity remains unclear. Here, a study of the disturbances that redistribute sediment on hillslopes clarifies a physical interpretation. We conceptualize the cumulative hillslope diffusivity, which is a rate constant for topographic degradation at large scales, as the aggregate of all surface disturbing processes. A numerical model that generates pit and mound topography from tree throw events illustrates this idea. Using the diffusion equation, we model the degradation of pits and mounds by all smaller scale disturbances. However, when examined at a larger scale, the effective hillslope diffusivity is composed of the small scale diffusivity plus the effect of tree throw. We also present a method to determine the background hillslope diffusivity using the extant hillslope roughness and rates of roughness production. Numerical simulations show that the variance of the surface roughness of a hillslope as introduced by pit and mound topography reaches a steady state when the rate of variance production (tree throw) is constant. The magnitude of the steady state variance is a function of variance production and decay (small scale diffusivity), so there is an opportunity to determine hillslope diffusivity values if the rates of variance production are known. This method yields estimates of the modern hillslope diffusivity which are useful in problems involving the human and climate change time scales.

  9. Strong out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy of Fe adatoms on Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eelbo, T.; Waśniowska, M.; Sikora, M.; Dobrzański, M.; Kozłowski, A.; Pulkin, A.; Autès, G.; Miotkowski, I.; Yazyev, O. V.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2014-03-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms adsorbed on the surface of the topological insulator Bi2Te3(111) are investigated. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy prove the existence of two distinct types of Fe species, while our first-principles calculations assign them to Fe adatoms in the hcp and fcc hollow sites. The combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements and angular dependent magnetization curves reveals out-of-plane anisotropies for both species with anisotropy constants of Kfcc=(10±4) meV/atom and Khcp=(8±4) meV/atom. These values are well in line with the results of calculations.

  10. Protein diffusion and long-term adsorption states at charged solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kubiak-Ossowska, Karina; Mulheran, Paul A

    2012-11-06

    The diffusion pathways of lysozyme adsorbed to a model charged ionic surface are studied using fully atomistic steered molecular dynamics simulation. The simulations start from existing protein adsorption trajectories, where it has been found that one particular residue, Arg128 at the N,C-terminal face, plays a crucial role in anchoring the lysozyme to the surface [Langmuir 2010 , 26 , 15954 - 15965]. We first investigate the desorption pathway for the protein by pulling the Arg128 side chain away from the surface in the normal direction, and its subsequent readsorption, before studying diffusion pathways by pulling the Arg128 side chain parallel to the surface. We find that the orientation of this side chain plays a decisive role in the diffusion process. Initially, it is oriented normal to the surface, aligning in the electrostatic field of the surface during the adsorption process, but after resorption it lies parallel to the surface, being unable to return to its original orientation due to geometric constraints arising from structured water layers at the surface. Diffusion from this alternative adsorption state has a lower energy barrier of ∼0.9 eV, associated with breaking hydrogen bonds along the pathway, in reasonable agreement with the barrier inferred from previous experimental observation of lysozyme surface clustering. These results show the importance of studying protein diffusion alongside adsorption to gain full insight into the formation of protein clusters and films, essential steps in the future development of functionalized surfaces.

  11. Subkelvin spin polarized STM: measuring magnetization curves of individual adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Jens

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic nanostructures consisting of a few atoms on non-magnetic substrates are explored as model systems for miniaturized data storage devices and for the implementation of novel spin-based computation techniques. Since these nanostructures are well defined and controllable on the atomic scale, they are ideally suited to study the fundamentals of magnetic interactions. We used spin polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy at subkelvin temperatures to image the magnetization of individual adatoms as a function of an external magnetic field. This allows to directly measure their magnetic interactions at very low energy scale. We will present the design of the 300mK STM [1] and then focus on the results. Interestingly, Co atoms on Pt(111) behave paramagnetic even at very low temperatures, 300 times smaller than the previously reported giant barrier between up and down spin [2]. A peculiar variation in the saturation flux density, which is measured for each atom, is found. This is attributed to their mutual indirect exchange via the substrate electrons. Indeed, we observe an interaction between the adatom and a Co monolayer stripe oscillating with distance between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling on the scale of the Fermi wavelength. [1] J. Wiebe et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4871 (2004). [2] P. Gambardella et al., Science 300, 1130 (2003).

  12. Specific Ions Modulate Diffusion Dynamics of Hydration Water on Lipid Membrane Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Effects of specific ions on the local translational diffusion of water near large hydrophilic lipid vesicle surfaces were measured by Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP). ODNP relies on an unpaired electron spin-containing probe located at molecular or surface sites to report on the dynamics of water protons within ∼10 Å from the spin probe, which give rise to spectral densities for electron–proton cross-relaxation processes in the 10 GHz regime. This pushes nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry to more than an order of magnitude higher frequencies than conventionally feasible, permitting the measurement of water moving with picosecond to subnanosecond correlation times. Diffusion of water within ∼10 Å of, i.e., up to ∼3 water layers around the spin probes located on hydrophilic lipid vesicle surfaces is ∼5 times retarded compared to the bulk water translational diffusion. This directly reflects on the activation barrier for surface water diffusion, i.e., how tightly water is bound to the hydrophilic surface and surrounding waters. We find this value to be modulated by the presence of specific ions in solution, with its order following the known Hofmeister series. While a molecular description of how ions affect the hydration structure at the hydrophilic surface remains to be answered, the finding that Hofmeister ions directly modulate the surface water diffusivity implies that the strength of the hydrogen bond network of surface hydration water is directly modulated on hydrophilic surfaces. PMID:24456096

  13. The realization of half-metal and spin-semiconductor for metal adatoms on arsenene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Geng; Zhao, Yinchang; Zeng, Shuming; Ni, Jun

    2016-12-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to study the adsorption of 15 different metal adatoms on silicenelike arsenene. The adsorption energies, geometries, density of states, dipole moments, work functions, net magnetic moments and Bader charges transferred from adatoms to arsenene sheet are calculated. All of the 15 metal adatoms on arsenene have binding energies larger than cohesive energies of the bulk metal, implying that stable adsorbates can be formed. As a result of the localized states originating from adatoms, the adsorption systems show a rich variety of electronic properties, such as metal, half-metal, semiconducting, and spin-semiconducting behaviors. The Co doped arsenene displays a half-metal property. The adsorption of Cu, Ag, and Au turns semiconducting arsenene into a narrow gap spin-semiconductor. These results indicate potential applications of functionalizations of silicenelike arsenene with metal adatoms, in particular for spintronics and dilute magnetic semiconductor materials.

  14. Crystal surface integrity and diffusion measurements on Earth and planetary materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.; Thomas, J. B.; Hanchar, J. M.; Wirth, R.

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of diffusion behavior in minerals is key to providing quantitative constraints on the ages and thermal histories of Earth and planetary materials. Laboratory experiments are a vital source of the needed diffusion measurements, but these can pose challenges because the length scales of diffusion achievable in a laboratory time are commonly less than 1 μm. An effective strategy for dealing with this challenge is to conduct experiments involving inward diffusion of the element of interest from a surface source, followed by quantification of the resulting diffusive-uptake profile using a high-resolution depth-profiling technique such as Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), or ion microprobe (SIMS). The value of data from such experiments is crucially dependent on the assumption that diffusion in the near-surface of the sample is representative of diffusion in the bulk material. Historical arguments suggest that the very process of preparing a polished surface for diffusion studies introduces defects-in the form of dislocations and cracks-in the outermost micrometer of the sample that make this region fundamentally different from the bulk crystal in terms of its diffusion properties. Extensive indirect evidence suggests that, in fact, the near-surface region of carefully prepared samples is no different from the bulk crystal in terms of its diffusion properties. A direct confirmation of this conclusion is nevertheless clearly important. Here we use transmission electron microscopy to confirm that the near-surface regions of olivine, quartz and feldspar crystals prepared using careful polishing protocols contain no features that could plausibly affect diffusion. This finding does not preclude damage to the mineral structure from other techniques used in diffusion studies (e.g., ion implantation), but even in this case the role of possible structural damage can be objectively assessed and controlled. While all

  15. Reflection of diffuse light from dielectric one-dimensional rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    González-Alcalde, Alma K; Méndez, Eugenio R; Terán, Emiliano; Cuppo, Fabio L S; Olivares, J A; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-03-01

    We study the reflection of diffuse light from 1D randomly rough dielectric interfaces. Results for the reflectance under diffuse illumination are obtained by rigorous numerical simulations and then contrasted with those obtained for flat surfaces. We also explore the possibility of using perturbation theories and conclude that they are limited for this type of study. Numerical techniques based on Kirchhoff approximation and reduced Rayleigh equations yield better results. We find that, depending on the refractive index contrast and nature of the irregularities, the roughness can increase or decrease the diffuse reflectance of the surface.

  16. Anisotropic parallel self-diffusion coefficients near the calcite surface: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Luís F. M.; Castier, Marcelo; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2016-08-01

    Applying classical molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate the parallel self-diffusion coefficients of different fluids (methane, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) confined between two { 10 1 ¯ 4 } calcite crystal planes. We have observed that the molecules close to the calcite surface diffuse differently in distinct directions. This anisotropic behavior of the self-diffusion coefficient is investigated for different temperatures and pore sizes. The ion arrangement in the calcite crystal and the strong interactions between the fluid particles and the calcite surface may explain the anisotropy in this transport property.

  17. Anisotropic parallel self-diffusion coefficients near the calcite surface: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luís F M; Castier, Marcelo; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-08-28

    Applying classical molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate the parallel self-diffusion coefficients of different fluids (methane, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) confined between two {101̄4} calcite crystal planes. We have observed that the molecules close to the calcite surface diffuse differently in distinct directions. This anisotropic behavior of the self-diffusion coefficient is investigated for different temperatures and pore sizes. The ion arrangement in the calcite crystal and the strong interactions between the fluid particles and the calcite surface may explain the anisotropy in this transport property.

  18. The role of electrostatic interactions in protease surface diffusion and the consequence for interfacial biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Feller, Bob E; Kellis, James T; Cascão-Pereira, Luis G; Robertson, Channing R; Frank, Curtis W

    2010-12-21

    This study examines the influence of electrostatic interactions on enzyme surface diffusion and the contribution of diffusion to interfacial biocatalysis. Surface diffusion, adsorption, and reaction were investigated on an immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) multilayer substrate over a range of solution ionic strength values. Interfacial charge of the enzyme and substrate surface was maintained by performing the measurements at a fixed pH; therefore, electrostatic interactions were manipulated by changing the ionic strength. The interfacial processes were investigated using a combination of techniques: fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy. We used an enzyme charge ladder with a net charge ranging from -2 to +4 with respect to the parent to systematically probe the contribution of electrostatics in interfacial enzyme biocatalysis on a charged substrate. The correlation between reaction rate and adsorption was determined for each charge variant within the ladder, each of which displayed a maximum rate at an intermediate surface concentration. Both the maximum reaction rate and adsorption value at which this maximum rate occurs increased in magnitude for the more positive variants. In addition, the specific enzyme activity increased as the level of adsorption decreased, and for the lowest adsorption values, the specific enzyme activity was enhanced compared to the trend at higher surface concentrations. At a fixed level of adsorption, the specific enzyme activity increased with positive enzyme charge; however, this effect offers diminishing returns as the enzyme becomes more highly charged. We examined the effect of electrostatic interactions on surface diffusion. As the binding affinity was reduced by increasing the solution ionic strength, thus weakening electrostatic interaction, the rate of surface diffusion increased considerably. The enhancement in specific activity achieved at

  19. Diffusion-Driven Instability on a Curved Surface: Spherical Case Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-López, M.; Chacón-Acosta, G.; Santiago, J. A.

    2017-04-01

    In this manuscript, we review the reaction-diffusion systems when these processes occur on curved surfaces. We show a general overview, from the original manuscripts by Turing, to the most recent developments with thick curved surfaces. We use the classical Schnakenberg model to present in a self-contained way the instability conditions of pattern formation in a flat surface; next, we give the basic elements of differential geometry of surfaces. With these tools, we study the reaction-diffusion system on a curved surface particularly on the sphere. When comparing the dispersion relations of both geometries, we found a modification in the range of the wavenumber due solely to the geometry of the substrate where the species diffuses.

  20. Particle tracking single protein-functionalized quantum dot diffusion and binding at silica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rife, Jack C; Long, James P; Wilkinson, John; Whitman, Lloyd J

    2009-04-09

    We evaluate commercial QD585 and QD605 streptavidin-functionalized quantum dots (QDs) for single-particle tracking microscopy at surfaces using total internal reflectance fluorescence and measure single QD diffusion and nonspecific binding at silica surfaces in static and flow conditions. The QD diffusion coefficient on smooth, near-ideal, highly hydroxylated silica surfaces is near bulk-solution diffusivity, as expected for repulsive surfaces, but many QD trajectories on rougher, less-than-ideal surfaces or regions display transient adsorptions. We attribute the binding to defect sites or adsorbates, possibly in conjunction with protein conformation changes, and estimate binding energies from the transient adsorption lifetimes. We also assess QD parameters relevant to tracking, including hydrodynamic radius, charge state, signal levels, blinking reduction with reducing solutions, and photoinduced blueing and bleaching.

  1. Using Self-Similarity to Simulate Meniscus Evolution Around TMV Due to Surface Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Richard; Zhang, Yue; Fakhraai, Zahra

    It has been hypothesized that enhanced surface diffusion allows the formation of stable molecular glasses during physical vapor deposition. The improved properties of these glasses, such as increased density and kinetic stability can help improve material properties in pioneering fields of technology such as organic electronics and pharmaceutical drug delivery. While surface diffusion has been measured previously on the surfaces of organic glasses, direct measurements on the surface of vapor-deposited stable glasses has proven more challenging. This research focuses on a straightforward method for measuring the surface diffusion coefficients of molecular glasses through the use of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanorods as probe particles. In conjunction, mathematical models based on the thin film equation were used to simulate fast meniscus formation around the nanorods on the glassy surface. The evolution of the meniscus is self-similar, which allows quick quantification of the diffusion coefficient, by solving the time evolution for a single experiment. Experimental data were compared and fit to these simulations to derive a quantity for the surface diffusion coefficient, Ds. Nsf-CAREER DMR-1350044.

  2. Efficient diffusive mechanisms of O atoms at very low temperatures on surfaces of astrophysical interest.

    PubMed

    Congiu, Emanuele; Minissale, Marco; Baouche, Saoud; Chaabouni, Henda; Moudens, Audrey; Cazaux, Stephanie; Manicò, Giulio; Pirronello, Valerio; Dulieu, François

    2014-01-01

    At the low temperatures of interstellar dust grains, it is well established that surface chemistry proceeds via diffusive mechanisms of H atoms weakly bound (physisorbed) to the surface. Until recently, however, it was unknown whether atoms heavier than hydrogen could diffuse rapidly enough on interstellar grains to react with other accreted species. In addition, models still require simple reduction as well as oxidation reactions to occur on grains to explain the abundances of various molecules. In this paper we investigate O-atom diffusion and reactivity on a variety of astrophysically relevant surfaces (water ice of three different morphologies, silicate, and graphite) in the 6.5-25 K temperature range. Experimental values were used to derive a diffusion law that emphasizes that O atoms diffuse by quantum mechanical tunnelling at temperatures as low as 6.5 K. The rates of diffusion on each surface, based on modelling results, were calculated and an empirical law is given as a function of the surface temperature. The relative diffusion rates are k(H2Oice) > k(sil) > k(graph) > k(expected). The implications of efficient O-atom diffusion over astrophysically relevant time-scales are discussed. Our findings show that O atoms can scan any available reaction partners (e.g., either another H atom, if available, or a surface radical like O or OH) at a faster rate than that of accretion. Also, as dense clouds mature, H2 becomes far more abundant than H and the O : H ratio grows, and the reactivity of O atoms on grains is such that O becomes one of the dominant reactive partners together with H.

  3. Influence of molecular shape, conformability, net surface charge, and tissue interaction on transscleral macromolecular diffusion.

    PubMed

    Srikantha, Nishanthan; Mourad, Fatma; Suhling, Klaus; Elsaid, Naba; Levitt, James; Chung, Pei Hua; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Jackson, Timothy L

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of molecular shape, conformability, net surface charge and tissue interaction on transscleral diffusion. Unfixed, porcine sclera was clamped in an Ussing chamber. Fluorophore-labelled neutral albumin, neutral dextran, or neutral ficoll were placed in one hemi-chamber and the rate of transscleral diffusion was measured over 24 h using a spectrophotometer. Experiments were repeated using dextrans and ficoll with positive or negative net surface charges. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was undertaken to compare transscleral diffusion with diffusion through a solution. All molecules were 70 kDa. With FRAP, the diffusion coefficient (D) of neutral molecules was highest for albumin, followed by ficoll, then dextran (p < 0.0001). Positive dextrans diffused fastest, followed by negative, then neutral dextrans (p = 0.0004). Neutral ficoll diffused the fastest, followed by positive then negative ficoll (p = 0.5865). For the neutral molecules, transscleral D was highest for albumin, followed by dextran, then ficoll (p < 0.0001). D was highest for negative ficoll, followed by neutral, then positive ficoll (p < 0.0001). By contrast, D was highest for positive dextran, followed by neutral, then negative dextran (p = 0.0021). In conclusion, diffusion in free solution does not predict transscleral diffusion and the molecular-tissue interaction is important. Molecular size, shape, and charge may all markedly influence transscleral diffusion, as may conformability to a lesser degree, but their effects may be diametrically opposed in different molecules, and their influence on diffusion is more complex than previously thought. Each variable cannot be considered in isolation, and the interplay of all these variables needs to be tested, when selecting or designing drugs for transscleral delivery.

  4. Measurement of diffusion length and surface recombination velocity in Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) and Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinden, Pierre; Van de Wiele, Fernand

    1985-03-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cells by means of a simple linear regression on experimental quantum efficiency values versus the inverse of the absorption coefficient. This method is extended to the case of Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells. Under certain conditions, the real or the effective surface recombination velocity may be measured.

  5. Magnetism of an adatom on bilayer graphene and its control: A first-principles perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafday, Dhani; Saha-Dasgupta, T.

    2013-11-01

    We present a first-principles investigation of the electronic and magnetic properties of an adatom on bilayer graphene within the framework of density functional theory. In particular, we study the influence of an applied gate voltage which modifies the electronic states of the bilayer graphene as well as shifts the adatom energy states relative to that of the graphene energy states. Our study carried out for a choice of three different adatoms, Na, Cu, and Fe, shows that the nature of adatom-graphene bonding evolves from ionic to covalent, in moving from an alkali metal, Na, to a transition metal, Cu or Fe. This leads to the formation of magnetic moments in the latter cases (Cu, Fe) and the absence of a magnetic moment in the former (Na). Application of an external electric field to bilayer graphene completely changes the scenario, switching on a magnetic moment for the Na adatom, and switching off the magnetic moments for Cu and Fe adatoms. Our results have important implications for fundamental studies of controlled adatom magnetism and spintronics applications in nanotechnology.

  6. Magnetism of Adatom on Bilayer Graphene and its Control: A First-principles Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri; Nafday, Dhani

    2014-03-01

    We present first-principles investigation of the electronic and magnetic properties of adatom on bilayer graphene within the framework of density functional theory. In particular, we study the influence of an applied gate-voltage which modifies the electronic states of the bilayer graphene as well as shifts the adatom energy states relative to that of the graphene energy states. Our study carried out for a choice of three different adatoms, Na, Cu and Fe, shows that the nature of adatom-graphene bonding evolves from ionic to covalent, in moving from alkali metal, Na to transition metal, Cu or Fe. This leads to the formation of magnetic moments in the latter cases (Cu, Fe) and its absence in the former (Na). Application of an external electric field to bilayer graphene, completely changes the scenario, switching on a magnetic moment for Na adatom, and switching off the magnetic moments for Cu, and Fe adatoms. Our results have important implications for fundamental studies of controlled adatom magnetism and spintronics application in nanotechnology. The authors thank Ministry of Earth Science and Department of Science and Technology, India for financial support.

  7. Effects of adatoms and physisorbed molecules on the physical properties of antimonene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Üzengi Aktürk, O.; Aktürk, E.; Ciraci, S.

    2016-01-01

    A recent study predicted that a 2D single layer of antimony in buckled honeycomb as well as asymmetric washboard structures, named antimonene, is stable at high temperature and displays semiconducting properties. Based on first-principles, spin-polarized density functional calculations, we investigated chemisorption of selected adatoms and physisorption of molecules on two antimonene phases. Since adspecies-adspecies interaction is minimized by using large supercells, our results mimic the effects of isolated, single adatoms or molecules. We found that molecules such as H2,O2, and H2O neither form strong chemical bonds nor dissociate; they are physisorbed with a weak binding energy without affecting the properties of antimonene. The adatoms, such as H, Li, B, C, N, O, Al, In, Si, P, Cl, Ti, As, and Sb, are chemisorbed with significant binding energy, whereby the atomic and electronic structures are modified locally. Boron and carbon adatoms are implemented into buckled antimonene crystal leading to a local reconstruction of the crystal. Nitrogen gives rise to Stone-Wales type defects. The localized states originating from adatoms give rise to diversity of electronic structure. The lowest conduction and highest valence bands of antimonene in asymmetric washboard structures have very high curvature. Once combined with adatom states, these bands offer a variety of features. Specific adatoms lead to spin polarization, attain magnetic moments, and can attribute a half-metallic character to antimonene.

  8. Revisiting polymer surface diffusion in the extreme case of strong adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changqian; Granick, Steve

    2014-12-09

    Revisiting polymer surface adsorption with a level of quantification not possible at the time of earlier seminal contributions to this field, we employ fluorescence microscopy to quantify the in-plane diffusion of end-labeled polystyrene adsorbed onto quartz and mica from cyclohexane solution, mostly at 25 °C. Care is taken to prohibit a surface-hopping mechanism, and the experimental techniques are adapted to measurements that persist for up to a few days. The main conclusion is that we fail to observe a single Fickian diffusion coefficient: instead, diffusion displays a broad multicomponent spectrum, indicating that the heterogeneity of surface diffusion fails to average out even over these long times and over distances (∼600 nm, the diameter of a diffraction-limited spot) greatly exceeding the size of the polymer molecules. This holds generally when we vary the molecular weight, the surface roughness, and the temperature. It quantifies the long-believed scenario that strongly adsorbed polymer layers (monomer-surface interaction of more than 1k(B)T) intrinsically present diverse surface conformations that present heterogeneous environments to one another as they diffuse. Bearing in mind that in spite of adsorption from dilute solution the interfacial polymer concentration is high, ramifications of these findings are relevant to the interfacial mobility of polymer glasses, melts, and nanocomposites.

  9. Atomic Diffusion and Molecular Self-Assembly on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, April D.

    The research described herein focuses on understanding and exploiting nanometer-scale surface phenomena with respect to surface reactivity and self-assembled systems. Using scanning tunneling miscroscopy, atoms and small molecules ( i.e., fewer than 30 atoms) adsorbed on metal surfaces were studied with the objective being to capture, understand, and manipulate the events occurring at the interface between gases and solid surfaces. The specific approach was to examine a variety of different but related chemical species in order to understand how chemical functionality affects the assembly behavior of technologically important species on metal surfaces. Using this systematic approach, in which, for example, only a single atom (or group of atoms) in the adsorbed species was varied, it was possible to uncover subtle differences in assembly behavior and overlayer stability. These differences are explained in terms of the chemical properties of the differing atom(s), which are based on well-established periodic trends and governed by electrostatics. Similar studies focusing on varying ligand functionality are also presented. Findings from this research add to our understanding of fundamental chemical interactions that govern assembly at the gas/solid interface. Importantly, the work here contributes to the establishment of heuristic rules that, in the future, could help predict assembly behavior. The impact of this research has the potential to transform our approach to sensor technology, heterogeneous catalysis, and other related fields.

  10. Evolution of glassy gratings with variable aspect ratios under surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malshe, Rohit; Ediger, M. D.; Yu, Lian; de Pablo, J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The structural evolution of surface gratings on a glassy material is investigated by means of molecular simulations. The gratings provide a means to probe surface diffusion in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature. A theory by Mullins [J. Appl. Phys. 30, 77 (1959)], 10.1063/1.1734979 is used to extract qu-antitative measures of surface diffusivity that rely on calculation of grating amplitude as a function of time. The simulations are implemented in the context of a model binary glass mixture [S. S. Ashwin and S. Sastry, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 15, S1253 (2003), 10.1088/0953-8984/15/11/343]. We find that surface diffusion is faster than bulk diffusion by several orders of magnitude, consistent with recent experimental data for an organic glass former. The diffusivities extracted by the grating-decay approach are consistent with those estimated on the basis of mean-squared particle displacements. The grating-decay approach, however, is more efficient than traditional techniques based on Einstein's diffusion equation. Grating decay is also more versatile and is shown to be applicable in a variety of sample geometries.

  11. Investigation of the abnormal Zn diffusion phenomenon in III-V compound semiconductors induced by the surface self-diffusion of matrix atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liangliang; Xu, Chang; Liu, Zhuming

    2017-01-01

    Zn diffusion in III-V compound semiconductorsare commonly processed under group V-atoms rich conditions because the vapor pressure of group V-atoms is relatively high. In this paper, we found that group V-atoms in the diffusion sources would not change the shaped of Zn profiles, while the Zn diffusion would change dramatically undergroup III-atoms rich conditions. The Zn diffusions were investigated in typical III-V semiconductors: GaAs, GaSb and InAs. We found that under group V-atoms rich or pure Zn conditions, the double-hump Zn profiles would be formed in all materials except InAs. While under group III-atoms rich conditions, single-hump Zn profiles would be formed in all materials. Detailed diffusion models were established to explain the Zn diffusion process; the surface self-diffusion of matrix atoms is the origin of the abnormal Zn diffusion phenomenon.

  12. Adsorption and migration of single metal atoms on the calcite (10.4) surface.

    PubMed

    Pinto, H; Haapasilta, V; Lokhandwala, M; Öberg, S; Foster, Adam S

    2017-04-05

    Transition metal atoms are one of the key ingredients in the formation of functional 2D metal organic coordination networks. Additionally, the co-deposition of metal atoms can play an important role in anchoring the molecular structures to the surface at room temperature. To gain control of such processes requires the understanding of adsorption and diffusion properties of the different transition metals on the target surface. Here, we used density functional theory to investigate the adsorption of 3d (Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu), 4d (Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag) and 5d (Hf, W, Ir, Pt, Au) transition metal adatoms on the insulating calcite (10.4) surface. We identified the most stable adsorption sites and calculated binding energies and corresponding ground state structures. We find that the preferential adsorption sites are the Ca-Ca bridge sites. Apart from the Cr, Mo, Cu, Ag and Au all the studied metals bind strongly to the calcite surface. The calculated migration barriers for the representative Ag and Fe atoms indicates that the metal adatoms are mobile on the calcite surface at room temperature. Bader analysis suggests that there is no significant charge transfer between the metal adatoms and the calcite surface.

  13. Adsorption and migration of single metal atoms on the calcite (10.4) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, H.; Haapasilta, V.; Lokhandwala, M.; Öberg, S.; Foster, Adam S.

    2017-04-01

    Transition metal atoms are one of the key ingredients in the formation of functional 2D metal organic coordination networks. Additionally, the co-deposition of metal atoms can play an important role in anchoring the molecular structures to the surface at room temperature. To gain control of such processes requires the understanding of adsorption and diffusion properties of the different transition metals on the target surface. Here, we used density functional theory to investigate the adsorption of 3d (Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu), 4d (Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag) and 5d (Hf, W, Ir, Pt, Au) transition metal adatoms on the insulating calcite (10.4) surface. We identified the most stable adsorption sites and calculated binding energies and corresponding ground state structures. We find that the preferential adsorption sites are the Ca–Ca bridge sites. Apart from the Cr, Mo, Cu, Ag and Au all the studied metals bind strongly to the calcite surface. The calculated migration barriers for the representative Ag and Fe atoms indicates that the metal adatoms are mobile on the calcite surface at room temperature. Bader analysis suggests that there is no significant charge transfer between the metal adatoms and the calcite surface.

  14. Surface hardening of stainless steel by runaway electrons preionized diffuse discharge in air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, M. V.; Shulepov, M. A.; Oskomov, K. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present microhardness measurements of stainless steel surface treated by diffuse discharge in air atmosphere. The cleaning from carbon in comparison to the initial sample was observed at a depth exceeding 20 nm. The oxygen concentration was also increased in comparison to that in the initial sample at a depth of up to about 50 nm. Comparative analysis shows that after treatment the microhardness of stainless steel surface increased in 2 times due to interaction of near-surface layers with product of plasma chemical reactions produced in diffuse discharge.

  15. Effect of Diffuse Backscatter in Cassini Datasets on the Inferred Properties of Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan-Salem, A. K.; Tyler, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    Microwave (2.18 cm-λ) backscatter data for the surface of Titan obtained with the Cassini Radar instrument exhibit a significant diffuse scattering component. An empirical scattering law of the form Acos^{n}θ, with free parameters A and n, is often employed to model diffuse scattering, which may involve one or more unidentified mechanisms and processes, such as volume scattering and scattering from surface structure that is much smaller than the electromagnetic wavelength used to probe the surface. The cosine law in general is not explicit in its dependence on either the surface structure or electromagnetic parameters. Further, the cosine law often is only a poor representation of the observed diffuse scattering, as can be inferred from computation of standard goodness-of-fit measures such as the statistical significance. We fit four Cassini datasets (TA Inbound and Outbound, T3 Outbound, and T8 Inbound) with a linear combination of a cosine law and a generalized fractal-based quasi-specular scattering law (A. K. Sultan- Salem and G. L. Tyler, J. Geophys. Res., 111, E06S08, doi:10.1029/2005JE002540, 2006), in order to demonstrate how the presence of diffuse scattering increases considerably the uncertainty in surface parameters inferred from the quasi-specular component, typically the dielectric constant of the surface material and the surface root-mean-square slope. This uncertainty impacts inferences concerning the physical properties of the surfaces that display mixed scattering properties.

  16. Effects of rainfall and surface flow on chemical diffusion from soil to runoff water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although basic processes of diffusion and convection have been used to quantify chemical transport from soil to surface runoff, there are little research results actually showing how these processes were affected by rainfall and surface flow. We developed a laboratory flow cell and a sequence of exp...

  17. Resolving High Amplitude Surface Motion with Diffusing Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, W.; Budakian, R.; Putterman, Seth J.

    1996-01-01

    A new technique has been developed for the purpose of imaging high amplitude surface motion. With this method one can quantitatively measure the transition to ripple wave turbulence. In addition, one can measure the phase of the turbulent state. These experiments reveal strong coherent structures in turbulent range of motion.

  18. Below melting point photothermal reshaping of single gold nanorods driven by surface diffusion.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Adam B; Siddiquee, Arif M; Chon, James W M

    2014-12-23

    Plasmonic gold nanorod instability and reshaping behavior below melting points are important for many future applications but are yet to be fully understood, with existing nanoparticle melting theories unable to explain the observations. Here, we have systematically studied the photothermal reshaping behavior of gold nanorods irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses to report that the instability is driven by curvature-induced surface diffusion rather than a threshold melting process, and that the stability dramatically decreases with increasing aspect ratio. We successfully utilized the surface diffusion model to explain the observations and found that the activation energy for surface diffusion was dependent on the aspect ratio of the rods, from 0.6 eV for aspect ratio of 5 to 1.5 eV for aspect ratio less than 3. This result indicates that the surface atoms are much easier to diffuse around in larger aspect ratio rods than in shorter rods and can induce reshaping at any given temperature. Current plasmonics and nanorod applications with the sharp geometric features used for greater field enhancement will therefore need to consider surface diffusion driven shape change even at low temperatures.

  19. Thermodynamic, kinetic and conformational analysis of proteins diffusion-sorption on a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Sanfeld, Albert; Royer, Catherine; Steinchen, Annie

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we examine particularly some of the more fundamental properties of protein conformational changes at a solid surface coupled with diffusion from the bulk of an aqueous solution and with the adsorption-desorption processes. We focus our attention on adsorbed protein monolayers upon a solid surface using a thermodynamic and kinetic analytical development. Account is also taken of the effects on the overall rate of the conformational change on a solid surface of deviation from ideality, of protein flexibility, of surface free energy and of interaction with reactive solid sites. Our theory applied to steady states is illustrated by examples such as folding-misfolding-unfolding of RNase and SNase on a solid surface after diffusion and adsorption from an aqueous solution. For this purpose, we put forward the determining steps which shall lead to the steady state. The existence of three situations is highlighted according to the values of the typical constants relevant for the protein considered: reaction rate determining step, diffusion and sorption determining steps, mixed adsorption diffusion and reaction rate. Finally, we have tried to link the developments of our theories to a large literature based on experimental results encountered during proteins diffusion-sorption-reaction processes, fundamental topics that has been since long investigated by Miller's team in MPKG.

  20. A model for surface diffusion of trans-membrane proteins on lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ashutosh; Steigmann, David J.

    2011-06-01

    The equilibrium theory of lipid membranes is modified to include the effects of a continuous distribution of trans-membrane proteins. These influence membrane shape and evolve in accordance with a diffusive balance law. The model is purely mechanical in the absence of the proteins. Conditions ensuring energy dissipation in the presence of diffusion are given and an example constitutive function is used to simulate the coupled inertia-less interplay between membrane shape and protein distribution. The work extends an earlier continuum theory of equilibrium configurations of composite lipid-protein membranes to accommodate surface diffusion.

  1. The influence of acoustic reflections from diffusive architectural surfaces on spatial auditory perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Philip W.

    This thesis addresses the effect of reflections from diffusive architectural surfaces on the perception of echoes and on auditory spatial resolution. Diffusive architectural surfaces play an important role in performance venue design for architectural expression and proper sound distribution. Extensive research has been devoted to the prediction and measurement of the spatial dispersion. However, previous psychoacoustic research on perception of reflections and the precedence effect has focused on specular reflections. This study compares the echo threshold of specular reflections, against those for reflections from realistic architectural surfaces, and against synthesized reflections that isolate individual qualities of reflections from diffusive surfaces, namely temporal dispersion and spectral coloration. In particular, the activation of the precedence effect, as indicated by the echo threshold is measured. Perceptual tests are conducted with direct sound, and simulated or measured reflections with varying temporal dispersion. The threshold for reflections from diffusive architectural surfaces is found to be comparable to that of a specular re ection of similar energy rather than similar amplitude. This is surprising because the amplitude of the dispersed re ection is highly attenuated, and onset cues are reduced. This effect indicates that the auditory system is integrating re ection response energy dispersed over many milliseconds into a single stream. Studies on the effect of a single diffuse reflection are then extended to a full architectural enclosure with various surface properties. This research utilizes auralizations from measured and simulated performance venues to investigate spatial discrimination of multiple acoustic sources in rooms. It is found that discriminating the lateral arrangement of two sources is possible at narrower separation angles when reflections come from at rather than diffusive surfaces. Additionally, subjective impressions are

  2. Computer modelling of nanoscale diffusion phenomena at epitaxial interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailov, M.; Ranguelov, B.

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines an important area in the application of computer modelling to interface phenomena. Being relevant to the fundamental physical problem of competing atomic interactions in systems with reduced dimensionality, these phenomena attract special academic attention. On the other hand, from a technological point of view, detailed knowledge of the fine atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces correlates with a large number of practical problems in materials science. Typical examples are formation of nanoscale surface patterns, two-dimensional superlattices, atomic intermixing at an epitaxial interface, atomic transport phenomena, structure and stability of quantum wires on surfaces. We discuss here a variety of diffusion mechanisms that control surface-confined atomic exchange, formation of alloyed atomic stripes and islands, relaxation of pure and alloyed atomic terraces, diffusion of clusters and their stability in an external field. The computational model refines important details of diffusion of adatoms and clusters accounting for the energy barriers at specific atomic sites: smooth domains, terraces, steps and kinks. The diffusion kinetics, integrity and decomposition of atomic islands in an external field are considered in detail and assigned to specific energy regions depending on the cluster stability in mass transport processes. The presented ensemble of diffusion scenarios opens a way for nanoscale surface design towards regular atomic interface patterns with exotic physical features.

  3. Diffuse pollution of surface water by pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Derksen, J G M; Rijs, G B J; Jongbloed, R H

    2004-01-01

    Pharmaceutical products for humans or animals, as well as their related metabolites (degradation products) end up in the aquatic environment after use. Recent investigations from abroad show that low concentrations of pharmaceuticals are detectable in municipal waste water, surface water, groundwater and even drinking water. Little is known about the effects, and with that the risk, of long term exposure to low concentrations of pharmaceuticals for aquatic organisms. On the basis of the current knowledge, further attention to map the presence and effects of pharmaceutical residues on aquatic organisms is justified. To map the Dutch situation, recently a monitoring program has started.

  4. Adsorption rate of phenol from aqueous solution onto organobentonite: surface diffusion and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Perez, Raul; Leyva-Ramos, Roberto; Mendoza-Barron, Jovita; Guerrero-Coronado, Rosa M

    2011-12-01

    The concentration decay curves for the adsorption of phenol on organobentonite were obtained in an agitated tank batch adsorber. The experimental adsorption rate data were interpreted with diffusional models as well as first-order, second-order and Langmuir kinetic models. The surface diffusion model adjusted the data quite well, revealing that the overall rate of adsorption was controlled by surface diffusion. Furthermore, the surface diffusion coefficient increased raising the mass of phenol adsorbed at equilibrium and was independent of the particle diameter in the range 0.042-0.0126 cm. It was demonstrated that the overall rate of adsorption was essentially not affected by the external mass transfer. The second-order and the Langmuir kinetic models fitted the experimental data quite well; however, the kinetic constants of both models varied without any physical meaning while increasing the particle size and the mass of phenol adsorbed at equilibrium.

  5. Jump rates for surface diffusion of large molecules from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Patrick Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2015-04-21

    We apply a recently developed stochastic model for the surface diffusion of large molecules to calculate jump rates for 9,10-dithioanthracene on a Cu(111) surface. The necessary input parameters for the stochastic model are calculated from first principles using density functional theory (DFT). We find that the inclusion of van der Waals corrections to the DFT energies is critical to obtain good agreement with experimental results for the adsorption geometry and energy barrier for diffusion. The predictions for jump rates in our model are in excellent agreement with measured values and show a marked improvement over transition state theory (TST). We find that the jump rate prefactor is reduced by an order of magnitude from the TST estimate due to frictional damping resulting from energy exchange with surface phonons, as well as a rotational mode of the diffusing molecule.

  6. Exploratory laboratory study of lateral turbulent diffusion at the surface of an alluvial channel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayre, William W.; Chamberlain, A.R.

    1964-01-01

    In natural streams turbulent diffusion is one of the principal mechanisms by which liquid and suspended-particulate contaminants are dispersed in the flow. A knowledge of turbulence characteristics is therefore essential in predicting the dispersal rates of contaminants in streams. In this study the theory of diffusion by continuous movements for homogeneous turbulence is applied to lateral diffusion at the surface of an open channel in which there is uniform flow. An exploratory-laboratory investigation was conducted in which the lateral dispersion at the water surface of a sand-Led flume was studied by measuring the lateral spread from a point source of small floating polyethylene articles. The experiment was restricted to a single set of low and channel geometry conditions. The results of the study indicate that with certain restrictions lateral dispersion in alluvial channels may be successfully described by the theory of diffusion by continuous movements. The experiment demonstrates a means for evaluating the lateral diffusion coefficient and also methods for quantitatively estimating fundamental turbulence properties, such as the intensity and the Lagrangian integral scale of turbulence in an alluvial channel. The experimental results show that with increasing distance from the source the coefficient of lateral turbulent diffusion increases initially but tends toward a constant limiting value. This result is in accordance with turbulent diffusion theory. Indications are that the distance downstream from the source required for the diffusion coefficient to reach its limiting value is actually very small when compared to the length scale of most diffusion phenomena in natural streams which are of practical interest.

  7. Hydrogen diffusion on Fe surface and into subsurface from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiangjian; Chen, Jun; Sun, Y. M.; Liang, Tianshui

    2016-12-01

    The chemisorption of atomic hydrogen on metal surface and into subsurface is of great importance to understand the fundamental diffusion mechanism in heterogenous catalysis and hydrogen-induced embrittlement. Using spin-polarized density functional theory, we show that hydrogen prefers the quasi four-fold hollow site near typical Hollow site on Fe(110) and that four-fold hollow site on Fe(100). A very weak surface reconstruction effect induced by hydrogen coverage is reported. Two three-dimensional (3D) potential energy surfaces (PESs) are constructed for modelling hydrogen diffusion on Fe surface and into subsurface by interpolating ab initio energy points (∼1200 for each surface). We appraise the accuracy of PES and plot some contours of potential energies at different adsorption heights including the important subsurface regions. Furthermore, possible minimum energy pathways for hydrogen diffusion on Fe surface and into subsurface are searched out based on these 3D PESs using a mesh method. These pathways are in good agreement with those obtained from the nudged elastic band method. Some trapping regions into subsurface for hydrogen chemisorption are shown and the diffusion coefficient is estimated by classical transition state theory.

  8. Diffusion coefficients for two-dimensional narrow asymmetric channels embedded on flat and curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, I.; Chacón-Acosta, G.; Dagdug, L.

    2014-12-01

    This paper focuses on the derivation of a general position-dependent diffusion coefficient to describe the two-dimensional (2D) diffusion in a narrow and smoothly asymmetric channel of varying cross section and non-straight midline embedded in a flat or on a curved surface. We consider the diffusion of non-interacting point-like Brownian particles under no external field. In order to project the 2D diffusion equation into an effective one-dimensional generalized Fick-Jacobs equation in both, flat and curved manifolds using the generalization of the mapping procedure introduced by Kalinay and Percus. The expression obtained is the more general position-dependent diffusion coefficient for 2D narrow channels that lies in a plane, which contains all the well-known previous results both symmetric and asymmetric channels as special cases. In a straightforward manner, previously defining the corresponding Fick-Jacobs equation on a curved surface, this result can be generalized to the case of a narrow 2D channel embedded on a no-flat smooth surface where the full position-dependent diffusion coefficient is modified according to the metric elements that accounts for the curvature of the surface. In addition, the equations for the mean first-passage time are obtained for asymmetrical channels on curved surfaces. As an example we shall solve this equation for the case of an asymmetric channel defined by straight walls embedded on a cylindrical surface having a reflecting wall at the origin and an absorbent one at distance θL.

  9. Disorder-induced bound states within an adatom-quantum wire system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnetta, Bradley; Ordonez, Gonzalo

    2014-03-01

    Bound states induced by disorder are theoretically observed within a quantum wire and adatom system. The quantum wire is modeled as an array of quantum wells with random energies and exhibits Anderson Localization. By varying the energy of our adatom and adjusting the tunneling strength between the adatom and the quantum wire we observe disorder-induced bound states between the the adatom and its attached point. The characteristics of these disorder-induced bound states are greatly influenced by the site of interest on the quantum wire. Utilizing random quantum wires and disordered superlattices to produce bound states may offer flexibility in fabrication as well as provide grounds for energy transmission in photovoltaics.

  10. Scaling and diffusion of oil spills in the Ocean Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquis, A. M.; Platonov, A.; Grau, J.; Sekula, E.

    2010-05-01

    The region of the Gulf of Lions at the northwestern Mediterranean Sea has been studied within a ten-year period from December 1996 until November 2006. More than 1000 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, which have been acquired by the Second European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS 1/2) as well as from ENVISAT. We present statistical results of the structure of several features revealed by SAR such as oil spills and tensioactive slicks dynamic. We compare oil splils obtained from the projects Clean Seas,ENVA4/CT/0334, RC2003/005700, ESP2005/07551 and ESA/AO/IP2240. Since natural (caused by plankton, fish, etc.) slicks as well as man-made oil slicks dampen the small-scale surface waves, which are responsible for the radar backscattering from the ocean surface, both types of effects may be confused and give look/alike false oil spill detections. The early SAR images were processed at a resolution of 1 pixel=200m and were provided by the RApid Information Dissemination System (RAIDS) SAR processing facility in West Freugh, UK. Recent ENVISAT images directly from ESA allow a higher resolution of 1 pixel = 26 m, improving the detected turbulent scaling range. The occurrence of marine oil pollution as well as several dynamic features near Barcelona (frames 8-10, 19, 20; 200 SAR images)is itself a random multi-scale process. The use of different multifractal techniques, both using limits to the smallest and largest available scales, show that the scaling laws are very complex and depend strongly on intermittency of the assumed turbulent cascade, the shapes of the multifractal spectra functions are seen to deviate from an homogeneous multifractal and depend both on the initial conditions of the spill or slick, and on the transit time that the spill has been subjected to the local turbulence.

  11. Surface modification of aluminum by runaway electron preionized diffuse discharges in different gases at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, Mikhail V.; Shulepov, Mikhail A.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of an examination of aluminum samples exposed to runaway electron preionized diffuse discharges in air, nitrogen, and argon at atmospheric pressure. The changes in the chemical composition, structure, and hardness of the aluminum surface layers caused by the action of the discharge were investigated. It has been found that the oxygen and carbon concentrations in the surface layers depend on the number of discharge pulses and on the chemical composition of the working gas. The goal of the study was to find possible uses of runaway electron preionized diffuse discharges in research and industry.

  12. A novel interferometric technique to estimate thermal diffusivity of optically transparent solid using isothermal surface velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settu, Balachandar; Shivaprakash, N. C.; Kameswara Rao, L.

    2015-07-01

    One-dimensional transient heat flow is interpreted as a procession of `macro-scale translatory motion of indexed isothermal surfaces'. A new analytical model is proposed by introducing velocity of isothermal surface in Fourier heat diffusion equation. The velocity dependent function is extracted by revisiting `the concept of thermal layer of heat conduction in solid' and `exact solution' to estimate thermal diffusivity. The experimental approach involves establishment of 1 D unsteady heat flow inside the sample through Step-temperature excitation. A novel self-reference interferometer is utilized to separate a `unique isothermal surface' in time- varying temperature field. The translatory motion of the said isothermal surface is recorded using digital camera to estimate its velocity. From the knowledge of thermo-optic coefficient, temperature of the said isothermal surface is predicted. The performance of proposed method is evaluated for Quartz sample and compared with literature.

  13. Variation in diffusion of gases through PDMS due to plasma surface treatment and storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Markov, Dmitry A; Lillie, Elizabeth M; Garbett, Shawn P; McCawley, Lisa J

    2014-02-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a commonly used polymer in the fabrication of microfluidic devices due to such features as transparency, gas permeability, and ease of patterning with soft lithography. The surface characteristics of PDMS can also be easily changed with oxygen or low pressure air plasma converting it from a hydrophobic to a hydrophilic state. As part of such a transformation, surface methyl groups are removed and replaced with hydroxyl groups making the exposed surface to resemble silica, a gas impermeable substance. We have utilized Platinum(II)-tetrakis(pentaflourophenyl)porphyrin immobilized within a thin (~1.5 um thick) polystyrene matrix as an oxygen sensor, Stern-Volmer relationship, and Fick's Law of simple diffusion to measure the effects of PDMS composition, treatment, and storage on oxygen diffusion through PDMS. Results indicate that freshly oxidized PDMS showed a significantly smaller diffusion coefficient, indicating that the SiO2 layer formed on the PDMS surface created an impeding barrier. This barrier disappeared after a 3-day storage in air, but remained significant for up to 3 weeks if PDMS was maintained in contact with water. Additionally, higher density PDMS formulation (5:1 ratio) showed similar diffusion characteristics as normal (10:1 ratio) formulation, but showed 60 % smaller diffusion coefficient after plasma treatment that never recovered to pre-treatment levels even after a 3-week storage in air. Understanding how plasma surface treatments contribute to oxygen diffusion will be useful in exploiting the gas permeability of PDMS to establish defined normoxic and hypoxic oxygen conditions within microfluidic bioreactor systems.

  14. Surface diffusion and desorption kinetics for perfluoro-n-butane on Ru(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, M. V.; Westre, E. D.; George, S. M.

    1991-03-01

    The surface diffusion and desorption kinetics for perfluoro-n-butane on Ru(001) were examined using laser-induced thermal desorption (LITD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. The surface diffusion displayed Arrhenius behavior and was coverage independent. The surface diffusion parameters for perfluoro-n-butane on Ru(001) were Edif=2.9±0.3 kcal/mol and D0=5.9×10-2±0.2 cm2/s. The desorption parameters for perfluoro-n-butane on Ru(001) were Edes=13.8±0.6 kcal/mol and νdes=2.8×1021±0.1 s-1. In comparison, the surface diffusion parameters for n-butane on Ru(001) were Edif=3.5±0.2 kcal/mol and D0=1.4×10-1±0.2 cm2/s. The desorption parameters for n-butane on Ru(001) were Edes=11.9±0.5 kcal/mol and νdes=3.6×1015±0.1 s-1. The corrugation ratio, defined as Ω≡Edif/Edes, was determined to be Ω=0.21 for perfluoro-n-butane on Ru(001). This corrugation ratio was substantially different than the corrugation ratio of Ω≊0.30 measured for n-butane and various other n-alkanes, cycloalkanes and branched alkanes on Ru(001). The comparison between perfluoro-n-butane and the other alkanes indicates that fluorination lowers the surface corrugation ratio on Ru(001). Likewise, fluorination significantly increases the preexponential for desorption from Ru(001). This study illustrates the magnitude of substituent effects on surface diffusion and desorption kinetics for a physisorbed molecule on a single-crystal metal surface.

  15. Determination of the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity: Two simple methods

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, J.C.; Venier, G.L.; Tamasi, M.J.L.; Bolzi, C.G.; Pla, J.C.; Godfrin, E.M.

    1997-12-31

    The present paper analyzes two new methods for the estimation of the diffusion length (L{sub d}) and surface recombination velocity (S) through simple and inexpensive equipment. The first one is based on the behavior of the short circuit current (J{sub sc}) under rear illumination, as a function of the cell width (d). In a general case, this model allows one to determine L{sub d} and the effective rear S by a numerical fitting. The second method uses crystalline silicon cells with localized diffusions. A geometry with linear diffusions is considered and the dependence of J{sub sc} with the distance between those diffusions is analyzed by means of a one dimensional model. The second method is applied to n{sup +}pp{sup +} solar cells fabricated in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA).

  16. A Lagrangian particle method for reaction-diffusion systems on deforming surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bergdorf, Michael; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    Reaction-diffusion processes on complex deforming surfaces are fundamental to a number of biological processes ranging from embryonic development to cancer tumor growth and angiogenesis. The simulation of these processes using continuum reaction-diffusion models requires computational methods capable of accurately tracking the geometric deformations and discretizing on them the governing equations. We employ a Lagrangian level-set formulation to capture the deformation of the geometry and use an embedding formulation and an adaptive particle method to discretize both the level-set equations and the corresponding reaction-diffusion. We validate the proposed method and discuss its advantages and drawbacks through simulations of reaction-diffusion equations on complex and deforming geometries.

  17. Effect of diffusion and surface recombination on the frequency-dependent characteristics of an OPFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vinaya K.

    1993-02-01

    Analytical studies have been made on the effect of diffusion and surface recombination on the frequency dependent characteristics of an ion-implanted GaAs optical field effect transistor. Modulated optical generation and voltage dependent depletion layer width in the active region have been considered whereas photovoltaic effect is ignored in this analysis. Result shows that drain-source current decreases with the increases of modulated signal frequency but diffusion effect increases the modulating frequency range from c.m. to m.m. wavelength. Moreover, I- V changes significantly with the trap center density only when Nr >= 1023/m2 with diffusion effect and >= 1020/m2 without diffusion effect at a particular dimension of the device. This model may be very much useful to measure the sensitivity of the device in terms of trap center density and modulating frequency.

  18. Diffusion of CO{sub 2} on Rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junseok; Sorescu, Dan C.; Deng, Xingyi; Jordan, Kenneth D.

    2011-12-15

    The diffusion of CO{sub 2} molecules on a reduced rutile TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1×1) surface has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The STM feature associated with a CO{sub 2} molecule at an oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}) becomes increasingly streaky with increasing temperature, indicating thermally activated CO{sub 2} diffusion from the V{sub O} site. From temperature-dependent tunneling current measurements, the barrier for diffusion of CO{sub 2} from the V{sub O} site is estimated to be 3.31 ± 0.23 kcal/mol. The corresponding value from the DFT calculations is 3.80 kcal/mol. In addition, the DFT calculations give a barrier for diffusion of CO{sub 2} along Ti rows of only 1.33 kcal/mol.

  19. Ehrlich-Schwöbel barriers and adsorption of Au, Cu and Ag stepped (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlattar, M.; Elkoraychy, E.; Sbiaai, K.; Mazroui, M.; Boughaleb, Y.

    2017-02-01

    We use a combination of quenched molecular dynamics and embedded atom method to calculate the activation energy barriers for the hopping and exchange mechanisms of Au, Ag or Cu on Au(100), Ag(100) or Cu(100) stepped surfaces. Our findings show that the Ehrlich-Schwöbel (ES) barriers for an adatom to undergo jump or exchange at a step edge are found to be dependent of the nature of substrate stepped surfaces. We also find that the ES barriers for the hopping processes are too high, except for Cu/Au(100). While for exchange process the Ehrlich-Schwöbel barriers are found to be very low and even negative. These ES barriers can explain the difference in the growth modes for the different systems. On the other hand, we calculated the adsorption energies at the most stable adsorption sites near step edges. In particular, we wish to clarify the relation between the adatom diffusion energy barriers and the adatom adsorption energies. These results may serve as some guiding rules for studying stepped surface morphologies, which are of importance to surface nanoengineering.

  20. INTRODUCTION: Surface Dynamics, Phonons, Adsorbate Vibrations and Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, L. W.

    2004-07-01

    understanding of the underlying factors determining the optical quality of GaInNAs, such as composition, growth and annealing conditions. We are still far from establishing an understanding of the band structure and its dependence on composition. Fundamental electronic interactions such as electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering, dependence of effective mass on composition, strain and orientation, quantum confinement effects, effects of localized nitrogen states on high field transport and on galvanometric properties, and mechanisms for light emission in these materials, are yet to be fully understood. Nature and formation mechanisms of grown-in and processing-induced defects that are important for material quality and device performance are still unknown. Such knowledge is required in order to design strategies to efficiently control and eliminate harmful defects. For many potential applications (such as solar cells, HBTs) it is essential to get more information on the transport properties of dilute nitride materials. The mobility of minority carriers is known to be low in GaInNAs and related material. The experimental values are far from reaching the theoretical ones, due to defects and impurities introduced in the material during the growth. The role of the material inhomogeneities on the lateral carrier transport also needs further investigation. From the device's point of view most attention to date has been focused on the GaInNAs/GaAs system, mainly because of its potential for optoelectronic devices covering the 1.3-1.55 µm data and telecommunications wavelength bands. As is now widely appreciated, these GaAs-compatible structures allow monolithic integration of AlGaAs-based distributed Bragg reflector mirrors (DBRs) for vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers with low temperature sensitivity and compatibility with AlOx-based confinement techniques. In terms of conventional edge-emitting lasers (EELs), the next step is to extend the wavelength range for cw room

  1. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and 0) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and 02 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  2. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and O2 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  3. Modified polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function with diffuse scattering: surface parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hanyu; Voelz, David G.

    2016-12-01

    The polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (pBRDF) describes the relationships between incident and scattered Stokes parameters, but the familiar surface-only microfacet pBRDF cannot capture diffuse scattering contributions and depolarization phenomena. We propose a modified pBRDF model with a diffuse scattering component developed from the Kubelka-Munk and Le Hors et al. theories, and apply it in the development of a method to jointly estimate refractive index, slope variance, and diffuse scattering parameters from a series of Stokes parameter measurements of a surface. An application of the model and estimation approach to experimental data published by Priest and Meier shows improved correspondence with measurements of normalized Mueller matrix elements. By converting the Stokes/Mueller calculus formulation of the model to a degree of polarization (DOP) description, the estimation results of the parameters from measured DOP values are found to be consistent with a previous DOP model and results.

  4. Anisotropic Diffusion Evolution of Vacancies Created by Oxygen Etching on a Si Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-Hua; Cai, Qun

    2011-07-01

    We report the diffusion behavior of dimer vacancies on a Si(100)-(2×1) surface by using ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy. The dimer vacancies are created by oxygen etching of Si atoms at elevated temperatures. By annealing the sample at 600-750 °C, the dimer vacancies uniformly distribute on the terrace nucleate to form larger elongated voids of one atomic layer deep. The long axis of these voids is parallel to the Si dimer rows. During annealing, the surface morphology evolves in a way dominantly caused by the anisotropic diffusion of the dimer vacancies. A difference of diffusion barriers of 0.17±0.09eV is obtained between the [110] and [11¯0] directions.

  5. Na + and HTO diffusion in compacted bentonite: Effect of surface chemistry and related texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkior, T.; Gaucher, E. C.; Brouard, C.; Yahiaoui, S.; Thoby, D.; Clinard, Ch.; Ferrage, E.; Guyonnet, D.; Tournassat, C.; Coelho, D.

    2009-05-01

    SummaryIn underground repository concepts for radioactive waste, bentonite is studied as a reference swelling material to be used as an engineered barrier. Under the changing geochemical conditions prevailing within the barrier (saturation with the fluid coming from the host formation, diffusion of various chemical plumes caused by the degradation of some constituents of the barrier-system, etc.), the surface chemistry of the clay particles could evolve. This work aims to characterize the effects of these changes on (i) the microstructure of compacted bentonite samples and (ii) the diffusion properties of HTO and Na in these samples. For this purpose, bentonite sets were equilibrated with different solutions: NaCl, CaCl 2, CsCl solutions as well as an artificial clayey porewater solution. The microstructure of the different samples was characterized by HRTEM and XRD, in a water saturated state. In parallel, effective diffusion coefficients of both HTO and 22Na were measured for the different samples. The density of the bentonite in the diffusion tests and in the HRTEM observations was set at 1.6 Mg m -3. From the microstructural observations and the results of diffusion tests, it is deduced that one key parameter is the occurrence of a gel phase in the material, which is found to depend strongly on the bentonite set: the gel phase dominates in Na-bentonite, while it is lacking in Cs-bentonite. The HTO diffusion coefficients are found to be lower in the samples with high gel phase content. Sodium diffusion does not follow the same trend: when compared with HTO, Na diffuses faster when the gel phase content is high. The latter result could indicate that the "accelerated diffusion mechanism" of cations, already mentioned in the literature, is enhanced in clayey materials that contain a gel phase.

  6. Diffusion Barriers Block Defect Occupation on Reduced CeO_{2}(111).

    PubMed

    Lustemberg, P G; Pan, Y; Shaw, B-J; Grinter, D; Pang, Chi; Thornton, G; Pérez, Rubén; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M V; Nilius, N

    2016-06-10

    Surface defects are believed to govern the adsorption behavior of reducible oxides. We challenge this perception on the basis of a combined scanning-tunneling-microscopy and density-functional-theory study, addressing the Au adsorption on reduced CeO_{2-x}(111). Despite a clear thermodynamic preference for oxygen vacancies, individual Au atoms were found to bind mostly to regular surface sites. Even at an elevated temperature, aggregation at step edges and not decoration of defects turned out to be the main consequence of adatom diffusion. Our findings are explained with the polaronic nature of the Au-ceria system, which imprints a strong diabatic character onto the diffusive motion of adatoms. Diabatic barriers are generally higher than those in the adiabatic regime, especially if the hopping step couples to an electron transfer into the ad-gold. As the population of O vacancies always requires a charge exchange, defect decoration by Au atoms becomes kinetically hindered. Our study demonstrates that polaronic effects determine not only electron transport in reducible oxides but also the adsorption characteristics and therewith the surface chemistry.

  7. Diffusion Barriers Block Defect Occupation on Reduced CeO2(111 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustemberg, P. G.; Pan, Y.; Shaw, B.-J.; Grinter, D.; Pang, Chi; Thornton, G.; Pérez, Rubén; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M. V.; Nilius, N.

    2016-06-01

    Surface defects are believed to govern the adsorption behavior of reducible oxides. We challenge this perception on the basis of a combined scanning-tunneling-microscopy and density-functional-theory study, addressing the Au adsorption on reduced CeO2 -x(111 ) . Despite a clear thermodynamic preference for oxygen vacancies, individual Au atoms were found to bind mostly to regular surface sites. Even at an elevated temperature, aggregation at step edges and not decoration of defects turned out to be the main consequence of adatom diffusion. Our findings are explained with the polaronic nature of the Au-ceria system, which imprints a strong diabatic character onto the diffusive motion of adatoms. Diabatic barriers are generally higher than those in the adiabatic regime, especially if the hopping step couples to an electron transfer into the ad-gold. As the population of O vacancies always requires a charge exchange, defect decoration by Au atoms becomes kinetically hindered. Our study demonstrates that polaronic effects determine not only electron transport in reducible oxides but also the adsorption characteristics and therewith the surface chemistry.

  8. Tailored surface free energy of membrane diffusers to minimize microbial adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Wang, S.; Müller-Steinhagen, H.

    2004-05-01

    Biofouling is considered to be the limiting factor of the majority of membrane processes. Since microbial adhesion is a prerequisite for membrane biofouling, prevention of microbial adhesion and colonization on the membrane surfaces will have a major impact in preventing biofouling. In this paper the effects of surface free energies on bacterial adhesion were investigated and the optimum surface free energy of membranes on which bacterial adhesion force is minimal was obtained. A graded nickel-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composite coating technique was used to tailor the surface free energy of membrane diffusers to the optimum value. Initial experimental results showed that these coatings reduced microbial adhesion by 68-94%.

  9. Laws of thermal diffusion of individual molecules on the gold surface.

    PubMed

    Sändig, Nadja; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2011-08-14

    By molecular dynamics simulations, we describe and discuss the mobility of single molecules on a metal surface. The calculated trajectories of 28 different molecules show that diffusion, subdiffusion and superdiffusion regimes exist. The trajectories also share some common features, which are expressed in the form of power laws that link the length of the path walked by the molecule, the molecular mass, and the surface-molecule interaction energy. The values of the exponents of the laws are easily rationalized and provide insight into the molecular behaviour on the surface. The calculations also show that the adsorption is governed by the combination of van der Waals and Coulomb molecule-surface interactions.

  10. The anomalous effect of surface diffusion on the nuclear magnetic resonance signal in restricted geometry.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, E P N S; Apalkov, V M; Cymbalyuk, G S

    2010-04-14

    Anisotropy of diffusion properties in a specimen plays a key role in numerous applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, like non-invasive tracking of fibers in the central nervous system. We suggest that contrasting fiber structures with certain diameters could be improved if second-order effects are taken into account. We introduce a procedure consisting of two standard diffusion NMR experiments differing in their gradient pulse characteristics. These two echo signals will be called the background and principal signals. We show that the difference obtained by subtracting one echo signal from the other has either typical or anomalous properties. In the typical case, as the duration of the gradient pulse in the second experiment is set to smaller and smaller values, the difference from the background echo signal tends toward its maximum. In contrast, in the anomalous case the difference between the background and the principal signals has a maximum at a certain nonzero duration of the pulse in the second experiment. This critical duration is determined by different characteristics, including the diameters of fibers. For this anomalous effect to take place the fast surface diffusion channel coupled to the surrounding media is required. The diffusion of magnetic molecules along the surface of restricted media and the coupling of the surface and the bulk translational motions can strongly modify the echo attenuation NMR signal. The origin of this strong anomalous effect is the change of the symmetry of the lowest diffusion eigenmode of the system. We illustrate the effect of surface diffusion for a cylindrically symmetric system and describe the experimental conditions under which the anomalous behavior of the echo signals can be observed.

  11. Influence of cloud optical thickness on surface diffuse light and carbon uptake in forests and croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, S. J.; Steiner, A. L.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    Accurately modeling atmospheric CO2 removal by terrestrial ecosystems requires an understanding of how atmospheric conditions change the rate of photosynthesis across major vegetation types. Diffuse light, which is created from interactions between incident solar radiation and atmospheric aerosols and clouds, has been postulated to increase carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. To determine how cloud conditions affect carbon uptake through its influence on diffuse light, we quantify the relationship between cloud optical thickness, which indicates surface light attenuation by clouds, and surface diffuse light. We then examine the relationship between cloud optical thickness and gross primary productivity (GPP) to determine whether cloud properties could modulate GPP in temperate ecosystems. Surface diffuse light and GPP data are obtained from publically available Ameriflux data (Mead Crop sites, University of Michigan Biological Station, Morgan Monroe, and Howland Forest) and cloud optical thickness data over the Ameriflux sites are retrieved from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spetroradiometer. We compare the response of GPP to cloud optical thickness between croplands and forests, as well as within ecosystem types to determine ecosystem-specific responses and the role of plant community composition on ecosystem-level GPP under varying cloud conditions. By linking atmospheric cloud properties to surface light conditions and ecosystem carbon fluxes, we refine understanding of land-atmosphere carbon cycling and how changes in atmospheric cloud conditions may influence the future of the land carbon sink.

  12. Wavelength Identification and Diffuse Reflectance Estimation for Surface and Profile Soil Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been used to estimate soil physical and chemical properties, but much of the previous work has been limited to surface soils or to samples obtained from a restricted geographic area. Our objectives in this research were (1) to assess the accuracy of...

  13. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  14. Minority carrier diffusion length and edge surface-recombination velocity in InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1993-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used to obtain the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) profiles in InP specimens containing a Schottky barrier perpendicular to the scanned (edge) surface. An independent technique was used to measure the edge surface-recombination velocity. These values were used in a fit of the experimental EBIC data with a theoretical expression for normalized EBIC (Donolato, 1982) to obtain the electron (minority carrier) diffusion length.

  15. On self-diffusion and surface energy upon compression or tension of an iron crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magomedov, M. N.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of the activation parameters (formation of vacancies and self-diffusion) and specific surface energy on the volume fraction ( V/ V 0) are calculated in terms of the Mie-Lenard-Jones pair potential of interatomic interaction for bcc-Fe along the 300-K and 3000-K isotherms. It is shown that under strong compressions ( V/ V 0 < 1) or tensions ( V/ V 0 > 1), the surface energy has a negative value, which must lead to the crystal structure fragmentation.

  16. Morphological, Chemical Surface, and Diffusive Transport Characterizations of a Nanoporous Alumina Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, María I.; Romero, Virgina; Vega, Victor; García, Javier; Prida, Victor M.; Hernando, Blanca; Benavente, Juana

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of a nanoporous alumina membrane (NPAM) by the two-step anodization method and its morphological and chemical surface characterization by analyzing Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) micrographs and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) spectra is reported. Influence of electrical and diffusive effects on the NaCl transport across the membrane nanopores is determined from salt diffusion measurements performed with a wide range of NaCl concentrations, which allows the estimation of characteristic electrochemical membrane parameters such as the NaCl diffusion coefficient and the concentration of fixed charges in the membrane, by using an appropriated model and the membrane geometrical parameters (porosity and pore length). These results indicate a reduction of ~70% in the value of the NaCl diffusion coefficient through the membrane pores with respect to solution. The transport number of ions in the membrane pores (Na+ and Cl−, respectively) were determined from concentration potential measurements, and the effect of concentration-polarization at the membrane surfaces was also considered by comparing concentration potential values obtained with stirred solutions (550 rpm) and without stirring. From both kinds of results, a value higher than 0.05 M NaCl for the feed solution seems to be necessary to neglect the contribution of electrical interactions in the diffusive transport. PMID:28347115

  17. Detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Li, H.; Li, M. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in similar diffusion bonding as well as on the fabrication of high quality martensitic stainless steel hollow structural components. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to observe the extent of surface asperity deformation under different bonding pressures. Results showed that an undamaged hollow structural component has been obtained with full interfacial contact and the same shear strength to that of base material. Fracture surface characteristic combined with surface roughness profiles distinctly revealed the enhanced surface asperity deformation as the applied pressure increases. The influence of surface asperity deformation mechanism on joint formation was analyzed: (a) surface asperity deformation not only directly expanded the interfacial contact areas, but also released deformation heat and caused defects, indirectly accelerating atomic diffusion, then benefits to void shrinkage; (b) surface asperity deformation readily introduced stored energy difference between two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, resulting in strain induced interface grain boundary migration. In addition, the influence of void on interface grain boundary migration was analyzed in detail.

  18. Centrifugal Compressor Surge Margin Improved With Diffuser Hub Surface Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability is an important parameter in the design of compressors for aircraft gas turbine engines. Compression system instabilities can cause compressor surge, which may lead to the loss of an aircraft. As a result, engine designers include a margin of safety between the operating line of the engine and the stability limit line of the compressor. The margin of safety is typically referred to as "surge margin." Achieving the highest possible level of surge margin while meeting design point performance objectives is the goal of the compressor designer. However, performance goals often must be compromised in order to achieve adequate levels of surge margin. Techniques to improve surge margin will permit more aggressive compressor designs. Centrifugal compressor surge margin improvement was demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center by injecting air into the vaned diffuser of a 4:1-pressure-ratio centrifugal compressor. Tests were performed using injector nozzles located on the diffuser hub surface of a vane-island diffuser in the vaneless region between the impeller trailing edge and the diffuser-vane leading edge. The nozzle flow path and discharge shape were designed to produce an air stream that remained tangent to the hub surface as it traveled into the diffuser passage. Injector nozzles were located near the leading edge of 23 of the 24 diffuser vanes. One passage did not contain an injector so that instrumentation located in that passage would be preserved. Several orientations of the injected stream relative to the diffuser vane leading edge were tested over a range of injected flow rates. Only steady flow (nonpulsed) air injection was tested. At 100 percent of the design speed, a 15-percent improvement in the baseline surge margin was achieved with a nozzle orientation that produced a jet that was bisected by the diffuser vane leading edge. Other orientations also improved the baseline surge margin. Tests were conducted at speeds below the

  19. Simulation studies for surfaces and materials strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, Timur

    1987-01-01

    Three different investigations based on computer simulations were carried out. Simulation calculations were performed using model potentials with two- and three-body interactions which were represented by the Mie and the Axilrod-Teller potentials, respectively. In the first part, to analyze stability criteria for simple crystals, a parametrical investigation was performed and stability regions for five different crystalline structures were determined with respect to potential energy parameters. To simulate some of the basic surface processes such as diffusion and nucleation, in the second and third parts, silicon surfaces were considered as a specific example. In these studies diffusion of adatoms on stepped surfaces were simulated and energetics associated with the formation of kink sites were calculated.

  20. Surfactant-modified diffusion on transition-metal surfaces (reprinted with the addition of the appendices)

    SciTech Connect

    FEIBELMAN,PETER J.; KELLOGG,GARY LEE

    2000-03-01

    Wanting to convert surface impurities from a nuisance to a systematically applicable nano-fabrication tool, the authors have sought to understand how such impurities affect self-diffusion on transition-metal surfaces. Their field-ion microscope experiments reveal that in the presence of surface hydrogen, self-diffusion on Rh(100) is promoted, while on Pt(100), not only is it inhibited, but its mechanism changes. First-principles calculations aimed at learning how oxygen fosters perfect layerwise growth on a growing Pt(111) crystal contradict the idea in the literature that it does so by directly promoting transport over Pt island boundaries. The discovery that its real effect is to burn off adventitious adsorbed carbon monoxide demonstrates the predictive value of state-of-the-art calculation methods.

  1. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; ...

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermalmore » exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.« less

  2. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  3. Correlation and dating of Quaternary alluvial-fan surfaces using scarp diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Leslie; Pelletier, Jon D.

    2004-06-01

    Great interest has recently been focused on dating and interpreting alluvial-fan surfaces. As a complement to the radiometric methods often used for surface-exposure dating, this paper illustrates a rapid method for correlating and dating fan surfaces using the cross-sectional shape of gullies incised into fan surfaces. The method applies a linear hillslope-diffusion model to invert for the diffusivity age, κt (m 2), using an elevation profile or gradient (slope) profile. Gullies near the distal end of fan surfaces are assumed to form quickly following fan entrenchment. Scarps adjacent to these gullies provide a measure of age. The method is illustrated on fan surfaces with ages of approximately 10 ka to 1.2 Ma in the arid southwestern United States. Two areas of focus are Death Valley, California, and the Ajo Mountains piedmont, Arizona. Gully-profile morphology is measured in two ways: by photometrically derived gradient (slope) profiles and by ground-surveyed elevation profiles. The κt values determined using ground-surveyed profiles are more consistent than those determined using photo-derived κt values. However, the mean κt values of both methods are comparable. The photometric method provides an efficient way to quantitatively and objectively correlate and relatively-date alluvial-fan surfaces. The κt values for each surface are determined to approximately 30-50% accuracy.

  4. A new approach to the problem of bulk-mediated surface diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Dagdug, Leonardo; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to bulk-mediated surface diffusion of a particle which can diffuse both on a flat surface and in the bulk layer above the surface. It is assumed that the particle is on the surface initially (at t = 0) and at time t, while in between it may escape from the surface and come back any number of times. We propose a new approach to the problem, which reduces its solution to that of a two-state problem of the particle transitions between the surface and the bulk layer, focusing on the cumulative residence times spent by the particle in the two states. These times are random variables, the sum of which is equal to the total observation time t. The advantage of the proposed approach is that it allows for a simple exact analytical solution for the double Laplace transform of the conditional probability density of the cumulative residence time spent on the surface by the particle observed for time t. This solution is used to find the Laplace transform of the particle mean square displacement and to analyze the peculiarities of its time behavior over the entire range of time. We also establish a relation between the double Laplace transform of the conditional probability density and the Fourier-Laplace transform of the particle propagator over the surface. The proposed approach treats the cases of both finite and infinite bulk layer thicknesses (where bulk-mediated surface diffusion is normal and anomalous at asymptotically long times, respectively) on equal footing. PMID:26328814

  5. Direct measurement of desorption and diffusion energies of O and N atoms physisorbed on amorphous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Physisorbed atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains play a central role in solid state astrochemistry. Their surface reactivity is one source of the observed molecular complexity in space. In experimental astrophysics, the high reactivity of atoms also constitutes an obstacle to measuring two of the fundamental properties in surface physics, namely desorption and diffusion energies, and so far direct measurements are non-existent for O and N atoms. Aims: We investigated the diffusion and desorption processes of O and N atoms on cold surfaces in order to give boundary conditions to astrochemical models. Methods: Here we propose a new technique for directly measuring the N- and O-atom mass signals. Including the experimental results in a simple model allows us to almost directly derive the desorption and diffusion barriers of N atoms on amorphous solid water ice (ASW) and O atoms on ASW and oxidized graphite. Results: We find a strong constraint on the values of desorption and thermal diffusion energy barriers. The measured barriers for O atoms are consistent with recent independent estimations and prove to be much higher than previously believed ( Edes = 1410-160+290; Edif = 990 -360+530 K on ASW). As for oxygen atoms, we propose that the combination Edes - Edif = 1320-750 K is a sensible choice among the possible pairs of solutions. Also, we managed to measure the desorption and diffusion energy of N atoms for the first time (Edes = 720-80+160; Edif = 525-200+260 K on ASW) in the thermal hopping regime and propose that the combination Edes-Edif = 720-400 K can be reasonably adopted in models. The value of Edif for N atoms is slightly lower than previously suggested, which implies that the N chemistry on dust grains might be richer.

  6. Dynamics of Pinned Membranes with Application to Protein Diffusion on the Surface of Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence C.-L.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical treatment and simulation algorithm for the dynamics of Helfrich elastic membrane surfaces in the presence of general harmonic perturbations and hydrodynamic coupling to the surrounding solvent. In the limit of localized and strong interactions, this harmonic model can be used to pin the membrane to intracellular/intercellular structures. We consider the case of pinning to the cytoskeleton and use such a model to estimate the macroscopic diffusion constant for band 3 protein on the surface of human erythrocytes. Comparison to experimental results suggests that thermal undulations of the membrane surface should play a significant role in protein mobility on the red blood cell. PMID:14747313

  7. Surface faceting and elemental diffusion behaviour at atomic scale for alloy nanoparticles during in situ annealing

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Miaofang; Wang, Chao; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng; Li, Dongguo; More, Karren L.; Lupini, Andrew; Allard, Lawrence F.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic performance of nanoparticles is primarily determined by the precise nature of the surface and near-surface atomic configurations, which can be tailored by post-synthesis annealing effectively and straightforwardly. Understanding the complete dynamic response of surface structure and chemistry to thermal treatments at the atomic scale is imperative for the rational design of catalyst nanoparticles. Here, by tracking the same individual Pt3Co nanoparticles during in situ annealing in a scanning transmission electron microscope, we directly discern five distinct stages of surface elemental rearrangements in Pt3Co nanoparticles at the atomic scale: initial random (alloy) elemental distribution; surface platinum-skin-layer formation; nucleation of structurally ordered domains; ordered framework development and, finally, initiation of amorphization. Furthermore, a comprehensive interplay among phase evolution, surface faceting and elemental inter-diffusion is revealed, and supported by atomistic simulations. This work may pave the way towards designing catalysts through post-synthesis annealing for optimized catalytic performance. PMID:26576477

  8. In Situ Atomic Scale Visualization Of Surface Kinetics Driven Dynamics Of Oxide Growth On A Ni–Cr Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Langli; Zou, Lianfeng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Baer, Donald R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Zhou, Guangwen; Wang, Chong M.

    2016-01-20

    We report in situ atomic-scale visualization of the dynamical three-dimensional (3D) growth of NiO during initial oxidation of Ni-10at%Cr using environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). Despite the thermodynamic preference for Cr2O3 formation, cubic NiO oxides nucleated and grew epitaxially as the dominating oxide phase on the Ni-Cr (100) surface during initial oxidation. The growth of NiO islands proceeds through step-by-step adatom mechanism in 3D, which is sustained by surface diffusion of Ni and O atoms. Although the shapes of oxide islands are controlled by strain energy between oxide and alloy substrate, local surface kinetic variations can lead to the change of surface planes of oxide islands. These results demonstrate that surface diffusion dominates initial oxidation of Ni-Cr in these test conditions.

  9. Plasma Treatment of Metal Surface by Runaway Electrons Preionized Diffuse Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor; Erofeev, Michael; Ripenko, Vasilii; Shulepov, Mikhail; Institute of High Current Electronics Collaboration; National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present experimental results on the generation of diffuse discharge initiated by runaway electron beam and X-rays in pulsed-periodic mode in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure, and its application for metal surface modification. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibilities of surface modification of copper, stainless steel, aluminum, niobium and titanium in the plasma of REP DD, formed in nitrogen flow. The study shows that REP DD treatment after exposure of 100000 shots provides ultrafine surface cleaning of all metals from carbon contamination. At the same time, it is found that all materials subjected to REP DD are involved in surface oxidation. Moreover, the surface energy of the treated specimens increased up to 4 times, whereas the other surface properties like microhardness or roughness remain almost unchanged. Thus, plasma treatment by runaway electron preionized diffuse discharge has enabled us to create an optimum metal surface without mechanical damages that is important for further coating, printing, painting, and adhesive bonding. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation under the Grant Number 14-29-00052.

  10. Relating adatom emission to improved durability of Pt-Pd diesel oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Tyne Richele; Goeke, Ronald S.; Ashbacher, Valerie; Thune, Peter C.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.; Kiefer, Boris; Kim, Chang H.; Balogh, Michael P.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2015-06-05

    Sintering of nanoparticles is an important contributor to loss of activity in heterogeneous catalysts, such as those used for controlling harmful emissions from automobiles. But mechanistic details, such as the rates of atom emission or the nature of the mobile species, remain poorly understood. Herein we report a novel approach that allows direct measurement of atom emission from nanoparticles. We use model catalyst samples and a novel reactor that allows the same region of the sample to be observed after short-term heat treatments (seconds) under conditions relevant to diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs). Monometallic Pd is very stable and does not sinter when heated in air (T ≤ 800 °C). Pt sinters readily in air, and at high temperatures (≥800 °C) mobile Pt species emitted to the vapor phase cause the formation of large, faceted particles. In Pt–Pd nanoparticles, Pd slows the rate of emission of atoms to the vapor phase due to the formation of an alloy. However, the role of Pd in Pt DOCs in air is quite complex: at low temperatures, Pt enhances the rate of Pd sintering (which otherwise would be stable as an oxide), while at higher temperature Pd helps to slow the rate of Pt sintering. DFT calculations show that the barrier for atom emission to the vapor phase is much greater than the barrier for emitting atoms to the support. Thus, vapor-phase transport becomes significant only at high temperatures while diffusion of adatoms on the support dominates at lower temperatures.

  11. Relating adatom emission to improved durability of Pt-Pd diesel oxidation catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Johns, Tyne Richele; Goeke, Ronald S.; Ashbacher, Valerie; ...

    2015-06-05

    Sintering of nanoparticles is an important contributor to loss of activity in heterogeneous catalysts, such as those used for controlling harmful emissions from automobiles. But mechanistic details, such as the rates of atom emission or the nature of the mobile species, remain poorly understood. Herein we report a novel approach that allows direct measurement of atom emission from nanoparticles. We use model catalyst samples and a novel reactor that allows the same region of the sample to be observed after short-term heat treatments (seconds) under conditions relevant to diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs). Monometallic Pd is very stable and does notmore » sinter when heated in air (T ≤ 800 °C). Pt sinters readily in air, and at high temperatures (≥800 °C) mobile Pt species emitted to the vapor phase cause the formation of large, faceted particles. In Pt–Pd nanoparticles, Pd slows the rate of emission of atoms to the vapor phase due to the formation of an alloy. However, the role of Pd in Pt DOCs in air is quite complex: at low temperatures, Pt enhances the rate of Pd sintering (which otherwise would be stable as an oxide), while at higher temperature Pd helps to slow the rate of Pt sintering. DFT calculations show that the barrier for atom emission to the vapor phase is much greater than the barrier for emitting atoms to the support. Thus, vapor-phase transport becomes significant only at high temperatures while diffusion of adatoms on the support dominates at lower temperatures.« less

  12. Transport noise arising from diffusion and bulk or surface generation recombination in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, H.

    The type of noise spectra in solids or solid state devices, which can arise from noise due to a combination of causes, such as diffusion of carriers, generation and recombination (g-r) processes of carriers in the bulk and at the surface was studied using techniques to be described apply equally well to the problem of heat diffusion, with heat transfer or reflection at the boundaries of the system, we have, however, mainly the carrier noise problem in mind. The physical noise sources, the diffusion source, g-r source and surface source, Clarke and Voss' P source are discussed as well as transport noise in symmetrical embedded bodies, in nonsymmetrical embedded bodies, in symmetrical nonembedded bodies and in nonsymmetrical nonembedded bodies. Results indicate that volume g-r and diffusion processes give rather smooth spectra, but, without a l/f range. The high frequency asymptote is always w-3/2 (embedded case) or omega to the minus 2 power (nonembedded case).

  13. A New Model for Diffusion and Island Growth in Metallic Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biham, Ofer; Karimi, Majid; Vidali, Gianfranco

    1996-03-01

    We propose a simple model that describes the diffusion of Cu atoms on the Cu(001) surface and their nucleation into islands. Using a simple formula, the values of the 128 energy barriers for the motion of an adatom in the presence of nearest and next-nearest neighbours are generated. These values are close to the ones obtained using the Embedded Atom Method (M. Karimi, T. Tomkowsky, G. Vidali, and O.Biham, Phys. Rev. B. 52, 5364 (1995)). The results of Monte Carlo simulations are compared with experimental data. This model provides a better understanding of diffusion on the FCC (001) surface than it has been possible so far. It should be valid for other FCC metals such as Ni and is likely to increase the feasibility of MC studies by reducing the need to calculate large sets of hopping energy barriers.

  14. Effect of surface modification, microstructure, and trapping on hydrogen diffusion coefficients in high strength alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebaraj Johnley Muthuraj, Josiah

    Cathodic protection is widely used for corrosion prevention. However, this process generates hydrogen at the protected metal surface, and diffusion of hydrogen through the metal may cause hydrogen embrittlement or hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking. Thus the choice of a metal for use as fasteners depends upon its hydrogen uptake, permeation, diffusivity and trapping. The diffusivity of hydrogen through four high strength alloys (AISI 4340, alloy 718, alloy 686, and alloy 59) was analyzed by an electrochemical method developed by Devanathan and Stachurski. The effect of plasma nitriding and microstructure on hydrogen permeation through AISI 4340 was studied on six different specimens: as-received (AR) AISI 4340, nitrided samples with and without compound layer, samples quenched and tempered (Q&T) at 320° and 520°C, and nitrided samples Q&T 520°C. Studies on various nitrided specimens demonstrate that both the gamma'-Fe 4N rich compound surface layer and the deeper N diffusion layer that forms during plasma nitriding reduce the effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient, although the gamma'-Fe4N rich compound layer has a larger effect. Multiple permeation transients yield evidence for the presence of only reversible trap sites in as-received, Q&T 320 and 520 AISI 4340 specimens, and the presence of both reversible and irreversible trap sites in nitrided specimens. Moreover, the changes in microstructure during the quenching and tempering process result in a significant decrease in the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen compared to as-received specimens. In addition, density functional theory-based molecular dynamics simulations yield hydrogen diffusion coefficients through gamma'- Fe4N one order of magnitude lower than through α-Fe, which supports the experimental measurements of hydrogen permeation. The effect of microstructure and trapping was also studied in cold rolled, solutionized, and precipitation hardened Inconel 718 foils. The effective hydrogen

  15. Bromelain surface modification increases the diffusion of silica nanoparticles in the tumor extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Alessandro; Haddix, Seth G; Taghipour, Nima; Scaria, Shilpa; Taraballi, Francesca; Cevenini, Armando; Yazdi, Iman K; Corbo, Claudia; Palomba, Roberto; Khaled, Sm Z; Martinez, Jonathan O; Brown, Brandon S; Isenhart, Lucas; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2014-10-28

    Tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a major obstacle to the diffusion of therapeutics and drug delivery systems in cancer parenchyma. This biological barrier limits the efficacy of promising therapeutic approaches including the delivery of siRNA or agents intended for thermoablation. After extravasation due to the enhanced penetration and retention effect of tumor vasculature, typical nanotherapeutics are unable to reach the nonvascularized and anoxic regions deep within cancer parenchyma. Here, we developed a simple method to provide mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with a proteolytic surface. To this extent, we chose to conjugate MSN to Bromelain (Br-MSN), a crude enzymatic complex, purified from pineapple stems, that belongs to the peptidase papain family. This surface modification increased particle uptake in endothelial, macrophage, and cancer cell lines with minimal impact on cellular viability. Most importantly Br-MSN showed an increased ability to digest and diffuse in tumor ECM in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Bromelain Surface Modification Increases the Diffusion of Silica Nanoparticles in the Tumor Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a major obstacle to the diffusion of therapeutics and drug delivery systems in cancer parenchyma. This biological barrier limits the efficacy of promising therapeutic approaches including the delivery of siRNA or agents intended for thermoablation. After extravasation due to the enhanced penetration and retention effect of tumor vasculature, typical nanotherapeutics are unable to reach the nonvascularized and anoxic regions deep within cancer parenchyma. Here, we developed a simple method to provide mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with a proteolytic surface. To this extent, we chose to conjugate MSN to Bromelain (Br–MSN), a crude enzymatic complex, purified from pineapple stems, that belongs to the peptidase papain family. This surface modification increased particle uptake in endothelial, macrophage, and cancer cell lines with minimal impact on cellular viability. Most importantly Br–MSN showed an increased ability to digest and diffuse in tumor ECM in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25119793

  17. Experimental study of surface tension, specific heat and thermal diffusivity of liquid and solid titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, K.; Wang, H. P.; Chang, J.; Wei, B.

    2015-10-01

    The thermophysical properties of liquid and solid titanium such as the surface tension, specific heat and thermal diffusivity have been investigated over a wide temperature range. By using electromagnetic levitation and oscillating drop method, the surface tension of liquid titanium was measured in the temperature range of 1802-2188 K. The viscosity and density of undercooled liquid titanium were calculated by some well-known models using the measured data as input. In addition, the specific heat of liquid titanium was determined over the experimental range using electromagnetic levitation and drop calorimetry obtaining the value of 33.64 J mol-1 K-1. In addition, the thermal diffusivity of solid titanium was measured by laser flash method in the temperature range of 171-1080 K.

  18. Low-Cost Dielectric Reflective Surface for Low-Level Backscattered Diffuse Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Nuaimi, Mustafa K. Taher; Hong, Wei; Gao, Xiqi

    2016-10-01

    This article presents the design of non-subwavelength, non-resonant, and non-absorptive dielectric surface that creates a low-level backward diffuse reflections under illumination of a far-field plane wave at millimeter wave regime. Thus, radar cross section reduction of a solid metallic object can be achieved. The dielectric surface is consist of unit cells of only two different electric permittivity (ɛ r1 = 6.14 and ɛ r2 = 3.49) distributed across the surface aperture to achieve low-level backscattered diffuse reflections. The unit cells used are having non-subwavelength size (0.53λ80GHz) which ensures an easier fabrication of the presented surface using low cost simple PCB technology, in particular at high frequencies. RCS reduction of more than 10 dBsm is achieved from 70 to 87 GHz (BW ≈ 21.65 %) using the presented dielectric surface of optimized permittivity distribution. The RCS reduction capabilities of the presented surface are studied theoretically under both normal and oblique incidences and then fabricated and verified experimentally by reflectivity measurements.

  19. Low-Cost Dielectric Reflective Surface for Low-Level Backscattered Diffuse Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Nuaimi, Mustafa K. Taher; Hong, Wei; Gao, Xiqi

    2017-02-01

    This article presents the design of non-subwavelength, non-resonant, and non-absorptive dielectric surface that creates a low-level backward diffuse reflections under illumination of a far-field plane wave at millimeter wave regime. Thus, radar cross section reduction of a solid metallic object can be achieved. The dielectric surface is consist of unit cells of only two different electric permittivity ( ɛ r1 = 6.14 and ɛ r2 = 3.49) distributed across the surface aperture to achieve low-level backscattered diffuse reflections. The unit cells used are having non-subwavelength size (0.53λ80GHz) which ensures an easier fabrication of the presented surface using low cost simple PCB technology, in particular at high frequencies. RCS reduction of more than 10 dBsm is achieved from 70 to 87 GHz (BW ≈ 21.65 %) using the presented dielectric surface of optimized permittivity distribution. The RCS reduction capabilities of the presented surface are studied theoretically under both normal and oblique incidences and then fabricated and verified experimentally by reflectivity measurements.

  20. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  1. Spin Hall Effect and Origins of Nonlocal Resistance in Adatom-Decorated Graphene.

    PubMed

    Van Tuan, D; Marmolejo-Tejada, J M; Waintal, X; Nikolić, B K; Valenzuela, S O; Roche, S

    2016-10-21

    Recent experiments reporting an unexpectedly large spin Hall effect (SHE) in graphene decorated with adatoms have raised a fierce controversy. We apply numerically exact Kubo and Landauer-Büttiker formulas to realistic models of gold-decorated disordered graphene (including adatom clustering) to obtain the spin Hall conductivity and spin Hall angle, as well as the nonlocal resistance as a quantity accessible to experiments. Large spin Hall angles of ∼0.1 are obtained at zero temperature, but their dependence on adatom clustering differs from the predictions of semiclassical transport theories. Furthermore, we find multiple background contributions to the nonlocal resistance, some of which are unrelated to the SHE or any other spin-dependent origin, as well as a strong suppression of the SHE at room temperature. This motivates us to design a multiterminal graphene geometry which suppresses these background contributions and could, therefore, quantify the upper limit for spin-current generation in two-dimensional materials.

  2. Strain effect on the adsorption, diffusion, and molecular dissociation of hydrogen on Mg (0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Huaping; Wang, Caizhuang; Yao, Yongxin; Hupalo, Myron; Wang, Yangang; McDougall, Dan; Tringides, Michael; Ho, Kaiming

    2013-12-14

    The adsorption, diffusion, and molecular dissociation of hydrogen on the biaxially strained Mg (0001) surface have been systematically investigated by the first principle calculations based on density functional theory. When the strain changes from the compressive to tensile state, the adsorption energy of H atom linearly increases while its diffusion barrier linearly decreases oppositely. The dissociation barrier of H{sub 2} molecule linearly reduces in the tensile strain region. Through the chemical bonding analysis including the charge density difference, the projected density of states and the Mulliken population, the mechanism of the strain effect on the adsorption of H atom and the dissociation of H{sub 2} molecule has been elucidated by an s-p charge transfer model. With the reduction of the orbital overlap between the surface Mg atoms upon the lattice expansion, the charge transfers from p to s states of Mg atoms, which enhances the hybridization of H s and Mg s orbitals. Therefore, the bonding interaction of H with Mg surface is strengthened and then the atomic diffusion and molecular dissociation barriers of hydrogen decrease accordingly. Our works will be helpful to understand and to estimate the influence of the lattice deformation on the performance of Mg-containing hydrogen storage materials.

  3. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 2. Diffuse reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P

    2013-10-31

    Based on the previously calculated luminance factors, we have investigated the integral characteristics of light reflection from a rough surface of the skin with large-scale inhomogeneities under various conditions of the skin illumination. Shadowing of incident and scattered beams by relief elements is taken into account. Diffuse reflectances by the Gaussian and the quasi-periodic surfaces are compared and, in general, both these roughness models are shown to give similar results. We have studied the effect of the angular structure of radiation multiply scattered deep in the tissue and the refraction of rays as they propagate from the dermis to the surface of the stratum corneum on the reflection characteristics of the skin surface. The importance of these factors is demonstrated. The algorithms constructed can be included in the schemes of calculation of the light fields inside and outside the medium in solving various direct and inverse problems of optics of biological tissues. (biophotonics)

  4. Optical characteristics of the filamentary and diffuse modes in surface dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Jie; Jiang, Nan; Shang, Ke-Feng; Lu, Na; Wu, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas generally exhibits filamentary and diffuse discharges at atmospheric air. The focus of this investigation is on the different optical characteristics and quantitative research about morphological features of two discharge modes. The temporally and spatially resolved characteristics of discharge phenomenon together with the gas temperature are presented with microsecond time scale. Discharge area is estimated by the sum of pixels that equal to "1" in MATLAB software. The formation of diffuse plasma mainly depends on an increase of the ionization coefficient and a creation of sufficient seed electrons by the Penning effect at low electric fields. Accordingly, experimental measurements show that diffuse discharge during the negative half cycle has good uniformity and stability compared with filamentary discharge during the positive half cycle. The rotational temperatures of plasma are determined by comparing the experimental spectra with the simulated spectra that have been investigated. The plasma gas temperature keeps almost constant in the filamentary discharge phase and subsequently increased by about 115 K during the diffuse discharge. In addition, it is shown to be nearly identical in the axial direction. Non-uniform temperature distribution can be observed in the radial direction with large fluctuations. The plasma length is demonstrated almost the same between two discharge modes.

  5. Monte Carlo Simulations of Coupled Diffusion and Surface Reactions during the Aqueous Corrosion of Borosilicate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75-x) mol% SiO2 (12.5+x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5+x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditions at a surface-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick’s 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.

  6. Observations indicative of rain-induced double diffusion in the ocean surface boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walesby, K.; Vialard, J.; Minnett, P. J.; Callaghan, A. H.; Ward, B.

    2015-05-01

    Double diffusion can result in the formation of thermohaline staircases, typically observed in the ocean interior. The observations presented here were acquired in the ocean surface boundary layer with the autonomous microstructure Air-Sea Interaction Profiler. An intense rain event (rainfall rates of up to 35 mm/h) resulted in cooler, fresher water (up to 0.15 practical salinity unit (psu) over the upper 7-10 m) overlaying warmer, saltier water, a situation potentially conducive to double-diffusive mixing. Although not as crisp as interfaces in the interior ocean because of elevated background mixing, a total of 303 thermohaline interfaces were detected within and at the base of the fresh layer, with mean changes in temperature (T) and salinity (S) across interfaces of 20 × 10-3∘C and 22 × 10-3 psu, respectively. These results call for new studies to disambiguate whether such interfaces are formed through double-diffusive mixing or shear instabilities and understand any long-term impacts on near-surface stratification.

  7. Molecular-dynamics analysis of mobile helium cluster reactions near surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-10-28

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the reactions of small mobile helium clusters (He{sub n}, 4 ≤ n ≤ 7) near low-Miller-index tungsten (W) surfaces, aiming at a fundamental understanding of the near-surface dynamics of helium-carrying species in plasma-exposed tungsten. These small mobile helium clusters are attracted to the surface and migrate to the surface by Fickian diffusion and drift due to the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation (TM) and cluster dissociation reactions are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. TM produces W adatoms and immobile complexes of helium clusters surrounding W vacancies located within the lattice planes at a short distance from the surface. These reactions are identified and characterized in detail based on the analysis of a large number of molecular-dynamics trajectories for each such mobile cluster near W(100), W(110), and W(111) surfaces. TM is found to be the dominant cluster reaction for all cluster and surface combinations, except for the He{sub 4} and He{sub 5} clusters near W(100) where cluster partial dissociation following TM dominates. We find that there exists a critical cluster size, n = 4 near W(100) and W(111) and n = 5 near W(110), beyond which the formation of multiple W adatoms and vacancies in the TM reactions is observed. The identified cluster reactions are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in the plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatom populations, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content, which are expected to influence the amount of hydrogen re-cycling and tritium retention in fusion tokamaks.

  8. 'Soft' Au, Pt and Cu contacts for molecular junctions through surface-diffusion-mediated deposition.

    PubMed

    Bonifas, Andrew P; McCreery, Richard L

    2010-08-01

    Virtually all types of molecular electronic devices depend on electronically addressing a molecule or molecular layer through the formation of a metallic contact. The introduction of molecular devices into integrated circuits will probably depend on the formation of contacts using a vapour deposition technique, but this approach frequently results in the metal atoms penetrating or damaging the molecular layer. Here, we report a method of forming 'soft' metallic contacts on molecular layers through surface-diffusion-mediated deposition, in which the metal atoms are deposited remotely and then diffuse onto the molecular layer, thus eliminating the problems of penetration and damage. Molecular junctions fabricated by this method exhibit excellent yield (typically >90%) and reproducibility, and allow examination of the effects of molecular-layer structure, thickness and contact work function.

  9. Surface recombination velocity and diffusion length of minority carriers in heavily doped silicon layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam-induced current and the dependence of the effective diffusion length of the minority carriers on the penetration depth of the electron beam were employed for the analysis of the carrier recombination characteristics in heavily doped silicon layers. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of P-diffused Si layers will be presented together with a three dimensional mapping of minority carrier lifetime in ion implanted Si. Layers heavily doped with As exhibit improved recombination characteristics as compared to those of the layers doped with P.

  10. Improving Seasonal Diffusive Flux Estimates through Inverse Calibration of Lake Surface Methane Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, K.; Thornton, B. F.; Wik, M.; Uhlbäck, J.; Rakos, N.; Crill, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusive flux of methane to the atmosphere from freshwater lakes is thought to be better understood than the more stochastic ebullitive (bubble) flux. Simple models describing the flux are largely driven by wind speed and surface water concentrations. Rooted in 3 seasons of direct open water chamber measurements at Inre Harrsjön, a small and shallow lake located in the subarctic region of Sweden, we present a comparison between measured exchanges and those calculated from several piston velocity models ran at varying temporal resolutions, as well as a method to increase precision in modeled results. On a majority of days the calculated piston velocities, per day, exceeded lake average depth. Under such conditions it is unlikely that the surface concentration can remain fixed. The result is that high piston velocities will effectively alter the gas content of the shallow lake, unless the sediment-to-lake flux matches the lake-to-atmosphere flux. Initial model runs using fixed surface concentrations confirmed this with seasonal averages of up to four times the up-scaled chamber measurements. In an attempt to compensate for the lake's inability to keep up with predicted fluxes, the fixed lake surface concentration was abandoned for variable wind-dependent lake surface concentrations. By inverting the gas exchange equation a required, or ideal, lake surface concentration - the concentration required by the models to match the measured fluxes at a given wind speed - could be obtained for dates where both wind and chamber measurements were available. These ideal concentrations were plotted as function of wind. Linear and exponential functions describing the wind-dependent surface concentrations were used in subsequent runs, completely replacing the static concentration approach. We found that incorporation of variable wind-driven lake surface concentration into the models greatly improved the accuracy of seasonal diffusive flux estimates, reducing the apparent error to

  11. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, E. Arciprete, F.; Latini, V.; Latini, S.; Patella, F.; Magri, R.

    2014-09-15

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surface occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.

  12. Facile surface modification of anion-exchange membranes for improvement of diffusion dialysis performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyeong; Park, Han-Sol; Seo, Seok-Jun; Park, Jin-Soo; Moon, Seung-Hyeon; Choi, Young-Woo; Jiong, Young Su; Kim, Dong Hee; Kang, Moon-Sung

    2014-02-15

    In this study, a facile membrane modification method by spin-coating of pyrrole (Py) monomers dissolved in a volatile solvent followed by an interfacial polymerization is proposed. The surface of a commercial anion-exchange membrane (i.e., Neosepta-AFX, Astom Corp., Japan) was successfully modified with polypyrrole (Ppy) to improve the acid recovery performance in diffusion dialysis (DD). The result of DD experiments revealed that both the acid and metal ion transports are significantly influenced by the surface modification. The metal crossover through the membranes was largely reduced while mostly maintaining the acid permeability by introducing a thin Ppy layer with excellent repelling property to cations on the membrane surface. As a result, the anion-exchange membrane modified with the optimum content of Py monomer (5 vol.%) exhibited excellent acid dialysis coefficient (KAcid) and selectivity (KAcid/KMetal) which is approximately twice as high as that of the pristine membrane.

  13. First-principles study of oxygen adsorption and diffusion on the UN(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. L.; Ao, L.; Zu, X. T.; Huang, H.; Liu, K. Z.

    2015-12-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to study the interaction of oxygen with UN(001) surface. The molecule oxygen was found to dissociate spontaneously on all considered adsorption sites on the surface. Atomic oxygen (O) preferred to adsorb on a hollow site or the top of uranium ions, which were energetically degenerate. Adsorption on top of nitrogen (N) ion was found to be unstable which may be attributed to the repulsion of negatively charged O with the N anions. In comparison with those on α-U(001)surface at the same coverage, the adsorption of O on UN(001) surface was found to be less stable, being about 0.7 eV higher in adsorption energy. The diffusion barrier for O on the surface was found to be ∼0.5 eV, similar to those of α-U(001)surface. The penetration of O into the substrate was difficult with a high barrier of 2.86 eV. Analysis on the density of states (DOS) has shown that the adsorbed oxygen has strong chemical interaction with surface ions, characterized by the hybridization of O 2p states with N 2p and U 6d, U 5f states.

  14. Surface tensions, viscosities, and diffusion constants in mixed component single aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdek, Bryan; Marshall, Frances; Song, Young-Chul; Haddrell, Allen; Reid, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Surface tension and viscosity are important aerosol properties but are challenging to measure on individual particles owing to their small size and mass. Aerosol viscosity impacts semivolatile partitioning from the aerosol phase, molecular diffusion in the bulk of the particle, and reaction kinetics. Aerosol surface tension impacts how particles activate to serve as cloud condensation nuclei. Knowledge of these properties and how they change under different conditions hinders accurate modelling of aerosol physical state and atmospheric impacts. We present measurements made using holographic optical tweezers to directly determine the viscosity and surface tension of optically trapped droplets containing ~1-4 picolitres of material (corresponding to radii of ~5-10 micrometres). Two droplets are captured in the experimental setup, equilibrated to a relative humidity, and coalesced through manipulation of the relative trap positions. The moment of coalescence is captured using camera imaging as well as from elastically backscattered light connected to an oscilloscope. For lower viscosity droplets, the relaxation in droplet shape to a sphere follows the form of a damped oscillator and gives the surface tension and viscosity. For high viscosity droplets, the relaxation results in a slow merging of the two droplets to form a sphere and the timescale of that process permits determination of viscosity. We show that droplet viscosity and surface tension can be quantitatively determined to within <10% of the expected value for low viscosity droplets and to better than 1 order of magnitude for high viscosity droplets. Examples illustrating how properties such as surface tension can change in response to environmental conditions will be discussed. Finally, a study of the relationship between viscosity, diffusion constants, vapour pressures, and reactive uptake coefficients for a mixed component aerosol undergoing oxidation and volatilisation will be discussed.

  15. Interfacial diffusion aided deformation during nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Amit; E, Weinan

    2016-07-01

    Nanoindentation is commonly used to quantify the mechanical response of material surfaces. Despite its widespread use, a detailed understanding of the deformation mechanisms responsible for plasticity during these experiments has remained elusive. Nanoindentation measurements often show stress values close to a material's ideal strength which suggests that dislocation nucleation and subsequent dislocation activity dominates the deformation. However, low strain-rate exponents and small activation volumes have also been reported which indicates high temperature sensitivity of the deformation processes. Using an order parameter aided temperature accelerated sampling technique called adiabatic free energy dynamics [J. B. Abrams and M. E. Tuckerman, J. Phys. Chem. B, 112, 15742 (2008)], and molecular dynamics we have probed the diffusive mode of deformation during nanoindentation. Localized processes such as surface vacancy and ad-atom pair formation, vacancy diffusion are found to play an important role during indentation. Our analysis suggests a change in the dominant deformation mode from dislocation mediated plasticity to diffusional flow at high temperatures, slow indentation rates and small indenter tip radii.

  16. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  17. Surface orientation dependence of the activation energy of S diffusion in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, P. E.; Terblans, J. J.; Swart, H. C.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of vacancies in the low-index orientations of bcc Fe was studied by a combined computational modelling and experimental investigation by making use of density functional theory (DFT), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Vacancies were considered to occur as a result of a Schottky defect forming in the bcc Fe lattice. This predicted a surface orientation dependence on the vacancy formation energy and consequently also on the activation energy of diffusion. Activation energies for the segregation of S in the Fe(1 0 0), Fe(1 1 0) and Fe(1 1 1) surface orientations were calculated by DFT modelling as 2.75 eV, 2.86 eV and 1.94 eV respectively. Simulations furthermore revealed a variation in the segregation kinetics of S as a result of the activation energy dependence on the surface orientation. Experimental data obtained by AES, TOF-SIMS and XRD confirmed this variation in the segregation kinetics of S segregation in different Fe orientations. This article provides compelling evidence for the formation of vacancies in bcc Fe to occur via the Schottky defect mechanism, which results in the orientation dependence for the activation energy of diffusion.

  18. Universal pinch off of rods by capillarity-driven surface diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Miksis, M.J.; Voorhees, P.W.; Davis, S.H.

    1998-06-05

    Interfacial energy is a central factor in setting the morphology of phases and in determining the stability of equilibrium morphologies. here the authors examine the morphological evolution of a rod via capillary-driven surface diffusion as it both approaches and departs the topological singularity of pinch off. During the final stages of pinching the neck radius approaches zero, and self-similar solutions are sought. The authors have derived local similarity solutions for the axisymmetric pinch off of rods when the morphological evolution is by capillarity-driven surface diffusion. These local solutions describe the approach to and departure from the topological singularity where a rod pinches into two separate bodies. During pinching, the self-similar surface profile far away from the neck approaches two opposing cones with a unique half-cone angle of 46.04{degree}. It is thus likely that all rods must pinch off with this cone angle. This assertion is supported by several numerical simulations. After pinch off, the smoothening of the cone tip is again self-similar. The results obtained here for rods also apply to the pinch off of cylindrical pore channels.

  19. The Dirichlet problem for the diffusion equation in the exterior of non-closed Lipschitz surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutitskii, P. A.

    2012-09-01

    We study the Dirichlet problem for the stationary diffusion equation in the exterior of non-closed Lipschitz surfaces in R3. The Dirichlet problem for a Laplace equation is a particular case of our problem. Theorems on existence and uniqueness of a weak solution of the problem are proved. The integral representation for a solution is obtained in the form of single layer potential. The density in the potential is defined as a solution of the operator (integral) equation, which is uniquely solvable.

  20. A multiscale MD–FE model of diffusion in composite media with internal surface interaction based on numerical homogenization procedure

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, M.; Milosevic, M.; Kojic, N.; Kim, K.; Ferrari, M.; Ziemys, A.

    2014-01-01

    Mass transport by diffusion within composite materials may depend not only on internal microstructural geometry, but also on the chemical interactions between the transported substance and the material of the microstructure. Retrospectively, there is a gap in methods and theory to connect material microstructure properties with macroscale continuum diffusion characteristics. Here we present a new hierarchical multiscale model for diffusion within composite materials that couples material microstructural geometry and interactions between diffusing particles and the material matrix. This model, which bridges molecular dynamics (MD) and the finite element (FE) method, is employed to construct a continuum diffusion model based on a novel numerical homogenization procedure. The procedure is general and robust for evaluating constitutive material parameters of the continuum model. These parameters include the traditional bulk diffusion coefficients and, additionally, the distances from the solid surface accounting for surface interaction effects. We implemented our models to glucose diffusion through the following two geometrical/material configurations: tightly packed silica nanospheres, and a complex fibrous structure surrounding nanospheres. Then, rhodamine 6G diffusion analysis through an aga-rose gel network was performed, followed by a model validation using our experimental results. The microstructural model, numerical homogenization and continuum model offer a new platform for modeling and predicting mass diffusion through complex biological environment and within composite materials that are used in a wide range of applications, like drug delivery and nanoporous catalysts. PMID:24578582

  1. Modification of a metallic surface in a vacuum arc discharge plasma using thermally stimulated ion diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    A new process for modifying a metallic surface in a vacuum arc discharge plasma using thermally stimulated ion diffusion is considered. The effect of the bias voltage (negative substrate potential) on the processes that occur on the surface of a treated part is studied when the substrate material interacts with an accelerated metallic-ion flow. The phase and elemental compositions of the modified layer are studied for substrates made of nickel-based superalloys, austenitic and martensitic steels, and titanium-based alloys. The heat resistance, the salt corrosion resistance, and the corrosion cracking resistance of steels and titanium-based alloys are investigated after their modification in vacuum arc plasmas of pure metals (Ti, Zr, Al, Cr, Y) and related alloys. The surface modification caused by the thermally stimulated ion saturation of the surfaces of parts made from structural materials is shown to change the structural-phase states of their surfaces and, correspondingly, the properties of these materials in relation to the state of the surface.

  2. Modeling the resupply, diffusion, and evaporation of cesium on the surface of controlled porosity dispenser photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhigang; Jensen, Kevin L.; Montgomery, Eric J.

    2013-09-01

    A controlled porosity dispenser (CPD) photocathode is currently being explored and developed to replace the Cs during operation and increase photocathode lifetime. Experimental results from cesium (Cs) emission of a sintered-wire tungsten CPD are presented and are used to inform a theoretical model of Cs resupply, diffusion, and evaporation on the surface of the photocathode. The evaporation of Cs from a tungsten surface is modeled using an effective one-dimensional potential well representation of the binding energy. The model accounts for both local and global interactions of Cs with the surface metal as well as with other Cs atoms. It is found that for typical activation temperatures within the range of 500 K-750 K, differences of less than 5% between the quantum efficiency (QE) maximum and minimum over ideal homogenous surfaces occur, even when variations to mimic surface non-uniformity due to pore blockage are included. The theoretical evaporation rates of sub-monolayer surface coverage of Cs compare well to the data of Taylor and Langmuir [I. Langmuir and J. B. Taylor, Phys. Rev. 40, 463-464 (1932)] and reproduce the nonlinear behavior of evaporation with varying coverage and temperature.

  3. Surface faceting and elemental diffusion behaviour at atomic scale for alloy nanoparticles during in situ annealing

    DOE PAGES

    Chi, Miaofang; Wang, Chao; Lei, Yinkai; ...

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic performance of nanoparticles is primarily determined by the precise nature of the surface and near-surface atomic configurations, which can be tailored by post-synthesis annealing effectively and straightforwardly. Understanding the complete dynamic response of surface structure and chemistry to thermal treatments at the atomic scale is imperative for the rational design of catalyst nanoparticles. Here, by tracking the same individual Pt3Co nanoparticles during in situ annealing in a scanning transmission electron microscope, we directly discern five distinct stages of surface elemental rearrangements in Pt3Co nanoparticles at the atomic scale: initial random (alloy) elemental distribution; surface platinum-skin-layer formation; nucleation ofmore » structurally ordered domains; ordered framework development and, finally, initiation of amorphization. Furthermore, a comprehensive interplay among phase evolution, surface faceting and elemental inter-diffusion is revealed, and supported by atomistic simulations. Furthermore, this work may pave the way towards designing catalysts through post-synthesis annealing for optimized catalytic performance.« less

  4. Nano-pits on GaAs (1 0 0) surface: Preferential sputtering and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Tanuj; Panchal, Vandana; Kumar, Ashish; Kanjilal, D.

    2016-07-01

    Self organized nano-structure array on the surfaces of semiconductors have potential applications in photonics, magnetic devices, photovoltaics, and surface-wetting tailoring etc. Therefore, the control over their dimensions is gaining scientific interest in last couple of decades. In this work, fabrication of pits of nano-dimensions is carried out on the GaAs (1 0 0) surface using 50 keV Ar+ at normal incidence. Variation in fluence from 3 × 1017 ions/cm2 to 5 × 1018 ions/cm2 does not make a remarkable variation in the dimension of pits such as size and depth, which is confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However the simultaneous dots formation is observed along with the pits at higher fluences. Average size of pits is found to be of 22 nm with depth of 1-5 nm for the used fluences. The importance of preferential sputtering of 'As' as compared to 'Ga' is estimated using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The observed alteration in near surface composition shows the Ga enrichment of surface, which is not being much affected by variation in fluence. The growth evolution of pits and dots for the used experimental conditions is explained on the basis of ion beam induced preferential sputtering and surface diffusion.

  5. Importance of surface diffusivities in pesticide adsorption kinetics onto granular versus powdered activated carbon: experimental determination and modeling.

    PubMed

    Baup, S; Wolbert, D; Laplanche, A

    2002-10-01

    Three pesticides (atrazine, bromoxynil and diuron) and two granular activated carbons are involved in equilibrium and kinetic adsorption experiments. Equilibrium is represented by Freundlich isotherm law and kinetic is described by the Homogeneous Surface Diffusion Model, based on external mass transfer and intraparticle surface diffusion. Equilibrium and long-term experiments are conducted to compare Powdered Activated Carbon and Granular Activated Carbon. These first investigations show that crushing GAC into PAC improves the accessibility of the adsorption sites without increasing the number of these sites. In a second part, kinetics experiments are carried out using a Differential Column Batch Reactor. Thanks to this experimental device, the external mass transfer coefficient k(f) is calculated from empirical correlation and the effect of external mass transfer on adsorption is likely to be minimized. In order to obtain the intraparticle surface diffusion coefficient D. for these pesticides, comparisons between experimental kinetic data and simulations are conducted and the best agreement leads to the Ds coefficient. This procedure appears to be an efficient way to acquire surface diffusion coefficients for the adsorption of pesticides onto GAC. Finally it points out the role of surface diffusivity in the adsorption rate. As a matter of fact, even if the amount of the target-compound that could be potentially adsorbed is really important, its surface diffusion coefficient may be small, so that its adsorption may not have enough contact time to be totally achieved.

  6. Dissociation and diffusion of hydrogen on defect-free and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surfaces: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zongying; Chen, Haipeng; Zhou, Shixue

    2017-02-01

    First-principles calculations with the density functional theory (DFT) have been carried out to study dissociation and diffusion of hydrogen on defect-free and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surfaces. Results show that energy barriers of 1.42 eV and 1.28 eV require to be overcome for H2 dissociation on defect-free and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surfaces respectively, indicating that reactivity of Mg (0001) surface is moderately increased due to vacancy defect. Besides, the existence of vacancy defect changes the preferential H atom diffusion entrance to the subsurface and reduces the diffusion energy barrier. An interesting remark is that the minimum energy diffusion path of H atom from magnesium surface into bulk is a spiral channel formed by staggered octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. The diffusion barriers computed for H atom penetration from the surface into inner-layers are all less than 0.70 eV, which is much smaller than the activation energy for H2 dissociation on the Mg (0001) surface. This suggests that H2 dissociation is more likely than H diffusion to be rate-limiting step for magnesium hydrogenation.

  7. Possibility of direct exchange diffusion of hydrogen on the Cl/Si(100)-2×1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ming-Feng; Lin, Deng-Sung; Tsay, Shiow-Fon

    2009-07-01

    The diffusion behavior of hydrogen substitutional sites on the chlorine-terminated Si(100) surface was investigated at elevated temperatures using time-lapse scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). STM movies show that each hydrogen atom undergoes Brownian motion within a monochloride dimer row. The position of a hydrogen substitutional site is exchanged directly with that of an immediate neighboring chlorine atom in either the same dimer (intradimer diffusion) or in one of the two adjacent dimers in the same row (intrarow diffusion). Accordingly, conceptual direct exchange diffusion (DED) in a two-dimensional lattice was experimentally observed. Analysis of STM movies at various temperatures yielded rather low attempt frequencies and energy barriers, leading to the suggestion that the diffusion mechanism involves an intermediate low-energy molecular state. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations were also performed and provided partial support for the proposed diffusion mechanism.

  8. Nitrogen diffusion-hardened titanium-6aluminum-4vanadium alloy surfaces in modular hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    In vitro galvanic corrosion testing of static cobalt alloy (CoCrMo) and titanium alloy (Ti64) couples illustrated that galvanic stimulus was not large enough to initiate accelerated corrosion at this interface. Analyses of explanted prostheses revealed that instances of accelerated corrosion were associated with areas of prior mechanical and could not be attributed to galvanic origin. Hence, any attempt at improving the performance of this CoCrMo/Ti64 alloy couple would have to center around controlling the resistance to mechanical damage of this mixed-metal interface, specifically the Ti64 alloy components, as the CoCrMo alloy already possesses superior tribological properties. Subsequently, the effect of a nitrogen diffusion hardening process on the surface morphology, chemistry, microhardness, and corrosion resistance of Ti64 alloy was determined. Surface morphology was analyzed using scanning probe microscopy. Diffusion hardened titanium alloy samples (N-Ti64) exhibited a more pronounced grain structure, less distinct machining grooves, increasingly nodular surface, and significantly higher Rsb{a} and RMS values compared to the Ti64 samples. The electrochemical behavior of the N-Ti64 and Ti64 sample groups were equivalent. The Vicker's microhardness values of the N-Ti64 alloy were 2.5 times and 1.5 times greater than the Ti64 and CoCrMo samples, respectively. The change in surface composition and chemistry was analyzed using Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of nitrogen diffusion hardening was apparent to a depth of 40 nm. N-Ti64 samples exhibited the presence of TiN/TiNO on the immediate surface and sub-surface layers and also a significant increase in the oxygen concentration profile compared to Ti64 alloy samples This increase in oxide thickness was confirmed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS analyses also resulted in a deterministic bilayer oxide (porous outer oxide and barrier inner oxide) model for the

  9. Retrieval of diffusing surface by two-frame interferometric method with blind phase shift of a reference wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravsky, Leonid I.; Kmet', Arkady B.; Voronyak, Taras I.

    2011-08-01

    Two-frame interferometric method with blind phase shift of a reference wave for smooth surfaces retrieval is considered. The ability of this method to reconstruct a macrorelief of diffusing surfaces with a given roughness is studied. Computer simulations have testified the ability of reliable low-noise reconstruction of the diffusing surface macrorelief with standard deviation of the roughness heights up to λ/10 by using the developed interferogram processing algorithm. The simulations have shown that the proposed correlation approach, which is used to determine the reference wave blind phase shift, is more suitable for a diffusing surface than for a smooth one and the increase of surface roughness leads to a quadruple decrease of this error in comparison with that for the smooth surface. Experimental verification of the interferometric method performance to retrieve real diffusing surface macroreliefs with given roughness has been done by using the experimental setup based on a Twyman-Green interferometer and roughness comparison specimen. The obtained experimental results virtually have coincided with the computer simulation results that prove the performance of the considered method to retrieve not only smooth, but also diffusing surfaces.

  10. Objective and Subjective Evaluation of Reflecting and Diffusing Surfaces in Auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Trevor John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The performance of reflectors and diffusers used in auditoria have been evaluated both objectively and subjectively. Two accurate systems have been developed to measure the scattering from surfaces via the cross correlation function. These have been used to measure the scattering from plane panels, curved panels and quadratic residue diffusers (QRDs). The scattering measurements have been used to test theoretical prediction methods based on the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral equation. Accurate prediction methods were found for all surfaces tested. The limitations of the more approximate methods have been defined. The assumptions behind Schroeder's design of the QRD have been tested and the local reacting admittance assumption found to be valid over a wide frequency range. It was found that the QRD only produces uniform scattering at low frequencies. For an on-axis source the scattering from a curved panel was as good as from a QRD. For an oblique source the QRD produced much more uniform scattering than the curved panel. The subjective measurements evaluated the smallest perceivable change in the early sound field, the part most influenced by reflectors and diffusers. A natural sounding simulation of a concert hall field within an anechoic chamber was used. Standard objective parameters were reasonable values when compared to values found in real halls and subjective preference measurements. A difference limen was measured for early lateral energy fraction (.048 +/-.005); inter aural cross correlation (.075 +/-.008); clarity index (.67 +/-.13 dB); and centre time (8.6 +/- 1.6 ms). It was found that: (i) when changes are made to diffusers and reflectors, changes in spatial impression will usually be larger than those in clarity; and (ii) acousticians can gain most by paying attention to lateral sound in auditoria. It was also found that: (i) diffuse reflections in the early sound field

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of coupled diffusion and surface reactions during the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-09-19

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, in this paper three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75 - x) mol% SiO2 (12.5 + x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5 + x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditions at a surface-area-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick's 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Finally, models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of coupled diffusion and surface reactions during the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-09-19

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, in this paper three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75 - x) mol% SiO2 (12.5 + x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5 + x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditionsmore » at a surface-area-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick's 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Finally, models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.« less

  13. Modeling diffuse sources of surface water contamination with plant protection products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendland, Sandra; Bock, Michael; Böhner, Jürgen; Lembrich, David

    2015-04-01

    Entries of chemical pollutants in surface waters are a serious environmental problem. Among water pollutants plant protection products (ppp) from farming practice are of major concern not only for water suppliers and environmental agencies, but also for farmers and industrial manufacturers. Lost chemicals no longer fulfill their original purpose on the field, but lead to severe damage of the environment and surface waters. Besides point-source inputs of chemical pollutants, the diffuse-source inputs from agricultural procedures play an important and not yet sufficiently studied role concerning water quality. The two most important factors for diffuse inputs are erosion and runoff. The latter usually occurs before erosion begins, and is thus often not visible in hindsight. Only if it has come to erosion, it is obvious to expect runoff in foresight at this area, too. In addition to numerous erosion models, there are also few applications to model runoff processes available. However, these conventional models utilize approximations of catchment parameters based on long-term average values or theoretically calculated concentration peaks which can only provide indications to relative amounts. Our study aims to develop and validate a simplified spatially-explicit dynamic model with high spatiotemporal resolution that enables to measure current and forecast runoff potential not only at catchment scale but field-differentiated. This method allows very precise estimations of runoff risks and supports risk reduction measures to be targeted before fields are treated. By focusing on water pathways occurring on arable land, targeted risk reduction measures like buffer strips at certain points and adapted ppp use can be taken early and pollution of rivers and other surface waters through transported pesticides, fertilizers and their products could be nearly avoided or largely minimized. Using a SAGA-based physical-parametric modeling approach, major factors influencing runoff

  14. Surface diffusion driven morphological instability in free-standing nickel nanorod arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Alrashid, Ebtihaj; Ye, Dexian

    2014-07-28

    Metallic nanostructures are thermodynamically unstable due to the excess of energy of large numbers of surface atoms. Morphological instability, such as Rayleigh breakup, sintering, and coalescence, can be observed at a temperature much lower than the bulk melting point of the metal. We study the morphological and crystalline evolution of well-aligned free-standing nickel nanorod arrays at elevated temperatures up to 600 °C. The as-deposited nickel nanorods are faceted with sharp nanotips, which are deformed at annealing temperatures higher than 400 °C due to strong surface diffusion. A mud-crack like pattern is formed in the samples annealed above 400 °C, leading to the generation of interconnected porous structure. Meanwhile, the X-ray diffraction reveals the recrystallization of nickel nanocrystals when annealed from 300 to 600 °C.

  15. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organic molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Joan E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on -alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto γ-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  16. Wideband Scattering Diffusion by using Diffraction of Periodic Surfaces and Optimized Unit Cell Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Filippo; Monorchio, Agostino; Manara, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    A methodology to obtain wideband scattering diffusion based on periodic artificial surfaces is presented. The proposed surfaces provide scattering towards multiple propagation directions across an extremely wide frequency band. They comprise unit cells with an optimized geometry and arranged in a periodic lattice characterized by a repetition period larger than one wavelength which induces the excitation of multiple Floquet harmonics. The geometry of the elementary unit cell is optimized in order to minimize the reflection coefficient of the fundamental Floquet harmonic over a wide frequency band. The optimization of FSS geometry is performed through a genetic algorithm in conjunction with periodic Method of Moments. The design method is verified through full-wave simulations and measurements. The proposed solution guarantees very good performance in terms of bandwidth-thickness ratio and removes the need of a high-resolution printing process. PMID:27181841

  17. Wideband Scattering Diffusion by using Diffraction of Periodic Surfaces and Optimized Unit Cell Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Filippo; Monorchio, Agostino; Manara, Giuliano

    2016-05-01

    A methodology to obtain wideband scattering diffusion based on periodic artificial surfaces is presented. The proposed surfaces provide scattering towards multiple propagation directions across an extremely wide frequency band. They comprise unit cells with an optimized geometry and arranged in a periodic lattice characterized by a repetition period larger than one wavelength which induces the excitation of multiple Floquet harmonics. The geometry of the elementary unit cell is optimized in order to minimize the reflection coefficient of the fundamental Floquet harmonic over a wide frequency band. The optimization of FSS geometry is performed through a genetic algorithm in conjunction with periodic Method of Moments. The design method is verified through full-wave simulations and measurements. The proposed solution guarantees very good performance in terms of bandwidth-thickness ratio and removes the need of a high-resolution printing process.

  18. Verification of the effect of surface preparation on Hot Isostatic Pressing diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanyun; Li, Chunjing; Huang, Bo; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) diffusion bonding with CLAM steel is the primary candidate fabrication technique for the first wall (FW) of DFLL-TBM. Surface state is one of the key factors for the joints quality. The effect of surface state prepared with grinder and miller on HIP diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel was investigated. HIP diffusion bonding was performed at 140 MPa and 1373 K within 3 h. The mechanical properties of the joints were investigated with instrumented Charpy V-notch impact tests and the microstructures of the joints were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the milled samples with fine surface roughness were more suitable for CLAM steel HIP diffusion bonding.

  19. The Study of Surface Diffusion and Growth Phenomena Using Electronic Structure Calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaxiras, Efthimios

    1996-03-01

    Diffusion and growth phenomena on semiconductor surfaces represent one of the most challenging problems in the theory of materials. At the core of these phenomena are issues of kinetics and of the thermodynamic stability of surface structures. Such complex issues can be addressed accurately only through the use of first-principles electronic structure calculations in the framework of density functional theory. For realistic systems, these calculations are computationally demanding, but they provide a reliable description of the energetics and the electronic properties. In addition to prototypical systems like Si or Ge, the calculations can also handle successfully variations in the chemical composition, such as the presence of adsorbates (which can affect significantly both the kinetics and the equilibrium geometries on a surface). The results of these calculations can be combined with stochastic simulations and simple phenomenological models to provide direct comparison to experiment. We will illustrate the ability of this theoretical approach to tackle realistic problems of technological importance and to make predictions on the behavior of complicated systems, through several examples, including passivation of surfaces, surfactant mediated growth, and electromigration on stepped surfaces ( In collaboration with D. Kandel. This work was supported by ONR, Contract#N00014-95-1-0350. ).

  20. Retention/Diffusivity Studies in Free-Surface Flowing Liquid Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Stubbers; G.H. Miley; M. Nieto; W. Olczak; D.N. Ruzic; A. Hassanein

    2004-12-14

    FLIRE was designed to measure the hydrogen and helium retention and diffusivity in a flowing stream of liquid lithium, and it has accomplished these goals. Retention coefficients for helium in the flowing liquid stream were 0.1-2% for flow speeds of 44 cm/s and implantation energies between 500 and 2000 eV. The energy dependence of retention is linear for the energy range considered, as expected, and the dependence of retention on flow velocity fits the expected square-root of flow speed dependence. Estimates of the helium diffusion coefficient in the flowing lithium stream were {approx} 4 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/s, and are independent of implantation energy. This value is much lower than expected, which could be due to several factors, such as mixing, bubble formation or surface film formation. In the case of hydrogen, long term retention and release mechanisms are of greatest importance, since this relates to tritium inventory in flowing lithium PFCs for fusion applications. The amount of hydride formation was measured for flowing lithium exposed to neutral deuterium gas. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements indicate that the hydride concentration was between 0.1 and 0.2% over a wide range of pressures (6.5 x 10{sup -5} to 1 Torr). This result implies that the deuterium absorption rate is limited by the surface dissociation rate, since deuterium (hydrogen/tritium) is absorbed in its atomic form, not its molecular form.

  1. Surface diffusion effects on growth of nanowires by chemical beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, A. I.; Froeberg, L. E.; Jeppesen, S.; Bjoerk, M. T.; Samuelson, L.

    2007-02-01

    Surface processes play a large role in the growth of semiconductor nanowires by chemical beam epitaxy. In particular, for III-V nanowires the surface diffusion of group-III species is important to understand in order to control the nanowire growth. In this paper, we have grown InAs-based nanowires positioned by electron beam lithography and have investigated the dependence of the diffusion of In species on temperature, group-III and -V source pressure and group-V source combinations by measuring nanowire growth rate for different nanowire spacings. We present a model which relates the nanowire growth rate to the migration length of In species. The model is fitted to the experimental data for different growth conditions, using the migration length as fitting parameter. The results show that the migration length increases with decreasing temperature and increasing group-V/group-III source pressure ratio. This will most often lead to an increase in growth rate, but deviations will occur due to incomplete decomposition and changes in sticking coefficient for group-III species. The results also show that the introduction of phosphorous precursor for growth of InAs{sub 1-x}P{sub x} nanowires decreases the migration length of the In species followed by a decrease in nanowire growth rate.

  2. Surface diffusion effects on growth of nanowires by chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, A. I.; Fröberg, L. E.; Jeppesen, S.; Björk, M. T.; Samuelson, L.

    2007-02-01

    Surface processes play a large role in the growth of semiconductor nanowires by chemical beam epitaxy. In particular, for III-V nanowires the surface diffusion of group-III species is important to understand in order to control the nanowire growth. In this paper, we have grown InAs-based nanowires positioned by electron beam lithography and have investigated the dependence of the diffusion of In species on temperature, group-III and -V source pressure and group-V source combinations by measuring nanowire growth rate for different nanowire spacings. We present a model which relates the nanowire growth rate to the migration length of In species. The model is fitted to the experimental data for different growth conditions, using the migration length as fitting parameter. The results show that the migration length increases with decreasing temperature and increasing group-V/group-III source pressure ratio. This will most often lead to an increase in growth rate, but deviations will occur due to incomplete decomposition and changes in sticking coefficient for group-III species. The results also show that the introduction of phosphorous precursor for growth of InAs1-xPx nanowires decreases the migration length of the In species followed by a decrease in nanowire growth rate.

  3. The electrooxidation mechanism of formic acid on platinum and on lead ad-atoms modified platinum studied with the kinetic isotope effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełtowska-Brzezinska, M.; Łuczak, T.; Stelmach, J.; Holze, R.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of formic acid (FA) oxidation on platinum and upd-lead ad-atoms modified platinum electrodes have been studied using unlabelled and deuterated compounds. Poisoning of the electrode surface by CO-like species was prevented by suppression of dissociative chemisorption of FA due to a fast competitive underpotential deposition of lead ad-atoms on the Pt surface from an acidic solution containing Pb2+ cations. Modification of the Pt electrode with upd lead induced a catalytic effect in the direct electrooxidation of physisorbed FA to CO2. With increasing degree of H/D substitution, the rate of this reaction decreased in the order: HCOOH > DCOOH ≥ HCOOD > DCOOD. HCOOH was oxidized 8.5-times faster on a Pt/Pb electrode than DCOOD. This primary kinetic isotope effect proves that the C-H- and O-H-bonds are simultaneously cleaved in the rate determining step. A secondary kinetic isotope effect was found in the dissociative chemisorption of FA in the hydrogen adsorption-desorption range on a bare Pt electrode after H/D exchange in the C-H bond, wherein the influence of deuterium substitution in the O-H group was negligibly small. Thus the C-H bond cleavage is accompanied by the C-OH and not the O-H bond split in the FA decomposition, producing CO-like species on the Pt surface sites.

  4. Modeling bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two cell membrane targets indicates the importance of surface diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Sengers, Bram G.; McGinty, Sean; Nouri, Fatma Z.; Argungu, Maryam; Hawkins, Emma; Hadji, Aymen; Weber, Andrew; Taylor, Adam; Sepp, Armin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have developed a mathematical framework for describing a bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two independent membrane-bound targets that are expressed on the same cell surface. The bispecific antibody in solution binds either of the two targets first, and then cross-links with the second one while on the cell surface, subject to rate-limiting lateral diffusion step within the lifetime of the monovalently engaged antibody-antigen complex. At experimental densities, only a small fraction of the free targets is expected to lie within the reach of the antibody binding sites at any time. Using ordinary differential equation and Monte Carlo simulation-based models, we validated this approach against an independently published anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab experimental data set. As a result of dimensional reduction, the cell surface reaction is expected to be so rapid that, in agreement with the experimental data, no monovalently bound bispecific antibody binary complexes accumulate until cross-linking is complete. The dissociation of the bispecific antibody from the ternary cross-linked complex is expected to be significantly slower than that from either of the monovalently bound variants. We estimate that the effective affinity of the bivalently bound bispecific antibody is enhanced for about 4 orders of magnitude over that of the monovalently bound species. This avidity enhancement allows for the highly specific binding of anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab to the cells that are positive for both target antigens over those that express only one or the other We suggest that the lateral diffusion of target antigens in the cell membrane also plays a key role in the avidity effect of natural antibodies and other bivalent ligands in their interactions with their respective cell surface receptors. PMID:27097222

  5. Modeling bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two cell membrane targets indicates the importance of surface diffusion.

    PubMed

    Sengers, Bram G; McGinty, Sean; Nouri, Fatma Z; Argungu, Maryam; Hawkins, Emma; Hadji, Aymen; Weber, Andrew; Taylor, Adam; Sepp, Armin

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a mathematical framework for describing a bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two independent membrane-bound targets that are expressed on the same cell surface. The bispecific antibody in solution binds either of the two targets first, and then cross-links with the second one while on the cell surface, subject to rate-limiting lateral diffusion step within the lifetime of the monovalently engaged antibody-antigen complex. At experimental densities, only a small fraction of the free targets is expected to lie within the reach of the antibody binding sites at any time. Using ordinary differential equation and Monte Carlo simulation-based models, we validated this approach against an independently published anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab experimental data set. As a result of dimensional reduction, the cell surface reaction is expected to be so rapid that, in agreement with the experimental data, no monovalently bound bispecific antibody binary complexes accumulate until cross-linking is complete. The dissociation of the bispecific antibody from the ternary cross-linked complex is expected to be significantly slower than that from either of the monovalently bound variants. We estimate that the effective affinity of the bivalently bound bispecific antibody is enhanced for about 4 orders of magnitude over that of the monovalently bound species. This avidity enhancement allows for the highly specific binding of anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab to the cells that are positive for both target antigens over those that express only one or the other We suggest that the lateral diffusion of target antigens in the cell membrane also plays a key role in the avidity effect of natural antibodies and other bivalent ligands in their interactions with their respective cell surface receptors.

  6. Efficient floating diffuse functions for accurate characterization of the surface-bound excess electrons in water cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzhe; Bu, Yuxiang

    2017-01-25

    In this work, the effect of diffuse function types (atom-centered diffuse functions versus floating functions and s-type versus p-type diffuse functions) on the structures and properties of three representative water cluster anions featuring a surface-bound excess electron is studied and we find that an effective combination of such two kinds of diffuse functions can not only reduce the computational cost but also, most importantly, considerably improve the accuracy of results and even avoid incorrect predictions of spectra and the EE shape. Our results indicate that (a) simple augmentation of atom-centered diffuse functions is beneficial for the vertical detachment energy convergence, but it leads to very poor descriptions for the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) distributions of the water cluster anions featuring a surface-bound excess electron and thus a significant ultraviolet spectrum redshift; (b) the ghost-atom-based floating diffuse functions can not only contribute to accurate electronic calculations of the ground state but also avoid poor and even incorrect descriptions of the SOMO and the LUMO induced by excessive augmentation of atom-centered diffuse functions; (c) the floating functions can be realized by ghost atoms and their positions could be determined through an optimization routine along the dipole moment vector direction. In addition, both the s- and p-type floating functions are necessary to supplement in the basis set which are responsible for the ground (s-type character) and excited (p-type character) states of the surface-bound excess electron, respectively. The exponents of the diffuse functions should also be determined to make the diffuse functions cover the main region of the excess electron distribution. Note that excessive augmentation of such diffuse functions is redundant and even can lead to unreasonable LUMO characteristics.

  7. Surface charge measurements on different dielectrics in diffuse and filamentary barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschiersch, R.; Nemschokmichal, S.; Bogaczyk, M.; Meichsner, J.

    2017-03-01

    Previously, we reported on the measurement of surface charges during the operation of barrier discharges (BDs) using the electro-optic Pockels effect of a bismuth silicon oxide (BSO) crystal. With the present work, the next milestone is achieved by making this powerful method accessible to various dielectrics which are typically used in BD configurations. The dynamics and spatial distribution of positive and negative surface charges were determined on optically transparent borosilicate glass, mono-crystalline alumina and magnesia, respectively, covering the BSO crystal. By variation of the nitrogen admixture to helium and the pressure between 500~\\text{mbar} and 1~\\text{bar} , both the diffuse glow-like BD and the self-stabilized discharge filaments were operated inside of a gas gap of 3~\\text{mm} . The characteristics of the discharge and, especially, the influence of the different dielectrics on its development were studied by surface charge diagnostics, electrical measurements and ICCD camera imaging. Regarding the glow-like BD, the breakdown voltage changes significantly by variation of the cathodic dielectric, due to the different effective secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficients. These material-specific SEE yields were estimated using Townsend’s criterion in combination with analytical calculations of the effective ionization coefficient in helium with air impurities. Moreover, the importance of the surface charge memory effect for the self-stabilization of discharge filaments was quantified by the recalculated spatio-temporal behavior of the gap voltage.

  8. Diffusion Of Hydrophobin Proteins In Solution And Interactions With A Graphite Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2011-04-21

    Background Hydrophobins are small proteins produced by filamentous fungi that have a variety of biological functions including coating of spores and surface adhesion. To accomplish these functions, they rely on unique interface-binding properties. Using atomic-detail implicit solvent rigid-body Brownian dynamics simulations, we studied the diffusion of HFBI, a class II hydrophobin from Trichoderma reesei, in aqueous solution in the presence and absence of a graphite surface. Results In the simulations, HFBI exists in solution as a mixture of monomers in equilibrium with different types of oligomers. The oligomerization state depends on the conformation of HFBI. When a Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) layer is present in the simulated system, HFBI tends to interact with the HOPG layer through a hydrophobic patch on the protein. Conclusions From the simulations of HFBI solutions, we identify a tetrameric encounter complex stabilized by non-polar interactions between the aliphatic residues in the hydrophobic patch on HFBI. After the formation of the encounter complex, a local structural rearrangement at the protein interfaces is required to obtain the tetrameric arrangement seen in HFBI crystals. Simulations performed with the graphite surface show that, due to a combination of a geometric hindrance and the interaction of the aliphatic sidechains with the graphite layer, HFBI proteins tend to accumulate close to the hydrophobic surface.

  9. Dynamic behaviors of liquid droplets on a gas diffusion layer surface: Hybrid lattice Boltzmann investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Huang, Jun-Jie

    2015-07-01

    Water management is one of the key issues in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Fundamentally, it is related to dynamic behaviors of droplets on a gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface, and consequently they are investigated in this work. A two-dimensional hybrid method is employed to implement numerical simulations, in which the flow field is solved by using the lattice Boltzmann method and the interface between droplet and gas is captured by solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation directly. One or two liquid droplets are initially placed on the GDL surface of a gas channel, which is driven by the fully developed Poiseuille flow. At a fixed channel size, the effects of viscosity ratio of droplet to gas ( μ ∗ ), Capillary number (Ca, ratio of gas viscosity to surface tension), and droplet interaction on the dynamic behaviors of droplets are systematically studied. By decreasing viscosity ratio or increasing Capillary number, the single droplet can detach from the GDL surface easily. On the other hand, when two identical droplets stay close to each other or a larger droplet is placed in front of a smaller droplet, the removal of two droplets is promoted.

  10. Numerical investigation of the submonolayer growth and relaxation of stepped Ag (110) and Au (110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hontinfinde, Senan I. V.; Akpo, Aristide B.; Hontinfinde, Félix

    2016-09-01

    The terrace width distribution (TWD) as well as the adatom and island densities for some stepped fcc (110) surfaces with parallel and equidistant steps of equal stiffness are studied by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Reliable energy barriers for surface diffusion are used. They have been calculated by means of many-body potentials derived within the second moment approximation to the tight-binding model. The effects of the temperature, atom deposition flux and surface diffusion on quantities of interest in the early stage of the surface evolution process have been singled out. In most cases, linear, logarithmic and power-law behaviors are recovered for the evolution of the step width and terrace defects. The TWD is well described by the Gaussian distribution (GD) in the domain of temperature investigated but deviates from the Generalized Wigner Distribution (GWD).

  11. Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Diffusion Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Way, J.; Wolden, Colin

    2013-09-30

    Colorado School of Mines (CSM) developed high temperature, hydrogen permeable membranes that contain no platinum group metals with the goal of separating hydrogen from gas mixtures representative of gasification of carbon feedstocks such as coal or biomass in order to meet DOE NETL 2015 hydrogen membrane performance targets. We employed a dual synthesis strategy centered on transition metal carbides. In the first approach, novel, high temperature, surface diffusion membranes based on nanoporous Mo{sub 2}C were fabricated on ceramic supports. These were produced in a two step process that consisted of molybdenum oxide deposition followed by thermal carburization. Our best Mo{sub 2}C surface diffusion membrane achieved a pure hydrogen flux of 367 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at a feed pressure of only 20 psig. The highest H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity obtained with this approach was 4.9. A transport model using “dusty gas” theory was derived to describe the hydrogen transport in the Mo{sub 2}C coated, surface diffusion membranes. The second class of membranes developed were dense metal foils of BCC metals such as vanadium coated with thin (< 60 nm) Mo{sub 2}C catalyst layers. We have fabricated a Mo{sub 2}C/V composite membrane that in pure gas testing delivered a H{sub 2} flux of 238 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at 600 °C and 100 psig, with no detectable He permeance. This exceeds the 2010 DOE Target flux. This flux is 2.8 times that of pure Pd at the same membrane thickness and test conditions and over 79% of the 2015 flux target. In mixed gas testing we achieved a permeate purity of ≥99.99%, satisfying the permeate purity milestone, but the hydrogen permeance was low, ~0.2 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.psi. However, during testing of a Mo{sub 2}C coated Pd alloy membrane with DOE 1 feed gas mixture a hydrogen permeance of >2 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.psi was obtained which was stable during the entire test, meeting the permeance associated with the 2010 DOE target flux. Lastly, the Mo{sub 2}C/V composite

  12. A soil diffusion-reaction model for surface COS flux: COSSM v1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Maseyk, K.; Lett, C.; Seibt, U.

    2015-10-01

    Soil exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the second largest COS flux in terrestrial ecosystems. A novel application of COS is the separation of gross primary productivity (GPP) from concomitant respiration. This method requires that soil COS exchange is relatively small and can be well quantified. Existing models for soil COS flux have incorporated empirical temperature and moisture functions derived from laboratory experiments but not explicitly resolved diffusion in the soil column. We developed a mechanistic diffusion-reaction model for soil COS exchange that accounts for COS uptake and production, relates source-sink terms to environmental variables, and has an option to enable surface litter layers. We evaluated the model with field data from a wheat field (Southern Great Plains (SGP), OK, USA) and an oak woodland (Stunt Ranch Reserve, CA, USA). The model was able to reproduce all observed features of soil COS exchange such as diurnal variations and sink-source transitions. We found that soil COS uptake is strongly diffusion controlled and limited by low COS concentrations in the soil if there is COS uptake in the litter layer. The model provides novel insights into the balance between soil COS uptake and production: a higher COS production capacity was required despite lower COS emissions during the growing season compared to the post-senescence period at SGP, and unchanged COS uptake capacity despite the dominant role of COS emissions after senescence. Once there is a database of soil COS parameters for key biomes, we expect the model will also be useful to simulate soil COS exchange at regional to global scales.

  13. A soil diffusion-reaction model for surface COS flux: COSSM v1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Maseyk, K.; Lett, C.; Seibt, U.

    2015-07-01

    Soil exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the second largest COS flux in terrestrial ecosystems. A novel application of COS is the separation of gross primary productivity (GPP) from concomitant respiration. This method requires that soil COS exchange is relatively small and can be well quantified. Existing models for soil COS flux have incorporated empirical temperature and moisture functions derived from laboratory experiments, but not explicitly resolved diffusion in the soil column. We developed a 1-D diffusion-reaction model for soil COS exchange that accounts for COS uptake and production, relates source-sink terms to environmental variables, and has an option to enable surface litter layers. We evaluated the model with field data from a wheat field (Southern Great Plains (SGP), OK, USA) and an oak woodland (Stunt Ranch Reserve, CA, USA). The model was able to reproduce all observed features of soil COS exchange such as diurnal variations and sink-source transitions. We found that soil COS uptake is strongly diffusion controlled, and limited by low COS concentrations in the soil if there is COS uptake in the litter layer. The model provides novel insights into the balance between soil COS uptake and production: a higher COS production capacity was required despite lower COS emissions during the growing season compared to the post-senescence period at SGP, and unchanged COS uptake capacity despite the dominant role of COS emissions after senescence. Once there is a database of soil COS parameters for key biomes, we expect the model will also be useful to simulate soil COS exchange at regional to global scales.

  14. Bidirectional diffusion of ammonium and sodium cations in forward osmosis: role of membrane active layer surface chemistry and charge.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinglin; Boo, Chanhee; Ma, Jun; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-12-16

    Systematic fundamental understanding of mass transport in osmosis-driven membrane processes is important for further development of this emerging technology. In this work, we investigate the role of membrane surface chemistry and charge on bidirectional solute diffusion in forward osmosis (FO). In particular, bidirectional diffusion of ammonium (NH4(+)) and sodium (Na(+)) is examined using FO membranes with different materials and surface charge characteristics. Using an ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) draw solution, we observe dramatically enhanced cation fluxes with sodium chloride feed solution compared to that with deionized water feed solution for thin-film composite (TFC) FO membrane. However, the bidirectional diffusion of cations does not change, regardless of the type of feed solution, for cellulose triacetate (CTA) FO membrane. We relate this phenomenon to the membrane fixed surface charge by employing different feed solution pH to foster different protonation conditions for the carboxyl groups on the TFC membrane surface. Membrane surface modification is also carried out with the TFC membrane using ethylenediamine to alter carboxyl groups into amine groups. The modified TFC membrane, with less negatively charged groups, exhibits a significant decrease in the bidirectional diffusion of cations under the same conditions employed with the pristine TFC membrane. Based on our experimental observations, we propose Donnan dialysis as a mechanism responsible for enhanced bidirectional diffusion of cations in TFC membranes.

  15. Observation of trapped-hole diffusion on the surfaces of CdS nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utterback, James K.; Grennell, Amanda N.; Wilker, Molly B.; Pearce, Orion M.; Eaves, Joel D.; Dukovic, Gordana

    2016-11-01

    In CdS nanocrystals, photoexcited holes rapidly become trapped at the particle surface. The dynamics of these trapped holes have profound consequences for the photophysics and photochemistry of these materials. Using a combination of transient absorption spectroscopy and theoretical modelling, we demonstrate that trapped holes in CdS nanorods are mobile and execute a random walk at room temperature. In CdS nanorods of non-uniform width, we observe the recombination of spatially separated electrons and trapped holes, which exhibits a t-1/2 power-law decay at long times. A one-dimensional diffusion-annihilation model describes the time-dependence of the recombination over four orders of magnitude in time, from one nanosecond to ten microseconds, with a single adjustable parameter. We propose that diffusive trapped-hole motion is a general phenomenon in CdS nanocrystals, but one that is normally obscured in structures in which the wavefunctions of the electron and trapped hole spatially overlap. This phenomenon has important implications for the oxidation photochemistry of CdS nanocrystals.

  16. Electronic structure and magnetism of samarium and neodymium adatoms on free-standing graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, Agnieszka L.; Shick, Alexander B.; Máca, František; Kolorenč, Jindřich; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure of selected rare-earth atoms adsorbed on a free-standing graphene was investigated using methods beyond the conventional density functional theory (DFT+U , DFT+HIA, and DFT+ED). The influence of the electron correlations and the spin-orbit coupling on the magnetic properties has been examined. The DFT+U method predicts both atoms to carry local magnetic moments (spin and orbital) contrary to a nonmagnetic f6 (J =0 ) ground-state configuration of Sm in the gas phase. Application of DFT +Hubbard-I (HIA) and DFT +exact diagonalization (ED) methods cures this problem, and yields a nonmagnetic ground state with six f electrons and J =0 for the Sm adatom. Our calculations show that Nd adatom remains magnetic, with four localized f electrons and J =4.0 . These conclusions could be verified by STM and XAS experiments.

  17. Polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere delimited by a heterogeneous diffusely reflecting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strelkov, S. A.; Sushkevich, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Spatial frequency characteristics (SFC) and the scattering functions were studied in the two cases of a uniform horizontal layer with absolutely black bottom, and an isolated layer. The mathematical model for these examples describes the horizontal heterogeneities in a light field with regard to radiation polarization in a three dimensional planar atmosphere, delimited by a heterogeneous surface with diffuse reflection. The perturbation method was used to obtain vector transfer equations which correspond to the linear and nonlinear systems of polarization radiation transfer. The boundary value tasks for the vector transfer equation that is a parametric set and one dimensional are satisfied by the SFC of the nonlinear system, and are expressed through the SFC of linear approximation. As a consequence of the developed theory, formulas were obtained for analytical calculation of albedo in solving the task of dissemination of polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere with uniform Lambert bottom.

  18. Evolution of a train of interacting steps in a surface diffusion field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaha, Makio

    1993-03-01

    We study the time evolution of a train of parallel straight steps interacting with an elastic interaction. A general formula for the step velocity is given as a function of the step distances, the interaction strength and the kinetic coefficients of the step. If the attachment kinetics from the lower terrace of the step is faster than that from the upper terrace, the interference of diffusion field gives rise to an effective attraction in sublimation. There is a critical undersaturation below which two repulsive steps can form a bound state. When a step collides with a bound pair, recombination of the steps takes place, which looks like billiards. For an equidistant step train, under a similar condition, an instability occurs and the steps form pairs, which has a significant effect on the growth law of the vicinal surface.

  19. Method of coating the interior surface of hollow objects with a diffusion coating

    DOEpatents

    Knowles, Shawn D.; Senor, David J.; Forbes, Steven V.; Johnson, Roger N.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

    2005-03-15

    A method for forming a diffusion coating on the interior of surface of a hollow object wherein a filament, extending through a hollow object and adjacent to the interior surface of the object, is provided, with a coating material, in a vacuum. An electrical current is then applied to the filament to resistively heat the filament to a temperature sufficient to transfer the coating material from the filament to the interior surface of the object. The filament is electrically isolated from the object while the filament is being resistively heated. Preferably, the filament is provided as a tungsten filament or molybdenum filament. Preferably, the coating materials are selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hg, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni P, Pb, Pd, Pr, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Te, Tl, Y, Yb, Zn, and combinations thereof. The invention additionally allows for the formation of nitrides, hydrides, or carbides of all the possible coating materials, where such compounds exist, by providing a partial pressure of nitrogen, hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or combination thereof, within the vacuum.

  20. Self-assembly of two-dimensional DNA origami lattices using cation-controlled surface diffusion.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sungwook; Rothemund, Paul W K

    2014-09-10

    DNA origami has proven useful for organizing diverse nanoscale components into patterns with 6 nm resolution. However for many applications, such as nanoelectronics, large-scale organization of origami into periodic lattices is desired. Here, we report the self-assembly of DNA origami rectangles into two-dimensional lattices based on stepwise control of surface diffusion, implemented by changing the concentrations of cations on the surface. Previous studies of DNA–mica binding identified the fractional surface density of divalent cations (ñ(s2))as the parameter which best explains the behaviour of linear DNA on mica. We show that for ñ(s2) between 0.04 and 0.1, over 90% of DNA rectangles were incorporated into lattices and that, compared with other functions of cation concentration, ñ(s2) best captures the behaviour of DNA rectangles. This work shows how a physical understanding of DNA–mica binding can be used to guide studies of the higher-order assembly of DNA nanostructures, towards creating large-scale arrays of nanodevices for technology.

  1. Recovery of correlation function of internal random rough surfaces from diffusely scattered elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, F.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Craster, R. V.

    2017-02-01

    We propose an ultrasonic methodology to reconstruct the height correlation function of remotely inaccessible random rough surfaces in solids. The inverse method is based on the Kirchhoff approximation(KA), and it requires measuring the angular distribution of diffuse scattering intensities by sending in a narrow band incident pulse. Near field scattering effects are also included by considering the Fresnel assumption. The proposed approach is successfully verified by simulating the scattering from multiple realizations of rough surfaces whose correlation function is known, calculating the mean scattering intensities from these received signals, and then deploying the inverse method on these to reconstruct the original correlation function. Very good agreement between the reconstructed correlation function and the original is found, for a wide range of roughness parameters. In addition, the effect of reducing the number of realizations to approximate the mean intensity are investigated, providing confidence bounds for the experiment. An experiment on a corrugated rough surface is performed with a limited number of scans using a phased array, which further validates the proposed inversion algorithm.

  2. Radiation Heat Transfer Between Diffuse-Gray Surfaces Using Higher Order Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents recent work on developing methods for analyzing radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using p-version finite elements. The work was motivated by a thermal analysis of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) wing structure which showed the importance of radiation heat transfer throughout the structure. The analysis also showed that refining the finite element mesh to accurately capture the temperature distribution on the internal structure led to very large meshes with unacceptably long execution times. Traditional methods for calculating surface-to-surface radiation are based on assumptions that are not appropriate for p-version finite elements. Two methods for determining internal radiation heat transfer are developed for one and two-dimensional p-version finite elements. In the first method, higher-order elements are divided into a number of sub-elements. Traditional methods are used to determine radiation heat flux along each sub-element and then mapped back to the parent element. In the second method, the radiation heat transfer equations are numerically integrated over the higher-order element. Comparisons with analytical solutions show that the integration scheme is generally more accurate than the sub-element method. Comparison to results from traditional finite elements shows that significant reduction in the number of elements in the mesh is possible using higher-order (p-version) finite elements.

  3. Theoretical investigation of structures and energetics of sodium adatom and its dimer on graphene: DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-11-01

    Extensive ab initio calculations have been performed to study the energetics of a sodium (Na) atom and its dimer adsorbed on graphene using the SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS), partial density states (PDOS) of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated. After considering various sites for adsorption of Na on graphene, the center of a hexagonal ring of carbon atoms is found to be the preferred site of adsorption while the Na2 dimer prefers to rest parallel to the graphene sheet. We find insignificant energy differences among adsorption configurations involving different possible sites in parallel orientation, which implies high mobility of the dimer on the graphene sheet. We also notice only a slight distortion of the graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane upon adatom adsorption. However, some lateral displacements seen are more perceptible. Summary The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS) and PDOS of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated using SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. Preferred site for adsorption of a sodium atom on graphene is the hollow site. For the Na dimer adsorption, we found that horizontal orientation is favored over the vertical one. From DOS plots, it is clear that graphene's states are nearly unaffected by the adsorption of Na adatom and Interaction between sodium and graphene is predominantly ionic

  4. Interpretation of tracer surface diffusion experiments on UO2 — roles of gas and solid transport processes

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, D. R.

    1981-02-01

    In this paper, the spreading of a tracer from an enriched needle source which contacts the surface of a depleted pellet sink is analyzed rigorously. It is shown that volume diffusion in both the needle and the pellet need to be considered because only by this process is sufficient radioactivity accumulated for measurement after the anneal. Parasitic gas phase processes are of two types: evaporative loss of solid if a flowing gas is used, or molecular diffusion from enriched portions of the surface to depleted zones if the couple is in a closed vessel with a stagnant gas. A complete numerical solution including surface diffusion, solid diffusion, evaporative loss and contact resistance is applied to the UO2 tracer study of Marlowe and Kazanoff at 1915°C. Based upon UO2 evaporation experiments, the analysis shows that the evaporative loss effect is not important in these experiments. Finally, the UO2 surface diffusion coefficient deduced from analysis of these data is 0.2 ± 0.1 cm2/s at 1915°C, which is 104 times larger than that predicted by extrapolation of values obtained by mass transfer techniques.

  5. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT‐1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta‐Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F.; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Griffin, Lewis D.

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic GLT‐1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live‐cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT‐1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP‐time lapse imaging, we show that GLT‐1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity‐dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT‐1 is more stable than diffuse GLT‐1 and that glutamate increases GLT‐1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT‐1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT‐1a and GLT‐1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT‐1b more so. GLT‐1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT‐1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT‐1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252–1264 PMID:27189737

  6. Design of Advanced Photocatalysis System by Adatom Decoration in 2D Nanosheets of Group-IV and III–V Binary Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hao; Dai, Ying; Huang, Bai-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Searching for novel photocatalysts is one of the most important topic in photocatalytic fields. In the present work, we propose a feasible approach to improve the photocatalytic activities of 2D bilayers through surface decoration, i.e. hydrogenation, halogenation, and hydroxylation. Our investigations demonstrate that after surface modification, the optical adsorption expands into the visible region, while a built-in electric field is induced due to the interlayer coupling, which can promote the charge separation for photogenerated electron-hole pairs. Our results show that the indirect-direct band gap transition of SiC, SnC, BN and GaN can be realised through adatom decoration. Furthermore, the surface-modified 2D bilayers have suitable VBM and CBM alignments with the oxidation and reduction potentials for water splitting, suggesting powerful potentials in energy and environmental applications. PMID:26983908

  7. Theory of activated glassy relaxation, mobility gradients, surface diffusion, and vitrification in free standing thin films.

    PubMed

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2015-12-28

    We have constructed a quantitative, force level, statistical mechanical theory for how confinement in free standing thin films introduces a spatial mobility gradient of the alpha relaxation time as a function of temperature, film thickness, and location in the film. The crucial idea is that relaxation speeds up due to the reduction of both near-surface barriers associated with the loss of neighbors in the local cage and the spatial cutoff and dynamical softening near the vapor interface of the spatially longer range collective elasticity cost for large amplitude hopping. These two effects are fundamentally coupled. Quantitative predictions are made for how an apparent glass temperature depends on the film thickness and experimental probe technique, the emergence of a two-step decay and mobile layers in time domain measurements, signatures of confinement in frequency-domain dielectric loss experiments, the dependence of film-averaged relaxation times and dynamic fragility on temperature and film thickness, surface diffusion, and the relationship between kinetic experiments and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements such as ellipsometry.

  8. Surface diffuse discharge mechanism of well-aligned atmospheric pressure microplasma arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren-Wu, Zhou; Ru-Sen, Zhou; Jin-Xing, Zhuang; Jiang-Wei, Li; Mao-Dong, Chen; Xian-Hui, Zhang; Dong-Ping, Liu; Kostya (Ken, Ostrikov; Si-Ze, Yang

    2016-04-01

    A stable and homogeneous well-aligned air microplasma device for application at atmospheric pressure is designed and its electrical and optical characteristics are investigated. Current-voltage measurements and intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) images show that the well-aligned air microplasma device is able to generate a large-area and homogeneous discharge at the applied voltages ranging from 12 kV to 14 kV, with a repetition frequency of 5 kHz, which is attributed to the diffusion effect of plasma on dielectric surface. Moreover, this well-aligned microplasma device may result in the uniform and large-area surface modification of heat-sensitive PET polymers without damage, such as optimization in hydrophobicity and biocompatibility. In the biomedical field, the utility of this well-aligned microplasma device is further testified. It proves to be very efficient for the large-area and uniform inactivation of E. coli cells with a density of 103/cm2 on LB agar plate culture medium, and inactivation efficiency can reach up to 99% for 2-min treatment. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2014J01025), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11275261), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2015A030313005), and the Fund from the Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, China.

  9. Theory of activated glassy relaxation, mobility gradients, surface diffusion, and vitrification in free standing thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mirigian, Stephen E-mail: smirigian@gmail.com; Schweizer, Kenneth S. E-mail: smirigian@gmail.com

    2015-12-28

    We have constructed a quantitative, force level, statistical mechanical theory for how confinement in free standing thin films introduces a spatial mobility gradient of the alpha relaxation time as a function of temperature, film thickness, and location in the film. The crucial idea is that relaxation speeds up due to the reduction of both near-surface barriers associated with the loss of neighbors in the local cage and the spatial cutoff and dynamical softening near the vapor interface of the spatially longer range collective elasticity cost for large amplitude hopping. These two effects are fundamentally coupled. Quantitative predictions are made for how an apparent glass temperature depends on the film thickness and experimental probe technique, the emergence of a two-step decay and mobile layers in time domain measurements, signatures of confinement in frequency-domain dielectric loss experiments, the dependence of film-averaged relaxation times and dynamic fragility on temperature and film thickness, surface diffusion, and the relationship between kinetic experiments and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements such as ellipsometry.

  10. The computational study of amino group impregnation on the zeolite surface toward the behaviors of adsorption and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Sooho; Lee, Kwang Soon; Lee, Won Bo

    2014-03-01

    The molecular dynamic and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulation study were conducted to investigate the adsorption and diffusion behaviors of mixture of CO2 and N2. Pure silicalite structures of zeolites TON, AFI, and LTL were selected as the host materials to be evaluated in this study. The effect of surface modification of TON, realized by impregnating the amino functional group on TON surface, on the adsorption and the diffusion were analyzed and compared with the normal TON structure. The results show that, in the adsorption behaviors, the modified TON adsorbs more CO2 than the normal TON structure, however, at high pressure regions, CO2 uptake is lower than the normal TON due to reductions of pore volume. This effect was quantitatively analyzed for the various amino functional group; methyl-, ethylamine, and ammonia. In the diffusion behaviors, the mixture in the modified TON has a lower diffusivity than the mixture in the normal TON due to additional attractive interaction between the amino group and mixture. In addition, the single file mobilities as well as the self-diffusion coefficients were employed to describe the observed diffusion behaviors.

  11. Characteristics of Li diffusion on silicene and zigzag nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Hua, Guo; Jue-Xian, Cao; Bo, Xu

    2016-01-01

    We perform a density functional study on the adsorption and diffusion of Li atoms on silicene sheet and zigzag nanoribbons. Our results show that the diffusion energy barrier of Li adatoms on silicene sheet is 0.25 eV, which is much lower than on graphene and Si bulk. The diffusion barriers along the axis of zigzag silicene nanoribbon range from 0.1 to 0.25 eV due to an edge effect, while the diffusion energy barrier is about 0.5 eV for a Li adatom to enter into a silicene nanoribbon. Our calculations indicate that using silicene nanoribbons as anodes is favorable for a Li-ion battery. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11074212 and 11204123) and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu province, China (Grant No. BK20130945).

  12. Experimental investigation of correlation between surface amplitude parameters of frosted glass diffuser and size of polishing grit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dong; Katagiri, Tomoya; Aketagawa, Masato

    2016-11-01

    Frosted glass (FG) diffusers are used for various purposes in optical experiments and are qualitatively classified based on the particle size of the grit used to polish them. Moreover, their surface topographies are known to affect their optical ability. However, a quantitative relationship between the surface topography (especially the surface amplitude parameters) and the polishing grit size is yet to be established. In the present study, a contact-type surface roughness measurement instrument was used to measure the surface amplitude parameters of a variety of commercial FG diffusers. The determined parameters, which are defined in ISO 4287-1997, were then compared with the root mean square of the grit size and the quantitative relationships were investigated. The parameters that were most strongly correlated with the root mean square of the grit size were identified. The established relationships, which statistically reflect the optical properties of an FG diffuser, may be used to optimally select a diffuser for a particular optical experiment or numerical calculation.

  13. Theoretical study of sorption and diffusion of lithium atoms on the surface of crystalline silicon and inside it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzubov, A. A.; Eliseeva, N. S.; Popov, Z. I.; Fedorov, A. S.; Serzhantova, M. V.; Denisov, V. M.; Tomilin, F. N.

    2013-08-01

    The energy of the sorption and diffusion of lithium atoms on the reconstructed (4 × 2) (100) silicon surface in the process of their transport into near-surface layers, as well as inside crystalline silicon, at various lithium concentrations have been investigated within the density functional theory. It has been shown that single lithium atoms easily migrate on the (100) surface and gradually fill the surface states (T3 and L) located in channels between silicon dimers. The diffusion of lithium into near-surface silicon layers is hampered because of high potential barriers of the transition (1.22 eV). The dependences of the binding energy, potential barriers, and diffusion coefficient inside silicon on distances to the nearest lithium atoms have also been examined. It has been shown that an increase in the concentration of lithium to the Li0.5Si composition significantly reduces the transition energy (from 0.90 to 0.36 eV) and strongly increases (by one to three orders of magnitude) the lithium diffusion rate.

  14. Computer simulation of bulk and surface chemical diffusion of light atoms in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Murch, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    The lattice gas as a model for interstitial solid solution and adsorption systems is reviewed with emphasis on the generation of ordered structures. Then, as a prelude to the main discourse on chemical diffusion, the tracer diffusion coefficient is discussed in conjunction with the presentation of Monte Carlo results. Next, chemical diffusion is treated in detail with emphasis on the Danken equation. Monte Carlo results are then presented for the chemical diffusion coefficient. The large maximum in the chemical diffusivity observed within the ordered phase is traced back to the very strong driving force provided by the chemical potential derivative.

  15. Nitrogen-tuned transition metal Co adatom embedded graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiang; Qian, Jun; Zhai, Min; Liu, Feng; Qi, Chang; Shi, Xinzhi; Wang, Gaofeng; Xiong, Rui; Ye, Shuangli

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of Co in pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene is investigated. The coexistence of Co nanoparticles and Co2+ ions is formed by the deposition process. The distribution of Co can be tuned by nitrogen doping. Raman spectra reveal the presence of different defect types in samples. This result confirms that the surface state can be modified by nitrogen doping. Annealing process demonstrates that nitrogen doping favors a stable Co2+ ion-C network, which supports the geometric stability for the Co-graphene system. Therefore, nitrogen doping can offer an effective method to realize the TM-graphene system, which has potential applications in spintronic devices.

  16. Simulation of multilayer homoepitaxial growth on Cu (100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng-Min; Lu, Hang-Jun; Wu, Zi-Qin

    2006-04-01

    The processes of multilayer thin Cu films grown on Cu (100) surfaces at elevated temperature (250-400 K) are simulated by mean of kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method, where the realistic growth model and physical parameters are used. The effects of small island (dimer and trimer) diffusion, edge diffusion along the islands, exchange of the adatom with an atom in the existing island, as well as mass transport between interlayers are included in the simulation model. Emphasis is placed on revealing the influence of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier on growth mode and morphology during multilayer thin film growth. We present numerical evidence that the ES barrier does exist for the Cu/Cu(100) system and an ES barrier EB>0.125 eV is estimated from a comparison of the KMC simulation with the realistic experimental images. The transitions of growth modes with growth conditions and the influence of exchange barrier on growth mode are also investigated.

  17. Surface analysis of InP and InGaAs after low temperature diffusion of Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Goff, Florian; Mathiot, Daniel; Decobert, Jean; Le Goec, Jean-Pierre; Parillaud, Olivier; Reverchon, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-01

    In order to develop III-V based devices integrated directly above post-processed silicon wafers, low temperature diffusion of zinc in n-type InP and InGaAs is studied at compatible temperatures, below 425 oC. We particularly focus on the resulting surface degradation. Efficient Zn diffusion is obtained for InGaAs samples, where the surface remains mirror-like after thermal treatment. Conversely, no significant diffusion occurs in InP where the surface is deeply deteriorated. The stability study for InP under thermal annealing in various ambients allows us to rule out thermal dephosphorization as the main cause of the surface degradation. On the basis of experimental observations and thermodynamic considerations, it is suggested that InP degradation is linked to the direct interaction of Zn and P, inducing the formation of parasitic Zn x P2 alloys, which also hinders the efficient diffusion of Zn into the InP substrate.

  18. Gold Cluster Diffusion Kinetics on Stoichiometric and Reduced Surfaces of Rutile TiO 2 (110)

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Nir; Browning, Nigel D.

    2011-06-16

    Gold clusters on rutile TiO2 are known to serve as efficient oxidation catalysts for pollutants and environmental contaminants. However, the mechanism by which highly mobile small clusters migrate and aggregate into larger species relevant to gold’s catalytic activity remains unresolved. We report herein on ab initio simulations of the diffusion of atomic gold clusters up to the trimer on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces. We show that, on the stoichiometric surface, both the dimer and the trimer can exhibit relatively low surface mobility due to high energetic barriers for diffusion out of their energetic minima coupled with low barriers for the reverse motion. On the reduced surface, these clusters can diffuse relatively quickly between energetic minima within the oxygen vacancy site due to the large degree of vibrational entropy in their transition states. Our computed diffusion times provide a point of comparison for future experiments and will aid in development of models of gold cluster island sintering.

  19. Diffuse reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of surface contamination on sandblasted metals

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.L.; Barber, T.E.; Neu, J.T.; Nerren, B.H.

    1996-07-30

    The SOC 400 Surface Inspection Machine/Infrared (SIMIR) is a small, ruggedized Fourier transform infrared spectrometer having dedicated diffuse reflectance optics. The SOC 400 was designed for the purpose of detecting (qualitatively and quantitatively) oil stains on the inside surface of solid rocket motor casings in the as-sandblasted and cleaned condition at levels approaching 1 mg ft{sup {minus}2}. The performance of this instrument is described using spectral mapping techniques.

  20. Diffuse Reflectance Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Tool for the Identification of Surface Contamination on Sandblasted Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Louis G.; Barber, Tye E.; Neu, John T.; Nerren, Billy H.

    1997-01-01

    The SOC 400 Surface Inspection Machine/Infrared (SIMIR) is a small, ruggedized Fourier transform infrared spectrometer having dedicated diffuse reflectance optics. The SOC 400 was designed for the purpose of detecting (qualitatively and quantitatively) oil stains on the inside surface of solid rocket motor casings in the as-sandblasted and cleaned condition at levels approaching 1 mg. sq ft. The performance of this instrument is described using spectral mapping techniques.

  1. Refined BCF-type boundary conditions for mesoscale surface step dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Renjie; Ackerman, David M.; Evans, James W.

    2015-06-24

    Deposition on a vicinal surface with alternating rough and smooth steps is described by a solid-on-solid model with anisotropic interactions. Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of the model reveal step pairing in the absence of any additional step attachment barriers. We explore the description of this behavior within an analytic Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF)-type step dynamics treatment. Without attachment barriers, conventional kinetic coefficients for the rough and smooth steps are identical, as are the predicted step velocities for a vicinal surface with equal terrace widths. However, we determine refined kinetic coefficients from a two-dimensional discrete deposition-diffusion equation formalism which accounts for stepmore » structure. These coefficients are generally higher for rough steps than for smooth steps, reflecting a higher propensity for capture of diffusing terrace adatoms due to a higher kink density. Such refined coefficients also depend on the local environment of the step and can even become negative (corresponding to net detachment despite an excess adatom density) for a smooth step in close proximity to a rough step. Incorporation of these refined kinetic coefficients into a BCF-type step dynamics treatment recovers quantitatively the mesoscale step-pairing behavior observed in the KMC simulations.« less

  2. Refined BCF-type boundary conditions for mesoscale surface step dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Renjie; Ackerman, David M.; Evans, James W.

    2015-06-24

    Deposition on a vicinal surface with alternating rough and smooth steps is described by a solid-on-solid model with anisotropic interactions. Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of the model reveal step pairing in the absence of any additional step attachment barriers. We explore the description of this behavior within an analytic Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF)-type step dynamics treatment. Without attachment barriers, conventional kinetic coefficients for the rough and smooth steps are identical, as are the predicted step velocities for a vicinal surface with equal terrace widths. However, we determine refined kinetic coefficients from a two-dimensional discrete deposition-diffusion equation formalism which accounts for step structure. These coefficients are generally higher for rough steps than for smooth steps, reflecting a higher propensity for capture of diffusing terrace adatoms due to a higher kink density. Such refined coefficients also depend on the local environment of the step and can even become negative (corresponding to net detachment despite an excess adatom density) for a smooth step in close proximity to a rough step. Incorporation of these refined kinetic coefficients into a BCF-type step dynamics treatment recovers quantitatively the mesoscale step-pairing behavior observed in the KMC simulations.

  3. Refined BCF-type boundary conditions for mesoscale surface step dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Renjie; Ackerman, David M.; Evans, James W.

    2015-06-01

    Deposition on a vicinal surface with alternating rough and smooth steps is described by a solid-on-solid model with anisotropic interactions. Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of the model reveal step pairing in the absence of any additional step attachment barriers. We explore the description of this behavior within an analytic Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF)-type step dynamics treatment. Without attachment barriers, conventional kinetic coefficients for the rough and smooth steps are identical, as are the predicted step velocities for a vicinal surface with equal terrace widths. However, we determine refined kinetic coefficients from a two-dimensional discrete deposition-diffusion equation formalism which accounts for step structure. These coefficients are generally higher for rough steps than for smooth steps, reflecting a higher propensity for capture of diffusing terrace adatoms due to a higher kink density. Such refined coefficients also depend on the local environment of the step and can even become negative (corresponding to net detachment despite an excess adatom density) for a smooth step in close proximity to a rough step. Our key observation is that incorporation of these refined kinetic coefficients into a BCF-type step dynamics treatment recovers quantitatively the mesoscale step-pairing behavior observed in the KMC simulations.

  4. Diffusion effects on the determination of surface catalysis in Inductively Coupled Plasma facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viladegut, Alan; Düzel, Ümran; Chazot, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    Atomic recombination is an important process to consider when computing the heat flux transferred to the wall of a re-entry vehicle. Two chemical processes are influencing the species diffusion in the boundary layer surrounding a re-usable Thermal Protection System: gas phase reactions and catalytic recombination at the surface. The coupling between them is not normally taken into account when determining the catalytic recombination coefficient (γ) in plasma facilities. This work aims to provide evidence of such coupling based on both a theoretical analysis and an experimental campaign in the VKI-Plasmatron facility. Recombination coefficient measurements at off-stagnation point configuration on a linear copper calorimeter are provided. An evolution from a high-catalytic to a low-catalytic condition due to the boundary layer growth along the probe is observed. This result is consistent with a parametric analysis carried out using the in-house non-equilibrium boundary layer solver, which shows how the experimentally determined catalysis could be influenced by the amount of gas-phase recombination inside the boundary layer.

  5. Oxidation resistant peroxide cross-linked UHMWPE produced by blending and surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Rizwan M.; Oral, Ebru; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2014-06-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been widely used as acetabular cup in total hip replacement (THR) and tibial component in total knee replacement (TKR). Crosslinking of UHMWPE has been successful used to improve its wear performance leading to longer life of orthopedic implants. Crosslinking can be performed by radiation or organic peroxides. Peroxide crosslinking is a convenient process as it does not require specialized equipment and the level of crosslinking can be manipulated by changing the amount of peroxide added. However, there is concern about the long-term stability of these materials due to possible presence of by-products. Vitamin E has been successfully used to promote long-term oxidative stability of UHMWPE. In this study, UHMWPE has been crosslinked using organic peroxide in the presence of Vitamin E to produce an oxidation resistant peroxide crosslinked material. Crosslinking was performed both in bulk by mixing peroxide and resin, and only on the surface using diffusion of peroxides.The results show that UHMWPE can be crosslinked using organic peroxides in the presence of vitamin E by both methods. However, the level of crosslinking decreases with the increase in vitamin E content. The wear resistance increases with the increase in crosslink density, and oxidation resistance significantly increases due to the presence of vitamin E.

  6. Roughness distribution of multiple hit and long surface diffusion length noise reduced discrete growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disrattakit, P.; Chanphana, R.; Chatraphorn, P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventionally, the universality class of a discrete growth model is identified via the scaling of interface width. This method requires large-scale simulations to minimize finite-size effects on the results. The multiple hit noise reduction techniques (m > 1 NRT) and the long surface diffusion length noise reduction techniques (ℓ > 1 NRT) have been used to promote the asymptotic behaviors of the growth models. Lately, an alternative method involving comparison of roughness distribution in the steady state has been proposed. In this work, the roughness distribution of the (2 +1)-dimensional Das Sarma-Tamborenea (DT), Wolf-Villain (WV), and Larger Curvature (LC) models, with and without NRTs, are calculated in order to investigate effects of the NRTs on the roughness distribution. Additionally, effective growth exponents of the noise reduced (2 +1)-dimensional DT, WV and LC models are also calculated. Our results indicate that the NRTs affect the interface width both in the growth and the saturation regimes. In the steady state, the NRTs do not seem to have any impact on the roughness distribution of the DT model, but it significantly changes the roughness distribution of the WV and LC models to the normal distribution curves.

  7. Length distributions of nanowires: Effects of surface diffusion versus nucleation delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.

    2017-04-01

    It is often thought that the ensembles of semiconductor nanowires are uniform in length due to the initial organization of the growth seeds such as lithographically defined droplets or holes in the substrate. However, several recent works have already demonstrated that most nanowire length distributions are broader than Poissonian. Herein, we consider theoretically the length distributions of non-interacting nanowires that grow by the material collection from the entire length of their sidewalls and with a delay of nucleation of the very first nanowire monolayer. The obtained analytic length distribution is controlled by two parameters that describe the strength of surface diffusion and the nanowire nucleation rate. We show how the distribution changes from the symmetrical Polya shape without the nucleation delay to a much broader and asymmetrical one for longer delays. In the continuum limit (for tall enough nanowires), the length distribution is given by a power law times an incomplete gamma-function. We discuss interesting scaling properties of this solution and give a recipe for analyzing and tailoring the experimental length histograms of nanowires which should work for a wide range of material systems and growth conditions.

  8. Study on formation of step bunching on 6H-SiC (0001) surface by kinetic Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Chen, Xuejiang; Su, Juan

    2016-05-01

    The formation and evolution of step bunching during step-flow growth of 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces were studied by three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method and compared with the analytic model based on the theory of Burton-Cabera-Frank (BCF). In the KMC model the crystal lattice was represented by a structured mesh which fixed the position of atoms and interatomic bonding. The events considered in the model were adatoms adsorption and diffusion on the terrace, and adatoms attachment, detachment and interlayer transport at the step edges. In addition, effects of Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barriers at downward step edges and incorporation barriers at upwards step edges were also considered. In order to obtain more elaborate information for the behavior of atoms in the crystal surface, silicon and carbon atoms were treated as the minimal diffusing species. KMC simulation results showed that multiple-height steps were formed on the vicinal surface oriented toward [ 1 1 bar 00 ] or [ 11 2 bar 0 ] directions. And then the formation mechanism of the step bunching was analyzed. Finally, to further analyze the formation processes of step bunching, a one-dimensional BCF analytic model with ES and incorporation barriers was used, and then it was solved numerically. In the BCF model, the periodic boundary conditions (PBC) were applied, and the parameters were corresponded to those used in the KMC model. The evolution character of step bunching was consistent with the results obtained by KMC simulation.

  9. Cromolyn as surface active drug (surfadrug): Effect of the self-association on diffusion and percutaneous permeation.

    PubMed

    Tavano, Lorena; Nicoletta, Fiore Pasquale; Picci, Nevio; Muzzalupo, Rita

    2016-03-01

    Cromolyn sodium, or disodium cromoglycate (CS), is a surface active drug: a pharmacologically active compound with an amphiphilic nature. At certain conditions it is able to self-associate in several kind of supramolecular aggregates. Since CS could play the role of both carrier and drug, bypassing the use of additional excipients and increasing the system biocompatibility, the effects of cromolyn self-aggregates on diffusion and percutaneous permeation across rabbit ear skin were investigated. Niosomes (vesicular systems, 0.5wt% of CS), monomeric and isotropic solutions (0.5 and 5wt% of CS), nematic (15wt% of CS) and hexagonal phases (30wt% of CS) were selected as supramolecular systems and tested as transdermal delivery systems. Results demonstrated that CS was able to form vesicular structures of about 500nm of diameter and this formulation gave the higher percutaneous permeation profile (systemic action), while isotropic solution and liquid crystals mesophases acted as slower release reservoir of drug on the skin surface (local action), as confirmed by diffusion coefficients. Diffusion rates through a synthetic membrane were dependent both on CS concentration present into the formulations and on its structural organization: maximum diffusion was noticed with isotropic solution, a lower amount of diffused cromolyn sodium was achieved by hexagonal phase. Consequently, CS appears as a versatile surfadrug as, depending on the disease degree, it is possible to modulate its permeation profile by choosing the most appropriate formulation.

  10. Kinetic phase transitions in a surface-reaction model with diffusion: Computer simulations and mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Iwan; Fogedby, Hans C.

    1990-08-01

    A simple surface-reaction model based upon the oxidation of carbon monoxide on a catalytic surface, introduced by Ziff, Gulari, and Barshad (ZGB) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 2553 (1986)], has been extended in order to include diffusion of the adsorbed particles (both O and CO). The ZGB model is a nonequilibrium model exhibiting both a first- and a second-order phase transition. The effects of diffusion on the behavior of the model has been explored by means of computer simulations. The main effect of diffusion is to change the positions of the phase transitions and increase the rate of CO2 formation. Fast diffusion causes the second-order transition to disappear from the system. Simple explanations of these changes are given. The extended version of the ZGB model has furthermore been studied by mean-field theory in the pair approximation. This approach gives qualitatively correct predictions about the effects of diffusion and yields quantitative predictions in good agreement with simulation results in the vicinity of the first-order transition.

  11. Thermal Diffusion Dynamic Behavior of Two-Dimensional Ag-SMALL Clusters on Ag(1 1 1) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirur-Rehman; Hayat, Sardar Sikandar

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the thermal diffusion behavior of small two-dimensional Ag-islands on Ag(1 1 1) surface has been explored using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach is based on semi-empirical potentials. The key microscopic processes responsible for the diffusion of Ag1-5 adislands on Ag(1 1 1) surface are identified. The hopping and zigzag concerted motion along with rotation are observed for Ag one-atom to three-atom islands while single-atom and multi-atom processes are revealed for Ag four-atom and five-atom islands, during the diffusion on Ag(1 1 1) surface. The same increasing/decreasing trend in the diffusion coefficient and effective energy barrier is observed in both the self learning kinetic Monte Carlo (SLKMC) and MD calculations, for the temperature range of 300-700 K. An increase in the value of effective energy barrier is noticed with corresponding increase in the number of atoms in Ag-adislands. A reasonable linear fit is observed for the diffusion coefficient for studied temperatures (300, 500 and 700 K). For the observed diffusion mechanisms, our findings are in good agreement with ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for Al/Al(1 1 1) while the energy barrier values are in same range as the experimental values for Cu/Ag(1 1 1) and the theoretical values using ab initio DFT supplemented with embedded-atom method for Ag/Ag(1 1 1).

  12. The nature of bonding and electronic properties of graphene and benzene with iridium adatoms.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Petr; Granatier, Jaroslav; Klimeš, Jiří; Hobza, Pavel; Otyepka, Michal

    2014-10-14

    Recent theoretical simulations predicted that graphene decorated with Ir adatoms could realize a two-dimensional topological insulator with a substantial band gap. Our understanding of how the electronic properties of graphene change in the presence of metal adatoms is however still limited, as the binding is quite complex involving static and dynamic correlation effects together with relativistic contributions, which makes the theoretical description of such systems quite challenging. We applied the quantum chemical complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) method and density functional theory beyond the standard local density functional approach including relativistic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects on Ir-benzene and Ir-graphene complexes. The CASPT2-SOC method revealed a strong binding affinity of Ir for benzene (33.1 kcal mol(-1)) at a 1.81 Å distance, which was of a single reference character, and a weaker binding affinity (6.3 kcal mol(-1)) at 3.00 Å of a multireference character. In the Ir-graphene complex, the quartet ground-state of the Ir atom changed to the doublet state upon adsorption, and the binding energy predicted by optB86b-vdW-SOC functional remained high (33.8 kcal mol(-1)). In all cases the dynamic correlation effects significantly contributed to the binding. The density of states calculated with the hybrid functional HSE06 showed that the gap of 0.3 eV was induced in graphene by the adsorbed Ir atom even in scalar relativistic calculation, in contrast to metallic behaviour predicted by local density approximation. The results suggest that the strong correlation effects contribute to the opening of the band gap in graphene covered with the Ir adatoms. The value of the magnetic anisotropy energy of 0.1 kcal mol(-1) predicted by HSE06 is lower than those calculated using local functionals.

  13. Vorticity models of ocean surface diffusion in coastal jets and eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, D.; Matulka, A.; Sekula, E.

    2010-05-01

    We present and discuss the use of multi-fractal techniques used to investigete vorticity and jet dynamical state of these features detected in the sea surface as well as to identify possible local parametrizations of turbulent diffusion in complex non-homogeneous flows. We use a combined vorticity/energy equation to parametrize mixing at the Rossby Deformation Radius, which may be used even in non Kolmogorov types of flows. The vorticity cascade is seen to be different to the energy cascade and may have important cnsecuences in pollutant dispersion prediction, both in emergency accidental releases and on a day to day operational basis. We also identify different SAR signatures of river plumes near the coast, which are usefull to provide calibrations for the different local configurations that allow to predict the behaviour of different tracers and tensioactives in the coastal sea surface area by means of as a geometrical characterization of the vorticity and velocity maps which induce local mixing and dilution jet processes. The satellite-borne SAR seems to be a good system for the identification of dynamic. lt is also a convenient tool to investigate the eddy structures of a certain area where the effect of bathymetry and local currents are important in describing the ocean surface behavior. Maximum eddy size agrees remarkably well with the limit imposed by the local Rossby deformation radius using the usual thermocline induced stratification, Redondo and Platonov (2000). The Rossby deformation radius, defined as Rd = (N/f)h, where N is the Brunt-Vaisalla frequency, f is the local Coriolis parameter (f=2Osin(lat), where O is the rotation of the earth as function of the latitude), The role of buoyancy may be also detected by seasonal changes in h, the thermocline depth, with these considerations Rd is ranged between 6 and 30 Km. Bezerra M.O., Diez M., Medeiros C. Rodriguez A., Bahia E., Sanchez Arcilla A and Redondo J.M. (1998) "Study on the influence of waves on

  14. First-principles study of hydrogen dissociation and diffusion on transition metal-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiwen; Guo, Xinjun; Wu, Mingyi; Sun, Qiang; Jia, Yu

    2014-06-01

    First-principles calculations within the density functional theory (DFT) have been carried out to study hydrogen molecules dissociation and diffusion on clean and transition metals (TMs) doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces following Pozzo et al. work. Firstly, the stability of Mg(0 0 0 1) surface doped with transition metals atom has been studied. The results showed that transition metals on the left of the table tend to substitute Mg in the second layer, while the other transition metals prefer to substitute Mg in the first layer. Secondly, we studied hydrogen molecules dissociation and diffusion on clean and Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces which the transition metal atoms substituted both in the first layer and second layer. When transition metal atoms substitute in the first layer, the results agree with the Pozzo et al. result; when transition metal atoms substitute in the second layer, the results showed that the transition metals on the left of the periodic table impact on the dissociation barriers is less. However, for the transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) on the right, there is a great impact on the barriers. The transition metals doped surfaces bind the dissociated H atoms loosely, making them easily diffused. The results further reveal that the Fe dopant on the Mg surface is the best choice for H2 dissociation and hydrogen storage.

  15. Selective silver atom interaction at β-SiC(100) surfaces: From anisotropic diffusion to metal atomic wires and stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, M.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Soukiassian, P.

    2007-07-01

    Silver (Ag) atom interaction on β-SiC(100) surface reconstructions is investigated by atom-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy. On the 3×2 (Si-rich) reconstruction, the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction is dominant with no surface wetting, leading to Ag cluster formation. In contrast, on the c(4×2) Si-terminated reconstruction, almost equivalent Ag-Ag and Ag-surface interactions allow selective one dimensional nano-object formation including Ag atomic wires and stripes following the substrate registry. Their orientation is mediated by anisotropic Ag atom diffusion occurring along Si-dimer rows at 25°C and perpendicularly to them at elevated temperatures, suggesting dimer flipping as diffusion barrier. These metal nanowires potentially open up cross-wiring capability in massively parallel Si atomic lines network.

  16. An experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces for thermal radiation in cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-07-01

    In cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors, one of the most important issues is the fast cooling of their mirrors and keeping them cool during operation to reduce thermal noise. For this purpose, the correct estimation of thermal-radiation heat transfer through the pipe-shaped radiation shield is vital to reduce the heat load on the mirrors. However, the amount of radiation heat transfer strongly depends on whether the surfaces reflect radiation rays diffusely or specularly. Here, we propose an original experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces. This experiment has clearly shown that the examined diamond-like carbon-coated surface is specular. This result emphasizes the importance of suppressing the specular reflection of radiation in the pipe-shaped shield.

  17. Realization of anomalous multiferroicity in free-standing graphene with magnetic adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Y.; Ricco, L. S.; Dessotti, F. A.; Machado, R. S.; Shelykh, I. A.; de Souza, M.; Seridonio, A. C.

    2016-11-01

    It is generally believed that free-standing graphene does not demonstrate any ferroic properties. In the present work we revise this statement and show that a single graphene sheet with a pair of magnetic adatoms can be driven into ferroelectric (FE) and multiferroic (MF) phases by tuning the Dirac cones slope. The transition into the FE phase occurs gradually, but an anomalous MF phase appears abruptly by means of a quantum phase transition. Our findings suggest that such features should exist in graphene recently investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy [H. González-Herrero et al., Science 352, 437 (2016), 10.1126/science.aad8038].

  18. Advacancy-mediated atomic steps kinetics and two-dimensional negative island nucleation on ultra-flat Si(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnikov, S. V.; Latyshev, A. V.; Kosolobov, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated Si(111) surface morphology transformations during high-temperature sublimation and oxygen treatments by means of in situ ultrahigh vacuum reflection electron microscopy. By analyzing atomic steps kinetics and two-dimensional negative (vacancy) islands nucleation on ultra-flat Si(111) surface with extremely wide (up to 120 μm in size) terraces we have estimated the activation energy associated with the surface-bulk vacancy exchange processes. We show that atomic steps motion and negative islands nucleation kinetics at temperatures above 1180 °C can be described by the step-flow model of Burton, Cabrera and Frank taking into account advacancies formation. By comparing experimental results with predictions of model we conclude that the surface mass transport at temperatures above 1180 °C is governed by surface vacancies nucleation and interaction with atomic steps rather than via adatoms surface diffusion.

  19. Application of ToFSIMS to Studying Surface Diffusion: Do cocaine and heroin form a two-dimensional gas on surfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Recep; Maccagnano, Sara; Bohannan, Gary; Gresham, Gary; Groenewold, Gary

    2001-03-01

    Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy ( ToFSIMS) is a practical tool for studying the movement of molecules on material surfaces as a function of time. The high detection sensitivity, rapid data acquisition and reasonable spatial resolution present ideal conditions for such studies. An application of ToFSIMS is presented characterizing the diffusion of large molecules on gold-coated Si wafers. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was selected for study because it contaminates material surfaces and can be detected easily. Also, the temperature dependent diffusion properties of hydrochlorinated heroin and cocaine are presented as part of a forensic application. While the PDMS diffusion could be explained by a two-dimensional ( 2-D) Brownian motion with a Gaussian probability distribution function (pdf) with a diffusion coefficient of 1.6 μ m^2/sec, the cocaine and to a lesser extent heroin were observed to move nearly freely on the surfaces as though they were part of a 2-D gas evaporating in 2-D from a condensed phase. The results could be described reasonably well using an extreme Lévi pdf with an index of stability α<= 0.01.

  20. First Principles Calculations on the Diffusion of Cu, Ag and Au Atoms or Aggregates on the Bulk and Surface of Titania

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2011-0002 First Principles Calculations on the Diffusion of Cu, Ag and Au Atoms or Aggregates on the Bulk and...SUBTITLE First Principles Calculations on the Diffusion of Cu, Ag and Au Atoms or Aggregates on the Bulk and Surface of Titania 5a. CONTRACT...093072 Final report First principles calculations on the diffusion of Cu, Ag and Au atoms or aggregates on the bulk and surface of titania List

  1. Diffusion of hydrogen interstitials in the near-surface region of Pd(111) under the influence of surface coverage and external static electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Rey, M.; Tremblay, J. C.

    2015-04-21

    Past scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments of H manipulation on Pd(111), at low temperature, have shown that it is possible to induce diffusion of surface species as well as of those deeply buried under the surface. Several questions remain open regarding the role of subsurface site occupancies. In the present work, the interaction potential of H atoms with Pd(111) under various H coverage conditions is determined by means of density functional theory calculations in order to provide an answer to two of these questions: (i) whether subsurface sites are the final locations for the H impurities that attempt to emerge from bulk regions, and (ii) whether penetration of the surface is a competing route of on-surface diffusion during depletion of surface H on densely covered Pd(111). We find that a high H coverage has the effect of blocking resurfacing of H atoms travelling from below, which would otherwise reach the surface fcc sites, but it hardly alters deeper diffusion energy barriers. Penetration is unlikely and restricted to high occupancies of hcp hollows. In agreement with experiments, the Pd lattice expands vertically as a consequence of H atoms being blocked at subsurface sites, and surface H enhances this expansion. STM tip effects are included in the calculations self-consistently as an external static electric field. The main contribution to the induced surface electric dipoles originates from the Pd substrate polarisability. We find that the electric field has a non-negligible effect on the H-Pd potential in the vicinity of the topmost Pd atomic layer, yet typical STM intensities of 1-2 VÅ{sup −1} are insufficient to invert the stabilities of the surface and subsurface equilibrium sites.

  2. Spin-dependent beating patterns in thermoelectric properties: Filtering the carriers of the heat flux in a Kondo adatom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seridonio, A. C.; Siqueira, E. C.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.; Shelykh, I. A.; Figueira, M. S.

    2014-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the thermoelectric properties of a spin-polarized two-dimensional electron gas hosting a Kondo adatom hybridized with a STM tip. Such a setup is treated within the single-impurity Anderson model in combination with the atomic approach for the Green's functions. Due to the spin dependence of the Fermi wave numbers, the electrical and thermal conductances together with thermopower and Lorenz number reveal beating patterns as a function of the STM tip position in the Kondo regime. In particular, by tuning the lateral displacement of the tip with respect to the adatom vicinity, the temperature, and the position of the adatom level, one can change the sign of the Seebeck coefficient through charge and spin. This opens a possibility of the microscopic control of the heat flux analogously to that established for the electrical current.

  3. Diffuse-source pesticide inputs in surface waters: online risk assessment at field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenberger, S.; Röpke, B.; Bach, M.; Frede, H.-G.

    2003-04-01

    Diffuse pesticide input from agricultural fields into surface waters depends, apart from substance properties, also on soil properties, site hydrology, tillage and application practices, weather conditions, and distance to water bodies. A product which can be used safely at one site may pose unacceptable risk to aquatic life at another site. Thus, there is a great need for site-specific risk assessment approaches. Our objective is therefore to develop a tool for assessing pesticide inputs via runoff/erosion, drainflow, and spraydrift for single fields. The tool will be part of the web-based Information System for Integrated Plant Production (ISIP, www.isip.de), but also able to run independently. ISIP is an interactive portal for both farmers and advisors and will become the leading decision support system for plant production and plant protection in Germany over the next years. The aim is an approach which i) is applicable for the majority of European countries, ii) needs only input data readily available for large areas (such as provided by hydrological and soil maps), iii) predicts, with daily resolution, realistic (not worst-case) loads and resulting aquatic concentrations (PECsw), and iv) provides a substance-specific risk assessment on the basis of model results for consulting and management purposes. Special emphasis is laid on scientifically up-to-date model approaches and robust, but site-specific parameterization. For instance, drainage inputs will be calculated using the preferential flow model MACRO 5 (Nick Jarvis, SLU, Sweden). In the later stages of the project, the tool will provide a fully GIS-based risk assessment in ISIP for single fields in Germany.

  4. One-dimensional diffusion of Sr atoms on Sr/Si(111)-3 × 2 reconstruction surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wenhan; Yang, Jingjing

    2016-11-01

    The electronic and geometric structures of the Sr/Si(111)-3 × 2 surface were investigated by scanning tunnelling microscopy and scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. The honeycomb-chain (HCC) model may be used to describe the reconstruction structure of the Sr/Si(111)-3 × 2 surface. Furthermore, one-dimensional (1D) concerted motion of Sr atom chains on the Sr/Si(111)-3 × 2 surface was observed at room temperature. Three reasons contribute to this 1D self-diffusion: low metal coverage of the Sr/Si(111)-3 × 2 reconstruction surface, weak interaction between the Sr and Si substrate, and surface vacancies and thermal fluctuation energy at room temperature. From this study, the origin of the long-existing blurred low energy electron diffraction pattern of alkali-earth metal induced-Si(111)3 × 2 surface was clarified, and the self-diffusion of metal atoms at room temperature also explains the common phase transition phenomenon on these reconstructed surfaces.

  5. Selectivity and self-diffusion of CO2 and H2 in a mixture on a graphite surface

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Thuat T.; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Hägg, May-Britt; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2013-01-01

    We performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the mechanism of adsorption from a gas mixture of CO2 and H2 (mole fraction of CO2 = 0.30) and diffusion along a graphite surface, with the aim to help enrich industrial off-gases in CO2, separating out H2. The temperature of the system in the simulation covered typical industrial conditions for off-gas treatment (250–550 K). The interaction energy of single molecules CO2 or H2 on graphite surface was calculated with classical force fields (FFs) and with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The results were in good agreement. The binding energy of CO2 on graphite surface is three times larger than that of H2. At lower temperatures, the selectivity of CO2 over H2 is five times larger than at higher temperatures. The position of the dividing surface was used to explain how the adsorption varies with pore size. In the temperature range studied, the self-diffusion coefficient of CO2 is always smaller than of H2. The temperature variation of the selectivities and the self-diffusion coefficient imply that the carbon molecular sieve membrane can be used for gas enrichment of CO2. PMID:24790965

  6. Selectivity and Self Diffusion of CO2 and h2 in a Mixture on a Graphite Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Thuat; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs; Bedeaux, Dick; Hägg, May-Britt

    2013-12-01

    We performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the mechanism of adsorption from a gas mixture of CO2 and H2 (mole fraction of CO2 = 0.30) and diffusion along a graphite surface, with the aim to help enrich industrial off-gases in CO2, separating out H2. The temperature of the system in the simulation covered typical industrial conditions for off-gas treatment (250 ̶ 550K). The interaction energy of single molecules CO2 or H2 on graphite surface was calculated with classical force fields and with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The results were in good agreement. The binding energy of CO2 on graphite surface is three times larger than that of H2. At lower temperatures, the selectivity of CO2 over H2 is five times larger than at higher temperatures. The position of the dividing surface was used to explain how the adsorption varies with pore size. In the temperature range studied, the self-diffusion coefficient of CO2 is always smaller than of H2. The temperature variation of the selectivities and the self diffusion coefficient imply that the carbon molecular sieve membrane can be used for gas enrichment of CO2.

  7. Selectivity and self-diffusion of CO2 and H2 in a mixture on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Thuat T; Vlugt, Thijs J H; Hägg, May-Britt; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2013-01-01

    We performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the mechanism of adsorption from a gas mixture of CO2 and H2 (mole fraction of CO2 = 0.30) and diffusion along a graphite surface, with the aim to help enrich industrial off-gases in CO2, separating out H2. The temperature of the system in the simulation covered typical industrial conditions for off-gas treatment (250-550 K). The interaction energy of single molecules CO2 or H2 on graphite surface was calculated with classical force fields (FFs) and with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The results were in good agreement. The binding energy of CO2 on graphite surface is three times larger than that of H2. At lower temperatures, the selectivity of CO2 over H2 is five times larger than at higher temperatures. The position of the dividing surface was used to explain how the adsorption varies with pore size. In the temperature range studied, the self-diffusion coefficient of CO2 is always smaller than of H2. The temperature variation of the selectivities and the self-diffusion coefficient imply that the carbon molecular sieve membrane can be used for gas enrichment of CO2.

  8. Radiotracer study of the adsorption of organic compounds on gold. adsorption of chloroacetic and phenylacetic acid, and the effects of cadmium, copper, and silver adatoms on it

    SciTech Connect

    Horani, G.; Andreev, V.N.; Vazarinov, V.E.

    1986-04-01

    This paper studies the adsorption of monochloroacetic and phenylacetic acid (MA and PA, respectively) by the radiotracer technique on gold-plated gold electrodes in acidic solutions. The authors also study the effect of cadmium, copper, and silver adatoms on these processes. The adsorption of MA was measured as a function of potential of the electrode. Data from these measurements are presented. Data show that cadmium, copper, and silver ions present in the solution have no effect on the adsorption of PA at potentials where they are not adsorbed on the gold surface. It is confirmed that the radiotracer technique will be as effective in adsorption studies on the gold-plated gold electrode as it was in the case of the platinized platinum electrode.

  9. Molecular surface area based predictive models for the adsorption and diffusion of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suxin; Chen, Jiangang; Wang, Bijia; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-15

    Two predictive models were presented for the adsorption affinities and diffusion coefficients of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix. Quantitative structure-sorption behavior relationship would not only provide insights into sorption process, but also enable rational engineering for desired properties. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for three disperse dyes were measured. The predictive model for adsorption affinity was based on two linear relationships derived by interpreting the experimental measurements with molecular structural parameters and compensation effect: ΔH° vs. dye size and ΔS° vs. ΔH°. Similarly, the predictive model for diffusion coefficient was based on two derived linear relationships: activation energy of diffusion vs. dye size and logarithm of pre-exponential factor vs. activation energy of diffusion. The only required parameters for both models are temperature and solvent accessible surface area of the dye molecule. These two predictive models were validated by testing the adsorption and diffusion properties of new disperse dyes. The models offer fairly good predictive ability. The linkage between structural parameter of disperse dyes and sorption behaviors might be generalized and extended to other similar polymer-penetrant systems.

  10. The mechanisms for nanoparticle surface diffusion and chain self-assembly determined from real-time nanoscale kinetics in liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-08-20

    The mechanisms for nanoparticle self-assembly are often inferred from the morphology of the final nanostructures in terms of attractive and repulsive interparticle interactions. Understanding how nanoparticle building blocks are pieced together during self-assembly is a key missing component needed to unlock new strategies and mechanistic understanding of this process. Here we use real-time nanoscale kinetics derived from liquid cell transmission electron microscopy investigation of nanoparticle self-assembly to show that nanoparticle mobility dictates the pathway for self-assembly and final nanostructure morphology. We describe a new method for modulating nanoparticle diffusion in a liquid cell, which we employ to systematically investigate the effect of mobility on self-assembly of nanoparticles. We interpret the observed diffusion in terms of electrostatically induced surface diffusion resulting from nanoparticle hopping on the liquid cell window surface. Slow-moving nanoparticles self-assemble predominantly into linear 1D chains by sequential attachment of nanoparticles to existing chains, while highly mobile nanoparticles self-assemble into chains and branched structures by chain–chain attachments. Self-assembly kinetics are consistent with a diffusion-driven mechanism; we attribute the change in self-assembly pathway to the increased self-assembly rate of highly mobile nanoparticles. Furthermore, these results indicate that nanoparticle mobility can dictate the self-assembly mechanism and final nanostructure morphology in a manner similar to interparticle interactions.

  11. The mechanisms for nanoparticle surface diffusion and chain self-assembly determined from real-time nanoscale kinetics in liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-08-20

    The mechanisms for nanoparticle self-assembly are often inferred from the morphology of the final nanostructures in terms of attractive and repulsive interparticle interactions. Understanding how nanoparticle building blocks are pieced together during self-assembly is a key missing component needed to unlock new strategies and mechanistic understanding of this process. Here we use real-time nanoscale kinetics derived from liquid cell transmission electron microscopy investigation of nanoparticle self-assembly to show that nanoparticle mobility dictates the pathway for self-assembly and final nanostructure morphology. We describe a new method for modulating nanoparticle diffusion in a liquid cell, which we employ to systematically investigate themore » effect of mobility on self-assembly of nanoparticles. We interpret the observed diffusion in terms of electrostatically induced surface diffusion resulting from nanoparticle hopping on the liquid cell window surface. Slow-moving nanoparticles self-assemble predominantly into linear 1D chains by sequential attachment of nanoparticles to existing chains, while highly mobile nanoparticles self-assemble into chains and branched structures by chain–chain attachments. Self-assembly kinetics are consistent with a diffusion-driven mechanism; we attribute the change in self-assembly pathway to the increased self-assembly rate of highly mobile nanoparticles. Furthermore, these results indicate that nanoparticle mobility can dictate the self-assembly mechanism and final nanostructure morphology in a manner similar to interparticle interactions.« less

  12. Chern insulators without band inversion in Mo S2 monolayers with 3 d adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xinyuan; Zhao, Bao; Zhang, Jiayong; Xue, Yang; Li, Yun; Yang, Zhongqin

    2017-02-01

    Electronic and topological properties of Mo S2 monolayers endowed with 3 d transition metal (TM) adatoms (V-Fe) are explored by using ab initio methods and k .p models. Without the consideration of the Hubbard U interaction, the V, Cr, and Fe adatoms tend to locate on the top of the Mo atoms, while the most stable site for the Mn atom is at the hollow position of the Mo-S hexagon. After the Hubbard U is applied, the most stable sites of all the systems become the top of the Mo atoms. Chern insulators without band inversion are achieved in these systems. The V and Fe adsorption systems are the best candidates to produce the topological states. The k .p model calculations indicate that these topological states are determined by the TM magnetism, the C3 v crystal field from the Mo S2 substrate, and the TM atomic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The special two-meron pseudospin texture is found to contribute to the topology. The apparent difference between the Berry curvatures for the V and Fe adsorption systems is also explored. Our results widen the understanding of the Chern insulators and are helpful for the applications of the Mo S2 monolayers in the future electronics and spintronics.

  13. Symmetry-protected coherent transport for diluted vacancies and adatoms in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Tijerina, David A.; da Silva, Luis G. G. V. Dias

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of a low concentration of adatoms or single vacancies in the linear-response transport properties of otherwise clean graphene. These impurities were treated as localized orbitals, and for each type two cases with distinct coupling symmetries were studied. For adatoms, we considered top- and hollow-site adsorbates (TOP and HS). For vacancies, we studied impurity formation by soft bond reconstruction (REC), as well as the more symmetric case of charge accumulation in unreconstructed vacancies (VAC). Our results indicate that the transport is determined by usual impurity scattering when the graphene-impurity coupling does not possess C3 v symmetry (TOP and REC). In contrast, VAC impurities decouple from the electronic states at the Dirac points, and yield no contribution to the resistivity for a sample in charge neutrality. Furthermore, the inversion-symmetry-conserving HS impurities also decouple from entire sets of momenta throughout the Brillouin zone, and do not contribute to the resistivity within a broad range of parameters. These behaviors are protected by C3 v and inversion symmetry, respectively, and persist for more general impurity models.

  14. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; Fuente, César de la; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  15. Copper adatoms on graphene: Theory of orbital and spin-orbital effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Tobias; Irmer, Susanne; Gmitra, Martin; Kochan, Denis; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    We present a combined DFT and model Hamiltonian analysis of spin-orbit coupling in graphene induced by copper adatoms in the bridge and top positions, representing isolated atoms in the dilute limit. The orbital physics in both systems is found to be surprisingly similar, given the fundamental difference in the local symmetry. In both systems the Cu p and d contributions at the Fermi level are very similar. Based on the knowledge of orbital effects we identify that the main cause of the locally induced spin-orbit couplings are Cu p and d orbitals. By employing the DFT+U formalism as an analysis tool we find that both the p and d orbital contributions are equally important to spin-orbit coupling, although p contributions to the density of states are much higher. We fit the DFT data with phenomenological tight-binding models developed separately for the top and bridge positions. Our model Hamiltonians describe the low-energy electronic band structure in the whole Brillouin zone and allow us to extract the size of the spin-orbit interaction induced by the local Cu adatom to be in the tens of meV. By application of the phenomenological models to Green's function techniques, we find that copper atoms act as resonant impurities in graphene with large lifetimes of 50 and 100 fs for top and bridge, respectively.

  16. Nitrogen-tuned bonding mechanism of Li and Ti adatom embedded graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangho; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2013-09-15

    The effects of nitrogen defects on the bonding mechanism and resultant binding energy between the metal and graphene layer were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the graphitic N-doped graphene, Li adatom exhibited ionic bonding character, while Ti adatom showed features of covalent bonding similar to that of pristine graphene. However, in the cases of pyridinic and pyrrolic structures, partially covalent bonding characteristic occurred around N atoms in the process of binding with metals, and this particular bond formation enhanced the bond strength of metal on the graphene layer as much as it exceeded the cohesive energy of the metal bulk. Thus, Li and Ti metals are expected to be dispersed with atomic accuracy on the pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene layers. These results demonstrate that the bonding mechanism of metal–graphene complex can change according to the type of N defect, and this also affects the binding results. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nitrogen defects changed the bonding mechanism between metal and graphene. • Bonding character and binding results were investigated using DFT calculations. • Covalent bonding character occurred around pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene. • Pyridinic and pyrrolic N atoms are effective for metal dispersion on the graphene.

  17. Defects in Silicene: Vacancy Clusters, Extended Line Defects, and Di-adatoms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Wu, Yifeng; Tu, Yi; Wang, Yonghui; Jiang, Tong; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Yonghao

    2015-01-01

    Defects are almost inevitable during the fabrication process, and their existence strongly affects thermodynamic and (opto)electronic properties of two-dimensional materials. Very recent experiments have provided clear evidence for the presence of larger multi-vacancies in silicene, but their structure, stability, and formation mechanism remain largely unexplored. Here, we present a detailed theoretical study of silicene monolayer containing three types of defects: vacancy clusters, extended line defects (ELDs), and di-adatoms. First-principles calculations, along with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, revealed the coalescence tendency of small defects and formation of highly stable vacancy clusters. The 5|8|5 ELD – the most favorable extended defect in both graphene and silicene sheets – is found to be easier to form in the latter case due to the mixed sp2/sp3 hybridization of silicon. In addition, hybrid functional calculations that contain part of the Hatree-Fock exchange energy demonstrated that the introduction of single and double silicon adatoms significantly enhances the stability of the system, and provides an effective approach on tuning the magnetic moment and band gap of silicene. PMID:25619941

  18. Diffusion Filters for Variational Data Assimilation of Sea Surface Temperature in an Intermediate Climate Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    proposed. 3.1. Sequential Diffusion Filter ( SDF ). The sequential diffu- sion filter ( SDF ) scheme is similar to the S3DVar method derived by Xie et al...17]. The SDF scheme uses a sequence of 3DVars to obtain the final estimation to retrieve information from all wavelengths from long- to shortwaves...in turn. The matrix is modeled by applying the diffusion filter sequentially in and direction, respectively. SDF begins its sequence with a

  19. Cellular automaton simulation of the diffusive motion of bacteria and their adhesion to nanostructures on a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Emura, Chie; Oya, Masashi

    2016-12-01

    The growth of a biofilm begins with the adhesion of bacteria to a solid surface. Consequently, biofilm growth can be managed by the control of bacterial adhesion. Recent experimental studies have suggested that bacterial adhesion can be controlled by modifying a solid surface using nanostructures. Computational prediction and analysis of bacterial adhesion behavior are expected to be useful for the design of effective arrangements of nanostructures for controlling bacterial adhesion. The present study developed a cellular automaton (CA) model for bacterial adhesion simulation that could describe both the diffusive motion of bacteria and dependence of their adhesion patterns on the distance between nanostructures observed in experimental studies. The diffusive motion was analyzed by the moment scaling spectrum theory, and the present model was confirmed to describe subdiffusion behavior due to obstacles. Adhesion patterns observed in experimental studies can be successfully simulated by introducing CA rules to describe a mechanism by which bacteria tend to move to increase the area of contact with nanostructures.

  20. Temperature effects of adsorption of C60 molecules on Si(111)-(7×7) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Sarid, Dror

    1994-03-01

    The adsorption of submonolayers C60 molecules on Si(111)-(7×7) surfaces, deposited at room temperature and then annealed to various elevated temperatures, is studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. For room temperature adsorption, the C60 molecules were observed to favor bonding to adatom bridge sites within a triangular half cell. After annealing to 600 °C, however, they were found to bond dominantly to adatom or restatom sites. The adsorbate-substrate interaction at room temperature is characterized by charge transfer from the substrate to the molecules. After the annealing process, however, the adsorbates bond covalently to the substrate. It is found that the desorption of the submonolayer adsorbates due to the annealing process is minimal. The surface diffusion of the adsorbates begins when annealing the sample to 700 °C, at which point the initial clustering of the adsorbates takes place. When annealing the sample to 850 °C, the C60 molecules decomposed on the sample surface and reacted with the Si atoms to form SiC islands.

  1. Investigation of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} polycrystalline growth: Ga diffusion and surface morphology evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jun-feng; Liao, Cheng; Jiang, Tao; Xie, Hua-mu; Zhao, Kui

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ga diffusion in CIGS absorption layer after annealing treatment. • Phenomenon of surface reconstruction after annealing treatment. • Understand selenium effect on CIGS annealing process. • Explain the kinetic of Ga diffusion and MoSe{sub 2} formation. - Abstract: We report a study of selenization and annealing treatment of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) film. Morphologies and composition of surface and cross section were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectra were used to investigate film structure. Depth profiles of element distributions were detected by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). A double-layer structure was formed in the film by selenizing metallic precursor at 450 °C. Further annealing at 600 °C in pure argon enhanced gallium diffusion from the bottom to the top of the film, while additional selenium in the annealing had a negative effect. A MoSe{sub 2} layer was detected between CIGS and Mo layers with annealing in additional Se. The annealing treatment also significantly modified the film surface morphology. A large amount of triangular and polygon shaped islands were observed by SEM. That might be due to different nucleation kinetics for different crystal facets.

  2. Interaction of light with an atom near the surface of a superlattice. II. Quasiperiodic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Shen; Gong, Chang-De

    1989-04-01

    Spontaneous-emission properties and resonance fluorescence for a two-level adatom near the surface of a semi-infinite superlattice with quasiperiodic structure are studied by use of surface-dressed optical Bloch equations and Maxwell's equations. Effects of dielectric properties and the geometric structure of this superlattice on spontaneous-decay rate and frequency shift, resonance-fluorescence spectrum, time evolution of adatomic inversion, and fluctuations of the dipole moment for this adatom are discussed and some novel phenomena are discovered.

  3. Investigation of ultrafast photothermal surface expansion and diffusivity in GaAs via laser-induced dynamic gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    This thesis details the first direct ultrafast measurements of the dynamic thermal expansion of a surface and the temperature dependent surface thermal diffusivity using a two-color reflection transient grating technique. Studies were performed on p-type, n-type, and undoped GaAs(100) samples over a wide range of temperatures. By utilizing a 90 fs ultraviolet probe with visible excitation beams, the effects of interband saturation and carrier dynamics become negligible; thus lattice expansion due to heating and subsequent contraction caused by cooling provided the dominant influence on the probe. At room temperature a rise due to thermal expansion was observed, corresponding to a maximum net displacement of {approximately} 1 {Angstrom} at 32 ps. The diffracted signal was composed of two components, thermal expansion of the surface and heat flow away from the surface, thus allowing a determination of the rate of expansion as well as the surface thermal diffusivity, D{sub S}. By varying the fringe spacing of the grating, this technique has the potential to separate the signal contributions to the expansion of the lattice in the perpendicular and parallel directions. In the data presented here a large fringe spacing was used, thus the dominant contribution to the rising edge of the signal was expansion perpendicular to the surface. Comparison of he results with a straightforward thermal model yields good agreement over a range of temperatures (20--300{degrees}K). Values for D{sub S} in GaAs were measured and found to be in reasonable agreement with bulk values above 50{degrees}K. Below 50{degrees}K, D{sub S} were determined to be up to an order of magnitude slower than the bulk diffusivity due to increased phonon boundary scattering. The applicability and advantages of the TG technique for studying photothermal and photoacoustic phenomena are discussed.

  4. On the HSAB based estimate of charge transfer between adsorbates and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokalj, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of the HSAB based electron charge transfer parameter, Δ N, is analyzed for molecular and atomic adsorbates on metal surfaces by means of explicit DFT calculations. For molecular adsorbates Δ N gives reasonable trends of charge transfer if work function is used for electronegativity of metal surface. For this reason, calculated work functions of low Miller index surfaces for 11 different metals are reported. As for reactive atomic adsorbates, e.g., N, O, and Cl, the charge transfer is proportional to the adatom valence times the electronegativity difference between the metal surface and the adatom, where the electronegativity of metal is represented by a linear combination of atomic Mulliken electronegativity and the work function of metal surface. It is further shown that the adatom-metal bond strength is linearly proportional to the metal-to-adatom charge transfer thus making the Δ N parameter a useful indicator to anticipate the corresponding adsorption energy trends.

  5. Application of diffuse discharges of atmospheric pressure formed by runaway electrons for modification of copper and stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.; Erofeev, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    The results of studies devoted to the influence of a runaway electron pre-ionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) formed in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure on the surface of copper and stainless steel are presented. Nanosecond high-voltage pulses were used to obtain REP DD in different gases at high pressures in a chamber with a flat anode and a cathode possessing a small radius of curvature. This mode of discharge was implemented owing to the generation of runaway electrons and X-rays. The conditions under which the surface of copper and stainless steel was cleaned from carbon and oxidized are described.

  6. Measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length and edge surface-recombination velocity in InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Hakimzadeh, Roshanak

    1993-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to measure the electron (minority carrier) diffusion length (L(sub n)) and the edge surface-recombination velocity (V(sub s)) in zinc-doped Czochralski-grown InP wafers. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) profiles were obtained in specimens containing a Schottky barrier perpendicular to the scanned (edge) surface. An independent technique was used to measure V(sub s), and these values were used in a theoretical expression for normalized EBIC. A fit of the experimental data with this expression enabled us to determine L(sub n).

  7. Application of diffuse discharges of atmospheric pressure formed by runaway electrons for modification of copper and stainless steel surface

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F. Shulepov, M. A.; Erofeev, M. V.

    2015-12-15

    The results of studies devoted to the influence of a runaway electron pre-ionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) formed in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure on the surface of copper and stainless steel are presented. Nanosecond high-voltage pulses were used to obtain REP DD in different gases at high pressures in a chamber with a flat anode and a cathode possessing a small radius of curvature. This mode of discharge was implemented owing to the generation of runaway electrons and X-rays. The conditions under which the surface of copper and stainless steel was cleaned from carbon and oxidized are described.

  8. Cluster adsorption on amorphous and crystalline surfaces - A molecular dynamics study of model Pt on Cu and model Pd on Pt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garofalini, S. H.; Halicioglu, T.; Pound, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Molecular dynamics was used to study the structure, dispersion and short-time behavior of ten-atom clusters adsorbed onto amorphous and crystalline substrates, in which the cluster atoms differed from the substrate atoms. Two adatom-substrate model systems were chosen; one, in which the interaction energy between adatom pairs was greater than that between substrate pairs, and the other, in which the reverse was true. At relatively low temperature ranges, increased dispersion of cluster atoms occurred: (a) on the amorphous substrate as compared to the FCC(100) surface, (b) with increasing reduced temperature, and (c) with adatom-substrate interaction energy stronger than adatom-adatom interaction. Two-dimensional clusters (rafts) on the FCC(100) surface displayed migration of edge atoms only, indicating a mechanism for the cluster rotation and shape changes found in experimental studies.

  9. Atomic-scale mechanisms for diffusion of impurities in transition-metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetseris, Leonidas; Logothetidis, S.; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2010-03-01

    We use results from first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory to evaluate the performance of ZrN, HfN, and TiN as diffusion barrier materials. We examine primarily migration of Cu impurities through the bulk or through inter-grain voids of nitride films and we elucidate the conditions that favor moderate diffusion in the former case and very rapid migration in the latter. Migration activation energies for Cu interstitials in the bulk of the materials lie in the range of 0.9-1.4 eV, while the corresponding values for surface diffusion of Cu adatoms vary between 0.1 and 0.55 eV. Based on the agreement between the calculated activation energies and available measured values we resolve previous conflicting suggestions that were used to interpret various experimental data. Overall, our findings highlight the role of native point defects, impurities, and film texture on the performance of nitride diffusion barrier materials. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Collective concerted motion in a molecular adlayer visualized through the surface diffusion of isolated vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Christian; Otero, Roberto; Écija, David; Trelka, Marta; Martín, Nazario; Gallego, José M.; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2016-10-01

    We have measured STM movies to study the diffusion of individual vacancies in a self-assembled layer of a tetrathiafulvalene derivative (exTTF) on Au(111) at room temperature. The diffusion is anisotropic, being faster along the compact direction of the molecular lattice. A detailed analysis of the anisotropic displacement distribution of the single vacancies shows that the relative abundance of double jumps (that is, the collective motion of molecular dimers) with respect to single jumps is rather large, the number of double jumps being more than 20% of the diffusion events. We conjecture that the relative abundances of long jumps might be related to the strength of the intermolecular bonding and the misfit of the molecular overlayer with the substrate lattice.

  11. Characterization and fabrication of nano- and micron-sized structures on the Si surface using scanning probe microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Elain Su-Eng

    The fabrication and stability of nanostructures on the Si surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We used direct current heating to fabricate step bunch structures, 30 to 50 angstroms in size, on the Si(111) surface. Using STM, we monitored their relaxation as a function of electron bombardment heating time at 930, made quantitative comparison with a step based theory of mass transport, and found good agreement with the size scaling predictions of a locally conserved mechanism of mass transport. We then monitored the relaxation of the step bunch structures as a function of direct current heating time, and found that the presence of the electric field significantly increased the rate of the relaxation relative to the zero field case. We made quantitative comparison with a step based model modified to include a surface diffusion bias and obtained an upper limit on the effective charge of an adatom on the surface. We also studied the step bunching effect in the temperature range 1155-1215. The step patterns on the surface were analyzed using STM and the model of Kandel and Weeks was used to calculate the anisotropy ratio on the surface. Assuming the operation of a surface diffusion bias, we calculated the effective charge of an adatom on the surface in this higher temperature range. We used AFM to fabricate and characterize micron-sized structures on the Si(100) surface. We couple the fabrication process of Snow and Campbell to anneals in ultra-high vacuum. We then present the results of a preliminary study of the thermal decay of two-dimensional structures fabricated on the Si(100) surface.

  12. Wood Surface Modification in Diffuse Coplanar Surface Barrier Discharge for Creating Water Repellent Films from N{sub 2}/HMDSO and N{sub 2}/HMDS Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Odraskova, M.; Szalay, Z.; Zahoranova, A.; Rahel, J.; Cernak, M.

    2008-03-19

    Diffuse Coplanar Surface Barrier Discharge was successfully tested for creating a water-repellent surface from HMDSO and HMDS compounds on samples of spruce wood (Picea abies, Karst). The best results were achieved when the treated sample was in continuous motion during the course of film deposition. Best hydrophobic coating was achieved for 29% of total gas flow through the HMDSO and HMDS liquid. The surface free energy of modified surface was 30 mJ/m{sup 2} for HMDSO and 24 mJ/m{sup 2} for HMDS mixtures. The 50 {mu}l water droplet required (180{+-}30) min to penetrate into the modified spruce in HMDSO mixture and (213{+-}30) min in HMDS mixture. This is more than 20 fold increase compared to the unmodified spruce. The chemical composition of deposited layer was analyzed by ATR-FTIR. The presence of Si-O-Si and Si(CH{sub 3}) functional groups was confirmed.

  13. Oxidation-induced spin reorientation in Co adatoms and CoPd dimers on Ni/Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Beeck, T.; Fiedler, S.; Baev, I.; Wurth, W.; Martins, M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasmall magnetic clusters and adatoms are of strong current interest because of their possible use in future technological applications. Here, we demonstrate that the magnetic coupling between the adsorbates and the substrate can be significantly changed through oxidation. The magnetic properties of Co adatoms and CoPd dimers deposited on a remanently magnetized Ni/Cu(100) substrate have been investigated by x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy at the Co L2 ,3 edges. Using spectral differences, pure and oxidized components are distinguished, and their respective magnetic moments are determined. The Co adatoms and the CoPd dimers are coupled ferromagnetically to the substrate, while their oxides, Co-O and CoPd-O, are coupled antiferromagnetically to the substrate. Along with the spin reorientation from the pure to the oxidized state, the magnetic moment of the adatom is highly reduced from Co to Co-O. In contrast, the magnetic moment of the dimer is of similar order for CoPd and CoPd-O.

  14. Shape optimization of radiant enclosures with specular-diffuse surfaces by means of a random search and gradient minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukolaine, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    A technique of the shape optimization of radiant enclosures with specular-diffuse surfaces is proposed. The shape optimization problem is formulated as an operator equation of the first kind with respect to a surface to be optimized. The operator equation is reduced to a minimization problem for a least-squares objective shape functional. The minimization problem is solved by a combination of the pure random (or blind) search (the simplest stochastic minimization method) and the conjugate gradient method. The random search is used to find a starting point for the gradient method. The latter needs the gradient of the objective functional. The shape gradient of the objective functional is derived by means of the shape sensitivity analysis and the adjoint problem method. Eventually, the shape gradient is obtained as a result of solving the direct and adjoint problems. If a surface to be optimized is given by a finite number of parameters, then the objective functional becomes a function in a finite-dimensional space and the shape gradient becomes an ordinary gradient. Numerical examples of the shape optimization of "two-dimensional" radiant enclosures with polyhedral specular or specular-diffuse surfaces are given.

  15. Diffusion-Induced Hydrophilic Conversion of Polydimethylsiloxane/Block-Type Phospholipid Polymer Hybrid Substrate for Temporal Cell-Adhesive Surface.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Hun; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-24

    In this study, diffusion-induced hydrophobic-hydrophilic conversion of the surface of the cross-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate was realized by employing a simple swelling-deswelling process of PDMS substrate in a block-type polymer solution with the aim of development of a temporal cell-adhesive substrate. The ABA block-type polymer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) segment and PDMS segment with over 70% of dimethylsiloxane unit composition could be successfully incorporated in the PDMS substrate during the swelling-deswelling process to prepare the PDMS/phospholipid block copolymer hybrid substrates. During the aging process of the PDMS substrate for 4 days in aqueous medium, its surface property changed gradually from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy data provided strong evidence that the time-dependent hydrophilic conversion of the PDMS/block-type phospholipid polymer hybrid substrate was induced by the diffusion of the hydrophilic PMPC segment in the block-type polymer to be tethered on the substrate. During the hydrophilic conversion process, surface-adsorbed fibronectin was gradually desorbed from the substrate surface, and this resulted in successful detachment of two-dimensional connected cell crowds.

  16. Electronic and magnetic coupling between rare-earth adatoms and the Fe(001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, C. ); Rochow, R. ); Braicovich, L. ); Jungblut, R. ); Kachel, T. ); Tillmann, D.; Kisker, E. )

    1990-02-15

    The spin-dependent electronic structure of monolayer coverages of rare-earth metals on Fe(001) has been studied by spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. The highly spin-polarized photoemission from the localized 4{ital f} levels of Gd, Tb, and Dy on Fe(001) reveals the antiparallel coupling between these heavy rare earths and the Fe spin moment. Exchange-split final-state multiplet terms of the 4{ital f} spectra of the heavy rare earths are explicitly distinguished by direct observation of opposite polarization. For 1 monolayer of the light rare-earth Nd on Fe(001) the rare-earth magnetic moment couples parallel to the Fe magnetic moment.

  17. Ferromagnetism, adatom effect, and edge reconstruction induced by Klein boundary in graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Zhi-qiang; Shi, Jun-jie; Zhang, Min

    2013-05-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic characteristics of Klein graphene nanoribbons (KGNRs), as observed by Suenaga and Koshino [K. Suenaga and M. Koshino, Nature 468, 1088 (2010)], are investigated using first-principles calculations. We find three new characteristics induced by the Klein boundary. First, the localized edge states in the KGNRs have a ferromagnetic coupling rather than the antiferromagnetic coupling of the zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs). Lieb's theorem is no longer applicable in the KGNRs. Second, the marginal single carbon adatom of the ZGNRs can destroy the edge states nearby. The edge states can recover if the length of the zigzag chains is equal to or greater than five times that of the lattice constant. Finally, we show that the pentagon-heptagon edge can be induced from the Klein boundary.

  18. Measuring the charge state of an adatom with noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gross, Leo; Mohn, Fabian; Liljeroth, Peter; Repp, Jascha; Giessibl, Franz J; Meyer, Gerhard

    2009-06-12

    Charge states of atoms can be investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy, but this method requires a conducting substrate. We investigated the charge-switching of individual adsorbed gold and silver atoms (adatoms) on ultrathin NaCl films on Cu(111) using a qPlus tuning fork atomic force microscope (AFM) operated at 5 kelvin with oscillation amplitudes in the subangstrom regime. Charging of a gold atom by one electron charge increases the force on the AFM tip by a few piconewtons. Moreover, the local contact potential difference is shifted depending on the sign of the charge and allows the discrimination of positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged atoms. The combination of single-electron charge sensitivity and atomic lateral resolution should foster investigations of molecular electronics, photonics, catalysis, and solar photoconversion.

  19. Step Energetics and Diffusion Barriers on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodiyalam, S.

    1996-03-01

    Using the empirical potentials of Stillinger-Weber and Khor-Das Sarma, step energies and step-step interaction strengths have been calculated for steps on the high temperature 1×1 reconstructed phase of Si(111). (S. Kodiyalam, K.E. Khor, N.C. Bartelt, E.D. Williams and S. Das Sarma, Phys. Rev. B 51), 5200 (1995) Two distinct configurations of atoms along the step edge have been considered - one with atoms on the upper terrace that could rebond with atoms on the lower terrace and the other without these atoms. The Stillinger-weber potential allows this rebonding which results in step-step interactions an order of magnitude larger than experimental estimates thereby suggesting that such rebonded configurations do not occur. Kink energies, calculated from the orientational dependence of step energies, are however much larger that dictated by the measured step stiffness.(C. Alfonso, J.M. Bremond, J.C. Heyraud and J.J. Metois, Surf. Sci. 262), 371 (1992) Diffusion barriers over the Si(111) surface as well as the high symmetry (low energy) [\\overline211] and [\\overline1\\overline12] steps (with no rebonding between upper and lower terrace atoms) have been calculated using the Stillinger-Weber potential. (S. Kodiyalam, K.E. Khor and S. Das Sarma, Submitted to Phys. Rev. B, MS No. BG5796 (1995)) These calculations suggest that a Schwoebel barrier (of magnitude 0.61 ± 0.07 eV) on the [\\overline211] step is a robust feature i.e. a feature that is expected to survive in more satisfactory calculations. Motivated by experiments on direct current induced reversible step bunching on this surface, (E.D. Williams, E. Fu, Y.N. Yang, D.Kandel and J.D. Weeks, Surf. Sci. 336) L746 (1995) the relevance of a Schwoebel barrier to electromigration of steps has also been explored by modifying the diffusion equation for adatom concentration proposed by Soyanov. Data from this and other experiments has been used to place an upper bound on the Schwoebel barrier and a lower bound on the

  20. Diffusion of small clusters on metal (100) surfaces: Exact master-equation analysis for lattice-gas models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.R.; Evans, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Exact results are presented for the surface diffusion of small two-dimensional clusters, the constituent atoms of which are commensurate with a square lattice of adsorption sites. Cluster motion is due to the hopping of atoms along the cluster perimeter with various rates. We apply the formalism of Titulaer and Deutch [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 77}, 472 (1982)], which describes evolution in reciprocal space via a linear master equation with dimension equal to the number of cluster configurations. We focus on the regime of rapid hopping of atoms along straight close-packed edges, where certain subsets of configurations cycle rapidly between each other. Each such subset is treated as a single quasiconfiguration, thereby reducing the dimension of the evolution equation, simplifying the analysis, and elucidating limiting behavior. We also discuss the influence of concerted atom motions on the diffusion of tetramers and larger clusters. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden-Popper phases?

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C; Tamimi, Mazin A; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of three Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form A(n-1)A(2)'B(n)O(3n+1), A(n-1)A(2)'B(n)X(3n+1); LaSrCo(0.5)Fe(0.5)O(4-δ) (n = 1), La(0.3)Sr(2.7)CoFeO(7-δ) (n = 2) and LaSr3Co(1.5)Fe(1.5)O(10-δ) (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. This is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. We conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.

  2. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden–Popper phases?

    DOE PAGES

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin A.; Huq, Ashfia; ...

    2015-03-02

    There is a possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides; it is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of threemore » Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form An-1A2'BnO3n+1, An-1A2'BnX3n+1; LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2) and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. Furthermore this is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. This paper conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.« less

  3. Structural changes caused by H 2 adsorption on the Si(111)7 × 7 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S. H.; Wagner, S.; Gibson, J. M.; Loretto, D.; Robinson, I. K.; Bean, J. C.

    1990-12-01

    Structural changes caused by the adsorption of molecular hydrogen adsorption onto the Si(111)7 × 7 surface reconstruction are quantified using the first structure parameter refinement on transmission electron diffraction (TED) data. We find that initial adsorption of molecular hydrogen onto the Si(111)7 × 7 surface causes a preferential decrease in the occupancy of the center adatoms. Further adsorption of hydrogen results in the breaking of the dimer bonds and the removal of the corner adatoms.

  4. Graphene chemical vapor deposition at very low pressure: The impact of substrate surface self-diffusion in domain shape

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, T. H. R.; Ek-Weis, J.; Lacerda, R. G.; Ferlauto, A. S.

    2014-08-18

    The initial stages of graphene chemical vapor deposition at very low pressures (<10{sup −5 }Torr) were investigated. The growth of large graphene domains (∼up to 100 μm) at very high rates (up to 3 μm{sup 2} s{sup −1}) has been achieved in a cold-wall reactor using a liquid carbon precursor. For high temperature growth (>900 °C), graphene grain shape and symmetry were found to depend on the underlying symmetry of the Cu crystal, whereas for lower temperatures (<900 °C), mostly rounded grains are observed. The temperature dependence of graphene nucleation density was determined, displaying two thermally activated regimes, with activation energy values of 6 ± 1 eV for temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 960 °C and 9 ± 1 eV for temperatures above 960 °C. The comparison of such dependence with the temperature dependence of Cu surface self-diffusion suggests that graphene growth at high temperatures and low pressures is strongly influenced by copper surface rearrangement. We propose a model that incorporates Cu surface self-diffusion as an essential process to explain the orientation correlation between graphene and Cu crystals, and which can clarify the difference generally observed between graphene domain shapes in atmospheric-pressure and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition.

  5. Convection, diffusion and reaction in a surface-based biosensor: modeling of cooperativity and binding site competition on the surface and in the hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Konstantin; Mafé, Salvador; Stroeve, Pieter

    2006-04-15

    We study theoretically the transport and kinetic processes underlying the operation of a biosensor (particularly the surface plasmon sensor "Biacore") used to study the surface binding kinetics of biomolecules in solution to immobilized receptors. Unlike previous studies, we concentrate mainly on the modeling of system-specific phenomena rather than on the influence of mass transport limitations on the intrinsic kinetic rate constants determined from binding data. In the first problem, the case of two-site binding where each receptor unit on the surface can accommodate two analyte molecules on two different sites is considered. One analyte molecule always binds first to a specific site. Subsequently, the second analyte molecule can bind to the adjacent unoccupied site. In the second problem, two different analytes compete for one binding site on the same surface receptor. Finally, the third problem considers the case of positive cooperativity among bound molecules in the hydrogel using a simple mean-field approach. The transport in both the flow channel and the hydrogel phases of the biosensor is taken into account in this case (with few exceptions, most previous studies assume a simpler model in which the hydrogel is treated as a planar surface with the receptors). We consider simultaneously diffusion and convection through the flow channel together with diffusion and cooperativity binding on the surface and in the hydrogel. In each case, typical results for the concentration contours of the free and bound molecules in the flow channel and hydrogel regions are presented together with the time-dependent association/dissociation curves and reaction rates. For binding site competition, the analysis predicts overshoot phenomena.

  6. Surface-based reconstruction and diffusion MRI in the assessment of gray and white matter damage in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffini, Matteo; Bergsland, Niels; LaganÃ, Marcella; Tavazzi, Eleonora; Tortorella, Paola; Rovaris, Marco; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Despite advances in the application of nonconventional MRI techniques in furthering the understanding of multiple sclerosis pathogenic mechanisms, there are still many unanswered questions, such as the relationship between gray and white matter damage. We applied a combination of advanced surface-based reconstruction and diffusion tensor imaging techniques to address this issue. We found significant relationships between white matter tract integrity indices and corresponding cortical structures. Our results suggest a direct link between damage in white and gray matter and contribute to the notion of gray matter loss relating to clinical disability.

  7. Chemical and Topographical Modification of Polycarbonate Surfaces through Diffusion/Photocuring Processes of Hydrogel Precursors Based on Vinylpyrrolidone.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Alberto; Lujan, Noelia; Reinecke, Helmut; García, Carolina; Campo, Adolfo Del; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Juan

    2017-02-21

    Facile procedures capable of simultaneously conferring hydrophilicity and tailored topography to surfaces of hydrophobic supports, such as polycarbonate (PC), are very attractive but rare. In this work, we describe a simple methodology to wrinkle PC surfaces after a process of (a) contacting with a photopolymerizable vinylic solution, (b) UV curing of such solutions, and (c) detachment of the formed polymer network, upon swelling in ethanol. The influence of different parameters such as contact lag time between the PC surface and the polymerizable solution, the monomer concentration and type of solvents, as well as the cross-linking degree on the formation of wrinkles, has been studied. The dimensions of the wrinkles can be tailored to some extent by altering the different parameters. Surface chemistry has been analyzed by contact angle measurements and by confocal Raman microscopy. The results are consistent with a chemical alteration of the surface and the formation of an outer hydrogel layer, which is interpenetrated into the PC structure. A mechanism of monomer diffusion and PC swelling that produces surface instabilities and wrinkling is proposed.

  8. Surface faceting and elemental diffusion behaviour at atomic scale for alloy nanoparticles during in situ annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Miaofang; Wang, Chao; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng; Li, Dongguo; More, Karren L.; Lupini, Andrew; Allard, Lawrence F.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic performance of nanoparticles is primarily determined by the precise nature of the surface and near-surface atomic configurations, which can be tailored by post-synthesis annealing effectively and straightforwardly. Understanding the complete dynamic response of surface structure and chemistry to thermal treatments at the atomic scale is imperative for the rational design of catalyst nanoparticles. Here, by tracking the same individual Pt3Co nanoparticles during in situ annealing in a scanning transmission electron microscope, we directly discern five distinct stages of surface elemental rearrangements in Pt3Co nanoparticles at the atomic scale: initial random (alloy) elemental distribution; surface platinum-skin-layer formation; nucleation of structurally ordered domains; ordered framework development and, finally, initiation of amorphization. Furthermore, a comprehensive interplay among phase evolution, surface faceting and elemental inter-diffusion is revealed, and supported by atomistic simulations. Furthermore, this work may pave the way towards designing catalysts through post-synthesis annealing for optimized catalytic performance.

  9. Optical luminescence studies of diffusion times at the potassium ethyl xanthate adsorption layer on the surface of sphalerite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, R.; Todoran, D.; Anitas, E. M.; Szakács, Zs

    2016-08-01

    We propose reflectance measurements as a method for the evaluation of the kinetics of adsorption processes, to compute the diffusion times of the adsorption products at the thin layers formed at the sphalerite natural mineral-potassium ethyl xanthate solution interface. The method is based on the intensity measurement of the reflected monochromatic radiation obtained from the mineral-xanthate thin layer as a function of time. These determinations were made at the thin layer formed between the sphalerite or activated sphalerite natural minerals with potassium ethyl xanthate, for different solutions concentrations and pH values at constant temperature. Diffusion times of desorbed molecular species into the liquid bring important information about the global kinetics of the ions in this phase during adsorption processes at interfaces. Analysing the time dependence of this parameter one concluded on the diffusion properties of the xanthate molecule in the solution depending on its concentration and pH, knowing that at the initial time these molecules had a uniform spread. This method enabled us to determine that, in time interval of approximately 35 minutes to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the formation of the interface layer, one had three different kinetic behaviours of our systems. In the first 5-8 min one had highly adsorbent character, the state of equilibrium is followed by low adsorbent properties. Gaining information on the adsorption kinetics in the case of xanthate on mineral surface leads to the optimization of the industrial froth flotation process.

  10. Effect of dynamic diffusion of air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media on the microhardness of ionic crystals with juvenile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyavin, O. V.; Fedorov, V. Yu.; Chernov, Yu. M.; Shpeizman, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The load dependences of the microhardness of surface layers of NaCl and LiF ionic single crystals with juvenile surfaces and surfaces exposed to air for a long time measured in the air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media have been investigated. It has been found that there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness as a function of the load for LiF crystals indented in helium and after their aging in air, as well as a weaker effect of the nitrogen and air gaseous media on the studied dependences as compared to NaCl crystals. It has also been found that, after the aging of the surface of NaCl crystals in air, there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness in the nitrogen and air gaseous media, as well as a pronounced change in the microhardness as a function of the time of aging the samples in air as compared to the weaker effect of the gaseous medium for LiF crystals. The obtained data have been analyzed in terms of the phenomenon of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of particles from the external medium into crystalline materials during their plastic deformation along the nucleating and moving dislocations. It has been shown that this phenomenon affects the microhardness through changes in the intensity of dislocation multiplication upon the formation of indentation rosettes in different gaseous media. The performed investigation of the microhardness of the juvenile surface of NaCl and LiF crystals in different gaseous media has revealed for the first time a different character of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of these media in a "pure" form.

  11. Passivation of phosphorus diffused silicon surfaces with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Influence of surface doping concentration and thermal activation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Armin Benick, Jan; Kimmerle, Achim; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2014-12-28

    Thin layers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are well known for the excellent passivation of p-type c-Si surfaces including highly doped p{sup +} emitters, due to a high density of fixed negative charges. Recent results indicate that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can also provide a good passivation of certain phosphorus-diffused n{sup +} c-Si surfaces. In this work, we studied the recombination at Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivated n{sup +} surfaces theoretically with device simulations and experimentally for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited with atomic layer deposition. The simulation results indicate that there is a certain surface doping concentration, where the recombination is maximal due to depletion or weak inversion of the charge carriers at the c-Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. This pronounced maximum was also observed experimentally for n{sup +} surfaces passivated either with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single layers or stacks of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped by SiN{sub x}, when activated with a low temperature anneal (425 °C). In contrast, for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} stacks activated with a short high-temperature firing process (800 °C) a significant lower surface recombination was observed for most n{sup +} diffusion profiles without such a pronounced maximum. Based on experimentally determined interface properties and simulation results, we attribute this superior passivation quality after firing to a better chemical surface passivation, quantified by a lower interface defect density, in combination with a lower density of negative fixed charges. These experimental results reveal that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} stacks can provide not only excellent passivation on p{sup +} surfaces but also on n{sup +} surfaces for a wide range of surface doping concentrations when activated with short high-temperature treatments.

  12. Development of Surfaces Optically Suitable for Flat Solar Panels. [using a reflectometer which separately evaluates spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A reflectometer which can separately evaluate the spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces is described. A phase locked detection system for the reflectometer is also described. A selective coating on aluminum potentially useful for flat plate solar collector applications is presented. The coating is composed of strongly bound copper oxide (divalent) and is formed by an etching process performed on an aluminum alloy with high copper content. Fabrication costs are expected to be small due to the one stop fabrication process. A number of conclusions gathered from the literature as to the required optical properties of flat plate solar collectors are discussed.

  13. Investigation of the electrochemically active surface area and lithium diffusion in graphite anodes by a novel OsO4 staining method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffmann, Lukas; Birkenmaier, Claudia; Müller, Marcus; Bauer, Werner; Mitsch, Tim; Feinauer, Julian; Krämer, Yvonne; Scheiba, Frieder; Hintennach, Andreas; Schleid, Thomas; Schmidt, Volker; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    Negative electrodes of lithium-ion batteries generally consist of graphite-based active materials. In order to realize batteries with a high current density and therefore accelerated charging processes, the intercalation of lithium and the diffusion processes of these carbonaceous materials must be understood. In this paper, we visualized the electrochemical active surface area for three different anode materials using a novel OsO4 staining method in combination with scanning electron microscopy techniques. The diffusion behavior of these three anode materials is investigated by potentiostatic intermittent titration technique measurements. From those we determine the diffusion coefficient with and without consideration of the electrochemical active surface area.

  14. Electric Field Induced Surface Modification of Au

    SciTech Connect

    Erchak, A.A.; Franklin, G.F.; Houston, J.E.; Mayer, T.M.; Michalske, T.A.

    1999-02-15

    We discuss the role of localized high electric fields in the modification of Au surfaces with a W probe using the Interfacial Force Microscope. Upon bringing a probe close to a Au surface, we measure both the interfacial force and the field emission current as a function of separation with a constant potential of 100 V between tip and sample. The current initially increases exponentially as the separation decreases. However, at a distance of less than {approximately} 500{angstrom} the current rises sharply as the surface begins to distort and rapidly close the gap. Retraction of the tip before contact is made reveals the formation of a mound on the surface. We propose a simple model, in which the localized high electric field under the tip assists the production of mobile Au adatoms by detachment from surface steps, and a radial field gradient causes a net flux of atoms toward the tip by surface diffusion. These processes give rise to an unstable surface deformation which, if left unchecked, results in a destructive mechanical contact. We discuss our findings with respect to earlier work using voltage pulses in the STM as a means of nanofabrication.

  15. Diffusion of Ge below the Si(100) Surface: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uberuaga, Blas P.; Leskovar, Michael; Smith, Arthur P.; Jónsson, Hannes; Olmstead, Marjorie

    2000-03-01

    We have studied diffusion of Ge into subsurface layers of Si(100). Auger electron diffraction measurements show Ge in the fourth layer after submonolayer growth at temperatures as low as 500 °C. Density functional theory predictions of equilibrium Ge subsurface distributions are consistent with the measurements. We identify a surprisingly low energy pathway resulting from low interstitial formation energy in the third and fourth layers. Doping significantly affects the formation energy, suggesting that n-type doping may lead to sharper Si/Ge interfaces.

  16. Diffusion of Ge below the Si(100) surface: theory and experiment

    PubMed

    Uberuaga; Leskovar; Smith; Jonsson; Olmstead

    2000-03-13

    We have studied diffusion of Ge into subsurface layers of Si(100). Auger electron diffraction measurements show Ge in the fourth layer after submonolayer growth at temperatures as low as 500 degrees C. Density functional theory predictions of equilibrium Ge subsurface distributions are consistent with the measurements. We identify a surprisingly low energy pathway resulting from low interstitial formation energy in the third and fourth layers. Doping significantly affects the formation energy, suggesting that n-type doping may lead to sharper Si/Ge interfaces.

  17. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  18. Diffusion Processes in Water on Oxide Surfaces: Quasielastic Neutron Scattering Study of Hydration Water in Rutile Nano-Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Ehlers, Georg; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Wang, Wei; Wesolowski, David J

    2011-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) was used to investigate the diffusion dynamics of hydration water on the surface of rutile (TiO{sub 2}) nanopowder. The dynamics measurements utilizing two inelastic instruments, a backscattering spectrometer and a disk chopper spectrometer, probed the fast, intermediate, and slow motions of the water molecules on the time scale of picoseconds to more than a nanosecond. We employed a model-independent analysis of the data collected at each value of the scattering momentum transfer to investigate the temperature dependence of several diffusion components. All of the probed components were present in the studied temperature range of 230-320 K, providing, at a first sight, no evidence of discontinuity in the hydration water dynamics. However, a qualitative change in the elastic scattering between 240 and 250 K suggested a surface freezing-melting transition, when the motions that were localized at lower temperatures became delocalized at higher temperatures. On the basis of our previous molecular dynamics simulations of this system, we argue that interpretation of QENS data from such a complex interfacial system requires at least qualitative input from simulations, particularly when comparing results from spectrometers with very different energy resolutions and dynamic ranges.

  19. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  20. Possibility of transforming the electronic structure of one species of graphene adatoms into that of another by application of gate voltage: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kevin T.; Lee, Hoonkyung; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2011-10-01

    Graphene provides many advantages for controlling the electronic structure of adatoms and other adsorbates via gating. Using the projected density of states and charge density obtained from first-principles density-functional periodic supercell calculations, we investigate the possibility of performing “alchemy” of adatoms on graphene, i.e., transforming the electronic structure of one species of adatom into that of another species by application of a gate voltage. Gating is modeled as a change in the number of electrons in the unit cell, with the inclusion of a compensating uniform background charge. Within this model and the generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation functional, we find that such transformations are possible for K, Ca, and several transition-metal adatoms. Gate control of the occupation of the p states of In on graphene is also investigated. The validity of the supercell approximation with uniform compensating charge and the model for exchange and correlation is also discussed.

  1. Beryllium in the Galactic halo - Surface abundances from standard, diffusive, and rotational stellar evolution, and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    1990-01-01

    The recently observed upper limits to the beryllium abundances in population II stars are much lower than population I detections. This difference reflects an intrinsic difference in the initial abundances and is not caused by different degrees of depletion driven by stellar evolution processes from similar initial abundances. Evolutionary sequences of models from the early premain sequence to beyond the turnoff that correspond to halo dwarfs with Fe/H abundances of -1.3, -2.3, and -3.3 are constructed, and standard, diffusive, and rotational mechanisms are used to estimate a maximal possible beryllium depletion. Halo star models in the T(eff) range 6000 to 5000 K might be rotationally depleted by a factor of 1.5-2, and the total depletion should be no more than (conservatively) a factor of 3. Implications for cosmology, cosmic-ray theory, and Galactic chemical evolution are discussed.

  2. Fullerene film on metal surface: Diffusion of metal atoms and interface model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-jie; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian; Wang, Peng; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Wang, Jia-Ou; Wu, Rui; Qian, Hai-Jie; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2014-05-12

    We try to understand the fact that fullerene film behaves as n-type semiconductor in electronic devices and establish a model describing the energy level alignment at fullerene/metal interfaces. The C{sub 60}/Ag(100) system was taken as a prototype and studied with photoemission measurements. The photoemission spectra revealed that the Ag atoms of the substrate diffused far into C{sub 60} film and donated electrons to the molecules. So the C{sub 60} film became n-type semiconductor with the Ag atoms acting as dopants. The C{sub 60}/Ag(100) interface should be understood as two sub-interfaces on both sides of the molecular layer directly contacting with the substrate. One sub-interface is Fermi level alignment, and the other is vacuum level alignment.

  3. Experimental test of the single adatom exchange model in surfactant-mediated growth of Ge on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailes, A. A., III; Boshart, M. A.; Seiberling, L. E.

    1998-03-01

    We have tested the single adatom exchange model for surfactant-mediated growth. Using two samples with different coverages of Ge on Sb-terminated Si(100), we generated energy distributions of scattered MeV ions from transmission ion channeling experiments. We studied the system both after room temperature deposition of Ge and after annealing at 350°C. We then compared simulated energy distributions for the single adatom exchange model to the experimental energy distributions. No combination of temperature and coverage produced a good fit between data and simulations of this model. Before annealing, however, a model having Ge in dimer-like sites on top of undisturbed Sb dimers describes the data well for both Ge coverages.

  4. Black Phosphorus N-Type Field-Effect Transistor with Ultrahigh Electron Mobility via Aluminum Adatoms Doping.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Amit; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Ang, Kah-Wee

    2017-02-01

    High-performance black phosphorus n-type field-effect transistors are realized using Al adatoms as effective electron donors, which achieved a record high mobility of >1495 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 260 K. The electron mobility is corroborated to charged-impurity scattering at low temperature, whilst metallic-like conduction is observed at high gate bias with increased carrier density due to enhanced electron-phonon interactions at high temperature.

  5. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden–Popper phases?

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin A.; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-03-02

    There is a possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides; it is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of three Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form An-1A2'BnO3n+1, An-1A2'BnX3n+1; LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2) and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. Furthermore this is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. This paper conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.

  6. Manipulating the Lateral Diffusion of Surface-Anchored EGF Demonstrates that Receptor Clustering Modulates its Phosphorylation Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Stabley, Daniel; Retterer, Scott T; Marshal, Stephen; Salaita, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Upon activation, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor becomes phosphorylated and triggers a vast signaling network that has profound effects on cell growth. The EGF receptor is observed to assemble into clusters after ligand binding and tyrosine kinase autophosphorylation, but the role of these assemblies in the receptor signaling pathway remains unclear. To address this question, we measured the phosphorylation of EGFR when the EGF ligand was anchored onto laterally mobile and immobile surfaces. We found that cells generated clusters of ligand-receptor complex on mobile EGF surfaces, and generated a lower ratio of phosphorylated EGFR to EGF than when compared to immobilized EGF that is unable to cluster. This result was verified by tuning the lateral assembly of ligand-receptor complexes on the surface of living cells using patterned supported lipid bilayers. Nanoscale metal lines fabricated into the supported membrane constrained lipid diffusion and EGF receptor assembly into micron and sub-micron scale corrals. Single cell analysis indicated that clustering impacts EGF receptor activation, and larger clusters (> 1 m2) of ligand-receptor complex generated lower EGF receptor phosphorylation per ligand than smaller assemblies (< 1 m2) in HCC1143 cells that were engaged to ligand-functionalized surfaces. We investigated EGFR clustering by treating cells with compounds that disrupt the cytoskeleton (Latrunculin-B), clathrin-mediated endocytosis (Pitstop2), and inhibit EGFR activation (Gefitinib). These results help elucidate the nature of large-scale EGFR clustering, thus underscoring the general significance of receptor spatial organization in tuning function.

  7. M-CSF receptor mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids impair not only kinase activity but also surface expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyoshi, Masateru; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Yukihara, Mamiko; Bhuyan, Farzana; Suzu, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Many mutations were identified in Fms as a putative genetic cause of HDLS. •All of the mutations tested severely impair the kinase activity. •Most of the mutations also impair the trafficking to the cell surface. •These defects further suggest that HDLS is caused by a loss of Fms function. -- Abstract: The tyrosine kinase Fms, the cell surface receptor for M-CSF and IL-34, is critical for microglial proliferation and differentiation in the brain. Recently, a number of mutations have been identified in Fms as a putative genetic cause of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), implying an important role of microglial dysfunction in HDLS pathogenesis. In this study, we initially confirmed that 11 mutations, which reside within the ATP-binding or major tyrosine kinase domain, caused a severe impairment of ligand-induced Fms auto-phosphorylation. Intriguingly, we found that 10 of the 11 mutants also showed a weak cell surface expression, which was associated with a concomitant increase in the low molecular weight hypo-N-glycosylated immature gp130Fms-like species. Indeed, the mutant proteins heavily accumulated to the Golgi-like perinuclear regions. These results indicate that all of the Fms mutations tested severely impair the kinase activity and most of the mutations also impair the trafficking to the cell surface, further suggesting that HDLS is caused by the loss of Fms function.

  8. Measuring the Minority-Carrier Diffusion Length of n-Type In0.53Ga0.47As Epilayers Using Surface Photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Tao; Li, Xue; Shao, Xiumei; Pavelka, Tibor; Huang, Li; Gong, Haimei

    2017-04-01

    We report measurements of the minority-carrier diffusion length of n-type In0.53Ga0.47As epilayer samples using the surface photovoltage (SPV) method, and the minority-carrier lifetime of the same samples obtained by the microwave photoconductivity decay ( μ-PCD) method. The minority-carrier diffusion length was determined from the surface photovoltage and the optical absorption coefficient of the material. By scanning the SPV probe over the sample, the difference in surface photovoltage could be measured, as well as enabling surface photovoltage mapping. Samples having two different doping concentrations were used: sample A with 3 × 1016 cm-3 and sample B with 1 × 1016 cm-3, having minority-carrier diffusion length at room temperature of 5.59 μm and 6.3 μm, respectively. Meanwhile, sample uniformity was investigated using SPV for the first time. Lifetime measurements were performed on the n-type In0.53Ga0.47As epilayer samples using the μ-PCD technique, obtaining the minority-carrier diffusion length indirectly. Comparison of the minority-carrier diffusion length values obtained from SPV versus μ-PCD showed good consistency. Therefore, the presented method could be useful for characterization of the minority-carrier diffusion length of wafers.

  9. Estimation of direct, diffuse, and total FPARs from Landsat surface reflectance data and ground-based estimates over six FLUXNET sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjuan; Fang, Hongliang

    2015-04-01

    The fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by green elements (FPAR) is an essential climate variable (ECV) in quantifying canopy absorbed PAR (APAR) and gross and net primary production. It has been demonstrated that FPAR is larger under totally diffuse than clear sky conditions because all canopy parts can absorb lights effectively under diffuse conditions. The direct and diffuse FPARs are defined, therefore, as the FPAR values obtained under clear (most sunny) and overcast (most cloudy) conditions, respectively, and FPAR represents the summed canopy absorption efficiency for both direct and diffuse PAR. Satellite FPAR products, such as MODIS, GEOV1, MERIS, and JRC-TIP, have been generated at different temporal and spatial resolutions. Except for JRC-TIP which generates direct and diffuse FPARs separately, all the other products typically correspond to the instantaneous black-sky FPAR under direct illumination only. However, even under fully clear sky conditions, the proportion of diffuse PAR over the surface cannot be ignored. Otherwise, FPAR will be underestimated, especially for small leaf area index (LAI) region. To address this, the present study developed a new approach to estimate direct, diffuse, and total FPARs, separately, from Landsat 30m surface reflectance data. Field-measured direct and diffuse FPARs were first derived for crops, deciduous broadleaf forests, and evergreen needleleaf forests at six FLUXNET sites. Then, a coupled soil-leaf-canopy (SLC) radiative transfer model was used to simulate surface reflectance under direct and diffuse illumination conditions, respectively. Direct, diffuse, and total FPARs were estimated by comparing Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data and simulated surface reflectances using a lookup table approach. The differences between the Landsat-estimated and the field-measured FPARs are less than 0.05 (10%). The diffuse FPAR is higher than the direct FPAR by up to 19.38%, whereas the total FPAR is

  10. Surface tension effects on the onset of double-diffusive convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. F.

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the critical thermal Rayleigh number for onset of convection in a horizontal layer of density-stratified fluid with a free surface when heated from below. Three different aqueous solutions were used: salt, glycerol, and acetic acid. The rates of change in surface tension with concentration for these three solutions are positive, nearly zero, and negative, respectively. Compared to the rigid-rigid boundaries, the critical thermal Rayleigh number was found to be larger by 11.2 percent for the salt solution and smaller by 10.0 percent for the glycerol solution. With the acetic acid solution, however, the effect of the free surface was found to be negligible.

  11. Surface tension effects on the onset of double-diffusive convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the critical thermal Rayleigh number for onset of convection in a horizontal layer of density-stratified fluid with a free surface when heated from below. Three different aqueous solutions were used: salt, glycerol, and acetic acid. The rates of change in surface tension with concentration for these three solutions are positive, nearly zero, and negative, respectively. Compared to the rigid-rigid boundaries, the critical thermal Rayleigh number was found to be larger by 11.2 percent for the salt solution and smaller by 10.0 percent for the glycerol solution. With the acetic acid solution, however, the effect of the free surface was found to be negligible.

  12. The Effect of Phase Transitions, Surface Diffusion, and Defects on Heterogeneous Reactions: Multiplicities and Fluctuations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    DISTRIBUTION Ŕ Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. b1 b 121"W 993t FLE-CTES, OCT 2 1 1993 13 . ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 wartfs) SThe influence...34. (15) to site j is P-... V, (1)-0)N., ",x, ’" where T =Il/k, P is the adsorption time on a PA., C pd,- ( 1 - .,). ( 13 ) clean surface. Since the time...depends on the values of the References parameters. the importance of migration, and surface dtfects. [1] L.F. Razon and R.A. Schmitz. Catal. Rev

  13. Ag surface diffusion and out-of-bulk segregation in CrN-Ag nano-composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Incerti, L; Rota, A; Ballestrazzi, A; Gualtieri, E; Valeri, S

    2011-10-01

    CrN-Ag nanocomposite coatings are deposited on Si(100) wafers and 20MnCr5 steel disks in a mixed Ar+N2 atmosphere by reactive magnetron sputtering. Structure, composition and morphology were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) cross sectional analysis. The as deposited film matrix is mainly composed by CrN phase (78%), but a relevant part (28%) is composed by Cr2N. Ag agglomerates in the CrN matrix forming elongated grains 200-400 nm wide and 50-100 nm high, which extends on the top of CrN columns. At the surface Ag aggregates into two different structures: large tetrahedral crystalline clusters, with typical dimension ranging from 200 to 500 nm, and smaller Ag nanoparticles with diameter of 15-25 nm. The annealing in N2 atmosphere up to 500 degrees C does not affect size and distribution of the Ag grains in the sub-surface region, while it induces a size increase of the bigger Ag clusters on the surface, mainly related to Ag surface diffusion and clusters coalescence. Annealing at higher temperature leads to an evident Ag out-of-bulk segregation, generating Ag depleted voids in the near-surface region, and further increasing of the Ag clusters size at the surface. Tribological tests on as deposited CrN-Ag film reveal a coefficient of friction against a steel ball reduced with respect to CrN film, probably related to the presence of Ag which acts as solid lubricant, but the coating is removed after a very short sliding distance. The poor mechanical properties of the realized Ag-based coatings are confirmed by lower hardness and Young modulus values with respect to pure CrN.

  14. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O2, temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, Ek, i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  15. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E.; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O2, temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, Ek, i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  16. First-principles study on the interaction of nitrogen atom with α–uranium: From surface adsorption to bulk diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Qiulei; Deng, Huiqiu E-mail: hqdeng@gmail.com; Xiao, Shifang; Li, Xiaofan; Hu, Wangyu; Ao, Bingyun; Chen, Piheng

    2014-04-28

    Experimental studies of nitriding on uranium surfaces show that the modified layers provide considerable protection against air corrosion. The bimodal distribution of nitrogen is affected by both its implantation and diffusion, and the diffusion of nitrogen during implantation is also governed by vacancy trapping. In the present paper, nitrogen adsorption, absorption, diffusion, and vacancy trapping on the surface of and in the bulk of α–uranium are studied with a first-principles density functional theory approach and the climbing image nudged elastic band method. The calculated results indicate that, regardless of the nitrogen coverage, a nitrogen atom prefers to reside at the hollow1 site and octahedral (Oct) site on and below the surface, respectively. The lowest energy barriers for on-surface and penetration diffusion occur at a coverage of 1/2 monolayer. A nitrogen atom prefers to occupy the Oct site in bulk α–uranium. High energy barriers are observed during the diffusion between neighboring Oct sites. A vacancy can capture its nearby interstitial nitrogen atom with a low energy barrier, providing a significant attractive nitrogen-vacancy interaction at the trapping center site. This study provides a reference for understanding the nitriding process on uranium surfaces.

  17. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium–sulfur battery design

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-04-05

    Lithium–sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Lastly, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides.

  18. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium–sulfur battery design

    DOE PAGES

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; ...

    2016-04-05

    Lithium–sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance.more » Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Lastly, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides.« less

  19. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium–sulfur battery design

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium–sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Hence, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides. PMID:27046216

  20. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium-sulfur battery design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Hence, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides.

  1. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium-sulfur battery design.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-04-05

    Lithium-sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Hence, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides.

  2. Improving Surface Geostrophic Current from a GOCE-Derived Mean Dynamic Topography Using Edge-Enhancing Diffusion Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Reales, J. M.; Andersen, O. B.; Vigo, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    With increased geoid resolution provided by the gravity and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) mission, the ocean's mean dynamic topography (MDT) can be now estimated with an accuracy not available prior to using geodetic methods. However, an altimetric-derived MDT still needs filtering in order to remove short wavelength noise unless integrated methods are used in which the three quantities are determined simultaneously using appropriate covariance functions. We studied nonlinear anisotropic diffusive filtering applied to the oceańs MDT and a new approach based on edge-enhancing diffusion (EED) filtering is presented. EED filters enable controlling the direction and magnitude of the filtering, with subsequent enhancement of computations of the associated surface geostrophic currents (SGCs). Applying this method to a smooth MDT and to a noisy MDT, both for a region in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, we found that EED filtering provides similar estimation of the current velocities in both cases, whereas a non-linear isotropic filter (the Perona and Malik filter) returns results influenced by local residual noise when a difficult case is tested. We found that EED filtering preserves all the advantages that the Perona and Malik filter have over the standard linear isotropic Gaussian filters. Moreover, EED is shown to be more stable and less influenced by outliers. This suggests that the EED filtering strategy would be preferred given its capabilities in controlling/preserving the SGCs.

  3. Water film thickness-dependent conformation and diffusion of single-strand DNA on poly(ethylene glycol)-silane surface

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyun; Aluru, N. R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate, using molecular dynamics simulations, the conformation and diffusion of longer and shorter single-strand DNA (ssDNA) as a function of water film thickness. While the conformation of the shorter ssDNA is significantly affected and the diffusion is suppressed with reduction in water film thickness, the conformation and diffusion of the longer DNA is not influenced. We explain our observations by considering the competition between stacking interaction of bases and solvation tendency of ssDNA. This paper suggests an approach to control the surface motion of ssDNA in nanoscale water films using film thickness. PMID:20404938

  4. Mass Transport in Surface Diffusion of van der Waals Bonded Systems: Boosted by Rotations?

    PubMed

    Hedgeland, Holly; Sacchi, Marco; Singh, Pratap; McIntosh, Andrew J; Jardine, Andrew P; Alexandrowicz, Gil; Ward, David J; Jenkins, Stephen J; Allison, William; Ellis, John

    2016-12-01

    Mass transport at a surface is a key factor in heterogeneous catalysis. The rate is determined by excitation across a translational barrier and depends on the energy landscape and the coupling to the thermal bath of the surface. Here we use helium spin-echo spectroscopy to track the microscopic motion of benzene adsorbed on Cu(001) at low coverage (θ ∼ 0.07 ML). Specifically, our combined experimental and computational data determine both the absolute rate and mechanism of the molecular motion. The observed rate is significantly higher by a factor of 3.0 ± 0.1 than is possible in a conventional, point-particle model and can be understood only by including additional molecular (rotational) coordinates. We argue that the effect can be described as an entropic contribution that enhances the population of molecules in the transition state. The process is generally relevant to molecular systems and illustrates the importance of the pre-exponential factor alongside the activation barrier in studies of surface kinetics.

  5. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadi, V. Nihtianov, S.

    2016-02-15

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, L{sub B}, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is reported. The value of L{sub B} is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and confirmed analytically in the boron deposition temperature range from 700 °C down to 400 °C. For this temperature range the local loading effect of the boron deposition is investigated on the micro scale. A L{sub B} = 2.2 mm was determined for boron deposition at 700 °C, while a L{sub B} of less than 1 mm was observed at temperatures lower than 500 °C.

  6. Sea surface temperature as a tracer to estimate cross-shelf turbulent diffusivity and flushing time in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yadan; Ridd, Peter V.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate parameterization of spatially variable diffusivity in complex shelf regions such as the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon is an unresolved issue for hydrodynamic models. This leads to large uncertainties to the flushing time derived from them and to the evaluation of ecosystem resilience to terrestrially derived pollution. In fact, numerical hydrodynamic models and analytical cross-shore diffusion models have predicted very different flushing times for the GBR lagoon. Nevertheless, scarcity of in situ measurements used previously in the latter method prevents derivation of detailed diffusivity profiles. Here detailed cross-shore profiles of diffusivity were calculated explicitly in a closed form for the first time from the steady state transects of sea surface temperature for different sections of the GBR lagoon. We find that diffusivity remains relatively constant within the inner lagoon (<˜20 km) where tidal current is weak, and increases linearly with sufficiently large tidal amplitude in reef-devoid regions, but increases dramatically where the reef matrixes start and fluctuates with reef size and density. The cross-shelf profile of steady state salinity calculated using the derived diffusivity values agrees well with field measurements. The calculated diffusivity values are also consistent with values derived from satellite-tracked drifters. Flushing time by offshore diffusion is of the order of 1 month, suggesting the important role of turbulent diffusion in flushing the lagoon, especially in reef-distributed regions. The results imply that previous very large residence times predicted by numerical hydrodynamic models may result from underestimation of diffusivity. Our findings can guide parameterization of diffusivity in hydrodynamic modeling.

  7. Continuum model of crystal surface relaxation below the roughening transition: Diffusion-mediated decay of axisymmetric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margetis, Dionisios; Aziz, Michael J.; Stone, Howard A.

    2002-03-01

    We use a continuum model to study analytically the morphological relaxation of crystal surfaces containing a single facet below the thermodynamic roughening transition. The surface evolution is characterized by evolution of the facet width, which we treat as a free-boundary problem in the spirit of Spohn [J. Phys. I 3, 69 (1993)], and the interplay between line tension and step-step interactions along the sloping surface outside the facet in the case of diffusion-limited kinetics. We focus on cases with azimuthal symmetry. When the relative strength of step-step interactions is small, we solve the nonlinear partial differential equation for the height gradient via application of the boundary-layer technique. Accordingly, we derive and study a universal ordinary differential equation that is valid within a boundary layer near the facet edge. We compare our results with numerical simulations of a step flow model by Israeli and Kandel [PRB 60, 5946 (1999)]. We discuss the relevance of our analysis to recent experiments and to situations without azimuthal symmetry.

  8. Surface Exchange and Bulk Diffusivity of LSCF as SOFC Cathode: Electrical Conductivity Relaxation and Isotope Exchange Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yihong; Gerdes, Kirk; Horita, Teruhisa; Liu, Xingbo

    2013-05-05

    The oxygen diffusion coefficient (D) and surface exchange coefficient (k) of a typical SOFC cathode material, La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) were characterized by both electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) and oxygen isotope exchange (IE) methods. Conductivity relaxation experiments were conducted at 800°C for small step changes in partial pressure of oxygen (P{sub O{sub 2}} ), both decreasing and increasing, from 0.02 atm to 0.20 atm. The results revealed P{sub O{sub 2}} dependent hysteresis with the reduction process requiring more equilibration time than oxidation. Analysis of the experimental data indicated that the surface exchange coefficient is a function of the final oxygen partial pressure in an isothermal system. In addition, both forward and backward oxygen reduction reaction constants, which are vital for the fundamental understanding of SOFC cathode reaction mechanisms, are investigated based on the relationship between surface exchange coefficient and P{sub O{sub 2}} . The direct comparisons between the results from both ECR and IE were presented and the possible experimental errors in both methods were discussed.

  9. Epitaxial niobium (011) surfaces as a template for Cu(3)Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, Randal Scott

    2001-10-01

    The symmetry breaking between ABC and ACB stacking twins in the growth of Cu3Au (111) thin films on Nb (011) is investigated. Nb films, similar to the buffer layers upon which Cu3Au is grown, are studied with low energy electron microscopy for the first time. Microscopy of the Nb surface reveals the organization of an oxygen-induced Nb surface which reconstructs into a stripe phase at and just below T0 = 1230 +/- 30°C. Above this temperature the reconstruction lifts. At temperatures more than 100K below T0 the surface is dominated by a single reconstruction variant. This symmetry breaking is attributed to shear from anisotropic thermal contraction of the Al2O3 substrate. The response of stripes to in-plane shear is also observed within strain fields caused by dislocations in the Nb film. These behaviors lead to a model of stripe behavior based on a competition between surface and bulk elastic energy. Additionally, LEEM studies show steps on the Nb surface which coalesce into bcc {110} nanofacets. The nanofacets intersect the (011) plane at 90° and 60° angles and completely accommodate sample miscut at low temperature. At high temperature the steps are of single height and occur in all orientations. A phase diagram is proposed for the surface facets as a function of temperature and miscut azimuth. Cu3Au films are grown under a number of conditions, which isolates step nucleation as the key to the stacking bias. The stacking ratio has a sinusoidal dependance on miscut azimuth. The ratio depends on miscut magnitude first linearly but with a rapid increase for miscuts; near 1°. This behavior fits well with a model of selective step nucleation for adatoms within diffusion distance of surface steps. Variations in average adatom chemistry and size have little effect, leaving the best explanation for stacking selection as an adatom affinity for step nucleation due to increased coordination number and reduced energy at step sites.

  10. Modeling Nanoparticle Targeting to a Vascular Surface in Shear Flow Through Diffusive Particle Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bei; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yihua; Yang, Longxiang; Zhang, Guocheng; Liu, Yaling

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles are regarded as promising carriers for targeted drug delivery and imaging probes. A fundamental understanding of the dynamics of polymeric nanoparticle targeting to receptor-coated vascular surfaces is therefore of great importance to enhance the design of nanoparticles toward improving binding ability. Although the effects of particle size and shear flow on the binding of nanoparticles to a vessel wall have been studied at the particulate level, a computational model to investigate the details of the binding process at the molecular level has not been developed. In this research, dissipative particle dynamics simulations are used to study nanoparticles with diameters of several nanometers binding to receptors on vascular surfaces under shear flow. Interestingly, shear flow velocities ranging from 0 to 2000 s(-1) had no effect on the attachment process of nanoparticles very close to the capillary wall. Increased binding energy between the ligands and wall caused a corresponding linear increase in bonding ability. Our simulations also indicated that larger nanoparticles and those of rod shape with a higher aspect ratio have better binding ability than those of smaller size or rounder shape.

  11. Growth morphology of vicinal hillocks on the (101) face of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}: Evidence of surface diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T.A.; De Yoreo, J.J.; Lee, J.D.; Ferguson, J.R.

    1995-01-10

    The growth morphologies of vicinal hillocks on KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (101) surfaces have been investigated using atomic force microscopy. Both 2D and spiral dislocation growth hillocks are observed on the same crystal surface at supersaturations of {approximately}5%. Growth occurs on monomolecular 5 {Angstrom} steps both by step-flow and through layer-by-layer growth. The distribution of islands on the terraces demonstrate that surface diffusion is an important factor during growth. Terraces that are less than the diffusion length do not contain any islands. This, together with the length scale of the inter island spacing and the denuded zones provide an estimate of the diffusion length. In situ experiments at very low supersaturation ({approximately}0.l%) show that growth is a discontinuous process due to step pinning. In addition, in situ images allow for the direct determination of the fundamental growth parameters {alpha}, the step edge energy, and {beta}, the kinetic coefficient.

  12. A scanning tunneling microscopy study of PH 3 adsorption on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 surfaces, P-segregation and thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Shen, T.-C.

    2007-04-01

    PH 3 adsorption on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 was studied after various exposures between 0.3 and 60 L at room temperature by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). PH 3-, PH 2-, H-reacted, and unreacted adatoms can be identified by analyzing empty-state STM images at different sample biases. PH x-reacted rest-atoms can be observed in empty-state STM images if neighboring adatoms are hydrogen terminated. Most of the PH 3 adsorbs dissociatively on the surface, generating H- and PH 2-adsorbed rest-atom and adatom sites. Dangling-bonds at rest-atom sites are more reactive than adatom sites and the faulted half of the 7 × 7 unit cell is more reactive than the unfaulted half. Center adatoms are overwhelmingly preferred over corner adatoms for PH 2 adsorption. The saturation P coverage is ˜0.18 ML. Annealing of PH 3-reacted 7 × 7 surfaces at 900 K generates disordered, partially P-covered surfaces, but dosing PH 3 at 900 K forms P/Si(1 1 1)- 6√{3} surfaces. Si deposition at 510 K leaves disordered clusters on the surface, which cannot be reordered by annealing up to 800 K. However, annealing above 900 K recreates P/Si(1 1 1)- 6√{3} surfaces. Surface morphologies formed by sequential rapid thermal annealing are also presented.

  13. Noble-metal intercalation process leading to a protected adatom in a graphene hollow site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan Nair, M.; Cranney, M.; Jiang, T.; Hajjar-Garreau, S.; Aubel, D.; Vonau, F.; Florentin, A.; Denys, E.; Bocquet, M.-L.; Simon, L.

    2016-08-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that gold deposited on a monolayer (ML) of graphene on SiC(0001) is intercalated below the ML after an annealing procedure and affects the band structure of graphene. Here we prove experimentally and theoretically that some of the gold forms a dispersed phase composed of single adatoms, being intercalated between the ML and the buffer layer and in a hollow position with respect to C atoms of the ML on top. They are freestanding and negatively charged, due to the partial screening of the electron transfer between SiC and the ML, without changing the intrinsic n-type doping of the ML. As these single atoms decouple the ML from the buffer layer, the quasiparticles of graphene are less perturbed, thus increasing their Fermi velocity. Moreover, the hollow position of the intercalated single Au atoms might lead to spin-orbit coupling in the graphene layer covering IC domains. This effect of spin-orbit coupling has been recently observed experimentally in Au-intercalated graphene on SiC(0001) [D. Marchenko, A. Varykhalov, J. Sánchez-Barriga, Th. Seyller, and O. Rader, Appl. Phys. Lett. 108, 172405 (2016), 10.1063/1.4947286] and has been theoretically predicted for heavy atoms, like thallium, in a hollow position on graphene [C. Weeks, J. Hu, J. Alicea, M. Franz, and R. Wu, Phys. Rev. X 1, 021001 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevX.1.021001; A. Cresti, D. V. Tuan, D. Soriano, A. W. Cummings, and S. Roche, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 246603 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.246603].

  14. Molecular dynamics of DNA-protein conjugates on electrified surfaces: solutions to the drift-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Langer, A; Kaiser, W; Svejda, M; Schwertler, P; Rant, U

    2014-01-16

    Self-assembled monolayers of charged polymers are an integral component of many state-of-the-art nanobiosensors. Electrical interactions between charged surfaces and charged biomolecules, adopting the roles of linkers or capture molecules, are not only crucial to the sensor performance but may also be exploited for novel sensing concepts based on electrically actuated interfaces. Here we introduce an analytical model describing the behavior of double-stranded DNA and proteins tethered to externally biased microelectrodes. Continuum electrostatic Poisson-Boltzmann models and the drift-diffusion (Smoluchowski) equation are used to calculate the steady state as well as the dynamic behavior of oligonucleotide rods in DC and AC electric fields. The model predicts the oligonucleotide orientation on the surface and calculates how the increased hydrodynamic drag caused by a protein bound to the DNA's distal end affects the molecular dynamics of the DNA-protein complex. The results of the model are compared to experiments with electrically switchable DNA layers, and very good agreement between theory and experiment is found. The hydrodynamic diameter of the bound protein can be analyzed from experimental data of the slowed motion of the DNA-protein conjugate with angstrom precision.

  15. Communication: Surface-to-bulk diffusion of isolated versus interacting C atoms in Ni(111) and Cu(111) substrates: A first principle investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Harpale, Abhilash; Panesi, Marco; Chew, Huck Beng

    2015-02-14

    Using first principle calculations, we study the surface-to-bulk diffusion of C atoms in Ni(111) and Cu(111) substrates, and compare the barrier energies associated with the diffusion of an isolated C atom versus multiple interacting C atoms. We find that the preferential Ni-C bonding over C–C bonding induces a repulsive interaction between C atoms located at diagonal octahedral voids in Ni substrates. This C–C interaction accelerates C atom diffusion in Ni with a reduced barrier energy of ∼1 eV, compared to ∼1.4-1.6 eV for the diffusion of isolated C atoms. The diffusion barrier energy of isolated C atoms in Cu is lower than in Ni. However, bulk diffusion of interacting C atoms in Cu is not possible due to the preferential C–C bonding over C–Cu bonding, which results in C–C dimer pair formation near the surface. The dramatically different C–C interaction effects within the different substrates explain the contrasting growth mechanisms of graphene on Ni(111) and Cu(111) during chemical vapor deposition.

  16. Communication: Surface-to-bulk diffusion of isolated versus interacting C atoms in Ni(111) and Cu(111) substrates: A first principle investigation.

    PubMed

    Harpale, Abhilash; Panesi, Marco; Chew, Huck Beng

    2015-02-14

    Using first principle calculations, we study the surface-to-bulk diffusion of C atoms in Ni(111) and Cu(111) substrates, and compare the barrier energies associated with the diffusion of an isolated C atom versus multiple interacting C atoms. We find that the preferential Ni-C bonding over C-C bonding induces a repulsive interaction between C atoms located at diagonal octahedral voids in Ni substrates. This C-C interaction accelerates C atom diffusion in Ni with a reduced barrier energy of ∼1 eV, compared to ∼1.4-1.6 eV for the diffusion of isolated C atoms. The diffusion barrier energy of isolated C atoms in Cu is lower than in Ni. However, bulk diffusion of interacting C atoms in Cu is not possible due to the preferential C-C bonding over C-Cu bonding, which results in C-C dimer pair formation near the surface. The dramatically different C-C interaction effects within the different substrates explain the contrasting growth mechanisms of graphene on Ni(111) and Cu(111) during chemical vapor deposition.

  17. The effect of nitrogen diffusion hardening on the surface chemistry and scratch resistance of Ti-6A1-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, R; Weimer, J J; George, M A; Lucas, L C

    2000-08-01

    Modular, head-stem, mixed-metal connections are susceptible to mechanically mediated electrochemical interactions. Any attempt to improve the performance of these connections should center around increasing their resistance to mechanical damage, particularly the titanium alloy (Ti64). This study investigated the effect of a nitrogen-diffusion-hardening process on Ti64, with specific reference to changes in composition, chemistry, electrochemistry and its ability to resist and/or repassivate scratch damage. The nitrogen-diffusion-hardened Ti64 alloy had TiN and TiNO complexes at the immediate surface and sub-surface layers. The diffusion-hardened samples also had a deeper penetration of oxygen compared to regular Ti64 alloy samples. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data corroborated the increased thickness of the barrier oxide on the diffusion-hardened samples. The nitrogen-diffusion-hardened samples were more resistant to scratch damage and repaired/repassivated faster after such damage. The results suggest that the nitrogen-diffusion-hardened titanium alloy should exhibit increased resistance to mechanical-electrochemical interactions in mixed-metal modular interfaces in total hip prostheses.

  18. Near-surface controls on the composition of growing crystals: Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations of Ti energetics and diffusion in alpha quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzillo, N. A.; Watson, E. B.; Thomas, J. B.; Nayak, S. K.; Curioni, A.

    2014-04-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore changes in the vacancy-formation energy for Ti atoms and Ti-O bond characteristics in the outermost monolayers of the (1 0 0) and (0 1 0) prism faces of α quartz. Within 2 or 3 polyhedral layers of the crystal surface, the Ti vacancy-formation energy is substantially smaller than the bulk-lattice value of 11.8 eV. This is true of both oxygen-terminated surfaces and the geologically more realistic case in which the outermost oxygens are bonded to hydrogen. A key additional finding is that the Ti vacancy-formation energy near the H-terminated (1 0 0) surface differs by 1-2 eV from that near the H-terminated (0 1 0) surface. This difference means that the energy change accompanying Ti ↔ Si exchange between the bulk lattice and the near surface is also different for (1 0 0) and (0 1 0). Ultimately, therefore, the equilibrium concentrations of Ti near these two prism faces will not be the same. During crystal growth, this compositional difference may be “captured” by the quartz lattice and preserved as sectoral variation in Ti content-a feature commonly observed in both synthetic and natural α quartz. In this respect, the MD simulations provide direct support for the growth entrapment model (GEM; Watson, 2004) for non-equilibrium uptake of trace elements. To complement the vacancy-formation energy results, we used the first-principles metadynamics method to calculate diffusion pathways and free energy barriers for Ti diffusion in the bulk α quartz lattice and in the near-surface region. The computed estimate of the bulk-lattice activation energy compares favorably with the experimentally determined value of 2.8 eV (Cherniak et al., 2007), lending credence to the method. Diffusion results for the near-surface reveal a steep decrease in the activation energy for Ti diffusion approaching the surface in the outermost 2-3 polyhedral layers of the crystal. This finding implies depth-dependent Ti diffusion

  19. Diffusion aluminide coatings for internal surface of rhenium- and rhenium-ruthenium-containing single-crystal superalloys turbine blades: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubovadzhyan, S. A.; Galoyan, A. G.

    2012-09-01

    Process of formation rhenium or refractory carbides based diffusion barrier layer (coating) on internal surface of rhenium- and rhenium-ruthenium-containing single-crystal high-temperature alloys (superalloy) turbine blades, prior to diffusion aluminide coating deposition, is studied. It is shown that diffusion barrier layer is preventing deleterious secondary reaction zone formation under aluminide coating during long-term high-temperature operation. The kinetics of powder carburizing process of rhenium- and rhenium-ruthenium-containing high-temperature alloys is investigated, and conditions for carburizing these alloys are determined. The phase composition of the surface layer after carburizing is studied, and the effect of the fractional composition of a carbon-based powder mixture on the carburizing rate is determined.

  20. Measurement of the s